Science.gov

Sample records for adolescent bipolar disorder

  1. [Bipolar disorder in childhood and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Fu-I, Lee

    2004-10-01

    Many advances in the knowledge of childhood- and adolescent-onset bipolar disorder have been seen over the last 15 years. Current efforts focus on investigating clinical features, developing more instruments for early diagnosis and improving treatment research. The present study aims to present the main clinical characteristic of the disorder in children and adolescents, as well as the nomenclature, description of clinical phenotypes and the most common cycling pattern in youths. A discussion of comorbidity, differential diagnosis and advances in psychopharmacological treatment will also be presented.

  2. Family Functioning and the Course of Adolescent Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Aimee E.; Judd, Charles M.; Axelson, David A.; Miklowitz, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The symptoms of bipolar disorder affect and are affected by the functioning of family environments. Little is known, however, about the stability of family functioning among youth with bipolar disorder as they cycle in and out of mood episodes. This study examined family functioning and its relationship to symptoms of adolescent bipolar disorder,…

  3. Risk of Substance Use Disorders in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilens, Timothy E.; Biederman, Joseph; Kwon, Anne; Ditterline, Jeffrey; Forkner, Peter; Moore, Hadley; Swezey, Allison; Snyder, Lindsey; Henin, Aude; Wozniak, Janet; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Previous work in adults and youths has suggested that juvenile onset bipolar disorder (BPD) is associated with an elevated risk of substance use disorders (SUD). Considering the public health importance of this issue, the authors now report on a controlled study of adolescents with and without BPD to evaluate the risk of SUD. Method:…

  4. The Enigma of Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatchett, Gregory T.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been a proliferation in the number of children and adolescents diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Except in rare cases, the young people who receive this diagnosis do not meet the strict diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder I or II in the DSM-IV-TR. Many pediatric psychiatrists insist there are important development…

  5. Treatment Guidelines for Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowatch, Robert A.; Fristad, Mary; Birmaher, Boris; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Findling, Robert L.; Hellander, Martha

    2005-01-01

    Clinicians who treat children and adolescents with bipolar disorder desperately need current treatment guidelines. These guidelines were developed by expert consensus and a review of the extant literature about the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric bipolar disorders. The four sections of these guidelines include diagnosis, comorbidity, acute…

  6. Olfactocentric Paralimbic Cortex Morphology in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Fei; Kalmar, Jessica H.; Womer, Fay Y.; Edmiston, Erin E.; Chepenik, Lara G.; Chen, Rachel; Spencer, Linda; Blumberg, Hilary P.

    2011-01-01

    The olfactocentric paralimbic cortex plays a critical role in the regulation of emotional and neurovegetative functions that are disrupted in core features of bipolar disorder. Adolescence is thought to be a critical period in both the maturation of the olfactocentric paralimbic cortex and in the emergence of bipolar disorder pathology. Together,…

  7. Commentary: Treatment Guidelines for Child and Adolescent Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Jon

    2005-01-01

    Once considered rare in children, pediatric bipolar disorder is now widely diagnosed in the United States. The illness has become a cultural phenomenon, adorning the cover of Time magazine and headlining national news broadcasts. Kowatch and colleagues, in compiling consensus recommendations for bipolar disorder in children and adolescents, have…

  8. Bipolar Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spearing, Melissa

    Bipolar disorder, a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, affects approximately one percent of the population. It commonly occurs in late adolescence and is often unrecognized. The diagnosis of bipolar disorder is made on the basis of symptoms, course of illness, and when possible, family history. Thoughts of suicide are…

  9. Peer Relationship Difficulties in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Rebecca S.; Freeman, Andrew J.; La Greca, Annette M.; Youngstrom, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) is associated with psychosocial impairment, but few studies have examined peer relationship functioning and PBD. Adolescence is a crucial developmental period when peers become increasingly salient. Objective: This study compared perceived friendship quality and peer victimization in adolescents with…

  10. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Bipolar Disorder KidsHealth > For Teens > Bipolar Disorder Print A A ... Bipolar Disorder en español Trastorno bipolar What Is Bipolar Disorder? Bipolar disorders are one of several medical conditions ...

  11. Reward Processing in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Manpreet K.; Chang, Kiki D.; Kelley, Ryan G.; Cui, Xu; Sherdell, Lindsey; Howe, Meghan E.; Gotlib, Ian H.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating psychiatric condition that commonly begins in adolescence, a developmental period that has been associated with increased reward seeking. Because youth with BD are especially vulnerable to negative risk-taking behaviors, understanding the neural mechanisms by which dysregulated affect interacts…

  12. Information Processing in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Jane; Joormann, Jutta; Gotlib, Ian H.; Kelley, Ryan G.; Acquaye, Tenah; Howe, Meghan; Chang, Kiki D.; Singh, Manpreet K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cognitive models of bipolar I disorder (BD) may aid in identification of children who are especially vulnerable to chronic mood dysregulation. Information-processing biases related to memory and attention likely play a role in the development and persistence of BD among adolescents; however, these biases have not been extensively…

  13. Adolescent with Tourette Syndrome and Bipolar Disorder: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Young-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome consists of multiple motor tics and one or more vocal tics. Psychopathology occurs in approximately 90% of Tourette syndrome patients, with attention-deficit/hyperactivity, mood, and obsessive-compulsive disorders being common. Additionally, Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder may be related in some individuals. However, it is unclear why bipolar disorder may be overrepresented in Tourette syndrome patients, and more research is needed. Herein, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy diagnosed with both Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder, whose symptoms improved with aripiprazole, atomoxetine, and valproate. The patient was diagnosed with Tourette syndrome at 8 years of age when he developed tics and experienced his first depressive episode. The patient had a poor response to a variety of antidepressants and anti-tic medications. A combination of valproate and aripiprazole stabilized both the patient's tics and mood symptoms. It is important to assess individuals with Tourette syndrome for other disorders, including bipolar disorder. The treatment of children and adolescents with both Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder is an important clinical issue. PMID:25598829

  14. Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Miller, Thomas H

    2016-06-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic mental health disorder that is frequently encountered in primary care. Many patients with depression may actually have bipolar disorder. The management of bipolar disorder requires proper diagnosis and awareness or referral for appropriate pharmacologic therapy. Patients with bipolar disorder require primary care management for comorbidities such as cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. PMID:27262007

  15. Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This practice parameter reviews the literature on the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. The parameter focuses primarily on bipolar 1 disorder because that is the type most often studied in juveniles. The presentation of bipolar disorder in youth, especially children, is often considered atypical compared…

  16. Relation between Amygdala Structure and Function in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmar, Jessica H.; Wang, Fei; Chepenik, Lara G.; Womer, Fay Y.; Jones, Monique M.; Pittman, Brian; Shah, Maulik P.; Martin, Andres; Constable, R. Todd; Blumberg, Hilary P.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents with bipolar disorder showed decreased amygdala volume and increased amygdala response to emotional faces. Amygdala volume is inversely related to activation during emotional face processing.

  17. Meta-Analysis of Amygdala Volumes in Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeifer, Jonathan C.; Welge, Jeffrey; Strakowski. Stephen M.; Adler, Caleb M.; Delbello, Melissa P.

    2008-01-01

    The size of amygdala of bipolar youths and adults is investigated using neuroimaging studies. Findings showed that smaller volumes of amygdala were observed in youths with bipolar youths compared with children and adolescents without bipolar disorder. The structural amygdala abnormalities in bipolar youths are examined further.

  18. Children with a Prepubertal and Early Adolescent Bipolar Disorder Phenotype from Pediatric Versus Psychiatric Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, Rebecca; Geller, Barbara; Frazier, Jeanne; Beringer, Linda; Zimerman, Betsy; Klages, Tricia; Bolhofner, Kristine

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine characteristics between subjects with a prepubertal and early adolescent bipolar disorder phenotype from pediatric versus psychiatric venues. Method: Subjects (N = 93) with a prepubertal and early adolescent bipolar disorder phenotype were obtained through consecutive new case ascertainment from designated pediatric and…

  19. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go ... The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. ...

  20. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Hippocampal Anatomy in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, Carrie E.; Soares, Jair C.; Klunder, Andrea D.; Nicoletti, Mark; Dierschki, Nicole; Hayashi, Kiralee M.; Narr, Katherine L.; Bhrambilla, Paolo; Sassi, Roberto B.; Axelson, David; Ryan, Neal; Birmaher, Boris; Thompson, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    The article discusses the use of three-dimensional mapping methods in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder to find out if localized alterations in hippocampal structure are exhibited. It also explores the developmental differences where the patient with bipolar disorder showed increasing hippocampal size with increasing age.

  1. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Hippocampal Anatomy in Adolescents With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bearden, Carrie E.; Soares, Jair C.; Klunder, Andrea D.; Nicoletti, Mark; Dierschke, Nicole; Hayashi, Kiralee M.; Narr, Katherine L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Sassi, Roberto B.; Axelson, David; Ryan, Neal; Birmaher, Boris; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Early-onset bipolar disorder is thought to be a particularly severe variant of the illness. Continuity with the adult form of illness remains unresolved, but preliminary evidence suggests similar biological underpinnings. Recently, we observed localized hippocampal decreases in unmedicated adults with bipolar disorder that were not detectable with conventional volumetric measures. Using the same three-dimensional mapping methods, we sought to investigate whether a similar pattern exists in adolescents with bipolar disorder. Method High-resolution brain magnetic resonance images were acquired from 16 adolescents meeting DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder (mean age 15.5 ± 3.4 years, 50% female) and 20 demographically matched, typically developing control subjects. Three-dimensional parametric mesh models of the hippocampus were created from manual tracings of the hippocampal formation. Results Controlling for total brain volume, total hippocampal volume was significantly smaller in adolescent patients with bipolar disorder relative to controls (by 9.2%). Statistical mapping results, confirmed by permutation testing, revealed significant localized deformations in the head and tail of the left hippocampus in adolescents with bipolar disorder, relative to normal controls. In addition, there was a significant positive correlation between hippocampal size and age in patients with bipolar disorder, whereas healthy controls showed an inverse relation. Discussion Localized hippocampal deficits in adolescent patients with bipolar disorder suggest a possible neural correlate for memory deficits observed in this illness. Moreover, age-related increases in hippocampal size in patients with bipolar disorder, not observed in healthy controls, may reflect abnormal developmental mechanisms in bipolar disorder. This possibility must be confirmed by longitudinal studies. PMID:18356767

  2. Is increased sexual behavior a symptom of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents?

    PubMed

    Adelson, Stewart; Bell, Robinette; Graff, Adam; Goldenberg, David; Haase, Elizabeth; Downey, Jennifer I; Friedman, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    While there is consensus that bipolar disorder exists in children and adolescents, its diagnostic criteria are debated. Excessive sexual behavior has been reported in youth who may have juvenile bipolar disorder (JBD), and has been termed "hypersexuality." Although there is no universal definition of this term, this observation has led to a hypothesis that increased sexual behavior characterizes the bipolar syndrome in children and adolescents, and differentiates it from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Although this hypothesis is plausible, evidence for it is incomplete, because testing it definitively would require both establishing a standard definition of hypersexuality in children and adolescents, and also reaching consensus about the other nonsexual criteria for pediatric bipolar disorder. In addition, studies to test it would need to control factors other than JBD that are known to increase sexual behavior in children and adolescents. These include sexual abuse and related posttraumatic stress disorder, excessive exposure to sexual stimuli, psychiatric illness in general, and social variables such as family chaos and social stress. Some of these factors might increase sexual behavior in youth with bipolar disorder through psychodynamic mechanisms rather than as a result of the illness itself. Therefore, further research is needed to determine whether increased sexual behavior can serve as a diagnostically valuable criterion for bipolar disorder in children and adolescents, and whether it differentiates the disorder from other conditions known to be associated with increased sexual behavior in youth.

  3. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... or digestive problems Problems sleeping, or wanting to sleep all of the time Feeling tired all of the time Thoughts about death and suicide Causes & Risk Factors What causes bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder may be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. It sometimes runs in ...

  4. Family-Focused Treatment for Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Miklowitz, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The course of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents is highly recurrent and impairing. This article describes the adaptation of family-focused treatment (FFT) for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. FFT is given in 21 sessions over 9 months, and is usually initiated during the recovery period following an acute episode of depression or (hypo)mania. The treatment consists of an engagement phase followed by psychoeducation, communication enhancement training, and problem-solving skills training. Results of randomized trials in adults and adolescents find that patients with bipolar disorder who receive FFT and pharmacotherapy recover from episodes more quickly and have longer periods of sustained remission than patients who receive briefer forms of therapy and pharmacotherapy. The application of FFT to youth who are genetically at risk for bipolar disorder is described. Problems in disseminating empirically supported family interventions in community settings are discussed. PMID:22801288

  5. Evidence-Based Family Interventions for Adolescents and Young Adults With Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Miklowitz, David J

    2016-01-01

    An individual can develop bipolar disorder at any age, but emergence during adolescence and young adulthood can lead to a number of problematic behaviors and outcomes. Several drugs are available as first-line treatments, but even optimal pharmacotherapy rarely leads to complete remission and recovery. When added to pharmacologic treatment, certain targeted psychosocial treatments can improve outcomes for young patients with bipolar disorder. Because bipolar disorder affects family members as well as patients, and because adolescents and young adults often live with and are dependent on their parents, the patient's family should usually be included in treatment. Family-focused treatment and dialectical behavior therapy are promising methods of conducting family intervention. With effective treatment and the support of their families, young patients with bipolar disorder can learn to manage their disorder and become independent and healthy adults. PMID:27570931

  6. [Bipolar disorder in children and adolescents: a difficult diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Jardri, Renaud; Etain, Bruno; Thomas, Pierre; Rolland, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe mental condition with neurodevelopmental features that clinically results in pathological fluctuations of mood. Whereas it was classically or traditionally considered as an adult-onset disorder, recent findings suggest that BD may occur very early in the life course, thus, determining what is now called Juvenile bipolar disorder (JBD). One of the reasons for which JBD has been so difficult to identify is that JBD primary symptoms vary much from the typical adulthood BD clinical expression. Euphoric mood is rare in JBD, while irritability mood, aggressive temper, mixed manic state onset, rapid cycling, anger outbursts and chronic course of symptoms are much more frequent. This specific clinical presentation makes JBD difficult to differentiate from other diagnoses related to pathological externalizing behaviours, including conduct disorder, oppositional provocative disorder, and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. PMID:24935683

  7. Bipolar disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of self-esteem Thoughts of death or suicide Trouble getting to sleep or sleeping too much ... with bipolar disorder are at high risk of suicide . They may use alcohol or other substances . This ...

  8. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... health professional before making a commitment. Learn More Free Booklets and Brochures Bipolar Disorder: A brochure on ... in the public domain and available for use free of charge. Citation of the NIMH is appreciated. ...

  9. Characterization and Factors Associated with Sleep Quality in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roybal, Donna J.; Chang, Kiki D.; Chen, Michael C.; Howe, Meghan E.; Gotlib, Ian H.; Singh, Manpreet K.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is an early marker for bipolar disorder (BD) onset in youth. We characterized sleep quality in adolescents experiencing mania within the last 6-12 months. We examined the association between mood and sleep in 27 adolescents with BD and 24 matched healthy controls (HC). Subjects were assessed by parent and teen report of sleep, a…

  10. Child Behavior Checklist Profiles of Children and Adolescents with and at High Risk for Developing Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Lisa L.; DelBello, Melissa P.; Stanford, Kevin E.; Strakowski, Stephen M.

    2007-01-01

    In order to recognize behavioral patterns in children and adolescents at risk for developing bipolar disorder, this study examined Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) profiles of bipolar offspring both with (BD group) and without ("at-risk" or AR group) bipolar disorder themselves. The BD youth had three CBCL subscale T scores greater than or equal to…

  11. Bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Frederick K.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    1999-01-01

    Bipolar disorder's unique combination of three characteristics - clear genetic diathesis, distinctive clinical features, early availability of an effective treatment (lithium) - explains its special place in the history of psychiatry and its contribution to the current explosive growth of neuroscience. This article looks at the state of the art in bipolar disorder from the vantage point of: (i) genetics (possible linkages on chromosomes 18 and 21q, polygenic hypothesis, research into genetic markers); (ii) diagnosis (new focus on the subjective aspects of bipolar disorder to offset the current trend of underdiagnosis due to overreliance on standardized interviews and rating scales); (iii) outcome (increase in treatment-resistant forms signaling a change in the natural history of bipolar disorder); (iv) pathophysiology (research into circadian biological rhythms and the kindling hypothesis to explain recurrence); (v) treatment (emergence of the anticonvulsants, suggested role of chronic antidepressant treatment in the development of treatment resistance); (vi) neurobiology (evaluation of regulatory function in relation to affective disturbances, role of postsynaptic second-messenger mechanisms, advances in functional neuroimaging); and (vii) psychosocial research (shedding overly dualistic theories of the past to understand the mind and brain as an entity, thus emphasizing the importance of balancing the psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches). Future progress in the understanding and treatment of bipolar disorder will rely on successful integration of the biological and psychosocial lines of investigation. PMID:22033232

  12. Family Treatment for Bipolar Disorder and Substance Abuse in Late Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Miklowitz, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The initial onset of bipolar disorder occurs in childhood or adolescence in about 50% of patients. Early-onset forms of the disorder have a poorer prognosis than adult-onset forms and are frequently characterized by comorbid substance abuse. Clinical trials research suggests that family psychoeducational approaches are effective adjuncts to medication in stabilizing the symptoms of bipolar disorder in adults and youth, although their efficacy in patients with comorbid substance use disorders has not been systematically investigated. This article describes the family-focused treatment (FFT) of a late adolescent with bipolar disorder and polysubstance dependence. The treatment of this patient and family required adapting FFT to consider the family’s structure, dysfunctional alliance patterns, and unresolved conflicts from early in the family’s history. The case illustrates the importance of conducting manual-based behavioral family treatments with a psychotherapeutic attitude, including addressing unstated emotional conflicts and resistances that may impede progress. PMID:22504610

  13. Family treatment for bipolar disorder and substance abuse in late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Miklowitz, David J

    2012-05-01

    The initial onset of bipolar disorder occurs in childhood or adolescence in about 50% of patients. Early-onset forms of the disorder have a poorer prognosis than adult-onset forms and are frequently characterized by comorbid substance abuse. Clinical trials research suggests that family psychoeducational approaches are effective adjuncts to medication in stabilizing the symptoms of bipolar disorder in adults and youth, although their efficacy in patients with comorbid substance use disorders has not been systematically investigated. This article describes the family-focused treatment (FFT) of a late adolescent with bipolar disorder and polysubstance dependence. The treatment of this patient and family required adapting FFT to consider the family's structure, dysfunctional alliance patterns, and unresolved conflicts from early in the family's history. The case illustrates the importance of conducting manual-based behavioral family treatments with a psychotherapeutic attitude, including addressing unstated emotional conflicts and resistances that may impede progress.

  14. Profile of aripiprazole in the treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kirino, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a pernicious illness. Compared with the later-onset form, early onset bipolar disorder is associated with worse psychosocial outcomes, and is characterized by rapid cycling and increased risks of substance abuse and suicide attempts. Controlling mood episodes and preventing relapse in this group of pediatric patients requires careful treatment. Here, we review the effectiveness of aripiprazole for bipolar disorder in children and adolescents, with discussion of this drug’s unique pharmacological profile and various clinical study outcomes. Aripiprazole acts as a serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, as well as a partial agonist of the serotonin 5-HT1A and dopamine D2 receptors. It can be safely used in children and adolescents, as it is highly tolerated and shows lower rates of the side effects typically observed with other antipsychotic drugs, including sedation, weight gain, hyperprolactinemia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. The presently reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs generally reported aripiprazole to be effective and well-tolerated in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. However, due to the limited number of RCTs, the present conclusions must be evaluated cautiously. Furthermore, aripiprazole cannot yet be considered a preferred treatment for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, as there is not yet evidence that aripiprazole shows greater efficacy compared to other second-generation antipsychotics. Additional data are needed from future head-to-head comparison studies. PMID:25473324

  15. Cortical Volume Alterations in Conduct Disordered Adolescents with and without Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Olvera, Rene L.; Glahn, David C.; O’Donnell, Louise; Bearden, Carrie E.; Soares, Jair C.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Pliszka, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence that bipolar disorder (BD) and conduct disorder (CD) are co-occurring disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging has revealed differences in the structure and function of the frontal cortex in these disorders when studied separately; however, the impact of BD comorbidity on brain structure in adolescents with CD has not yet been examined. Method: We conducted an optimized voxel based morphometry (VBM) study of juvenile offenders with the following diagnoses: conduct disorder with comorbid bipolar disorder (CD-BD; n = 24), conduct disorder without bipolar disorder (CD; n = 24) and healthy controls (HC, n = 24). Participants were 13–17 years of age, in a residential treatment facility for repeat offenders. The three groups in this study were similar in age, gender, socioeconomic status and ethnicity. Results: We found CD-BD subjects had decreased volume relative to controls at the voxel level in the right medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). Using a Threshold-Free Cluster Enhancement (TFCE) technique, the CD-BD subjects had significantly decreased volumes of the right medial prefrontal cortex and portions of the superior and inferior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate and temporal gyrus. The CD subjects did not have differences in brain volume compared to control subjects or CD-BD subjects. Conclusions: Our findings suggest the comorbidity between CD and BD is associated with neurobiological impact namely volumetric differences from healthy controls. Furthermore subjects with this comorbidity had poorer lifetime functioning, more mood and attentional dysfunction, and more medication exposure than subjects with CD who were not BD. PMID:26237382

  16. Parental Expressed Emotion and Suicidal Ideation in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Alissa J.; Portnoff, Larissa C.; Axelson, David A.; Kowatch, Robert A.; Walshaw, Patricia; Miklowitz, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Family environmental variables are risk factors for recurrent courses of mood disorder in adolescents. The present study examined the association between parental expressed emotion (EE)—critical, hostile and/or emotionally overinvolved attitudes toward a concurrently ill offspring - and suicidal ideation in adolescents with bipolar disorder. The sample consisted of 95 adolescents with a bipolar I or II diagnosis who had experienced a mood episode in the prior 3 months. Participants (mean age = 15.54 yrs., SD = 1.4) were interviewed and completed questionnaires regarding current and past suicidal ideation prior to their participation in a treatment trial. Parents completed five-minute speech samples from which levels of EE were assessed. High EE attitudes in parents were associated with current suicidal ideation in adolescents. This relationship was independent of the effects of age, gender, current depressive or manic symptoms, comorbid diagnoses, bipolar I/II subtype, family adaptability, and family cohesion. These results underscore the importance of addressing the emotional reactivity of caregivers in treating adolescents with bipolar disorder who have suicidal ideation. PMID:24589450

  17. A Pilot Controlled Trial of Topiramate for Mania in Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelBello, Melissa P.; Findling, Robert L.; Kushner, Stuart; Wang, Daniel; Olson, William H.; Capece, Julie A.; Fazzio, Lydia; Rosenthal, Norman R.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of topiramate monotherapy for acute mania in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder type 1. Method: This double-blind, placebo-controlled study was discontinued early when adult mania trials with topiramate failed to show efficacy. Efficacy end points included the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), Brief…

  18. Family Functioning, Social Impairment, and Symptoms Among Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Peris, Tara; Axelson, David; Kowatch, Robert A.; Miklowitz, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Impaired social functioning is common among youth with bipolar disorder (BD), emerges in multiple settings, and persists over time. However, little is known about factors associated with poor peer and family functioning in the early-onset form of BD. Using a sample of adolescents with BD I or II, we examined which symptoms of BD,…

  19. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: A 1-Year Open Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Tina R.; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe an adapted version of dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents with bipolar disorder. Method: The dialectical behavior therapy intervention is delivered over 1 year and consists of two modalities: family skills training (conducted with individual family units) and individual therapy. The acute treatment period (6 months)…

  20. Types of Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Studies Peer Support Research WeSearchTogether Types of Bipolar Disorder There are several kinds of bipolar disorder. Each ... like an illness. What is the difference between bipolar disorder and ordinary mood swings? The three main things ...

  1. Prepubertal and early adolescent bipolar I disorder: review of diagnostic validation by Robins and Guze criteria.

    PubMed

    Geller, Barbara; Tillman, Rebecca

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenology of pediatric bipolar disorder is a controversial topic in the field of child psychiatry. The first National Institute of Mental Health-funded study in the field, Phenomenology and Course of Pediatric Bipolar Disorders, selected a conservative phenotype for credibility in a contentious field. To address the problems of differentiation of mania from attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and of the ubiquitous manifestation of irritability across child psychiatry diagnoses, a prepubertal and early adolescent bipolar I disorder phenotype (PEA-BP) was defined by DSM-IV bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed phase) with elation and/or grandiosity as one criterion. This criterion avoided diagnosing mania by symptoms that overlapped with those of ADHD (e.g., hyperactivity, distractibility) and ensured that subjects had at least 1 of the cardinal symptoms of mania (i.e., elation or grandiosity). This definition was analogous to the requirement that DSM-IV major depressive disorder include at least 1 of the cardinal symptoms of depression (i.e., sad mood or anhedonia). Subjects were 93 children with a mean +/- SD age of 10.9 +/- 2.6 years. Validation of the phenotype was shown according to Robins and Guze criteria: unique symptoms that did not overlap with those of ADHD, stability of the diagnosis (did not become ADHD or other disorders on follow-up) as shown by a 4-year prospective longitudinal study, significantly higher familial aggregation of bipolar disorder in relatives of PEA-BP versus ADHD and healthy control probands, and family-based linkage disequilibrium of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66 allele in PEA-BP probands. Furthermore, PEA-BP resembled the most severe adult bipolar disorder, manifested by a chronic, ultradian-cycling, mixed manic, psychotic course. A conservatively defined child mania phenotype met the Robins and Guze criteria for establishing diagnostic validity in psychiatric illness. Continuities between PEA-BP and

  2. Attachment Styles and Psychopathology among Adolescent Children of Parents with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Mustafa; Gencoglan, Salih; Akguc, Leyla; Ozatalay, Esin; Fettahoglu, Emine Cigil

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare attachment styles and psychopathology in adolescent children of parents with bipolar disorder (BD) with a healthy control group. Material/Methods We studied 25 adolescents who had at least 1 parent with BD (BD group) and 28 adolescents who had no parents with BD (control group). The adolescent participants were between the ages of 12 and 17 years. We used the Adolescent Relationship Scales Questionnaire (A-RSQ) for the adolescents in the BD vs. control groups, and we used the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-age Children – present and lifetime version (K-SADS-PL). We used the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I), Clinician Version for each parent of adolescents in the BD and control groups to rule out psychopathologies. Results Attachment styles of participants were assessed according to A-RSQ, dismissing attachment style scores of adolescents in BD group were found significantly higher compared to the healthy control group (p<0.05). As a result of the assessments, 12 adolescents (48%) out of 25 in the BD group and 5 adolescents (18%) out of 28 in the control group were given DSM-IV Axis I diagnosis, which is a statistically significant result (p<0.05). However, when psychiatric diagnoses were assessed separately, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions We found that the adolescent children of parents with BD have increased risk of developing mental illnesses, and that these adolescents adopt dismissing attachment styles. PMID:25877235

  3. Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy for Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: Treatment Development and Results from an Open Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hlastala, Stefanie A.; Kotler, Julie S.; McClellan, Jon M.; McCauley, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Background In adolescents and adults, bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and impairment in psychosocial and occupational functioning. IPSRT is an empirically-supported adjunctive psychotherapy for adults with bipolar disorder which has been shown to help delay relapse, speed recovery from a bipolar depressive episode, and increase occupational and psychosocial functioning in adults with BD. The current study is designed to describe the adolescent-specific developmental adaptations made to IPSRT (i.e., IPSRT-A) and to report the results from an open trial of IPSRT-A with 12 adolescents with a bipolar spectrum disorder. Method Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy was adapted to be developmentally-relevant to adolescents with bipolar disorder. Twelve adolescents (mean age 16.5 ± 1.3 years) diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder participated in 16–18 sessions of adjunctive IPSRT-A over 20 weeks. Manic, depressive, and general symptoms and global functioning were measured at baseline, monthly during treatment, and at post-treatment. Adolescent satisfaction with treatment was also measured. Results Feasibility and acceptability of IPSRT-A were high; 11/12 participants completed treatment, 97% of sessions were attended, and adolescent-rated satisfaction scores were high. IPSRT-A participants experienced significant decreases in manic, depressive and general psychiatric symptoms over the 20 weeks of treatment. Participants’ global functioning increased significantly as well. Effect sizes ranged from medium-large to large. Conclusions IPSRT-A appears to be a promising adjunctive treatment for adolescents with bipolar disorder. A current randomized controlled trial is underway to examine effects of adjunctive IPSRT-A on psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial functioning. PMID:20186968

  4. Age associations with neural processing of reward anticipation in adolescents with bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Urošević, Snežana; Luciana, Monica; Jensen, Jonathan B; Youngstrom, Eric A; Thomas, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Reward/behavioral approach system hypersensitivity is implicated in bipolar disorders (BD) and in normative development during adolescence. Pediatric onset of BD is associated with a more severe illness course. However, little is known about neural processing of rewards in adolescents with BD or developmental (i.e., age) associations with activation of these neural systems. The present study aims to address this knowledge gap. The present sample included 21 adolescents with BD and 26 healthy adolescents, ages 13 to 19. Participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol using the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID) task. Behavioral performance was similar between groups. Group differences in BOLD activation during target anticipation and feedback anticipation periods of the task were examined using whole-brain analyses, as were group differences in age effects. During both target anticipation and feedback anticipation, adolescents with BD, compared to adolescents without psychopathology, exhibited decreased engagement of frontal regions involved in cognitive control (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). Healthy adolescents exhibited age-related decreases, while adolescents with BD exhibited age-related increases, in activity of other cognitive control frontal areas (i.e., right inferior frontal gyrus), suggesting altered development in the BD group. Longitudinal research is needed to examine potentially abnormal development of cognitive control during reward pursuit in adolescent BD and whether early therapeutic interventions can prevent these potential deviations from normative development. PMID:27114896

  5. Age associations with neural processing of reward anticipation in adolescents with bipolar disorders

    PubMed Central

    Urošević, Snežana; Luciana, Monica; Jensen, Jonathan B.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Thomas, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Reward/behavioral approach system hypersensitivity is implicated in bipolar disorders (BD) and in normative development during adolescence. Pediatric onset of BD is associated with a more severe illness course. However, little is known about neural processing of rewards in adolescents with BD or developmental (i.e., age) associations with activation of these neural systems. The present study aims to address this knowledge gap. The present sample included 21 adolescents with BD and 26 healthy adolescents, ages 13 to 19. Participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol using the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID) task. Behavioral performance was similar between groups. Group differences in BOLD activation during target anticipation and feedback anticipation periods of the task were examined using whole-brain analyses, as were group differences in age effects. During both target anticipation and feedback anticipation, adolescents with BD, compared to adolescents without psychopathology, exhibited decreased engagement of frontal regions involved in cognitive control (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). Healthy adolescents exhibited age-related decreases, while adolescents with BD exhibited age-related increases, in activity of other cognitive control frontal areas (i.e., right inferior frontal gyrus), suggesting altered development in the BD group. Longitudinal research is needed to examine potentially abnormal development of cognitive control during reward pursuit in adolescent BD and whether early therapeutic interventions can prevent these potential deviations from normative development. PMID:27114896

  6. Sleep impairment, mood symptoms, and psychosocial functioning in adolescent bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lunsford-Avery, Jessica R.; Judd, Charles M.; Axelson, David A.; Miklowitz, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Few empirical studies have investigated the role of sleep impairment in the course of adolescent bipolar spectrum disorders (BSD). The present study examined the longitudinal associations between sleep disruption, mood symptom severity, and psychosocial functioning in a 2-year follow-up of patients with adolescent BSD. Fifty-three adolescents with BSD (mean [SD] age: 14.6 [1.6]) participated in a two-site randomized trial of family focused treatment for adolescents (FFT-A) or enhanced care, a briefer psychoeducational treatment; both treatments were administered with pharmacotherapy. Sleep disturbance was assessed with the Adolescent Sleep Habits Questionnaire (ASHQ) filled out by patients every 6 weeks in the first study year and every 3 months in the second year. Main outcomes included clinician-rated measures of mania, depression and psychosocial impairment over 2 years. Sleep impairment was significantly associated with mania and depression severity scores and psychosocial impairment ratings across the 2-year follow-up. Despite its efficaciousness in reducing mood symptoms, FFT-A was not more effective than enhanced care in improving sleep habits. Sleep impairment may play a substantial role in the course of adolescent BSD. Youth with BSDs may benefit from targeted psychosocial interventions that emphasize sleep regularity. PMID:22884306

  7. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: Results from a Pilot Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fersch-Podrat, Rachael K.; Rivera, Maribel; Axelson, David A.; Merranko, John; Yu, Haifeng; Brent, David A.; Birmaher, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot randomized trial of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) versus psychosocial treatment as usual (TAU) for adolescents diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BP). Methods: We recruited participants 12–18 years of age with a primary BP diagnosis (I, II, or operationalized not otherwise specified [NOS] criteria) from a pediatric specialty clinic. Eligible patients were assigned using a 2:1 randomization structure to either DBT (n=14) or psychosocial TAU (n=6). All patients received medication management from a study-affiliated psychiatrist. DBT included 36 sessions (18 individual, 18 family skills training) over 1 year. TAU was an eclectic psychotherapy approach consisting of psychoeducational, supportive, and cognitive behavioral techniques. An independent evaluator, blind to treatment condition, assessed outcomes including affective symptoms, suicidal ideation and behavior, nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior, and emotional dysregulation, quarterly over 1 year. Results: Adolescents receiving DBT attended significantly more therapy sessions over 1 year than did adolescents receiving TAU, possibly reflecting greater engagement and retention; both treatments were rated as highly acceptable by adolescents and parents. As compared with adolescents receiving TAU, adolescents receiving DBT demonstrated significantly less severe depressive symptoms over follow-up, and were nearly three times more likely to demonstrate improvement in suicidal ideation. Models indicate a large effect size, for more weeks being euthymic, over follow-up among adolescents receiving DBT. Although there were no between-group differences in manic symptoms or emotional dysregulation with treatment, adolescents receiving DBT, but not those receiving TAU, evidenced improvement from pre- to posttreatment in both manic symptoms and emotional dysregulation. Conclusions: DBT may offer promise as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy in the treatment

  8. Lower Orbital Frontal White Matter Integrity in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafantaris, Vivian; Kingsley, Peter; Ardekani, Babak; Saito, Ema; Lencz, Todd; Lim, Kelvin; Szeszko, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Patients with bipolar I disorder demonstrated white matter abnormalities in white matter regions as seen through the use of diffusion tensor imaging. The findings suggest that white matter abnormalities in pediatric bipolar disorder may be useful in constructing neurobiological models of the disorder.

  9. Difficulties In Emotional Regulation and Substance Use Disorders: A Controlled Family Study of Bipolar Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wilens, Timothy E.; Martelon, MaryKate; Anderson, Jesse P.; Shelley-Abrahamson, Rachel; Biederman, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-regulatory mechanisms appear etiologically operant in the context of both substance use disorders (SUD) and bipolar disorder (BD), however, little is known about the role of deficits in emotional self-regulation (DESR) as it relates to SUD in context to mood dysregulation. To this end, we examined to what extent DESR was associated with SUD in a high-risk sample of adolescents with and without BD. Methods 203 families were assessed with a structured psychiatric interview. Using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), a subject was considered to have DESR when he or she had an average elevation of 1 standard deviation (SD) above the norm on 3 clinical scale T scores (Attention, Aggression, and Anxiety/Depression; scores: 60×3 ≥180). Results Among probands and siblings with CBCL data (N=303), subjects with DESR were more likely to have any SUD, alcohol use disorder, drug use disorder, and cigarette smoking compared to subjects with scores<180 (all p values <0.001), even when correcting for BD. We found no significant differences in the risk of any SUD and cigarette smoking between those with 1 SD and 2 SD above the mean (all p values >0.05). Subjects with cigarette smoking and SUD had more DESR compared to those without these disorders. Conclusions Adolescents with DESR are more likely to smoke cigarettes and have SUD. More work is needed to explore DESR in longitudinal samples. PMID:23422834

  10. Controlled Study of Encopresis and Enuresis in Children with a Prepubertal and Early Adolescent Bipolar-I Disorder Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klages, Tricia; Geller, Barbara; Tillman, Rebecca; Bolhofner, Kristine; Zimerman, Betsy

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence of encopresis/enuresis, relationship between maternal hostility and encopresis, parent-child concordance of reporting encopresis/enuresis, and familial aggregation of enuresis in subjects with a prepubertal and early adolescent bipolar-I disorder phenotype (PEA-BP), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder…

  11. Characterization and Factors Associated with Sleep Quality in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Roybal, Donna J.; Chang, Kiki D.; Chen, Michael C.; Howe, Meghan E.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is an early marker for bipolar disorder (BD) onset in youth. We characterized sleep quality in adolescents experiencing mania within the last 6–12 months. We examined the association between mood and sleep in 27 adolescents with BD and 24 matched healthy controls (HC). Subjects were assessed by parent and teen report of sleep, a semi-structured clinical interview, the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), and the Childhood Depression Rating Scale (CDRS-R). Average BD youth YMRS (mean 20.3 ± 7.3) and CDRS-R (mean 42.4 ± 14.1) scores indicated they were still ill at time of assessment. Compared to HCs, adolescents with BD have distinct patterns of prolonged sleep onset latency, frequent nighttime awakenings, and increased total time awake. Mood symptoms, specifically excessive guilt, self-injurious behavior, and worsening evening mood, interfered with sleep. Further studies are needed to determine whether early regulation of sleep would improve long-term outcome in BD youth. PMID:21701911

  12. Cognitive Remediation: Potential Novel Brain-Based Treatment for Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Dickstein, Daniel P.; Cushman, Grace K.; Kim, Kerri L.; Weissman, Alexandra B.; Wegbreit, Ezra

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is among the most impairing psychiatric disorders affecting children and adolescents, despite our best psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments. Cognitive remediation, defined as a behavioral intervention designed to improve cognitive functions so as to reduce psychiatric illness, is an emerging brain-based treatment approach that has thus far not been studied in pediatric BD. The present article reviews the basic principles of cognitive remediation, describes what is known about cognitive remediation in psychiatric disorders, and delineates potential brain/behavior alterations implicated in pediatric BD that might be targets for cognitive remediation. Emerging data shows that cognitive remediation may be useful in children and adults with schizophrenia, ADHD, and anxiety disorders, and in adults with BD. Potential targets for cognitive remediation in pediatric BD include face processing, response inhibition, frustration, and cognitive flexibility. Further study is warranted to determine if cognitive remediation for these targets, or others, may serve as a novel, brain-based treatment for pediatric BD. PMID:26135596

  13. Brief Report: A Family Risk Study Exploring Bipolar Spectrum Problems and Cognitive Biases in Adolescent Children of Bipolar Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espie, Jonathan; Jones, Steven H.; Vance, Yvonne H.; Tai, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Children of parents with bipolar disorder are at increased risk of bipolar spectrum diagnoses. This cross-sectional study explores cognitive factors in the prediction of vulnerability to bipolar disorder. Adolescents at high-risk (with a parent with bipolar disorder; n = 23) and age and gender matched adolescents (n = 24) were recruited. Parent…

  14. Disorder-specific volumetric brain difference in adolescent major depressive disorder and bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Carrey, Normand; Langevin, Lisa Marie; Jaworska, Natalia; Crawford, Susan

    2014-03-01

    Structural abnormalities in frontal, limbic and subcortical regions have been noted in adults with both major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). In the current study, we examined regional brain morphology in youth with MDD and BD as compared to controls. Regional brain volumes were measured in 32 MDD subjects (15.7 ± 2.1 years), 14 BD subjects (16.0 ± 2.4 years) and 22 healthy controls (16.0 ± 2.8 years) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Regions of interest included the hippocampus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), caudate, putamen and thalamus. Volumetric differences between groups were significant (F26,80 = 1.80, p = 0.02). Post-hoc analyses indicated that individuals with MDD showed reduced left hippocampus volumes (p = 0.048) as well as right ACC white and gray matter volumes (p = 0.003; p = 0.01) compared to controls. BD participants also displayed reduced left hippocampal and right/left putamen volumes compared to controls (p < 0.001; p = 0.015; p = 0.046 respectively). Interestingly, right and left ACC white matter volumes were smaller in MDD than in BD participants (p = 0.019; p = 0.045 respectively). No volumetric group differences were observed for the DLPFC and thalamus. Discriminant analysis was able to correctly classify 81.0 % of subjects as having BD or as MDD based on imaging data. Confirmation and extension of our findings requires larger sample sizes. Our findings provide new evidence of distinct, specific regional brain volumetric differences between MDD and BD that may be used to distinguish the two disorders.

  15. Psychosocial Treatment of Bipolar Disorders in Adolescents: A Proposed Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielson, Carla Kmett; Feeny, Norah C.; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the severity of bipolar disorder (BP) and the amount of attention the psychosocial treatment of BP among adults has been given (e.g., Basco & Rush, 1996; Miklowitz, Frank, & George, 1996), no published outcome study or psychosocial treatment manual to date exists for children with this disorder. Based upon what is known about the…

  16. Clinical Implications of DSM-IV Subtyping of Bipolar Disorders in Referred Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Gabriele; Perugi, Giulio; Millepiedi, Stefania; Mucci, Maria; Pari, Cinzia; Pfanner, Chiara; Berloffa, Stefano; Toni, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Objective: According to DSM-IV, bipolar disorders (BDs) include four subtypes, BD I, BD II, cyclothymic disorder, and BD not otherwise specified (NOS). We explore the clinical implications of this subtyping in a naturalistic sample of referred youths with BD I, BD II, and BD-NOS. Method: The sample consisted of 217 patients, 135 males and 82…

  17. Practitioner Review: The Assessment of Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroni, Argelinda; Lunsford, Jessica R.; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Towbin, Kenneth E.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of youth are being diagnosed with, and treated for, bipolar disorder (BD). Controversy exists about whether youth with non-episodic irritability and symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) should be considered to have a developmental presentation of mania. Method: A selective review of the…

  18. Prevalence and correlates of heavy smoking and nicotine dependence in adolescents with bipolar and cannabis use disorders.

    PubMed

    Heffner, Jaimee L; Anthenelli, Robert M; Adler, Caleb M; Strakowski, Stephen M; Beavers, Jennifer; DelBello, Melissa P

    2013-12-30

    The study examined the prevalence and correlates of heavy smoking and nicotine dependence in adolescents with bipolar and cannabis use disorders. Participants were 80 adolescents between 13 and 22 years of age with co-occurring bipolar I disorder and cannabis abuse or dependence who reported ever trying a cigarette. Diagnostic and symptom severity measures were completed as part of the baseline assessments for a clinical trial. Almost half (49%) of these participants who ever tried a cigarette were current heavy smokers (≥10 cigarettes/day), and 70% met DSM-IV-TR lifetime criteria for nicotine dependence. Heavy smoking was associated with older age, heavier marijuana use and greater compulsive craving, lifetime diagnoses of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, illicit drug use disorders, and poorer overall functioning. Nicotine dependence was related to White race, higher current mania severity, and poorer overall functioning. These findings suggest that heavy smoking and nicotine dependence were highly prevalent among these adolescents. Although both were associated with greater physical and psychosocial problems, only heavy smoking was linked to a clear pattern of more severe substance-related and psychiatric problems. Further research to elucidate mechanisms and develop interventions to address early, entrenched patterns of co-use of tobacco and marijuana is warranted.

  19. Fluoxetine Monotherapy in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Comorbid Non-Bipolar Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintana, Humberto; Butterbaugh, Grant J.; Purnell, William; Layman, Ann K.

    2007-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for developing comorbid non-bipolar mood disorders. Fluoxetine monotherapy is an established treatment for pediatric mood disorders; however its efficacy in ADHD and comorbid mood disorder is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated 30 children who met DSM-IV criteria for…

  20. [Neuropsychology of bipolar disorders].

    PubMed

    Rathgeber, Katrin; Gauggel, Siegfried

    2006-03-01

    In this article the contribution of neuropsychological research for a better understanding of the psychopathology of mood disorders is reviewed. First, the broad spectrum of bipolar disorders is described. Second, a selective review of important results of neuropsychological studies with patients with mood disorders is presented. Although several methodological problems limit the interpretation of the findings, there is evidence that patients with a bipolar disorder show a consistent impairment in attention, memory/learning and executive functions. The cognitive deficits are still visible during clinical recovery (euthymia) and closely associated with psychosocial limitation in daily life. Finally, the impact of neuropsychological findings is considered in relation to assessment, treatment and prognosis.

  1. Epilepsy and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Knott, Sarah; Forty, Liz; Craddock, Nick; Thomas, Rhys H

    2015-11-01

    It is well recognized that mood disorders and epilepsy commonly co-occur. Despite this, our knowledge regarding the relationship between epilepsy and bipolar disorder is limited. Several shared features between the two disorders, such as their episodic nature and potential to run a chronic course, and the efficacy of some antiepileptic medications in the prophylaxis of both disorders, are often cited as evidence of possible shared underlying pathophysiology. The present paper aims to review the bidirectional associations between epilepsy and bipolar disorder, with a focus on epidemiological links, evidence for shared etiology, and the impact of these disorders on both the individual and wider society. Better recognition and understanding of these two complex disorders, along with an integrated clinical approach, are crucial for improved evaluation and management of comorbid epilepsy and mood disorders.

  2. [Pediatric bipolar disorder - case report of a bipolar patient with disease onset in childhood and adolescence: implications for diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Lackner, N; Birner, A; Bengesser, S A; Reininghaus, B; Kapfhammer, H P; Reininghaus, E

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, intense controversies have evolved about the existence and exact diagnostic criteria of pediatric bipolar affective disorder. The present study aims to discuss pediatric bipolar affective disorder based on the current literature focussing on the diagnostic prospects. Based on a case study, a process of bipolar disorder developed in childhood is depicted exemplarily. Because of the high comorbidity and overlapping symptoms of paediatric bipolar affective disorder and other psychiatric disorders, the major impact of the differential diagnosis has to be stressed. An early diagnosis and the treatment possibilities are discussed.

  3. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Child and Adolescent Bipolar Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fristad, Mary A.; MacPherson, Heather A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Pediatric bipolar spectrum disorders (BPSDs) are serious conditions associated with morbidity and mortality. Although most treatment research examined pharmacotherapy for pediatric BPSDs, growing literature suggests that psychosocial interventions are also important to: provide families with an understanding of symptoms, course, and treatment of BPSDs; teach youth and parents methods for coping with symptoms (e.g., problem-solving, communication, cognitive-behavioral skills); and prevent relapse. Method Thirteen psychosocial intervention trials for pediatric BPSDs were identified via a comprehensive literature search and evaluated according to the Task Force on the Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures guidelines. All interventions were examined adjunctive to pharmacotherapy and/or treatment as usual (TAU). Results No well-established or questionably efficacious treatments were identified. Family psychoeducation plus skill building was probably efficacious (i.e., Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy, Family-Focused Treatment); cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) was possibly efficacious. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) were experimental. Limited research precluded subdivision of treatments by format and age. Only single- and multiple-family psychoeducation plus skill building and CBT were evaluated with children. Only single-family psychoeducation plus skill building and DBT, and individual (commonly with limited familial involvement) CBT and IPSRT were evaluated with adolescents. Conclusions Psychosocial interventions that involve families, psychoeducation, and skill building may offer added benefit to pharmacotherapy and/or other TAU. Limitations of current research include few outcome studies, small samples, and failure to use stringent control conditions or randomization. The review concludes with a discussion of mediators and moderators, recommendations for best practice

  4. Methylphenidate in the Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findling, Robert L.; Short, Elizabeth J.; McNamara, Nora K.; Demeter, Christine A.; Stansbrey, Robert J.; Gracious, Barbara L.; Whipkey, Resaca; Manos, Michael J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.

    2007-01-01

    The short-term efficacy of methylphenidate in the treatment of youths aged 5 to 17 years with bipolar disorder (BD) and comorbid attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was investigated. The trial observation showed that euthymic youths with BD and ADHD might benefit from short-term concomitant treatment with methylphenidate.

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Risperidone and Quetiapine in Adolescents With Bipolar II Disorder Comorbid With Conduct Disorder.

    PubMed

    Masi, Gabriele; Milone, Annarita; Stawinoga, Agnieszka; Veltri, Stefania; Pisano, Simone

    2015-10-01

    Although a frequent co-occurrence between bipolar disorder (BD) and conduct disorder (CD) in youth has been frequently reported, data about pharmacological management are scarce and focused on BD type I. Second generation antipsychotics are frequently used in clinical practice, but no comparative studies are available. The aim of this exploratory study was to compare efficacy and safety of risperidone and quetiapine in a sample of adolescents presenting a BD type II comorbid with CD. Twenty-two patients diagnosed with a structured interview according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, (male/female ratio, 12/10; mean (SD) age 15.0 (1.4) years) were randomized in 2 treatment groups (quetiapine [n = 12] vs risperidone [n = 10]), treated with flexible doses, and followed up for 12 weeks. Efficacy measures assessed manic symptoms, aggression, anxiety, depression, global clinical severity, and impairment. Safety measures included body mass index, serum prolactin, extrapyramidal adverse effects, and electrocardiogram. At the end of the study, all patients improved in all efficacy measures. Both treatments showed similar efficacy in reducing manic symptoms and aggression. Quetiapine was more effective in improving anxiety and depressive symptoms. A change in body mass index was found, and in a post hoc analysis, it was significant only in the risperidone group. Prolactin significantly increased only in the risperidone group. In BD type II, CD comorbidity, quetiapine, or risperidone monotherapy may be effective and relatively safe, although the small sample size, the limited duration of the study, and the design (lack of a blind assessments and of a placebo group) make it difficult to draw definitive conclusions.

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Risperidone and Quetiapine in Adolescents With Bipolar II Disorder Comorbid With Conduct Disorder.

    PubMed

    Masi, Gabriele; Milone, Annarita; Stawinoga, Agnieszka; Veltri, Stefania; Pisano, Simone

    2015-10-01

    Although a frequent co-occurrence between bipolar disorder (BD) and conduct disorder (CD) in youth has been frequently reported, data about pharmacological management are scarce and focused on BD type I. Second generation antipsychotics are frequently used in clinical practice, but no comparative studies are available. The aim of this exploratory study was to compare efficacy and safety of risperidone and quetiapine in a sample of adolescents presenting a BD type II comorbid with CD. Twenty-two patients diagnosed with a structured interview according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, (male/female ratio, 12/10; mean (SD) age 15.0 (1.4) years) were randomized in 2 treatment groups (quetiapine [n = 12] vs risperidone [n = 10]), treated with flexible doses, and followed up for 12 weeks. Efficacy measures assessed manic symptoms, aggression, anxiety, depression, global clinical severity, and impairment. Safety measures included body mass index, serum prolactin, extrapyramidal adverse effects, and electrocardiogram. At the end of the study, all patients improved in all efficacy measures. Both treatments showed similar efficacy in reducing manic symptoms and aggression. Quetiapine was more effective in improving anxiety and depressive symptoms. A change in body mass index was found, and in a post hoc analysis, it was significant only in the risperidone group. Prolactin significantly increased only in the risperidone group. In BD type II, CD comorbidity, quetiapine, or risperidone monotherapy may be effective and relatively safe, although the small sample size, the limited duration of the study, and the design (lack of a blind assessments and of a placebo group) make it difficult to draw definitive conclusions. PMID:26226481

  7. COMORBID ANXIETY IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH BIPOLAR SPECTRUM DISORDERS: PREVALENCE AND CLINICAL CORRELATES

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Regina; Axelson, David A.; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Goldstein, Tina R.; Ha, Wonho; Liao, Fangzi; Gill, Mary Kay; Iyengar, Satish; Strober, Michael A; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Yen, Shirley; Hower, Heather; Hunt, Jeffrey; Ryan, Neal D.; Dickstein, Daniel; Keller, Martin B.; Birmaher, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Objective Anxiety disorders are among the most common comorbid conditions in youth with bipolar disorder (BP). We aimed to examine the prevalence and correlates of comorbid anxiety disorders among youth with BP. Methods As part of the Course and Outcome of Bipolar Youth study (COBY), 446 youth ages 7 to 17, who met DSM-IV criteria for BP-I (n=260), BP-II (n=32) or operationalized criteria for BP not otherwise specified (BP-NOS; n=154) were included. Subjects were evaluated for current and lifetime Axis-I psychiatric disorders at intake using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Aged Children–Present and Lifetime version (K-SADS-PL), and standardized instruments to assess functioning and family history. Results Forty-four percent (n=194) of the sample met DSM-IV criteria for at least one lifetime anxiety disorder, most commonly Separation Anxiety (24%) and Generalized Anxiety Disorders (16%). Nearly 20% met criteria for two or more anxiety disorders. Overall, anxiety disorders predated the onset of BP. BP-II subjects were more likely than BP-I or BP-NOS subjects to have a comorbid anxiety disorder. After adjusting for confounding factors, BP youth with anxiety were more likely to have BP-II, longer duration of mood symptoms, more severe ratings of depression, and family history of depression, hopelessness and somatic complaints during their worst lifetime depressive episode than those without anxiety. Conclusions Comorbid anxiety disorders are common in youth with BP, and most often predate BP onset. BP-II, a family history of depression, and more severe lifetime depressive episodes distinguish BP youth with comorbid anxiety disorders from those without. Careful consideration should be given to the assessment of comorbid anxiety in BP youth. PMID:20868643

  8. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Engmann, Birk

    2012-01-01

    This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet. PMID:22649454

  9. Genetics of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, N.; Jones, I.

    1999-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (also known as manic depressive illness) is a complex genetic disorder in which the core feature is pathological disturbance in mood (affect) ranging from extreme elation, or mania, to severe depression usually accompanied by disturbances in thinking and behaviour. The lifetime prevalence of 1% is similar in males and females and family, twin, and adoption studies provide robust evidence for a major genetic contribution to risk. There are methodological impediments to precise quantification, but the approximate lifetime risk of bipolar disorder in relatives of a bipolar proband are: monozygotic co-twin 40-70%; first degree relative 5-10%; unrelated person 0.5-1.5%. Occasional families may exist in which a single gene plays the major role in determining susceptibility, but the majority of bipolar disorder involves the interaction of multiple genes (epistasis) or more complex genetic mechanisms (such as dynamic mutation or imprinting). Molecular genetic positional and candidate gene approaches are being used for the genetic dissection of bipolar disorder. No gene has yet been identified but promising findings are emerging. Regions of interest identified in linkage studies include 4p16, 12q23-q24, 16p13, 21q22, and Xq24-q26. Chromosome 18 is also of interest but the findings are confusing with up to three possible regions implicated. To date most candidate gene studies have focused on neurotransmitter systems influenced by medication used in clinical management of the disorder but no robust positive findings have yet emerged. It is, however, almost certain that over the next few years bipolar susceptibility genes will be identified. This will have a major impact on our understanding of disease pathophysiology and will provide important opportunities to investigate the interaction between genetic and environmental factors involved in pathogenesis. This is likely to lead to major improvements in treatment and patient care but will also raise important

  10. Disturbed sleep as risk factor for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder--Data from a 10-year prospective-longitudinal study among adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Philipp S; Höfler, Michael; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lieb, Roselind; Bauer, Michael; Pfennig, Andrea; Beesdo-Baum, Katja

    2015-09-01

    There is ample data suggesting that individuals with bipolar disorder more frequently suffer from disturbed sleep even when euthymic. Since sleep is a process that is crucial for affective homeostasis, disturbed sleep in healthy individuals may be a risk factor for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Utilizing data from a large cohort of adolescents and young adults, this study tests the hypothesis that disturbed sleep constitutes a risk factor for the later onset of bipolar disorder. A representative community sample of N = 3021 adolescents and young adults (baseline age 14-24) was assessed using the standardized Composite International Diagnostic Interview and followed-up prospectively up to 3 times over up to 10 years. Disturbed sleep at baseline was quantified utilizing the corresponding items from the self-report inventory SCL-90-R. The compound value (insomnia-score) as an ordinal parameter for the severity of sleep disturbances was used to assess associations with the incidence of bipolar disorder among participants free of major mental disorder at baseline (N = 1943) using odds ratios (OR) from logistic regressions. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, parental mood disorder and lifetime alcohol or cannabis dependence. Poor sleep quality significantly increased the risk for the subsequent development of bipolar disorder (OR = 1.75; p = 0.001). Regarding individual sleep items, trouble falling asleep and early morning awakening were predictive for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Disturbed sleep in persons otherwise free of major mental disorders appears to confer an increased risk for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. PMID:26228404

  11. Disturbed sleep as risk factor for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder--Data from a 10-year prospective-longitudinal study among adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Philipp S; Höfler, Michael; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lieb, Roselind; Bauer, Michael; Pfennig, Andrea; Beesdo-Baum, Katja

    2015-09-01

    There is ample data suggesting that individuals with bipolar disorder more frequently suffer from disturbed sleep even when euthymic. Since sleep is a process that is crucial for affective homeostasis, disturbed sleep in healthy individuals may be a risk factor for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Utilizing data from a large cohort of adolescents and young adults, this study tests the hypothesis that disturbed sleep constitutes a risk factor for the later onset of bipolar disorder. A representative community sample of N = 3021 adolescents and young adults (baseline age 14-24) was assessed using the standardized Composite International Diagnostic Interview and followed-up prospectively up to 3 times over up to 10 years. Disturbed sleep at baseline was quantified utilizing the corresponding items from the self-report inventory SCL-90-R. The compound value (insomnia-score) as an ordinal parameter for the severity of sleep disturbances was used to assess associations with the incidence of bipolar disorder among participants free of major mental disorder at baseline (N = 1943) using odds ratios (OR) from logistic regressions. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, parental mood disorder and lifetime alcohol or cannabis dependence. Poor sleep quality significantly increased the risk for the subsequent development of bipolar disorder (OR = 1.75; p = 0.001). Regarding individual sleep items, trouble falling asleep and early morning awakening were predictive for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Disturbed sleep in persons otherwise free of major mental disorders appears to confer an increased risk for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder.

  12. [Creativity and bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Maçkalı, Zeynep; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Oral, Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder has been an intriguing topic since ancient times. Early studies focused on describing characteristics of creative people. From the last quarter of the twentieth century, researchers began to focus on the relationship between mood disorders and creativity. Initially, the studies were based on biographical texts and the obtained results indicated a relationship between these two concepts. The limitations of the retrospective studies led the researchers to develop systematic investigations into this area. The systematic studies that have focused on artistic creativity have examined both the prevalence of mood disorders and the creative process. In addition, a group of researchers addressed the relationship in terms of affective temperaments. Through the end of the 90's, the scope of creativity was widened and the notion of everyday creativity was proposed. The emergence of this notion led researchers to investigate the associations of the creative process in ordinary (non-artist) individuals. In this review, the descriptions of creativity and creative process are mentioned. Also, the creative process is addressed with regards to bipolar disorder. Then, the relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder are evaluated in terms of aforementioned studies (biographical, systematic, psychobiographical, affective temperaments). In addition, a new model, the "Shared Vulnerability Model" which was developed to explain the relationship between creativity and psychopathology is introduced. Finally, the methodological limitations and the suggestions for resolving these limitations are included.

  13. Glutamine and Glutamate Levels in Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: A 4.0-T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Constance M.; Frazier, Jean A.; Glod, Carol A.; Breeze, Janis L.; Dieterich, Megan; Finn, Chelsea T.; deB. Frederick, Blaise; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to use proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, at 4.0 T, to explore the glutamine and glutamate levels in the anterior cingulate cortex of children and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BPD; medicated and unmedicated) and healthy comparison subjects (HCSs). We hypothesized that unmedicated children with…

  14. The effect of adjunctive light therapy on ameliorating breakthrough depressive symptoms in adolescent-onset bipolar disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Papatheodorou, G; Kutcher, S

    1995-01-01

    Seven adolescents or young adults (aged 16 to 22 years) who met DSM-III-R criteria for bipolar disorder were treated for persistent depressive symptoms (greater than three weeks) with adjunctive light therapy (10,000 lux given twice per day). Patients were evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Symptoms Check List (SCL-58). Three patients showed a marked response of greater than 70% decrease of their baseline score. Two patients had a moderate decrease (40% to 74%) and two patients obtained mild to no response. There were no reported side-effects. Paired t-tests done on pre- and post-BDI scores (pre mean = 21.2 sd +/- 10.0; post mean = 11.1, sd +/- 8.8; paired t = 4.31; p > 0.0051) and pre- and post-SCL-58 scores above baseline of 58 (pre mean = 57.4, sd +/- 24.4; post mean = 28.7, sd +/- 18.6; paired t = 5.50; p > 0.0015) showed significant improvement. These preliminary results indicate that some bipolar adolescents with breakthrough depressive symptoms could benefit from light therapy as an adjunct to their continued thymoleptic treatment. PMID:7786884

  15. Bipolar disorder in women

    PubMed Central

    Parial, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar affective disorder in women is a challenging disorder to treat. It is unique in its presentation in women and characterized by later age of onset, seasonality, atypical presentation, and a higher degree of mixed episodes. Medical and psychiatric co-morbidity adversely affects recovery from the bipolar disorder (BD) more often in women. Co-morbidity, particularly thyroid disease, migraine, obesity, and anxiety disorders occur more frequently in women while substance use disorders are more common in men. Treatment of women during pregnancy and lactation is challenging. Pregnancy neither protects nor exacerbates BD, and many women require continuation of medication during the pregnancy. The postpartum period is a time of high risk for onset and recurrence of BD in women. Prophylaxis with mood stabilizers might be needed. Individualized risk/benefits assessments of pregnant and postpartum women with BD are required to promote the health of the women and to avoid or limit exposure of the fetus or infant to potential adverse effects of medication. PMID:26330643

  16. Screening the risk of bipolar spectrum disorders: Validity evidence of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Ortuño-Sierra, Javier; Paino, Mercedes; Muñiz, José

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gather sources of validity evidence of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) in young adults for its use as a screening tool for bipolar spectrum disorders. The sample was composed of 1,002 participants, 268 men (26.7%). The mean age of participants was 21.1 years (SD=3.9). The results showed that between 3 and 59% of the sample reported some hypomanic experience. Gender differences were found in the total score of the MDQ. The analysis of the internal structure by exploratory factor analysis yielded 2 factors, called Energy-Activity and Disinhibition-Attention. This dimensional structure was replicated in the exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM), and also had factorial equivalence by gender. Participants who met the cut-off points of the MDQ reported a worse perceived mental health status and more consummatory and anticipatory pleasure, compared to the low scores group. These findings indicate that the MDQ has adequate psychometric properties in non-clinical samples, and could be useful as a screening tool in psychopathology, with the possibility of optimizing strategies for early identification and prevention in individuals at high risk for bipolar disorders. Future studies should further explore the role of subclinical bipolar phenotype and conduct longitudinal studies in samples of the general population. PMID:26055933

  17. Screening the risk of bipolar spectrum disorders: Validity evidence of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Ortuño-Sierra, Javier; Paino, Mercedes; Muñiz, José

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gather sources of validity evidence of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) in young adults for its use as a screening tool for bipolar spectrum disorders. The sample was composed of 1,002 participants, 268 men (26.7%). The mean age of participants was 21.1 years (SD=3.9). The results showed that between 3 and 59% of the sample reported some hypomanic experience. Gender differences were found in the total score of the MDQ. The analysis of the internal structure by exploratory factor analysis yielded 2 factors, called Energy-Activity and Disinhibition-Attention. This dimensional structure was replicated in the exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM), and also had factorial equivalence by gender. Participants who met the cut-off points of the MDQ reported a worse perceived mental health status and more consummatory and anticipatory pleasure, compared to the low scores group. These findings indicate that the MDQ has adequate psychometric properties in non-clinical samples, and could be useful as a screening tool in psychopathology, with the possibility of optimizing strategies for early identification and prevention in individuals at high risk for bipolar disorders. Future studies should further explore the role of subclinical bipolar phenotype and conduct longitudinal studies in samples of the general population.

  18. Bipolar and Related Disorders Induced by Sodium 4-Phenylbutyrate in a Male Adolescent with Bile Salt Export Pump Deficiency Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Giulia; Pirillo, Martina; Taruschio, Gianfranco; Andreone, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Bile Salt Export Pump (BSEP) Deficiency disease, including Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2), is a rare disease, usually leading within the first ten years to portal hypertension, liver failure, hepatocellular carcinoma. Often liver transplantation is needed. Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB) seems to be a potential therapeutic compound for PFIC2. Psychiatric side effects in the adolescent population are little known and little studied since the drug used to treat children and infants. So we described a case of Caucasian boy, suffering from a late onset PFIC2, listed for a liver transplant when he was sixteen and treated with 4-FB (200 mg per kilogram of body weight per day). The drug was discontinued for the onset of bipolar and related disorders. This case illustrates possible psychiatric side effects of the drug. PMID:27757140

  19. Tobacco Use in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Daniel; Berk, Michael; Dodd, Seetal; Rapado-Castro, Marta; Quirk, Shae E.; Ellegaard, Pernille K.; Berk, Lesley; Dean, Olivia M.

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco use in mental health in general and bipolar disorder in particular remains disproportionally common, despite declining smoking rates in the community. Furthermore, interactions between tobacco use and mental health have been shown, indicating the outcomes for those with mental health disorders are impacted by tobacco use. Factors need to be explored and addressed to improve outcomes for those with these disorders and target specific interventions for people with psychiatric illness to cease tobacco smoking. In the context of bipolar disorder, this review explores; the effects of tobacco smoking on symptoms, quality of life, suicidal behaviour, the biological interactions between tobacco use and bipolar disorder, the interactions between tobacco smoking and psychiatric medications, rates and factors surrounding tobacco smoking cessation in bipolar disorder and suggests potential directions for research and clinical translation. The importance of this review is to bring together the current understanding of tobacco use in bipolar disorder to highlight the need for specific intervention. PMID:25912533

  20. Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in crisis. What do I do? Share Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens Download PDF Download ePub ... brochure will give you more information. What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder is a serious brain illness. It ...

  1. Bipolar Disorder, Bipolar Depression and Comorbid Illness.

    PubMed

    Manning, J Sloan

    2015-06-01

    There is a substantial need for the early recognition and treatment of the psychiatric and medical comorbidities of bipolar disorder in primary care. If comorbid conditions are recognized and treated, serious adverse health outcomes may be averted, including substantial morbidity and mortality. PMID:26172635

  2. Bipolar Disorder, Bipolar Depression and Comorbid Illness.

    PubMed

    Manning, J Sloan

    2015-06-01

    There is a substantial need for the early recognition and treatment of the psychiatric and medical comorbidities of bipolar disorder in primary care. If comorbid conditions are recognized and treated, serious adverse health outcomes may be averted, including substantial morbidity and mortality.

  3. Practitioner Review: The assessment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Argelinda; Lunsford, Jessica R.; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Towbin, Kenneth E.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Background An increasing number of youth are being diagnosed with, and treated for, bipolar disorder (BD). Controversy exists about whether youth with non-episodic irritability and symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) should be considered to have a developmental presentation of mania. Method A selective review of the literature related to this question, along with recommendations to guide clinical assessment. Results Data indicate differences between youth with episodic mania and those with non-episodic irritability in longitudinal diagnostic associations, family history, and pathophysiology. In youth with episodic mania, elation and irritability are both common during manic episodes. Conclusions In diagnosing mania in youth, clinicians should focus on the presence of episodes that consist of a distinct change in mood accompanied by concurrent changes in cognition and behavior. BD should not be diagnosed in the absence of such episodes. In youth with ADHD, symptoms such as distractibility and agitation should be counted as manic symptoms only if they are markedly increased over the youth's baseline symptoms at the same time that there is a distinct change in mood and the occurrence of other associated symptoms of mania. Although different techniques for diagnosing comorbid illnesses have not been compared systematically, it appears most rational to diagnose co-occurring illnesses such as ADHD only if the symptoms of the co-occurring illness are present when the youth is euthymic. PMID:19309325

  4. Neural activity to intense positive versus negative stimuli can help differentiate bipolar disorder from unipolar major depressive disorder in depressed adolescents: a pilot fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Diler, Rasim Somer; de Almeida, Jorge Renner Cardoso; Ladouceur, Cecile; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Phillips, Mary

    2013-12-30

    Failure to distinguish bipolar depression (BDd) from the unipolar depression of major depressive disorder (UDd) in adolescents has significant clinical consequences. We aimed to identify differential patterns of functional neural activity in BDd versus UDd and employed two (fearful and happy) facial expression/ gender labeling functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments to study emotion processing in 10 BDd (8 females, mean age=15.1 ± 1.1) compared to age- and gender-matched 10 UDd and 10 healthy control (HC) adolescents who were age- and gender-matched to the BDd group. BDd adolescents, relative to UDd, showed significantly lower activity to both intense happy (e.g., insula and temporal cortex) and intense fearful faces (e.g., frontal precentral cortex). Although the neural regions recruited in each group were not the same, both BDd and UDd adolescents, relative to HC, showed significantly lower neural activity to intense happy and mild happy faces, but elevated neural activity to mild fearful faces. Our results indicated that patterns of neural activity to intense positive and negative emotional stimuli can help differentiate BDd from UDd in adolescents.

  5. [Revisiting bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Senjyu, Yoshika; Ozawa, Hiroki

    2007-09-01

    According to the theory of evolution of Charles Darwin which is an author of The Origin of Species, human being evolves after long time to be profitable to "prosperity of a kind", and it is thought that there is the adaptive meaning. In other words, man stand on various creatures in number, and it may be said that human being building a high civilized society is the creature which was able to have an element of chosen mind and body in natural selection. However, a disease does not disappear from our daily life and tends to consider us to be "the misfortune" even if we human being is easy to suffer from a disease. "Evolution medicine" (Darwinian medicine) drop hint of meaning/the significance in aging and the process of the pathology. This paper refers to such a conception of bipolar disorder. PMID:17877000

  6. [Revisiting bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Senjyu, Yoshika; Ozawa, Hiroki

    2007-09-01

    According to the theory of evolution of Charles Darwin which is an author of The Origin of Species, human being evolves after long time to be profitable to "prosperity of a kind", and it is thought that there is the adaptive meaning. In other words, man stand on various creatures in number, and it may be said that human being building a high civilized society is the creature which was able to have an element of chosen mind and body in natural selection. However, a disease does not disappear from our daily life and tends to consider us to be "the misfortune" even if we human being is easy to suffer from a disease. "Evolution medicine" (Darwinian medicine) drop hint of meaning/the significance in aging and the process of the pathology. This paper refers to such a conception of bipolar disorder.

  7. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on neural correlates of attention and inhibition in adolescents with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, A W S; MacIntosh, B J; Scavone, A; Ou, X; Korczak, D; Goldstein, B I

    2016-01-01

    Executive dysfunction is common during and between mood episodes in bipolar disorder (BD), causing social and functional impairment. This study investigated the effect of acute exercise on adolescents with BD and healthy control subjects (HC) to test for positive or negative consequences on neural response during an executive task. Fifty adolescents (mean age 16.54±1.47 years, 56% female, 30 with BD) completed an attention and response inhibition task before and after 20 min of recumbent cycling at ~70% of age-predicted maximum heart rate. 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging data were analyzed in a whole brain voxel-wise analysis and as regions of interest (ROI), examining Go and NoGo response events. In the whole brain analysis of Go trials, exercise had larger effect in BD vs HC throughout ventral prefrontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus; the profile of these effects was of greater disengagement after exercise. Pre-exercise ROI analysis confirmed this 'deficit in deactivation' for BDs in rostral ACC and found an activation deficit on NoGo errors in accumbens. Pre-exercise accumbens NoGo error activity correlated with depression symptoms and Go activity with mania symptoms; no correlations were present after exercise. Performance was matched to controls and results survived a series of covariate analyses. This study provides evidence that acute aerobic exercise transiently changes neural response during an executive task among adolescents with BD, and that pre-exercise relationships between symptoms and neural response are absent after exercise. Acute aerobic exercise constitutes a biological probe that may provide insights regarding pathophysiology and treatment of BD. PMID:27187236

  8. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on neural correlates of attention and inhibition in adolescents with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, A W S; MacIntosh, B J; Scavone, A; Ou, X; Korczak, D; Goldstein, B I

    2016-05-17

    Executive dysfunction is common during and between mood episodes in bipolar disorder (BD), causing social and functional impairment. This study investigated the effect of acute exercise on adolescents with BD and healthy control subjects (HC) to test for positive or negative consequences on neural response during an executive task. Fifty adolescents (mean age 16.54±1.47 years, 56% female, 30 with BD) completed an attention and response inhibition task before and after 20 min of recumbent cycling at ~70% of age-predicted maximum heart rate. 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging data were analyzed in a whole brain voxel-wise analysis and as regions of interest (ROI), examining Go and NoGo response events. In the whole brain analysis of Go trials, exercise had larger effect in BD vs HC throughout ventral prefrontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus; the profile of these effects was of greater disengagement after exercise. Pre-exercise ROI analysis confirmed this 'deficit in deactivation' for BDs in rostral ACC and found an activation deficit on NoGo errors in accumbens. Pre-exercise accumbens NoGo error activity correlated with depression symptoms and Go activity with mania symptoms; no correlations were present after exercise. Performance was matched to controls and results survived a series of covariate analyses. This study provides evidence that acute aerobic exercise transiently changes neural response during an executive task among adolescents with BD, and that pre-exercise relationships between symptoms and neural response are absent after exercise. Acute aerobic exercise constitutes a biological probe that may provide insights regarding pathophysiology and treatment of BD.

  9. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on neural correlates of attention and inhibition in adolescents with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, A W S; MacIntosh, B J; Scavone, A; Ou, X; Korczak, D; Goldstein, B I

    2016-01-01

    Executive dysfunction is common during and between mood episodes in bipolar disorder (BD), causing social and functional impairment. This study investigated the effect of acute exercise on adolescents with BD and healthy control subjects (HC) to test for positive or negative consequences on neural response during an executive task. Fifty adolescents (mean age 16.54±1.47 years, 56% female, 30 with BD) completed an attention and response inhibition task before and after 20 min of recumbent cycling at ~70% of age-predicted maximum heart rate. 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging data were analyzed in a whole brain voxel-wise analysis and as regions of interest (ROI), examining Go and NoGo response events. In the whole brain analysis of Go trials, exercise had larger effect in BD vs HC throughout ventral prefrontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus; the profile of these effects was of greater disengagement after exercise. Pre-exercise ROI analysis confirmed this 'deficit in deactivation' for BDs in rostral ACC and found an activation deficit on NoGo errors in accumbens. Pre-exercise accumbens NoGo error activity correlated with depression symptoms and Go activity with mania symptoms; no correlations were present after exercise. Performance was matched to controls and results survived a series of covariate analyses. This study provides evidence that acute aerobic exercise transiently changes neural response during an executive task among adolescents with BD, and that pre-exercise relationships between symptoms and neural response are absent after exercise. Acute aerobic exercise constitutes a biological probe that may provide insights regarding pathophysiology and treatment of BD. PMID:27187236

  10. Treatment of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Geddes, John R; Miklowitz, David J

    2013-05-11

    We review recent developments in the acute and long-term treatment of bipolar disorder and identify promising future routes to therapeutic innovation. Overall, advances in drug treatment remain quite modest. Antipsychotic drugs are effective in the acute treatment of mania; their efficacy in the treatment of depression is variable with the clearest evidence for quetiapine. Despite their widespread use, considerable uncertainty and controversy remains about the use of antidepressant drugs in the management of depressive episodes. Lithium has the strongest evidence for long-term relapse prevention; the evidence for anticonvulsants such as divalproex and lamotrigine is less robust and there is much uncertainty about the longer term benefits of antipsychotics. Substantial progress has been made in the development and assessment of adjunctive psychosocial interventions. Long-term maintenance and possibly acute stabilisation of depression can be enhanced by the combination of psychosocial treatments with drugs. The development of future treatments should consider both the neurobiological and psychosocial mechanisms underlying the disorder. We should continue to repurpose treatments and to recognise the role of serendipity. We should also investigate optimum combinations of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments at different stages of the illness. Clarification of the mechanisms by which different treatments affect sleep and circadian rhythms and their relation with daily mood fluctuations is likely to help with the treatment selection for individual patients. To be economically viable, existing psychotherapy protocols need to be made briefer and more efficient for improved scalability and sustainability in widespread implementation. PMID:23663953

  11. Bipolar Disorder Among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  12. A systematic chart review of the naturalistic course and treatment of early-onset bipolar disorder in a child and adolescent psychiatry center.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, J; Srinath, Shoba; Girimaji, Satish; Seshadri, Shekhar P; Singh, Pritpal

    2004-01-01

    Studies on the naturalistic course of early-onset bipolar disorder are few and studies evaluating the efficacy of pharmacotherapy consist largely of open trials of thymoleptics and neuroleptics on small samples. The current study was undertaken to map the course of the disorder and the prevailing prescribing practice in early-onset bipolar disorder at a child and adolescent psychiatry center in India. A chart review of 139 children and adolescents (<16 years) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of bipolar disorder-mania was performed and the baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, episode characteristics, and treatment and follow-up details were collected and the data analyzed. The index episode remitted in all 133 (96%) subjects for whom the information was available. One hundred twenty-five (90%) subjects received thymoleptics for the index episode, of which lithium was used in 85%. Valproate was the next most commonly used thymoleptic (18%). Eighteen (13%) subjects received combination thymoleptics. Sixty-eight percent received neuroleptics either alone or as adjuncts in the acute phase. During the follow-up period, which ranged from 3 to 56 months (mean +/- SD, 15 +/- 14), 35% of subjects relapsed, 89% within the first 2 years. Twenty-eight percent of subjects relapsed despite being on apparently adequate doses of lithium. The limitations of the study are that it is retrospective in nature, and that structured diagnostic tools and rating scales were not used. We conclude that lithium is the most commonly used thymoleptic in early-onset bipolar disorder. Lithium alone or in combination with neuroleptics appears to have good efficacy in the acute phase of the disorder. The majority of relapses occurred in the first 2 years and the efficacy of currently used thymoleptics in prophylaxis is uncertain.

  13. Threat sensitivity in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Muhtadie, Luma; Johnson, Sheri L

    2015-02-01

    Life stress is a major predictor of the course of bipolar disorder. Few studies have used laboratory paradigms to examine stress reactivity in bipolar disorder, and none have assessed autonomic reactivity to laboratory stressors. In the present investigation we sought to address this gap in the literature. Participants, 27 diagnosed with bipolar I disorder and 24 controls with no history of mood disorder, were asked to complete a complex working memory task presented as "a test of general intelligence." Self-reported emotions were assessed at baseline and after participants were given task instructions; autonomic physiology was assessed at baseline and continuously during the stressor task. Compared to controls, individuals with bipolar disorder reported greater increases in pretask anxiety from baseline and showed greater cardiovascular threat reactivity during the task. Group differences in cardiovascular threat reactivity were significantly correlated with comorbid anxiety in the bipolar group. Our results suggest that a multimethod approach to assessing stress reactivity-including the use of physiological parameters that differentiate between maladaptive and adaptive profiles of stress responding-can yield valuable information regarding stress sensitivity and its associations with negative affectivity in bipolar disorder. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25688436

  14. Threat Sensitivity in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Muhtadie, Luma; Johnson, Sheri L.

    2015-01-01

    Life stress is a major predictor of the course of bipolar disorder. Few studies have used laboratory paradigms to examine stress reactivity in bipolar disorder, and none have assessed autonomic reactivity to laboratory stressors. In the present investigation we sought to address this gap in the literature. Participants, 27 diagnosed with bipolar I disorder and 24 controls with no history of mood disorder, were asked to complete a complex working memory task presented as “a test of general intelligence.” Self-reported emotions were assessed at baseline and after participants were given task instructions; autonomic physiology was assessed at baseline and continuously during the stressor task. Compared to controls, individuals with bipolar disorder reported greater increases in pretask anxiety from baseline and showed greater cardiovascular threat reactivity during the task. Group differences in cardiovascular threat reactivity were significantly correlated with comorbid anxiety in the bipolar group. Our results suggest that a multimethod approach to assessing stress reactivity—including the use of physiological parameters that differentiate between maladaptive and adaptive profiles of stress responding— can yield valuable information regarding stress sensitivity and its associations with negative affectivity in bipolar disorder. PMID:25688436

  15. The management of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Kate E A; Geddes, John R

    2016-03-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common mental disorder which is relapsing and remitting in nature. Subsyndromal symptoms are common and associated with poorer outcomes. Management of the disorder can be challenging and depends on the polarity and severity of the mood episode. PMID:26961448

  16. The management of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Kate E A; Geddes, John R

    2016-03-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common mental disorder which is relapsing and remitting in nature. Subsyndromal symptoms are common and associated with poorer outcomes. Management of the disorder can be challenging and depends on the polarity and severity of the mood episode.

  17. [Prodromal phase in bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Fakra, E; Kaladjian, A; Da Fonseca, D; Maurel, M; Adida, M; Besnier, N; Pringuey, D; Azorin, J-M

    2010-01-01

    The prodromal phase is generally described as a subsyndromal stage preceding the disease onset. The characterization of such phase found its main purpose in secondary prevention. Up to now, clinical research relating to this topic in mental health has primarily focus on schizophrenic disorders. Over the last years, some studies have applied similar methods in order to characterize a preclinical phase in bipolar disorders. In spite of the fact that this strategy appears less adequate in bipolar disorders, these studies have demonstrated the existence of prodromal signs in a majority of patients. However, these features appear for the moment neither sufficiently characteristic, nor sufficiently specific to allow the construction of suitable assessment instruments, or to suggest precise guidelines in the management of these subjects. Also, these prodromal features show considerable overlap with other psychiatric disorders, especially attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia Interestingly, a limited number of studies have looked at the number of patients considered in a prodromal phase of schizophrenia which later developed a bipolar disorder and reported substantial proportions of subjects in this case, further highlighting the obvious bias in favor of schizophrenia in the actual prevention politics. In order to identify potential candidates at a prodromal phase of bipolar disorders that could benefit from early intervention, studies have relied on both high genetic risk and symptoms at the boundary of the actual classification. However, even within such approach, pharmacological treatments have not proven obvious advantage in terms of prevention. It is suggested that adopting a more longitudinal vision of the disease and, given the mean age of onset of bipolar disorder and a fortiori of its prodromal phase, a more developmental perspective of individuals, could help lowering the confusion in this field ; Also, given the considerable overlap

  18. [Bipolar disorder in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Monczor, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a frequent disorder in the elderly, with a prevalence of 0.1 a 0.4%; a 10% of bipolar patients have mania onset after 50 years old. It has in ageing a more heterogeneous clinical presentation. The manic episodes are less severe, mixed depression is common, as well as confusion and cognitive impairment. A first manic episode in ageing can be secondary to medical illness. Treatment for bipolar disorder in ageing is similar to treatment for young patients. The differences are due to pharmacocinetic changes because of the age, with the comorbidity and with the etiology, if it is a secondary mania. Lithium can be the first choice for treating mania in patients with antecedent of good response and have tolerance to adverse effects, but because of its toxicity and secondary effects other possibilities may be considered: divalproate, cabamazepine, antipsychotics. There are some little studies that show lamotrigine efficacy in bipolar depression in elderly. We need more specific studies about bipolar disorder treatment in aging.

  19. Integrated neurobiology of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Maletic, Vladimir; Raison, Charles

    2014-01-01

    From a neurobiological perspective there is no such thing as bipolar disorder. Rather, it is almost certainly the case that many somewhat similar, but subtly different, pathological conditions produce a disease state that we currently diagnose as bipolarity. This heterogeneity - reflected in the lack of synergy between our current diagnostic schema and our rapidly advancing scientific understanding of the condition - limits attempts to articulate an integrated perspective on bipolar disorder. However, despite these challenges, scientific findings in recent years are beginning to offer a provisional "unified field theory" of the disease. This theory sees bipolar disorder as a suite of related neurodevelopmental conditions with interconnected functional abnormalities that often appear early in life and worsen over time. In addition to accelerated loss of volume in brain areas known to be essential for mood regulation and cognitive function, consistent findings have emerged at a cellular level, providing evidence that bipolar disorder is reliably associated with dysregulation of glial-neuronal interactions. Among these glial elements are microglia - the brain's primary immune elements, which appear to be overactive in the context of bipolarity. Multiple studies now indicate that inflammation is also increased in the periphery of the body in both the depressive and manic phases of the illness, with at least some return to normality in the euthymic state. These findings are consistent with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which are known to drive inflammatory activation. In summary, the very fact that no single gene, pathway, or brain abnormality is likely to ever account for the condition is itself an extremely important first step in better articulating an integrated perspective on both its ontological status and pathogenesis. Whether this perspective will translate into the discovery of innumerable more homogeneous forms of bipolarity is one of the

  20. Family Focused Therapy for Bipolar Adolescents: Lessons from a Difficult Treatment Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Elizabeth L.; Taylor, Dawn O.; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Miklowitz, David J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines obstacles and challenges encountered in the manualized Family Focused Therapy-A of an adolescent with bipolar disorder. We begin by describing adolescent bipolar disorder and some of the many complications that frequently accompany it. We summarize Family Focused Therapy (FFT-A), an empirically validated treatment approach for…

  1. [Cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gabriele; Schaffer, Markus; Winklbaur, Bernadette

    2007-01-01

    Bipolar disorders are often associated with cognitive deficits which have an influence on social functioning and the course of the illness. These deficits have an impact on occupational ability and social integration. To date, specific cognitive domains have been found which characterize bipolar affective disorders. However, there is evidence of stable and lasting cognitive impairment in all phases of the disorder, including the remission phase, in the following domains: sustained attention, memory and executive functions (e.g. cognitive flexibility and problem solving). Although their cognitive deficits are comparable the deficits in patients with schizophrenia are more severe than those with bipolar disorder. Recent brain imaging findings indicate structural and functional abnormalities in the cortical and limbic networks of the brain in patients with bipolar disorder compared to healthy controls. Mood stabilizer and atypical antipsychotics may reduce cognitive deficits in certain domains (e.g. executive functions and word fluency) and may have a positive effect on quality of life and social functioning. PMID:17640495

  2. Suicidality in Bipolar I Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sheri L.; McMurrich, Stephanie L.; Yates, Marisa

    2005-01-01

    People with bipolar disorder are at high suicide risk. The literature suggests that suicidality is predicted by higher symptom severity and less use of pharmacological agents, but few studies have examined the joint contributions of these variables. The present study examines the conjoint contribution of symptom severity and pharmacological…

  3. [Poststroke-bipolar affective disorder].

    PubMed

    Bengesser, S A; Wurm, W E; Lackner, N; Birner, A; Reininghaus, B; Kapfhammer, H-P; Reininghaus, E

    2013-08-01

    A few weeks after suffering from a basal ganglia infarction (globus pallidus) with left-sided hemiplegia, a 23-year-old woman exhibited for the first time a pronounced mania with self-endangerment. The use of oral contraceptives was the only determinable risk factor. During the further course, the mother also developed a depressive disorder. Thus a certain genetic predisposition for affective disorders may be relevant, although this would not explain the outbreak by itself. An association between the right-sided basal ganglia infarction and the occurrence of a bipolar affective disorder has been described in the literature. Vascular or, respectively, inflammatory risk factors in synopsis with the aetiopathogenesis of bipolar affective disorders are also discussed in depth in this case report. PMID:23939559

  4. Mathematical models of bipolar disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, Darryl; Roque-Urrea, Tairi; Urrea-Roque, John; Troyer, Jessica; Wirkus, Stephen; Porter, Mason A.

    2009-07-01

    We use limit cycle oscillators to model bipolar II disorder, which is characterized by alternating hypomanic and depressive episodes and afflicts about 1% of the United States adult population. We consider two non-linear oscillator models of a single bipolar patient. In both frameworks, we begin with an untreated individual and examine the mathematical effects and resulting biological consequences of treatment. We also briefly consider the dynamics of interacting bipolar II individuals using weakly-coupled, weakly-damped harmonic oscillators. We discuss how the proposed models can be used as a framework for refined models that incorporate additional biological data. We conclude with a discussion of possible generalizations of our work, as there are several biologically-motivated extensions that can be readily incorporated into the series of models presented here.

  5. Targeting astrocytes in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Li, Baoman; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes are homeostatic cells of the central nervous system, which are critical for development and maintenance of synaptic transmission and hence of synaptically connected neuronal ensembles. Astrocytic densities are reduced in bipolar disorder, and therefore deficient astroglial function may contribute to overall disbalance in neurotransmission and to pathological evolution. Classical anti-bipolar drugs (lithium salts, valproic acid and carbamazepine) affect expression of astroglial genes and modify astroglial signalling and homeostatic cascades. Many effects of both antidepressant and anti-bipolar drugs are exerted through regulation of glutamate homeostasis and glutamatergic transmission, through K(+) buffering, through regulation of calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 (that controls metabolism of arachidonic acid) or through Ca(2+) homeostatic and signalling pathways. Sometimes anti-depressant and anti-bipolar drugs exert opposite effects, and some effects on gene expression in drug treated animals are opposite in neurones vs. astrocytes. Changes in the intracellular pH induced by anti-bipolar drugs affect uptake of myo-inositol and thereby signalling via inositoltrisphosphate (InsP3), this being in accord with one of the main theories of mechanism of action for these drugs. PMID:27015045

  6. Nicotine dependence and psychosis in Bipolar disorder and Schizoaffective disorder, Bipolar Type

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Elena; Hartz, Sarah; Tran, Jeffrey; Hilty, Donald; Sklar, Pamela; Smoller, Jordan W.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with Bipolar disorder smoke more than the general population. Smoking negatively impacts mortality and clinical course in Bipolar disorder patients. Prior studies have shown contradictory results regarding the impact of psychosis on smoking behavior in Bipolar disorder. We analyzed a large sample of Bipolar disorder and Schizoaffective disorder, Bipolar Type patients and predicted those with a history of psychosis would be more likely to be nicotine dependent. Methods Data from subjects and controls were collected from the Genomic Psychiatry Cohort (GPC). Subjects were diagnosed with Bipolar disorder without psychosis (N=610), Bipolar disorder with psychosis (N=1591), and Schizoaffective Disorder, Bipolar Type (N=1544). Participants were classified with or without nicotine dependence. Diagnostic groups were compared to controls (N=10065) using logistic regression. Results Among smokers (N=6157), those with Bipolar disorder had an increased risk of nicotine dependence (OR=2.5; p<0.0001). Patients with Bipolar disorder with psychosis were more likely to be dependent than Bipolar disorder patients without psychosis (OR=1.3; p=0.03). Schizoaffective disorder, Bipolar Type patients had more risk of nicotine dependence when compared to Bipolar disorder patients with or without psychosis (OR=1.2; p=0.02). Conclusions Bipolar disorder patients experiencing more severity of psychosis have more risk of nicotine dependence. PMID:26467098

  7. Integrated Neurobiology of Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Maletic, Vladimir; Raison, Charles

    2014-01-01

    From a neurobiological perspective there is no such thing as bipolar disorder. Rather, it is almost certainly the case that many somewhat similar, but subtly different, pathological conditions produce a disease state that we currently diagnose as bipolarity. This heterogeneity – reflected in the lack of synergy between our current diagnostic schema and our rapidly advancing scientific understanding of the condition – limits attempts to articulate an integrated perspective on bipolar disorder. However, despite these challenges, scientific findings in recent years are beginning to offer a provisional “unified field theory” of the disease. This theory sees bipolar disorder as a suite of related neurodevelopmental conditions with interconnected functional abnormalities that often appear early in life and worsen over time. In addition to accelerated loss of volume in brain areas known to be essential for mood regulation and cognitive function, consistent findings have emerged at a cellular level, providing evidence that bipolar disorder is reliably associated with dysregulation of glial–neuronal interactions. Among these glial elements are microglia – the brain’s primary immune elements, which appear to be overactive in the context of bipolarity. Multiple studies now indicate that inflammation is also increased in the periphery of the body in both the depressive and manic phases of the illness, with at least some return to normality in the euthymic state. These findings are consistent with changes in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which are known to drive inflammatory activation. In summary, the very fact that no single gene, pathway, or brain abnormality is likely to ever account for the condition is itself an extremely important first step in better articulating an integrated perspective on both its ontological status and pathogenesis. Whether this perspective will translate into the discovery of innumerable more homogeneous forms of

  8. Comorbidity in pediatric bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gagan; Wilens, Timothy

    2009-04-01

    The growing literature shows the pervasiveness and importance of comorbidity in youth with bipolar disorder (BPD). For instance, up to 90% of youth with BPD have been described to manifest comorbidity with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Multiple anxiety, substance use, and disruptive behavior disorders are the other most commonly reported comorbidities with BPD. Moreover, important recent data highlight the importance of obsessive-compulsive and pervasive developmental illness in the context of BPD. Data suggest that not only special developmental relationships are operant in the context of comorbidity but also that the presence of comorbid disorders with BPD results in a more severe clinical condition. Moreover, the presence of comorbidity has therapeutic implications for the treatment response for both BPD and the associated comorbid disorder. Future longitudinal studies to address the relationship and the impact of comorbid disorders on course and therapeutic response over time are required in youth with BPD. PMID:19264265

  9. Glutamine and Glutamate Levels in Children and Adolescents With Bipolar Disorder: A 4.0-T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    MOORE, CONSTANCE M.; FRAZIER, JEAN A.; GLOD, CAROL A.; BREEZE, JANIS L.; DIETERICH, MEGAN; FINN, CHELSEA T.; FREDERICK, BLAISE DEB.; RENSHAW, PERRY F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to use proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, at 4.0 T, to explore the glutamine and glutamate levels in the anterior cingulate cortex of children and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BPD; medicated and unmedicated) and healthy comparison subjects (HCSs). We hypothesized that unmedicated children with BPD would have reduced glutamine and glutamate levels compared with HCSs and medicated children with BPD. Method Spectra were acquired from the anterior cingulate cortex in 22 children and adolescents with DSM-IV-TR BPD, type 1 (13 female: age 12.6 ± 4.4 years: 7 of the subjects with BPD were unmedicated at the time of the scan) and 10 HCSs (7 female: age 12.3 ± 2.5 years). Results Unmedicated subjects with BPD had significantly lower glutamine levels than HCSs or medicated subjects with BPD. There were no differences in glutamate levels between the three groups. Conclusions These results are consistent with there being an abnormality in anterior cingulate cortex glia in untreated children and adolescents with BPD. The results of this pilot study may be important in helping us better understand the pathophysiology of child and adolescent BPD. In addition, this observation may help to develop better and more targeted treatments, in particular those affecting the metabolism of glutamine, perhaps by regulation of glutamine synthetase activity. PMID:17420688

  10. A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Divalproex Extended-Release in the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Karen Dineen; Redden, Laura; Kowatch, Robert A.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Segal, Scott; Chang, Kiki; Wozniak, Patricia; Vigna, Namita V.; Abi-Saab, Walid; Saltarelli, Mario

    2009-01-01

    A double-blind study that involves 150 patients aged 10-17 on the effect of divalproex extended-release in the treatment of bipolar disorder shows that the drug was similar to placebo based on adverse events and that no treatment effect was observed in the drug. The drug is not suitable for treatment of youths with bipolar I disorder, mixed or…

  11. Swimming in Deep Water: Childhood Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senokossoff, Gwyn W.; Stoddard, Kim

    2009-01-01

    The authors focused on one parent's struggles in finding a diagnosis and intervention for a child who had bipolar disorder. The authors explain the process of identification, diagnosis, and intervention of a child who had bipolar disorder. In addition to the personal story, the authors provide information on the disorder and outline strategies…

  12. [Oxidative stress in bipolar affective disorder].

    PubMed

    Reininghaus, E Z; Zelzer, S; Reininghaus, B; Lackner, N; Birner, A; Bengesser, S A; Fellendorf, F T; Kapfhammer, H-P; Mangge, H

    2014-09-01

    The results of mortality studies have indicated that medical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes are the most important causes of mortality among patients with bipolar disorder. The reasons for the increased incidence and mortality are not fully understood. Oxidative stress and an inadequate antioxidative system might be one missing link and could also help to further elucidate the pathophysiological basis of bipolar disorder. This article provides a comprehensive review of oxidative stress in general and about the existing data for bipolar disorder. In addition information is given about possible therapeutic strategies to reduce oxidative stress and the use in bipolar disorder. PMID:24441847

  13. Course of Subthreshold Bipolar Disorder in Youth: Diagnostic Progression from Bipolar Disorder Not Otherwise Specified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Strober, Michael A.; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Ha, Wonho; Gill, Mary Kay; Goldstein, Tina R.; Yen, Shirley; Hower, Heather; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Liao, Fangzi; Iyengar, Satish; Dickstein, Daniel; Kim, Eunice; Ryan, Neal D.; Frankel, Erica; Keller, Martin B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the rate of diagnostic conversion from an operationalized diagnosis of bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) to bipolar I disorder (BP-I) or bipolar II disorder (BP-II) in youth over prospective follow-up and to identify factors associated with conversion. Method: Subjects were 140 children and adolescents…

  14. Reduced Amygdalar Gray Matter Volume in Familial Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Kiki; Karchemskiy, Asya; Barnea-Goraly, Naama; Garrett, Amy; Simeonova, Diana Iorgova; Reiss, Allan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Subcortical limbic structures have been proposed to be involved in the pathophysiology of adult and pediatric bipolar disorder (BD). We sought to study morphometric characteristics of these structures in pediatric subjects with familial BD compared with healthy controls. Method: Twenty children and adolescents with BD I (mean age = 14.6…

  15. Early-Onset Bipolar Spectrum Disorders: Diagnostic Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danner, Stephanie; Fristad, Mary A.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Birmaher, Boris; Horwitz, Sarah M.; Demeter, Christine; Findling, Robert L.; Kowatch, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Since the mid 1990s, early-onset bipolar spectrum disorders (BPSDs) have received increased attention in both the popular press and scholarly press. Rates of diagnosis of BPSD in children and adolescents have increased in inpatient, outpatient, and primary care settings. BPSDs remain difficult to diagnose, particularly in youth. The current…

  16. Major Ups and Downs: Bipolar Disorder Brings Extreme Mood Swings

    MedlinePlus

    ... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Major Ups and Downs Bipolar Disorder Brings Extreme Mood Swings Most people feel happy ... Strike Out Stroke Wise Choices Links Dealing with Bipolar Disorder If you have bipolar disorder, get treatment and ...

  17. Developmental staging models in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Passos, Ives C; Jansen, Karen; Kapczinski, Flavio

    2015-12-01

    The previous contribution of Duffy and colleagues suggests that a chain of behavioral events starting during childhood precedes the development of full-blown bipolar disorder. In this vein, the recent contribution of Keown-Stoneman and colleagues brings a new perspective to the study of prodromal symptoms of bipolar disorder.

  18. Screening for bipolar disorder during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Lindsay; Mittal, Leena; Nicoloro, Jennifer; Caiozzo, Christina; Maciejewski, Paul K; Miller, Laura J

    2015-08-01

    Bipolar disorder is a high-risk condition during pregnancy. In women receiving prenatal care, this study addresses the proportion screening positive for bipolar disorder with or without also screening positive for depression. This is a pilot study using chart abstraction of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) scores from patients' initial prenatal visits. Among 342 participants, 289 (87.1 %) completed the EPDS, 277 (81.0 %) completed the MDQ, and 274 (80.1 %) completed both. Among EPDS screens, 49 (16.4 %) were positive. Among MDQ screens, 14 (5.1 %) were positive. Nine (21.4 %) of the 42 participants with a positive EPDS also had a positive MDQ. Of the 14 patients with a positive MDQ, five (35.7 %) had a negative EPDS. The prevalence of positive screens for bipolar disorder in an obstetric population is similar to gestational diabetes and hypertension, which are screened for routinely. Without screening for bipolar disorder, there is a high risk of misclassifying bipolar depression as unipolar depression. If only women with current depressive symptoms are screened for bipolar disorder, approximately one third of bipolar disorder cases would be missed. If replicated, these findings support simultaneous screening for both depression and bipolar disorder during pregnancy.

  19. Bipolar Disorder in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Patricia M.; Pacheco, Mary Rae

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the individual components of bipolar disorder in children and the behaviors that can escalate as a result of misdiagnosis and treatment. The brain/behavior relationship in bipolar disorders can be affected by genetics, developmental failure, or environmental influences, which can cause an onset of dramatic mood swings and…

  20. Viruses, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Yolken, R H; Torrey, E F

    1995-01-01

    The hypothesis that viruses or other infectious agents may cause schizophrenia or bipolar disorder dates to the 19th century but has recently been revived. It could explain many clinical, genetic, and epidemiologic aspects of these diseases, including the winter-spring birth seasonality, regional differences, urban birth, household crowding, having an older sibling, and prenatal exposure to influenza as risk factors. It could also explain observed immunological changes such as abnormalities of lymphocytes, proteins, autoantibodies, and cytokines. However, direct studies of viral infections in individuals with these psychiatric diseases have been predominantly negative. Most studies have examined antibodies in blood or cerebrospinal fluid, and relatively few studies have been done on viral antigens, genomes, cytopathic effect on cell culture, and animal transmission experiments. Viral research on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is thus comparable to viral research on multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease: an attractive hypothesis with scattered interesting findings but no clear proof. The application of molecular biological techniques may allow the identification of novel infectious agents and the associations of these novel agents with serious mental diseases. PMID:7704891

  1. The relationship between borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Morgan, Theresa A

    2013-06-01

    It is clinically important to recognize both bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder (BPD) in patients seeking treatment for depression, and it is important to distinguish between the two. Research considering whether BPD should be considered part of a bipolar spectrum reaches differing conclusions. We reviewed the most studied question on the relationship between BPD and bipolar disorder: their diagnostic concordance. Across studies, approximately 10% of patients with BPD had bipolar I disorder and another 10% had bipolar II disorder. Likewise, approximately 20% of bipolar II patients were diagnosed with BPD, though only 10% of bipolar I patients were diagnosed with BPD. While the comorbidity rates are substantial, each disorder is nontheless diagnosed in the absence of the other in the vast majority of cases (80% to 90%). In studies examining personality disorders broadly, other personality disorders were more commonly diagnosed in bipolar patients than was BPD. Likewise, the converse is also true: other axis I disorders such as major depression, substance abuse, and post-traumatic stress disorder are also more commonly diagnosed in patients with BPD than is bipolar disorder. These findings challenge the notion that BPD is part of the bipolar spectrum.

  2. Evidence-Based Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Findling, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy is an important component of treatment for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. The body of evidence supporting safe and effective treatments in this population is growing. Available data provide information on the risks and benefits of pharmacologic agents used for acute manic, mixed, and depressive episodes as well as for maintenance treatment. Lithium, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics comprise the armamentarium for treating pediatric bipolar disorder. When selecting treatment, clinicians must consider the efficacy and side effect profile of potential pharmacotherapies, as well as the patient's history, including the presence of comorbidities, in order to develop a treatment plan that will ensure optimal outcomes. PMID:27570928

  3. Memory in Early Onset Bipolar Disorder and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Similarities and Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udal, Anne H.; Oygarden, Bjorg; Egeland, Jens; Malt, Ulrik F.; Groholt, Berit

    2012-01-01

    Differentiating between early-onset bipolar disorder (BD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can be difficult. Memory problems are commonly reported in BD, and forgetfulness is among the diagnostic criteria for ADHD. We compared children and adolescents with BD (n = 23), ADHD combined type (ADHD-C; n = 26), BD + ADHD-C (n = 15),…

  4. Emotional Face Identification in Youths with Primary Bipolar Disorder or Primary Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Karen E.; Pescosolido, Matthew F.; Reidy, Brooke L.; Galvan, Thania; Kim, Kerri L.; Young, Matthew; Dickstein, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Bipolar disorder (BD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are often comorbid or confounded; therefore, we evaluated emotional face identification to better understand brain/behavior interactions in children and adolescents with either primary BD, primary ADHD, or typically developing controls (TDC). Method: Participants…

  5. Bipolar disorder: causes, contexts, and treatments.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Robert L

    2007-05-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic and often devastating illness that may go undiagnosed because of its complex and diverse presentation. Clinicians can provide psychological treatments, in conjunction with pharmacotherapy, that can reduce the frequency, severity, and duration of manic and depressive episodes. Because bipolar disorder is characterized by high degrees of comorbidity and high rates of medical complications, the clinician will frequently need to implement other treatments targeted to comorbid conditions, such as panic, generalized anxiety, substance abuse, and personality disorders. This article introduces the issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session devoted to the treatment of bipolar disorder. We describe the cognitive styles and personal vulnerabilities that pose greater risk for bipolar disorder. Three evidence-based psychological treatments (interpersonal social rhythm therapy, family-focused treatment, and cognitive-behavioral therapy) and current pharmacological treatments are examined and illustrated. Finally, we review the effectiveness and practice implications of a variety of treatments for this severe and underresearched disorder.

  6. Bipolar Disorder: A Daughter's Experience.

    PubMed

    Khare, Satya Rashi

    2016-09-01

    My father suffered from bipolar disorder. His illness placed an enormous strain on our relationship which, for the most part, was filled with turbulence. Although our family physician played an integral role in supporting my parents throughout the disease, I did not receive the same support and suffered as a consequence. In this essay, I describe my father's manic and major depressive episodes, as well as my emotions that resulted from the experience. Treating mental illness goes beyond just treating the patient but rather encompasses the family as a whole. My relationship with my father may have been different had I learned effective coping strategies through the support of my family physician. PMID:27621165

  7. Bipolar Disorder and Cognitive Therapy: A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riskind, John H.

    2005-01-01

    This article comments on the three articles (Leahy, 2005; Newman, 2005; and Reilly-Harrington & Knauz, 2005) that deal with the applications of cognitive therapy to treatment of bipolar disorder. They focus on the uses of cognitive therapy in treating three important facets of the special problems of bipolar patients: rapid cycling, severe…

  8. Anticipation in bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    McInnis, M.G.; McMahon, F.J.; Chase, G.A.; Simpson, S.G.; Ross, C.A.; DePaulo, J.R. Jr. )

    1993-08-01

    Anticipation refers to the increase in disease severity or decrease in age at onset in succeeding generations. This phenomenon, formerly ascribed to observation biases, correlates with the expansion of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TNRs) in some disorders. If present in bipolar affective disorder (BPAD), anticipation could provide clues to its genetic etiology. The authors compared age at onset and disease severity between two generations of 34 unilineal families ascertained for a genetic linkage study of BPAD. Life-table analyses showed a significant decrease in survival to first mania or depression from the first to the second generation (P <.001). Intergenerational pairwise comparisons showed both a significantly earlier age at onset (P < .001) and a significantly increased disease severity (P < .001) in the second generation. This difference was significant under each of four data-sampling schemes which excluded probands in the second generation. The second generation experienced onset 8.9-13.5 years earlier and illness 1.8-3.4 times more severe than did the first generation. In additional analyses, drug abuse, deaths of affected individuals prior to interview, decreased fertility, censoring of age at onset, and the cohort effect did not affect our results. The authors conclude that genetic anticipation occurs in this sample of unilineal BPAD families. These findings may implicate genes with expanding TNRs in the genetic etiology of BPAD. 24 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Bipolar disorder and neurophysiologic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Simon M

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that some variants of bipolar disorder (BD) may be due to hyperconnectivity between orbitofrontal (OFC) and temporal pole (TP) structures in the dominant hemisphere. Some initial MRI studies noticed that there were corpus callosum abnormalities within specific regional areas and it was hypothesized that developmentally this could result in functional or effective connectivity changes within the orbitofrontal-basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits. Recent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) white matter fiber tractography studies may well be superior to region of interest (ROI) DTI in understanding BD. A “ventral semantic stream” has been discovered connecting the TP and OFC through the uncinate and inferior longitudinal fasciculi and the elusive TP is known to be involved in theory of mind and complex narrative understanding tasks. The OFC is involved in abstract valuation in goal and sub-goal structures and the TP may be critical in binding semantic memory with person–emotion linkages associated with narrative. BD patients have relative attenuation of performance on visuoconstructional praxis consistent with an atypical localization of cognitive functions. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that some BD alleles are being selected for which could explain the enhanced creativity in higher-ability probands. Associations between ROI’s that are not normally connected could explain the higher incidence of artistic aptitude, writing ability, and scientific achievements among some mood disorder subjects. PMID:19337455

  10. Bipolar disorder and ADHD: comorbidity and diagnostic distinctions.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Ciro; De Chiara, Lavinia; Faedda, Gianni L

    2015-08-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are neurodevelopmental disorders with onset in childhood and early adolescence, and common persistence in adulthood. Both disorders are often undiagnosed, misdiagnosed, and sometimes over diagnosed, leading to high rates of morbidity and disability. The differentiation of these conditions is based on their clinical features, comorbidity, psychiatric family history course of illness, and response to treatment. We review recent relevant findings and highlight epidemiological, clinical, family history, course, and treatment-response differences that can aid the differential diagnosis of these conditions in an outpatient pediatric setting. PMID:26084666

  11. Low Social Rhythm Regularity Predicts First Onset of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders Among At Risk Individuals with Reward Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Alloy, Lauren B.; Boland, Elaine M.; Ng, Tommy H.; Whitehouse, Wayne G.; Abramson, Lyn Y.

    2015-01-01

    The social zeitgeber model (Ehlers, Frank, & Kupfer, 1988) suggests that irregular daily schedules or social rhythms provide vulnerability to bipolar spectrum disorders. This study tested whether social rhythm regularity prospectively predicted first lifetime onset of bipolar spectrum disorders in adolescents already at risk for bipolar disorder based on exhibiting reward hypersensitivity. Adolescents (ages 14 – 19) previously screened to have high (N = 138) or moderate (N = 95) reward sensitivity, but no lifetime history of bipolar spectrum disorder, completed measures of depressive and manic symptoms, family history of bipolar disorder, and the Social Rhythm Metric. They were followed prospectively with semi-structured diagnostic interviews every six months for an average of 31.7 (SD = 20.1) months. Hierarchical logistic regression indicated that low social rhythm regularity at baseline predicted greater likelihood of first onset of bipolar spectrum disorder over follow-up among high, but not moderate, reward sensitivity adolescents, controlling for follow-up time, gender, age, family history of bipolar disorder, and initial manic and depressive symptoms (β= −.150, Wald = 4.365, p = .037, OR = .861, 95% CI = .748 – .991). Consistent with the social zeitgeber theory, low social rhythm regularity provides vulnerability to first onset of bipolar spectrum disorder among at-risk adolescents. It may be possible to identify adolescents at risk for developing a bipolar spectrum disorder based on exhibiting both reward hypersensitivity and social rhythm irregularity before onset occurs. PMID:26595474

  12. Optimising the management of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    MsAbda Mahmood; Ebmeler, Klaus R

    2015-05-01

    NICE recommends that when adults present in primary care with depression, they should be asked about previous periods of overactivity or disinhibited behaviour. If this behaviour lasted for four or more days referral for a specialist mental health assessment should be considered. Although depressive episodes are not necessary for a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, they are common and dominate the lifetime pattern of the condition: 50% of the time is spent in a euthymic (well) state, 38% in a depressed and 12% in a manic state. If there have only been depressive symptoms, it is not possible to exclude bipolar disorder. A diagnosis of bipolar disorder is supported by diagnostic criteria and usually confirmed by a psychiatrist. If the GP suspects mania or severe depression, or if patients are a danger to themselves or others, an urgent referral should be made for a specialist mental health assessment. If a manic episode has been present during the history the diagnosis is bipolar I disorder, while a hypomanic episode is indicative of bipolar disorder. The patient's care plan should include current health status, social situation, social support, co-ordination arrangements with secondary care, details of early warning signs, and the patient's preferred course of action in the event of a clinical relapse. Physical health checks should focus on cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity and respiratory disease given the heightened risk for these illnesses in bipolar disorder. PMID:27254890

  13. Optimising the management of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    MsAbda Mahmood; Ebmeler, Klaus R

    2015-05-01

    NICE recommends that when adults present in primary care with depression, they should be asked about previous periods of overactivity or disinhibited behaviour. If this behaviour lasted for four or more days referral for a specialist mental health assessment should be considered. Although depressive episodes are not necessary for a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, they are common and dominate the lifetime pattern of the condition: 50% of the time is spent in a euthymic (well) state, 38% in a depressed and 12% in a manic state. If there have only been depressive symptoms, it is not possible to exclude bipolar disorder. A diagnosis of bipolar disorder is supported by diagnostic criteria and usually confirmed by a psychiatrist. If the GP suspects mania or severe depression, or if patients are a danger to themselves or others, an urgent referral should be made for a specialist mental health assessment. If a manic episode has been present during the history the diagnosis is bipolar I disorder, while a hypomanic episode is indicative of bipolar disorder. The patient's care plan should include current health status, social situation, social support, co-ordination arrangements with secondary care, details of early warning signs, and the patient's preferred course of action in the event of a clinical relapse. Physical health checks should focus on cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity and respiratory disease given the heightened risk for these illnesses in bipolar disorder.

  14. Big data for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Monteith, Scott; Glenn, Tasha; Geddes, John; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The delivery of psychiatric care is changing with a new emphasis on integrated care, preventative measures, population health, and the biological basis of disease. Fundamental to this transformation are big data and advances in the ability to analyze these data. The impact of big data on the routine treatment of bipolar disorder today and in the near future is discussed, with examples that relate to health policy, the discovery of new associations, and the study of rare events. The primary sources of big data today are electronic medical records (EMR), claims, and registry data from providers and payers. In the near future, data created by patients from active monitoring, passive monitoring of Internet and smartphone activities, and from sensors may be integrated with the EMR. Diverse data sources from outside of medicine, such as government financial data, will be linked for research. Over the long term, genetic and imaging data will be integrated with the EMR, and there will be more emphasis on predictive models. Many technical challenges remain when analyzing big data that relates to size, heterogeneity, complexity, and unstructured text data in the EMR. Human judgement and subject matter expertise are critical parts of big data analysis, and the active participation of psychiatrists is needed throughout the analytical process.

  15. Big data for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Monteith, Scott; Glenn, Tasha; Geddes, John; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The delivery of psychiatric care is changing with a new emphasis on integrated care, preventative measures, population health, and the biological basis of disease. Fundamental to this transformation are big data and advances in the ability to analyze these data. The impact of big data on the routine treatment of bipolar disorder today and in the near future is discussed, with examples that relate to health policy, the discovery of new associations, and the study of rare events. The primary sources of big data today are electronic medical records (EMR), claims, and registry data from providers and payers. In the near future, data created by patients from active monitoring, passive monitoring of Internet and smartphone activities, and from sensors may be integrated with the EMR. Diverse data sources from outside of medicine, such as government financial data, will be linked for research. Over the long term, genetic and imaging data will be integrated with the EMR, and there will be more emphasis on predictive models. Many technical challenges remain when analyzing big data that relates to size, heterogeneity, complexity, and unstructured text data in the EMR. Human judgement and subject matter expertise are critical parts of big data analysis, and the active participation of psychiatrists is needed throughout the analytical process. PMID:27068058

  16. The role of sleep in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Gold, Alexandra K; Sylvia, Louisa G

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness characterized by alternating periods of elevated and depressed mood. Sleep disturbances in bipolar disorder are present during all stages of the condition and exert a negative impact on overall course, quality of life, and treatment outcomes. We examine the partnership between circadian system (process C) functioning and sleep-wake homeostasis (process S) on optimal sleep functioning and explore the role of disruptions in both systems on sleep disturbances in bipolar disorder. A convergence of evidence suggests that sleep problems in bipolar disorder result from dysregulation across both process C and process S systems. Biomarkers of depressive episodes include heightened fragmentation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, reduced REM latency, increased REM density, and a greater percentage of awakenings, while biomarkers of manic episodes include reduced REM latency, greater percentage of stage I sleep, increased REM density, discontinuous sleep patterns, shortened total sleep time, and a greater time awake in bed. These findings highlight the importance of targeting novel treatments for sleep disturbance in bipolar disorder. PMID:27418862

  17. The role of sleep in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Alexandra K; Sylvia, Louisa G

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness characterized by alternating periods of elevated and depressed mood. Sleep disturbances in bipolar disorder are present during all stages of the condition and exert a negative impact on overall course, quality of life, and treatment outcomes. We examine the partnership between circadian system (process C) functioning and sleep–wake homeostasis (process S) on optimal sleep functioning and explore the role of disruptions in both systems on sleep disturbances in bipolar disorder. A convergence of evidence suggests that sleep problems in bipolar disorder result from dysregulation across both process C and process S systems. Biomarkers of depressive episodes include heightened fragmentation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, reduced REM latency, increased REM density, and a greater percentage of awakenings, while biomarkers of manic episodes include reduced REM latency, greater percentage of stage I sleep, increased REM density, discontinuous sleep patterns, shortened total sleep time, and a greater time awake in bed. These findings highlight the importance of targeting novel treatments for sleep disturbance in bipolar disorder. PMID:27418862

  18. The role of sleep in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Gold, Alexandra K; Sylvia, Louisa G

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness characterized by alternating periods of elevated and depressed mood. Sleep disturbances in bipolar disorder are present during all stages of the condition and exert a negative impact on overall course, quality of life, and treatment outcomes. We examine the partnership between circadian system (process C) functioning and sleep-wake homeostasis (process S) on optimal sleep functioning and explore the role of disruptions in both systems on sleep disturbances in bipolar disorder. A convergence of evidence suggests that sleep problems in bipolar disorder result from dysregulation across both process C and process S systems. Biomarkers of depressive episodes include heightened fragmentation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, reduced REM latency, increased REM density, and a greater percentage of awakenings, while biomarkers of manic episodes include reduced REM latency, greater percentage of stage I sleep, increased REM density, discontinuous sleep patterns, shortened total sleep time, and a greater time awake in bed. These findings highlight the importance of targeting novel treatments for sleep disturbance in bipolar disorder.

  19. Distinguishing bipolar disorder from other psychiatric disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet K; Ketter, Terence; Chang, Kiki D

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric onset bipolar disorder (BD) is a challenging diagnosis with potentially debilitating outcomes. This review aims to critically evaluate recently published literature relevant to the diagnosis of BD in youth, emphasizing interesting and important new findings characterizing pediatric BD and reporting updates in the diagnostic and statistical manual relevant to this disorder in youth. Challenges regarding the diagnosis of BD will be discussed, in addition to important distinctions with other childhood disorders, including other bipolar spectrum disorders; major depressive disorder; dysthymia; disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD); attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other disruptive behavioral disorders; anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); psychotic disorders; autism spectrum disorders; substance use disorders; and borderline personality disorder. The review concludes with a comment on past research limitations and future directions in the field. PMID:25315116

  20. Implicit motives and cognitive variables: specific links to vulnerability for unipolar or bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fuhr, Kristina; Hautzinger, Martin; Meyer, Thomas Daniel

    2014-01-30

    Cognitive variables contribute to the etiology of affective disorders. With the differentiation between explicit and implicit measures some studies have indicated underlying depressogenic schemata even in bipolar disorders. We tested for differences in implicit motives and cognitive variables between patients with remitted unipolar and bipolar disorder compared to controls and in a high-risk sample. Additionally we investigated whether affective symptoms relate to those variables. We cross-sectionally examined N=164 participants (53 with bipolar disorder, 58 with major depression, and 53 without affective disorders) and a high-risk sample (N=49) of adolescent children of either parents with unipolar or bipolar disorder or of healthy parents. The Multi-Motive-Grid was used to measure the implicit motives achievement, affiliation, and power, in addition to the cognitive measures of self-esteem, dysfunctional attitudes, and perfectionism. Unipolar and bipolar groups did not differ from healthy controls in implicit motives but showed higher scores in the cognitive factors. Adolescents at high risk for unipolar disorder showed lower scores in the power and achievement motives compared to adolescents at low risk. Subsyndromal depressive symptoms were related to the cognitive variables in both samples. Our results underline the importance of cognitive-behavioral treatment for both unipolar and bipolar disorder. PMID:24182545

  1. A neuroplastic deafferentation hypothesis for bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jonathan; Mirams, Jamie; Patel, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder, characterised by extreme cyclical variations in mood between depression and mania, is a common, debilitating and sometimes fatal psychiatric condition with an unclear aetiology. In this paper we propose a hypothesis for the development of bipolar disorder through which neuroplastic changes in response to an index depressive episode leads to the amplification of subthreshold pleasurable stimuli that then drive conversion into a manic state. This ‘pleasure deafferentation hypothesis’ is reached through a discussion of the neuroscientific basis of deafferentation at the level of the neuron and its role in the development of various neurological and psychiatric phenomena before a case for deafferentation as applied to bipolar disorder is justified and its implications discussed. PMID:26459976

  2. Interventions for Sleep Disturbance in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Kaplan, Kate A.; Soehner, Adriane

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Bipolar disorder is a severe and chronic disorder, ranked in the top 10 leading causes of disability worldwide. Sleep disturbances are strongly coupled with inter-episode dysfunction and symptom worsening in bipolar disorder. Experimental studies suggest that sleep deprivation can trigger manic relapse. There is evidence that sleep deprivation can have an adverse impact on emotion regulation the following day. The clinical management of the sleep disturbances experienced by bipolar patients, including insomnia, hypersomnia delayed sleep phase and irregular sleep-wake schedule, may include medication approaches, psychological interventions, light therapies and sleep deprivation. Psychological interventions, as described here, are advantageous in that they are low in side effects, may be preferred by patients, are durable and have no abuse potential. PMID:25750600

  3. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; González-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Ayşegül; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vázquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valentí, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martínez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Özerdem, Ayşegül; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flávio; Vieta, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorders. Method An expert task force iteratively developed consensus through serial consensus-based revisions using the Delphi method. Initial survey items were based on systematic review of the literature. Subsequent surveys included new or reworded items and items that needed to be rerated. This process resulted in the final ISBD Task Force clinical recommendations on antidepressant use in bipolar disorder. Results There is striking incongruity between the wide use of and the weak evidence base for the efficacy and safety of antidepressant drugs in bipolar disorder. Few well-designed, long-term trials of prophylactic benefits have been conducted, and there is insufficient evidence for treatment benefits with antidepressants combined with mood stabilizers. A major concern is the risk for mood switch to hypomania, mania, and mixed states. Integrating the evidence and the experience of the task force members, a consensus was reached on 12 statements on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorder. Conclusions Because of limited data, the task force could not make broad statements endorsing antidepressant use but acknowledged that individual bipolar patients may benefit from antidepressants. Regarding safety, serotonin reuptake inhibitors and bupropion may have lower rates of manic switch than tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and norepinephrine-serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The frequency and severity of antidepressant-associated mood elevations appear to be greater in bipolar I than bipolar II disorder. Hence, in bipolar I patients antidepressants should be prescribed only as an adjunct to mood-stabilizing medications

  4. Kids with Bipolar Disorder More Likely to Abuse Drugs, Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161012.html Kids With Bipolar Disorder More Likely to Abuse Drugs, Alcohol: Study And ... 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For some teens with bipolar disorder, the risk that they will abuse alcohol and ...

  5. Clinical, Demographic, and Familial Correlates of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders among Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Shamseddeen, Wael; Axelson, David A.; Kalas, Cathy; Monk, Kelly; Brent, David A.; Kupfer, David J.; Birmaher, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Despite increased risk, most offspring of parents with bipolar disorder (BP) do not manifest BP. The identification of risk factors for BP among offspring could improve preventive and treatment strategies. We examined this topic in the Pittsburgh Bipolar Offspring Study (BIOS). Method: Subjects included 388 offspring, ages 7-17 years,…

  6. Differences between patients with borderline personality disorder who do and do not have a family history of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Martinez, Jennifer; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy

    2014-10-01

    Diagnostic confusion sometimes exists between bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder (BPD). To improve the recognition of bipolar disorder researchers have identified nondiagnostic factors that point toward bipolar disorder. One such factor is the presence of a family history of bipolar disorder. In the current report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project, we compared the demographic, clinical, and psychosocial characteristics of patients with BPD who did and did not have a family history of bipolar disorder. A large sample of psychiatric outpatients were interviewed with semi-structured interviews. Three hundred seventeen patients without bipolar disorder were diagnosed with DSM-IV borderline personality disorder. Slightly less than 10% of the 317 patients with BPD (9.5%, n=30) reported a family history of bipolar disorder in their first-degree relatives. There were no differences between groups in any specific Axis I or Axis II disorder. The patients with a positive family history were significantly less likely to report excessive or inappropriate anger, but there was no difference in the frequency of other criteria for BPD such as affective instability, impulsivity, or suicidal behavior. The patients with a positive family history reported a significantly higher rate of increased appetite and fatigue. There was no difference in overall severity of depression, scores on the Global Assessment of Functioning, history of psychiatric hospitalizations, suicide attempts, time unemployed due to psychiatric reasons during the 5 years before the evaluation, and ratings of current and adolescent social functioning. There was no difference on any of the 5 subscales of the childhood trauma questionnaire. Overall, we found few differences between BPD patients with and without a family history of bipolar disorder thereby suggesting that a positive family history of bipolar disorder was not a useful marker for

  7. Discriminating Between Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer, Paul A; Perlis, Roy H

    2016-03-01

    Rates of misdiagnosis between major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder have been reported to be substantial, and the consequence of such misdiagnosis is likely to be a delay in achieving effective control of symptoms, in some cases spanning many years. Particularly in the midst of a depressive episode, or early in the illness course, it may be challenging to distinguish the 2 mood disorders purely on the basis of cross-sectional features. To date, no useful biological markers have been reliably shown to distinguish between bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder.

  8. Discriminating Between Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer, Paul A; Perlis, Roy H

    2016-03-01

    Rates of misdiagnosis between major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder have been reported to be substantial, and the consequence of such misdiagnosis is likely to be a delay in achieving effective control of symptoms, in some cases spanning many years. Particularly in the midst of a depressive episode, or early in the illness course, it may be challenging to distinguish the 2 mood disorders purely on the basis of cross-sectional features. To date, no useful biological markers have been reliably shown to distinguish between bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder. PMID:26876315

  9. Comorbidity of Asperger's syndrome and Bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background and objective Asperger's Syndrome (AS) is a pervasive developmental disorder that is sometimes unrecognized, especially in the adult psychiatric setting. On the other hand, in patients with an AS diagnosis, comorbid psychiatric disorders may be unrecognized in the juvenile setting. The aim of the paper is to show and discuss some troublesome and complex problems of the management of patients with AS and comorbid Bipolar Disorder (BD). Methods The paper describes three patients affected by AS and bipolar spectrum disorders. Results and conclusion Mood stabilizers and 2nd generation antipsychotics were effective in the treatment of these AS patients with comorbid BD, while the use of antidepressants was associated with worsening of the mood disorder. It is of importance to recognize both the psychiatric diagnoses in order to arrange an exhaustive therapeutic program and to define specific and realistic goals of treatment. PMID:19014623

  10. Spotlight on quetiapine in acute mania and depression associated with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Dando, Toni M; Keating, Gillian M

    2006-01-01

    Quetiapine (Seroquel), an atypical antipsychotic with established efficacy in the treatment of schizophrenia, shows efficacy in the treatment of acute mania and depression associated with bipolar disorder.Quetiapine, either as monotherapy or in combination with lithium or divalproex sodium (valproate semisodium), is generally well tolerated and effective in reducing manic symptoms in adult and adolescent patients with acute bipolar mania, and is approved for use in adults for this indication. As monotherapy, the drug is also effective in reducing depressive symptoms in patients with bipolar depression. It is associated with a low incidence of extrapyramidal symptom (EPS)-related adverse events and low EPS ratings in bipolar disorder. Quetiapine thus shows potential in the treatment of bipolar depression, and represents a useful agent for the treatment of acute bipolar mania.

  11. Memory and Learning in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Erin B.; Treland, Julia E.; Snow, Joseph; Dickstein, Daniel P.; Towbin, Kenneth E.; Charney, Dennis S.; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that patients with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBPD) would demonstrate impairment relative to diagnosis-free controls of comparable age, gender, and IQ on measures of memory functioning. Method: The authors administered a battery of verbal and visuospatial memory tests to 35 outpatients with PBPD and 20 healthy…

  12. [The nosological evolution of bipolar affective disorder].

    PubMed

    Bélteczki, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    The nosological improvement of the bipolar disorder (manic-depression) follow the written history of psychiatry. The symptoms of manic and depressive episodes and mixed states were described in the ancient times. In my summary I accompany the taxonomic improvement, the changing of diagnostic categories and the work of the most important researchers from the beginning to these days. PMID:27244868

  13. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Combination Pharmacotherapy, Adverse Effects, and Treatment of High-Risk Youth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kiki D

    2016-01-01

    Treating bipolar disorder in pediatric patients is challenging because data from rigorous trials of pharmacotherapy in this population are still not plentiful enough. Furthermore, the treatment of children and adolescents is complicated by the frequent need to combine pharmacotherapies to address all bipolar symptoms as well as this population's elevated risk for experiencing side effects. Additionally, young patients with depressive episodes who are at high risk for developing bipolar disorder need careful treatment to prevent or delay the emergence of mania. Despite these challenges, clinicians should evaluate the existing pediatric literature, extrapolate evidence obtained from adult patients, and draw from clinical experience to guide treatment decisions for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. PMID:27570929

  14. Novel glutamatergic agents for major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Ibrahim, Lobna; Henter, Ioline D.; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Mood disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BPD) are common, chronic, recurrent mental illnesses that affect the lives and functioning of millions of individuals worldwide. Growing evidence suggests that the glutamatergic system is central to the neurobiology and treatment of these disorders. Here, we review data supporting the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology of mood disorders as well as the efficacy of glutamatergic agents as novel therapeutics. PMID:21971560

  15. Memantine: New prospective in bipolar disorder treatment

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Giulia; Demontis, Francesca; Serra, Francesca; De Chiara, Lavinia; Spoto, Andrea; Girardi, Paolo; Vidotto, Giulio; Serra, Gino

    2014-01-01

    We review preclinical and clinical evidences strongly suggesting that memantine, an old drug currently approved for Alzheimer’s dementia, is an effective treatment for acute mania and for the prevention of manic/hypomanic and depressive recurrences of manic-depressive illness. Lithium remains the first line for the treatment and prophylaxis of bipolar disorders, but currently available treatment alternatives for lithium resistant patients are of limited and/or questionable efficacy. Thus, research and development of more effective mood stabilizer drugs is a leading challenge for modern psychopharmacology. We have demonstrated that 21 d administration of imipramine causes a behavioural syndrome similar to a cycle of bipolar disorder, i.e., a mania followed by a depression, in rats. Indeed, such treatment causes a behavioural supersensitivity to dopamine D2 receptor agonists associated with an increase sexual activity and aggressivity (mania). The dopamine receptor sensitization is followed, after imipramine discontinuation, by an opposite phenomenon (dopamine receptor desensitization) and an increased immobility time (depression) in the forced swimming test of depression. Memantine blocks the development of the supersensitivity and the ensuing desensitization associated with the depressive like behavior. On the basis of these observations we have suggested the use of memantine in the treatment of mania and in the prophylaxis of bipolar disorders. To test this hypothesis we performed several naturalistic studies that showed an acute antimanic effect and a long-lasting and progressive mood-stabilizing action (at least 3 years), without clinically relevant side effects. To confirm the observations of our naturalistic trials we are now performing a randomized controlled clinical trial. Finally we described the studies reporting the efficacy of memantine in manic-like symptoms occurring in psychiatric disorders other than bipolar. Limitations: A randomized controlled

  16. [Bipolar disorders and self-stigma].

    PubMed

    Richard-Lepouriel, H

    2015-09-16

    Despite wide media coverage in recent years, the stigmatization of people with bipolar disorder still exists. Bipolar people also have their own tendency to self-stigmatize that is to integrate their beliefs, prejudices and stigmatizing behaviors. The consequences are important: shame, guilt, withdrawal and renunciation to lead one's own life according to personal values increasing therefore the risk of mood relapses. Self-stigma is rarely assessed in clinical practice and few strategies have been designed to face them efficiently. Recognizing self-stigmatizing beliefs and challenging them are the first steps of this vast endeavour. PMID:26591079

  17. Putative Drugs and Targets for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zarate, Carlos A.; Manji, Husseini K.

    2009-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapy for bipolar disorder (BPD) is generally unsatisfactory for a large number of patients. Even with adequate modern bipolar pharmacological therapies, many afflicted individuals continue to have persistent mood episode relapses, residual symptoms, functional impairment and psychosocial disability. Creating novel therapeutics for BPD is urgently needed. Promising drug targets and compounds for BPD worthy of further study involve the following systems: purinergic, dynorphin opioid neuropeptide, cholinergic (muscarinic and nicotinic), melatonin and serotonin (5-HT2C receptor), glutamatergic, hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis have all been implicated. Intracellular pathways and targets worthy of further study include glycogen synthase kinase-3 protein, protein kinase C, arachidonic acid cascade. PMID:18704977

  18. Special Considerations in the Treatment of College Students with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lejeune, Simon M. W.

    2011-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a relatively common mental disorder that often has its onset during the college years. This means that students simultaneously face both the challenge of late adolescent development and the challenge of adapting to a major mental illness. As a further complication, the college environment is not well suited to the kinds of…

  19. Childhood-Onset Bipolar Disorder: Evidence for Increased Familial Loading of Psychiatric Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rende, Richard; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Strober, Michael; Gill, Mary Kay; Valeri, Sylvia; Chiappetta, Laurel; Ryan, Neal; Leonard, Henrietta; Hunt, Jeffrey; Iyengar, Satish; Keller, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether childhood-onset bipolar disorder (BP) is associated with an increased psychiatric family history compared with adolescent-onset BP. Method: Semistructured psychiatric interviews were conducted for 438 youth with BP spectrum disorders. To evaluate the effects of age at onset and psychiatric family history, the sample…

  20. Circadian Phase Preference in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kerri L.; Weissman, Alexandra B.; Puzia, Megan E.; Cushman, Grace K.; Seymour, Karen E.; Wegbreit, Ezra; Carskadon, Mary A.; Dickstein, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder (BD) rates have notably increased over the past three decades. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with BD, efforts are needed to identify factors useful in earlier detection to help address this serious public health concern. Sleep is particularly important to consider given the sequelae of disrupted sleep on normative functioning and that sleep is included in diagnostic criteria for both Major Depressive and Manic Episodes. Here, we examine one component of sleep—i.e., circadian phase preference with the behavioral construct of morningness/eveningness (M/E). In comparing 30 BD and 45 typically developing control (TDC) participants, ages 7–17 years, on the Morningness-Eveningness Scale for Children (MESC), no between-group differences emerged. Similar results were found when comparing three groups (BD−ADHD; BD+ADHD; TDC). Consistent with data available on circadian phase preference in adults with BD, however, we found that BD adolescents, ages 13 years and older, endorsed significantly greater eveningness compared to their TDC peers. While the current findings are limited by reliance on subjective report and the high-rate of comorbid ADHD among the BD group, this finding that BD teens demonstrate an exaggerated shift towards eveningness than would be developmentally expected is important. Future studies should compare the circadian rhythms across the lifespan for individuals diagnosed with BD, as well as identify the point at which BD youth part ways with their healthy peers in terms of phase preference. In addition, given our BD sample was overall euthymic, it may be that M/E is more state vs. trait specific in latency age youth. Further work would benefit from assessing circadian functioning using a combination of rating forms and laboratory-based measures. Improved understanding of sleep in BD may identify behavioral targets for inclusion in prevention and intervention protocols. PMID:26237260

  1. Customization in prescribing for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Volpe-Vartanian, Joanna; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Horgan, Constance M; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Frank, Richard G; Lee, Sue

    2012-06-01

    For many disorders, patient heterogeneity requires physicians to customize their treatment to each patient's needs. We test for the existence of customization in physicians' prescribing for bipolar disorder, using data from a naturalistic clinical effectiveness trial of bipolar disorder treatment (STEP-BD), which did not constrain physician prescribing. Multinomial logit is used to model the physician's choice among five combinations of drug classes. We find that our observed measure of the patient's clinical status played only a limited role in the choice among drug class combinations, even for conditions such as mania that are expected to affect class choice. However, treatment of a patient with given characteristics differed widely depending on which physician was seen. The explanatory power of the model was low. There was variation within each physician's prescribing, but the results do not suggest a high degree of customization in physicians' prescribing, based on our measure of clinical status.

  2. The developmental stages of Bipolar Disorder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Fatima Imam; Verdolini, Norma; Agius, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is a developing disorder; its early stages are sometimes misdiagnosed as anxiety or depressive disorders. At the same time, these disorders are often in comorbidity with bipolar disorder. This complex symptomatology can lead to misinterpretation and underdiagnosis of bipolar disorders, mainly at the earliest stages. Consequently, one of the most important challenges for clinicians is to recognize the non specific early symptoms with the aid of clinical information, for example a family history of bipolar disorder. Furthermore, it is well-known that comorbid anxiety disorders can lead to a worse prognosis in bipolar patients but it is not exactly clear to what extent. A deeper understanding of the relationship between these comorbidities and their stage of development will hopefully lead to better care of patients with bipolar disorder from a younger age. PMID:26417761

  3. Is There a Bipolar Prodrome Among Children and Adolescents?

    PubMed

    Hunt, Jeffrey; Schwarz, Charlotte M; Nye, Paul; Frazier, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    Bipolar disorder in youth substantially impairs behavior, family, and social functioning and interferes with developmental course. There is increasing interest in defining a bipolar prodrome similar to that reported in early-onset psychosis that will allow for earlier intervention and reduction in overall morbidity and mortality. Several lines of research have addressed this important issue including studies of offspring of bipolar parents, high-risk cohorts, and longitudinal follow-up of subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD), ADHD, and bipolar spectrum disorder. The development and validation of bipolar prodrome rating scales also shows promise. Recent attempts to intervene at earlier stages of bipolar disorder have led to some positive outcomes. However, a controversy remains concerning the identification and management of the earliest symptoms. Further research is needed to fully validate a bipolar prodrome and to determine the optimal course of action at various stages of illness. PMID:26893233

  4. Heritability of cognitive functions in families with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Antila, Mervi; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Kieseppä, Tuula; Soronen, Pia; Palo, Outi M; Paunio, Tiina; Haukka, Jari; Partonen, Timo; Lönnqvist, Jouko

    2007-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is highly heritable. Cognitive dysfunctions often observed in bipolar patients and their unaffected relatives implicate that these impairments may be associated with genetic predisposition to bipolar disorder and thus fulfill the criteria of a valid endophenotype for the disorder. However, the most fundamental criterion, their heritability, has not been directly studied in any bipolar population. This population-based study estimated the heritability of cognitive functions in bipolar disorder. A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV were administered to a population-based sample of 110 individuals from 52 families with bipolar disorder. Heritability of cognitive functions as assessed with neuropsychological test scores were estimated using the Solar package. Significant additive heritabilities were found in verbal ability, executive functioning, and psychomotor processing speed. Genetic contribution was low to verbal learning functions. High heritability, in executive functioning and psychomotor processing speed suggest that these may be valid endophenotypic traits for genetic studies of bipolar disorder.

  5. Unmet needs of bipolar disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Hajda, Miroslav; Prasko, Jan; Latalova, Klara; Hruby, Radovan; Ociskova, Marie; Holubova, Michaela; Kamaradova, Dana; Mainerova, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder (BD) is a serious mental illness with adverse impact on the lives of the patients and their caregivers. BD is associated with many limitations in personal and interpersonal functioning and restricts the patients’ ability to use their potential capabilities fully. Bipolar patients long to live meaningful lives, but this goal is hard to achieve for those with poor insight. With progress and humanization of society, the issue of patients’ needs became an important topic. The objective of the paper is to provide the up-to-date data on the unmet needs of BD patients and their caregivers. Methods A systematic computerized examination of MEDLINE publications from 1970 to 2015, via the keywords “bipolar disorder”, “mania”, “bipolar depression”, and “unmet needs”, was performed. Results Patients’ needs may differ in various stages of the disorder and may have different origin and goals. Thus, we divided them into five groups relating to their nature: those connected with symptoms, treatment, quality of life, family, and pharmacotherapy. We suggested several implications of these needs for pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. Conclusion Trying to follow patients’ needs may be a crucial point in the treatment of BD patients. However, many needs remain unmet due to both medical and social factors. PMID:27445475

  6. Genetic relationships between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and schizoaffective disorder.

    PubMed

    Cardno, Alastair G; Owen, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial evidence for partial overlap of genetic influences on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with family, twin, and adoption studies showing a genetic correlation between the disorders of around 0.6. Results of genome-wide association studies are consistent with commonly occurring genetic risk variants, contributing to both the shared and nonshared aspects, while studies of large, rare chromosomal structural variants, particularly copy number variants, show a stronger influence on schizophrenia than bipolar disorder to date. Schizoaffective disorder has been less investigated but shows substantial familial overlap with both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A twin analysis is consistent with genetic influences on schizoaffective episodes being entirely shared with genetic influences on schizophrenic and manic episodes, while association studies suggest the possibility of some relatively specific genetic influences on broadly defined schizoaffective disorder, bipolar subtype. Further insights into genetic relationships between these disorders are expected as studies continue to increase in sample size and in technical and analytical sophistication, information on phenotypes beyond clinical diagnoses are increasingly incorporated, and approaches such as next-generation sequencing identify additional types of genetic risk variant.

  7. The Neurobiology of Bipolar Disorder: An Integrated Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a heterogeneous condition with myriad clinical manifestations and many comorbidities leading to severe disabilities in the biopsychosocial realm. The objective of this review article was to underline recent advances in knowledge regarding the neurobiology of bipolar disorder. A further aim was to draw attention to new therapeutic targets in the treatment of bipolar disorder. To accomplish these goals, an electronic search was undertaken of the PubMed database in August 2015 of literature published during the last 10 years on the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. A wide-ranging evaluation of the existing work was done with search terms such as "mood disorders and biology," "bipolar disorder and HPA axis," "bipolar disorder and cytokines," "mood disorders and circadian rhythm," "bipolar disorder and oxidative stress," etc. This endeavor showed that bipolar disorder is a diverse condition sharing neurobiological mechanisms with major depressive disorder and psychotic spectrum disorders. There is convincing evidence of crosstalk between different biological systems that act in a deleterious manner causing expression of the disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Inflammatory mediators act in concert with oxidative stress to dysregulate hormonal, metabolic, and circadian homeostasis in precipitating and perpetuating the illness. Stress, whether biologically or psychologically mediated, is responsible for the initiation and progression of the diathesis. Bipolar spectrum disorders have a strong genetic component; severe life stresses acting through various paths cause the illness phenotype. PMID:26865997

  8. The Neurobiology of Bipolar Disorder: An Integrated Approach.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Ather

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a heterogeneous condition with myriad clinical manifestations and many comorbidities leading to severe disabilities in the biopsychosocial realm. The objective of this review article was to underline recent advances in knowledge regarding the neurobiology of bipolar disorder. A further aim was to draw attention to new therapeutic targets in the treatment of bipolar disorder. To accomplish these goals, an electronic search was undertaken of the PubMed database in August 2015 of literature published during the last 10 years on the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. A wide-ranging evaluation of the existing work was done with search terms such as "mood disorders and biology," "bipolar disorder and HPA axis," "bipolar disorder and cytokines," "mood disorders and circadian rhythm," "bipolar disorder and oxidative stress," etc. This endeavor showed that bipolar disorder is a diverse condition sharing neurobiological mechanisms with major depressive disorder and psychotic spectrum disorders. There is convincing evidence of crosstalk between different biological systems that act in a deleterious manner causing expression of the disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Inflammatory mediators act in concert with oxidative stress to dysregulate hormonal, metabolic, and circadian homeostasis in precipitating and perpetuating the illness. Stress, whether biologically or psychologically mediated, is responsible for the initiation and progression of the diathesis. Bipolar spectrum disorders have a strong genetic component; severe life stresses acting through various paths cause the illness phenotype.

  9. The Neurobiology of Bipolar Disorder: An Integrated Approach.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Ather

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a heterogeneous condition with myriad clinical manifestations and many comorbidities leading to severe disabilities in the biopsychosocial realm. The objective of this review article was to underline recent advances in knowledge regarding the neurobiology of bipolar disorder. A further aim was to draw attention to new therapeutic targets in the treatment of bipolar disorder. To accomplish these goals, an electronic search was undertaken of the PubMed database in August 2015 of literature published during the last 10 years on the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. A wide-ranging evaluation of the existing work was done with search terms such as "mood disorders and biology," "bipolar disorder and HPA axis," "bipolar disorder and cytokines," "mood disorders and circadian rhythm," "bipolar disorder and oxidative stress," etc. This endeavor showed that bipolar disorder is a diverse condition sharing neurobiological mechanisms with major depressive disorder and psychotic spectrum disorders. There is convincing evidence of crosstalk between different biological systems that act in a deleterious manner causing expression of the disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Inflammatory mediators act in concert with oxidative stress to dysregulate hormonal, metabolic, and circadian homeostasis in precipitating and perpetuating the illness. Stress, whether biologically or psychologically mediated, is responsible for the initiation and progression of the diathesis. Bipolar spectrum disorders have a strong genetic component; severe life stresses acting through various paths cause the illness phenotype. PMID:26865997

  10. Bipolar Disorder in Children: Implications for Speech-Language Pathologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quattlebaum, Patricia D.; Grier, Betsy C.; Klubnik, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, bipolar disorder is an increasingly common diagnosis in children, and these children can present with severe behavior problems and emotionality. Many studies have documented the frequent coexistence of behavior disorders and speech-language disorders. Like other children with behavior disorders, children with bipolar disorder…

  11. Systematic review of the prevalence of bipolar disorder and bipolar spectrum disorders in population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Dell'Aglio, José Caetano; Basso, Lissia Ana; Argimon, Irani Iracema de Lima; Arteche, Adriane

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of a systematic literature review aimed at providing an overview of the lifetime prevalence of bipolar disorder and bipolar spectrum disorders in population-based studies. Databases MEDLINE, ProQuest, Psychnet, and Web of Science were browsed for papers published in English between 1999 and May 2012 using the following search string: bipolar disorders OR bipolar spectrum disorders AND prevalence OR cross-sectional OR epidemiology AND population-based OR non-clinical OR community based. The search yielded a total of 434 papers, but only those published in peer-reviewed journals and with samples aged ≥ 18 years were included, resulting in a final sample of 18 papers. Results revealed rather heterogeneous findings concerning the prevalence of bipolar disorders and bipolar spectrum disorders. Lifetime prevalence of bipolar disorder ranged from 0.1 to 7.5%, whereas lifetime prevalence of bipolar spectrum disorders ranged from 2.4 to 15.1%. Differences in the rates of bipolar disorder and bipolar spectrum disorders may be related to the consideration of subthreshold criteria upon diagnosis. Differences in the prevalence of different subtypes of the disorder are discussed in light of diagnostic criteria and instruments applied.

  12. Systematic review of the prevalence of bipolar disorder and bipolar spectrum disorders in population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Dell'Aglio, José Caetano; Basso, Lissia Ana; Argimon, Irani Iracema de Lima; Arteche, Adriane

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of a systematic literature review aimed at providing an overview of the lifetime prevalence of bipolar disorder and bipolar spectrum disorders in population-based studies. Databases MEDLINE, ProQuest, Psychnet, and Web of Science were browsed for papers published in English between 1999 and May 2012 using the following search string: bipolar disorders OR bipolar spectrum disorders AND prevalence OR cross-sectional OR epidemiology AND population-based OR non-clinical OR community based. The search yielded a total of 434 papers, but only those published in peer-reviewed journals and with samples aged ≥ 18 years were included, resulting in a final sample of 18 papers. Results revealed rather heterogeneous findings concerning the prevalence of bipolar disorders and bipolar spectrum disorders. Lifetime prevalence of bipolar disorder ranged from 0.1 to 7.5%, whereas lifetime prevalence of bipolar spectrum disorders ranged from 2.4 to 15.1%. Differences in the rates of bipolar disorder and bipolar spectrum disorders may be related to the consideration of subthreshold criteria upon diagnosis. Differences in the prevalence of different subtypes of the disorder are discussed in light of diagnostic criteria and instruments applied. PMID:25923299

  13. Diagnostic features, prevalence, and impact of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Ketter, Terrence A

    2010-06-01

    Bipolar disorder shares depressive symptoms with unipolar major depressive disorder but is defined by episodes of mania or hypomania. Bipolar disorder in its broadest sense has a community lifetime prevalence of 4% and is a severely impairing illness that impacts several aspects of patients' lives. Race, ethnicity, and gender have no effect on prevalence rates, but women are more likely to experience rapid cycling, mixed states, depressive episodes, and bipolar II disorder than men. Patients with bipolar disorder have high rates of disability and higher rates of mortality than individuals without bipolar disorder. Natural causes such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as suicide and other "unnatural" causes are key contributors to the high mortality rate. The costs associated with bipolar disorder include not only the direct costs of treatment, but also the much greater indirect costs of decreased productivity, excess unemployment, and excess mortality. PMID:20573324

  14. Historical Underpinnings of Bipolar Disorder Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Brittany L.; Brown, E. Sherwood; Croarkin, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Mood is the changing expression of emotion and can be described as a spectrum. The outermost ends of this spectrum highlight two states, the lowest low, melancholia, and the highest high, mania. These mood extremes have been documented repeatedly in human history, being first systematically described by Hippocrates. Nineteenth century contemporaries Falret and Baillarger described two forms of an extreme mood disorder, with the validity and accuracy of both debated. Regardless, the concept of a cycling mood disease was accepted before the end of the 19th century. Kraepelin then described “manic depressive insanity” and presented his description of a full spectrum of mood dysfunction which could be exhibited through single episodes of mania or depression or a complement of many episodes of each. It was this concept which was incorporated into the first DSM and carried out until DSM-III, in which the description of episodic mood dysfunction was used to build a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Criticism of this approach is explored through discussion of the bipolar spectrum concept and some recent examinations of the clinical validity of these DSM diagnoses are presented. The concept of bipolar disorder in children is also explored. PMID:27429010

  15. Historical Underpinnings of Bipolar Disorder Diagnostic Criteria.

    PubMed

    Mason, Brittany L; Brown, E Sherwood; Croarkin, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Mood is the changing expression of emotion and can be described as a spectrum. The outermost ends of this spectrum highlight two states, the lowest low, melancholia, and the highest high, mania. These mood extremes have been documented repeatedly in human history, being first systematically described by Hippocrates. Nineteenth century contemporaries Falret and Baillarger described two forms of an extreme mood disorder, with the validity and accuracy of both debated. Regardless, the concept of a cycling mood disease was accepted before the end of the 19th century. Kraepelin then described "manic depressive insanity" and presented his description of a full spectrum of mood dysfunction which could be exhibited through single episodes of mania or depression or a complement of many episodes of each. It was this concept which was incorporated into the first DSM and carried out until DSM-III, in which the description of episodic mood dysfunction was used to build a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Criticism of this approach is explored through discussion of the bipolar spectrum concept and some recent examinations of the clinical validity of these DSM diagnoses are presented. The concept of bipolar disorder in children is also explored.

  16. Historical Underpinnings of Bipolar Disorder Diagnostic Criteria.

    PubMed

    Mason, Brittany L; Brown, E Sherwood; Croarkin, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Mood is the changing expression of emotion and can be described as a spectrum. The outermost ends of this spectrum highlight two states, the lowest low, melancholia, and the highest high, mania. These mood extremes have been documented repeatedly in human history, being first systematically described by Hippocrates. Nineteenth century contemporaries Falret and Baillarger described two forms of an extreme mood disorder, with the validity and accuracy of both debated. Regardless, the concept of a cycling mood disease was accepted before the end of the 19th century. Kraepelin then described "manic depressive insanity" and presented his description of a full spectrum of mood dysfunction which could be exhibited through single episodes of mania or depression or a complement of many episodes of each. It was this concept which was incorporated into the first DSM and carried out until DSM-III, in which the description of episodic mood dysfunction was used to build a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Criticism of this approach is explored through discussion of the bipolar spectrum concept and some recent examinations of the clinical validity of these DSM diagnoses are presented. The concept of bipolar disorder in children is also explored. PMID:27429010

  17. [Confusing clinical presentations and differential diagnosis of bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Gorwood, P

    2004-01-01

    An early recognition of bipolar disorders may have an important impact on the prognosis of this disorder according to different mechanisms. Bipolar disorder is nevertheless not easy to detect, the diagnosis being correctly proposed after, in average more than a couple of Years and three different doctors assessments. A short delay before introducing the relevant treatment should help avoiding inappropriate treatments (prescribing, for example, neuroleptics for long periods, antidepressive drugs each time depressive symptoms occurs, absence of treatment despite mood disorders), with their associated negative impact such as mood-switching, rapid cycling or presence of chronic side-effects stigmates. Furthermore, non-treated mood disorders in bipolar disorder are longer, more stigmatizing and may be associated with an increased risk of suicidal behaviour and mortality. Lastly, compliance, an important factor regarding the long term prognosis of bipolar disorder, should be improved when there is a short delay between correct diagnosis and treatment and onset of the disorder. We therefore propose to review the literature for the different pitfalls involved in the diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Non-bipolar mood-disorders are frequently quoted as one of the alternative diagnosis. Hyperthymic temperament, side-effects of prescribed treatments and organic comorbid disorders may be involved. Bipolar disorders have a sex-ratio closer to 1 (men are thus more frequently of the bipolar type in mood-disorders), with earlier age at onset, and more frequent family history of suicidal attempts and bipolar disorder. Schizo-affective disorders are also a major concern regarding the diagnosis of bipolar disorder. This is explained by flat affects sometimes close to anhedonia, presence of a schizoïd personality in bipolar disorder, persecutive hostility that can be considered to be related to irritability rather than a schizophrenic symptom. Rapid cycling, mixed episodes and short

  18. [Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or bipolar disorder?].

    PubMed

    Da Fonseca, D; Adida, M; Belzeaux, R; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    The attention deficit disorder and the bipolar disorder maintain a complex relation. Indeed, these two syndromes share numerous symptoms that engender numerous diagnostic difficulties. According to several studies, it seems that these two disorders are really different with significant differences at the functional and anatomical level. However, there are common cognitive deficits as well as relatively frequent co-morbidity which is necessary to know in order to adjust the treatment.

  19. [Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or bipolar disorder?].

    PubMed

    Da Fonseca, D; Adida, M; Belzeaux, R; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    The attention deficit disorder and the bipolar disorder maintain a complex relation. Indeed, these two syndromes share numerous symptoms that engender numerous diagnostic difficulties. According to several studies, it seems that these two disorders are really different with significant differences at the functional and anatomical level. However, there are common cognitive deficits as well as relatively frequent co-morbidity which is necessary to know in order to adjust the treatment. PMID:25550235

  20. Bipolar disorder: Evidence for a major locus

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, M.A.; Flodman, P.L.; Sadovnick, A.D.; Ameli, H.

    1995-10-09

    Complex segregation analyses were conducted on families of bipolar I and bipolar II probands to delineate the mode of inheritance. The probands were ascertained from consecutive referrals to the Mood Disorder Service, University Hospital, University of British Columbia and diagnosed by DSM-III-R and Research Diagnostic Criteria. Data were available on over 1,500 first-degree relatives of the 186 Caucasian probands. The purpose of the analyses was to determine if, after correcting for age and birth cohort, there was evidence for a single major locus. Five models were fit to the data using the statistical package SAGE: (1) dominant, (2) recessive, (3) arbitrary mendelian inheritance, (4) environmental, and (5) no major effects. A single dominant, mendelian major locus was the best fitting of these models for the sample of bipolar I and II probands when only bipolar relatives were defined as affected (polygenic inheritance could not be tested). Adding recurrent major depression to the diagnosis {open_quotes}affected{close_quotes} for relatives reduced the evidence for a major locus effect. Our findings support the undertaking of linkage studies and are consistent with the analyses of the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Collaborative Study data by Rice et al. and Blangero and Elston. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. The birth of the bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Pichot, P

    1995-01-01

    The history of the description by Jean-Pierre Falret of circular insanity, the origin of our present day bipolar disorder, is presented as well as the claims of priority raised by his colleague Jules Baillarger. A detailed account is given of the long-lasting controversy which has often given rise to biased judgments about the respective roles of the two psychiatrists. It is shown that the clinical concept was an expression of Falret's views about the nature of mental disorders and that, through the influence these views had on future nosological systems, the apparently purely picturesque episode corresponds to a landmark in the history of psychiatry.

  2. Bipolar disorder dynamics: affective instabilities, relaxation oscillations and noise

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, John R.; Goodwin, Guy M.; Holmes, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic, recurrent mental illness characterized by extreme episodes of depressed and manic mood, interspersed with less severe but highly variable mood fluctuations. Here, we develop a novel mathematical approach for exploring the dynamics of bipolar disorder. We investigate how the dynamics of subjective experience of mood in bipolar disorder can be understood using a relaxation oscillator (RO) framework and test the model against mood time-series fluctuations from a set of individuals with bipolar disorder. We show that variable mood fluctuations in individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder can be driven by the coupled effects of deterministic dynamics (captured by ROs) and noise. Using a statistical likelihood-based approach, we show that, in general, mood dynamics are described by two independent ROs with differing levels of endogenous variability among individuals. We suggest that this sort of nonlinear approach to bipolar disorder has neurobiological, cognitive and clinical implications for understanding this mental illness through a mechacognitive framework. PMID:26577592

  3. Selecting appropriate treatments for maintenance therapy for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Long-term management of bipolar disorder is a crucial component of treatment because the recurrence of the illness negatively affects patients' daily lives and increases their risks for poor health and suicide. An ideal maintenance treatment for bipolar disorder is relatively simple to take, prevents recurrence of both manic and depressive episodes, and is well-tolerated over the long term. Although many different types of medications are used for maintenance therapy of bipolar disorder, none can be considered ideal for a majority of people with bipolar disorder, and each specific form of therapy has different strengths and limitations. Clinicians need to be aware of unique efficacy and side effect factors when choosing long-term therapy and consider treatment components, goals, and individual patient characteristics, which are essential to the successful long-term management of bipolar disorder. Additionally, several forms of psychotherapy specifically tailored to the needs of people with bipolar disorder should be considered as an adjunct to medication.

  4. A Review of MR Spectroscopy Studies of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, D.G.; Hellem, T.L.; Shi, X.-F.; Sung, Y.H.; Prescot, A.P.; Kim, T.S.; Huber, R.S.; Forrest, L.N.; Renshaw, P.F.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness whose pathophysiology is poorly understood and for which there is an urgent need for improved diagnosis and treatment. MR spectroscopy is a neuroimaging method capable of in vivo measurement of neurochemicals relevant to bipolar disorder neurobiology. MR spectroscopy studies of adult bipolar disorder provide consistent evidence for alterations in the glutamate system and mitochondrial function. In bipolar disorder, these 2 phenomena may be linked because 85% of glucose in the brain is consumed by glutamatergic neurotransmission and the conversion of glutamate to glutamine. The purpose of this article is to review the MR spectroscopic imaging literature in pediatric bipolar disorder, at-risk samples, and severe mood dysregulation, with a focus on the published findings that are relevant to glutamatergic and mitochondrial functioning. Potential directions for future MR spectroscopy studies of the glutamate system and mitochondrial dysfunction in pediatric bipolar disorder are discussed. PMID:24557702

  5. [Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or bipolar disorder in childhood?].

    PubMed

    Lazaratou, H

    2012-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is considered one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood, characterized by inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity. Even though a strict definition of this entity is constantly sought, ADHD is an often redefined and reconceptualized syndrome. Epidemiological studies show large differences in the incidence, pointing out that the effort of actual taxonomic systems to offer objective diagnostic criteria have not yielded substantial results. Bipolar Disorder (BD) with onset in childhood is distinguished from the adult form by the scarcity of affective symptoms. Very often, neither depressive mood, nor hypomanic euphoria are in the front line being covered by irritability with crises of violence. Children or adolescents have consecutive cycles, which include brief episodes of depressive, hypomanic, manic or mixed periods without free intervals. There was a delay in the recognition of this clinical picture. Τhe diagnostic criteria in the actual taxonomic systems are not separated from those of adults and according to some studies the disorder is under diagnosed mainly in European countries. The contemporary literature deals largely with the relationship ADHD - BD in young people because the two disorders share the same clinical picture with slight variations. Τhe differential diagnosis in favor of BD is mainly based on the presence of affective disorders in the family. The main questions raised are whether there is comorbidity, whether ADHD is overdiagnosed against BD or whether ADHD represents a prodromal manifestation of early onset BD. Children with comorbid ADHD and BD tend to express mostly a stimulant phenotype with a chronic course and have higher rates of antisocial conduct disorder. This particular phenotype suggests a symptomatic continuum between ADHD and early onset BD which is possibly responsible for the difficulties met in differential diagnosis and differences in the rates of

  6. Frontotemporal dementia mimicking bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, Andrew H; Schroeder, Ryan W; Baade, Lyle E; Lincoln, Janka; Khan, Ahsan Y

    2013-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is a cause of behavioral disturbance that usually appears in individuals between 45 and 65 years of age. The authors present the case of a 65-year-old patient that illustrates how frontotemporal dementia can be misdiagnosed based on a behavioral pattern that suggests the presence of a primary mood disorder. Early accurate diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia and subsequent supportive measures can allow patients and families to make important decisions about business and legal affairs and how to spend remaining leisure time in the most meaningful and enjoyable way possible.

  7. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Evidence for Prodromal States and Early Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luby, Joan L.; Navsaria, Neha

    2010-01-01

    Background: Childhood bipolar disorder remains a controversial but increasingly diagnosed disorder that is associated with significant impairment, chronic course and treatment resistance. Therefore, the search for prodromes or early markers of risk for later childhood bipolar disorder may be of great importance for prevention and/or early…

  8. Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder: a systematic review of prevalence and incidence rates, risk factors, and targeted interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Marta; Galling, Britta; Correll, Christoph U

    2013-01-01

    Objective Pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) is associated with poor outcomes, including suicidal ideation (SI) and suicide attempt (SA). However, frequencies and risk factors of SI/SA and targeted intervention trials for SI/SA in PBD have not been reviewed systematically. Methods We conducted a systematic PubMed review, searching for articles reporting on prevalences/incidences, correlates and intervention studies targeting SI/SA in PBD. Weighted means were calculated, followed by an exploratory meta-regression of SI and SA correlates. Results Fourteen studies (n = 1,595) with 52.1% males aged 14.4 years reported data on SI/SA prevalence (N = 13, n = 1,508) and/or correlates (N = 10, n = 1,348) in PBD. Weighted mean prevalences were: past SI = 57.4%, past SA = 21.3%, current SI = 50.4%, and current SA = 25.5%; incidences (mean: 42 months follow-up were: SI = 14.6% and SA = 14.7%. Regarding significant correlates, SI (N = 3) was associated with a higher percentage of Caucasian race, narrow (as opposed to broad) PBD phenotype, younger age, and higher quality of life than SA. Significant correlates of SA (N = 10) included female gender, older age, earlier illness onset, more severe/episodic PBD, mixed episodes, comorbid disorders, past self-injurious behavior/SI/SA, physical/sexual abuse, parental depression, family history of suicidality, and poor family functioning. Race, socioeconomic status, living situation, and life events were not clearly associated with SA. In a meta-regression analysis, bipolar I disorder and comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder were significantly associated with SA. Only one open label study targeting the reduction of SI/SA in PBD was identified. Conclusions SI and SA are highly common but under-investigated in PBD. Exploration of predictors and protective factors is imperative for the establishment of effective preventive and intervention strategies, which are urgently needed. PMID:23829436

  9. [Bipolar disorder and psychoanalytical concepts of depression and mania].

    PubMed

    Solimano, Alberto; Manfredi, Clelia

    2006-01-01

    The categorical diagnostic model of bipolar disorders (DSM IV) has brought about increasing questioning, since its use gains troubles related not only to clinical experience, but to epidemiological studies as well. Regarding this, other models have emerged, such as the bipolar spectrum by Akiskal that covers the classic bipolar disorder on one side to unipolar disorder on the other, including soft bipolar disorders as well. The authors start from this notion of bipolar spectrum to set out the relationship between bipolar disease and psychoanalytical concepts of depression and mania. They develop Freud's basic theories and those of the British School that constitute a strong and coherent theoretical structure. Psychoanalysis proposes a unitary psychopathological model that manifests itself as depression or maniac reaction as secondary defense, to account for both the clinical expression and the psychodynamic comprehension of mood disorders.

  10. The relationship of major depressive disorder to bipolar disorder: continuous or discontinuous?

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Franco

    2005-12-01

    Recent studies have questioned current diagnostic systems that split mood disorders into the independent categories of bipolar disorders and depressive disorders. The current classification of mood disorders runs against Kraepelin's unitary view of manic-depressive insanity (illness). The main findings of recent studies supporting a continuity between bipolar disorders (mainly bipolar II disorder) and major depressive disorder are presented. The features supporting a continuity between bipolar II disorder and major depressive disorder currently are 1) depressive mixed states (mixed depression) and dysphoric (mixed) hypomania (opposite polarity symptoms in the same episode do not support a splitting of mood disorders); 2) family history (major depressive disorder is the most common mood disorder in relatives of bipolar probands); 3) lack of points of rarity between the depressive syndromes of bipolar II disorder and major depressive disorder; 4) major depressive disorder with bipolar features such as depressive mixed states, young onset age, atypical features, bipolar family history, irritability, racing thoughts, and psychomotor agitation; 5) a high proportion of major depressive disorders shifting to bipolar disorders during long-term follow-up; 6) a high proportion of major depressive disorders with history of manic and hypomanic symptoms; 7) factors of hypomania present in major depressive disorder episodes; 8) recurrent course of major depressive disorder; and 9) depressive symptoms much more common than manic and hypomanic symptoms in the course of bipolar disorders.

  11. Does Borderline Personality Disorder Manifest Itself Differently in Patients With Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder?

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Morgan, Theresa A; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy; Walsh, Emily

    2015-12-01

    Perugi and colleagues (2013) recently reported that some features of borderline personality disorder (BPD) significantly predicted a diagnosis of bipolar disorder among depressed patients. They interpreted these findings as indicating that some BPD criteria are nonspecific and are indicators of bipolar disorder rather than BPD, whereas other criteria are more specific to BPD. In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project, the authors tested the hypothesis that BPD presents itself differently in psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder. The authors found that the patients with bipolar disorder were significantly more likely to report impulsive behavior and transient dissociation. No criterion was significantly more common in the BPD patients with MDD. The authors therefore do not consider the BPD criteria to be nonspecific with regard to the distinction between BPD and bipolar disorder.

  12. Genetic susceptibility for bipolar disorder and response to antidepressants in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tansey, Katherine E; Guipponi, Michel; Domenici, Enrico; Lewis, Glyn; Malafosse, Alain; O'Donovan, Michael; Wendland, Jens R; Lewis, Cathryn M; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    The high heterogeneity of response to antidepressant treatment in major depressive disorder (MDD) makes individual treatment outcomes currently unpredictable. It has been suggested that resistance to antidepressant treatment might be due to undiagnosed bipolar disorder or bipolar spectrum features. Here, we investigate the relationship between genetic susceptibility for bipolar disorder and response to treatment with antidepressants in MDD. Polygenic scores indexing risk for bipolar disorder were derived from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Bipolar Disorder whole genome association study. Linear regressions tested the effect of polygenic risk scores for bipolar disorder on proportional reduction in depression severity in two large samples of individuals with MDD, treated with antidepressants, NEWMEDS (n=1,791) and STAR*D (n=1,107). There was no significant association between polygenic scores for bipolar disorder and response to treatment with antidepressants. Our data indicate that molecular measure of genetic susceptibility to bipolar disorder does not aid in understanding non-response to antidepressants.

  13. The structural neuroimaging of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Emsell, Louise; McDonald, Colm

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing body of literature fuelled by advances in high-resolution structural MRI acquisition and image processing techniques which implicates subtle neuroanatomical abnormalities in the aetiopathogenesis of bipolar disorder. This account reviews the main findings from structural neuroimaging research into regional brain abnormalities, the impact of genetic liability and mood stabilizing medication on brain structure in bipolar disorder, and the overlapping structural deviations found in the allied disorders of schizophrenia and depression. The manifold challenges extant within neuroimaging research are highlighted with accompanying recommendations for future studies. The most consistent findings include preservation of total cerebral volume with regional grey and white matter structural changes in prefrontal, midline and anterior limbic networks, non-contingent ventriculomegaly and increased rates of white matter hyperintensities, with more pronounced deficits in juveniles suffering from the illness. There is increasing evidence that medication has observable effects on brain structure, whereby lithium status is associated with volumetric increase in the medial temporal lobe and anterior cingulate gyrus. However, research continues to be confounded by the use of highly heterogeneous methodology and clinical populations, in studies employing small scale, low-powered, cross-sectional designs. Future work should investigate larger, clinically homogenous groups of patients and unaffected relatives, combining both categorical and dimensional approaches to illness classification in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs in order to elucidate trait versus state mechanisms, genetic effects and medication/illness progression effects over time. PMID:20374145

  14. White-matter microstructure and gray-matter volumes in adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Paillère Martinot, M-L; Lemaitre, H; Artiges, E; Miranda, R; Goodman, R; Penttilä, J; Struve, M; Fadai, T; Kappel, V; Poustka, L; Conrod, P; Banaschewski, T; Barbot, A; Barker, G J; Büchel, C; Flor, H; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Heinz, A; Ittermann, B; Lawrence, C; Loth, E; Mann, K; Paus, T; Pausova, Z; Rietschel, M; Robbins, T W; Smolka, M N; Schumann, G; Martinot, J-L; L, Reed; S, Williams; A, Lourdusamy; S, Costafreda; A, Cattrell; C, Nymberg; L, Topper; L, Smith; S, Havatzias; K, Stueber; C, Mallik; TK, Clarke; D, Stacey; Wong C, Peng; H, Werts; S, Williams; C, Andrew; S, Desrivieres; S, Zewdie; I, Häke; N, Ivanov; A, Klär; J, Reuter; C, Palafox; C, Hohmann; C, Schilling; K, Lüdemann; A, Romanowski; A, Ströhle; E, Wolff; M, Rapp; R, Brühl; A, Ihlenfeld; B, Walaszek; F, Schubert; C, Connolly; J, Jones; E, Lalor; E, McCabe; A, Ní Shiothcháin; R, Whelan; R, Spanagel; F, Leonardi-Essmann; W, Sommer; S, Vollstaedt-Klein; F, Nees; S, Steiner; M, Buehler; E, Stolzenburg; C, Schmal; F, Schirmbeck; P, Gowland; N, Heym; C, Newman; T, Huebner; S, Ripke; E, Mennigen; K, Muller; V, Ziesch; C, Büchel; U, Bromberg; L, Lueken; J, Yacubian; J, Finsterbusch; N, Bordas; S, de Bournonville; Z, Bricaud; Briand F, Gollier; J, Massicotte; JB, Poline; H, Vulser; Y, Schwartz; C, Lalanne; V, Frouin; B, Thyreau; J, Dalley; A, Mar; N, Subramaniam; D, Theobald; N, Richmond; M, de Rover; A, Molander; E, Jordan; E, Robinson; L, Hipolata; M, Moreno; M, Arroyo; D, Stephens; T, Ripley; H, Crombag; Y, Pena; M, Lathrop; D, Zelenika; S, Heath; D, Lanzerath; B, Heinrichs; T, Spranger; B, Fuchs; C, Speiser; F, Resch; J, Haffner; P, Parzer; R, Brunner; A, Klaassen; I, Klaassen; P, Constant; X, Mignon; T, Thomsen; S, Zysset; A, Vestboe; J, Ireland; J, Rogers

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in white-matter (WM) microstructure, as lower fractional anisotropy (FA), have been reported in adolescent-onset bipolar disorder and in youth at familial risk for bipolarity. We sought to determine whether healthy adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms (SBP) would have early WM microstructural alterations and whether those alterations would be associated with differences in gray-matter (GM) volumes. Forty-two adolescents with three core manic symptoms and no psychiatric diagnosis, and 126 adolescents matched by age and sex, with no psychiatric diagnosis or symptoms, were identified after screening the IMAGEN database of 2223 young adolescents recruited from the general population. After image quality control, voxel-wise statistics were performed on the diffusion parameters using tract-based spatial statistics in 25 SBP adolescents and 77 controls, and on GM and WM images using voxel-based morphometry in 30 SBP adolescents and 106 controls. As compared with healthy controls, adolescents with SBP displayed lower FA values in a number of WM tracts, particularly in the corpus callosum, cingulum, bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, uncinate fasciculi and corticospinal tracts. Radial diffusivity was mainly higher in posterior parts of bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi and right cingulum. As compared with controls, SBP adolescents had lower GM volume in the left anterior cingulate region. This is the first study to investigate WM microstructure and GM morphometric variations in adolescents with SBP. The widespread FA alterations in association and projection tracts, associated with GM changes in regions involved in mood disorders, suggest altered structural connectivity in those adolescents. PMID:23628983

  15. Pharmacological Management of Bipolar Disorder in a Youth with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelBello, Melissa P.; Correll, Christoph U.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Carlson, Harold E.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, four clinicians respond to the following case vignette: A 12-year-old girl with insulin-dependent diabetes presents for treatment of her newly diagnosed bipolar disorder. How would you address the bipolar disorder pharmacologically, and how would the presence of diabetes affect your selection of medication and clinical management?

  16. Current issues: women and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Marangell, Lauren B.

    2008-01-01

    While the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) is typically complex, the treatment of women with bipolar disorder is even more challenging because clinicians must also individualize treatment based on the potential for pregnancy, drug interactions with oral contraceptives, and an increased risk of endocrine diseases that can either impact the course of illness or become manifest with some treatments. Women with BD should be checked for hypothyroidism, and if prescribed antidepressants, carefully watched for rapid cycling or a mood switch to mania, hypomania, or a mixed state. Several medications interact with oral contraceptives or increase the risk of developing polycystic ovary syndrome. Consideration of possible pregnancy is essential, and should be planned in advance whenever possible. Rates of recurrence have been shown to be equal in pregnant and nonpregnant women with BD. Risks of medication to the fetus at various points of development must be balanced against the risks of not treating, which is also detrimental to both fetus and mother. The postpartum period is a time of especially high risk; as many as 40% to 67% of women with BD report experiencing a postpartum mania or depression. The decision to breastfeed must also take into account the adverse impact of sleep deprivation in triggering mood episodes. In order to best address these issues, clinicians must be familiar with the data and collaborate with the patient to assess risks and benefits for the individual women and her family. PMID:18689292

  17. A linkage study of bipolar disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsoe, J.R.; Sadovnick, A.D.; Remick, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    We are currently surveying the genome with polymorphic DNA markers in search of loci linked to bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness) in three populations: 20 families (175 subjects) from the general North American population from San Diego (UCSD) and Vancouver (UBC); 3 Icelandic families (55 subjects); and an Old Order Amish pedigree 110 (118 subjects). Over 50 markers on chromosomes 1, 2, 5, 11, 17, 18, 20 and 21 have been examined. All markers have been tested in the Amish and Icelandic families, and a portion of them in the UCSD/UBC families, which we have only recently begun genotyping. The following candidate genes have been examined: {beta}-TSH, dopamine transporter (HDAT), {beta}2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2), glucocorticoid type II receptor (GRL), D2 dopamine receptor, serotonin transporter (HSERT), and G{alpha}s G protein subunit (GNAS1). Linkage analysis was conducted using an autosomal dominant model with age-dependent reduced penetrance. Subjects with bipolar, schizoaffective, or recurrent major depressive disorders were considered affected. No significant evidence for linkage was obtained. Mildly positive lods ranging between 1.1 and 1.6 were obtained for three loci: D11S29, HDAT, and GRL.

  18. Neuropsychological evidence of impaired cognitive empathy in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Shamay-Tsoory, Simone; Harari, Hagai; Szepsenwol, Ohad; Levkovitz, Yechiel

    2009-01-01

    The empathic abilities have never been examined in bipolar disorder patients, despite frequent observations of impaired social behavior. To examine the neuropsychological processes that underlie the affective and cognitive empathic ability in bipolar disorder, the authors compared affective and cognitive empathic abilities, as well as theory of mind and executive functions, of euthymic bipolar disorder patients and healthy comparison subjects. Significant deficits in cognitive empathy and theory of mind were observed, while affective empathy was elevated in bipolar disorder. Patients showed impaired cognitive flexibility (shifting and reversal learning) but intact planning behavior. Impaired cognitive empathy was related with performance in neurocognitive tasks of cognitive flexibility, suggesting that prefrontal cortical dysfunction may account for impaired cognitive empathy in bipolar disorder. PMID:19359453

  19. Risk factors for suicide among children and youths with bipolar spectrum and early bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Rajewska-Rager, Aleksandra; Sibilski, Piotr; Lepczyńska, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    In recent years much attention has been given to determine risk factors for suicide among adults with bipolar disorder. Such studies concerning children and youths, which would also take into account the specificity of the developmental age, are still too few. The ability to identify risk factors for children and youths with mood disorders, as well as the possibility to monitor them, is an essential element in preventing suicidal behaviours. Previous studies have clearly indicated that in the group of patients with an early onset of the bipolar disorder the occurrence of suicidal thoughts and intentions were significantly increased. Identifying the risk of suicide is hindered further by the complexity of the phenomenon, which is a compound interaction of various factors: biological, environmental, sociological, psychological and clinical. This is especially true with young adults suffering from mental illness and presenting a number of other psychopathological symptoms. The following paper introduces and reviews the results of current studies, which analysed the risk factors for suicide among children and youths with bipolar spectrum or already diagnosed with bipolar disorder. For this purpose we conducted the overview of recent years literature available in PubMed/MEDLINE database, including the following search criteria: early onset bipolar disorder, bipolar disorder in children and young people, the spectrum of bipolar disorder, and suicidal ideation, suicidal intent, suicide.

  20. Shared Genetic Factors Influence Risk for Bipolar Disorder and Alcohol Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carmiol, Nasdia; Peralta, Juan M; Almasy, Laura; Contreras, Javier; Pacheco, Adriana; Escamilla, Michael A; Knowles, Emma E; Raventós, Henriette; Glahn, David C

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder and alcohol use disorder (AUD) have a high rate of comorbidity, more than 50% of individuals with bipolar disorder also receive a diagnosis of AUD in their lifetimes. Although both disorders are heritable, it is unclear if the same genetic factors mediate risk for bipolar disorder and AUD. We examined 733 Costa Rican individuals from 61 bipolar pedigrees. Based on a best-estimate process, 32% of the sample met criteria for bipolar disorder, 17% had a lifetime AUD diagnosis, 32% met criteria for lifetime nicotine dependence, and 21% had an anxiety disorder. AUD, nicotine dependence and anxiety disorders were relatively more common among individuals with bipolar disorder than in their non-bipolar relatives. All illnesses were shown to be heritable and bipolar disorder was genetically correlated with AUD, nicotine dependence and anxiety disorders. The genetic correlation between bipolar and AUD remained when controlling for anxiety, suggesting that unique genetic factors influence risk for comorbid bipolar and AUD independent of anxiety. Our findings provide evidence for shared genetic effects on bipolar disorder and AUD risk. Demonstrating that common genetic factors influence these independent diagnostic constructs could help to refine our diagnostic nosology. PMID:24321773

  1. [Disease mongering and bipolar disorder in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    ,600 in 2003. At the same time, antidepressant sales have sextupled, from\\14.5 billion in 1998 to\\87 billion in 2006, according to statistics from GlaxoSmithKline. Recently, the pharmaceutical industry has shifted its focus from depression to bipolar disorder. Historically, Japanese psychiatrists have been familiar with Emil Kraepelin's "manic depressive insanity" (1899), whose definition was much narrower than that of its contemporary counterpart, bipolar disorder. Thus far, perhaps due partly to the reference in Kraepelin's definition of "manic depressive" disorder, Japanese psychiatrists have rather conservatively prescribed mood stabilizers for persons with frequent mood swings. Japanese psychiatrists can learn a great deal from their experience with the aggressive marketing of antidepressants. In the case of depression, over-medication arguably did more harm than good. The same risk exists with bipolar disorder. Disease mongering may occur whenever the interests of a pharmaceutical company exceed the expected benefits from the proposed pharmacotherapy on those affected by the putative bipolar disorder. In cases that are not severe enough for aggressive medication, psychiatrists should propose natural alternatives, such as an alteration of lifestyle and psychotherapy.

  2. Subcortical Gray Matter Volume Abnormalities in Healthy Bipolar Offspring: Potential Neuroanatomical Risk Marker for Bipolar Disorder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Nau, Sharon; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Kupfer, David J.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    A study is conducted to examine the extent to which bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with gray matter volume abnormalities in brain regions in healthy bipolar offspring relative to age-matched controls. Results show increased gray matter volume in the parahippocampus/hippocampus in healthy offspring at genetic risk for BD.

  3. Rapid-cycling bipolar disorder: cross-national community study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sing; Tsang, Adley; Kessler, Ronald C.; Jin, Robert; Sampson, Nancy; Andrade, Laura; Karam, Elie G.; Mora, Maria Elena Medina; Merikangas, Kathleen; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Popovici, Daniela Georgeta; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sagar, Rajesh; Wells, J. Elisabeth; Zarkov, Zahari; Petukhova, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in the community is largely unknown. Aims To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of rapid-cycling and non-rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in a large cross-national community sample. Method The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI version 3.0) was used to examine the prevalence, severity, comorbidity, impairment, suicidality, sociodemographics, childhood adversity and treatment of rapid-cycling and non-rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in ten countries (n = 54 257). Results The 12-month prevalence of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder was 0.3%. Roughly a third and two-fifths of participants with lifetime and 12-month bipolar disorder respectively met criteria for rapid cycling. Compared with the non-rapid-cycling, rapid-cycling bipolar disorder was associated with younger age at onset, higher persistence, more severe depressive symptoms, greater impairment from depressive symptoms, more out-of-role days from mania/hypomania, more anxiety disorders and an increased likelihood of using health services. Associations regarding childhood, family and other sociodemographic correlates were less clear cut. Conclusions The community epidemiological profile of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder confirms most but not all current clinically based knowledge about the illness. PMID:20194545

  4. Perturbed reward processing in pediatric bipolar disorder: an antisaccade study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Sven C; Ng, Pamela; Temple, Veronica; Hardin, Michael G; Pine, Daniel S; Leibenluft, Ellen; Ernst, Monique

    2010-12-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder is a severe and impairing illness. Characterizing the impact of pediatric bipolar disorder on cognitive function might aid in understanding the phenomenology of the disorder. While previous studies of pediatric bipolar disorder have reported deficits in cognitive control and reward behavior, little is understood about how affective processes influence behavioral control. Relative to prior studies using manual-response paradigms, eye movement tasks provide a more precise assessment of reward sensitivity and cognitive and motor control. The current study compares 20 youths with bipolar disorder (mean age = 13.9 years ± 2.22) and 23 healthy subjects (mean age = 13.8 years ± 2.49) on a mixed pro-antisaccade task with monetary incentives. On both types of saccades, participants were presented with three types of incentives: those where subjects can win money, lose money, or neither win nor lose money. Impaired reward processing was found in youths with bipolar disorder relative to controls, particularly on antisaccades. This difference was reflected in lower error rates during incentive trials in the control but not in the bipolar disorder group. By comparison, no group differences were found on prosaccade trials. The results provide further evidence for deficits in cognitive and reward processing in bipolar disorder. PMID:20080923

  5. Carbamazepine in Bipolar Disorder With Pain: Reviewing Treatment Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Austin; O’Connell, Christopher R.; Nallapula, Kishan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine if any monotherapy drug treatment has robust efficacy to treat comorbid bipolar disorder and chronic pain. Data Sources: The American Psychiatric Association (APA) treatment guidelines for bipolar mood disorder and the 2012 Cochrane database for pain disorders. Study Selection: We relied on the treatment guides to determine if the drugs that are APA guideline–supported to treat bipolar disorder have supporting data from the Cochrane database for chronic pain. Data Synthesis: No single drug was mentioned by either guideline to treat this comorbidity. However, carbamazepine was the only drug that has guideline-supported robust efficacy in the management of each condition separately. Conclusions: Carbamazepine was found to have strong preclinical data for the treatment of comorbid bipolar mood disorder and chronic pain disorders. While requiring more studies in this population, we propose that this treatment modality may benefit patients. PMID:25667814

  6. Bipolar disorder--underdiagnosis and HoNOS-PbR.

    PubMed

    Bongards, Eva Nora; Agius, Mark; Zaman, Rashid

    2013-09-01

    The effect of reassessing patients with depression and resistant depression in a CMHT caseload using the DSM IV criteria for bipolar I and bipolar II conditions inevitably leads to the diagnosis of more patients with bipolar disorder. This has an effect on the number of patients within the population of the CMHT who fall within the psychotic clusters of HONOS-PBR. This should effect the resources which will be allocated to deal with the patients in the team.

  7. Diagnosis, Epidemiology and Management of Mixed States in Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Fagiolini, Andrea; Coluccia, Anna; Maina, Giuseppe; Forgione, Rocco N; Goracci, Arianna; Cuomo, Alessandro; Young, Allan H

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 40% of patients with bipolar disorder experience mixed episodes, defined as a manic state with depressive features, or manic symptoms in a patient with bipolar depression. Compared with bipolar patients without mixed features, patients with bipolar mixed states generally have more severe symptomatology, more lifetime episodes of illness, worse clinical outcomes and higher rates of comorbidities, and thus present a significant clinical challenge. Most clinical trials have investigated second-generation neuroleptic monotherapy, monotherapy with anticonvulsants or lithium, combination therapy, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Neuroleptic drugs are often used alone or in combination with anticonvulsants or lithium for preventive treatment, and ECT is an effective treatment for mixed manic episodes in situations where medication fails or cannot be used. Common antidepressants have been shown to worsen mania symptoms during mixed episodes without necessarily improving depressive symptoms; thus, they are not recommended during mixed episodes. A greater understanding of pathophysiological processes in bipolar disorder is now required to provide a more accurate diagnosis and new personalised treatment approaches. Targeted, specific treatments developed through a greater understanding of bipolar disorder pathophysiology, capable of affecting the underlying disease processes, could well prove to be more effective, faster acting, and better tolerated than existing therapies, therefore providing better outcomes for individuals affected by bipolar disorder. Until such time as targeted agents are available, second-generation neuroleptics are emerging as the treatment of choice in the management of mixed states in bipolar disorder.

  8. Diagnosis, Epidemiology and Management of Mixed States in Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Fagiolini, Andrea; Coluccia, Anna; Maina, Giuseppe; Forgione, Rocco N; Goracci, Arianna; Cuomo, Alessandro; Young, Allan H

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 40% of patients with bipolar disorder experience mixed episodes, defined as a manic state with depressive features, or manic symptoms in a patient with bipolar depression. Compared with bipolar patients without mixed features, patients with bipolar mixed states generally have more severe symptomatology, more lifetime episodes of illness, worse clinical outcomes and higher rates of comorbidities, and thus present a significant clinical challenge. Most clinical trials have investigated second-generation neuroleptic monotherapy, monotherapy with anticonvulsants or lithium, combination therapy, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Neuroleptic drugs are often used alone or in combination with anticonvulsants or lithium for preventive treatment, and ECT is an effective treatment for mixed manic episodes in situations where medication fails or cannot be used. Common antidepressants have been shown to worsen mania symptoms during mixed episodes without necessarily improving depressive symptoms; thus, they are not recommended during mixed episodes. A greater understanding of pathophysiological processes in bipolar disorder is now required to provide a more accurate diagnosis and new personalised treatment approaches. Targeted, specific treatments developed through a greater understanding of bipolar disorder pathophysiology, capable of affecting the underlying disease processes, could well prove to be more effective, faster acting, and better tolerated than existing therapies, therefore providing better outcomes for individuals affected by bipolar disorder. Until such time as targeted agents are available, second-generation neuroleptics are emerging as the treatment of choice in the management of mixed states in bipolar disorder. PMID:26369921

  9. Treatment of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Jason J.; West, Amy E.; Heil, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim To review the diagnosis and the pharmacologic and psychosocial interventions for pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). Methods A comprehensive literature review of studies discussing the diagnosis and treatment of PBD was conducted. Results A context for understanding controversies and difficulties in the diagnosis of PBD is provided. An evidence-based assessment protocol for PBD is reviewed. The evidence for the following three categories of pharmacologic interventions are reviewed: Lithium, antiepileptics, and second generation antipsychotics. Algorithms for medication decisions are briefly reviewed. Existing psychosocial treatments and the evidence for those treatments are also reviewed. Conclusion Despite recent developments in understanding the phenomenology of PBD and in identifying pharmacologic and psychosocial interventions, critical gaps remain. PMID:21822352

  10. An exploration of testosterone levels in patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wooderson, Sarah C.; Gallagher, Peter; Watson, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Background Testosterone influences well-being, mood and cognition and may play a role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Aim To examine testosterone levels in patients with bipolar disorder compared with healthy controls. Method We examined baseline total testosterone levels and current depression scores in male and female patients with bipolar disorder and mild to moderate depression and healthy controls. Results A significant interaction between diagnosis and gender was observed (F(2,97)=9.791, P=0.002). Testosterone levels were significantly lower for male patients with bipolar disorder compared with male controls (P=0.001). Women with bipolar disorder had significantly higher testosterone levels than female controls (P=0.03). Conclusions Disturbances in testosterone levels may represent an important neurobiological abnormality in bipolar disorder and may differ by gender. If these findings are confirmed, the use of gender appropriate treatment strategies for the normalisation of testosterone levels in bipolar disorder depression should be further explored. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703738

  11. Risk Factors of Attempted Suicide in Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Suicide rates of bipolar patients are among the highest of any psychiatric disorder, and improved identification of risk factors for attempted and completed suicide translates into improved clinical outcome. Factors that may be predictive of suicidality in an exclusively bipolar population are examined. White race, family suicide history, and…

  12. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Knauz, Robert O.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the application of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to the treatment of rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Between 10% and 24% of bipolar patients experience a rapid cycling course, with 4 or more mood episodes occurring per year. Characterized by nonresponse to standard mood-stabilizing medications, rapid cyclers are…

  13. Borderline Personality Disorder in Transition Age Youth with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Shirley; Frazier, Elisabeth; Hower, Heather; Weinstock, Lauren M.; Topor, David R.; Hunt, Jeffrey; Goldstein, Tina R.; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Gill, Mary Kay; Ryan, Neal D.; Strober, Michael; Birmaher, Boris; Keller, Martin B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the longitudinal impact of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) on the course and outcome of Bipolar Disorder (BP) in a pediatric BP sample. Method Participants (N=271) and parents from the Course and Outcome of Bipolar Youth (COBY) study were administered structured clinical interviews and self-reports on average every 8.7 months over a mean of 93 months starting at age 13.0 +/- 3.1 years. The Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SIDP-IV) was administered at the first follow-up after age 18 to assess for symptoms of BPD. BPD operationalized at the disorder, factor, and symptom level, was examined as a predictor of poor clinical course of BP using all years of follow-up data. Results The number of BPD symptoms was significantly associated with poor clinical course of BP, above and beyond BP characteristics. Affective dysregulation was most strongly associated with poor course at the factor level; the individual symptoms most strongly associated with poor course were dissociation/stress-related paranoid ideation, impulsivity, and affective instability. Conclusions BPD severity adds significantly to the burden of BP illness and is significantly associated with a more chronic and severe course and outcome beyond what can be attributable to BP characteristics. PMID:25865120

  14. [Eczematous disorders in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Fölster-Holst, R

    2016-04-01

    Eczematous disorders in adolescence (definition WHO: the period between 10 and 20 years) are common and include mainly atopic dermatitis, contact eczema, and seborrheic dermatitis. They all share the similarity of inflammatory reactions which mainly affect the epidermis and can take a chronic course, depending on the underlying dermatosis. In the following article, the particularities of eczematous diseases in adolescents are discussed. PMID:26857132

  15. Identifying early indicators in bipolar disorder: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Benti, Liliane; Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Proudfoot, Judy; Parker, Gordon

    2014-06-01

    The identification of early markers has become a focus for early intervention in bipolar disorder. Using a retrospective, qualitative methodology, the present study compares the early experiences of participants with bipolar disorder to those with unipolar depression up until their first diagnosed episode. The study focuses on differences in early home and school environments as well as putative differences in personality characteristics between the two groups. Finally we a compare and contrast prodromal symptoms in these two populations. Thirty-nine participants, 20 diagnosed with unipolar depression and 19 diagnosed with bipolar disorder, took part in the study. A semi-structured interview was developed to elicit information about participants' experiences prior to their first episode. Participants with bipolar disorder reported disruptive home environments, driven personality features, greater emotion dysregulation and adverse experiences during the school years, whereas participants with depression tended to describe more supportive home environments, and more compliant and introvert personality traits. Retrospective data collection and no corroborative evidence from other family members. No distinction was made between bipolar I and bipolar II disorder nor between melancholic and non-melancholic depression in the sample. Finally the study spanned over a 12-month period which does not allow for the possibility of diagnostic reassignment of some of the bipolar participants to the unipolar condition. These findings indicate that there may be benefits in combining both proximal and distal indicators in identifying a bipolar disorder phenotype which, in turn, may be relevant to the development of early intervention programs for young people with bipolar disorder. PMID:24174009

  16. Eating Disorders in Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Shannon L.

    2004-01-01

    Research indicates that the primary onset of eating disorders occurs in adolescence and that there is a growing prevalence of adolescent males with eating disorders. This article describes the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa as they relate to adolescent males. Diagnostic criteria, at-risk groups, and implications for…

  17. Early Intervention in Bipolar Disorder, Part I

    PubMed Central

    Salvadore, Giacomo; Drevets, Wayne C.; Henter, Ioline D.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Manji, Husseini K.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of prevention is not new to psychiatry and has long been recognized in general medicine. Recent evidence has highlighted that early pharmacological and psychosocial treatment dramatically ameliorates poor prognosis and outcome for individuals with psychotic disorders, reducing conversion rates to full-blown illness and decreasing symptom severity. Nevertheless, despite the many recent advances in our thinking about early intervention, the need for early intervention in bipolar disorder (BPD) is an area that has been relatively neglected. This review attempts to synthesize what is currently known about early intervention in BPD. We discuss methodological issues pertaining to this topic, review clinical studies that focus on high-risk subjects as well as first-episode patients, and review findings from brain imaging studies in the offspring of individuals with BPD as well as in first-episode patients. A companion article discusses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of agents with neurotrophic and neuroplastic properties, with a particular emphasis on lithium and valproate. PMID:19649152

  18. Emotion regulation deficits in euthymic bipolar I versus bipolar II disorder: a functional and diffusion-tensor imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Caseras, Xavier; Murphy, Kevin; Lawrence, Natalia S; Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Watts, Jessica; Jones, Derek K; Phillips, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Emotion regulation deficits are a core feature of bipolar disorder. However, their potential neurobiological underpinnings and existence beyond bipolar I disorder remain unexplored. Our main goal was to investigate whether both individuals with bipolar I and bipolar II disorder show deficits in emotion regulation during an attention control task, and to explore the neurophysiological underpinnings of this potential deficit. Methods Twenty healthy controls, 16 euthymic participants with bipolar I disorder, and 19 euthymic participants with bipolar II disorder completed psychometric and clinical assessments, a neuroimaging emotion regulation paradigm, and an anatomical diffusion-weighted scan. Groups were matched for age, gender, and verbal IQ. Results During the presence of emotional distracters, subjects with bipolar I disorder showed slowed reaction times to targets, and increased blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses in the amygdala, accumbens, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, but not increased inverse functional connectivity between these prefrontal and subcortical areas, and altered white matter microstructure organization in the right uncinate fasciculus. Subjects with bipolar II disorder showed no altered reaction times, increased BOLD responses in the same brain areas, increased inverse functional connectivity between the prefrontal cortex and amygdala, and no abnormalities in white matter organization. Conclusions Participants with bipolar I disorder showed abnormalities in functional and anatomical connectivity between prefrontal cortices and subcortical structures in emotion regulation circuitry. However, these deficits did not extend to subjects with bipolar II disorder, suggesting fundamental differences in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder subtypes. PMID:25771686

  19. Anticonvulsant Drugs for Nerve Pain, Bipolar Disorder and Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    Anticonvulsant Drugs for Nerve Pain, Bipolar Disorder &Fibromyalgia: Choosing What’sRight for You What are anticonvulsant drugs? Anticonvulsants are drugs used to treat seizures. They are also used ...

  20. Connection between Genetic and Clinical Data in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mellerup, Erling; Andreassen, Ole; Bennike, Bente; Dam, Henrik; Durovic, Srdjan; Hansen, Thomas; Melle, Ingrid; Møller, Gert Lykke; Mors, Ole; Koefoed, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    Complex diseases may be associated with combinations of changes in DNA, where the single change has little impact alone. In a previous study of patients with bipolar disorder and controls combinations of SNP genotypes were analyzed, and four large clusters of combinations were found to be significantly associated with bipolar disorder. It has now been found that these clusters may be connected to clinical data. PMID:23028568

  1. Broadening the diagnosis of bipolar disorder: benefits vs. risks

    PubMed Central

    STRAKOWSKI, STEPHEN M.; FLECK, DAVID E.; MAJ, MARIO

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable debate over whether bipolar and related disorders that share common signs and symptoms, but are currently defined as distinct clinical entities in DSM-IV and ICD-10, may be better characterized as falling within a more broadly defined “bipolar spectrum”. With a spectrum view in mind, the possibility of broadening the diagnosis of bipolar disorder has been proposed. This paper discusses some of the rationale for an expanded diagnostic scheme from both clinical and research perspectives in light of potential drawbacks. The ultimate goal of broadening the diagnosis of bipolar disorder is to help identify a common etiopathogenesis for these conditions to better guide treatment. To help achieve this goal, bipolar researchers have increasingly expanded their patient populations to identify objective biological or endophenotypic markers that transcend phenomenological observation. Although this approach has and will likely continue to produce beneficial results, the upcoming DSM-IV and ICD-10 revisions will place increasing scrutiny on psychiatry’s diagnostic classification systems and pressure to re-evaluate our conceptions of bipolar disorder. However, until research findings can provide consistent and converging evidence as to the validity of a broader diagnostic conception, clinical expansion to a dimensional bipolar spectrum should be considered with caution. PMID:21991268

  2. The importance of anxiety states in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Goes, Fernando S

    2015-02-01

    Anxiety symptoms and syndromes are common in bipolar disorders, occurring in over half of all subjects with bipolar disorder type I. Despite methodological and diagnostic inconsistencies, most studies have shown a robust association between the presence of a broadly defined comorbid anxiety disorder and important indices of clinical morbidity in bipolar disorder, including a greater number of depressive episodes, worse treatment outcomes, and elevated risk of attempting suicide. Anxiety symptoms and/or syndromes often precede the onset of bipolar disorder and may represent a clinical phenotype of increased risk in subjects with prodromal symptoms. Although the causal relationship between anxiety and bipolar disorders remains unresolved, the multifactorial nature of most psychiatric phenotypes suggests that even with progress towards more biologically valid phenotypes, the "phenomenon" of comorbidity is likely to remain a clinical reality. Treatment studies of bipolar patients with comorbid anxiety have begun to provide preliminary evidence for the role of specific pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments, but these need to be confirmed in more definitive trials. Hence, there is an immediate need for further research to help guide assessment and help identify appropriate treatments for comorbid conditions.

  3. Prevalence, Clinical Presentation, and Differential Diagnosis of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Birmaher, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the past 20 years, the evidence regarding pediatric bipolar disorder (BP) has increased substantially. As a result, recent concerns have focused primarily on prevalence and differential diagnosis. Method Selective review of the literature. Results BP as defined by rigorously applying diagnostic criteria has been observed among children and especially adolescents in numerous countries. In contrast to increasing diagnoses in clinical settings, prevalence in epidemiologic studies has not recently changed. BP-spectrum conditions among youth are highly impairing and confer high risk for conversion to BP-I and BP-II. Compared to adults, youth with BP have more mixed symptoms, more changes in mood polarity, are more often symptomatic and seem to have worse prognosis. The course, clinical characteristics, and comorbidities of BP among children and adolescents are in many ways otherwise similar to those of adults with BP. Nonetheless, many youth with BP receive no treatment and most do not receive BP-specific treatment. Conclusion Despite increased evidence supporting the validity of pediatric BP, discrepancies between clinical and epidemiologic findings suggest that diagnostic misapplication may be common. Simultaneously, low rates of treatment of youth with BP suggest that withholding of BP diagnoses may also be common. Clinicians should apply diagnostic criteria rigorously in order to optimize diagnostic accuracy and ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:22652925

  4. Post-stroke emotional incontinence or bipolar disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Mnif, Leila; Sellami, Rim; Masmoudi, Jawaher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Post-stroke emotional incontinence and bipolar disorder are two disorders that involve the dysfunction of brain structures responsible for emotional regulation. The objective of this work is to study the links between these disorders through a clinical case. Case report We present the case of a 43-year-old man without previous psychiatric history who experienced emotional incontinence after cerebrovascular events. He reacted promptly to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment. However, he experienced his first episode of hypomania after 6 months of antidepressant therapy. Adjunctive therapy with valproic acid and low-dose paroxetine was eventually added, resulting in complete improvement of both emotional incontinence and hypomania after 4 additional months of treatment. Conclusion The clinician should carefully explore any history of premorbid bipolar disorder, personality disorder characterized by mood instability, and family history of bipolar disorder. PMID:27536109

  5. Bipolar disorder in general practice: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Piterman, Leon; Jones, Kay M; Castle, David J

    2010-08-16

    General practitioners are involved in the continuing care and shared care of patients with chronic mental illness, including bipolar disorder. Psychiatrists are particularly reliant on GPs to monitor and treat comorbidities as well as the psychiatric condition itself. Management of chronic mental illness is compromised by a number of factors, including problems with diagnosis, physical comorbidity, erratic attendance and poor compliance with treatment. Diagnosis of bipolar disorder is often delayed, and differential diagnoses to be considered include unipolar depression, anxiety disorder, drug and alcohol dependence, personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and general medical and central nervous system diseases. New Medicare items have been introduced under the Better Access to Mental Health Care initiative. However, uptake for patients with chronic psychiatric illness, including bipolar disorder, is low. Patients with bipolar disorder may be prone to a range of comorbid psychological, social and physical problems, and GPs need to be vigilant to detect and manage comorbidity and social problems as part of the overall plan. This includes assistance with certification for sickness and unemployment benefits. GPs may become involved during crises affecting patients and this may pose significant problems for GPs who need to provide ongoing care following patient discharge from hospital. Despite these difficulties, opportunities exist for GPs to play a vital and ongoing role in the management of patients with bipolar disorder. PMID:20712554

  6. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Erroneously Diagnosed and Treated as Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atmaca, Murad; Ozler, Sinan; Topuz, Mehtap; Goldstein, Sam

    2009-01-01

    Objective: There is a dearth of literature on patients erroneously diagnosed and treated for bipolar disorder. Method: The authors report a case of an adult with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder erroneously diagnosed and treated for bipolar disorder for 6 years. At that point, methylphenidate was initiated. The patient was judged to be a…

  7. The pharmacology of bipolar disorder during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Seetal; Berk, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Treating bipolar disorder in women during reproduction presents a significant challenge to the physician. The pharmaceutical agents most commonly used for treating bipolar disorder have been associated with adverse effects when used during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Of particular concern has been the association of lithium with cardiac malformations, and the association of carbamazepine and valproate with neural tube defects including spina bifida. Toxicity in neonates has also been reported for the most commonly used mood-stabilising agents. Treatment options for mood stabilisation are either associated with risks of adverse events, have been used less frequently and their associated risks are unknown, or may not provide effective prophylaxis against recurrences of bipolar episodes. However, strategies are available that minimise the risk to the fetus and infant whilst still providing effective prophylaxis against bipolar disorder in the mother. Ideally, a treatment regimen tailored to suit the individual should consider both mother and baby and should be planned prior to conception.

  8. Valuing happiness is associated with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Ford, Brett Q; Mauss, Iris B; Gruber, June

    2015-04-01

    Although people who experience happiness tend to have better psychological health, people who value happiness to an extreme tend to have worse psychological health, including more depression. We propose that the extreme valuing of happiness may be a general risk factor for mood disturbances, both depressive and manic. To test this hypothesis, we examined the relationship between the extreme valuing of happiness and risk for, diagnosis of, and illness course for bipolar disorder (BD). Supporting our hypothesis, the extreme valuing of happiness was associated with a measure of increased risk for developing BD (Studies 1 and 2), increased likelihood of past diagnosis of BD (Studies 2 and 3), and worse prospective illness course in BD (Study 3), even when controlling for current mood symptoms (Studies 1-3). These findings indicate that the extreme valuing of happiness is associated with and even predicts BD. Taken together with previous evidence, these findings suggest that the extreme valuing of happiness is a general risk factor for mood disturbances. More broadly, what emotions people strive to feel may play a critical role in psychological health.

  9. Cortical thinning in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Knöchel, Christian; Reuter, Johanna; Reinke, Britta; Stäblein, Michael; Marbach, Katharina; Feddern, Richard; Kuhlmann, Kristina; Alves, Gilberto; Prvulovic, David; Wenzler, Sofia; Linden, David E J; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola

    2016-04-01

    Although schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) share some clinical features such as psychotic symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions, little is known about possible pathophysiological similarities between both diseases. Therefore, we investigated the potential topographical overlap and segregation of cortical thickness abnormalities in SZ and BD patients. We analyzed 3D-anatomical magnetic resonance imaging datasets with the FreeSurfer 5.1.0 software to examine cortical thickness and volumes in three groups of participants: n=34 BD patients, n=32 SZ patients and n=38 healthy controls. We observed similar bilateral cortical thickness reductions in BD and SZ patients predominantly in the pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus and in the anterior and posterior cingulate. We also found disease-specific cortical reductions in the orbitofrontal cortex for BD patients and in dorsal frontal and temporal areas for SZ. Furthermore, inferior frontal gyrus cortical thinning was associated with deficits in psychomotor speed and executive functioning in SZ patients and with age at onset in both groups. Our findings support the hypothesis that thinning of the frontal cortex may represent a biological feature shared by both disease groups. The associations between cognitive deficits and the reported findings in SZ and to a lesser degree in BD patients add to the functional relevance of our results. However, further studies are needed to corroborate a model of shared pathophysiological disease features across BD and SZ. PMID:26876312

  10. Bipolar disorder: Functional neuroimaging markers in relatives.

    PubMed

    Piguet, Camille; Fodoulian, Leon; Aubry, Jean-Michel; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Houenou, Josselin

    2015-10-01

    Neural models of anatomical and functional alterations have been proposed for bipolar disorders (BD). However, studies in affected patients do not allow disentangling alterations linked to the liability to BD from those associated with the evolution, medication and comorbidities of BD. Explorations in high risk subjects allow the study of these risk markers. We reported and summarized all functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies focusing on first-degree relatives of BD patients. We found 29 studies reporting neural correlates of working memory (WM), emotional processing, executive functions and resting state in relatives of BD patients, compared to healthy subjects. Overall, the same regions that have been involved in patients, such as the inferior frontal gyrus and limbic areas, seem to be functionally altered in high-risk subjects. We conclude that the same brain regions already implicated in the pathophysiology of the disease such as the amygdala are also associated with the risk of BD. However longitudinal studies are required to understand their implication in the transition to BD.

  11. Copy number variation in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Green, EK; Rees, E; Walters, JTR; Smith, K-G; Forty, L; Grozeva, D; Moran, JL; Sklar, P; Ripke, S; Chambert, KD; Genovese, G; McCarroll, SA; Jones, I; Jones, L; Owen, MJ; O’Donovan, MC; Craddock, N; Kirov, G

    2016-01-01

    Large (>100 kb), rare (<1% in the population) copy number variants (CNVs) have been shown to confer risk for schizophrenia (SZ), but the findings for bipolar disorder (BD) are less clear. In a new BD sample from the United Kingdom (n = 2591), we have examined the occurrence of CNVs and compared this with previously reported samples of 6882 SZ and 8842 control subjects. When combined with previous data, we find evidence for a contribution to BD for three SZ-associated CNV loci: duplications at 1q21.1 (P = 0.022), deletions at 3q29 (P = 0.03) and duplications at 16p11.2 (P = 2.3 × 10−4). The latter survives multiple-testing correction for the number of recurrent large CNV loci in the genome. Genes in 20 regions (total of 55 genes) were enriched for rare exonic CNVs among BD cases, but none of these survives correction for multiple testing. Finally, our data provide strong support for the hypothesis of a lesser contribution of very large (>500 kb) CNVs in BD compared with SZ, most notably for deletions >1 Mb (P = 9 × 10−4). PMID:25560756

  12. Oppositional defiant disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adolescents, the following conditions can cause similar behavior problems and should be considered as possibilities: Anxiety disorders Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Bipolar disorder Depression Learning ...

  13. Elevated expectancies among persons diagnosed with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Eisner, Lori R.; Carver, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Students at risk for bipolar disorder endorse highly ambitious goals. This study examined expectations for the future among people with actual bipolar disorder, versus people with no history of mood disorder and persons with history of unipolar depression. Methods One hundred and three students were assessed for Axis I disorders and completed a measure of expected life outcomes. Results History of mania, but not history of depression, related to higher expectations of achieving popular fame and wealth. Conclusions People with history of mania anticipate great success in domains involving public recognition. PMID:19254445

  14. Impulsivity and risk taking in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Reddy, L Felice; Lee, Junghee; Davis, Michael C; Altshuler, Lori; Glahn, David C; Miklowitz, David J; Green, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Impulsive risk taking contributes to deleterious outcomes among clinical populations. Indeed, pathological impulsivity and risk taking are common in patients with serious mental illness, and have severe clinical repercussions including novelty seeking, response disinhibition, aggression, and substance abuse. Thus, the current study seeks to examine self-reported impulsivity (Barratt Impulsivity Scale) and performance-based behavioral risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task) in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Participants included 68 individuals with bipolar disorder, 38 with schizophrenia, and 36 healthy controls. Self-reported impulsivity was elevated in the bipolar group compared with schizophrenia patients and healthy controls, who did not differ from each other. On the risk-taking task, schizophrenia patients were significantly more risk averse than the bipolar patients and controls. Aside from the diagnostic group differences, there was a significant effect of antipsychotic (AP) medication within the bipolar group: bipolar patients taking AP medications were more risk averse than those not taking AP medications. This difference in risk taking because of AP medications was not explained by history of psychosis. Similarly, the differences in risk taking between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were not fully explained by AP effects. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:23963117

  15. The safety and effectiveness of open-label extended-release carbamazepine in the treatment of children and adolescents with bipolar I disorder suffering from a manic or mixed episode

    PubMed Central

    Findling, Robert L; Ginsberg, Lawrence D

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and effectiveness of open-label treatment with extended-release carbamazepine (ERC) in pediatric subjects suffering from bipolar I disorder. Method Medically healthy youths aged 10–17 years suffering from an acute manic or mixed episode were eligible. After screening for study eligibility, the youths began a 5-week titration period in which doses of ERC were adjusted in order to optimize benefit whilst minimizing adverse events, at doses between 200–1,200 mg/day. Thereafter, subjects could continue to receive treatment during a subsequent 21-week period. Safety measures included spontaneously reported adverse events (AEs) and laboratory assessments. The primary efficacy measure was the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). Results A total of 60 children (ages 10–12) and 97 adolescents (ages 13–17), with an overall average age of 13.4 years (standard deviation [SD] 2.0 years) received ERC. The mean duration of study participation was 109.6 days (SD 70.2 days), with 66 (42%) completing the entire study. At end of study participation (end point), the most prevalent dose of ERC was 1,200 mg: 31.7% of children and 24.7% of adolescents reached the 1,200 mg dose. The YMRS decreased from a mean of 28.6 (SD 6.2) at baseline to a mean of 13.8 (SD 9.4) (P<0.0001) at end point. A total of 26 subjects discontinued study participation because of AEs, the most common of which were rash (n=6), white blood cell count decreased (n=5), nausea (n=3), and vomiting (n=3). No deaths were reported. The most commonly reported AEs were headache (n=41), somnolence (n=30), nausea (n=22), dizziness (n=21), and fatigue (n=19). Conclusions Open-label administration of ERC might be a safe and effective intervention in this subject population. More definitive studies are warranted. PMID:25210452

  16. [Dementia and bipolar disorder on the borderline of old age].

    PubMed

    Kontis, D; Theochari, I; Tsalta, E

    2013-01-01

    Dementia and bipolar disorder have been traditionally considered two separate clinical entities. However, recent preclinical and clinical data in elderly people suggest that they are in fact related. Several theories have been put forward to interpret their relationship which could be summed up as follows: (1) Dementia could increase the risk for the emergence of bipolar symptoms, or (2) conversely, bipolar disorder might be associated with heightened risk for developing pseudodementia or dementia. (3) Alternatively, dementia, other brain diseases or drugs affecting brain function could lead to the combination of symptoms of dementia and bipolar disorder in elderly individuals. The two disorders demonstrate similarities with respect to their clinical expression (agitation, psychotic, mood and cognitive symptoms) and structural brain neuroimaging (enlarged lateral ventricles and white matter hyperintensities using magnetic resonance imaging-MRI). Despite the above similarities, the two disorders also have important differences. As expected, cognitive symptoms prevail in dementia and mood symptoms in bipolar disorder. In dementia but not in bipolar disorder there is evidence that brain structural abnormalities are diffuse and hippocampal volumes are smaller. Dementia and bipolar disorder present different abnormalities in functional brain neuroimaging. The pattern of "ventral" hyperactivity and "dorsal" hypoactivity in brain emotional circuits at rest is revealed in bipolar disorder but not dementia. With respect to their treatment, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are indicated against cognitive symptoms in dementia and also improve behavioural and psychological symptoms appearing during the course of dementia. Lithium, anticonvulsants, antipsychotics and antidepressants are effective in the management of the acute episodes of bipolar disorder of younger adults, but there are not yet evidence-based data in elderly bipolar patients. It is likely that the

  17. Neuroimaging findings in late-onset schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Changtae; Lim, Hyun Kook; Lee, Chang Uk

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in late-onset mental disorders. Among them, geriatric schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are significant health care risks and major causes of disability. We discussed whether late-onset schizophrenia (LOS) and late-onset bipolar (LOB) disorder can be a separate entity from early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) and early-onset bipolar (EOB) disorder in a subset of late-life schizophrenia or late-life bipolar disorder through neuroimaging studies. A literature search for imaging studies of LOS or LOB was performed in the PubMed database. Search terms used were "(imaging OR MRI OR CT OR SPECT OR DTI OR PET OR fMRI) AND (schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) AND late onset." Articles that were published in English before October 2013 were included. There were a few neuroimaging studies assessing whether LOS and LOB had different disease-specific neural substrates compared with EOS and EOB. These researches mainly observed volumetric differences in specific brain regions, white matter hyperintensities, diffusion tensor imaging, or functional neuroimaging to explore the differences between LOS and LOB and EOS and EOB. The aim of this review was to highlight the neural substrates involved in LOS and LOB through neuroimaging studies. The exploration of neuroanatomical markers may be the key to the understanding of underlying neurobiology in LOS and LOB. PMID:24401535

  18. Update on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: focus on cariprazine

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rona Jeannie; Findlay, Lillian Jan; El-Mallakh, Peggy L; El-Mallakh, Rif S

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are severe psychiatric disorders that are frequently associated with persistent symptoms and significant dysfunction. While there are a multitude of psychopharmacologic agents are available for treatment of these illnesses, suboptimal response and significant adverse consequences limit their utility. Cariprazine is a new, novel antipsychotic medication with dopamine D2 and D3 partial agonist effects. Its safety and efficacy have been investigated in acute psychosis of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, and unipolar depression. Efficacy has been demonstrated in schizophrenia and mania. It is unclear if cariprazine is effective in depression associated with unipolar or bipolar illness. Adverse consequences include extrapyramidal symptoms including akathisia, and various gastrointestinal symptoms. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently approved cariprazine. This review will provide clinicians with basic information regarding the research program of cariprazine. PMID:27524901

  19. Decision making in bipolar disorder: a cognitive modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Yechiam, Eldad; Hayden, Elizabeth P; Bodkins, Misty; O'Donnell, Brian F; Hetrick, William P

    2008-11-30

    A formal modeling approach was used to characterize decision-making processes in bipolar disorder. Decision making was examined in 28 bipolar patients (14 acute and 14 remitted) and 25 controls using the Iowa Gambling Task (Bechara et al., 1994), a decision-making task used for assessing cognitive impulsivity. To disentangle motivational and cognitive aspects of decision-making processes, we applied a formal cognitive model to the performance on the Iowa Gambling Task. The model has three parameters: The relative impact of rewards and punishments on evaluations, the impact of recent and past payoffs, and the degree of choice consistency. The results indicated that acute bipolar patients were characterized by low choice consistency, or a tendency to make erratic choices. Low choice consistency improved the prediction of acute bipolar disorder beyond that provided by cognitive functioning and self-report measures of personality and temperament. PMID:18848361

  20. Update on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: focus on cariprazine.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rona Jeannie; Findlay, Lillian Jan; El-Mallakh, Peggy L; El-Mallakh, Rif S

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are severe psychiatric disorders that are frequently associated with persistent symptoms and significant dysfunction. While there are a multitude of psychopharmacologic agents are available for treatment of these illnesses, suboptimal response and significant adverse consequences limit their utility. Cariprazine is a new, novel antipsychotic medication with dopamine D2 and D3 partial agonist effects. Its safety and efficacy have been investigated in acute psychosis of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, and unipolar depression. Efficacy has been demonstrated in schizophrenia and mania. It is unclear if cariprazine is effective in depression associated with unipolar or bipolar illness. Adverse consequences include extrapyramidal symptoms including akathisia, and various gastrointestinal symptoms. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently approved cariprazine. This review will provide clinicians with basic information regarding the research program of cariprazine. PMID:27524901

  1. Decision making in bipolar disorder: a cognitive modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Yechiam, Eldad; Hayden, Elizabeth P; Bodkins, Misty; O'Donnell, Brian F; Hetrick, William P

    2008-11-30

    A formal modeling approach was used to characterize decision-making processes in bipolar disorder. Decision making was examined in 28 bipolar patients (14 acute and 14 remitted) and 25 controls using the Iowa Gambling Task (Bechara et al., 1994), a decision-making task used for assessing cognitive impulsivity. To disentangle motivational and cognitive aspects of decision-making processes, we applied a formal cognitive model to the performance on the Iowa Gambling Task. The model has three parameters: The relative impact of rewards and punishments on evaluations, the impact of recent and past payoffs, and the degree of choice consistency. The results indicated that acute bipolar patients were characterized by low choice consistency, or a tendency to make erratic choices. Low choice consistency improved the prediction of acute bipolar disorder beyond that provided by cognitive functioning and self-report measures of personality and temperament.

  2. Bifurcation analysis of parametrically excited bipolar disorder model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nana, Laurent

    2009-02-01

    Bipolar II disorder is characterized by alternating hypomanic and major depressive episode. We model the periodic mood variations of a bipolar II patient with a negatively damped harmonic oscillator. The medications administrated to the patient are modeled via a forcing function that is capable of stabilizing the mood variations and of varying their amplitude. We analyze analytically, using perturbation method, the amplitude and stability of limit cycles and check this analysis with numerical simulations.

  3. Can cycles of chills and fever resolve bipolar disorder mania?

    PubMed

    Setsaas, Audun; Vaaler, Arne Einar

    2014-01-01

    Treatment resistance is common in populations of patients with bipolar disorder stressing the need for new therapeutic strategies. Favourable effects of fever on mental disease have been noted throughout history. Today there is increasing evidence that immunological processes are involved in the pathophysiology of mental disorders. We present a case in which a patient with treatment resistant bipolar disorder mania seemingly recovered as a result of recurrent fever. This indicates that artificial fever might become a last resort therapy for treatment resistant mania. PMID:24728894

  4. Neurocognitive Allied Phenotypes for Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hill, S. Kristian; Harris, Margret S. H.; Herbener, Ellen S.; Pavuluri, Mani; Sweeney, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are genetically complex and represent the end product of multiple biological and social factors. Links between genes and disorder-related abnormalities can be effectively captured via assessment of phenotypes that are both associated with genetic effects and potentially contributory to behavioral abnormalities. Identifying intermediate or allied phenotypes as a strategy for clarifying genetic contributions to disorders has been successful in other areas of medicine and is a promising strategy for identifying susceptibility genes in complex psychiatric disorders. There is growing evidence that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, rather than being wholly distinct disorders, share genetic risk at several loci. Further, there is growing evidence of similarity in the pattern of cognitive and neurobiological deficits in these groups, which may be the result of the effects of these common genetic factors. This review was undertaken to identify patterns of performance on neurocognitive and affective tasks across probands with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder as well as unaffected family members, which warrant further investigation as potential intermediate trait markers. Available evidence indicates that measures of attention regulation, working memory, episodic memory, and emotion processing offer potential for identifying shared and illness-specific allied neurocognitive phenotypes for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, very few studies have evaluated neurocognitive dimensions in bipolar probands or their unaffected relatives, and much work in this area is needed. PMID:18448479

  5. The Role of Family Functioning in Bipolar Disorder in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du Rocher Schudlich, Tina D.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Findling, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Investigated the association between family functioning and conflict and their links with mood disorder in parents and with children's risk for bipolar disorder. Participants were 272 families with a child between the ages of 5-17 years. Parents' history of psychiatric diagnoses and children's current diagnoses were obtained via semi-structured…

  6. ESPECTRA: Searching the Bipolar Spectrum in Eating Disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bipolar Disorder (BD) is a chronic, recurrent and highly prevalent illness. Despite the need for correct diagnosis to allow proper treatment, studies have shown that reaching a diagnosis can take up to ten years due to the lack of recognition of the broader presentations of BD. Frequent comorbidities with other psychiatric disorders are a major cause of misdiagnosis and warrant thorough evaluation. Methods/Design ESPECTRA (Occurrence of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders in Eating Disorder Patients) is a single-site cross-sectional study involving a comparison group, designed to evaluate the prevalence of bipolar spectrum in an eating disorder sample. Women aged 18-45 years will be evaluated using the SCID-P and Zurich criteria for diagnosis and the HAM-D, YOUNG, SCI-MOODS, HCL-32, BIS-11, BSQ, WHOQoL and EAS instruments for rating symptoms and measuring clinical correlates. Discussion The classificatory systems in psychiatry are based on categorical models that have been criticized for simplifying the diagnosis and leading to an increase in comorbidities. Some dimensional approaches have been proposed aimed at improving the validity and reliability of psychiatric disorder assessments, especially in conditions with high rates of comorbidity such as BD and Eating Disorder (ED). The Bipolar Spectrum (BS) remains under-recognized in clinical practice and its definition is not well established in current diagnostic guidelines. Broader evaluation of psychiatric disorders combining categorical and dimensional views could contribute to a more realistic understanding of comorbidities and help toward establishing a prognosis. PMID:21489298

  7. Altered Development of White Matter in Youth at High Familial Risk for Bipolar Disorder: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Versace, Amelia; Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Romero, Soledad; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Kupfer, David J.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study white matter (WM) development in youth at high familial risk for bipolar disorder (BD). WM alterations are reported in youth and adults with BD. WM undergoes important maturational changes in adolescence. Age-related changes in WM microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics in healthy…

  8. Bipolar disorder and the pseudoautosomal region: An association study

    SciTech Connect

    Parsian, A.; Todd, R.D.

    1994-03-15

    From family, adoption, and twin studies it is clear that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of bipolar disorder (McGuffin and Katz: The Biology of Depression, Gaskell, London, 1986). Recently Yoneda et al. reported an association between an allele (A4) of a VNTR marker (DXYS20) for the pseudoautosomal region and bipolar disorder in a Japanese population. In order to test for this association in a Caucasian population, we have typed a sample of 52 subjects with bipolar disorder and 61 normal controls. The bipolar subjects are probands of multiple incidence families. The normal controls are an epidemiologically ascertained sample of middle-aged, unrelated individuals. The two groups were matched for sex and ethnic background. There were no significant differences in the allele or genotype frequencies of DXYS20 between the two groups. In particular, there was no significant difference in the frequency of the A4 allele in normal controls and bipolar patients (0.377 vs. 0.317, respectively). The prevalence of the A4 allele in bipolar patients and normal controls was 0.567 and 0.622, respectively. We were not able to replicate the results of the 1992 Yoneda et al. study. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Naturalistic long-term use of methylphenidate in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Lydon, Eric; El-Mallakh, Rif S

    2006-10-01

    Antidepressant use seems to be problematic in bipolar disorder. The dopaminergic agent, bupropion, seems to be equally effective to serotoninergic agents but with greater safety. Methylphenidate is a stimulant medication that is sometimes used as an antidepressant in bipolar adults and is frequently used in children with comorbid bipolar and attention-deficit disorder. There are no data available for the safety of long-term methylphenidate in adults. A retrospective chart review of bipolar patients who received methylphenidate while attending a bipolar clinic was conducted. Data regarding side effects and symptoms were collected. Sixteen charts were reviewed. The mean duration of methylphenidate treatment was 14 months (+/-SD, +/-17.5 months; range, 1-60 months). Five had comorbid attention-deficit disorder, the remainder received the methylphenidate for depression. The mean dose was 16.3 mg/d (+/-SD, +/-8.7 mg/d; range, 5-40 mg/d). Several mild to moderate side effects were reported. Two patients (12.5%) discontinued methylphenidate because of adverse side effects. When available (44% of the sample), general assessment of function increased from (+/-SD) 48.3 +/- 9.9 to 69.3 +/- 10.6 (P = 0.006). Methylphenidate seems to be safe in the naturalistic setting. Controlled studies are needed to confirm its efficacy and safety in bipolar depression.

  10. Staging bipolar disorder: what data and what models are needed?

    PubMed

    Kupfer, David J; Frank, Ellen; Ritchey, Fiona C

    2015-06-01

    Although bipolar disorder is increasingly recognised as a spectrum of multisystem disorders (ie, bipolar disorders), proposed staging models and theories of bipolar disease progression often fail to incorporate longitudinal data or data from multiple domains of dysfunction. We propose that bipolar disorders are best thought of as syndromes, with different trajectories of development and progression for various symptoms and demographic groups. This inherent complexity might be better suited to non-traditional modelling techniques, potentially derived from chaos theory. In this Personal View, we propose an allostatic load framework to account for biomarkers of physiological symptom progression. We then suggest integration of two potential domains of biobehavioural markers: sleep and wake and circadian rhythm regulation and the behavioural activation system. A satisfactory model should account for the effects of developmental stage as well as demographic characteristics, including but not limited to sex, culture, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. The ultimate goal of a staging model has to be to inform the development of targeted, stage-appropriate interventions to reduce the substantial burden of bipolar disorders on individuals and societies. PMID:26360452

  11. Late life bipolar disorder evolving into frontotemporal dementia mimic

    PubMed Central

    Dols, Annemiek; Krudop, Welmoed; Möller, Christiane; Shulman, Kenneth; Sajatovic, Martha; Pijnenburg, Yolande AL

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although bipolar disorder has been understood classically as a cyclic disease with full recovery between mood episodes, in the last decade, evidence has accumulated supporting progressive features. The clinical picture of advanced or end-stage bipolar disorder is heterogeneous with possible deficits in cognition and behavior, as illustrated by our case series. Cases From our neuropsychiatric outpatient clinic, we describe four cases with bipolar disorder gradually developing a clinical syndrome, including apathy, disinhibition, loss of empathy, stereotypical behavior, and compulsiveness, fulfilling the criteria for possible behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. All cases were diagnosed with bipolar 1 disorder at least 10 years before the onset of the current symptoms, which were not due to recent mood episodes or switches of medication. In all cases, 3–7 years of follow-up yielded no progression. Repeated neuroimaging was within normal limits. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies were not supportive of underlying neurodegenerative pathology. C9orf72 mutation status was negative in all cases. Conclusion Symptoms fitting the criteria for possible behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia may be present in end-stage of bipolar disorder. An alternative neurodegenerative nature seems unlikely based on repeated normal neuroimaging and the absence of clinical progression. Functional involvement of the frontal-subcortical networks might play a role.

  12. A brief review of exercise, bipolar disorder, and mechanistic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Daniel; Turner, Alyna; Lauder, Sue; Gigler, Margaret E.; Berk, Lesley; Singh, Ajeet B.; Pasco, Julie A.; Berk, Michael; Sylvia, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence that exercise has been found to be effective in the treatment of depression, it is unclear whether these data can be extrapolated to bipolar disorder. Available evidence for bipolar disorder is scant, with no existing randomized controlled trials having tested the impact of exercise on depressive, manic or hypomanic symptomatology. Although exercise is often recommended in bipolar disorder, this is based on extrapolation from the unipolar literature, theory and clinical expertise and not empirical evidence. In addition, there are currently no available empirical data on program variables, with practical implications on frequency, intensity and type of exercise derived from unipolar depression studies. The aim of the current paper is to explore the relationship between exercise and bipolar disorder and potential mechanistic pathways. Given the high rate of medical co-morbidities experienced by people with bipolar disorder, it is possible that exercise is a potentially useful and important intervention with regard to general health benefits; however, further research is required to elucidate the impact of exercise on mood symptomology. PMID:25788889

  13. Late life bipolar disorder evolving into frontotemporal dementia mimic

    PubMed Central

    Dols, Annemiek; Krudop, Welmoed; Möller, Christiane; Shulman, Kenneth; Sajatovic, Martha; Pijnenburg, Yolande AL

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although bipolar disorder has been understood classically as a cyclic disease with full recovery between mood episodes, in the last decade, evidence has accumulated supporting progressive features. The clinical picture of advanced or end-stage bipolar disorder is heterogeneous with possible deficits in cognition and behavior, as illustrated by our case series. Cases From our neuropsychiatric outpatient clinic, we describe four cases with bipolar disorder gradually developing a clinical syndrome, including apathy, disinhibition, loss of empathy, stereotypical behavior, and compulsiveness, fulfilling the criteria for possible behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. All cases were diagnosed with bipolar 1 disorder at least 10 years before the onset of the current symptoms, which were not due to recent mood episodes or switches of medication. In all cases, 3–7 years of follow-up yielded no progression. Repeated neuroimaging was within normal limits. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies were not supportive of underlying neurodegenerative pathology. C9orf72 mutation status was negative in all cases. Conclusion Symptoms fitting the criteria for possible behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia may be present in end-stage of bipolar disorder. An alternative neurodegenerative nature seems unlikely based on repeated normal neuroimaging and the absence of clinical progression. Functional involvement of the frontal-subcortical networks might play a role. PMID:27660450

  14. Diagnosis, Phenomenology, Differential Diagnosis, and Comorbidity of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kowatch, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing a pediatric patient with bipolar disorder can pose a challenge for clinicians. Children typically do not present with the full criteria for a mood episode and may have symptoms of other disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, anxiety disorders, and other mood disorders, which may complicate the diagnostic process. By diligently interviewing parents and children about behaviors, thoroughly reviewing family histories, and systematically ruling out other disorders, clinicians can provide an accurate diagnosis for their pediatric patients. PMID:27570927

  15. [Psychoeducation and interpersonal and social rhythm therapy for bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Hiroko

    2011-01-01

    In treating bipolar disorder, specific psychotherapies in adjunct to pharmacotherapy have been shown to be effective in preventing new episodes and treating depressive episodes. Among those, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) developed by Frank, amalgamation of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) with behavioral therapy focused on social rhythm has been shown to be an efficacious adjunct to mediation in preventing new episodes in bipolar I patients and in treating depression in bipolar I arid II disorder. IPSRT has also been shown to enhance total functioning, relationship functioning and life satisfaction among patients with bipolar disorder, even after pretreatment functioning and concurrent depression were covaried. IPSRT was designed to directly address the major pathways to recurrence in bipolar disorder, namely medication nonadherence, stressful life events, and disruptions in social rhythms. IPT, originated by Klerman et al., is a strategic time-limited psychotherapy focused on one or two of four current interpersonal problem areas (ie, grief, interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, and interpersonal dificits). In IPSRT, the fifth problem area "grief for the lost healthy self" has been added in order to promote acceptance of the diagnosis and the need for life-long treatment. Social rhythm therapy is a behavioral approach aiming at increasing regularity of social rhythms using the Social Rhythm Metric (SRM), a chart to record daily social activities including how stimulating they were, developed from observation that disruptions in social rhythms often trigger affective episodes in patients with bipolar disorder. IPSRT also appears to be a promising intervention for a subset of individuals with bipolar II depression as monotherapy for the acute treatment.

  16. Mitochondrial Variants in Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, Brandi; Martin, Maureen V.; Sequeira, P. Adolfo; Moon, Emily A.; Morgan, Ling Z.; Watson, Stanley J.; Schatzberg, Alan; Akil, Huda; Myers, Richard M.; Jones, Edward G.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Bunney, William E.; Vawter, Marquis P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Mitochondria provide most of the energy for brain cells by the process of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial abnormalities and deficiencies in oxidative phosphorylation have been reported in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD), and major depressive disorder (MDD) in transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies. Several mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence have been reported in SZ and BD patients. Methodology/Principal Findings Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) from a cohort of 77 SZ, BD, and MDD subjects and age-matched controls (C) was studied for mtDNA sequence variations and heteroplasmy levels using Affymetrix mtDNA resequencing arrays. Heteroplasmy levels by microarray were compared to levels obtained with SNaPshot and allele specific real-time PCR. This study examined the association between brain pH and mtDNA alleles. The microarray resequencing of mtDNA was 100% concordant with conventional sequencing results for 103 mtDNA variants. The rate of synonymous base pair substitutions in the coding regions of the mtDNA genome was 22% higher (p = 0.0017) in DLPFC of individuals with SZ compared to controls. The association of brain pH and super haplogroup (U, K, UK) was significant (p = 0.004) and independent of postmortem interval time. Conclusions Focusing on haplogroup and individual susceptibility factors in psychiatric disorders by considering mtDNA variants may lead to innovative treatments to improve mitochondrial health and brain function. PMID:19290059

  17. Antipsychotic Drugs for Children and Adolescents: What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adolescents (teens and pre-teens), such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism, and certain behavior disorders. The drugs ... treatments can help with many disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, or a behavior disorder. Ask your child’s ...

  18. Neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome in bipolar disorder with psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Satoshi; Sakayori, Takeshi; Omori, Ataru; Fukuta, Hajime; Kobayashi, Takashi; Ishizaka, Kousuke; Saijo, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    Neuroleptics can induce not only physical adverse effects but also mental effects that produce deficit status in thought, affect, cognition, and behavior. This condition is known as neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS), which includes apathy, lack of initiative, anhedonia, indifference, blunted affect, and reduced insight into disease. Although this old concept now appears almost forgotten, neuroleptics, whether typical or atypical, can make depression or bipolar disorder resemble other more refractory conditions, readily leading to mistaken diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. The authors describe three cases of NIDS superimposed on depressive phase in bipolar disorder with psychosis, where the attending psychiatrist’s failure to recognize NIDS prevented patients from receiving effective treatment and achieving remission. All cases achieved remission after reduction of neuroleptics and intensive therapy, including electroconvulsive therapy, for bipolar depression. The concept of NIDS was originally introduced for schizophrenia, and it has rarely been highlighted in other diseases. In recent years, however, atypical antipsychotics are being more often administered to patients with bipolar disorder. Psychiatrists, therefore, should also remember and exercise caution regarding NIDS in the pharmacotherapy of bipolar disorder with and without psychosis. The authors believe that the concept of NIDS needs to be reappraised in current psychiatry. PMID:26893564

  19. [Bipolar disorder: evolution of the concept and current controversies].

    PubMed

    Del Porto, José Alberto

    2004-10-01

    The author reviews the evolution of the concept of bipolar disorder as an ongoing process. Its roots can be found in the work of Araeteus of Capadocia, who assumed that melancholia and mania were two forms of the same disease. The modern understanding of bipolar disorder began in France, through the work of Falret (1851) and Baillarger (1854). The pivotal concepts of Emil Kraepelin changed the basis of psychiatric nosology, and Kraepelin's unitary concept of manic-depressive insanity was largely accepted. Kraepelin and Weigandt's ideas on mixed states were the cornerstone of this unitary concept. After Kraepelin, however, the ideas of Kleist and Leonhard, in Germany, as well as the work of Angst, Perris and Winokur, emphasized the distinction between unipolar and bipolar forms of depression. More recently, the emphasis has shifted again to the bipolar spectrum, which, in its mild forms, expanded to the limits of normal temperament. In concluding, the author summarizes the polemic aspects concerning the nosology of bipolar disorder and its boundaries in comparison with those of with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorders and cycloid psychosis.

  20. Neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome in bipolar disorder with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Satoshi; Sakayori, Takeshi; Omori, Ataru; Fukuta, Hajime; Kobayashi, Takashi; Ishizaka, Kousuke; Saijo, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    Neuroleptics can induce not only physical adverse effects but also mental effects that produce deficit status in thought, affect, cognition, and behavior. This condition is known as neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS), which includes apathy, lack of initiative, anhedonia, indifference, blunted affect, and reduced insight into disease. Although this old concept now appears almost forgotten, neuroleptics, whether typical or atypical, can make depression or bipolar disorder resemble other more refractory conditions, readily leading to mistaken diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. The authors describe three cases of NIDS superimposed on depressive phase in bipolar disorder with psychosis, where the attending psychiatrist's failure to recognize NIDS prevented patients from receiving effective treatment and achieving remission. All cases achieved remission after reduction of neuroleptics and intensive therapy, including electroconvulsive therapy, for bipolar depression. The concept of NIDS was originally introduced for schizophrenia, and it has rarely been highlighted in other diseases. In recent years, however, atypical antipsychotics are being more often administered to patients with bipolar disorder. Psychiatrists, therefore, should also remember and exercise caution regarding NIDS in the pharmacotherapy of bipolar disorder with and without psychosis. The authors believe that the concept of NIDS needs to be reappraised in current psychiatry. PMID:26893564

  1. Combinations of SNPs Related to Signal Transduction in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Koefoed, Pernille; Andreassen, Ole A.; Bennike, Bente; Dam, Henrik; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hansen, Thomas; Jorgensen, Martin Balslev; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Melle, Ingrid; Møller, Gert Lykke; Mors, Ole; Werge, Thomas; Mellerup, Erling

    2011-01-01

    Any given single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a genome may have little or no functional impact. A biologically significant effect may possibly emerge only when a number of key SNP-related genotypes occur together in a single organism. Thus, in analysis of many SNPs in association studies of complex diseases, it may be useful to look at combinations of genotypes. Genes related to signal transmission, e.g., ion channel genes, may be of interest in this respect in the context of bipolar disorder. In the present study, we analysed 803 SNPs in 55 genes related to aspects of signal transmission and calculated all combinations of three genotypes from the 3×803 SNP genotypes for 1355 controls and 607 patients with bipolar disorder. Four clusters of patient-specific combinations were identified. Permutation tests indicated that some of these combinations might be related to bipolar disorder. The WTCCC bipolar dataset were use for replication, 469 of the 803 SNP were present in the WTCCC dataset either directly (n = 132) or by imputation (n = 337) covering 51 of our selected genes. We found three clusters of patient-specific 3×SNP combinations in the WTCCC dataset. Different SNPs were involved in the clusters in the two datasets. The present analyses of the combinations of SNP genotypes support a role for both genetic heterogeneity and interactions in the genetic architecture of bipolar disorder. PMID:21897858

  2. Insight Across the Different Mood States of Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    de Assis da Silva, Rafael; Mograbi, Daniel C; Silveira, Luciana Angélica Silva; Nunes, Ana Letícia Santos; Novis, Fernanda Demôro; Landeira-Fernandez, J; Cheniaux, Elie

    2015-09-01

    In bipolar disorder, levels of insight vary as a function of the mood state and appear to influence pharmacology compliance, quality of life, the presence of suicidal ideations, and aggressive behavior. To establish a comparison among different mood states in bipolar with regard to level of insight. Forty-eight patients were evaluated in different affective states (i.e., euthymia, mania, depression, and mixed state). Identifying information, sociodemographic data, and clinical records were recorded. The following scales were applied: Hamilton Depression Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale positive symptoms subscale, and Global Assessment of Functioning and Clinical Global Impressions Scale for use in bipolar disorder. Insight was evaluated using items 11 and 17 of the Young Mania Rating Scale and Hamilton Depression Scale, respectively. Insight in bipolar disorder was found to be more compromised during manic phases and mixed episodes than during periods of depression or euthymia. The factors associated with lower levels of insight were the following: shorter illness duration, older age, and greater severity in mania; the female gender and older age in depression; and shorter illness duration and more severe depressive symptoms in mixed episodes. In the same individual, levels of insight vary as a function of the affective state over the course of bipolar disorder and appear to be influenced by several clinical variables.

  3. The Increasing Frequency of Mania and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yutzy, Sean H.; Woofter, Chad R.; Abbott, Christopher C.; Melhem, Imad M.; Parish, Brooke S.

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of mania has not changed during the last century even with the development of new diagnostic criteria sets. More specifically, from the mid-1970s to 2000, the rate of mania (variably labeled major affective disorder–bipolar disorder and bipolar I disorder) was consistently identified in US and international studies as ranging from 0.4% to 1.6%. By the late 1990s to the 2000s, the prevalence reported by some researchers for bipolar disorders (I and II and others) was in the 5% to 7% and higher ranges. The purpose of this paper was to review explanations for this change and the potentially negative impacts on the field. PMID:22551790

  4. Choosing how to feel: emotion regulation choice in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hay, Aleena C; Sheppes, Gal; Gross, James J; Gruber, June

    2015-04-01

    Individuals with bipolar disorder experience emotion regulation difficulties, even during remission, but are able to effectively employ emotion regulation strategies when instructed. We hypothesized that this puzzling discrepancy might be due to their maladaptive emotion regulation choices. To test this hypothesis, we used a previously validated paradigm (Sheppes, Scheibe, Suri, & Gross, 2011; Sheppes et al., 2014), and asked remitted individuals with bipolar I disorder (n = 25) and healthy individuals (n = 26) to view standardized positive and negative images of high and low intensity, and choose reappraisal or distraction to decrease their emotion intensity. Replicating and extending prior results, participants across both groups showed a pattern of choosing distraction more for high versus low intensity positive and negative images, but no between-groups differences were evident. These results suggest that emotion regulation choice patterns may be robust across samples, and add to growing evidence that several basic emotion regulation elements may remain intact in bipolar disorder.

  5. Effectiveness of Simple Individual Psychoeducation for Bipolar II Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Emi; Taketani, Reiko; Yamamoto, Ami

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have proven the effectiveness of psychoeducation in bipolar II disorder patients; however, simpler psychoeducation is needed in daily medical practice. Therefore, we devised a simple individual psychoeducation program, which involved 20-minute sessions spent reading a textbook aloud in the waiting time before examination. Here, we report a successful case of simple individual psychoeducation with a patient with bipolar II disorder, a 64-year-old woman who had misconceptions surrounding her mood due to 24 years of treatment for depression. Her perception of mood state, particularly mixed state, was dramatically changed, and her quality of life was improved after the simple individual psychoeducation. This case suggests that the simple individual psychoeducation could be effective for bipolar II disorder by improving understanding of the disease and by meeting different individual needs. PMID:27559486

  6. Molecular neurobiological clues to the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    Bipolar disorder is a serious psychiatric disorder, with a high heritability and unknown pathogenesis. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified the first loci, implicating genes such as CACNA1C and ANK3. The genes highlight several pathways, notably calcium signalling, as being of importance. Molecular studies suggest that the risk variants impact on gene regulation and expression. Preliminary studies using reprogrammed patient-derived cells report alterations in the transcriptome and in cellular adhesion and differentiation. Mouse models show that genes involved in circadian biology, acting via dopaminergic effects, reproduce aspects of the bipolar phenotype. These findings together represent significant advances in identification of the genetic and molecular basis of bipolar disorder, yet we are still far from an integrated, evidence-based understanding of its aetiopathogenesis.

  7. The role of social relationships in bipolar disorder: a review.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Sarah; Rosenblum, Katherine L; McInnis, Melvin G; Muzik, Maria

    2014-10-30

    Social relationships and attachment are core developmental elements of human existence and survival that evolve over the lifetime of an individual. The internal and external factors that influence them include the presence of illness in the individual or in their immediate environment. The developmental aspects of attachment and social relationships have become increasingly of interest and relevance in light of early developmental epigenetic modification of gene expression patterns that may influence subsequent behavioral patterns and outcomes. This review examines extant literature on attachment and social relationships in bipolar cohorts. Despite many methodological challenges, the findings indicate that social relationships and capacity for attachment are significantly compromised in individuals with bipolar disorder compared to other mood disorders and normal controls. Though extant research is limited, research clearly points toward the importance of social relationships on the etiology, course, and consequences of bipolar disorder. We highlight a number of key considerations for future research.

  8. Effectiveness of Simple Individual Psychoeducation for Bipolar II Disorder.

    PubMed

    Saito-Tanji, Yuka; Tsujimoto, Emi; Taketani, Reiko; Yamamoto, Ami; Ono, Hisae

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have proven the effectiveness of psychoeducation in bipolar II disorder patients; however, simpler psychoeducation is needed in daily medical practice. Therefore, we devised a simple individual psychoeducation program, which involved 20-minute sessions spent reading a textbook aloud in the waiting time before examination. Here, we report a successful case of simple individual psychoeducation with a patient with bipolar II disorder, a 64-year-old woman who had misconceptions surrounding her mood due to 24 years of treatment for depression. Her perception of mood state, particularly mixed state, was dramatically changed, and her quality of life was improved after the simple individual psychoeducation. This case suggests that the simple individual psychoeducation could be effective for bipolar II disorder by improving understanding of the disease and by meeting different individual needs. PMID:27559486

  9. Suicidality in bipolar disorders--psychoanalytic contribution.

    PubMed

    Etzersdorfer, Elmar; Schell, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of psychoanalytic contributions to the understanding of suicidal behavior in bipolar patients. Although little specific literature is available, many authors have contributed to the understanding of these patients' psychodynamics and suicidality in various papers. Different points of emphasis are described, among these are defensive strategies, narcissistic personality structure, and dealing with intense feelings such as object loss. Using detailed case descriptions, the inner world of bipolar patients as it relates to their suicidality, along with the appropriate psychoanalytically oriented approach to treatment, are highlighted. PMID:16717045

  10. Self-Injury in Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... as depression, psychosis, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Bipolar Disorder. Additionally, some adolescents who engage in self-injury ... Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Child Abuse - The Hidden Bruises Bipolar Disorder In Children And Teens If you find Facts ...

  11. Neurocognitive Correlates of the Course of Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Monika; Schulze, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significant cognitive dysfunction has been recognized as an important state and trait feature of bipolar disorder. In this article, longitudinal studies comparing cognitive performance in bipolar disorder patients and healthy controls are reviewed. In contrast to cross-sectional reports, current longitudinal research findings do not support a progressive cognitive decline over time. However, a higher within-person instability in cognitive performance was found relative to controls. The need for larger samples remains, as well as for longer and more frequent observations. PMID:25377607

  12. [The role of the childhood maltreatment in bipolar affective disorder].

    PubMed

    Belteczki, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    In this review the relevant investigatons of the relationship between childhood maltreatment (CM) and bipolar disorder (BD) will be described. I present the most important features of different trauma forms (physical, sexual, emotional abuse and neglect). A short overview of the direct and long-term effects of childhood-maltreatment and the consequential neurobiological, neurodevelopmental alterations are summarized. A part of the traumameasurement scales and the hidden effects of trauma examiner scales are demonstrated. The clinical variables of bipolar disorder will be shown in the context of different maltreatment forms. Methodical problems and critical commenst are overviewed as well. PMID:27091922

  13. Synchronization of chaotic and nonchaotic oscillators: Application to bipolar disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nono Dueyou Buckjohn, C.; Siewe Siewe, M.; Tchawoua, C.; Kofane, T. C.

    2010-08-01

    In this Letter, we use a synchronization scheme on two bipolar disorder models consisting of a strong nonlinear system with multiplicative excitation and a nonlinear oscillator without parametric harmonic forcing. The stability condition following our control function is analytically demonstrated using the Lyapunov theory and Routh-Hurwitz criteria, we then have the condition for the existence of a feedback gain matrix. A convenient demonstration of the accuracy of the method is complemented by the numerical simulations from which we illustrate the synchronized dynamics between the two non-identical bipolar disorder patients.

  14. Polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder predict creativity.

    PubMed

    Power, Robert A; Steinberg, Stacy; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Nivard, Michel M; Johannesson, Magnus; Galesloot, Tessel E; Hottenga, Jouke J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Ullén, Fredrik; Tiemeier, Henning; Hofman, Albert; van Rooij, Frank J A; Walters, G Bragi; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E; Ingason, Andres; Helgason, Agnar; Kong, Augustine; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Koellinger, Philipp; Boomsma, Dorret I; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-07-01

    We tested whether polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder would predict creativity. Higher scores were associated with artistic society membership or creative profession in both Icelandic (P = 5.2 × 10(-6) and 3.8 × 10(-6) for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder scores, respectively) and replication cohorts (P = 0.0021 and 0.00086). This could not be accounted for by increased relatedness between creative individuals and those with psychoses, indicating that creativity and psychosis share genetic roots. PMID:26053403

  15. Genetic linkage study of bipolar disorder and the serotonin transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsoe, J.R.; Morison, M.; Mroczkowski-Parker, Z.; Bergesch, P.; Rapaport, M.H.; Mirow, A.L.

    1996-04-09

    The serotonin transporter (HTT) is an important candidate gene for the genetic transmission of bipolar disorder. It is the site of action of many antidepressants, and plays a key role in the regulation of serotonin neurotransmission. Many studies of affectively ill patients have found abnormalities in serotonin metabolism, and dysregulation of the transporter itself. The human serotonin transporter has been recently cloned and mapped to chromosome 17. We have identified a PstI RFLP at the HTT locus, and here report our examination of this polymorphism for possible linkage to bipolar disorder. Eighteen families were examined from three populations: the Old Order Amish, Iceland, and the general North American population. In addition to HTT, three other microsatellite markers were examined, which span an interval known to contain HTT. Linkage analyses were conducted under both dominant and recessive models, as well as both narrow (bipolar only) and broad (bipolar + recurrent unipolar) diagnostic models. Linkage could be excluded to HTT under all models examined. Linkage to the interval spanned by the microsatellites was similarly excluded under the dominant models. In two individual families, maximum lod scores of 1.02 and 0.84 were obtained at D17S798 and HTT, respectively. However, these data overall do not support the presence of a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder near the serotonin transporter. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Unipolar depression with racing thoughts: a bipolar spectrum disorder?

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Franco

    2005-10-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) with racing/crowded thoughts is understudied. Kraepelin classified 'depression with flight of ideas' in the mixed states of his manic-depressive insanity. The aim of the study was to test whether MDD with racing/crowded thoughts was close to bipolar disorders. Consecutive 379 bipolar-II disorder (BP-II) and 271 MDD depressed outpatients were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, the Hypomania Interview Guide, and the Family History Screen, by a senior psychiatrist in a private practice. Intra-depression hypomanic symptoms were systematically assessed. Mixed depression was defined as a major depressive episode (MDE) plus three or more intra-MDE hypomanic symptoms. MDD with racing/crowded thoughts was compared to MDD without racing/crowded thoughts on classic bipolar validators (young onset age, many recurrences, atypical and mixed depression, bipolar family history). Frequency of MDD with racing/crowded thoughts was 56.4%. MDD with racing/crowded thoughts, versus MDD without racing/crowded thoughts, had significantly lower age at onset, more MDE severity, more psychotic, melancholic, atypical, and mixed depressions, and more bipolar family history. Of the intra-MDE hypomanic symptoms, irritability, psychomotor agitation and distractibility were significantly more common in MDD with racing/crowded thoughts. Compared to BP-II on bipolar validators, validators were less common in MDD with racing/crowded thoughts. MDD with racing/crowded thoughts seemed to be a severe variant of MDD. MDD with racing/crowded thoughts versus MDD without racing/crowded thoughts, and versus BP-II, had significant differences on bipolar validators, suggesting that it may lie along a continuum linking MDD without racing/crowded thoughts and BP-II.

  17. Childhood IQ and risk of bipolar disorder in adulthood: prospective birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jana; Zammit, Stanley; Meyer, Thomas D.; Pell, Jill P.; Mackay, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    detection and treatment of bipolar disorder in adolescents and young adults. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703726

  18. Pediatric mania: a developmental subtype of bipolar disorder?

    PubMed

    Biederman, J; Mick, E; Faraone, S V; Spencer, T; Wilens, T E; Wozniak, J

    2000-09-15

    Despite ongoing controversy, the view that pediatric mania is rare or nonexistent has been increasingly challenged not only by case reports, but also by systematic research. This research strongly suggests that pediatric mania may not be rare but that it may be difficult to diagnose. Since children with mania are likely to become adults with bipolar disorder, the recognition and characterization of childhood-onset mania may help identify a meaningful developmental subtype of bipolar disorder worthy of further investigation. The major difficulties that complicate the diagnosis of pediatric mania include: 1) its pattern of comorbidity may be unique by adult standards, especially its overlap with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, aggression, and conduct disorder; 2) its overlap with substance use disorders; 3) its association with trauma and adversity; and 4) its response to treatment is atypical by adult standards.

  19. How bipolar disorders are managed in family practice

    PubMed Central

    Balachandra, Krishna; Sharma, Verinder; Dozois, David; Bhayana, Bhooma

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate family physicians’ experience in diagnosing and managing bipolar disorder, how they rate their undergraduate and postgraduate training in this area, and what they think they need to learn in the future. DESIGN Survey questionnaire. SETTING Family practices in London, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Random sample of 297 family physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Physicians’ experience in diagnosing and managing patients with bipolar disorder, rating of their undergraduate and postgraduate training in this area, and thoughts about what they need to learn in the future. RESULTS Of 297 surveys sent out, 147 (49.5%) were returned. Male respondents accounted for 62%, and female respondents 37%, of completed surveys. Average year of graduation from medical school was 1979. The most common response for level of experience in diagnosing and treating bipolar disorders was “somewhat comfortable.” Physicians frequently reported screening for symptoms of mood disorders (42%), and most of them were sharing care with other professionals (88%). Undergraduate training was rated as poor (42%) or satisfactory (46%), and postgraduate training was rated as poor (42%) or satisfactory (44%). Physicians thought they needed more education in issues of diagnosis and pharmacotherapy. CONCLUSION Family physicians were only somewhat comfortable with diagnosing and managing bipolar disorders, and most thought their undergraduate and graduate training in this area had been, at best, satisfactory. They expressed a need for more education in the areas of diagnosis and pharmacotherapy. PMID:16926928

  20. Family Intervention with a Case of Bipolar I Disorder with Family Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahu, Kamlesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a major mental illness. Inherited treatment of bipolar disorder has been focused on pharmacological treatments. Though, psychosocial variables appear to be important antecedents of bipolar disorder, poor drug compliance, expressed emotion or faulty communication and life events play a vital role in relapse. Conflict is commonly…

  1. Parenting among Mothers with Bipolar Disorder: Strengths, Challenges, and Service Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkataraman, Meenakshi; Ackerson, Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe form of mental illness with a primary disruption in mood. With fluctuating phases of mania and depression, bipolar disorder can have a serious impact on all activities of daily living, including parenting. Ten mothers with bipolar disorder were interviewed to understand their strengths, challenges, and service needs in…

  2. Bipolar disorder and co-occurring cannabis use disorders: characteristics, co-morbidities and clinical correlates.

    PubMed

    Lev-Ran, Shaul; Le Foll, Bernard; McKenzie, Kwame; George, Tony P; Rehm, Jürgen

    2013-10-30

    This study examines rates of co-morbid mental disorders and indicators of the course of illness among individuals with bipolar disorder and cannabis use disorders (CUD). Data were drawn from the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC Wave 1, 2001-2002), a nationally representative sample of adults living in the United States. Among individuals with lifetime prevalence of bipolar disorder (N=1905) rates of CUD in the past 12 months were 7.2%, compared to 1.2% in the general population. Logistic regression models adjusting for sociodemographic variables indicated that individuals with bipolar disorder and co-occurring CUD were at increased risk for nicotine dependence (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=3.8), alcohol (AOR=6.6) and drug (AOR=11.9) use disorders, as well as antisocial personality disorder (AOR=2.8) compared to those without CUD. Among individuals with co-occurring CUD, age of onset of bipolar disorder was significantly lower and median number of manic, hypomanic and depressive episodes per year was significantly greater compared to individuals without CUD. Co-occurring CUD is associated with significant co-morbidities and a more severe course of illness among individuals with bipolar disorder. Comprehensive evaluation of patients with bipolar disorder should include a systematic assessment of CUD.

  3. [Argentine consensus on the treatment of bipolar disorders].

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Gustavo Héctor; Strejilevich, Sergio; García Bonetto, Gerardo; Cetkovich-Bakmas, Marcelo; Zaratiegui, Rodolfo; Lagomarsino, Alejandro; Goldchluk, Aníbal; Kalina, Eduardo; Herbst, Luis; Gutiérrez, Benigno

    2005-01-01

    The consensus guidelines of argentine experts in the treatment of bipolar disorders are the result of three days of work of the 10 main local experts under the organization of the Argentine Association of Biological Psychiatry (AAPB). It was adopted a mixed criterion for its preparation: all the recent data of the evidence medicine based published until now were discussed and were balanced with the knowledge acquired from clinical experience of the local experts on the bipolar field. It presents general recommendations and suggested therapeutic sequences for the phase of maintenance, the manic/hypomanic or mixed episode and the depressive episode. These have been divided according to the classification in type I and II; with or without rapid cycling. Since the group of experts identified the delay and miss-diagnoses like the most important barrier for a suitable treatment enclosed a series of recommendations for differential diagnosis of bipolar disorders.

  4. Cannabis Use Disorder in Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Annabelle K; Magid, Viktoriya

    2016-07-01

    Cannabis use in the adolescent population poses a significant threat of addiction potential resulting in altered neurodevelopment. There are multiple mechanisms of treatment of cannabis use disorder including behavioral therapy management and emerging data on treatment via pharmacotherapy. Recognizing the diagnostic criteria for cannabis use disorder, cannabis withdrawal syndrome, and mitigating factors that influence adolescent engagement in cannabis use allows for comprehensive assessment and management in the adolescent population.

  5. Cannabis Use Disorder in Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Annabelle K; Magid, Viktoriya

    2016-07-01

    Cannabis use in the adolescent population poses a significant threat of addiction potential resulting in altered neurodevelopment. There are multiple mechanisms of treatment of cannabis use disorder including behavioral therapy management and emerging data on treatment via pharmacotherapy. Recognizing the diagnostic criteria for cannabis use disorder, cannabis withdrawal syndrome, and mitigating factors that influence adolescent engagement in cannabis use allows for comprehensive assessment and management in the adolescent population. PMID:27338965

  6. Bipolar co-morbidity in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: clinical and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Masi, Gabriele; Perugi, Giulio; Millepiedi, Stefania; Toni, Cristina; Mucci, Maria; Pfanner, Chiara; Berloffa, Stefano; Pari, Cinzia; Akiskal, Hagop S

    2007-08-01

    This paper reports on implications of bipolar disorder (BD) co-morbidity in 120 children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (84 males, 36 females, age 13.7 +/- 2.8 years), diagnosed using a clinical interview according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria, and naturalistically followed-up for 12 +/- 6 months. The aim of this naturalistic, retrospective study was to explore the effect of BD co-morbidity, disentangling it from other co-occurring variables, namely the co-morbidity with disruptive behavior disorders. Forty three patients (35.8%) had a bipolar co-morbidity. Compared with OCD patients without BD, they had an earlier onset of OCD, a greater severity and functional impairment, more frequent hoarding obsessions and compulsions, and a poorer response to treatments. They had a higher co-morbidity with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD), and a lower co-morbidity with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Finally, they received more mood stabilizers, and 30.2% of them did not receive serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) because of pharmacological (hypo)mania. When all the OCD responders and nonresponders were compared, nonresponders (n = 42, 35%) were more severe at baseline and at end of the follow-up, had more frequently hoarding obsessions and compulsions, and had more frequent BD, ODD, and conduct disorder (CD) and less GAD and panic disorder. In the final regression model, hoarding obsessions and compulsions, co-morbidity with ODD, and CD were negative predictors of treatment outcome. This study suggests that even though bipolar co-morbidity is frequent and affects phenomenology and co-morbidity in pediatric OCD, its effect on treatment response seems prevalently accounted for by co-morbidity with disruptive behavior disorders. The significance of the hoarding subtype deserves further research on larger samples of

  7. Brain oscillations in bipolar disorder and lithium-induced changes

    PubMed Central

    Atagün, Murat İlhan

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) studies in patients with bipolar disorder have revealed lower amplitudes in brain oscillations. The aim of this review is to describe lithium-induced EEG changes in bipolar disorder and to discuss potential underlying factors. A literature survey about lithium-induced EEG changes in bipolar disorder was performed. Lithium consistently enhances magnitudes of brain oscillations in slow frequencies (delta and theta) in both resting-state EEG studies as well as event-related oscillations studies. Enhancement of magnitudes of beta oscillations is specific to event-related oscillations. Correlation between serum lithium levels and brain oscillations has been reported. Lithium-induced changes in brain oscillations might correspond to lithium-induced alterations in neurotransmitters, signaling cascades, plasticity, brain structure, or biophysical properties of lithium. Therefore, lithium-induced changes in brain oscillations could be promising biomarkers to assess the molecular mechanisms leading to variability in efficacy. Since the variability of lithium response in bipolar disorder is due to the genetic differences in the mechanisms involving lithium, it would be highly promising to assess the lithium-induced EEG changes as biomarkers in genetic studies. PMID:27022264

  8. Early Onset Bipolar Disorder: Clinical and Research Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Gabrielle A.

    2005-01-01

    This article examined some of the reasons for confusion and controversy surrounding the frequency of diagnosis of bipolar disorder, especially in prepubertal children. Four case vignettes are used to articulate questions surrounding manifestations of euphoria and grandiosity, informant variance, diagnostic implications of medication-induced…

  9. Cognitive Flexibility in Phenotypes of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickstein, Daniel P.; Nelson, Eric E.; McClure, Erin B.; Grimley, Mary E.; Knopf, Lisa; Brotman, Melissa A.; Rich, Brendan A.; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Clinicians and researchers debate whether children with chronic, nonepisodic irritability should receive the diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD). To address this debate, we evaluated cognitive flexibility, or the ability to adapt to changing contingencies, in three groups of children: narrow-phenotype BD (NP-BD; full-duration manic…

  10. Parenting among Mothers with Bipolar Disorder: Children's Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkataraman, Meenakshi

    2011-01-01

    Four children from three families in which the mother had a bipolar disorder were interviewed to understand their perspectives on their mothers' parenting. Children identified strengths in their mother's parenting, such as helping them with homework and moods and providing for their wants. They also identified challenges, such as mothers sleeping…

  11. Comorbidity and Phenomenology of Bipolar Disorder in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Eduardo; Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the comorbidity of bipolar disorder (BPD) in children with ADHD and to study the psychopathological profile of ADHD children with and without mania. Method: A total of 100 children with ADHD were assessed with a semistructured diagnostic interview and questionnaires of mania, ADHD, and general psychopathology. Results: 8% of…

  12. Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder in Individuals with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Robert; Fay, Garry; Croghan, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective case series contrasts the phenomenology, clinical outcomes, treatment responses, and clinical characteristics of 26 individuals with bipolar disorder and developmental disabilities, 12 with nonrapid cycling courses and 14 with rapid cycling courses. Similarities and differences are highlighted within these two groups and…

  13. Creativity and bipolar disorder: Touched by fire or burning with questions?☆

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Murray, Greg; Fredrickson, Barbara; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Hinshaw, Stephen; Bass, Julie Malbrancq; Deckersbach, Thilo; Schooler, Jonathan; Salloum, Ihsan

    2012-01-01

    Substantial literature has linked bipolar disorder with creative accomplishment. Much of the thinking in this area has been inspired by biographical accounts of poets, musicians, and other highly accomplished groups, which frequently document signs of bipolar disorder in these samples. A smaller literature has examined quantitative measures of creativity among people with bipolar disorder or at risk for the disorder. In this paper, we provide a critical review of such evidence. We then consider putative mechanisms related to the link of bipolar disorder with creativity, by drawing on literature outside of bipolar disorder on personality, motivational, and affective predictors of creativity. Because so little research has directly evaluated whether these factors could help explain the elevations of creativity in bipolar disorder, we conclude with an agenda for future research on the theoretically and clinically compelling topic of creativity in bipolar disorder. PMID:22088366

  14. Mortality in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Clinical and serological predictors.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Faith; Origoni, Andrea; Schroeder, Jennifer; Schweinfurth, Lucy A B; Stallings, Cassie; Savage, Christina L G; Katsafanas, Emily; Banis, Maria; Khushalani, Sunil; Yolken, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Persons with schizophrenia and with bipolar disorder have a reduced life expectancy due largely to death from natural causes. The reasons for this increased mortality have not been completely defined. We prospectively assessed a cohort of persons with schizophrenia and one with bipolar disorder with a clinical evaluation and a blood sample from which immune and infectious disease markers were measured. Mortality was determined with data from the National Death Index following a period of up to 14years. We examined the role of demographic, clinical, and serological factors on mortality in bivariate and multivariate models. A total of 43/710 (6.1%) persons with schizophrenia and 12/406 (3.0%) with bipolar disorder died of natural causes. In the schizophrenia group, mortality was predicted by the following variables in a multivariate model: cigarette smoking (RR=6.93, 95% CI 1.59, 30.1, p=0.0099); autoimmune disorder (RR=8.08, 95% CI 2.50, 26.1, p=0.00047); gastrointestinal disorder (GI) (RR=3.53, 95% CI 1.43, 8.69 p=0.0061); and reduced maternal education (RR=0.84, 95% CI 0.72, 0.97), p=0.018. The combination of smoking and an autoimmune disorder yielded an unadjusted relative risk of 18.1 for mortality, and the combination of smoking and a GI disorder an unadjusted relative risk of 9.45, compared with individuals with neither risk factor. In the bipolar disorder group, significant bivariate predictors of mortality included lower cognitive score (RR=0.95, p=.0085) and the presence of type 1 or 2 diabetes (RR=3.90, p=.026). Given the extraordinary high risk of death due to smoking in schizophrenia, smoking cessation remains an urgent priority.

  15. Identifying Potential Regions of Copy Number Variation for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Hsuan; Lu, Ru-Band; Hung, Hung; Kuo, Po-Hsiu

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a complex psychiatric disorder with high heritability, but its genetic determinants are still largely unknown. Copy number variation (CNV) is one of the sources to explain part of the heritability. However, it is a challenge to estimate discrete values of the copy numbers using continuous signals calling from a set of markers, and to simultaneously perform association testing between CNVs and phenotypic outcomes. The goal of the present study is to perform a series of data filtering and analysis procedures using a DNA pooling strategy to identify potential CNV regions that are related to bipolar disorder. A total of 200 normal controls and 200 clinically diagnosed bipolar patients were recruited in this study, and were randomly divided into eight control and eight case pools. Genome-wide genotyping was employed using Illumina Human Omni1-Quad array with approximately one million markers for CNV calling. We aimed at setting a series of criteria to filter out the signal noise of marker data and to reduce the chance of false-positive findings for CNV regions. We first defined CNV regions for each pool. Potential CNV regions were reported based on the different patterns of CNV status between cases and controls. Genes that were mapped into the potential CNV regions were examined with association testing, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis, and checked with existing literature for their associations with bipolar disorder. We reported several CNV regions that are related to bipolar disorder. Two CNV regions on chromosome 11 and 22 showed significant signal differences between cases and controls (p < 0.05). Another five CNV regions on chromosome 6, 9, and 19 were overlapped with results in previous CNV studies. Experimental validation of two CNV regions lent some support to our reported findings. Further experimental and replication studies could be designed for these selected regions.

  16. Survival Strategies for Parenting Children with Bipolar Disorder: Innovative Parenting and Counseling Techniques for Helping Children with Bipolar Disorder and the Conditions That May Occur with It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, George T.

    This book provides practical advice on recognizing the symptoms, understanding the medication, and accessing the necessary support at school as well as the managing the day-to-day challenges of parenting a child with bipolar disorder. It draws on case studies to show what bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Tourette…

  17. [Emil Kraepelin and bipolar disorder: invention or over-extension?].

    PubMed

    Géraud, M

    1997-01-01

    From 1899 to 1913, Emil Kraepelin (1856-1926) creates and elaborates the nosographical group of the "manic-depressive insanity". In the 50-60s, Leonhard splits off this homogeneous group and describes unipolar psychosis, bipolar psychosis and cycloïd psychosis (anxiety-elation psychosis, motility psychosis and confusion psychosis). Recent nosographical orientations seem to announce a come-back to Kraepelin's conception of "mood disorders". This paper presents the essential of Kraepelin's "manic-depressive insanity" theory-temperamental basis, integration of mixed states, epidemiological datas- and highlights its dialectical relations with today's theory of bipolarity.

  18. Presentation and Management of Bipolar Affective Disorders in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, Elizabeth

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews four case summaries of patients presenting to her family practice within a 12 month period. Each patient presented unique features, which on careful history review, fit the pattern of bipolar affective disorder, the features of which are described. Management of these patients includes mandatory psychiatric consultation and lithium for treatment of acute mania, and prophylaxis of mania and depression. Guidelines for lithium therapy are presented. The family physician is in an ideal position to detect bipolar illness and to manage patients once stabilized on longterm lithium therapy. PMID:21289854

  19. A critical update on psychological interventions for bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Vieta, Eduard; Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Valentí, Marc; Berk, Lesley; Berk, Michael; Scott, Jan; Colom, Francesc

    2009-12-01

    Although pharmacotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for bipolar disorder, the combination of evidence-based psychological interventions and drug treatment enhances overall effectiveness, mostly by further protecting patients from relapse/recurrence. In recent years, well-designed controlled studies have added weight to evidence favoring specific psychotherapy modalities for bipolar disorders. However, critical issues that may limit the benefits of psychotherapy in day-to-day clinical practice have emerged. In this article, we critically examine the effectiveness of psychosocial approaches to bipolar illness by reviewing the literature, which has been substantially enriched during the past 5 years. Recent studies further support the fact that psychoeducation and cognitive-behavioral therapy are effective in bipolar disorder, especially the early stages. Family interventions based on a psychoeducational model are also effective. Intensive psychotherapies may be more effective than short, managed care-based ones. Group psychoeducation seems to have long-lasting effects and to be cost-effective. Future studies should focus on neurobiological markers of response to psychotherapy and tailor interventions to specific subtypes.

  20. Toward a Deeper Understanding of the Genetics of Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kerner, Berit

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common, complex psychiatric disorder characterized by mania and depression. The disease aggregates in families, but despite much effort, it has been difficult to delineate the basic genetic model or identify specific genetic risk factors. Not only single gene Mendelian transmission and common variant hypotheses but also multivariate threshold models and oligogenic quasi-Mendelian modes of inheritance have dominated the discussion at times. Almost complete sequence information of the human genome and falling sequencing costs now offer the opportunity to test these models in families in which the disorder is transmitted over several generations. Exome-wide sequencing studies have revealed an astonishing number of rare and potentially damaging mutations in brain-expressed genes that could have contributed to the disease manifestation. However, the statistical analysis of these data has been challenging, because genetic risk factors displayed a high degree of dissimilarity across families. This scenario is not unique to bipolar disorder, but similar results have also been found in schizophrenia, a potentially related psychiatric disorder. Recently, our group has published data which supported an oligogenic genetic model of transmission in a family with bipolar disorder. In this family, three affected siblings shared rare, damaging mutations in multiple genes, which were linked to stress response pathways. These pathways are also the target for drugs frequently used to treat bipolar disorder. This article discusses these findings in the context of previously proclaimed disease models and suggests future research directions, including biological confirmation and phenotype stratification as an approach to disease heterogeneity. PMID:26283973

  1. Toward a Deeper Understanding of the Genetics of Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Berit

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common, complex psychiatric disorder characterized by mania and depression. The disease aggregates in families, but despite much effort, it has been difficult to delineate the basic genetic model or identify specific genetic risk factors. Not only single gene Mendelian transmission and common variant hypotheses but also multivariate threshold models and oligogenic quasi-Mendelian modes of inheritance have dominated the discussion at times. Almost complete sequence information of the human genome and falling sequencing costs now offer the opportunity to test these models in families in which the disorder is transmitted over several generations. Exome-wide sequencing studies have revealed an astonishing number of rare and potentially damaging mutations in brain-expressed genes that could have contributed to the disease manifestation. However, the statistical analysis of these data has been challenging, because genetic risk factors displayed a high degree of dissimilarity across families. This scenario is not unique to bipolar disorder, but similar results have also been found in schizophrenia, a potentially related psychiatric disorder. Recently, our group has published data which supported an oligogenic genetic model of transmission in a family with bipolar disorder. In this family, three affected siblings shared rare, damaging mutations in multiple genes, which were linked to stress response pathways. These pathways are also the target for drugs frequently used to treat bipolar disorder. This article discusses these findings in the context of previously proclaimed disease models and suggests future research directions, including biological confirmation and phenotype stratification as an approach to disease heterogeneity. PMID:26283973

  2. Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Disorder: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jennifer B; Krivenko, Anna; Howland, Molly; Schlachet, Rebecca; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-09-01

    Poor medication adherence is a pervasive problem that causes disability and suffering as well as extensive financial costs among individuals with bipolar disorder (BD). Barriers to adherence are numerous and cross multiple levels, including factors related to bipolar pathology and those unique to an individual's circumstances. External factors, including treatment setting, healthcare system, and broader health policies, can also affect medication adherence in people with BD. Fortunately, advances in research have suggested avenues for improving adherence. A comprehensive review of adherence-enhancement interventions for the years 2005-2015 is included. Specific bipolar adherence-enhancement approaches that target knowledge gaps, cognitive patterns, specific barriers, and motivation may be helpful, as may approaches that capitalize on technology or novel drug-delivery systems. However, much work remains to optimally facilitate long-term medication adherence in people with BD. For adherence-enhancement approaches to be widely adapted, they need to be easily accessible, affordable, and practical. PMID:27435356

  3. Seasonality of bipolar disorders in a forensic setting.

    PubMed

    London, W P; Taylor, B M

    1981-10-01

    The authors studied 180 men who were found not guilty by reason of insanity (NGBRI) and committed to a forensic hospital for treatment. The 57 men diagnosed as bipolar disorder committed the crime for which they were found NGBRI (and which was, therefore, the result of mental illness) significantly more frequently during the 6 months August through January. The crimes committed by those in the bipolar group who were 31 years or older showed even seasonality. The crimes committed by the 123 men found NGBRI but not diagnosed as bipolar showed no seasonality. During the past 5 years on the forensic unit, the seclusion time, which was due primarily to manic behavior, was significantly higher during the 4 months December through March. These observations establish a seasonality of mania that appears age-related.

  4. Identifying Functional Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Bipolar Disorder: Toward DSM-V

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Mary L.; Vieta, Eduard

    2007-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is one of the most debilitating and common illnesses worldwide. Individuals with bipolar disorder frequently present to clinical services when depressed but are often misdiagnosed with unipolar depression, leading to inadequate treatment and poor outcome. Increased accuracy in diagnosing bipolar disorder, especially during depression, is therefore a key long-term goal to improve the mental health of individuals with the disorder. The attainment of this goal can be facilitated by identifying biomarkers reflecting pathophysiologic processes in bipolar disorder, namely impaired emotion regulation, impaired attention, and distractibility, which persist during depression and remission and are not common to unipolar depression. In this critical review, we examine the feasibility of identifying biomarker of bipolar disorder by discussing existing findings regarding functional abnormalities in neural systems underlying emotion processing (amygdala centered), working memory, and attention (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex centered) that persist through bipolar depression and remission and are bipolar specific rather than common to unipolar depression. We then focus on future research goals relating to major clinical problems in bipolar disorder, including, the identification of biomarkers allowing detection of individuals at risk of subsequent development of the disorder. Bipolar disorder is a common, debilitating, and potentially fatal disorder. Current and future research in bipolar disorder should focus on identification of disorder biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy and the mental heath of those with the disorder. PMID:17562698

  5. Storm in My Brain: Kids and Mood Disorders (Bipolar Disorder and Depression)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bipolar disorder, and other illnesses your • Use gentle music, relaxation tapes, dim lights, warm baths and massage ... and bathroom. • Encourage expression and learning through art, music and creative writing. • Be flexible with assignments, homework, ...

  6. Neural Correlates of Treatment in Adolescents with Bipolar Depression During Response Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Segreti, Anna Maria; Ladouceur, Cecile D; Almeida, Jorge RC; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A; Phillips, Mary L; Pan, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective Abnormal prefrontal and subcortical activity during cognitive control tasks is identified in non-depressed adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD); however, little is known about the neural correlates of bipolar adolescents in a depressed state (BDd). We aimed to investigate baseline versus after-treatment patterns of neural activity underlying motor response and response inhibition in adolescents with BDd. Methods In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, 10 adolescents with BDd relative to 10 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC) completed a well-validated go/no go block-design cognitive control task at baseline and after 6 weeks of naturalistic treatment. We used whole-brain analysis and controlled our results for multiple comparisons. Results There was significant improvement in depression scores (mean change: 57%±28). There was no behavioral difference in BDd baseline versus HC and after treatment. BDd adolescents relative to HC had higher baseline cortical, but not subcortical, neural activity (e.g., bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal during both the go [motor control] and the no go [response inhibition] conditions, and left superior temporal during the no go condition). However, after-treatment activity relative to baseline neural activity during response inhibition was significantly increased in subcortical (e.g., right hippocampus and left thalamus), but not cortical, regions. In addition, at baseline, lower left thalamus activity was correlated with higher depression scores. Conclusions Adolescents with BDd had baseline prefrontal and temporal hyperactivity underlying motor control and response inhibition that did not change after treatment in contrast to relatively decreased baseline subcortical activity underlying response inhibition associated with the depressive state that was increased after the treatment. PMID:23607410

  7. Psychopharmacology of topiramate: from epilepsy to bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mula, Marco; Cavanna, Andrea E; Monaco, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is one of the novel antiepileptic drugs and exhibits a wide range of mechanisms of action. Efficacy of TPM has been demonstrated in partial-onset seizures and primary generalized seizures in adults and children, as both monotherapy and adjunctive therapy. More recently, TPM has been proposed as an add-on treatment for patients with lithium-resistant bipolar disorder, especially those displaying rapid-cycling and mixed states. This paper reviews the multiple mechanisms of action and the tolerability profile of TPM in the light of its therapeutic potential in affective disorders. Studies of TPM in bipolar disorder are evaluated, and the efficacy and tolerability issues as a mood stabilizing agent are discussed. PMID:19412496

  8. Innovative approaches to bipolar disorder and its treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; Harmer, Catherine J.; Nobre, Anna C.; Saunders, Kate; Goodwin, Guy M.; Geddes, John R.

    2016-01-01

    All psychiatric disorders have suffered from a dearth of truly novel pharmacological interventions. In bipolar disorder, lithium remains a mainstay of treatment, six decades since its effects were serendipitously discovered. The lack of progress reflects several factors, including ignorance of the disorder's pathophysiology and the complexities of the clinical phenotype. After reviewing the current status, we discuss some ways forward. First, we highlight the need for a richer characterization of the clinical profile, facilitated by novel devices and new forms of data capture and analysis; such data are already promoting a reevaluation of the phenotype, with an emphasis on mood instability rather than on discrete clinical episodes. Second, experimental medicine can provide early indications of target engagement and therapeutic response, reducing the time, cost, and risk involved in evaluating potential mood stabilizers. Third, genomic data can inform target identification and validation, such as the increasing evidence for involvement of calcium channel genes in bipolar disorder. Finally, new methods and models relevant to bipolar disorder, including stem cells and genetically modified mice, are being used to study key pathways and drug effects. A combination of these approaches has real potential to break the impasse and deliver genuinely new treatments. PMID:27111134

  9. The Differential Levels of Inflammatory Cytokines and BDNF among Bipolar Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chung, Yi-Lun; Li, Chia-Ling; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Wang, Liang-Jen; Chen, Po See; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsai-Hsin; Chiu, Yen-Chu; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Kao-Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Emerging evidence suggests that inflammation and neurodegeneration underlies bipolar disorder. To investigate biological markers of cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor between bipolar I, bipolar II, and other specified bipolar disorder with short duration hypomania may support the association with inflammatory dysregulation and bipolar disorder and, more specifically, provide evidence for other specified bipolar disorder with short duration hypomania patients were similar to bipolar II disorder patients from a biological marker perspective. Methods: We enrolled patients with bipolar I disorder (n=234), bipolar II disorder (n=260), other specified bipolar disorder with short duration hypomania (n=243), and healthy controls (n=140). Their clinical symptoms were rated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale. Inflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-α, C-reactive protein, transforming growth factor-β1, and interleukin-8) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels were measured in each group. Multivariate analysis of covariance and linear regression controlled for possible confounders were used to compare cytokine and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels among the groups. Results: Multivariate analysis of covariance adjusted for age and sex and a main effect of diagnosis was significant (P<.001). Three of the 5 measured biomarkers (tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor-β1, and interleukin-8) were significantly (P=.006, .01, and <.001) higher in all bipolar disorder patients than in controls. Moreover, covarying for multiple associated confounders showed that bipolar I disorder patients had significantly higher IL-8 levels than did bipolar II disorder and other specified bipolar disorder with short duration hypomania patients in multivariate analysis of covariance (P=.03) and linear regression (P=.02) analyses. Biomarkers differences between bipolar II disorder and other specified bipolar

  10. A latent class analysis of parental bipolar disorder: Examining associations with offspring psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Freed, Rachel D; Tompson, Martha C; Otto, Michael W; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Henin, Aude

    2015-12-15

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is highly heterogeneous, and course variations are associated with patient outcomes. This diagnostic complexity challenges identification of patients in greatest need of intervention. Additionally, course variations have implications for offspring risk. First, latent class analysis (LCA) categorized parents with BD based on salient illness characteristics: BD type, onset age, polarity of index episode, pole of majority of episodes, rapid cycling, psychosis, anxiety comorbidity, and substance dependence. Fit indices favored three parental classes with some substantively meaningful patterns. Two classes, labeled "Earlier-Onset Bipolar-I" (EO-I) and "Earlier-Onset Bipolar-II" (EO-II), comprised parents who had a mean onset age in mid-adolescence, with EO-I primarily BD-I parents and EO-II entirely BD-II parents. The third class, labeled "Later-Onset BD" (LO) had an average onset age in adulthood. Classes also varied on probability of anxiety comorbidity, substance dependence, psychosis, rapid cycling, and pole of majority of episodes. Second, we examined rates of disorders in offspring (ages 4-33, Mage=13.46) based on parental latent class membership. Differences emerged for offspring anxiety disorders only such that offspring of EO-I and EO-II parents had higher rates, compared to offspring of LO parents, particularly for daughters. Findings may enhance understanding of BD and its nosology.

  11. A latent class analysis of parental bipolar disorder: Examining associations with offspring psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Freed, Rachel D; Tompson, Martha C; Otto, Michael W; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Henin, Aude

    2015-12-15

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is highly heterogeneous, and course variations are associated with patient outcomes. This diagnostic complexity challenges identification of patients in greatest need of intervention. Additionally, course variations have implications for offspring risk. First, latent class analysis (LCA) categorized parents with BD based on salient illness characteristics: BD type, onset age, polarity of index episode, pole of majority of episodes, rapid cycling, psychosis, anxiety comorbidity, and substance dependence. Fit indices favored three parental classes with some substantively meaningful patterns. Two classes, labeled "Earlier-Onset Bipolar-I" (EO-I) and "Earlier-Onset Bipolar-II" (EO-II), comprised parents who had a mean onset age in mid-adolescence, with EO-I primarily BD-I parents and EO-II entirely BD-II parents. The third class, labeled "Later-Onset BD" (LO) had an average onset age in adulthood. Classes also varied on probability of anxiety comorbidity, substance dependence, psychosis, rapid cycling, and pole of majority of episodes. Second, we examined rates of disorders in offspring (ages 4-33, Mage=13.46) based on parental latent class membership. Differences emerged for offspring anxiety disorders only such that offspring of EO-I and EO-II parents had higher rates, compared to offspring of LO parents, particularly for daughters. Findings may enhance understanding of BD and its nosology. PMID:26394919

  12. Factors associated with lithium efficacy in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2014-01-01

    About one-third of lithium-treated, bipolar patients are excellent lithium responders; that is, lithium monotherapy totally prevents further episodes of bipolar disorder for ten years and more. These patients are clinically characterized by an episodic clinical course with complete remission, a bipolar family history, low psychiatric comorbidity, mania-depression episode sequences, a moderate number of episodes, and a low number of hospitalizations in the pre-lithium period. Recently, it has been found that temperamental features of hypomania (a hyperthymic temperament) and a lack of cognitive disorganization predict the best results of lithium prophylaxis. Lithium exerts a neuroprotective effect, in which increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) play an important role. The response to lithium has been connected with the genotype of the BDNF gene and serum BDNF levels. A better response to lithium is connected with the Met allele of the BDNF Val/Met polymorphism, as is a hyperthymic temperament. Excellent lithium responders have normal cognitive functions and serum BDNF levels, even after long-term duration of the illness. The preservation of cognitive functions in long-term lithium-treated patients may be connected with the stimulation of the BDNF system, with the resulting prevention of affective episodes exerting deleterious cognitive effects, and possibly also with lithium's antiviral effects. A number of candidate genes that are related to neurotransmitters, intracellular signaling, neuroprotection, circadian rhythms, and other pathogenic mechanisms of bipolar disorder were found to be associated with the lithium prophylactic response. The Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen) has recently performed the first genome-wide association study on the lithium response in bipolar disorder.

  13. Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Kamryn T.; Doyle, Angela Celio; Hoste, Renee Rienecke; Herzog, David B.; Le Grange, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    A study to examine the kind of eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) among adolescents encountered during treatment at an outpatient eating disorder clinic is conducted. Results indicate that EDNOS is more predominant among adolescents seeking treatment for eating disorders.

  14. Panic Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip breadcrumb navigation Panic Disorder In Children And Adolescents Quick Links Facts For Families Guide Facts For ... is a common and treatable disorder. Children and adolescents with panic disorder have unexpected and repeated periods ...

  15. Eating Disorders in Adolescent Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Dilip R.; Greydanus, Donald E.; Pratt, Helen D.; Phillips, Elaine L.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews research on eating disorders in adolescent athletes, including prevalence, its uncommonness among male athletes, risk factors, medical complications, prevention strategies, and implications for sport and exercise participation, management, and prognosis. (EV)

  16. Bipolar Disorder in Pregnancy and Postpartum: Principles of Management.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sabrina J; Fersh, Madeleine E; Ernst, Carrie; Klipstein, Kim; Albertini, Elizabeth Streicker; Lusskin, Shari I

    2016-02-01

    Pregnancy and postpartum represent times of increased vulnerability for women with bipolar disorder, yet this condition remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. As 50 % of pregnancies are unplanned, the risks associated with the illness and the potential risks associated with treatment should be considered when a woman of reproductive age first presents for evaluation. This article reviews the epidemiology of perinatal bipolar disorder, screening recommendations, and treatment with pharmacotherapy and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). An overview of the data in pregnancy and lactation is presented for lithium, lamotrigine, valproic acid, newer antipsychotics, and ECT. General principles of management include close monitoring in pregnancy and postpartum, careful adjustment of the treatment regimen to attenuate the risk of relapse, and avoidance of valproic acid when possible. Thoughtful consideration of these issues will minimize the risks to the mother and baby.

  17. [Termination without cause of a worker with bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Vicente-Herrero, María Teófila; Ruiz-Flores, Miguel; Torres, J Ignacio; Capdevila, Luisa; Ramírez, María Victoria; Terradillos, María Jesús; López-González, Ángel Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We describe the case of a worker with bipolar disorder who was terminated for incompetence, following a determination of being unfit for duty based on a periodic medical examination. The judge reversed the dismissal on the basis of failing to comply with the provisions of Article 52 a) of the Spanish Workers' Law. Social and labor integration of people with bipolar disorder presents challenges due both to the clinical characteristics of the disease and its chronic course, and the limitations associated with continued treatment. These situations can benefit from an evaluation of fitness for duty by an occupational physician and the implementation of preventive measures by the company, as it is necessary to exhaust all options before considering an extreme decision such as work unfitness and subsequent termination. The initial objective should be the social and labor integration of the affected worker, while minimizing risk to self and others.

  18. Functional impairment, stress, and psychosocial intervention in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Miklowitz, David J

    2011-12-01

    The longitudinal course of bipolar disorder (BD) is highly impairing. This article reviews recent research on functional impairment in the course of BD, the roles of social and intrafamilial stress in relapse and recovery, and the role of adjunctive psychosocial interventions in reducing risk and enhancing functioning. Comparative findings in adult and childhood BD are highlighted. Life events and family-expressed emotion have emerged as significant predictors of the course of BD. Studies of social information processing suggest that impairments in the recognition of facial emotions may characterize both adult- and early-onset bipolar patients. Newly developed psychosocial interventions, particularly those that focus on family and social relationships, are associated with more rapid recovery from episodes and better psychosocial functioning. Family-based psychoeducational approaches are promising as early interventions for children with BD or children at risk of developing the disorder. For adults, interpersonal therapy, mindfulness-based strategies, and cognitive remediation may offer promise in enhancing functioning.

  19. [Termination without cause of a worker with bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Vicente-Herrero, María Teófila; Ruiz-Flores, Miguel; Torres, J Ignacio; Capdevila, Luisa; Ramírez, María Victoria; Terradillos, María Jesús; López-González, Ángel Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We describe the case of a worker with bipolar disorder who was terminated for incompetence, following a determination of being unfit for duty based on a periodic medical examination. The judge reversed the dismissal on the basis of failing to comply with the provisions of Article 52 a) of the Spanish Workers' Law. Social and labor integration of people with bipolar disorder presents challenges due both to the clinical characteristics of the disease and its chronic course, and the limitations associated with continued treatment. These situations can benefit from an evaluation of fitness for duty by an occupational physician and the implementation of preventive measures by the company, as it is necessary to exhaust all options before considering an extreme decision such as work unfitness and subsequent termination. The initial objective should be the social and labor integration of the affected worker, while minimizing risk to self and others. PMID:23744020

  20. Stability of facial emotion recognition performance in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Martino, Diego J; Samamé, Cecilia; Strejilevich, Sergio A

    2016-09-30

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance in emotional processing over time in a sample of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder (BD). Performance in the facial recognition of the six basic emotions (surprise, anger, sadness, happiness, disgust, and fear) did not change during a follow-up period of almost 7 years. These preliminary results suggest that performance in facial emotion recognition might be stable over time in BD. PMID:27416537

  1. Voice analysis as an objective state marker in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Faurholt-Jepsen, M; Busk, J; Frost, M; Vinberg, M; Christensen, E M; Winther, O; Bardram, J E; Kessing, L V

    2016-01-01

    Changes in speech have been suggested as sensitive and valid measures of depression and mania in bipolar disorder. The present study aimed at investigating (1) voice features collected during phone calls as objective markers of affective states in bipolar disorder and (2) if combining voice features with automatically generated objective smartphone data on behavioral activities (for example, number of text messages and phone calls per day) and electronic self-monitored data (mood) on illness activity would increase the accuracy as a marker of affective states. Using smartphones, voice features, automatically generated objective smartphone data on behavioral activities and electronic self-monitored data were collected from 28 outpatients with bipolar disorder in naturalistic settings on a daily basis during a period of 12 weeks. Depressive and manic symptoms were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17-item and the Young Mania Rating Scale, respectively, by a researcher blinded to smartphone data. Data were analyzed using random forest algorithms. Affective states were classified using voice features extracted during everyday life phone calls. Voice features were found to be more accurate, sensitive and specific in the classification of manic or mixed states with an area under the curve (AUC)=0.89 compared with an AUC=0.78 for the classification of depressive states. Combining voice features with automatically generated objective smartphone data on behavioral activities and electronic self-monitored data increased the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of classification of affective states slightly. Voice features collected in naturalistic settings using smartphones may be used as objective state markers in patients with bipolar disorder. PMID:27434490

  2. Voice analysis as an objective state marker in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Faurholt-Jepsen, M; Busk, J; Frost, M; Vinberg, M; Christensen, E M; Winther, O; Bardram, J E; Kessing, L V

    2016-07-19

    Changes in speech have been suggested as sensitive and valid measures of depression and mania in bipolar disorder. The present study aimed at investigating (1) voice features collected during phone calls as objective markers of affective states in bipolar disorder and (2) if combining voice features with automatically generated objective smartphone data on behavioral activities (for example, number of text messages and phone calls per day) and electronic self-monitored data (mood) on illness activity would increase the accuracy as a marker of affective states. Using smartphones, voice features, automatically generated objective smartphone data on behavioral activities and electronic self-monitored data were collected from 28 outpatients with bipolar disorder in naturalistic settings on a daily basis during a period of 12 weeks. Depressive and manic symptoms were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17-item and the Young Mania Rating Scale, respectively, by a researcher blinded to smartphone data. Data were analyzed using random forest algorithms. Affective states were classified using voice features extracted during everyday life phone calls. Voice features were found to be more accurate, sensitive and specific in the classification of manic or mixed states with an area under the curve (AUC)=0.89 compared with an AUC=0.78 for the classification of depressive states. Combining voice features with automatically generated objective smartphone data on behavioral activities and electronic self-monitored data increased the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of classification of affective states slightly. Voice features collected in naturalistic settings using smartphones may be used as objective state markers in patients with bipolar disorder.

  3. Electrical mapping in bipolar disorder patients during the oddball paradigm.

    PubMed

    Di Giorgio Silva, Luiza Wanick; Cartier, Consuelo; Cheniaux, Elie; Novis, Fernanda; Silveira, Luciana Angélica; Cavaco, Paola Anaquim; de Assis da Silva, Rafael; Batista, Washington Adolfo; Tanaka, Guaraci Ken; Gongora, Mariana; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Basile, Luis Fernando; Budde, Henning; Cagy, Mauricio; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is characterized by an alternated occurrence between acute mania episodes and depression or remission moments. The objective of this study is to analyze the information processing changes in BP (Bipolar Patients) (euthymia, depression and mania) during the oddball paradigm, focusing on the P300 component, an electric potential of the cerebral cortex generated in response to external sensorial stimuli, which involves more complex neurophysiological processes related to stimulus interpretation. Twenty-eight bipolar disorder patients (BP) (17 women and 11 men with average age of 32.5, SD: 9.5) and eleven healthy controls (HC) (7 women and 4 men with average age of 29.78, SD: 6.89) were enrolled in this study. The bipolar patients were divided into 3 major groups (i.e., euthymic, depressive and maniac) according to the score on the Clinical Global Impression--Bipolar Version (CGI-BP). The subjects performed the oddball paradigm simultaneously to the EEG record. EEG data were also recorded before and after the execution of the task. A one-way ANOVA was applied to compare the P300 component among the groups. After observing P300 and the subcomponents P3a and P3b, a similarity of amplitude and latency between euthymic and depressive patients was observed, as well as small amplitude in the pre-frontal cortex and reduced P3a response. This can be evidence of impaired information processing, cognitive flexibility, working memory, executive functions and ability to shift the attention and processing to the target and away from distracting stimuli in BD. Such neuropsychological impairments are related to different BD symptoms, which should be known and considered, in order to develop effective clinical treatment strategies. PMID:26551764

  4. Borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder: what is the difference and why does it matter?

    PubMed

    Paris, Joel; Black, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and bipolar disorder (types I and II) are frequently confused because of their symptomatic overlap. Although affective instability is a prominent feature of each, the pattern is entirely different. BPD is characterized by transient mood shifts that occur in response to interpersonal stressors, whereas bipolar disorder is associated with sustained mood changes. These disorders can be further distinguished by comparing their phenomenology, etiology, family history, biological studies, outcome, and response to medication. Their distinction is of great clinical importance because misdiagnosis can deprive the patient of potentially effective treatment, whether it is psychotherapy for BPD or medication for bipolar disorder. On the basis of a comprehensive literature review, guidelines for differential diagnosis are suggested, and priorities for further research are recommended.

  5. Borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder: what is the difference and why does it matter?

    PubMed

    Paris, Joel; Black, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and bipolar disorder (types I and II) are frequently confused because of their symptomatic overlap. Although affective instability is a prominent feature of each, the pattern is entirely different. BPD is characterized by transient mood shifts that occur in response to interpersonal stressors, whereas bipolar disorder is associated with sustained mood changes. These disorders can be further distinguished by comparing their phenomenology, etiology, family history, biological studies, outcome, and response to medication. Their distinction is of great clinical importance because misdiagnosis can deprive the patient of potentially effective treatment, whether it is psychotherapy for BPD or medication for bipolar disorder. On the basis of a comprehensive literature review, guidelines for differential diagnosis are suggested, and priorities for further research are recommended. PMID:25536097

  6. Functional neuroanatomy of bipolar disorder: structure, function, and connectivity in an amygdala–anterior paralimbic neural system

    PubMed Central

    Blond, Benjamin N; Fredericks, Carolyn A; Blumberg, Hilary P

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In past decades, neuroimaging research in bipolar disorder has demonstrated a convergence of findings in an amygdala–anterior paralimbic cortex neural system. This paper reviews behavioral neurology literature that first suggested a central role for this neural system in the disorder and the neuroimaging evidence that supports it. Methods Relevant articles are reviewed to provide an amygdala–anterior paralimbic cortex neural system model of bipolar disorder, including articles from the fields of behavioral neurology and neuroanatomy, and neuroimaging. Results The literature is highly supportive of key roles for the amygdala, anterior paralimbic cortices, and connections among these structures in the emotional dysregulation of bipolar disorder. The functions subserved by their more widely distributed connection sites suggest that broader system dysfunction could account for the range of functions—from neurovegetative to cognitive—disrupted in the disorder. Abnormalities in some components of this neural system are apparent by adolescence, while others, such as those in rostral prefrontal regions, appear to progress over adolescence and young adulthood, suggesting a neurodevelopmental model of the disorder. However, some findings conflict, which may reflect the small sample sizes of some studies, and clinical heterogeneity and methodological differences across studies. Conclusions Consistent with models derived from early behavioral neurology studies, neuroimaging studies support a central role for an amygdala–anterior paralimbic neural system in bipolar disorder, and implicate abnormalities in the development of this system in the disorder. This system will be an important focus of future studies on the developmental pathophysiology, detection, treatment, and prevention of the disorder. PMID:22631619

  7. Improving the Recognition of Borderline Personality Disorder in a Bipolar World.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Both bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder (BPD) are serious mental health disorders resulting in significant psychosocial morbidity, reduced health-related quality of life, and excess mortality. Yet research on BPD has received much less funding from the National Institute of Health (NIH) than has bipolar disorder during the past 25 years. Why hasn't the level of NIH research funding for BPD been commensurate with the level of psychosocial morbidity, mortality, and health expenditures associated with the disorder? In the present article, the author illustrates how the bipolar disorder research community has done a superior job of "marketing" their disorder. Studies of underdiagnosis, screening, diagnostic spectra, and economics are reviewed for both bipolar disorder and BPD. Researchers of bipolar disorder have conducted multiple studies highlighting the problem with underdiagnosis, developed and promoted several screening scales, published numerous studies of the operating characteristics of these screening measures, attempted to broaden the definition of bipolar disorder by advancing the concept of the bipolar spectrum, and repeatedly demonstrated the economic costs and public health significance of bipolar disorder. In contrast, researchers of BPD have almost completely ignored each of these four issues and research efforts. Although BPD is as frequent as (if not more frequent than) bipolar disorder, as impairing as (if not more impairing than) bipolar disorder, and as lethal as (if not more lethal than) bipolar disorder, it has received less than one-tenth the level of funding from the NIH and has been the focus of many fewer publications in the most prestigious psychiatric journals. The researchers of BPD should consider adopting the strategy taken by researchers of bipolar disorder before the diagnosis is eliminated in a future iteration of the DSM or the ICD.

  8. Genetic association between NRG1 and schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder in Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zujia; Chen, Jianhua; Khan, Raja Amjad Waheed; Song, Zhijian; Wang, Meng; Li, Zhiqiang; Shen, Jiawei; Li, Wenjin; Shi, Yongyong

    2016-04-01

    Schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and bipolar disorder are three major psychiatric disorders affecting around 0.66%, 3.3%, and 1.5% of the Han Chinese population respectively. Several genetic linkage analyses and genome wide association studies identified NRG1 as a susceptibility gene of schizophrenia, which was validated by its role in neurodevelopment, glutamate, and other neurotransmitter receptor expression regulation. To further investigate whether NRG1 is a shared risk gene for major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder as well as schizophrenia, we performed an association study among 1,248 schizophrenia cases, 1,056 major depression cases, 1,344 bipolar disorder cases, and 1,248 controls. Totally 15 tag SNPs were genotyped and analyzed, and no population stratification was found in our sample set. Among the sites, rs4236710 (corrected Pgenotye  = 0.015) and rs4512342 (Pallele  = 0.03, Pgenotye  = 0.045 after correction) were associated with schizophrenia, and rs2919375 (corrected Pgenotye  = 0.004) was associated with major depressive disorder. The haplotype rs4512342-rs6982890 showed association with schizophrenia (P = 0.03 for haplotype "TC" after correction), and haplotype rs4531002-rs11989919 proved to be a shared risk factor for both major depressive disorder ("CC": corrected P = 0.009) and bipolar disorder ("CT": corrected P = 0.003). Our results confirmed that NRG1 was a shared common susceptibility gene for major mental disorders in Han Chinese population.

  9. Psychosocial interventions and medication adherence in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Depp, Colin A.; Moore, David J.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Lebowitz, Barry D.; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that psychosocial interventions can have a valuable role in reducing the substantial psychosocial disability associated with bipolar disorder. Randomized controlled trials of these interventions indicate that improvements are seen in symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and treatment adherence. These interventions systematically presented in the form of standardized treatment manuals, vary in format, duration, and theoretical basis. All are meant to augment pharmacotherapy, which represents the standard of treatment in the field. Modalities that have gathered the most empirical support include cognitive-behavioral therapy, familyfo-cused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythms therapy, and psychoeducation. The enhancement of adherence to pharmacotherapy is a common therapeutic target, due to the association of nonadherence with higher relapse rates, hospitalization, and health care costs among people with bipolar disorder. Given the complexity of nonadherence behavior, multicomponent interventions are often required. In this review, we provide an overview of the rationale, evidence base, and major psychotherapeutic approaches in bipolar disorder, focusing on the assessment and enhancement of medication adherence. PMID:18689293

  10. Childhood Bipolar Disorder: A Difficult Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Kimberly Kode

    2014-01-01

    Identifying children with emotional or behavior disorders has long been problematic. In a general sense, those children who are most likely to be noticed by teachers and, therefore, referred for possible special education placement are those who exhibit externalizing behaviors, including physical aggression, noncompliance, and rule-breaking. It is…

  11. New developments in the genetics of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Gen; Potash, James B

    2014-11-01

    The last several years have been breakthrough ones in bipolar disorder (BPD) genetics, as the field has identified robust risk variants for the first time. Leading the way have been genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that have assessed common genetic markers across very large groups of patients and controls. These have resulted in findings in genes including ANK3, CACNA1C, SYNE1, ODZ4, and TRANK1. Additional studies have begun to examine the biology of these genes and how risk variants influence aspects of brain and behavior that underlie BPD. For example, carriers of the CACNA1C risk variant have been found to exhibit hippocampal and anterior cingulate dysfunction during episodic memory recall. This work has shed additional light on the relationship of bipolar susceptibility variants to other disorders, particularly schizophrenia. Even larger BPD GWAS are expected with samples now amassed of 21,035 cases and 28,758 controls. Studies have examined the pharmacogenomics of BPD with studies of lithium response, yielding high profile results that remain to be confirmed. The next frontier in the field is the identification of rare bipolar susceptibility variants through large-scale DNA sequencing. While only a couple of papers have been published to date, many studies are underway. The Bipolar Sequencing Consortium has been formed to bring together all of the groups working in this area, and to perform meta-analyses of the data generated. The consortium, with 13 member groups, now has exome data on ~3,500 cases and ~5,000 controls, and on ~162 families. The focus will likely shift within several years from exome data to whole genome data as costs of obtaining such data continue to drop. Gene-mapping studies are now providing clear results that provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disorder. Sequencing studies should extend this process further. Findings could eventually set the stage for rational therapeutic development. PMID:25194313

  12. A report on older-age bipolar disorder from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Gildengers, Ariel G; Dols, Annemiek; Al Jurdi, Rayan K; Forester, Brent P; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Beyer, John; Manes, Facundo; Rej, Soham; Rosa, Adriane R; Schouws, Sigfried NTM; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Young, Robert C; Shulman, Kenneth I

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the coming generation, older adults with bipolar disorder (BD) will increase in absolute numbers as well as proportion of the general population. This is the first report of the International Society for Bipolar Disorder (ISBD) Task Force on Older-Age Bipolar Disorder (OABD). Methods This task force report addresses the unique aspects of OABD including epidemiology and clinical features, neuropathology and biomarkers, physical health, cognition, and care approaches. Results The report describes an expert consensus summary on OABD that is intended to advance the care of patients, and shed light on issues of relevance to BD research across the lifespan. Although there is still a dearth of research and health efforts focused on older adults with BD, emerging data has brought some answers, innovative questions, and novel perspectives related to the notion of late onset, medical comorbidity, and the vexing issue of cognitive impairment and decline. Conclusions Improving our understanding of the biological, clinical, and social underpinnings relevant to OABD is an indispensable step in building a complete map of BD across the lifespan. PMID:26384588

  13. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of flax oil in pediatric bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gracious, Barbara L; Chirieac, Madalina C; Costescu, Stefan; Finucane, Teresa L; Youngstrom, Eric A; Hibbeln, Joseph R

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This clinical trial evaluated whether supplementation with flax oil, containing the omega-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid (α-LNA), safely reduced symptom severity in youth with bipolar disorder. Methods Children and adolescents aged 6-17 years with symptomatic bipolar I or bipolar II disorder (n = 51), manic, hypomanic, mixed, or depressed, were randomized to either flax oil capsules containing 550 mg α-LNA per 1 gram or an olive oil placebo adjunctively or as monotherapy. Doses were titrated to 12 capsules per day as tolerated over 16 weeks. Primary outcomes included changes in the Young Mania Rating Scale, Child Depression Rating Scale-Revised, and Clinical Global Impressions-Bipolar ratings using Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Results There were no significant differences in primary outcome measures when compared by treatment assignment. However, clinician-rated Global Symptom Severity was negatively correlated with final serum omega-3 fatty acid compositions: % α-LNA (r = −0.45, p < 0.007), % eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (r = −0.47, p < 0.005), and positively correlated with final arachidonic acid (AA) (r = 0.36, p < 0.05) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) n-6 (r = 0.48, p < 0.004). The mean duration of treatment for α-LNA was 11.8 weeks versus 8 weeks for placebo; however, the longer treatment duration for α-LNA was not significant after controlling for baseline variables. Subjects discontinued the study for continued depressive symptoms. Conclusions Studies of essential fatty acid supplementation are feasible and well tolerated in the pediatric population. Although flax oil may decrease severity of illness in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder who have meaningful increases in serum EPA percent levels and/or decreased AA and DPA n-6 levels, individual variations in conversion of α-LNA to EPA and docosahexaenoic acid as well as dosing burden favor the use of fish oil both for clinical trials and clinical practice. Additionally

  14. Social Change and Increasing of Bipolar Disorders: An Evolutionary Model

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Mauro Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this paper is to see if behaviours defined as pathological and maladjusted in certain contexts may produce adaptive effects in other contexts, especially if they occur in attenuated form. Interactions between environment and behaviour are studied from an evolutionary standpoint in an attempt to understand how new attitudes emerge in an evolving context. Methodology: Narrative review. Following an historical examination of how the description of depression in Western society has changed, we examine a series of studies performed in areas where great changes have taken place as well as research on emigration from Sardinia in the 1960s and 70s and immigration to Sardinia in the 1990s. Results and conclusions: If we postulate that mood disorders are on the increase and that the epidemic began in the 17th century with the "English malady", we must suppose that at least the "light" forms have an adaptive advantage, otherwise the expansion of the disorder would have been self-limiting. "Compulsive hyper-responsabilization”, as well as explorative behaviours, may represent a base for adaptation in certain conditions of social change. The social emphasis in individualism and responsibility may have changed not only the frequency, but also the phenomenology of mood disorders particularly the increases in bipolar disorders. From the sociobiological standpoint the conditions that may favour "subthreshold" bipolar or depressive features are to be considered in relation to the contextual role of gender and the different risks of the two disorders in males and females. PMID:23878615

  15. The Treatment of Adult Bipolar Disorder with Aripiprazole: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Ather

    2016-04-07

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by exacerbations of opposite mood polarity, ranging from manic to major depressive episodes. In the current nosological system of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual - 5(th) edition (DSM-5), it is conceptualized as a spectrum disorder consisting of bipolar disorder type I, bipolar disorder type II, cyclothymic disorder, and bipolar disorder not otherwise specified. Treatment of all phases of this disorder is primarily with mood stabilizers, but many patients either show resistance to the conventional mood stabilizing medications or are intolerant to their side-effects. In this setting, second-generation antipsychotics have gained prominence as many bipolar subjects who are otherwise treatment refractory show response to these agents. Aripiprazole is a novel antipsychotic initially approved for the treatment of schizophrenia but soon found to be effective in bipolar disorder. This drug is well studied, as randomized controlled trials have been conducted in various phases of bipolar disorders. Aripiprazole exhibits the pharmacodynamic properties of partial agonism, functional selectivity, and serotonin-dopamine activity modulation - the new exemplars in the treatment of major psychiatric disorders. It is the first among a new series of psychotropic medications, which now also include brexpiprazole and cariprazine. The current review summarizes the data from controlled trials regarding the efficacy and safety of aripiprazole in adult bipolar patients. On the basis of this evidence, aripiprazole is found to be efficacious in the treatment and prophylaxis of manic and mixed episodes but has no effectiveness in acute and recurrent bipolar depression.

  16. BIPOLAR DISORDER AND MECHANISMS OF ACTION OF MOOD STABILIZERS

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Stanley I.; Basselin, Mireille; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Rao, Jagadeesh S.

    2009-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a major medical and social burden, whose cause, pathophysiology and treatment are not agreed on. It is characterized by recurrent periods of mania and depression (Bipolar I) or of hypomania and depression (Bipolar II). Its inheritance is polygenic, with evidence of a neurotransmission imbalance and disease progression. Patients often take multiple agents concurrently, with incomplete therapeutic success, particularly with regard to depression. Suicide is common. Of the hypotheses regarding the action of mood stabilizers in BD, the “arachidonic acid (AA) cascade” hypothesis is presented in detail in this review. It is based on evidence that chronic administration of lithium, carbamazepine, sodium valproate, or lamotrigine to rats downregulated AA turnover in brain phospholipids, formation of prostaglandin E2, and/or expression of AA-cascade enzymes, including cytosolic phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase-2 and/or acyl-CoA synthetase. The changes were selective for AA, since brain docosahexaenoic or palmitic acid metabolism, when measured, was unaffected, and topiramate, ineffective in BD, did not modify the rat brain AA cascade. Downregulation of the cascade by the mood stabilizers corresponded to inhibition of AA neurotransmission via dopaminergic D2-like and glutamatergic NMDA receptors. Unlike the mood stabilizers, antidepressants that increase switching of bipolar depression to mania upregulated the rat brain AA cascade. These observations suggest that the brain AA cascade is a common target of mood stabilizers, and that bipolar symptoms, particularly mania, are associated with an upregulated cascade and excess AA signaling via D2-like and NMDA receptors. This review presents ways to test these suggestions. PMID:19555719

  17. No evidence for allelic association between bipolar disorder and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Craddock, N.; Daniels, J.; Roberts, E.

    1995-08-14

    We have tested the hypothesis that DNA markers in the MAOA gene show allelic association with bipolar affective disorder. Eighty-four unrelated Caucasian patients with DSM III-R bipolar disorder and 84 Caucasian controls were typed for three markers in MAOA: a dinucleotide repeat in intron 2, a VNTR in intron 1, and an Fnu4HI RFLP in exon 8. No evidence for allelic association was observed between any of the markers and bipolar disorder. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  18. The role and impact of psychotherapy in the management of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Otto, Michael W; Miklowitz, David J

    2004-11-01

    A growing body of evidence documents the value of structured psychotherapeutic interventions for the co-management of bipolar disorder in the context of ongoing medication treatment. This article reviews the rationale, elements, and outcomes for those psychosocial treatments for bipolar disorder that have been examined in randomized trials. The available evidence suggests that interventions delivered in individual, group, or family settings, can provide significant benefit to patients undergoing pharmacotherapy for bipolar disorder.

  19. Transcription factor 4 gene rs9960767 polymorphism in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ozel, Mavi Deniz; Onder, Mehmet Emin; Sazci, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor 4 (TCF4) gene encodes a helix-loop-helix transcription factor protein, which initiates neuronal differentiation and is primarily expressed during nervous system development. The aim of the present study is to investigate the association of the TCF4 rs9960767 polymorphism and bipolar disorder, which is highly heritable. DNA isolation was performed on 95 patients with bipolar disorder and 108 healthy control subjects to examine the TCF4 rs9960767 polymorphism. Genotypic and allelic frequencies were determined using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method designed in our laboratory. Statistical analysis was performed using χ2 test within the 95% confidence interval. Odds ratios were calculated and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was verified for all control subjects and patients. The A allele frequency was 95.8% in the patients and 94.4% in the control subjects, and 4.2% in the patients and 5.6% in the control subjects for the C allele. The genotype frequencies of the TCF4 gene rs9960767 variant were as follows: AA, 91.6% and AC, 8.4% in patients with bipolar (CC genotype was not observed in cases); AA, 89.8%; AC, 9.3% and CC, 0.9% in the control subjects. No statistically significant difference was identified between the patients and control subjects (χ2=0.937; P=0.626). In addition, gender specific analysis was performed, although no significant association was found according to the gender distrubition. All patients and control subjects were in HWE (P>0.05). Statistical analysis of the data indicates that the TCF4 gene rs9960767 polymorphism is not an independent risk factor for bipolar disorder in the overall population or in terms of gender; however, an increased population size would improve the statistical power. Furthermore, additional gene variants that are specifically involved in neuronal development may be analyzed for revealing the complex genetic architecture of bipolar disorder. An

  20. Transcription factor 4 gene rs9960767 polymorphism in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ozel, Mavi Deniz; Onder, Mehmet Emin; Sazci, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor 4 (TCF4) gene encodes a helix-loop-helix transcription factor protein, which initiates neuronal differentiation and is primarily expressed during nervous system development. The aim of the present study is to investigate the association of the TCF4 rs9960767 polymorphism and bipolar disorder, which is highly heritable. DNA isolation was performed on 95 patients with bipolar disorder and 108 healthy control subjects to examine the TCF4 rs9960767 polymorphism. Genotypic and allelic frequencies were determined using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method designed in our laboratory. Statistical analysis was performed using χ2 test within the 95% confidence interval. Odds ratios were calculated and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was verified for all control subjects and patients. The A allele frequency was 95.8% in the patients and 94.4% in the control subjects, and 4.2% in the patients and 5.6% in the control subjects for the C allele. The genotype frequencies of the TCF4 gene rs9960767 variant were as follows: AA, 91.6% and AC, 8.4% in patients with bipolar (CC genotype was not observed in cases); AA, 89.8%; AC, 9.3% and CC, 0.9% in the control subjects. No statistically significant difference was identified between the patients and control subjects (χ2=0.937; P=0.626). In addition, gender specific analysis was performed, although no significant association was found according to the gender distrubition. All patients and control subjects were in HWE (P>0.05). Statistical analysis of the data indicates that the TCF4 gene rs9960767 polymorphism is not an independent risk factor for bipolar disorder in the overall population or in terms of gender; however, an increased population size would improve the statistical power. Furthermore, additional gene variants that are specifically involved in neuronal development may be analyzed for revealing the complex genetic architecture of bipolar disorder. An

  1. Using Smartphones to Monitor Bipolar Disorder Symptoms: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kindermann, Sally; Maier, Andreas; Kerl, Christopher; Moock, Jörn; Barbian, Guido; Rössler, Wulf

    2016-01-01

    Background Relapse prevention in bipolar disorder can be improved by monitoring symptoms in patients' daily life. Smartphone apps are easy-to-use, low-cost tools that can be used to assess this information. To date, few studies have examined the usefulness of smartphone data for monitoring symptoms in bipolar disorder. Objective We present results from a pilot test of a smartphone-based monitoring system, Social Information Monitoring for Patients with Bipolar Affective Disorder (SIMBA), that tracked daily mood, physical activity, and social communication in 13 patients. The objective of this study was to investigate whether smartphone measurements predicted clinical symptoms levels and clinical symptom change. The hypotheses that smartphone measurements are (1) negatively related to clinical depressive symptoms and (2) positively related to clinical manic symptoms were tested. Methods Clinical rating scales were administered to assess clinical depressive and manic symptoms. Patients used a smartphone with the monitoring app for up to 12 months. Random-coefficient multilevel models were computed to analyze the relationship between smartphone data and externally rated manic and depressive symptoms. Overall clinical symptom levels and clinical symptom changes were predicted by separating between-patient and within-patient effects. Using established clinical thresholds from the literature, marginal effect plots displayed clinical relevance of smartphone data. Results Overall symptom levels and change in clinical symptoms were related to smartphone measures. Higher overall levels of clinical depressive symptoms were predicted by lower self-reported mood measured by the smartphone (beta=-.56, P<.001). An increase in clinical depressive symptoms was predicted by a decline in social communication (ie, outgoing text messages: beta=-.28, P<.001) and a decline in physical activity as measured by the smartphone (ie, cell tower movements: beta=-.11, P=.03). Higher overall

  2. Bipolar Disorder after Stroke in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Raquel Calvão; Lopes, Rui; Alves, José Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The onset of bipolar disorder (BD) secondary to a stroke event is a rare clinical entity. Although it may be related to specific regions of the brain, several other factors have been linked to its expression such as subcortical atrophy or chronic vascular burden. While precise locations and cerebral circuits involved in the bipolarity expression after stroke still need to be determined, their investigation represents an opportunity to study brain function and BD etiopathogenesis. We present a BD secondary to multiple subcortical biparietal lacunar infarctions, a lacunar infarction in left putamen and an ischemic lesion at the cerebral trunk evolving the right median portion, in a 65-year-old male patient who experienced manic, hypomanic, and depressive episodes, after 6, 10, and 16 months, respectively, of the cerebrovascular events. PMID:24991445

  3. Transdiagnostic Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and Comorbid Anxiety with the Unified Protocol: A Clinical Replication Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellard, Kristen K.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder with recurrent manic and depressive episodes. More than 75% of bipolar patients have a current or lifetime diagnosis of a comorbid anxiety disorder. Comorbid anxiety in BD is associated with greater illness severity, greater functional impairment, and poorer illness-related outcomes.…

  4. Differentiating Bipolar Disorder--Not Otherwise Specified and Severe Mood Dysregulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towbin, Kenneth; Axelson, David; Leibenluft, Ellen; Birmaher, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Bipolar disorder--not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) and severe mood dysregulation (SMD) are severe mood disorders that were defined to address questions about the diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD) in youth. SMD and BP-NOS are distinct phenotypes that differ in clinical presentation and longitudinal course. The purpose of this review is…

  5. Emergent treatments based on the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder: A selective review.

    PubMed

    Brady, Roscoe O; Keshavan, Matcheri

    2015-12-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic psychiatric disorder that is a cause of significant symptomatology even in the setting of optimal treatment. Most current treatments are developed from serendipity, and not based on known pathophysiology. In this review we examine a number of somatic and pharmacologic therapies that are poised to become part of the armamentarium of interventions to treat bipolar illness. As a group, these interventions are derived from a growing understanding of the biological underpinnings of bipolar disorders. We will look at emergent treatments based on our understanding of the molecular biology, neuroanatomy, and the genetics of bipolar disorder. PMID:26525885

  6. Antipsychotic Medicines for Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    Antipsychotic Drugs for Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: What You Should Know What are antipsychotic drugs? Antipsychotics are prescription drugs used to treat schizophrenia. They can also be used— ...

  7. The psychosocial context of bipolar disorder: environmental, cognitive, and developmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Alloy, Lauren B; Abramson, Lyn Y; Urosevic, Snezana; Walshaw, Patricia D; Nusslock, Robin; Neeren, Amy M

    2005-12-01

    In this article, we review empirical research on the role of individuals' current environmental contexts, cognitive styles, and developmental histories as risk factors for the onset, course, and expression of bipolar spectrum disorders. Our review is focused on the following over arching question: Do psychosocial factors truly contribute risk to the onset, course, or expression of bipolar disorders? As a secondary issue, we also address whether the psychosocial risks for bipolar disorders are similar to those for unipolar depression. We begin by discussing the methodological requirements for demonstrating a psychosocial risk factor and the challenges posed by bipolar spectrum disorders for psychosocial risk research. Next, we review the extant studies on the role of recent life events and supportive and non-supportive social interactions (current environment) in bipolar disorders, as well as psychosocial treatments designed to remediate these current environmental factors. We then review the role of cognitive styles featured as vulnerabilities in theories of unipolar depression as risk factors for bipolar disorder alone and in combination with life events, including studies of cognitive-behavioral therapies for bipolar disorder. Finally, we review studies of parenting and maltreatment histories in bipolar disorders. We conclude with an assessment of the state of the psychosocial risk factors literature in bipolar disorder with regard to our guiding questions.

  8. [Research on Early Identification of Bipolar Disorder Based on Multi-layer Perceptron Neural Network].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haowei; Gao, Yanni; Yuan, Chengmei; Liu, Ying; Ding, Yuqing

    2015-06-01

    Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network belongs to multi-layer feedforward neural network, and has the ability and characteristics of high intelligence. It can realize the complex nonlinear mapping by its own learning through the network. Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness with high recurrence rate, high self-harm rate and high suicide rate. Most of the onset of the bipolar disorder starts with depressive episode, which can be easily misdiagnosed as unipolar depression and lead to a delayed treatment so as to influence the prognosis. The early identifica- tion of bipolar disorder is of great importance for patients with bipolar disorder. Due to the fact that the process of early identification of bipolar disorder is nonlinear, we in this paper discuss the MLP neural network application in early identification of bipolar disorder. This study covered 250 cases, including 143 cases with recurrent depression and 107 cases with bipolar disorder, and clinical features were statistically analyzed between the two groups. A total of 42 variables with significant differences were screened as the input variables of the neural network. Part of the samples were randomly selected as the learning sample, and the other as the test sample. By choosing different neu- ral network structures, all results of the identification of bipolar disorder were relatively good, which showed that MLP neural network could be used in the early identification of bipolar disorder. PMID:26485974

  9. [Research on Early Identification of Bipolar Disorder Based on Multi-layer Perceptron Neural Network].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haowei; Gao, Yanni; Yuan, Chengmei; Liu, Ying; Ding, Yuqing

    2015-06-01

    Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network belongs to multi-layer feedforward neural network, and has the ability and characteristics of high intelligence. It can realize the complex nonlinear mapping by its own learning through the network. Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness with high recurrence rate, high self-harm rate and high suicide rate. Most of the onset of the bipolar disorder starts with depressive episode, which can be easily misdiagnosed as unipolar depression and lead to a delayed treatment so as to influence the prognosis. The early identifica- tion of bipolar disorder is of great importance for patients with bipolar disorder. Due to the fact that the process of early identification of bipolar disorder is nonlinear, we in this paper discuss the MLP neural network application in early identification of bipolar disorder. This study covered 250 cases, including 143 cases with recurrent depression and 107 cases with bipolar disorder, and clinical features were statistically analyzed between the two groups. A total of 42 variables with significant differences were screened as the input variables of the neural network. Part of the samples were randomly selected as the learning sample, and the other as the test sample. By choosing different neu- ral network structures, all results of the identification of bipolar disorder were relatively good, which showed that MLP neural network could be used in the early identification of bipolar disorder.

  10. Response to lithium in bipolar disorder: clinical and genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2014-06-18

    The use of lithium is a cornerstone for preventing recurrences in bipolar disorder (BD). The response of patients with bipolar disorder to lithium has different levels of magnitude. About one-third of lithium-treated patients are excellent lithium responders (ELR), showing total prevention of the episodes. A number of clinical characteristics were delineated in patients with favorable response to lithium as regards to clinical course, family history of mood disorders, and psychiatric comorbidity. We have also demonstrated that temperamental features of hypomania (a hyperthymic temperament) and a lack of cognitive disorganization predict the best results of lithium prophylaxis. A degree of prevention against manic and depressive episodes has been regarded as an endophenotype for pharmacogenetic studies. The majority of data have been gathered from so-called "candidate" gene studies. The candidates were selected on the basis of neurobiology of bipolar disorder and mechanisms of lithium action including, among others, neurotransmission, intracellular signaling, neuroprotection or circadian rhythms. We demonstrated that response to lithium has been connected with the genotype of BDNF gene and serum BDNF levels and have shown that ELR have normal cognitive functions and serum BDNF levels, even after long-term duration of the illness. A number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of BD have been also performed in recent years, some of which also focused on lithium response. The Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen) has established the large sample for performing the genome-wide association study (GWAS) of lithium response in BD, and the first results have already been published.

  11. Early psychosocial intervention for youth at risk for bipolar I or II disorder: a one-year treatment development trial

    PubMed Central

    Miklowitz, David J; Chang, Kiki D; Taylor, Dawn O; George, Elizabeth L; Singh, Manpreet K; Schneck, Christopher D; Dickinson, L Miriam; Howe, Meghan E; Garber, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies have identified behavioral phenotypes that predispose genetically vulnerable youth to a later onset of bipolar I or II disorder, but few studies have examined whether early psychosocial intervention can reduce risk of syndromal conversion. In a one-year open trial, we tested a version of family-focused treatment adapted for youth at high risk for bipolar disorder (FFT-HR). Methods A referred sample of 13 children (mean 13.4 ± 2.69 years; 4 boys, 9 girls) who had a parent with bipolar I or II disorder participated at one of two outpatient specialty clinics. Youth met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder (n = 8), cyclothymic disorder (n = 1), or bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (n = 4), with active mood symptoms in the past month. Participants were offered FFT-HR (12 sessions in four months) with their parents, plus psychotropic medications as needed. Independent evaluators assessed depressive symptoms, hypomanic symptoms, and global functioning at baseline and then every four months for one year, with retrospective severity and impairment ratings made for each week of the follow-up interval. Results Families were mostly adherent to the treatment protocol (85% retention), and therapists administered the FFT-HR manual with high levels of fidelity. Youth showed significant improvements in depression, hypomania, and psychosocial functioning scores on the Adolescent Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. They also showed significant improvements in Young Mania Rating Scale and Children’s Depression Rating Scale scores. Conclusions FFT-HR is a promising intervention for youth at high risk for BD. Larger-scale randomized trials that follow youth into young adulthood will be necessary to determine whether early psychosocial intervention can reduce the probability of developing bipolar I or II disorder among genetically vulnerable youth. PMID:21320254

  12. Early Recognition of High Risk of Bipolar Disorder and Psychosis: An Overview of the ZInEP "Early Recognition" Study.

    PubMed

    Theodoridou, Anastasia; Heekeren, Karsten; Dvorsky, Diane; Metzler, Sibylle; Franscini, Maurizia; Haker, Helene; Kawohl, Wolfram; Rüsch, Nicolas; Walitza, Susanne; Rössler, Wulf

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of persons with first signs of emerging psychosis is regarded as a promising strategy to reduce the burden of the disease. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in early detection of psychosis and bipolar disorders, with a clear need for sufficient sample sizes in prospective research. The underlying brain network disturbances in individuals at risk or with a prodrome are complex and yet not well known. This paper provides the rationale and design of a prospective longitudinal study focused on at-risk states of psychosis and bipolar disorder. The study is carried out within the context of the Zurich Program for Sustainable Development of Mental Health services (Zürcher Impulsprogramm zur Nachhaltigen Entwicklung der Psychiatrie). Persons at risk for psychosis or bipolar disorder between 13 and 35 years of age are examined by using a multi-level-approach (psychopathology, neuropsychology, genetics, electrophysiology, sociophysiology, magnetic resonance imaging, near-infrared spectroscopy). The included adolescents and young adults have four follow-ups at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. This approach provides data for a better understanding of the relevant mechanisms involved in the onset of psychosis and bipolar disorder, which can serve as targets for future interventions. But for daily clinical practice a practicable "early recognition" approach is required. The results of this study will be useful to identify the strongest predictors and to delineate a prediction model. PMID:25325050

  13. Comparing clinical responses and the biomarkers of BDNF and cytokines between subthreshold bipolar disorder and bipolar II disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Wang, Liang-Jen; Chen, Po See; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Li, Chia-Ling; Chung, Yi-Lun; Hsieh, Tsai-Hsin; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2016-01-01

    Patients with subthreshold hypomania (SBP; subthreshold bipolar disorder) were indistinguishable from those with bipolar disorder (BP)-II on clinical bipolar validators, but their analyses lacked biological and pharmacological treatment data. Because inflammation and neuroprogression underlies BP, we hypothesized that cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are biomarkers for BP. We enrolled 41 drug-naïve patients with SBP and 48 with BP-II undergoing 12 weeks of pharmacological treatment (valproic acid, fluoxetine, risperidone, lorazepam). The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were used to evaluate clinical responses at baseline and at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. Inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-α, transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1, interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8 and IL-1β) and BDNF levels were also measured. Mixed models repeated measurement was used to examine the therapeutic effect and changes in BDNF and cytokine levels between the groups. HDRS and YMRS scores significantly (P < 0.001) declined in both groups, the SBP group had significantly lower levels of BDNF (P = 0.005) and TGF-β1 (P = 0.02). Patients with SBP and BP-II respond similarly to treatment, but SBP patients may have different neuroinflammation marker expression. PMID:27270858

  14. Comparing clinical responses and the biomarkers of BDNF and cytokines between subthreshold bipolar disorder and bipolar II disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Wang, Liang-Jen; Chen, Po See; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Li, Chia-Ling; Chung, Yi-Lun; Hsieh, Tsai-Hsin; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2016-01-01

    Patients with subthreshold hypomania (SBP; subthreshold bipolar disorder) were indistinguishable from those with bipolar disorder (BP)-II on clinical bipolar validators, but their analyses lacked biological and pharmacological treatment data. Because inflammation and neuroprogression underlies BP, we hypothesized that cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are biomarkers for BP. We enrolled 41 drug-naïve patients with SBP and 48 with BP-II undergoing 12 weeks of pharmacological treatment (valproic acid, fluoxetine, risperidone, lorazepam). The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were used to evaluate clinical responses at baseline and at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. Inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-α, transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1, interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8 and IL-1β) and BDNF levels were also measured. Mixed models repeated measurement was used to examine the therapeutic effect and changes in BDNF and cytokine levels between the groups. HDRS and YMRS scores significantly (P < 0.001) declined in both groups, the SBP group had significantly lower levels of BDNF (P = 0.005) and TGF-β1 (P = 0.02). Patients with SBP and BP-II respond similarly to treatment, but SBP patients may have different neuroinflammation marker expression. PMID:27270858

  15. Comparison of clinical and sociodemographic features of bipolar disorder patients with those of social anxiety disorder patients comorbid with bipolar disorder in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Berkol, Tonguç D.; Kırlı, Ebru; Islam, Serkan; Pınarbaşı, Rasim; Özyıldırım, İlker

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of social anxiety disorder (SAD) comorbidity on the clinical features, illness severity, and response to mood stabilizers in bipolar disorder (BD) patients. Methods: This retrospective study included bipolar patients that were treated at the Department of Psychiatry, Haseki Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey in 2015, and who provided their informed consents for participation in this study. The study was conducted by assessing patient files retrospectively. Two hundred bipolar patients were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition axis-I (SCID-I) in order to detect all possible comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. The sample was split according to the presence of SAD comorbidity and the groups were compared. Results: The SAD comorbidity was detected in 17.5% (35/200) of the BD patients. The SAD comorbid bipolar patients were more educated, had earlier onset of BD, lower number of manic episodes, and more severe episodes. There was no difference between groups in terms of total number of episodes, hospitalization, suicidality, being psychotic, treatment response to lithium and anticonvulsants. Conclusion: Social anxiety disorder comorbidity may be associated with more severe episodes and early onset of BD. However, SAD comorbidity may not be related to treatment response in bipolar patients. PMID:26905355

  16. Lower "N"-Acetyl-Aspartate Levels in Prefrontal Cortices in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: A (Superscript 1]H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caetano, Sheila C.; Olvera, Rene L.; Hatch, John P.; Sanches, Marsal; Chen, Hua Hsuan; Nicoletti, Mark; Stanley, Jeffrey A.; Fonseca, Manoela; Hunter, Kristina; Lafer, Beny; Pliszka, Steven R.; Soares, Jair C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The few studies applying single-voxel [superscript 1]H spectroscopy in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD) have reported low "N"-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) levels in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and high myo-inositol/phosphocreatine plus creatine (PCr+Cr) ratios in the anterior cingulate. The aim of this study…

  17. CAG repeat expansions in bipolar and unipolar disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Oruc, L.; Verheyen, G.R.; Raeymaekers, P.; Van Broeckhoven, C.

    1997-03-01

    Family, twin, and adoption studies consistently have indicated that the familial aggregation of bipolar (BP) disorder and unipolar recurrent major depression (UPR) is accounted for largely by genetic factors. However, the mode of inheritance is complex. One of the possible explanations could be that a gene with variable penetrance and variable expression is involved. Recently there have been reports on a new class of genetic diseases caused by an abnormal trinucleotide-repeat expansion (TRE). In a number of genetic disorders, these dynamic mutations were proved to be the biological basis for the clinically observed phenomenon of anticipation. DNA consisting of repeated triplets of nucleotides becomes unstable and increases in size over generations within families, giving rise to an increased severity and/or an earlier onset of the disorder. It has been recognized for a long time that anticipation occurs in multiplex families transmitting mental illness. More recent studies also suggest that both BP disorder and UPR show features that are compatible with anticipation. Although the findings of anticipation in BP disorders and in UPR must be interpreted with caution because of the possible presence of numerous ascertainment biases, they support the hypothesis that pathological TREs are implicated in the transmission of these disorders. TRE combined with variable penetrance of expression could explain the complex transmission pattern observed in BP disorder. In view of this, the recent reports of an association between CAG-repeat length and BP disorder in a Belgian, Swedish, and British population are promising. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Cognitive enhancing agents in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Vreeker, Annabel; van Bergen, Annet H; Kahn, René S

    2015-07-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a core feature of schizophrenia and is also present in bipolar disorder (BD). Whereas decreased intelligence precedes the onset of psychosis in schizophrenia and remains relatively stable thereafter; high intelligence is a risk factor for bipolar illness but cognitive function decreases after onset of symptoms. While in schizophrenia, many studies have been conducted on the development of cognitive enhancing agents; in BD such studies are almost non-existent. This review focuses on the pharmacological agents with putative effects on cognition in both schizophrenia and bipolar illness; specifically agents targeting the dopaminergic, cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmitter pathways in schizophrenia and the cognitive effects of lithium, anticonvulsants and antipsychotics in BD. In the final analysis we conclude that cognitive enhancing agents have not yet been produced convincingly for schizophrenia and have hardly been studied in BD. Importantly, studies should focus on other phases of the illness. To be able to treat cognitive deficits effectively in schizophrenia, patients in the very early stages of the illness, or even before - in the ultra-high risk stages - should be targeted. In contrast, cognitive deficits occur later in BD, and therefore drugs should be tested in BD after the onset of illness. Hopefully, we will then find effective drugs for the incapacitating effects of cognitive deficits in these patients.

  19. Diagnostic Specificity of Neurophysiological Endophenotypes in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Johannesen, Jason K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The utility of an endophenotype depends on its ability to reduce complex disorders into stable, genetically linked phenotypes. P50 and P300 event-related potential (ERP) measures are endophenotype candidates for schizophrenia; however, their abnormalities are broadly observed across neuropsychiatric disorders. This study examined the diagnostic efficiency of P50 and P300 in schizophrenia as compared with healthy and bipolar disorder samples. Supplemental ERP measures and a multivariate classification approach were evaluated as methods to improve specificity. Methods: Diagnostic classification was first modeled in schizophrenia (SZ = 50) and healthy normal (HN = 50) samples using hierarchical logistic regression with predictors blocked by 4 levels of analysis: (1) P50 suppression, P300 amplitude, and P300 latency; (2) N100 amplitude; (3) evoked spectral power; and (4) P50 and P300 hemispheric asymmetry. The optimal model was cross-validated in a holdout sample (SZ = 34, HN = 31) and tested against a bipolar (BP = 50) sample. Results: P50 and P300 endophenotypes classified SZ from HN with 71% accuracy (sensitivity = .70, specificity = .72) but did not differentiate SZ from BP above chance level. N100 and spectral power measures improved classification accuracy of SZ vs HN to 79% (sensitivity = .78, specificity = .80) and SZ vs BP to 72% (sensitivity = .74, specificity = .70). Cross validation analyses supported the stability of these models. Conclusions: Although traditional P50 and P300 measures failed to differentiate schizophrenia from bipolar participants, N100 and evoked spectral power measures added unique variance to classification models and improved accuracy to nearly the same level achieved in comparison of schizophrenia to healthy individuals. PMID:22927673

  20. Renaming schizophrenia to reduce stigma: comparison with the case of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Nell; Mason, Oliver; Scior, Katrina

    2015-04-01

    Renaming disorders to change public beliefs and attitudes remains controversial. This study compared the potentially destigmatising effects of renaming schizophrenia with the effects of renaming bipolar disorder by comparing the label 'schizophrenia' to 'integration disorder', and 'bipolar disorder' to 'manic depression', in 1621 lay participants. 'Bipolar disorder' was associated with less fear and social distance than 'manic depression'. 'Integration disorder' was associated with increased endorsement of a biopsychosocial cause and reduced attributions of dangerousness but also increased social distance, highlighting the complex effects renaming has on stigma.

  1. Reward sensitivity and anger in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Duek, Or; Osher, Yamima; Belmaker, Robert H; Bersudsky, Yuly; Kofman, Ora

    2014-01-30

    According to the hypersensitive behavioral approach system (BAS) model of bipolar disorder (BP), hypersensitivity of the BAS is a trait that should be present even in the euthymic state. This would be expected to result in increased anger and reward sensitivity, both of which are related to the approach system. This study examined these predictions through the use of tasks that assess different aspects of the BAS: reward sensitivity, anger and impulsivity. These characteristics were assessed using the probabilistic classification task (PCT), ultimatum game (UG) and single key impulsivity paradigm (SKIP), respectively. Participants were euthymic adult bipolar disorder patients (BP; N=40) and healthy controls (HC; N=41). In the UG, all participants showed the standard pattern of rejecting overtly unfair offers and accepting clearly fair offers; however, BPs rejected more of the moderately unfair offers than did HCs. BP and HC participants did not differ on their ability to learn, but did show different patterns of learning from reward and punishment. Learning for reward and punishment were negatively correlated in the BP group, suggesting that individuals could learn well either from reward or punishment, but not both. No correlation was found between these forms of learning in the HC group. BP patients show signs of their disorder even in the euthymic state, as seen by the dysbalance between reward and punishment learning and their residual anger in the UG.

  2. Cognitive control of gaze in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Katharine N.; Schall, Jeffrey D.; Logan, Gordon D.; Park, Sohee

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare two components of executive functioning, response monitoring and inhibition in bipolar disorder (BP) and schizophrenia (SZ). The saccadic countermanding task is a translational paradigm optimized for detecting subtle abnormalities in response monitoring and response inhibition. We have previously reported countermanding performance abnormalities in SZ, but the degree to which these impairments are shared by other psychotic disorders is unknown. 18 BP, 17 SZ, and 16 demographically-matched healthy controls (HC) participated in a saccadic countermanding task. Performance on the countermanding task is approximated as a race between movement generation and inhibition processes; this model provides an estimate of the time needed to cancel a planned movement. Response monitoring was assessed by the reaction time (RT) adjustments based on trial history. Like SZ patients, BP patients needed more time to cancel a planned movement. The two patient groups had equivalent inhibition efficiency. On trial history-based RT adjustments, however, we found a trend towards exaggerated trial history-based slowing in SZ compared to BP. Findings have implications for understanding the neurobiology of cognitive control, for defining the etiological overlap between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and for developing pharmacological treatments of cognitive impairments. PMID:25601802

  3. Inflammatory mediators of cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Isabelle E.; Pascoe, Michaela C.; Wollenhaupt-Aguiar, Bianca; Kapczinski, Flavio; Soares, Jair C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have pointed to neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and neurotrophic factors as key mediators in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Little is however known about the cascade of biological episodes underlying the cognitive deficits observed during the acute and euthymic phases of bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of this review is to assess the potential association between cognitive impairment and biomarkers of inflammation, oxidative stress and neurotrophic activity in BD. Methods Scopus (all databases), Pubmed and Ovid Medline were systematically searched with no language or year restrictions, up to November 2013, for human studies that collected both inflammatory markers and cognitive data in BD. Selected search terms were bipolar disorder, depression, mania, psychosis, inflammatory, cognitive and neurotrophic. Results Ten human studies satisfied the criteria for consideration. The findings showed that high levels of peripheral inflammatory-cytokine, oxidative stress and reduced brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were associated with poor cognitive performance. The BDNF val66met polymorphism is a potential vulnerability factor for cognitive impairment in BD. Conclusions Current data provide preliminary evidence of a link between the cognitive decline observed in BD and mechanisms of neuroinflammation and neuroprotection. The identification of BD specific inflammatory markers and polymorphisms in inflammatory response genes may be of assistance for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24862657

  4. Reward sensitivity and anger in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Duek, Or; Osher, Yamima; Belmaker, Robert H; Bersudsky, Yuly; Kofman, Ora

    2014-01-30

    According to the hypersensitive behavioral approach system (BAS) model of bipolar disorder (BP), hypersensitivity of the BAS is a trait that should be present even in the euthymic state. This would be expected to result in increased anger and reward sensitivity, both of which are related to the approach system. This study examined these predictions through the use of tasks that assess different aspects of the BAS: reward sensitivity, anger and impulsivity. These characteristics were assessed using the probabilistic classification task (PCT), ultimatum game (UG) and single key impulsivity paradigm (SKIP), respectively. Participants were euthymic adult bipolar disorder patients (BP; N=40) and healthy controls (HC; N=41). In the UG, all participants showed the standard pattern of rejecting overtly unfair offers and accepting clearly fair offers; however, BPs rejected more of the moderately unfair offers than did HCs. BP and HC participants did not differ on their ability to learn, but did show different patterns of learning from reward and punishment. Learning for reward and punishment were negatively correlated in the BP group, suggesting that individuals could learn well either from reward or punishment, but not both. No correlation was found between these forms of learning in the HC group. BP patients show signs of their disorder even in the euthymic state, as seen by the dysbalance between reward and punishment learning and their residual anger in the UG. PMID:24230992

  5. What psychotherapists should know about pharmacotherapies for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joseph F

    2007-05-01

    This article provides a practice-friendly overview of current psychotropic agents used for the treatment of bipolar disorder. The author reviews definitions and concepts about mood stabilization according to the evidence base, in turn profiling a "clinical niche" for lithium, anticonvulsant drugs, atypical antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Results from randomized clinical trials are summarized to help clinicians individualize treatment decisions and tailor them to real-world patients. Recognition and management of common adverse effects are discussed alongside risk-benefit strategies to guide optimal treatment that balances clinical efficacy with drug safety and tolerability. PMID:17417812

  6. The clinical significance of creativity in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Greg; Johnson, Sheri L.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical implications of the high rates of creativity within bipolar disorder (BD) have not been explored. The aim of this review is to outline these implications by (i) reviewing evidence for the link between creativity and BD, (ii) developing a provisional model of mechanisms underpinning the creativity–BD link, (iii) describing unique challenges faced by creative-BD populations, and (iv) systematically considering evidence-based psychosocial treatments in the light of this review. While more research into the creativity–BD nexus is urgently required, treatment outcomes will benefit from consideration of this commonly occurring phenotype. PMID:20579791

  7. Synchronization of EEG activity in patients with bipolar disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panischev, O. Yu; Demin, S. A.; Muhametshin, I. G.; Demina, N. Yu

    2015-12-01

    In paper we apply the method based on the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) to determine the differences in frequency-phase synchronization of the cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activities in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We found that for healthy subjects the frequency-phase synchronization of EEGs from long-range electrodes was significantly better for BD patients. In BD patients a high synchronization of EEGs was observed only for short-range electrodes. Thus, the FNS is a simple graphical method for qualitative analysis can be applied to identify the synchronization effects in EEG activity and, probably, may be used for the diagnosis of this syndrome.

  8. Tourette Syndrome and Bipolar Disorder: Unique Problems with Pediatric Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kavoor, Anjana Rao; Mitra, Sayantanava; Mehta, Varun S; Goyal, Nishant; Sinha, Vinod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder are frequent comorbidities in pediatric age group. They provide a clinician with certain unique challenges. While on one hand the tics mask manifestation of affective symptomatology, the latter makes it difficult to elicit tics with certainty. Data suggest that they might share genetic and neurobiological basis and this is currently an area of extensive research. These clinical and biological overlaps provide grey areas in our understanding, which not only complicates the diagnosis, but also poses problems with management. PMID:25969612

  9. Functional Outcome in Bipolar Disorder: The Big Picture

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Boaz; Manove, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on functional outcome in bipolar disorder (BD) has uncovered various factors that exacerbate psychosocial disability over the course of illness, including genetics, illness severity, stress, anxiety, and cognitive impairment. This paper presents an integrated view of these findings that accounts for the precipitous decline in psychosocial functioning after illness onset. The proposed model highlights a number of reciprocal pathways among previously studied factors that trap people in a powerful cycle of ailing forces. The paper discusses implications to patient care as well as the larger social changes required for shifting the functional trajectory of people with BD from psychosocial decline to growth. PMID:21961062

  10. High Behavioral Approach System (BAS) Sensitivity, Reward Responsiveness, and Goal-Striving Predict First Onset of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders: A Prospective Behavioral High-Risk Design

    PubMed Central

    Alloy, Lauren B.; Bender, Rachel E.; Whitehouse, Wayne G.; Wagner, Clara A.; Liu, Richard T.; Grant, David A.; Jager-Hyman, Shari; Molz, Ashleigh; Choi, James Y.; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Abramson, Lyn Y.

    2012-01-01

    A prospective, behavioral high-risk design provided a theoretically guided examination of vulnerability to first onset of bipolar spectrum disorder based on the Behavioral Approach System (BAS) model. Adolescents (ages 14–19) at an “age of risk” for bipolar disorder onset were screened on BAS sensitivity by interviewers blind to current symptoms, lifetime history, and family history of psychopathology. Participants were selected with high versus moderate levels of BAS sensitivity and administered a lifetime diagnostic interview. Those with a bipolar spectrum disorder, psychosis, or hypomanic episode with onset prior to the BAS sensitivity assessment were excluded. High BAS (n = 171) and Moderate BAS (n = 119) sensitivity participants in the final sample completed baseline measures of symptoms, goal-setting, and reward responsiveness and were followed prospectively with semistructured diagnostic interviews every 6 months. Consistent with the vulnerability hypothesis of the BAS model of bipolar disorder, high BAS participants had a greater likelihood, and shorter time to onset, of bipolar spectrum disorder than moderate BAS participants across an average of 12.8 months of follow-up (12.9% vs. 4.2%), controlling for baseline depressive and hypomanic symptoms, and family history of bipolar disorder. High reward responsiveness on a behavioral task and ambitious goal-striving for popular fame and financial success (but not impulsivity) also predicted first onset of bipolar spectrum disorder controlling for the covariates and BAS risk group, and ambitious goal-striving partially mediated the BAS risk group effect. We discuss implications of the findings for the BAS model of bipolar disorder and early intervention efforts. PMID:22004113

  11. Melatonin receptor 1B gene associated with hyperglycemia in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hukic, Dzana S; Lavebratt, Catharina; Frisén, Louise; Backlund, Lena; Hilding, Agneta; Gu, Harvest F; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Erlinge, David; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Schalling, Martin; Ösby, Urban

    2016-06-01

    Bipolar patients are at a higher risk of developing metabolic disorders. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is twice the rate reported in the population. Antipsychotic medication increases the risk of metabolic abnormalities. However, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia have a similarly increased mortality from cardiovascular causes of death, although bipolar patients medicate with antipsychotic drugs to a much smaller extent than schizophrenic patients. Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia share substantial genetic risk components; thus, increased metabolic abnormalities is hypothesized to be an effect of specific sets of metabolic risk genes, which might overlap with the metabolic risk genes in schizophrenia. This study reports that a functional genetic variant of MTNR1B, previously implicated in the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin release also in schizophrenia, was associated with elevated fasting glucose levels in bipolar patients and controls. This finding suggests that the MTNR1B-dependent vulnerability for elevated fasting plasma glucose levels is shared between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. PMID:26991397

  12. Hyperthyroidism and Risk for Bipolar Disorders: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Wen; Chen, Mu-Hong; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Chiang, Huey-Ling; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Wang, Wei-Shu; Chen, Pan-Ming; Hu, Tsung-Ming; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Su, Tung-Ping; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Background Thyroid disorders have long been associated with psychiatric illness, often with symptoms suggestive of mood disorders. The most common clinical features associated with hyperthyroidism are anxiety and depression. The risk of bipolar disorders, especially bipolar mania, among patients with thyroid disorders has not been well characterized. Objective We explored the relationship of hyperthyroidism and the subsequent development of bipolar disorders, and examined the risk factors for bipolar disorders in patients with hyperthyroidism. Methods We identified patients who were diagnosed with hyperthyroidism between 2000 and 2010 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort without hyperthyroidism was matched based on age, sex, and comorbidities. The occurrence of bipolar disorders was evaluated in both cohorts based on diagnosis and the use of mood stabilizer drugs. Results The hyperthyroidism cohort consisted of 21, 574 patients, and the comparison cohort consisted of 21, 574 matched control patients without hyperthyroidism. The incidence of bipolar disorders (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.31, 95% CI 1.80–2.99, P<.001) was higher for the hyperthyroidism patients than the control patients. Multivariate, matched regression models showed that women (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.34–3.05, P = .001), patients with alcohol use disorders (HR 3.03, 95% CI 1.58–5.79, P = .001), and those with asthma (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.18–2.43, P = .004) were independent risk factors for the development of bipolar disorders in hyperthyroidism patients. Conclusions Although a possibility that the diagnosis of bipolar disorders in this study actually includes "bipolar disorders due to hyperthyroidism" cannot be excluded, this study suggests that hyperthyroidism may increase the risk of developing bipolar disorders. PMID:24023669

  13. The relationship between bipolar disorder and type 2 diabetes: more than just co-morbid disorders.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Cynthia V; Gardner, David M; Ransom, Thomas; Alda, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rates are three times higher in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), compared to the general population. This is a major contributing factor to the elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality, the leading cause of death in bipolar patients. There may be shared pathophysiology linking the two disorders, including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and mitochondrial dysfunction, common genetic links, and epigenetic interactions. Life-style, phenomenology of bipolar symptoms, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy may be contributing factors. Patients with BD and T2DM have a more severe course of illness and are more refractory to treatment. Control of their diabetes is poorer when compared to diabetics without BD, and an existing disparity in medical care may be partly responsible. Glucose abnormalities in bipolar patients need to be screened for and treated. Metformin appears to have the best benefit/risk ratio, and the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and analogues also appear promising, although these agents have not been specifically studied in populations with mood disorders. Physicians need to be aware of the increased risk for T2DM and cardiovascular disease in bipolar patients, and appropriate prevention, screening, case finding, and treatment is recommended. PMID:22621171

  14. The relationship between bipolar disorder and type 2 diabetes: more than just co-morbid disorders.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Cynthia V; Gardner, David M; Ransom, Thomas; Alda, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rates are three times higher in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), compared to the general population. This is a major contributing factor to the elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality, the leading cause of death in bipolar patients. There may be shared pathophysiology linking the two disorders, including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and mitochondrial dysfunction, common genetic links, and epigenetic interactions. Life-style, phenomenology of bipolar symptoms, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy may be contributing factors. Patients with BD and T2DM have a more severe course of illness and are more refractory to treatment. Control of their diabetes is poorer when compared to diabetics without BD, and an existing disparity in medical care may be partly responsible. Glucose abnormalities in bipolar patients need to be screened for and treated. Metformin appears to have the best benefit/risk ratio, and the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and analogues also appear promising, although these agents have not been specifically studied in populations with mood disorders. Physicians need to be aware of the increased risk for T2DM and cardiovascular disease in bipolar patients, and appropriate prevention, screening, case finding, and treatment is recommended.

  15. Differences in Trauma Experience Between Patients With Bipolar I Disorder, Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, and Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Song, Wonyoung; Park, Jae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare differences in traumatic experiences between patients with bipolar I disorder, patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and controls. The traumatic experiences (as measured by the Trauma Experience Questionnaire) of 40 participants with bipolar I disorder were compared with those of 38 participants with MDD and 92 controls. Participants with bipolar I disorder exhibited a significantly higher frequency of traumatic experiences and higher impact ratings when traumas did occur than did patients with MDD and controls. In addition, the present impact of past trauma for patients in the bipolar I disorder and MDD groups was significantly higher than for controls. The bipolar I disorder group reported more severe traumatic experiences than did both the MDD and control groups, and the MDD group in turn reported more severe traumatic experiences than did the control group.

  16. Meta-Analyses of Developing Brain Function in High-Risk and Emerged Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moon-Soo; Anumagalla, Purnima; Talluri, Prasanth; Pavuluri, Mani N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Identifying early markers of brain function among those at high risk (HR) for pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) could serve as a screening measure when children and adolescents present with subsyndromal clinical symptoms prior to the conversion to bipolar disorder. Studies on the offspring of patients with bipolar disorder who are genetically at HR have each been limited in establishing a biomarker, while an analytic review in summarizing the findings offers an improvised opportunity toward that goal. Methods: An activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of mixed cognitive and emotional activities using the GingerALE software from the BrainMap Project was completed. The meta-analysis of all fMRI studies contained a total of 29 reports and included PBD, HR, and typically developing (TD) groups. Results: The HR group showed significantly greater activation relative to the TD group in the right DLPFC–insular–parietal–cerebellar regions. Similarly, the HR group exhibited greater activity in the right DLPFC and insula as well as the left cerebellum compared to patients with PBD. Patients with PBD, relative to TD, showed greater activation in regions of the right amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus, medial PFC, left ventral striatum, and cerebellum and lower activation in the right VLPFC and the DLPFC. Conclusion: The HR population showed increased activity, presumably indicating greater compensatory deployment, in relation to both the TD and the PBD, in the key cognition and emotion-processing regions, such as the DLPFC, insula, and parietal cortex. In contrast, patients with PBD, relative to HR and TD, showed decreased activity, which could indicate a decreased effort in multiple PFC regions in addition to widespread subcortical abnormalities, which are suggestive of a more entrenched disease process. PMID:25404919

  17. Cortical thickness differences between bipolar depression and major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Martin J; Chhetry, Binod Thapa; Oquendo, Maria A; Sublette, M Elizabeth; Sullivan, Gregory; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder (BD) is a psychiatric disorder with high morbidity and mortality that cannot be distinguished from major depressive disorder (MDD) until the first manic episode. A biomarker able to differentiate BD and MDD could help clinicians avoid risks of treating BD with antidepressants without mood stabilizers. Methods Cortical thickness differences were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging in BD depressed patients (n = 18), MDD depressed patients (n = 56), and healthy volunteers (HVs) (n = 54). A general linear model identified clusters of cortical thickness difference between diagnostic groups. Results Compared to the HV group, the BD group had decreased cortical thickness in six regions, after controlling for age and sex, located within frontal and parietal lobes, and posterior cingulate cortex. Mean cortical thickness changes in clusters ranged from 7.6–9.6% (cluster wise p-values from 1.0 e−4 to 0.037). When compared to MDD, three clusters of lower cortical thickness in BD were identified that overlapped with clusters that differentiated the BD and HV groups. Mean cortical thickness changes in the clusters ranged from 7.5–8.2% (cluster wise p-values from 1.0 e−4 to 0.023). The difference in cortical thickness was more pronounced when the subgroup of subjects with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) was compared to the MDD group. Conclusions Cortical thickness patterns were distinct between BD and MDD. These results are a step toward developing an imaging test to differentiate the two disorders. PMID:24428430

  18. Adolescent Eating Disorder: Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muuss, Rolf E.

    1985-01-01

    Examines anorexia nervosa, an eating disorder seen with increasing frequency, especially among adolescent girls. Presents five theories about causation, discusses early characteristics, typical family patterns, physical and medical characteristics, social adjustment problems, and society's contribution to anorexia. Describes course of the…

  19. Psychosocial Interventions for Children with Early-Onset Bipolar Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofthouse, Nicholas; Fristad, Mary A.

    2004-01-01

    Once considered virtually nonexistent, bipolar disorder in children has recently received a great deal of attention from mental health professionals and the general public. This paper provides a current review of literature pertaining to the psychosocial treatment of children with early-onset bipolar spectrum disorder (EOBPSD). Commencing with…

  20. Naming the Enemy: An Art Therapy Intervention for Children with Bipolar and Comorbid Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, David

    2007-01-01

    Treatment and diagnosis for the pediatric form of bipolar disorder presents a clinical challenge given the differences from its adult counterpart and the various comorbid forms that complicate presentation and developmental course. This article discusses manifestations of early onset bipolar disorder and offers a method for implementing art…

  1. Subcortical volumes differentiate Major Depressive Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, and remitted Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sacchet, Matthew D; Livermore, Emily E; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Glover, Gary H; Gotlib, Ian H

    2015-09-01

    Subcortical gray matter regions have been implicated in mood disorders, including Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Bipolar Disorder (BD). It is unclear, however, whether or how these regions differ among mood disorders and whether such abnormalities are state- or trait-like. In this study, we examined differences in subcortical gray matter volumes among euthymic BD, MDD, remitted MDD (RMD), and healthy (CTL) individuals. Using automated gray matter segmentation of T1-weighted MRI images, we estimated volumes of 16 major subcortical gray matter structures in 40 BD, 57 MDD, 35 RMD, and 61 CTL individuals. We used multivariate analysis of variance to examine group differences in these structures, and support vector machines (SVMs) to assess individual-by-individual classification. Analyses yielded significant group differences for caudate (p = 0.029) and ventral diencephalon (VD) volumes (p = 0.003). For the caudate, both the BD (p = 0.004) and the MDD (p = 0.037) participants had smaller volumes than did the CTL participants. For the VD, the MDD participants had larger volumes than did the BD and CTL participants (ps < 0.005). SVM distinguished MDD from BD with 59.5% accuracy. These findings indicate that mood disorders are characterized by anomalies in subcortical gray matter volumes and that the caudate and VD contribute uniquely to differential affective pathology. Identifying abnormalities in subcortical gray matter may prove useful for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of mood disorders.

  2. Schema therapy for bipolar disorder: a conceptual model and future directions.

    PubMed

    Hawke, Lisa D; Provencher, Martin D; Parikh, Sagar V

    2013-05-15

    Schema therapy (ST) is an integrative form of psychotherapy developed for complex, chronic psychological disorders with a characterlogical underpinning. Bipolar disorder is just such a disorder--complex and often comorbid, with demonstrated stable cognitive and personality features that complicate the course of illness. This article presents the reasons justifying the application of ST to bipolar disorder and proposes a treatment rationale and future directions for treatment and research. If well adapted to the characteristics of bipolar disorder, ST might prove to be an effective adjunctive psychotherapy option that attenuates emotional reactivity, reduces symptoms and improves quality of life.

  3. Altered amygdala-prefrontal response to facial emotion in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Graur, Simona; Monk, Kelly; Bonar, Lisa K.; Hickey, Mary Beth; Dwojak, Amanda C.; Axelson, David; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Goldstein, Tina R.; Bebko, Genna; Bertocci, Michele A.; Hafeman, Danella M.; Gill, Mary Kay; Birmaher, Boris; Phillips, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify neuroimaging measures associated with risk for, or protection against, bipolar disorder by comparing youth offspring of parents with bipolar disorder versus youth offspring of non-bipolar parents versus offspring of healthy parents in (i) the magnitude of activation within emotional face processing circuitry; and (ii) functional connectivity between this circuitry and frontal emotion regulation regions. The study was conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Centre. Participants included 29 offspring of parents with bipolar disorder (mean age = 13.8 years; 14 females), 29 offspring of non-bipolar parents (mean age = 13.8 years; 12 females) and 23 healthy controls (mean age = 13.7 years; 11 females). Participants were scanned during implicit processing of emerging happy, sad, fearful and angry faces and shapes. The activation analyses revealed greater right amygdala activation to emotional faces versus shapes in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder and offspring of non-bipolar parents than healthy controls. Given that abnormally increased amygdala activation during emotion processing characterized offspring of both patient groups, and that abnormally increased amygdala activation has often been reported in individuals with already developed bipolar disorder and those with major depressive disorder, these neuroimaging findings may represent markers of increased risk for affective disorders in general. The analysis of psychophysiological interaction revealed that offspring of parents with bipolar disorder showed significantly more negative right amygdala-anterior cingulate cortex functional connectivity to emotional faces versus shapes, but significantly more positive right amygdala-left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex functional connectivity to happy faces (all P-values corrected for multiple tests) than offspring of non-bipolar parents and healthy controls. Taken together with findings of increased amygdala

  4. Medication Adherence in a Comparative Effectiveness Trial for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sylvia, Louisa G.; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Leon, Andrew C.; Kansky, Christine I.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ketter, Terence A.; Friedman, Edward S.; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Thase, Michael E.; Ostacher, Michael J.; Keyes, Michelle; Rabideau, Dustin; Nierenberg, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychopharmacology remains the foundation of treatment for bipolar disorder, but medication adherence in this population is low (Range = 20% to 64%). We examined medication adherence in a multi-site, comparative effectiveness study of lithium. Method The Lithium Moderate Dose Use Study (LiTMUS) was a six-month, six-site, randomized effectiveness trial of adjunctive moderate dose lithium therapy compared to optimized treatment in adult outpatients with bipolar I or II disorder (N=283). Medication adherence was measured at each study visit with the Tablet Routine Questionnaire. Results We found that 4.50% of participants reported missing at least 30% of their medications in the past week at baseline and non-adherence remained low throughout the trial (< 7%). Poor medication adherence was associated with more manic symptoms and side effects as well as lower lithium serum levels at mid- and post-treatment, but not with poor quality of life, overall severity of illness, or depressive symptoms. Conclusion Participants in LiTMUS were highly adherent with taking their medications. The lack of association with possible predictors of adherence, such as depression and quality of life, could be explained by the limited variance or other factors as well as by not using an objective measure of adherence. PMID:24117232

  5. Case report: bipolar disorder as the first manifestation of CADASIL

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an inherited cerebrovascular disease, clinically characterized by variable manifestations of migraine, recurrent transient ischemic attack or lacunar strokes, cognitive decline, and mood disturbances. However, manic episodes have rarely been documented as an initial symptom of CADASIL and bipolar disorder presenting as the first manifestation in CADASIL has not been reported previously from evaluations by psychiatrists or psychological testing by psychologists. Case presentation A 53 year old woman developed symptoms of mania in her 50s leading to a personality change involving a continuously labile mood and irritability over a number of years. Neuropsychological testing revealed an intact memory, but impairment in attention and executive function. In the Rorschach test, she showed a high level of cognitive rigidity. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were very consistent with a diagnosis of CADASIL, which was confirmed by genetic testing for NOTCH3 mutations. Atypical antipsychotics proved to be helpful in treating her manic symptoms and for behavior control. Conclusion We present a novel case of CADASIL that first presented as bipolar disorder. We contend that when patients show a late onset personality change or chronically irritable mood that deteriorates over many years, an organic cause such as CADASIL must be considered. Further studies are needed to better understand the exact impacts of cerebral tissue lesions and psychiatric symptoms in CADASIL patients. PMID:24929957

  6. Predominant mania course in Indian patients with bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Rangappa, Sushma Bilichodu; Munivenkatappa, Shashidhara; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Jain, Sanjeev; Reddy, Y C Janardhan

    2016-08-01

    Many long-term follow-up studies suggest that bipolar disorder (BD) is highly recurrent and that depressive episodes are commoner than hypomania/manic episodes. However, some studies from tropical countries including India suggest that the patients experience a greater proportion of manic episodes than depressive episodes. The aim of the present study was to examine the course of BD type 1 (BD I) in a sample of hospitalized Indian subjects. We examined the clinical course of 285 BD I subjects with at least 5 years of illness using standard life charting method. These subjects were hospitalized between October 2010 and October 2012. The predominant polarity (having at least two-thirds of their lifetime episodes at one polarity) was mania (79%). Unipolar mania (≥ 3 mania episodes and no episodes of depression) was observed in 48% of the subjects. The frequency of rapid cycling course was noted in 2.5% of the subjects. Predominant manic polarity group had the illness onset mostly with a manic episode (88.9%) and the predominant depressive polarity group with a depressive episode (73.8%). Mania was the predominant polarity with a high rate of unipolar mania and a majority of the subjects had greater number of manic episodes than depressive/mixed episodes. The onset polarity determined the predominant polarity during the course of illness. Predominantly, mania course could have significant implications in the treatment of bipolar disorder. PMID:27520890

  7. EFFICACY OF LITHIUM PROPHYLAXIS IN BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Manu R.K.; Chandrasekaran, R.; Shreeram, S.S.; Anand, I.

    1995-01-01

    Forty four patients attending the affective disorder clink at J1PMER Hospital who were on prophylactic lithium for bipolar affective disorder were studied, Intra-individual comparison for severity of illness was made between periods of similar duration with and without lithium prophylaxis. It was found that during lithium prophylaxis patients did significantly better on the following parameters: number of episodes of illness, duration of episodes, hospital admission, neuroleptic dosages and duration of antidepressant treatment. Of the 44 patients included in the study, 45% were good responders, 39% were partial responders and 16% were poor responders. Late age of onset was found to be a significant predictor of good response to lithium. PMID:21743706

  8. Psychosocial Interventions for Bipolar Disorder: Perspective from the Behavioral Approach System (BAS) Dysregulation Theory

    PubMed Central

    Nusslock, Robin; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Alloy, Lauren B.; Coan, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Research has emerged providing consistent support for the behavioral approach system (BAS) dysregulation theory of bipolar disorder. The objective of the current article is to examine the extent to which findings from the BAS dysregulation theory can inform psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder. Towards this end, we first provide an overview of the BAS dysregulation theory. Second, we review extant research on psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder. And, third, we discuss means by which research and theory in line with the BAS dysregulation model can inform psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder. Particular attention is given to the clinical implications of research suggesting that bipolar disorder is characterized by high drive/incentive motivation, ambitious goal-setting, and perfectionism in the achievement domain. PMID:20161456

  9. Increased Clinical and Neurocognitive Impairment in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Comorbid Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Adam S.; Bates, Marsha E.

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar (BD) symptomatology is prevalent in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and may lead to increased impairment. The current study compared clinical and neurocognitive impairment in children (7-13 years) diagnosed with ASD (n=55), BD (n=34), ASD + BD (n=23), and a non-clinical control group (n=27). Relative to the ASD group, the ASD…

  10. Bipolar disorder: how far are we from a rigorous definition and effective management?

    PubMed

    Emilien, Gérard; Septien, Lucia; Brisard, Claudine; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Bourin, Michel

    2007-06-30

    Bipolar disorder is a pathological disturbance of mood, characterized by waxing and waning manic, depressive and, sometimes distinctly mixed states. A diagnosis of bipolar disorder can only be made with certainty when the manic syndrome declares itself. Most individuals who are diagnosed with this disorder will experience both poles of the illness recurrently, but depressive episodes are the commonest cause of morbidity and, indeed, of death by suicide. Twin, adoption and epidemiological studies suggest a strongly genetic aetiology. It is a genetically and phenotypically complex disorder. Thus, the genes contributing are likely to be numerous and of small effect. Individuals with bipolar disorder also display deficits on a range of neuropsychological tasks in both the acute and euthymic phases of illness and correlations between number of affective episodes experienced and task performance are commonly reported. Current self-report and observer-rated scales are optimized for unipolar depression and hence limited in their ability to accurately assess bipolar depression. The development of a specific depression rating scale will improve the assessment of bipolar depression in both research and clinical settings. It will improve the development of better treatments and interventions. Guidelines support the use of antidepressants for bipolar depression. With regard to the adverse effects of antidepressants for bipolar depression, double-blind, placebo-controlled data suggest that antidepressant monotherapy or the addition of a tricyclic antidepressant may worsen the course of bipolar disorder. Importantly, adjunctive psychotherapies add significantly (both statistically and clinically) to the efficacy of pharmacological treatment regimens. The successful management of bipolar disorder clearly demands improved recognition of bipolar disorder and effective long-term treatment for bipolar depression as well as mania.

  11. Psychotherapy for Bipolar Disorder in Adults: A Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Holly A.; Swanson, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Although pharmacotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for bipolar disorder, medication offers only partial relief for patients. Treatment with pharmacologic interventions alone is associated with disappointingly low rates of remission, high rates of recurrence, residual symptoms, and psychosocial impairment. Bipolar-specific therapy is increasingly recommended as an essential component of illness management. This review summarizes the available data on psychotherapy for adults with bipolar disorder. We conducted a search of the literature for outcome studies published between 1995 and 2013 and identified 35 reports of 28 randomized controlled trials testing individual or group psychosocial interventions for adults with bipolar disorder. These reports include systematic trials investigating the efficacy and effectiveness of individual psychoeducation, group psychoeducation, individual cognitive-behavioral therapy, group cognitive-behavioral therapy, family therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, and integrated care management. The evidence demonstrates that bipolar disorder-specific psychotherapies, when added to medication for the treatment of bipolar disorder, consistently show advantages over medication alone on measures of symptom burden and risk of relapse. Whether delivered in a group or individual format, those who receive bipolar disorder-specific psychotherapy fare better than those who do not. Psychotherapeutic strategies common to most bipolar disorder-specific interventions are identified. PMID:26279641

  12. Neuroanatomical voxel-based profile of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, E; Bellani, M; Altamura, A C; Brambilla, P

    2016-08-01

    Although schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) share elements of pathology (Ellison-Wright and Bullmore, 2009), the neural mechanisms underlying these disorders are still under investigation. Up until now, many neuroimaging studies investigated the brain structural differences of SCZ and BD compared with healthy controls (HC), trying to identify the possible neuroanatomical markers for the two disorders. However, just a few studies focused on the brain structural changes between the two diagnoses. The present review summarises the findings of the voxel-based grey matter (GM) comparisons between SCZ and BD, with the objective to highlight the possible consistent anatomical differences between the two disorders. While the comparisons between patients and HC highlighted overlapping areas of GM reduction in insula and anterior cingulate cortex, the SCZ-BD comparisons suggest the presence of more generalised GM deficits in SCZ compared with BD. Indeed, in a number of studies, SCZ patients showed lower GM volumes than BD patients in fronto-temporal cortex, thalamus, hippocampus and amygdala. Conversely, only a couple of studies reported GM deficits in BD compared with SCZ, both at the level of cerebellum. In summary, the two disorders exhibit both common and specific neuroanatomical characteristics, whose knowledge is mandatory to develop innovative diagnostic and treatment strategies. PMID:27095442

  13. The medicalisation of "ups and downs": the marketing of the new bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Moncrieff, Joanna

    2014-08-01

    The concept of bipolar disorder has undergone a transformation over the last two decades. Once considered a rare and serious mental disorder, bipolar disorder is being diagnosed with increasing frequency in Europe and North America, and is suggested to replace many other diagnoses. The current article shows how the modern concept of bipolar disorder has been created in the course of efforts to market new antipsychotics and other drugs for bipolar disorder, to enable these drugs to migrate out of the arena of serious mental disorder and into the more profitable realm of everyday emotional problems. A new and flexible notion of the condition has been created that bears little resemblance to the classical condition, and that can easily be applied to ordinary variations in temperament. The assertion that bipolar disorder is a brain disease arising from a biochemical imbalance helps justify this expansion by portraying drug treatment as targeted and specific, and by diverting attention from the adverse effects and mind-altering properties of the drugs themselves. Childhood behavioural problems have also been metamorphosed into "paediatric bipolar disorder," under the leadership of academic psychiatry, with the assistance of drug company financing. The expansion of bipolar disorder, like depression before it, medicalises personal and social difficulties, and profoundly affects the way people in Western nations conceive of what it means to be human.

  14. Cross-cultural comparisons on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test performance in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ming; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Fleck, David E; Strakowski, Stephen M

    2011-10-30

    We compared executive dysfunction with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) among distinct national and ethnic patients with bipolar disorder in euthymia. Bipolar patients, aged 16-45years, from the United States (n=25) and Taiwan (n=30) did not differ significantly on any measure. The WCST score for number Failure to Maintain Set was significantly positively correlated with residual affective symptoms in Taiwanese and US patients. Selective executive dysfunction in euthymia is inherent to bipolar disorder. Euthymic bipolar patients of various ethnic groups may exhibit similar executive dysfunction.

  15. A Closer Examination of Bipolar Disorder in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.

    2005-01-01

    Children who present with severe behavioral concerns may be diagnosed as having other commonly diagnosed childhood disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and/or conduct disorder, among others, when they may be suffering from early-onset bipolar disorder. Awareness of the symptoms of early-onset…

  16. Connectome Signatures of Neurocognitive Abnormalities in Euthymic Bipolar I Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ajilore, Olusola; Vizueta, Nathalie; Walshaw, Patricia; Zhan, Liang; Leow, Alex; Altshuler, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Connectomics have allowed researchers to study integrative patterns of neural connectivity in humans. Yet, it is unclear how connectomics may elucidate structure-function relationships in bipolar I disorder (BPI). Expanding on our previous structural connectome study, here we used an overlapping sample with additional psychometric and fMRI data to relate structural connectome properties to both fMRI signals and cognitive performance. Methods 42 subjects completed a neuropsychological (NP) battery covering domains of processing speed, verbal memory, working memory, and cognitive flexibility. 32 subjects also had fMRI data performing a Go/NoGo task. Results Bipolar participants had lower NP performance across all domains, but only working memory reached statistical significance. In BPI participants, processing speed was significantly associated with both white matter integrity (WMI) in the corpus callosum and interhemispheric network integration. Mediation models further revealed that the relationship between interhemispheric integration and processing speed was mediated by WMI, and processing speed mediated the relationship between WMI and working memory. Bipolar subjects had significantly decreased BA47 activation during NoGo vs. Go. Significant predictors of BA47 fMRI activations during the Go/NoGo task were its nodal path length (left hemisphere) and its nodal clustering coefficient (right hemisphere). Conclusions This study suggests that structural connectome changes underlie abnormalities in fMRI activation and cognitive performance in euthymic BPI subjects. Results support that BA47 structural connectome changes may be a trait marker for BPI. Future studies are needed to determine if these “connectome signatures” may also confer a biological risk and/or serve as predictors of relapse. PMID:26228398

  17. Platelet parameters (PLT, MPV, P-LCR) in patients with schizophrenia, unipolar depression and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Wysokiński, Adam; Szczepocka, Ewa

    2016-03-30

    There are no studies comparing platelet parameters platelet parameters (platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR)) between patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and unipolar depression. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine and compare differences in PLT, MPV and P-LCR in patients with schizophrenia, unipolar depression and bipolar disorder. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, naturalistic study of 2377 patients (schizophrenia n=1243; unipolar depression n=791; bipolar disorder n=343, including bipolar depression n=259 and mania n=84). There were significant differences for PLT, MPV and P-LCR values between study groups. A significant percentage of patients with bipolar disorder had abnormal (too low or too high) number of platelets. Negative correlation between PLT and age was found in all study groups and positive correlation between age and MPV and P-LCR was found in patients with schizophrenia.

  18. Differential responses to lithium in hyperexcitable neurons from patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jerome; Wang, Qiu-Wen; Kim, Yongsung; Yu, Diana X; Pham, Son; Yang, Bo; Zheng, Yi; Diffenderfer, Kenneth E; Zhang, Jian; Soltani, Sheila; Eames, Tameji; Schafer, Simon T; Boyer, Leah; Marchetto, Maria C; Nurnberger, John I; Calabrese, Joseph R; Ødegaard, Ketil J; McCarthy, Michael J; Zandi, Peter P; Alda, Martin; Alba, Martin; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Mi, Shuangli; Brennand, Kristen J; Kelsoe, John R; Gage, Fred H; Yao, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder that is characterized by intermittent episodes of mania and depression; without treatment, 15% of patients commit suicide. Hence, it has been ranked by the World Health Organization as a top disorder of morbidity and lost productivity. Previous neuropathological studies have revealed a series of alterations in the brains of patients with bipolar disorder or animal models, such as reduced glial cell number in the prefrontal cortex of patients, upregulated activities of the protein kinase A and C pathways and changes in neurotransmission. However, the roles and causation of these changes in bipolar disorder have been too complex to exactly determine the pathology of the disease. Furthermore, although some patients show remarkable improvement with lithium treatment for yet unknown reasons, others are refractory to lithium treatment. Therefore, developing an accurate and powerful biological model for bipolar disorder has been a challenge. The introduction of induced pluripotent stem-cell (iPSC) technology has provided a new approach. Here we have developed an iPSC model for human bipolar disorder and investigated the cellular phenotypes of hippocampal dentate gyrus-like neurons derived from iPSCs of patients with bipolar disorder. Guided by RNA sequencing expression profiling, we have detected mitochondrial abnormalities in young neurons from patients with bipolar disorder by using mitochondrial assays; in addition, using both patch-clamp recording and somatic Ca(2+) imaging, we have observed hyperactive action-potential firing. This hyperexcitability phenotype of young neurons in bipolar disorder was selectively reversed by lithium treatment only in neurons derived from patients who also responded to lithium treatment. Therefore, hyperexcitability is one early endophenotype of bipolar disorder, and our model of iPSCs in this disease might be useful in developing new therapies and drugs aimed at its clinical

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis and the Risk of Bipolar Disorder: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Jen; Lu, Ti; Shen, Cheng-Che; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Pan-Ming; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hu, Li-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have suggested that chronic inflammation plays an essential role in the pathophysiology of both rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and bipolar disorder. The most common clinical features associated with RA are anxiety and depression. The risk of bipolar disorder among patients with RA has not been characterized adequately. Objective To determine the association between RA and the subsequent development of bipolar disorder and examine the risk factors for bipolar disorder among patients with RA. Methods We identified patients who were diagnosed with RA in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort was created by matching patients without RA with those with RA according to age, sex, and comorbidities. The occurrence of bipolar disorder was evaluated in both cohorts. Results The RA cohort consisted of 2,570 patients, and the comparison cohort consisted of 2,570 matched control patients without RA. The incidence of bipolar disorder (incidence rate ratio  = 2.13, 95% confidence interval [CI]  = 1.12–4.24, P =  .013) was higher among patients with RA than among control patients. Multivariate, matched regression models revealed that asthma (hazard ratio [HR]  = 2.76, 95% CI 1.27–5.96, P =  .010), liver cirrhosis (HR  = 3.81, 95% CI  = 1.04–14.02, P =  .044), and alcohol use disorders (HR  = 5.29, 95% CI  = 1.71–16.37, P =  .004) were independent risk factors for the development of bipolar disorder among patients with RA. Conclusion RA might increase the incidence of bipolar disorder development. Based on our data, we suggest that, following RA diagnosis, greater attention be focused on women with asthma, liver cirrhosis, and alcohol use disorder. Prospective clinical studies of the relationship between RA and bipolar disorder are warranted. PMID:25229610

  20. Season of birth is associated with adult body mass index in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Soreca, Isabella; Cheng, Yu; Frank, Ellen; Fagiolini, Andrea; Kupfer, David J

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors, such as abdominal obesity and obesity in general, are very prevalent among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). Although long-term use of psychotropic medications is an important determinant of these risk factors, other evidence suggests that early development may interact with the mood disorder diathesis to exponentially increase the risk of obesity. The goal of our study was to test whether season of birth is associated with adult body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity in individuals with bipolar disorder. We compared season of birth effects on BMI in 375 adult patients with bipolar disorder and 196 adult patients with unipolar major depression. We found a significant season of birth effect on BMI in patients with bipolar disorder, but not unipolar. In patients with bipolar disorder, season of birth was also associated with waist circumference, with a stronger effect in males. Season of birth affects adult BMI and waist circumference in patients with bipolar disorder, but not in patients with unipolar depression. Our results suggest that early environmental factors, yet to be identified, interact with specific neurobiological features of bipolar disorder to determine stable traits and disease risk factors in adult life. PMID:23445513

  1. Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    García, Saínza; Martínez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; López-Zurbano, Saioa; Zorrilla, Iñaki; López, Purificación; Vieta, Eduard; González-Pinto, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Antipsychotics are the drugs prescribed to treat psychotic disorders; however, patients often fail to adhere to their treatment, and this has a severe negative effect on prognosis in these kinds of illnesses. Among the wide range of risk factors for treatment nonadherence, this systematic review covers those that are most important from the point of view of clinicians and patients and proposes guidelines for addressing them. Analyzing 38 studies conducted in a total of 51,796 patients, including patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder, we found that younger age, substance abuse, poor insight, cognitive impairments, low level of education, minority ethnicity, poor therapeutic alliance, experience of barriers to care, high intensity of delusional symptoms and suspiciousness, and low socioeconomic status are the main risk factors for medication nonadherence in both types of disorder. In the future, prospective studies should be conducted on the use of personalized patient-tailored treatments, taking into account risk factors that may affect each individual, to assess the ability of such approaches to improve adherence and hence prognosis in these patients. PMID:27307187

  2. Impaired conflict resolution and vigilance in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Andrea; Chiaie, Roberto Delle; Spagna, Alfredo; Bernabei, Laura; Sciarretta, Martina; Roca, Javier; Biondi, Massimo; Casagrande, Maria

    2015-09-30

    Difficulty attending is a common deficit of euthymic bipolar patients. However, it is not known whether this is a global attentional deficit or relates to a specific attentional network. According to the attention network approach, attention is best understood in terms of three functionally and neuroanatomically distinct networks-alerting, orienting, and executive control. In this study, we explored whether and which of the three attentional networks are altered in euthymic Bipolar Disorder (BD). A sample of euthymic BD patients and age-matched healthy controls completed the Attention Network Test for Interactions and Vigilance (ANTI-V) that provided not only a measure of orienting, executive, and alerting networks, but also an independent measure of vigilance (tonic alerting). Compared to healthy controls, BD patients have impaired executive control (greater interference), reduced vigilance (as indexed by a decrease in the d' sensitivity) as well as slower overall reaction times and poorer accuracy. Our results show that deficits in executive attention and sustained attention often persist in BD patients even after complete remission of affective symptoms, thus suggesting that cognitive enhancing treatments programmed to improve these deficits could contribute to improve their functional recovery.

  3. Impaired conflict resolution and vigilance in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Andrea; Chiaie, Roberto Delle; Spagna, Alfredo; Bernabei, Laura; Sciarretta, Martina; Roca, Javier; Biondi, Massimo; Casagrande, Maria

    2015-09-30

    Difficulty attending is a common deficit of euthymic bipolar patients. However, it is not known whether this is a global attentional deficit or relates to a specific attentional network. According to the attention network approach, attention is best understood in terms of three functionally and neuroanatomically distinct networks-alerting, orienting, and executive control. In this study, we explored whether and which of the three attentional networks are altered in euthymic Bipolar Disorder (BD). A sample of euthymic BD patients and age-matched healthy controls completed the Attention Network Test for Interactions and Vigilance (ANTI-V) that provided not only a measure of orienting, executive, and alerting networks, but also an independent measure of vigilance (tonic alerting). Compared to healthy controls, BD patients have impaired executive control (greater interference), reduced vigilance (as indexed by a decrease in the d' sensitivity) as well as slower overall reaction times and poorer accuracy. Our results show that deficits in executive attention and sustained attention often persist in BD patients even after complete remission of affective symptoms, thus suggesting that cognitive enhancing treatments programmed to improve these deficits could contribute to improve their functional recovery. PMID:26144587

  4. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder in an Era of “Mindless Psychiatry”

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Peter I.; Levin, Edmund C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) reflects shifts in conceptualizing bipolar disorder among children and adolescents since the mid-1990s. Since then, PBD diagnoses, predominantly in the United States, have increased dramatically, and the diagnosis has attracted significant controversy. During the same period, psychiatric theory and practice has become increasingly biological. The aim of this paper is to examine the rise of PBD in terms of wider systemic influences. Method In the context of literature referring to paradigm shifts in psychiatry, we reviewed the psychiatric literature, media cases, and information made available by investigative committees and journalists. Results Social historians and prominent psychiatrists describe a paradigm shift in psychiatry over recent decades: from an era of “brainless psychiatry,” when an emphasis on psychodynamic and family factors predominated to the exclusion of biological factors, to a current era of “mindless psychiatry” that emphasizes neurobiological explanations for emotional and behavioral problems with limited regard for contextual meaning. Associated with this has been a tendency within psychiatry and society to neglect trauma and attachment insecurity as etiological factors; the “atheoretical” (but by default biomedical) premise of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (3rd and 4th eds.); the influence of the pharmaceutical industry in research, continuing medical education, and direct-to-consumer advertising; and inequality in the U.S. health system that favors “diagnostic upcoding.” Harm from overmedicating children is now a cause of public concern. Conclusion It can be argued that PBD as a widespread diagnosis, particularly in the United States, reflects multiple factors associated with a paradigm shift within psychiatry rather than recognition of a previously overlooked common disorder. PMID:22211441

  5. The Treatment of Adult Bipolar Disorder with Aripiprazole: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by exacerbations of opposite mood polarity, ranging from manic to major depressive episodes. In the current nosological system of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual – 5th edition (DSM-5), it is conceptualized as a spectrum disorder consisting of bipolar disorder type I, bipolar disorder type II, cyclothymic disorder, and bipolar disorder not otherwise specified. Treatment of all phases of this disorder is primarily with mood stabilizers, but many patients either show resistance to the conventional mood stabilizing medications or are intolerant to their side-effects. In this setting, second-generation antipsychotics have gained prominence as many bipolar subjects who are otherwise treatment refractory show response to these agents. Aripiprazole is a novel antipsychotic initially approved for the treatment of schizophrenia but soon found to be effective in bipolar disorder. This drug is well studied, as randomized controlled trials have been conducted in various phases of bipolar disorders. Aripiprazole exhibits the pharmacodynamic properties of partial agonism, functional selectivity, and serotonin-dopamine activity modulation – the new exemplars in the treatment of major psychiatric disorders. It is the first among a new series of psychotropic medications, which now also include brexpiprazole and cariprazine. The current review summarizes the data from controlled trials regarding the efficacy and safety of aripiprazole in adult bipolar patients. On the basis of this evidence, aripiprazole is found to be efficacious in the treatment and prophylaxis of manic and mixed episodes but has no effectiveness in acute and recurrent bipolar depression. PMID:27190727

  6. Structure-function associations in hippocampus in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Chepenik, Lara G; Wang, Fei; Spencer, Linda; Spann, Marisa; Kalmar, Jessica H; Womer, Fay; Kale Edmiston, E; Pittman, Brian; Blumberg, Hilary P

    2012-04-01

    Hippocampus volume decreases and verbal memory deficits have been reported in bipolar disorder (BD) as independent observations. We investigated potential associations between these deficits in subjects with BD. Hippocampus volumes were measured on magnetic resonance images of 31 subjects with BD and 32 healthy comparison (HC) subjects. The California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT) assessed verbal memory function in these subjects. Compared to the HC group, the BD group showed both significantly smaller hippocampus volumes and impaired performance on CVLT tests of immediate, short delay and long delay cued and free recall. Further, smaller hippocampus volume correlated with impaired performance in BD. Post hoc analyses revealed a trend towards improved memory in BD subjects taking antidepressant medications. These results support associations between morphological changes in hippocampus structure in BD and verbal memory impairment. They provide preliminary evidence pharmacotherapy may reverse hippocampus-related memory deficits. PMID:22342942

  7. Future Directions for Pharmacotherapies for Treatment-resistant Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Seetal; Fernandes, Brisa S; Dean, Olivia M

    2015-01-01

    Current pharmacological treatments for bipolar disorder (BD) are limited and efficacy has historically been discovered through serendipity. There is now scope for new drug development, focused on the underlying biology of BD that is not targeted by current therapies. The need for novel treatments is urgent when considering treatment resistant BD, where current therapies have failed. While established drugs targeting the monoamine systems continue to be worthwhile, new biological targets including inflammatory and oxidative an nitrosative pathways, apoptotic and neurotrophic pathways, mitochondrial pathways, the N-methyl-Daspartate (NMDA)-receptor complex, the purinergic system, neuropeptide system, cholinergic system and melatonin pathways are all being identified as potential anchors for the discovery of new agents. Many agents are experimental and efficacy data is limited, however further investigation may provide a new line for drug discovery, previously stalled by lack of corporate interest. PMID:26467413

  8. IQ and the fronto-temporal cortex in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Galve, Leticia; Bruno, Stefania; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Summers, Mary; Cipolotti, Lisa; Ron, Maria A

    2012-03-01

    Cognitive changes are documented in bipolar disorder (BP). Cortical volume loss, especially in prefrontal regions, has also been reported, but associations between cognition and cortical abnormalities have not been fully documented. This study explores associations between cognitive performance and cortical parameters (area, thickness and volume) of the fronto-temporal cortex in 36 BP patients (25 BPI and 11 BPII). T1-weighted volumetric MRI images were obtained using a 1.5 Tesla scanner. Cortical parameters were measured using surface-based morphometry and their associations with estimated premorbid, current IQ, visual memory, and executive function explored. Premorbid IQ was associated with frontal cortical area and volume, but no such associations were present for current cognitive performance. Cortical parameters were not different in BPI and BPII patients, but the association between current IQ and temporal cortical area was stronger in BPII patients. The pattern of cortico-cognitive associations in BPI and BPII patients merits further consideration. PMID:22264359

  9. Future Directions for Pharmacotherapies for Treatment-resistant Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Seetal; Fernandes, Brisa S.; Dean, Olivia M.

    2015-01-01

    Current pharmacological treatments for bipolar disorder (BD) are limited and efficacy has historically been discovered through serendipity. There is now scope for new drug development, focused on the underlying biology of BD that is not targeted by current therapies. The need for novel treatments is urgent when considering treatment resistant BD, where current therapies have failed. While established drugs targeting the monoamine systems continue to be worthwhile, new biological targets including inflammatory and oxidative an nitrosative pathways, apoptotic and neurotrophic pathways, mitochondrial pathways, the N-methyl-Daspartate (NMDA)–receptor complex, the purinergic system, neuropeptide system, cholinergic system and melatonin pathways are all being identified as potential anchors for the discovery of new agents. Many agents are experimental and efficacy data is limited, however further investigation may provide a new line for drug discovery, previously stalled by lack of corporate interest. PMID:26467413

  10. Spectrophotometric analysis of lithium carbonate used for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    May, James; Hickey, Michelle; Triantis, Iasonas; Palazidou, Eleni; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2015-03-01

    Lithium therapy is the gold standard of treatment for patients with Bipolar Disorder. However, despite its effectiveness, it is a potentially hazardous drug requiring regular monitoring of blood levels to ensure toxic levels are not reached. This paper describes the spectrophotometric analysis of Lithium carbonate in solution as a first step in developing a portable home monitoring device for blood lithium analysis.. Using a high-end spectrophotometer, solutions of lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) have been optically fingerprinted. Preliminary measurements indicate that the ultraviolet region shows a strong distinction between different lithium concentrations. Utilizing second derivative absorption curves, the region of 220 nm to 230 nm demonstrated the ability to differentiate between concentrations representing those found in patients. Furthermore, the method could determine to within a 1-6% accuracy whether an unknown solution of Li2CO3 is either inside or outside the high-end of the therapeutic limit. PMID:25798326

  11. Pharmacological Approaches for Treatment-resistant Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Hui Poon, Shi; Sim, Kang; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is prevalent, with high risks of disability, substance abuse and premature mortality. Treatment responses typically are incomplete, especially for depressive components, so that many cases can be considered "treatment resistant." We reviewed reports on experimental treatments for such patients: there is a striking paucity of such research, mainly involving small incompletely controlled trials of add-on treatment, and findings remain preliminary. Encouraging results have been reported by adding aripiprazole, bupropion, clozapine, ketamine, memantine, pramipexole, pregabalin, and perhaps tri-iodothyronine in resistant manic or depressive phases. The urgency of incomplete responses in such a severe illness underscores the need for more systematic, simpler, and better controlled studies in more homogeneous samples of patients. PMID:26467409

  12. Internet use by patients with bipolar disorder: Results from an international multisite survey.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Ardau, Raffaella; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bilderbeck, Amy; Bocchetta, Alberto; Bossini, Letizia; Castro, Angela M Paredes; Cheung, Eric Yw; Chillotti, Caterina; Choppin, Sabine; Del Zompo, Maria; Dias, Rodrigo; Dodd, Seetal; Duffy, Anne; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Hernandez, Miryam Fernández; Garnham, Julie; Geddes, John; Gildebro, Jonas; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goodwin, Guy M; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Hassel, Stefanie; Henry, Chantal; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Kapur, Vaisnvy; Kunigiri, Girish; Lafer, Beny; Larsen, Erik R; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W; Lund, Anne Hvenegaard; Misiak, Blazej; Monteith, Scott; Munoz, Rodrigo; Nakanotani, Takako; Nielsen, René E; O'Donovan, Claire; Okamura, Yasushi; Osher, Yamima; Piotrowski, Patryk; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sagduyu, Kemal; Sawchuk, Brett; Schwartz, Elon; Scippa, Ângela M; Slaney, Claire; Sulaiman, Ahmad H; Suominen, Kirsi; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Tam, Peter; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Vieta, Eduard; Vinberg, Maj; Viswanath, Biju; Volkert, Julia; Zetin, Mark; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2016-08-30

    There is considerable international interest in online education of patients with bipolar disorder, yet little understanding of how patients use the Internet and other sources to seek information. 1171 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in 17 countries completed a paper-based, anonymous survey. 81% of the patients used the Internet, a percentage similar to the general public. Older age, less education, and challenges in country telecommunications infrastructure and demographics decreased the odds of using the Internet. About 78% of the Internet users looked online for information on bipolar disorder or 63% of the total sample. More years of education in relation to the country mean, and feeling very confident about managing life decreased the odds of seeking information on bipolar disorder online, while having attended support groups increased the odds. Patients who looked online for information on bipolar disorder consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 2.3 other information sources such as books, physician handouts, and others with bipolar disorder. Patients not using the Internet consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 1.6 other information sources. The percentage of patients with bipolar disorder who use the Internet is about the same as the general public. Other information sources remain important.

  13. Internet use by patients with bipolar disorder: Results from an international multisite survey.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Ardau, Raffaella; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bilderbeck, Amy; Bocchetta, Alberto; Bossini, Letizia; Castro, Angela M Paredes; Cheung, Eric Yw; Chillotti, Caterina; Choppin, Sabine; Del Zompo, Maria; Dias, Rodrigo; Dodd, Seetal; Duffy, Anne; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Hernandez, Miryam Fernández; Garnham, Julie; Geddes, John; Gildebro, Jonas; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goodwin, Guy M; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Hassel, Stefanie; Henry, Chantal; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Kapur, Vaisnvy; Kunigiri, Girish; Lafer, Beny; Larsen, Erik R; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W; Lund, Anne Hvenegaard; Misiak, Blazej; Monteith, Scott; Munoz, Rodrigo; Nakanotani, Takako; Nielsen, René E; O'Donovan, Claire; Okamura, Yasushi; Osher, Yamima; Piotrowski, Patryk; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sagduyu, Kemal; Sawchuk, Brett; Schwartz, Elon; Scippa, Ângela M; Slaney, Claire; Sulaiman, Ahmad H; Suominen, Kirsi; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Tam, Peter; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Vieta, Eduard; Vinberg, Maj; Viswanath, Biju; Volkert, Julia; Zetin, Mark; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2016-08-30

    There is considerable international interest in online education of patients with bipolar disorder, yet little understanding of how patients use the Internet and other sources to seek information. 1171 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in 17 countries completed a paper-based, anonymous survey. 81% of the patients used the Internet, a percentage similar to the general public. Older age, less education, and challenges in country telecommunications infrastructure and demographics decreased the odds of using the Internet. About 78% of the Internet users looked online for information on bipolar disorder or 63% of the total sample. More years of education in relation to the country mean, and feeling very confident about managing life decreased the odds of seeking information on bipolar disorder online, while having attended support groups increased the odds. Patients who looked online for information on bipolar disorder consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 2.3 other information sources such as books, physician handouts, and others with bipolar disorder. Patients not using the Internet consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 1.6 other information sources. The percentage of patients with bipolar disorder who use the Internet is about the same as the general public. Other information sources remain important. PMID:27391371

  14. Lamotrigine Dosing for Pregnant Patients With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Crystal T.; Klein, Autumn M.; Perel, James M.; Helsel, Joseph; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little information is available on the need for dosage changes for lamotrigine in pregnant women with bipolar disorder. The authors present new data on serial serum levels of lamotrigine in pregnant patients on lamotrigine monotherapy. They also review the epilepsy literature on use of lamotrigine during pregnancy. Method Lamotrigine serum samples were obtained from eight mother-infant pairs at different time points during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Results All of the women were taking lamotrigine throughout pregnancy. Serum-level-to-dose ratios were lower during pregnancy than the postpartum period. Lamotrigine was taken once daily in doses ranging from 100 mg to 300 mg. Three patients had an increase of 50 mg to their daily dose across pregnancy. The change in serum lamotrigine levels in the postpartum period ranged from a 30% decrease to a 640% increase compared with the first level obtained during pregnancy. Level-to-dose ratios obtained within 4 weeks after delivery reflected a mean level 402% greater than the baseline level during gestation. Compared with the third trimester, lamotrigine serum concentration increased an average of 154% within 5 weeks after delivery. The most dramatic increase in lamotrigine serum level early after delivery occurred at 1.5 weeks. The mean infant cord level was 66% of the maternal serum level at delivery. The mean breast-fed infant serum level was 32.5% of the maternal serum levels. Conclusions The pattern of lamotrigine changes during pregnancy in these women with bipolar disorder was consistent with that described in the epilepsy literature. PMID:24185239

  15. Potential Therapeutic Effects of Physical Exercise for Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; de Souza Moura, Antonio Marcos; Lamego, Murilo Khede; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Paes, Flávia; Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Lattari, Eduardo; Rimes, Ridson; Manochio, João; Budde, Henning; Wegner, Mirko; Mura, Gioia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Cheniaux, Elie; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are observed in a variety of domains in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). These deficits are attributed to neurobiological, functional and structural brain factors, particularly in prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, cortical alterations in each phase (mania/hypomania, euthymia and depression) are also present. A growing basis of evidence supports aerobic exercise as an alternative treatment method for BD symptoms. Its benefits for physical health in healthy subjects and some psychiatric disorders are fairly established; however evidence directly addressed to BD is scant. Lack of methodological consistency, mainly related to exercise, makes it difficult accuracy and extrapolation of the results. Nevertheless, mechanisms related to BD physiopathology, such as hormonal and neurotransmitters alterations and mainly related to brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) can be explored. BDNF, specially, have a large influence on brain ability and its gene expression is highly responsive to aerobic exercise. Moreover, aerobic exercise trough BDNF may induce chronic stress suppression, commonly observed in patients with BD, and reduce deleterious effects caused by allostatic loads. Therefore, it is prudent to propose that aerobic exercise plays an important role in BD physiopathological mechanisms and it is a new way for the treatment for this and others psychiatric disorders.

  16. Potential Therapeutic Effects of Physical Exercise for Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; de Souza Moura, Antonio Marcos; Lamego, Murilo Khede; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Paes, Flávia; Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Lattari, Eduardo; Rimes, Ridson; Manochio, João; Budde, Henning; Wegner, Mirko; Mura, Gioia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Cheniaux, Elie; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are observed in a variety of domains in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). These deficits are attributed to neurobiological, functional and structural brain factors, particularly in prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, cortical alterations in each phase (mania/hypomania, euthymia and depression) are also present. A growing basis of evidence supports aerobic exercise as an alternative treatment method for BD symptoms. Its benefits for physical health in healthy subjects and some psychiatric disorders are fairly established; however evidence directly addressed to BD is scant. Lack of methodological consistency, mainly related to exercise, makes it difficult accuracy and extrapolation of the results. Nevertheless, mechanisms related to BD physiopathology, such as hormonal and neurotransmitters alterations and mainly related to brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) can be explored. BDNF, specially, have a large influence on brain ability and its gene expression is highly responsive to aerobic exercise. Moreover, aerobic exercise trough BDNF may induce chronic stress suppression, commonly observed in patients with BD, and reduce deleterious effects caused by allostatic loads. Therefore, it is prudent to propose that aerobic exercise plays an important role in BD physiopathological mechanisms and it is a new way for the treatment for this and others psychiatric disorders. PMID:26556085

  17. Longitudinal Predictors of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders: A Behavioral Approach System (BAS) Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Alloy, Lauren B.; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Urosevic, Snezana; Bender, Rachel E.; Wagner, Clara A.

    2009-01-01

    We review longitudinal predictors, primarily psychosocial, of the onset, course, and expression of bipolar spectrum disorders. We organize our review along a proximal – distal continuum, discussing the most proximal (i.e., prodromes) predictors of bipolar episodes first, then recent environmental (i.e., life events) predictors of bipolar symptoms and episodes next, followed by more distal psychological (i.e., cognitive styles) predictors, and ending with the most distal temperament (i.e., Behavioral Approach System sensitivity) predictors. We then present a theoretical model, the Behavioral Approach System (BAS) dysregulation model, for understanding and integrating the role of these predictors of bipolar spectrum disorders. Finally, we consider the implications of the reviewed longitudinal predictors for future research and psychosocial treatments of bipolar disorders. PMID:20161008

  18. Family-Focused Therapy for Bipolar Disorder: Reflections on 30 Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Miklowitz, David J; Chung, Bowen

    2016-09-01

    Family-focused therapy (FFT) is an evidence-based intervention for adults and children with bipolar disorder (BD) and their caregivers, usually given in conjunction with pharmacotherapy after an illness episode. The treatment consists of conjoint sessions of psychoeducation regarding bipolar illness, communication enhancement training, and problem-solving skills training. This paper summarizes over 30 years of research on FFT and family processes in BD. Across eight randomized controlled trials with adults and adolescents with BD, FFT and mood-stabilizing medications have been found to hasten recovery from mood episodes, reduce recurrences, and reduce levels of symptom severity compared to briefer forms of psychoeducation and medications over 1-2 years. Several studies indicate that the effects of FFT on symptom improvement are greater among patients with high-expressed emotion relatives. New research focuses on FFT as an early intervention for youth at risk for BD, neuroimaging as a means of evaluating treatment mechanisms, and progress in implementing FFT in community mental health settings. PMID:27471058

  19. Family-Focused Therapy for Bipolar Disorder: Reflections on 30 Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Miklowitz, David J; Chung, Bowen

    2016-09-01

    Family-focused therapy (FFT) is an evidence-based intervention for adults and children with bipolar disorder (BD) and their caregivers, usually given in conjunction with pharmacotherapy after an illness episode. The treatment consists of conjoint sessions of psychoeducation regarding bipolar illness, communication enhancement training, and problem-solving skills training. This paper summarizes over 30 years of research on FFT and family processes in BD. Across eight randomized controlled trials with adults and adolescents with BD, FFT and mood-stabilizing medications have been found to hasten recovery from mood episodes, reduce recurrences, and reduce levels of symptom severity compared to briefer forms of psychoeducation and medications over 1-2 years. Several studies indicate that the effects of FFT on symptom improvement are greater among patients with high-expressed emotion relatives. New research focuses on FFT as an early intervention for youth at risk for BD, neuroimaging as a means of evaluating treatment mechanisms, and progress in implementing FFT in community mental health settings.

  20. Adverse Effects in the Pharmacologic Management of Bipolar Disorder During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Charlotte S; Freeman, Marlene P

    2016-09-01

    Management of bipolar disorder during pregnancy often involves medications with potential adverse effects, including risks to the mother and fetus. Although some specifics are known, many medications continue to have incompletely characterized reproductive safety profiles. Women with bipolar disorder who are planning pregnancy face challenging decisions about their treatment; careful risk-benefit discussions are necessary. With the goal of further informing these discussions, this article reviews the data currently available regarding medication safety in the management of bipolar disorder during pregnancy, with specific attention to lithium, valproic acid, lamotrigine, carbamazepine, and antipsychotic medications. PMID:27514299

  1. Brain structure-function associations in multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fears, Scott C; Schür, Remmelt; Sjouwerman, Rachel; Service, Susan K; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Knowles, Emma; Gomez-Makhinson, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C; Aldana, Ileana; Teshiba, Terri M; Abaryan, Zvart; Al-Sharif, Noor B; Navarro, Linda; Tishler, Todd A; Altshuler, Lori; Bartzokis, George; Escobar, Javier I; Glahn, David C; Thompson, Paul M; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I; Sabatti, Chiara; Cantor, Rita M; Freimer, Nelson B; Bearden, Carrie E

    2015-07-01

    Recent theories regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder suggest contributions of both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative processes. While structural neuroimaging studies indicate disease-associated neuroanatomical alterations, the behavioural correlates of these alterations have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder to: (i) characterize neurobehavioural correlates of neuroanatomical measures implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder; (ii) identify brain-behaviour associations that differ between diagnostic groups; (iii) identify neurocognitive traits that show evidence of accelerated ageing specifically in subjects with bipolar disorder; and (iv) identify brain-behaviour correlations that differ across the age span. Structural neuroimages and multi-dimensional assessments of temperament and neurocognition were acquired from 527 (153 bipolar disorder and 374 non-bipolar disorder) adults aged 18-87 years in 26 families with heavy genetic loading for bipolar disorder. We used linear regression models to identify significant brain-behaviour associations and test whether brain-behaviour relationships differed: (i) between diagnostic groups; and (ii) as a function of age. We found that total cortical and ventricular volume had the greatest number of significant behavioural associations, and included correlations with measures from multiple cognitive domains, particularly declarative and working memory and executive function. Cortical thickness measures, in contrast, showed more specific associations with declarative memory, letter fluency and processing speed tasks. While the majority of brain-behaviour relationships were similar across diagnostic groups, increased cortical thickness in ventrolateral prefrontal and parietal cortical regions was associated with better declarative memory only in bipolar disorder subjects, and not in non-bipolar disorder family

  2. Brain structure–function associations in multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schür, Remmelt; Sjouwerman, Rachel; Service, Susan K.; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Knowles, Emma; Gomez-Makhinson, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C.; Aldana, Ileana; Teshiba, Terri M.; Abaryan, Zvart; Al-Sharif, Noor B.; Navarro, Linda; Tishler, Todd A.; Altshuler, Lori; Bartzokis, George; Escobar, Javier I.; Glahn, David C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I.; Sabatti, Chiara; Cantor, Rita M.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent theories regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder suggest contributions of both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative processes. While structural neuroimaging studies indicate disease-associated neuroanatomical alterations, the behavioural correlates of these alterations have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder to: (i) characterize neurobehavioural correlates of neuroanatomical measures implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder; (ii) identify brain–behaviour associations that differ between diagnostic groups; (iii) identify neurocognitive traits that show evidence of accelerated ageing specifically in subjects with bipolar disorder; and (iv) identify brain–behaviour correlations that differ across the age span. Structural neuroimages and multi-dimensional assessments of temperament and neurocognition were acquired from 527 (153 bipolar disorder and 374 non-bipolar disorder) adults aged 18–87 years in 26 families with heavy genetic loading for bipolar disorder. We used linear regression models to identify significant brain–behaviour associations and test whether brain–behaviour relationships differed: (i) between diagnostic groups; and (ii) as a function of age. We found that total cortical and ventricular volume had the greatest number of significant behavioural associations, and included correlations with measures from multiple cognitive domains, particularly declarative and working memory and executive function. Cortical thickness measures, in contrast, showed more specific associations with declarative memory, letter fluency and processing speed tasks. While the majority of brain–behaviour relationships were similar across diagnostic groups, increased cortical thickness in ventrolateral prefrontal and parietal cortical regions was associated with better declarative memory only in bipolar disorder subjects, and not in non-bipolar

  3. Elevated levels of plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor in rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Munkholm, Klaus; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vinberg, Maj

    2014-09-01

    Impaired neuroplasticity may be implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, involving peripheral alterations of the neurotrophins brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3). Evidence is limited by methodological issues and is based primarily on case-control designs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BDNF and NT-3 levels differ between patients with rapid cycling bipolar disorder and healthy control subjects and whether BDNF and NT-3 levels alter with affective states in rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients. Plasma levels of BDNF and NT-3 were measured in 37 rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients and in 40 age- and gender matched healthy control subjects using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In a longitudinal design, repeated measurements of BDNF and NT-3 were evaluated in various affective states in bipolar disorder patients during a 6-12 months period and compared with repeated measurements in healthy control subjects. Careful attention was given to standardization of all procedures and adjustment for potential confounders of BDNF and NT-3. In linear mixed models, adjusting for demographical and lifestyle factors, levels of BDNF were significantly elevated in bipolar disorder patients in euthymic- (p<0.05), depressed- (p<0.005) and manic/hypomanic (p<0.005) states compared with healthy control subjects. Within bipolar disorder patients, adjusting for medication, there was no significant difference in BDNF levels between affective states, with equally elevated levels present in euthymic-, depressive- and manic/hypomanic patients. Levels of BDNF were higher in patients with longer duration of illness compared with patients with shorter duration of illness. We found no difference in NT-3 levels between bipolar disorder patients in any affective state compared with healthy control subjects and no difference in NT-3 levels between affective states in bipolar disorder patients. The results suggest that

  4. The Double-Edged Sword of Goal Engagement: Consequences of Goal Pursuit in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Fulford, Daniel; Carver, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    A series of studies suggest that bipolar disorder is related to high sensitivity to incentives and that incentive sensitivity (or sensitivity of the approach system) can predict the course of mania. Incentive sensitivity in bipolar disorder seems to be related to two processes: a tendency to invest in difficult-to-attain goals and an over-reactivity to cues of goal progress versus thwarting. Both of those processes appear relevant to symptom generation. Hence, bipolar disorder seems related to a greater emphasis on reaching goals and also a problematic reactivity to reaching those highly desired goals. We suggest directions for treatment development focused on these issues in goal regulation. PMID:22610999

  5. The Relationship between Bipolar Disorder and Cannabis Use in Daily Life: An Experience Sampling Study

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Elizabeth; Jones, Steven; Black, Nancy; Carter, Lesley-Anne; Barrowclough, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although cannabis use is common in bipolar disorder and may contribute to worse clinical outcomes, little is understood about the relationship between this drug and bipolar disorder over the course of daily life. The aim of study was to examine the effect of cannabis on affect and bipolar symptoms in a group of individuals with bipolar disorder. Methods Twenty-four participants with bipolar disorder type I or type II completed diaries for 6 days using Experience Sampling Methodology to investigate the temporal associations between cannabis, affect and bipolar disorder symptoms. Results The results indicated that higher levels of positive affect increase the odds of using cannabis (OR:1.25 ,CI:1.06–1.47, P=0.008). However, neither negative affect, manic nor depressive symptoms predicted the use of cannabis. Cannabis use was associated with subsequent increases in positive affect (β=0.35, CI:0.20-0.51, P=0.000), manic symptoms (β=0.20,CI:0.05-0.34, P=0.009) and depressive symptoms (β= 0.17,CI:0.04-0.29, P=0.008). Conclusion The findings indicate that cannabis use is associated with a number of subsequent psychological effects. However there was no evidence that individuals with BD were using cannabis to self-medicate minor fluctuations in negative affect or bipolar disorder symptoms over the course of daily life. The findings in relation to existing literature and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25738578

  6. Bipolar disorder, not so rare diagnosis: subtypes of different degrees of severity, diagnosis, therapy.

    PubMed

    Amihăesei, Ioana Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is manifesting as a mood disorder, typically showing episodes of mania, alternating with depressive episodes. The subtypes are including bipolar I disorder (one or several manic episodes) and bipolar II disorder (hypomanic episodes and one or several major depressive episodes). Nevertheless, sub-threshold diagnosis criteria may include another 5.1, up to 6.4% of the population as having a bipolar spectrum disorder diagnosis. Anyone who received the diagnosis is not considered cured afterwards (just in remission). Diagnosis is considering the symptoms of mania, hypomania and depression. Therapy is based on lithium, anticonvulsants, for the manic symptoms, lamotrigine for the depressive episodes and antipsychotics. Under medication, most of the affected subjects are living a normal life; to a certain degree, medication may also prevent the relapses.

  7. Double-Blind 18-Month Trial of Lithium Versus Divalproex Maintenance Treatment in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findling, Robert L.; McNamara, Nora K.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Stansbrey, Robert; Gracious, Barbara L.; Reed, Michael D.; Calabrese, Joseph R.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether divalproex sodium (DVPX) was superior to lithium carbonate ([Li.sup.+]) in the maintenance monotherapy treatment of youths diagnosed with bipolar disorder who had been previously stabilized on combination [Li.sup.+] and DVPX ([Li.sup.+]/DVPX) pharmacotherapy. Method: Youths ages 5-17 years with bipolar I or II…

  8. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder versus Severe Mood Dysregulation: Risk for Manic Episodes on Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringaris, Argyris; Baroni, Argelinda; Haimm, Caroline; Brotman, Melissa; Lowe, Catherine H.; Myers, Frances; Rustgi, Eileen; Wheeler, Wanda; Kayser, Reilly; Towbin, Kenneth; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: An important question in pediatric bipolar research is whether marked nonepisodic irritability is a manifestation of bipolar disorder in youth. This study tests the hypothesis that youth with severe mood dysregulation (SMD), a category created for the purpose of studying children presenting with severe nonepisodic irritability, will be…

  9. Mood-Dependent Cognitive Change in a Man with Bipolar Disorder Who Cycles Every 24 Hours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Dominic; Mansell, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A case study of a bipolar patient whose mood changes every 24 hours is described to illustrate the changes in cognitive processing and content during different phases of bipolar disorder. The participant completed a battery of questionnaires and tasks on 4 separate occasions: twice when depressed and twice when manic. Depression tended to be…

  10. A Pharmacotherapy Algorithm for Stabilization and Maintenance of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavuluri, Mani N.; Henry, David B.; Devineni, Bhargavi; Carbray, Julie A.; Naylor, Michael W.; Janicak, Philip G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of an evidence-based pharmacotherapy algorithm in the treatment of pediatric bipolar disorder. Method: The study reports the results of a study of 64 bipolar type I subjects who were treated according to an algorithm developed in our specialty clinic. All subjects had been diagnosed using the…

  11. Attention and Memory Biases in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder: Indications from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotlib, Ian H.; Traill, Saskia K.; Montoya, Rebecca L.; Joormann, Jutta; Chang, Kiki

    2005-01-01

    Background: Although children of bipolar parents are at heightened risk for developing emotional disorders, the processes underlying this vulnerability are not well understood. This study examined biases in the processing of emotional stimuli as a potential vulnerability marker of bipolar disorder. Methods: Sixteen children of bipolar parents who…

  12. An Evaluation of Social and Adaptive Skills in Adults with Bipolar Disorder and Severe/Profound Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Terlonge, Cindy; Gonzalez, Melissa L.; Rivet, Tessa

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the interrelationship of social and adaptive skills in adults with bipolar disorder and severe or profound intellectual disability. A bipolar group (N=14), a severe psychopathology group without bipolar disorder (N=14), and a control group with no DSM-IV Axis I diagnosis (N=14) were compared on the…

  13. An archetype of the collaborative efforts of psychotherapy and psychopharmacology in successfully treating dissociative identity disorder with comorbid bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Manu N; Meier, Stacey L Colton; Meier, Robert S; Lakshmanan, Ramaswamy

    2010-07-01

    We present a case where dissociative identity disorder was effectively treated with memory retrieval psychotherapy. However, the patient's comorbid bipolar disorder contributed to the patient's instability and fortified the amnesiac barriers that exist between alter personality states in dissociative identity disorder, which made memory retrieval difficult to achieve. Implications from this case indicate that a close collaboration between psychologist and psychiatrist focused on carefully diagnosing and treating existing comorbid conditions may be the most important aspect in treating dissociative identity disorder. We present our experience of successfully treating a patient with dissociative identity disorder and bipolar disorder using this collaborative method.

  14. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Risk for Bipolar Disorder: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Jen; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Shen, Cheng-Che; Wang, Yen-Po; Hu, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Pan-Ming; Su, Tung-Ping; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lu, Ti

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that chronic inflammation may play a vital role in the pathophysiology of both gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and bipolar disorder. Among patients with GERD, the risk of bipolar disorder has not been well characterized. Objective We explored the relationship between GERD and the subsequent development of bipolar disorder, and examined the risk factors for bipolar disorder in patients with GERD. Methods We identified patients who were diagnosed with GERD in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort without GERD was matched according to age, sex, and comorbidities. The occurrence of bipolar disorder was evaluated in both cohorts based on diagnosis and the prescription of medications. Results The GERD cohort consisted of 21,674 patients, and the comparison cohort consisted of 21,674 matched control patients without GERD. The incidence of bipolar disorder (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.58–3.36, P<.001) was higher among GERD patients than among comparison cohort. Multivariate, matched regression models showed that the female sex (hazard ratio [HR] 1.78, 95% CI 1.76–2.74, P = .008), being younger than 60 years old (HR 2.35, 95% CI 1.33–4.16, P = .003), and alcohol use disorder (HR 4.89, 95% CI 3.06–7.84, P = .004) were independent risk factors for the development of bipolar disorder among GERD patients. Conclusions GERD may increase the risk of developing bipolar disorder. Based on our data, we suggest that attention should be focused on female patients younger than 60 years, and patients with alcohol use disorder, following a GERD diagnosis. PMID:25255080

  15. CACNA1C hypermethylation is associated with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Starnawska, A; Demontis, D; Pen, A; Hedemand, A; Nielsen, A L; Staunstrup, N H; Grove, J; Als, T D; Jarram, A; O'Brien, N L; Mors, O; McQuillin, A; Børglum, A D; Nyegaard, M

    2016-01-01

    The CACNA1C gene, encoding a subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel is one of the best-supported susceptibility genes for bipolar disorder (BD). Genome-wide association studies have identified a cluster of non-coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in intron 3 to be highly associated with BD and schizophrenia. The mechanism by which these SNPs confer risk of BD appears to be through an altered regulation of CACNA1C expression. The role of CACNA1C DNA methylation in BD has not yet been addressed. The aim of this study was to investigate if CACNA1C DNA methylation is altered in BD. First, the methylation status of five CpG islands (CGIs) across CACNA1C in blood from BD subjects (n=40) and healthy controls (n=38) was determined. Four islands were almost completely methylated or completely unmethylated, while one island (CGI 3) in intron 3 displayed intermediate methylation levels. In the main analysis, the methylation status of CGI 3 was analyzed in a larger sample of BD subjects (n=582) and control individuals (n=319). Out of six CpG sites that were investigated, five sites showed significant hypermethylation in cases (lowest P=1.16 × 10−7 for CpG35). Nearby SNPs were found to influence the methylation level, and we identified rs2238056 in intron 3 as the strongest methylation quantitative trait locus (P=2.6 × 10−7) for CpG35. In addition, we found an increased methylation in females, and no difference between bipolar I and II. In conclusion, we find that CACNA1C methylation is associated with BD and suggest that the regulatory effect of the non-coding risk variants involves a shift in DNA methylation. PMID:27271857

  16. Cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder: from acute episode to remission.

    PubMed

    Volkert, J; Schiele, M A; Kazmaier, Julia; Glaser, Friederike; Zierhut, K C; Kopf, J; Kittel-Schneider, S; Reif, A

    2016-04-01

    Considerable evidence demonstrates that neuropsychological deficits are prevalent in bipolar disorder during both acute episodes and euthymia. However, it is less clear whether these cognitive disturbances are state- or trait-related. We here present the first longitudinal study employing a within-subject pre- and post-testing examining acutely admitted bipolar patients (BP) in depression or mania and during euthymia, aiming to identify cognitive performance from acute illness to remission. Cognitive performance was measured during acute episodes and repeated after at least 3 months of remission. To do so, 55 BP (35 depressed, 20 hypo-/manic) and 55 healthy controls (HC) were tested with a neuropsychological test battery (attention, working memory, verbal memory, executive functioning). The results showed global impairments in acutely ill BP compared to HC: depressed patients showed a characteristic psychomotor slowing, while manic patients had severe deficits in executive functioning. Twenty-nine remitted BP could be measured in the follow-up (dropout rate 48 %), whose cognitive functions partially recovered, whereas working memory and verbal memory were still impaired. However, we found that subthreshold depressive symptoms and persisting sleep disturbances in euthymic BP were associated with reduced speed, deficits in attention and verbal memory, while working memory was correlated with psychotic symptoms (lifetime). This result indicates working memory as trait related for a subgroup of BP with psychotic symptoms. In contrast, attention and verbal memory are negatively influenced by state factors like residual symptoms, which should be more considered as possible confounders in the search of cognitive endophenotypes in remitted BP. PMID:26611783

  17. Prevention of bipolar disorder in at-risk children: theoretical assumptions and empirical foundations.

    PubMed

    Miklowitz, David J; Chang, Kiki D

    2008-01-01

    This article examines how bipolar symptoms emerge during development, and the potential role of psychosocial and pharmacological interventions in the prevention of the onset of the disorder. Early signs of bipolarity can be observed among children of bipolar parents and often take the form of subsyndromal presentations (e.g., mood lability, episodic elation or irritability, depression, inattention, and psychosocial impairment). However, many of these early presentations are diagnostically nonspecific. The few studies that have followed at-risk youth into adulthood find developmental discontinuities from childhood to adulthood. Biological markers (e.g., amygdalar volume) may ultimately increase our accuracy in identifying children who later develop bipolar I disorder, but few such markers have been identified. Stress, in the form of childhood adversity or highly conflictual families, is not a diagnostically specific causal agent but does place genetically and biologically vulnerable individuals at risk for a more pernicious course of illness. A preventative family-focused treatment for children with (a) at least one first-degree relative with bipolar disorder and (b) subsyndromal signs of bipolar disorder is described. This model attempts to address the multiple interactions of psychosocial and biological risk factors in the onset and course of bipolar disorder. PMID:18606036

  18. Bipolar disorder: a neural network perspective on a disorder of emotion and motivation.

    PubMed

    Wessa, Michèle; Kanske, Philipp; Linke, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe, chronic disease with a heritability of 60-80%. BD is frequently misdiagnosed due to phenomenological overlap with other psychopathologies, an important issue that calls for the identification of biological and psychological vulnerability and disease markers. Altered structural and functional connectivity, mainly between limbic and prefrontal brain areas, have been proposed to underlie emotional and motivational dysregulation in BD and might represent relevant vulnerability and disease markers. In the present laboratory review we discuss functional and structural neuroimaging findings on emotional and motivational dysregulation from our research group in BD patients and healthy individuals at risk to develop BD. As a main result of our studies, we observed altered orbitofrontal and limbic activity and reduced connectivity between dorsal prefrontal and limbic brain regions, as well as reduced integrity of fiber tracts connecting prefrontal and subcortical brain structures in BD patients and high-risk individuals. Our results provide novel insights into pathophysiological mechanisms of bipolar disorder. The current laboratory review provides a specific view of our group on altered brain connectivity and underlying psychological processes in bipolar disorder based on our own work, integrating relevant findings from others. Thereby we attempt to advance neuropsychobiological models of BD.

  19. Glucose metabolism alterations in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Gianluca; Cattaneo, Annamaria; Zanardini, Roberta; Gennarelli, Massimo; Maina, Giuseppe; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella

    2015-09-15

    Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) are more frequently affected by metabolic syndrome (MetS) than the general population, but the neurobiological correlates underlying such association are still not clarified and few studies in BD have evaluated the role of regulators of lipid and glucose metabolism. The present study was aimed to investigate putative alterations in markers linked to metabolic dysfunctions as C-peptide, Ghrelin, GIP, GLP-1, Glucagon, Insulin, Leptin, PAI-1 (total), Resistin and Visfatin in a sample of BD patients compared to controls. Furthermore, associations between changes of metabolic markers and relevant clinical features, such as severity of symptomatology, number and type of past mood episodes, drug treatments and presence/absence of metabolic alterations (MetS, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) were analyzed. A total of 57 patients with BD and 49 healthy controls were recruited. The main results showed lower serum levels of Glucagon, GLP-1, Ghrelin, and higher levels of GIP in BD patients as compared to controls (p = 0.018 for Ghrelin; p < 0.0001 for Glucagon; p < 0.0001 for GLP-1; p < 0.0001 for GIP). Further, Glucagon and GLP-1 levels were significantly associated with the number of past mood episodes. These findings support the hypothesis that alterations in Glucagon, GLP-1, GIP and Ghrelin might be involved in BD pathogenesis and might represent useful biomarkers for the development of preventive and personalized therapies in this disorder. PMID:26120808

  20. Metacognition in psychosis: comparison of schizophrenia with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Tas, Cumhur; Brown, Elliot C; Aydemir, Omer; Brüne, Martin; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-11-30

    While deficits in metacognition have been observed in schizophrenia (SZ), it is less clear whether these are specific to the disorder. Accordingly, this study compared metacognitive abilities of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) and examined the degree to which neurocognition contributed to metacognitive deficits in both groups. Participants were 30 patients with SZ and 30 with BD. Metacognitive capacity was measured using the Metacognition Assessment Scale Abbreviated (MAS-A). This scale comprises four domains: self-reflectivity, understanding others' minds, decentration and mastery. Verbal memory, executive functioning and symptoms were concurrently assessed. Group comparisons revealed that SZ patients had greater deficits in metacognitive self-reflectivity, which correctly classified 85.2% of patients with SZ in a logistic regression. Self-reflectivity and understanding others'minds were related to verbal memory and executive functioning in the SZ group, but not in the BD group. Furthermore, greater positive and general psychotic symptoms were associated with poorer metacognition in SZ. Results suggest SZ involves unique deficits in the ability to self-reflect and that these deficits may be uniquely linked with neurocognition.

  1. Preserved white matter in unmedicated pediatric bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana Maria A; Kleinman, Ana; Zanetti, Marcus; Jackowski, Marcel; Duran, Fábio; Pereira, Fabrício; Lafer, Beny; Busatto, Geraldo F; Caetano, Sheila C

    2014-09-01

    White matter (WM) abnormalities have been reported in bipolar disorder (BD) patients, as well as in their non-BD relatives, both children and adults. Although it is considered an emerging vulnerability marker for BD, there are no studies investigating WM alterations in pediatric unmedicated patients and young healthy offspring. In this study, we evaluated the presence of WM alterations in 18 pediatric, non medicated BD patients, as well as in 18 healthy offspring of BD type I parents and 20 healthy controls. 3T DT-MRI data were acquired and scans were processed with tract-based spatial statistics to provide measures of fractional anisotropy and diffusivity. We found no significant differences in WM microstructure between BD patients, healthy offspring and healthy controls. Previous studies that reported WM alterations investigated older subjects, either on medication (BD patients) or with psychiatric diagnoses other than BD (unaffected offspring). Our findings highlight the importance of the understanding of disease ontogeny and brain development dynamics in the search for early vulnerability markers for psychiatric disorders.

  2. Gambling problems in bipolar disorder in the UK: prevalence and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lisa; Metcalf, Alice; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Forty, Liz; Perry, Amy; Lloyd, Joanne; Geddes, John R.; Goodwin, Guy M.; Jones, Ian; Craddock, Nick; Rogers, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Background North American studies show bipolar disorder is associated with elevated rates of problem gambling; however, little is known about rates in the different presentations of bipolar illness. Aims To determine the prevalence and distribution of problem gambling in people with bipolar disorder in the UK. Method The Problem Gambling Severity Index was used to measure gambling problems in 635 participants with bipolar disorder. Results Moderate to severe gambling problems were four times higher in people with bipolar disorder than in the general population, and were associated with type 2 disorder (OR = 1.74, P = 0.036), history of suicidal ideation or attempt (OR = 3.44, P = 0.02) and rapid cycling (OR = 2.63, P = 0.008). Conclusions Approximately 1 in 10 patients with bipolar disorder may be at moderate to severe risk of problem gambling, possibly associated with suicidal behaviour and a rapid cycling course. Elevated rates of gambling problems in type 2 disorder highlight the probable significance of modest but unstable mood disturbance in the development and maintenance of such problems. PMID:26089303

  3. Mapping corpus callosum morphology in twin pairs discordant for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Bearden, Carrie E; van Erp, Theo G M; Dutton, Rebecca A; Boyle, Christina; Madsen, Sarah; Luders, Eileen; Kieseppa, Tuula; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Huttunen, Matti; Partonen, Timo; Kaprio, Jaakko; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Thompson, Paul M; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2011-10-01

    Callosal volume reduction has been observed in patients with bipolar disorder, but whether these deficits reflect genetic vulnerability to the illness remains unresolved. Here, we used computational methods to map corpus callosum abnormalities in a population-based sample of twin pairs discordant for bipolar disorder. Twenty-one probands with bipolar I disorder (mean age 44.4 ± 7.5 years; 48% female), 19 of their non-bipolar co-twins, and 34 demographically matched control twin individuals underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Three-dimensional callosal surface models were created to visualize its morphologic variability and to localize group differences. Neurocognitive correlates of callosal area differences were additionally investigated in a subsample of study participants. Bipolar (BPI) probands, but not their co-twins, showed significant callosal thinning and area reduction, most pronounced in the genu and splenium, relative to healthy twins. Altered callosal curvature was additionally observed in BPI probands. In bipolar probands and co-twins, genu and splenium midsagittal areas were significantly correlated with verbal processing speed and response inhibition. These findings suggest that aberrant connections between cortical regions--possibly reflecting decreased myelination of white matter tracts--may be involved in bipolar pathophysiology. However, findings of callosal thinning appear to be disease related, rather than reflecting genetic vulnerability to bipolar illness. PMID:21383237

  4. Molecular hydrogen: an overview of its neurobiological effects and therapeutic potential for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a bioactive molecule that has a diversity of effects, including anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties; these overlap with the process of neuroprogression in major psychiatric disorders. Specifically, both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are associated with increased oxidative and inflammatory stress. Moreover, lithium which is commonly administered for treating bipolar disorder has effects on oxidative stress and apoptotic pathways, as do valproate and some atypical antipsychotics for treating schizophrenia. Molecular hydrogen has been studied pre-clinically in animal models for the treatment of some medical conditions including hypoxia and neurodegenerative disorders, and there are intriguing clinical findings in neurological disorders including Parkinson’s disease. Therefore, it is hypothesized that administration of hydrogen molecule may have potential as a novel therapy for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and other concurrent disorders characterized by oxidative, inflammatory and apoptotic dysregulation. PMID:23742229

  5. The link between bipolar disorders and creativity: evidence from personality and temperament studies.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shefali; Ketter, Terence A

    2010-12-01

    Although extensive literature supports connections between bipolar disorder and creativity, possible mechanisms underlying such relationships are only beginning to emerge. Herein we review evidence supporting one such possible mechanism, namely that personality/temperament contribute to enhanced creativity in individuals with bipolar disorder, a theory supported by studies showing that certain personality/temperamental traits are not only common to bipolar disorder patients and creative individuals but also correlate with measures of creativity. Thus, we suggest based on studies using three important personality/temperament measures-the Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Openness Personality Inventory (NEO); the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI); and the Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A)-that changeable (increased TEMPS-A-cyclothymia) and at times negative (increased NEO-neuroticism) affect and open-minded (increased NEO-openness) and intuitive (increased MBTI-intuition) cognition may contribute importantly to enhanced creativity in individuals with bipolar disorder. PMID:20936438

  6. Cognitive impairment among older adults with late-life schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Barton W; Loughran, Casey I; Meeks, Thomas W

    2010-04-01

    Neurologists are increasingly faced with the daunting task of disentangling dementia from primary psychiatric conditions or recognizing their coexistence in older patients. Both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are characterized by substantial intergroup cognitive heterogeneity among older and younger patients. In schizophrenia, deficits in many cognitive domains are common; however, "rapid forgetting," loss of crystallized knowledge, and greater than age-normal declines in cognitive function are rare and warrant careful evaluation for secondary causes. The cognitive deficits associated with bipolar disorder tend be most severe during acute affective episodes, but some deficits tend to persist even during periods of relative euthymia. Lifetime number of affective episodes in bipolar disorder may adversely affect cognitive functions in bipolar disorder, but severe deficits and/or substantive declines over a period of a few years are unusual and warrant careful evaluation for secondary causes.

  7. Mutation screening of the human period 2 gene in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Shiino, Yayoi; Nakajima, Satoru; Ozeki, Yuji; Isono, Takahiro; Yamada, Naoto

    2003-02-20

    We tested whether the human period 2 gene (hper2), one of the essential components of the circadian oscillator, might have influence on bipolar disorder. We screened 88 bipolar disorder patients and 127 controls, all of Japanese origin. Screening in the casein kinase I epsilon (CKIepsilon) binding region of hper2, which was previously reported in familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome patients, with polymerase chain reaction amplification revealed four polymorphisms. One of the four polymorphisms had an amino acid substitution of a serine at 662 with a glycine (S662G). The frequencies of the S662G allele and genotypes on patients with bipolar disorder were very low and had no difference from those in controls. Polymorphism on the CKIepsilon binding region of hper2 gene which was previously reported, is unlikely to play an important role in the development of bipolar disorder. PMID:12565145

  8. Rethinking emotion: cognitive reappraisal is an effective positive and negative emotion regulation strategy in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Gruber, June; Hay, Aleena C; Gross, James J

    2014-04-01

    Bipolar disorder involves difficulties with emotion regulation, yet the precise nature of these emotion regulatory difficulties is unclear. The current study examined whether individuals with remitted bipolar I disorder (n = 23) and healthy controls (n = 23) differ in their ability to use one effective and common form of emotion regulation, cognitive reappraisal. Positive, negative, and neutral films were used to elicit emotion, and participants were cued to watch the film carefully (i.e., uninstructed condition) or reappraise while measures of affect, behavior, and psychophysiology were obtained. Results showed that reappraisal was associated with reductions in emotion reactivity across subjective (i.e., positive and negative affect), behavioral (i.e., positive facial displays), and physiological (i.e., skin conductance) response domains across all participants. Results suggest that reappraisal may be an effective regulation strategy for both negative and positive emotion across both healthy adults and individuals with bipolar disorder. Discussion focuses on clinical and treatment implications for bipolar disorder.

  9. The role of mood stabilisers in the treatment of the depressive facet of bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel; Prica, Corina

    2007-01-01

    It was previously shown that available mood stabilisers are used to treat bipolar depression. As part of the natural course of illness, patients with bipolar disorder often suffer from episodes of depression more frequently and for longer durations than mania. A major challenge in the treatment of bipolar depression is the tendency for antidepressant medications, particularly tricyclic antidepressants, to precipitate episodes of mania, or to increase cycle frequency or symptom intensity. Thus, exploring the utility of mood stabilisers as monotherapy for bipolar depression is important. The aim of this review it to collate data involving the effects of some mood stabilisers like lithium, carbamazepine, valproate and lamotrigine in depressive aspects of bipolar disorder, but as well using an animal model of depression, to understand their mechanism of action.

  10. Risk of Suicidal Behavior With Antidepressants in Bipolar and Unipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Andrew C; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Solomonon, David A.; Li, Chunshan; Coryell, William H.; Endicott, Jean; Fawcett, Jan; Keller, Martin B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the risk ofsuicidal behavior (suicide attempts and deaths) associated with antidepressants in participants with bipolar I, bipolar n, and unipolar major depressive disorders. Design A 27-year longitudinal (1981-2008) observational study ofmood disorders (Research Diagnostic Criteria diagnoses based on Schedule Dr Afi:ctive Disorders and Schizophrenia and review ofmedical records) was used to evaluate antidepressants and risk Dr suicidal behavior. Mixed-efi:cts logistic regression models examined propensity Dr antidepressant exposure. Mixed-efi:cts swvival models that were matched on the propensity score examined exposure status as a risk factor for time until suicidal behavior. Setting Five US academic medical centers. Results Analyses of206 participants with bipolar I disorder revealed 2,010 exposure intervals (980 exposed to antidepressants; 1,030 unexposed); 139 participants with bipolar II disorder had 1 ,407 exposure intervals (694 exposed; 713 unexposed); and 361 participants with unipolar depressive disorder had 2, 745 exposure intervals (1,328 exposed; 1,417 unexposed). Propensity score analyses confinned that more severely ill participants were more likely to initiate antidepressant treatment. In mixed-elects swvival analyses, those with bipolar I disorder had a significant reduction in risk of suicidal behavior by 54% (HR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.31-0.69; t = -3.74; P < .001) during periods of antidepressant exposure compared to propensity-matched unexposed intervals. Similarly, the risk was reduced by 35% (HR = 0.65; 95% CI, 0.43-0.99; t = −2.01; P = .045) in bipolar II disorder. By contrast, there was no evidence of an increased or decreased risk with antidepressant exposure in unipolar disorder. Condusions Based on obsetVational data adjusted Dr propensity to receive antidepressants, antidepressants may protect patients with bipolar disorders but not unipolar depressive disorder from suicidal behavior. PMID:25093469

  11. [Prevalence of psychiatric disorders among homeless adolescents].

    PubMed

    Aichhorn, Wolfgang; Santeler, Stefan; Stelzig-Schöler, Renate; Kemmler, Georg; Steinmayr-Gensluckner, Maria; Hinterhuber, Hartmann

    2008-01-01

    Various studies show a high prevalence of mental disorders among homeless people. So far most of these studies deal solely with single men, mainly affected by homelessness. Few data exist for women, children, adolescents and whole families that are more and more affected by poverty and homelessness. This study, conducted in Innsbruck/Austria, determined the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among homeless adolescents. The adolescents were recruited in a counselling centre and homeless shelter specifically founded for homeless youth. Mental disorders were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SKID-I). 40 adolescents and young adults ranging from 14-23 years (mean 17.9 years) were included in the study. The results show that 58% of the homeless adolescents were exposed to continuous violence in their families and that violence was a major reason for them to leave home. The overall prevalence of diagnosed psychiatric disorders was 80% in the whole sample; the leading disorder was substance abuse/dependence (65%), followed by mood disorders (42.5%), anxiety disorders (17.5%) and eating disorders (17.5%). 57.5% of the adolescents had a history of self-harm and 25% reported at least one suicide attempt. Duration of homelessness had the greatest influence on the prevalence of mental disorders. Longer duration of homelessness was associated with a higher risk of psychiatric disorder or self-harm. These results demonstrate the urgent need for early psychosocial and psychiatric help for homeless adolescents. PMID:18826872

  12. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes. PMID:27025465

  13. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes.

  14. Has analytical flexibility increased in imaging studies of bipolar disorder and major depression?

    PubMed

    Munafò, M R; Kempton, M J

    2015-02-01

    There has been extensive discussion of problems of reproducibility of research. Analytical flexibility may contribute to this, by increasing the likelihood that a reported finding represents a chance result. We explored whether analytical flexibility has increased over time, using human imaging studies of bipolar disorder and major depression. Our results indicate that the number of measures collected per study has increased over time for studies of bipolar disorder, but not for studies of major depression.

  15. NEUROCOGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT IN UNAFFECTED SIBLINGS OF YOUTH WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Alysa E.; Wozniak, Janet; Wilens, Timothy E.; Henin, Aude; Seidman, Larry J.; Petty, Carter; Fried, Ronna; Gross, Lara M.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence for the familiality of pediatric bipolar disorder (BPD) and its association with impairments on measures of processing speed, verbal learning and “executive” functions. The current study investigated whether these neurocognitive impairments index the familial risk underlying the diagnosis. Methods Subjects were 170 youth with BPD (mean age 12.3 yrs), their 118 non-mood disordered siblings and 79 non mood-disordered controls. Groups were compared on a battery of neuropsychological tests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, the Stroop, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, the Rey-Osterreith Complex Figure, an auditory working memory CPT and the California Verbal Learning Test (Child Edition). Measures were factor analyzed for data reduction purposes. All analyses controlled for age, sex and ADHD. Results Principal components analyses with a promax rotation yielded three factors reflecting: 1) processing speed/verbal learning; 2) working memory/interference control and 3) abstract problem solving. A CPT working memory measure with interference filtering demands (WM INT) was only administered to subjects 12 and older and thus analyzed separately. BPD youth showed impairments versus controls and unaffected relatives on all three factors and the WM INT. Unaffected relatives exhibited impairments versus controls on the abstract problem-solving factor and the WM INT. They also showed a statistical trend (p=.07) toward worse performance on the working/memory interference control factor. Conclusions Neurocognitive impairments in executive functions may reflect the familial neurobiological risk mechanisms underlying pediatric BPD and may have utility as endophenotypes in molecular genetic studies of the condition. PMID:19079809

  16. Epigenetic GABAergic targets in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, A; Auta, J; Chen, Y; Davis, J M; Dong, E; Gavin, D P; Grayson, D R; Matrisciano, F; Pinna, G; Satta, R; Sharma, R P; Tremolizzo, L; Tueting, P

    2011-06-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that a dysfunction of the GABAergic/glutamatergic network in telencephalic brain structures may be the pathogenetic mechanism underlying psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BP) disorder patients. Data obtained in Costa's laboratory (1996-2009) suggest that this dysfunction may be mediated primarily by a downregulation in the expression of GABAergic genes (e.g., glutamic acid decarboxylase₆₇[GAD₆₇] and reelin) associated with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)-dependent hypermethylation of their promoters. A pharmacological strategy to reduce the hypermethylation of GABAergic promoters is to administer drugs, such as the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproate (VPA), that induce DNA-demethylation when administered at doses that facilitate chromatin remodeling. The benefits elicited by combining VPA with antipsychotics in the treatment of BP disorder suggest that an investigation of the epigenetic interaction of these drugs is warranted. Our studies in mice suggest that when associated with VPA, clinically relevant doses of clozapine elicit a synergistic potentiation of VPA-induced GABAergic promoter demethylation. Olanzapine and quetiapine (two clozapine congeners) also facilitate chromatin remodeling but at doses higher than used clinically, whereas haloperidol and risperidone are inactive. Hence, the synergistic potentiation of VPA's action on chromatin remodeling by clozapine appears to be a unique property of the dibenzepines and is independent of their action on catecholamine or serotonin receptors. By activating DNA-demethylation, the association of clozapine or its derivatives with VPA or other more potent and selective HDAC inhibitors may be considered a promising treatment strategy for normalizing GABAergic promoter hypermethylation and the GABAergic gene expression downregulation detected in the postmortem brain of SZ and BP disorder patients. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  17. Epigenetic GABAergic Targets in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, A.; Auta, J.; Chen, Y.; Davis, J.M.; Dong, E.; Gavin, D.P.; Grayson, D.R.; Matrisciano, F.; Pinna, G.; Satta, R.; Sharma, R.P.; Tremolizzo, L.; Tueting, P.

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that a dysfunction of the GABAergic/glutamatergic network in telencephalic brain structures may be the pathogenetic mechanism underlying psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BP) disorder patients. Data obtained in Costa’s laboratory (1996–2009) suggest that this dysfunction may be mediated primarily by a downregulation in the expression of GABAergic genes (e.g., glutamic acid decarboxylase67 [GAD67] and reelin) associated with DNA-methyltransferase (DNMT)-dependent hypermethylation of their promoters. A pharmacological strategy to reduce the hypermethylation of GABAergic promoters is to administer drugs, such as the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproate (VPA), that induce DNA-demethylation when administered at doses that facilitate chromatin remodeling. The benefits elicited by combining VPA with antipsychotics in the treatment of BP disorder suggest that an investigation of the epigenetic interaction of these drugs is warranted. Our studies in mice suggest that when associated with VPA, clinically relevant doses of clozapine elicit a synergistic potentiation of VPA-induced GABAergic promoter demethylation. Olanzapine and quetiapine (two clozapine congeners) also facilitate chromatin remodeling but at doses higher than used clinically, whereas haloperidol and risperidone are inactive. Hence, the synergistic potentiation of VPA’s action on chromatin remodeling by clozapine appears to be a unique property of the dibenzepines and is independent of their action on catecholamine or serotonin receptors. By activating DNA-demethylation, the association of clozapine or its derivatives with VPA or other more potent and selective HDAC inhibitors may be considered a promising treatment strategy for normalizing GABAergic promoter hypermethylation and the GABAergic gene expression downregulation detected in the postmortem brain of SZ and BP disorder patients. PMID:21074545

  18. Construct Validity of Adolescent Antisocial Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jeanette; Elkins, Irene J.; Legrand, Lisa; Peuschold, Dawn; Iacono, William G.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the construct validity of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) diagnosed in adolescence. Boys and girls were grouped by history of DSM-III-R conduct disorder (CD) and ASPD: Controls (n = 340) had neither diagnosis; CD Only (n = 77) had CD by age 17 but no ASPD through age 20; Adolescent ASPD (n = 64) had ASPD by age 17. The…

  19. Cognitive Coping in Anxiety-Disordered Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legerstee, Jeroen S.; Garnefski, Nadia; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated differences in cognitive coping strategies between anxiety-disordered and non-anxious adolescents. In addition, the interaction effect with gender as well as differences between specific anxiety diagnoses was examined. A clinical sample of 159 anxiety-disordered adolescents and a general community sample of 370…

  20. Identification of Pathways for Bipolar Disorder A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nurnberger, John I.; Koller, Daniel L.; Jung, Jeesun; Edenberg, Howard J.; Foroud, Tatiana; Guella, Ilaria; Vawter, Marquis P.; Kelsoe, John R.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Genome-wide investigations provide systematic information regarding the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders. OBJECTIVE To identify biological pathways that contribute to risk for bipolar disorder (BP) using genes with consistent evidence for association in multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS). DATA SOURCES Four independent data sets with individual genome-wide data available in July 2011 along with all data sets contributed to the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Bipolar Group by May 2012. A prior meta-analysis was used as a source for brain gene expression data. STUDY SELECTION The 4 published GWAS were included in the initial sample. All independent BP data sets providing genome-wide data in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium were included as a replication sample. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS We identified 966 genes that contained 2 or more variants associated with BP at P < .05 in 3 of 4 GWAS data sets (n = 12 127 [5253 cases, 6874 controls]). Simulations using 10 000 replicates of these data sets corrected for gene size and allowed the calculation of an empirical P value for each gene; empirically significant genes were entered into a pathway analysis. Each of these pathways was then tested in the replication sample (n = 8396 [3507 cases, 4889 controls]) using gene set enrichment analysis for single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The 226 genes were also compared with results from a meta-analysis of gene expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Empirically significant genes and biological pathways. RESULTS Among 966 genes, 226 were empirically significant (P < .05). Seventeen pathways were overrepresented in analyses of the initial data set. Six of the 17 pathways were associated with BP in both the initial and replication samples: corticotropin-releasing hormone signaling, cardiac β-adrenergic signaling, phospholipase C signaling, glutamate receptor signaling, endothelin 1 signaling, and cardiac

  1. An evidence-based medicine strategy for achieving remission in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Beyer, John L

    2008-01-01

    Controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of several classes of drugs for achieving acute response in bipolar mania and depression. For many years, clinical response has been the primary outcome in the majority of short-term efficacy studies. However, there is a growing consensus that the optimal goal in the long-term management of bipolar disorder is remission. The purpose of this article is to briefly summarize the clinical importance of remission in bipolar disorder and to review data on the effectiveness of available treatments for achieving and sustaining remission.

  2. Emotion-relevant impulsivity predicts sustained anger and aggression after remission in bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sheri L; Carver, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that anger and aggression are of concern even during remission for persons with bipolar I disorder, although there is substantial variability in the degree of anger and aggression across individuals. Little research is available to examine psychological models of anger and aggression for those with remitted bipolar disorder, and that was the goal of this study. Participants were 58 persons diagnosed with bipolar I disorder using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, who were followed with monthly symptom severity interviews until they achieved remission, and then assessed using the Aggression-Short Form. We examined traditional predictors of clinical parameters and trauma exposure, and then considered three trait domains that have been shown to be elevated in bipolar disorder and have also been linked to aggression outside of bipolar disorder: emotion-relevant impulsivity, approach motivation, and dominance-related constructs. Emotion-relevant impulsivity was related to anger, hostility, verbal aggression, and physical aggression, even after controlling for clinical variables. Findings extend the importance of emotion-relevant impulsivity to another important clinical outcome and suggest the promise of using psychological models to understand the factors driving aggression and anger problems that persist into remission among persons with bipolar disorder. PMID:26437231

  3. Paediatric bipolar disorder: international comparisons of hospital discharge rates 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Clacey, Joe; Goldacre, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Controversy surrounds the diagnosis and prevalence of paediatric bipolar disorder, with estimates varying considerably between countries. Aims To determine the international hospital discharge rates for paediatric bipolar disorder compared with all other psychiatric diagnoses. Method We used national data-sets from 2000 to 2010 from England, Australia, New Zealand, the USA and Germany. Results For those aged under 20 years, the discharge rates for paediatric bipolar disorder per 100 000 population were: USA 95.6, Australia 11.7, New Zealand 6.3, Germany 1.5 and England 0.9. The most marked divergence in discharge rates was in 5- to 9-year-olds: USA 27, New Zealand 0.22, Australia 0.14, Germany 0.03 and England 0.00. Conclusions The disparity between US and other discharge rates for paediatric bipolar disorder is markedly greater than the variation for child psychiatric discharge rates overall, and for adult rates of bipolar disorder. This suggests there may be differing diagnostic practices for paediatric bipolar disorder in the USA. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © 2015 The Royal College of Psychiatrists. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703743

  4. Emotion-relevant impulsivity predicts sustained anger and aggression after remission in bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sheri L; Carver, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that anger and aggression are of concern even during remission for persons with bipolar I disorder, although there is substantial variability in the degree of anger and aggression across individuals. Little research is available to examine psychological models of anger and aggression for those with remitted bipolar disorder, and that was the goal of this study. Participants were 58 persons diagnosed with bipolar I disorder using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, who were followed with monthly symptom severity interviews until they achieved remission, and then assessed using the Aggression-Short Form. We examined traditional predictors of clinical parameters and trauma exposure, and then considered three trait domains that have been shown to be elevated in bipolar disorder and have also been linked to aggression outside of bipolar disorder: emotion-relevant impulsivity, approach motivation, and dominance-related constructs. Emotion-relevant impulsivity was related to anger, hostility, verbal aggression, and physical aggression, even after controlling for clinical variables. Findings extend the importance of emotion-relevant impulsivity to another important clinical outcome and suggest the promise of using psychological models to understand the factors driving aggression and anger problems that persist into remission among persons with bipolar disorder.

  5. Comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder with bipolar disorder: A distinct form?

    PubMed

    Ozdemiroglu, Filiz; Sevincok, Levent; Sen, Gulnur; Mersin, Sanem; Kocabas, Oktay; Karakus, Kadir; Vahapoglu, Fatih

    2015-12-30

    We examined whether the patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD) and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) comorbidity may represent a distinct form of BD. The subjects diagnosed with BD (n=48), OCD (n=61), and BD with OCD (n=32) were compared in terms of several socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Previous history of suicidal attempts was more likely to be higher in BD-OCD group compared to the other two groups. A more episodic course of OCD, higher rates of rapid cycling, and the seasonality were found in BD-OCD patients. The frequency of bipolar II and NOS subtypes was more prevalent in patients with BD-OCD than in OCD patients. The first diagnosed illness was BD in the majority of BD-OCD cases. It was found that first affective episode was major depression in half of BD-OCD patients. Age at onset of BD was found to be earlier in BD-OCD group compared to pure BD patients. Bipolarity may not have a specific effect on the phenomenology of OC symptoms. The episodic course of OCD, seasonality, rapid cycling, earlier onset of BD, and impulsivity in BD-OCD patients may be indicative for a distinct form of BD. PMID:26561371

  6. Comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder with bipolar disorder: A distinct form?

    PubMed

    Ozdemiroglu, Filiz; Sevincok, Levent; Sen, Gulnur; Mersin, Sanem; Kocabas, Oktay; Karakus, Kadir; Vahapoglu, Fatih

    2015-12-30

    We examined whether the patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD) and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) comorbidity may represent a distinct form of BD. The subjects diagnosed with BD (n=48), OCD (n=61), and BD with OCD (n=32) were compared in terms of several socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Previous history of suicidal attempts was more likely to be higher in BD-OCD group compared to the other two groups. A more episodic course of OCD, higher rates of rapid cycling, and the seasonality were found in BD-OCD patients. The frequency of bipolar II and NOS subtypes was more prevalent in patients with BD-OCD than in OCD patients. The first diagnosed illness was BD in the majority of BD-OCD cases. It was found that first affective episode was major depression in half of BD-OCD patients. Age at onset of BD was found to be earlier in BD-OCD group compared to pure BD patients. Bipolarity may not have a specific effect on the phenomenology of OC symptoms. The episodic course of OCD, seasonality, rapid cycling, earlier onset of BD, and impulsivity in BD-OCD patients may be indicative for a distinct form of BD.

  7. Can Bipolar Disorder-Specific Neuropsychological Impairments in Children Be Identified?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henin, Aude; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Fried, Ronna; Wozniak, Janet; Faraone, Stephen V.; Harrington, Kara; Davis, Stephanie; Doyle, Alysa E.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined neuropsychological deficits among children with bipolar disorder while attending to its comorbidity with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Seventy-three unmedicated children (ages 6-17 years) with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) bipolar…

  8. A Possible Common Neurophysiologic Basis for MDD, Bipolar Disorder, and Schizophrenia: Lessons from Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Shahaf, Goded

    2016-01-01

    There is ample electrophysiological evidence of attention dysfunction in the EEG/ERP signal of major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The reduced attention-related ERP waves show much similarity between MDD, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, raising the question whether there are similarities in the neurophysiologic process that underlies attention dysfunction in these pathologies. The present work suggests that there is such a unified underlying neurophysiologic process, which results in reduced attention in the three pathologies. Naturally, as these pathologies involve different clinical manifestations, we expect differences in their underlying neurophysiology. These differences and their subtle manifestation in the ERP marker for attention are also discussed. MDD, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia are just three of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, which involve changes in the EEG/ERP manifestations of attention. Further work should expand the basic model presented here to offer comprehensive modeling of these multiple disorders and to emphasize similarities and dissimilarities of the underlying neurophysiologic processes. PMID:27313546

  9. Transdiagnostic Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and Comorbid Anxiety with the Unified Protocol: A Clinical Replication Series

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, Kristen K.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder with recurrent manic and depressive episodes. Over 75% of bipolar patients have a current or lifetime diagnosis of a comorbid anxiety disorder. Comorbid anxiety in BD is associated with greater illness severity, greater functional impairment, and poorer illness-related outcomes. Effectively treating comorbid anxiety in individuals with BD has been recognized as one of the biggest unmet needs in the field of bipolar disorder. Recently, the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP) was developed to be applicable to the full range of anxiety and mood disorders, based upon converging evidence from genetics, cognitive and affective neuroscience, and behavioral research suggesting common, core emotion-related pathology. Here, we present a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of the UP for the treatment of BD with comorbid anxiety, in a clinical replication series consisting of three cases. PMID:22822175

  10. [Psychotherapy of personality disorders in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Baader, Aline; Schmeck, Klaus; Resch, Franz; Kaess, Michael

    2014-01-01

    By the current state of knowledge adolescent personality disorders should be taken seriously due to their high prevalence and severe symptomatology. Personality disorders are characterized by a stable pattern of deviation concerning cognition, affectivity, impulse control, and interpersonal relationships and have negative repercussions in psychosocial functioning and subsequent development. There is emerging evidence that personality disorder diagnosis is reliable and valid during adolescence. It is essential to detect youth with personality pathology in order to refer them to specific psychotherapeutic interventions and consequently avoid further chronification and life-long functional impairment. This selective review will give an overview over personality disorders in adolescents as well as according psychotherapeutic interventions.

  11. Staging Models in Bipolar Disorder: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Ather

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is manifested as severe dysregulation of mood with recurrent manic and major depressive episodes. It is associated with psychiatric and medical comorbidities, inadequate response to currently available pharmacological agents and a progressively deteriorating course in many patients. The index episode is often depressive in nature, while the first manic or hypomanic episode may occur several years later in the course of the disorder causing delay in diagnosis and use of inappropriate treatment strategies. Staging has been used to great advantage in other branches of medicine like cardiology and oncology. There is growing realization that major mental disorders are fundamentally progressive, with simpler treatment requirements and better prognosis during initial stages of the illness. Defining these conditions into clinically applicable stages not only helps in better understanding the trajectory of a particular disorder, but also assists in management. Patients with a chronic, recalcitrant condition like bipolar disorder are likely to greatly benefit from this approach. If the illness is correctly identified early in its course, proper treatment can be instigated arresting progression to latter phases which are associated with myriad complications in the biopsychosocial realm. With these considerations, a search of the MEDLINE data base was conducted to seek out literature pertaining to staging models in bipolar disorder. A thorough scrutiny of the existing research work revealed that a number of investigators have endeavored to stage define bipolar disorder. This paper outlines staging proposals for bipolar disorder which have the greatest supporting evidence in the literature. PMID:27121423

  12. Dysregulation of the NF-κB pathway as a potential inducer of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Elhaik, Eran; Zandi, Peter

    2015-11-01

    A century of investigations enhanced our understanding of bipolar disorder although it remains a complex multifactorial disorder with a mostly unknown pathophysiology and etiology. The role of the immune system in this disorder is one of the most controversial topics in genetic psychiatry. Though inflammation has been consistently reported in bipolar patients, it remains unclear how the immunologic process influences the disorder. One of the core components of the immune system is the NF-κB pathway, which plays an essential role in the development of innate and adaptive immunity. Remarkably, the NF-κB pathway received only little attention in bipolar studies, as opposed to studies of related psychiatric disorders where immune dysregulation has been proposed to explain the neurodegeneration in patient conditions. If immune dysregulation can also explains the neurodegeneration in bipolar disorder, it will underscore the role of the immune system in the chronicity and pathophysiology of the disorder and may promote personalized therapeutic strategies. This is the first review to summarize the current knowledge of the pathophysiological functions of NF-κB in bipolar disorder.

  13. Can Psychological, Social and Demographical Factors Predict Clinical Characteristics Symptomatology of Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Pawlak, Joanna; Kapelski, Pawel; Łabędzka, Magdalena; Skibinska, Maria; Zaremba, Dorota; Leszczynska-Rodziewicz, Anna; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Hauser, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia (SCH) is a complex, psychiatric disorder affecting 1 % of population. Its clinical phenotype is heterogeneous with delusions, hallucinations, depression, disorganized behaviour and negative symptoms. Bipolar affective disorder (BD) refers to periodic changes in mood and activity from depression to mania. It affects 0.5-1.5 % of population. Two types of disorder (type I and type II) are distinguished by severity of mania episodes. In our analysis, we aimed to check if clinical and demographical characteristics of the sample are predictors of symptom dimensions occurrence in BD and SCH cases. We included total sample of 443 bipolar and 439 schizophrenia patients. Diagnosis was based on DSM-IV criteria using Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. We applied regression models to analyse associations between clinical and demographical traits from OPCRIT and symptom dimensions. We used previously computed dimensions of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder as quantitative traits for regression models. Male gender seemed protective factor for depression dimension in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder sample. Presence of definite psychosocial stressor prior disease seemed risk factor for depressive and suicidal domain in BD and SCH. OPCRIT items describing premorbid functioning seemed related with depression, positive and disorganised dimensions in schizophrenia and psychotic in BD. We proved clinical and demographical characteristics of the sample are predictors of symptom dimensions of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We also saw relation between clinical dimensions and course of disorder and impairment during disorder.

  14. Staging Models in Bipolar Disorder: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Ather

    2016-05-31

    Bipolar disorder is manifested as severe dysregulation of mood with recurrent manic and major depressive episodes. It is associated with psychiatric and medical comorbidities, inadequate response to currently available pharmacological agents and a progressively deteriorating course in many patients. The index episode is often depressive in nature, while the first manic or hypomanic episode may occur several years later in the course of the disorder causing delay in diagnosis and use of inappropriate treatment strategies. Staging has been used to great advantage in other branches of medicine like cardiology and oncology. There is growing realization that major mental disorders are fundamentally progressive, with simpler treatment requirements and better prognosis during initial stages of the illness. Defining these conditions into clinically applicable stages not only helps in better understanding the trajectory of a particular disorder, but also assists in management. Patients with a chronic, recalcitrant condition like bipolar disorder are likely to greatly benefit from this approach. If the illness is correctly identified early in its course, proper treatment can be instigated arresting progression to latter phases which are associated with myriad complications in the biopsychosocial realm. With these considerations, a search of the MEDLINE data base was conducted to seek out literature pertaining to staging models in bipolar disorder. A thorough scrutiny of the existing research work revealed that a number of investigators have endeavored to stage define bipolar disorder. This paper outlines staging proposals for bipolar disorder which have the greatest supporting evidence in the literature. PMID:27121423

  15. Staging Models in Bipolar Disorder: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Ather

    2016-05-31

    Bipolar disorder is manifested as severe dysregulation of mood with recurrent manic and major depressive episodes. It is associated with psychiatric and medical comorbidities, inadequate response to currently available pharmacological agents and a progressively deteriorating course in many patients. The index episode is often depressive in nature, while the first manic or hypomanic episode may occur several years later in the course of the disorder causing delay in diagnosis and use of inappropriate treatment strategies. Staging has been used to great advantage in other branches of medicine like cardiology and oncology. There is growing realization that major mental disorders are fundamentally progressive, with simpler treatment requirements and better prognosis during initial stages of the illness. Defining these conditions into clinically applicable stages not only helps in better understanding the trajectory of a particular disorder, but also assists in management. Patients with a chronic, recalcitrant condition like bipolar disorder are likely to greatly benefit from this approach. If the illness is correctly identified early in its course, proper treatment can be instigated arresting progression to latter phases which are associated with myriad complications in the biopsychosocial realm. With these considerations, a search of the MEDLINE data base was conducted to seek out literature pertaining to staging models in bipolar disorder. A thorough scrutiny of the existing research work revealed that a number of investigators have endeavored to stage define bipolar disorder. This paper outlines staging proposals for bipolar disorder which have the greatest supporting evidence in the literature.

  16. Mood stabilizers and antipsychotics during breastfeeding: Focus on bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; León-Caballero, Jordi; Murru, Andrea; Verdolini, Norma; Furio, Maria Antonietta; Pancheri, Corinna; Valentí, Marc; Samalin, Ludovic; Roigé, Eva Solé; González-Pinto, Ana; Montes, Jose Manuel; Benabarre, Antonio; Crespo, Jose Manuel; de Dios Perrino, Consuelo; Goikolea, Jose Manuel; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Luis; Carvalho, André F; Vieta, Eduard

    2016-10-01

    Breast milk is considered the best source of nutrients and provides much better protection than immune modified milk. However, the postpartum period is a phase of increased risk for all women to experience psychiatric symptoms and recurrences or new episodes of bipolar disorder (BD), especially in those who have discontinued treatment. This is a systematic review of the risks and benefits of mood stabilizers and antipsychotics during breastfeeding as they relate to the health and well-being of mothers and their infants. Evidence-based treatment advice for women with BD during lactation is also provided. This systematic review has been conducted according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. We included studies examining the exposure and the effects of antipsychotics and mood stabilizers used to treat BD on infants during breastfeeding clearly reporting the estimated amount of drug or effects on infants. The final selection included 56 studies. The available data supports the use of lithium as a possible treatment option during breastfeeding. Carbamazepine and valproic acid are also considered relatively safe. Lamotrigine can be used but at the lowest doses and considered for individual cases. Among the antipsychotics, quetiapine and olanzapine should be considered as first-line treatment options. Risperidone may be compatible with breastfeeding under medical supervision. Clozapine and amisulpiride are currently contraindicated. Long-term outcome studies evaluating the infant׳s health and psychosocial and cognitive functioning are needed. PMID:27568278

  17. Chemokine and Chemokine Receptor Polymorphisms in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tokac, Damla; Tuzun, Erdem; Gulec, Huseyin; Yılmaz, Vuslat; Bireller, Elif Sinem; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating psychiatric disease with unknown etiology. Recent studies have shown inflammation as a potential contributing factor of BD pathogenesis. However, potential associations between chemokine and chemokine receptor polymorphisms and BD have been fundamentally understudied. To identify participation of chemokines in BD pathogenesis, we examined genetic variants of several chemokine and chemokine receptor genes. Methods The study population comprised 200 patients with BD and 195 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Genotyping of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) A2518G, CCR2 V64I, CCR5 Δ32, CCR5 A55029G, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) 3'A, and CXCR4 C138T polymorphisms was performed using polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme digestion. Results We found that CCR5-Δ32 II and CXCR4-C138T C+ genotype frequencies contributed to an increased risk for BD. However, no statistical significance could be obtained with these genotypes after Bonferroni correction. A significant asssociation was only found with MCP-1 GG and G+ genotypes, which were markedly more prevalent in patients with BD and these genotypes seemed to significantly increase the risk for BD even after Bonferroni correction. Conclusion Our findings indicate an association between genetic variants of certain chemokine and chemokine receptor (especially MCP-1) genes and BD. The exact mechanisms by which these variants contribute to BD pathogenesis and their clinical implications need to be further investigated. PMID:27757133

  18. CSF neuroinflammatory biomarkers in bipolar disorder are associated with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Rolstad, Sindre; Jakobsson, Joel; Sellgren, Carl; Isgren, Anniella; Ekman, Carl Johan; Bjerke, Maria; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Pålsson, Erik; Landén, Mikael

    2015-08-01

    Persistent cognitive impairment in the euthymic state of bipolar disorder is increasingly recognized. Mounting evidence also suggests an association between neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to test if cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of neuroinflammation could account for cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder. Hierarchical linear regression models were applied to account for performance in five cognitive domains using CSF neuroinflammatory biomarkers as predictors in patients with bipolar disorder type I and II (N=78). The associations between these biomarkers and cognition were further tested in healthy age- and sex-matched controls (N=86). In patients with bipolar disorder, the CSF biomarkers accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in executive functions (42.8%, p=<.0005) independently of age, medication, disease status, and bipolar subtype. The microglial marker YKL-40 had a high impact (beta=-.99), and was the only biomarker that contributed individually. CSF biomarkers were not associated with cognitive performance in healthy controls. The CSF neuroinflammation biomarker YKL-40 is associated with executive performance in euthymic bipolar disorder, but not in healthy controls.

  19. Treatment of bipolar disorders during pregnancy: maternal and fetal safety and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Richard A; Moore, Katherine M; Bobo, William V

    2015-01-01

    Treating pregnant women with bipolar disorder is among the most challenging clinical endeavors. Patients and clinicians are faced with difficult choices at every turn, and no approach is without risk. Stopping effective pharmacotherapy during pregnancy exposes the patient and her baby to potential harms related to bipolar relapses and residual mood symptom-related dysfunction. Continuing effective pharmacotherapy during pregnancy may prevent these occurrences for many; however, some of the most effective pharmacotherapies (such as valproate) have been associated with the occurrence of congenital malformations or other adverse neonatal effects in offspring. Very little is known about the reproductive safety profile and clinical effectiveness of atypical antipsychotic drugs when used to treat bipolar disorder during pregnancy. In this paper, we provide a clinically focused review of the available information on potential maternal and fetal risks of untreated or undertreated maternal bipolar disorder during pregnancy, the effectiveness of interventions for bipolar disorder management during pregnancy, and potential obstetric, fetal, and neonatal risks associated with core foundational pharmacotherapies for bipolar disorder. PMID:25565896

  20. Genome Wide Association Study Identifies Variants in NBEA Associated with Migraine in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Kaya K.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Zayats, Tetyana; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Anttila, Verneri; Akiskal, Hagop S.; Haavik, Jan; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Kelsoe, John R.; Johansson, Stefan; Oedegaard, Ketil J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common comorbidity among individuals with bipolar disorder, but the underlying mechanisms for this co-occurrence are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic background of bipolar patients with and without migraine. Methods We performed a genome-wide association analysis contrasting 460 bipolar migraneurs with 914 bipolar patients without migraine from the Bipolar Genome Study (BiGS). Results We identified one genome-wide significant association between migraine in bipolar disorder patients and rs1160720, an intronic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the NBEA gene (P= 2.97×10-8, OR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.47-2.25), although this was not replicated in a smaller sample of 289 migraine cases. Limitations Our study is based on self-reported migraine. Conclusions NBEA encodes neurobeachin, a scaffolding protein primarily expressed in the brain and involved in trafficking of vesicles containing neurotransmitter receptors. This locus has not previously been implicated in migraine per se. We found no evidence of association in data from the GWAS migraine meta-analysis consortium (n=118 710 participants) suggesting that the association might be specific to migraine co-morbid with bipolar disorder. PMID:25451450

  1. Early stages of pediatric bipolar disorder: retrospective analysis of a Czech inpatient sample

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Michal; Novak, Tomas; Vesela, Marie; Hlavka, Zdenek; Brunovsky, Martin; Povazan, Michal; Ptacek, Radek; Sebela, Antonin

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 30%–60% of adults diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BD) report onset between the ages 15 and 19 years; however, a correct diagnosis is often delayed by several years. Therefore, investigations of the early features of BD are important for adequately understanding the prodromal stages of the illness. Methods A complete review of the medical records of 46 children and adolescents who were hospitalized for BD at two psychiatric teaching centers in Prague, Czech Republic was performed. Frequency of BD in all inpatients, age of symptom onset, phenomenology of mood episodes, lifetime psychiatric comorbidity, differences between very-early-onset (<13 years of age) and early-onset patients (13–18 years), and differences between the offspring of parents with and without BD were analyzed. Results The sample represents 0.83% of the total number of inpatients (n=5,483) admitted during the study period at both centers. BD often started with depression (56%), followed by hypomania (24%) and mixed episodes (20%). The average age during the first mood episode was 14.9 years (14.6 years for depression and 15.6 years for hypomania). Seven children (15%) experienced their first mood episode before age 13 years (very early onset). Traumatic events, first-degree relatives with mood disorders, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were significantly more frequent in the very-early-onset group vs the early-onset group (13–18 years) (P≤0.05). The offspring of bipolar parents were significantly younger at the onset of the first mood episode (13.2 vs 15.4 years; P=0.02) and when experiencing the first mania compared to the offspring of non-BD parents (14.3 vs 15.9 years; P=0.03). Anxiety disorders, substance abuse, specific learning disabilities, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were the most frequent lifetime comorbid conditions. Conclusion Clinicians must be aware of the potential for childhood BD onset in patients who suffer from

  2. Increased Subgenual Cingulate Cortex Volume in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder Associated with Mood Stabilizer Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Mitsunaga, Myles M.; Garrett, Amy; Howe, Meghan; Karchemskiy, Asya; Reiss, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective The subgenual cingulate (SGC) cortex has been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. We sought to study morphometric characteristics of the SGC in pediatric subjects with familial bipolar disorder (BD) compared with healthy controls. Method Twenty children and adolescents with BD (mean age = 14.6 years, 4 females) and 20 healthy age-, gender-, and intelligence quotient-matched controls underwent high-resolution anatomical magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were primarily euthymic and most were taking medications. SGC cortex volumes were determined by manual tracings from a reliable rater, blinded to diagnosis. Analyses of covariance were performed with total cerebral gray matter and age as covariates. Results No differences were found in SGC volumes between BD subjects and healthy controls. Further analysis revealed that BD subjects with past mood stabilizer exposure had significantly increased SGC volumes compared with BD subjects without mood stabilizer exposure, and compared with controls. The increase was driven by larger bilateral posterior SGC volumes. Conclusions Youth with familial BD do not appear to have abnormalities in SGC volume. Mood stabilizer exposure, however, may be correlated with increases in SGC volume. PMID:21486168

  3. Comparisons of the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR in the acute treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuowei; Kemp, David E; Chan, Philip K; Fang, Yiru; Ganocy, Stephen J; Calabrese, Joseph R; Gao, Keming

    2011-02-01

    Quetiapine extended-release (quetiapine-XR) has been studied in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The purpose of this study was to compare the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR among these psychiatric conditions. The discontinuation due to adverse events (DAEs) and reported somnolence in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of quetiapine-XR in these psychiatric conditions were examined. The absolute risk reduction or increase and the number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) or harm (NNTH) for DAEs and reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR ≥ 300 mg/d relative to placebo were estimated. Data from one study in schizophrenia (n=465), one in mania (n=316), one in bipolar depression (n=280), two in refractory MDD (n=624), two in MDD (n=669) and three in GAD (n=1109) were available. The risk for DAEs of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in bipolar depression (NNTH=9), refractory MDD (NNTH=8), MDD (NNTH=9), and GAD (NNTH=5), but not in schizophrenia and mania. The risk for reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in schizophrenia (600 mg/d NNTH=15 and 800 mg/d NNTH=11), mania (NNTH=8), bipolar depression (NNTH=4), refractory MDD (NNTH=5), MDD (NNTH=5) and GAD (NNTH=5). These results suggest that patients with GAD had the poorest tolerability during treatment with quetiapine-XR, but they had a similar sensitivity as those with bipolar depression and MDD. Patients with schizophrenia or mania had a higher tolerability and a lower sensitivity than those with bipolar depression, MDD, or GAD.

  4. Improving Treatment Adherence in Bipolar Disorder: A Review of Current Psychosocial Treatment Efficacy and Recommendations for Future Treatment Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Weinstock, Lauren M.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment adherence is a frequent problem in bipolar disorder, with research showing that more than 60% of bipolar patients are at least partially nonadherent to medications. Treatment nonadherence is consistently predictive of a number of negative outcomes in bipolar samples, and the discontinuation of mood stabilizers places these patients at…

  5. Treating Insomnia Improves Mood State, Sleep, and Functioning in Bipolar Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Soehner, Adriane M.; Kaplan, Kate A.; Hein, Kerrie; Lee, Jason; Kanady, Jennifer; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Neylan, Thomas C.; Li, Descartes; Ketter, Terence A.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if a treatment for interepisode bipolar disorder I patients with insomnia improves mood state, sleep, and functioning. Method Alongside psychiatric care, interepisode bipolar disorder I participants with insomnia were randomly allocated to a bipolar disorder–specific modification of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBTI-BP; n = 30) or psychoeducation (PE; n = 28) as a comparison condition. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, the end of 8 sessions of treatment, and 6 months later. This pilot was conducted to determine initial feasibility and generate effect size estimates. Results During the 6-month follow-up, the CBTI-BP group had fewer days in a bipolar episode relative to the PE group (3.3 days vs. 25.5 days). The CBTI-BP group also experienced a significantly lower hypomania/mania relapse rate (4.6% vs. 31.6%) and a marginally lower overall mood episode relapse rate (13.6% vs. 42.1%) compared with the PE group. Relative to PE, CBTI-BP reduced insomnia severity and led to higher rates of insomnia remission at posttreatment and marginally higher rates at 6 months. Both CBTI-BP and PE showed statistically significant improvement on selected sleep and functional impairment measures. The effects of treatment were well sustained through follow-up for most outcomes, although some decline on secondary sleep benefits was observed. Conclusions CBTI-BP was associated with reduced risk of mood episode relapse and improved sleep and functioning on certain outcomes in bipolar disorder. Hence, sleep disturbance appears to be an important pathway contributing to bipolar disorder. The need to develop bipolar disorder–specific sleep diary scoring standards is highlighted. Public Health Significance This study suggests that an intervention to improve sleep and circadian functioning reduces risk of relapse and improves sleep and overall functioning among individuals who meet diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder. PMID:25622197

  6. Possible association between the dopamine D{sub 3} receptor gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Parsian, A.; Chakraverty, S.; Todd, R.D.

    1995-06-19

    A variety of studies have reported possible genetic associations between bipolar affective disorder and different loci using relative risk (case-control) comparisons. An alternative approach is to construct a contrast group using parental alleles which were not transmitted to an affected individual. We have used both approaches to test for possible associations between alleles of the dopamine D{sub 3} receptor gene and bipolar affective disorder. For relative risk studies, the probands of multiple incidence bipolar affective disorder families have been compared to alcoholic and psychiatrically normal contrast groups. Nontransmitted allele approaches have used bipolar affective disorder and alcoholic probands in which both parents were available for genotyping. Using the BalI restriction enzyme site polymorphism of Lannfelt et al., we have found no differences in the allele or genotype frequencies for bipolar vs. alcoholic or psychiatrically normal controls. In contrast, we have found evidence for an increased frequency of allele 1 and allele 1 containing genotypes in transmitted alleles from bipolar families. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Possible association between the dopamine D3 receptor gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, R.D.; Chakraverty, S.; Parsian, A.

    1994-09-01

    A variety of studies have reported possible genetic associations between bipolar affective disorder and different loci using relative risk approaches. An alternative approach is to determine untransmitted genotypes from families selected through a single affected individual. We have used both approaches to test for possible associations between alleles of the dopamine D3 receptor gene and bipolar affective disorder. For relative risk studies, the probands of multiple incidence bipolar affective disorder (n=66) and alcoholism (n=132) families and psychiatric normal controls (n=91) have been compared. Non-transmitted allele approaches have used bipolar affective disorder (n=28) and alcoholic (n=25) probands in which both parents were available for genotyping. Using the Bal I restriction enzyme site polymorphism of Lannfelt, we have found no differences in the allele or genotype frequencies for bipolar or alcoholic probands versus psychiatrically normal controls. In contrast, we have found evidence for an increased frequency of allele 1 and allele 1 containing genotypes in transmitted alleles from bipolar families.

  8. Theory of Mind in Bipolar Disorder, with Comparison to the Impairments Observed in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rachel L C; Young, Allan H

    2015-01-01

    Our ability to make sense of information on the potential intentions and dispositions of others is of paramount importance for understanding their communicative intent, and for judging what an appropriate reaction might be. Thus, anything that impinges on this ability has the potential to cause significant social impairment, and compromise an individual's level of functioning. Both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are known to feature theory of mind impairment. We conducted a theoretical review to determine the extent and types of theory of mind impairment in bipolar disorder, and evaluate their relationship to medication and symptoms. We also considered possible mediatory mechanisms, and set out to discover what else could be learnt about the impairment in bipolar disorder by comparison to the profile of impairment in schizophrenia. The literature established that in bipolar disorder (i) some form of theory of mind impairment has been observed in all mood states, including euthymia, (ii) the form of theory of mind assessed and task used to make the assessment influence the impairment observed, and (iii) there might be some relationship to cognitive impairment, although a relationship to standard clinical variables was harder to establish. What also became clear in the literature on bipolar disorder itself was the possible relationship of theory of mind impairment to history of psychotic symptoms. Direct comparative studies, including patients with schizophrenia, were thus examined, and provided several important directions for future research on the bases of impairment in bipolar disorder. Particularly prominent was the issue of whether theory of mind impairment could be considered a candidate endophenotype for the psychoses, although current evidence suggests that this may be premature. The differences in impairment across schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may, however, have genuine differential effects on social functioning and the likely success of

  9. A longitudinal pilot proton MRS investigation of the manic and euthymic states of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brady, R O; Cooper, A; Jensen, J E; Tandon, N; Cohen, B; Renshaw, P; Keshavan, M; Öngür, D

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate dysfunction in brain energy production as a key component of bipolar disorder. In particular, elevated brain lactate levels observed in this condition suggest a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, possibly as a result of mitochondrial abnormalities. Most prior imaging studies of brain metabolites were performed in either euthymic or depressed bipolar patients or compared different populations in different mood states. We sought to measure brain metabolite concentrations in the same patients in both manic and euthymic states. Given the dramatic changes in clinical state of bipolar disorder patients, we hypothesized that previously observed abnormalities in lactate concentrations in bipolar disorder might show state dependent changes. In this study 15 patients (mean age 36.1 years) diagnosed with bipolar I disorder underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the anterior cingulate cortex and parieto-occipital cortex during hospitalization for acute mania (mean Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) 22.1). Seven of these subjects returned (mean interval 21.16 months) to have imaging repeated while euthymic (mean YMRS 2.0). A group of age- and gender-matched control participants (N=6) were scanned as well. We report that during mania, bipolar disorder subjects had lactate levels comparable to healthy control subjects but during euthymia these levels were significantly reduced. No significant change was observed for other metabolites. These results implicate mood dependent alterations in energy metabolism in the biology of bipolar disorder. Additionally, this finding has potential use as a biomarker for both evaluating novel treatments as well as diagnostic clarification between mood disorders. PMID:22968227

  10. Theory of Mind in Bipolar Disorder, with Comparison to the Impairments Observed in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Rachel L. C.; Young, Allan H.

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to make sense of information on the potential intentions and dispositions of others is of paramount importance for understanding their communicative intent, and for judging what an appropriate reaction might be. Thus, anything that impinges on this ability has the potential to cause significant social impairment, and compromise an individual’s level of functioning. Both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are known to feature theory of mind impairment. We conducted a theoretical review to determine the extent and types of theory of mind impairment in bipolar disorder, and evaluate their relationship to medication and symptoms. We also considered possible mediatory mechanisms, and set out to discover what else could be learnt about the impairment in bipolar disorder by comparison to the profile of impairment in schizophrenia. The literature established that in bipolar disorder (i) some form of theory of mind impairment has been observed in all mood states, including euthymia, (ii) the form of theory of mind assessed and task used to make the assessment influence the impairment observed, and (iii) there might be some relationship to cognitive impairment, although a relationship to standard clinical variables was harder to establish. What also became clear in the literature on bipolar disorder itself was the possible relationship of theory of mind impairment to history of psychotic symptoms. Direct comparative studies, including patients with schizophrenia, were thus examined, and provided several important directions for future research on the bases of impairment in bipolar disorder. Particularly prominent was the issue of whether theory of mind impairment could be considered a candidate endophenotype for the psychoses, although current evidence suggests that this may be premature. The differences in impairment across schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may, however, have genuine differential effects on social functioning and the likely success of

  11. Economics of atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fleurence, Rachael L; Dixon, Julia M; Revicki, Dennis A

    2006-01-01

    Economic evaluations are increasingly being used by policy makers to evaluate the relative costs and benefits of healthcare interventions. These analyses provide economic and clinical evidence to decision makers seeking to make recommendations on treatment alternatives for patients. This article describes the economic evidence on the atypical antipsychotics currently approved for the treatment of bipolar disorder. This area remains under-researched. A literature search identified only six relevant studies of atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: two retrospective database analyses, three economic analyses alongside clinical trials and one cost-effectiveness analysis. Based on the limited available studies, there appears to be no significant difference in healthcare resource use between olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and valproate semisodium (divalproex sodium; an antiepileptic drug and a standard treatment for mania associated with bipolar disorder). While a cost-effectiveness study for the UK found haloperidol (a conventional antipsychotic) to be more cost effective than atypical antipsychotics, these results must be considered with caution because of the non-inclusion of adverse effects in the model. No economic data are available for aripiprazole, clozapine or ziprasidone in bipolar disorder. Until more economic evidence becomes available, the economic implications of atypical antipsychotic treatment in patients with bipolar disorder are unlikely to significantly impact on prescribing and treatment patterns. Future economic studies evaluating atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder should address the issue of long-term costs and effectiveness to reflect the chronic nature of the disease, the variety of health states that patients may experience and the range of treatments they may receive. A better understanding of the complex interplay between effectiveness, safety, quality of life, adherence and resource use should ultimately contribute to

  12. Seroreactive marker for inflammatory bowel disease and associations with antibodies to dietary proteins in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Severance, Emily G.; Gressitt, Kristin L.; Yang, Shuojia; Stallings, Cassie R.; Origoni, Andrea E.; Vaughan, Crystal; Khushalani, Sunil; Alaedini, Armin; Dickerson, Faith B.; Yolken, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Immune sensitivity to wheat glutens and bovine milk caseins may affect a subset of individuals with bipolar disorder. Digested byproducts of these foods are exorphins that have the potential to impact brain physiology through action at opioid receptors. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract might accelerate exposure of food antigens to systemic circulation and help explain elevated gluten and casein antibody levels in individuals with bipolar disorder. Methods We measured a marker of GI inflammation, anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), in non-psychiatric controls (n=207), bipolar disorder without a recent onset of psychosis (n=226), and bipolar disorder with a recent onset of psychosis (n=38). We compared ASCA levels to antibodies against gluten, casein, EBV, HSV-1, Influenza A, Influenza B, measles, and Toxoplasma gondii. Results Elevated ASCA conferred a 3.5 to 4.4-fold increased odds ratio of disease association (age-, race- and gender-corrected multinomial logistic regressions, p≤0.00001) that was independent of type of medication received. ASCA correlated with food antibodies in both bipolar groups (R2=0.29–0.59, p≤0.0005), and with measles and T. gondii IgG in the recent onset psychosis bipolar disorder group (R2=0.31–0.36, p≤0.004–0.01). Conclusions Elevated seropositivity of a GI-related marker and its association with antibodies to food-derived proteins and self-reported GI symptoms suggests a GI comorbidity in at least a subgroup of individuals with bipolar disorder. Marker seroreactivity may also represent part of an overall heightened activated immune state inherent to this mood disorder. PMID:24313887

  13. Anxiety Disorders and Rapid Cycling Data From a Cohort of 8129 Youths With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Puentes, Ruby; Sala, Regina; Ng, Bernardo; Galvez, Juan; Camacho, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs) are common in youths with bipolar disorder (BD). We examine psychiatric comorbidity, hospitalization, and treatment in youths with versus without AD and rapid cycling (four or more cycles per year). Data from the Integrated Healthcare Information Services cohort were used and included 8129 youths (ages ≤18 years). Prevalence of AD, demographic, type of AD, hospitalization, and use of psychotropics were compared between rapid and nonrapid cycling. Overall, 51% of the youths met criteria for at least one comorbid AD; they were predominantly female and were between 12 and 17 years of age. The most common comorbid ADs were generalized ADs and separation ADs. In the patients with rapid cycling, 65.5%met criteria for comorbid AD. The BD youths with AD were more likely to have major depressive disorders and other comorbid ADs, to be given more psychotropics, and to be hospitalized for depression and medical conditions more often than were those without AD. PMID:24284641

  14. Implicit and explicit self-associations in bipolar disorder: a comparison with healthy controls and unipolar depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jabben, Nienke; de Jong, Peter J; Kupka, Ralph W; Glashouwer, Klaske A; Nolen, Willem A; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2014-02-28

    According to cognitive theory, negative self-schemas are involved in the occurrence of depression. Whereas implicit depressive self-associations have been found in unipolar depression, it is unknown whether impaired associations with regard to the self are also involved in Bipolar Disorder (BD). This study investigated whether a bias in self-associations is a characteristic of bipolar disorder and whether discrepancies between implicit and explicit self-evaluations may be relevant for understanding bipolar psychopathology. Implicit and explicit self-associations were assessed in patients with BD (n=99), in patients with depressive disorder (n=1236), and healthy controls (n=387). Analyses of variance and correlation analyses were used to compare bipolar patients to controls and unipolar patients on implicit self-associations and the discrepancy between implicit and explicit self-associations. Similar to unipolar patients, patients with BD showed stronger implicit depressive self-associations than controls. Specifically for bipolar patients there was no significant correlation between implicit and explicit depressive self-associations. In a similar vein, discrepancies between implicit and explicit self-associations were relatively pronounced in symptomatic bipolar patients as compared to both healthy controls and unipolar depressed patients. Thus automatic depressive self-associations were characteristic for all mood disorders whereas a lack of concordance between implicit and explicit self-associations was specific for BD. PMID:24365387

  15. Joint analysis of psychiatric disorders increases accuracy of risk prediction for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Maier, Robert; Moser, Gerhard; Chen, Guo-Bo; Ripke, Stephan; Coryell, William; Potash, James B; Scheftner, William A; Shi, Jianxin; Weissman, Myrna M; Hultman, Christina M; Landén, Mikael; Levinson, Douglas F; Kendler, Kenneth S; Smoller, Jordan W; Wray, Naomi R; Lee, S Hong

    2015-02-01

    Genetic risk prediction has several potential applications in medical research and clinical practice and could be used, for example, to stratify a heterogeneous population of patients by their predicted genetic risk. However, for polygenic traits, such as psychiatric disorders, the accuracy of risk prediction is low. Here we use a multivariate linear mixed model and apply multi-trait genomic best linear unbiased prediction for genetic risk prediction. This method exploits correlations between disorders and simultaneously evaluates individual risk for each disorder. We show that the multivariate approach significantly increases the prediction accuracy for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder in the discovery as well as in independent validation datasets. By grouping SNPs based on genome annotation and fitting multiple random effects, we show that the prediction accuracy could be further improved. The gain in prediction accuracy of the multivariate approach is equivalent to an increase in sample size of 34% for schizophrenia, 68% for bipolar disorder, and 76% for major depressive disorders using single trait models. Because our approach can be readily applied to any number of GWAS datasets of correlated traits, it is a flexible and powerful tool to maximize prediction accuracy. With current sample size, risk predictors are not useful in a clinical setting but already are a valuable research tool, for example in experimental designs comparing cases with high and low polygenic risk.

  16. Joint Analysis of Psychiatric Disorders Increases Accuracy of Risk Prediction for Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Robert; Moser, Gerhard; Chen, Guo-Bo; Ripke, Stephan; Absher, Devin; Agartz, Ingrid; Akil, Huda; Amin, Farooq; Andreassen, Ole A.; Anjorin, Adebayo; Anney, Richard; Arking, Dan E.; Asherson, Philip; Azevedo, Maria H.; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A.; Bailey, Anthony J.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barchas, Jack D.; Barnes, Michael R.; Barrett, Thomas B.; Bass, Nicholas; Battaglia, Agatino; Bauer, Michael; Bayés, Mònica; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E.; Berrettini, Wade; Betancur, Catalina; Bettecken, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Black, Donald W.; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Breen, Gerome; Breuer, René; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bunney, William E.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Byerley, William F.; Caesar, Sian; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Casas, Miguel; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambert, Kimberly; Choudhury, Khalid; Cichon, Sven; Cloninger, C. Robert; Collier, David A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cormand, Bru; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Coryell, William H.; Craddock, Nicholas; Craig, David W.; Craig, Ian W.; Crosbie, Jennifer; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Curtis, David; Czamara, Darina; Daly, Mark J.; Datta, Susmita; Dawson, Geraldine; Day, Richard; De Geus, Eco J.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Devlin, Bernie; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary J.; Doyle, Alysa E.; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Duketis, Eftichia; Ebstein, Richard P.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Elia, Josephine; Ennis, Sean; Etain, Bruno; Fanous, Ayman; Faraone, Stephen V.; Farmer, Anne E.; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Flickinger, Matthew; Fombonne, Eric; Foroud, Tatiana; Frank, Josef; Franke, Barbara; Fraser, Christine; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Freitag, Christine M.; Friedl, Marion; Frisén, Louise; Gallagher, Louise; Gejman, Pablo V.; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Gordon, Scott D.; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Green, Elaine K.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Gross, Magdalena; Grozeva, Detelina; Guan, Weihua; Gurling, Hugh; De Haan, Lieuwe; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hallmayer, Joachim; Hamilton, Steven P.; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Thomas F.; Hartmann, Annette M.; Hautzinger, Martin; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Herms, Stefan; Hickie, Ian B.; Hipolito, Maria; Hoefels, Susanne; Holmans, Peter A.; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogendijk, Witte J.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hultman, Christina M.; Hus, Vanessa; Ingason, Andrés; Ising, Marcus; Jamain, Stéphane; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Kähler, Anna K.; Kahn, René S.; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelsoe, John R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kennedy, James L.; Kenny, Elaine; Kent, Lindsey; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Klauck, Sabine M.; Klei, Lambertus; Knowles, James A.; Kohli, Martin A.; Koller, Daniel L.; Konte, Bettina; Korszun, Ania; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Kuntsi, Jonna; Kwan, Phoenix; Landén, Mikael; Långström, Niklas; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Jacob; Lawson, William B.; Leboyer, Marion; Ledbetter, David H.; Lee, Phil H.; Lencz, Todd; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Li, Jun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Linszen, Don H.; Liu, Chunyu; Lohoff, Falk W.; Loo, Sandra K.; Lord, Catherine; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Lucae, Susanne; MacIntyre, Donald J.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Maestrini, Elena; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mahon, Pamela B.; Maier, Wolfgang; Malhotra, Anil K.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Christa L.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Matthews, Keith; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarroll, Steven A.; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGough, James J.; McGrath, Patrick J.; McGuffin, Peter; McInnis, Melvin G.; McIntosh, Andrew; McKinney, Rebecca; McLean, Alan W.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, William M.; McQuillin, Andrew; Medeiros, Helena; Medland, Sarah E.; Meier, Sandra; Melle, Ingrid; Meng, Fan; Meyer, Jobst; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Middleton, Lefkos; Milanova, Vihra; Miranda, Ana; Monaco, Anthony P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Morken, Gunnar; Morris, Derek W.; Morrow, Eric M.; Moskvina, Valentina; Mowry, Bryan J.; Muglia, Pierandrea; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murtha, Michael; Myers, Richard M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Neale, Benjamin M.; Nelson, Stan F.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Nikolov, Ivan; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Nolen, Willem A.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nurnberger, John I.; Nwulia, Evaristus A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Oades, Robert D.; Olincy, Ann; Oliveira, Guiomar; Olsen, Line; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osby, Urban; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Parr, Jeremy R.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Perlis, Roy H.; Pickard, Benjamin S.; Pimm, Jonathan; Piven, Joseph; Posthuma, Danielle; Potash, James B.; Poustka, Fritz; Propping, Peter; Purcell, Shaun M.; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby J.; Quinn, Emma M.; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rehnström, Karola; Reif, Andreas; Ribasés, Marta; Rice, John P.; Rietschel, Marcella; Ripke, Stephan; Roeder, Kathryn; Roeyers, Herbert; Rossin, Lizzy; Rothenberger, Aribert; Rouleau, Guy; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Santangelo, Susan L.; Schachar, Russell; Schalling, Martin; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Scheftner, William A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schumacher, Johannes; Schwarz, Markus; Scolnick, Edward; Scott, Laura J.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Shi, Jianxin; Shilling, Paul D.; Shyn, Stanley I.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sklar, Pamela; Slager, Susan L.; Smalley, Susan L.; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Erin N.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.S.; St Clair, David; State, Matthew; Steffens, Michael; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Strauss, John S.; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Sutcliffe, James; Szatmari, Peter; Szelinger, Szabocls; Thapar, Anita; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thompson, Robert C.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Tzeng, Jung-Ying; Uhr, Manfred; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Van Grootheest, Gerard; Van Os, Jim; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Vincent, John B.; Visscher, Peter M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Watson, Stanley J.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Werge, Thomas; Wienker, Thomas F.; Wiersma, Durk; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Williams, Nigel; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wray, Naomi R.; Xu, Wei; Young, Allan H.; Yu, Timothy W.; Zammit, Stanley; Zandi, Peter P.; Zhang, Peng; Zitman, Frans G.; Zöllner, Sebastian; Coryell, William; Potash, James B.; Scheftner, William A.; Shi, Jianxin; Weissman, Myrna M.; Hultman, Christina M.; Landén, Mikael; Levinson, Douglas F.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Wray, Naomi R.; Lee, S. Hong

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk prediction has several potential applications in medical research and clinical practice and could be used, for example, to stratify a heterogeneous population of patients by their predicted genetic risk. However, for polygenic traits, such as psychiatric disorders, the accuracy of risk prediction is low. Here we use a multivariate linear mixed model and apply multi-trait genomic best linear unbiased prediction for genetic risk prediction. This method exploits correlations between disorders and simultaneously evaluates individual risk for each disorder. We show that the multivariate approach significantly increases the prediction accuracy for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder in the discovery as well as in independent validation datasets. By grouping SNPs based on genome annotation and fitting multiple random effects, we show that the prediction accuracy could be further improved. The gain in prediction accuracy of the multivariate approach is equivalent to an increase in sample size of 34% for schizophrenia, 68% for bipolar disorder, and 76% for major depressive disorders using single trait models. Because our approach can be readily applied to any number of GWAS datasets of correlated traits, it is a flexible and powerful tool to maximize prediction accuracy. With current sample size, risk predictors are not useful in a clinical setting but already are a valuable research tool, for example in experimental designs comparing cases with high and low polygenic risk. PMID:25640677

  17. Joint analysis of psychiatric disorders increases accuracy of risk prediction for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Maier, Robert; Moser, Gerhard; Chen, Guo-Bo; Ripke, Stephan; Coryell, William; Potash, James B; Scheftner, William A; Shi, Jianxin; Weissman, Myrna M; Hultman, Christina M; Landén, Mikael; Levinson, Douglas F; Kendler, Kenneth S; Smoller, Jordan W; Wray, Naomi R; Lee, S Hong

    2015-02-01

    Genetic risk prediction has several potential applications in medical research and clinical practice and could be used, for example, to stratify a heterogeneous population of patients by their predicted genetic risk. However, for polygenic traits, such as psychiatric disorders, the accuracy of risk prediction is low. Here we use a multivariate linear mixed model and apply multi-trait genomic best linear unbiased prediction for genetic risk prediction. This method exploits correlations between disorders and simultaneously evaluates individual risk for each disorder. We show that the multivariate approach significantly increases the prediction accuracy for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder in the discovery as well as in independent validation datasets. By grouping SNPs based on genome annotation and fitting multiple random effects, we show that the prediction accuracy could be further improved. The gain in prediction accuracy of the multivariate approach is equivalent to an increase in sample size of 34% for schizophrenia, 68% for bipolar disorder, and 76% for major depressive disorders using single trait models. Because our approach can be readily applied to any number of GWAS datasets of correlated traits, it is a flexible and powerful tool to maximize prediction accuracy. With current sample size, risk predictors are not useful in a clinical setting but already are a valuable research tool, for example in experimental designs comparing cases with high and low polygenic risk. PMID:25640677

  18. Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Lactate and Glutathione Levels in Euthymic Bipolar I Disorder: 1H-MRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Pastorello, Bruno F.; Leite, Cláudia da Costa; Henning, Anke; Moreno, Ricardo A.; Garcia Otaduy, Maria Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are 2 closely integrated processes implicated in the physiopathology of bipolar disorder. Advanced proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques enable the measurement of levels of lactate, the main marker of mitochondrial dysfunction, and glutathione, the predominant brain antioxidant. The objective of this study was to measure brain lactate and glutathione levels in bipolar disorder and healthy controls. Methods: Eighty-eight individuals (50 bipolar disorder and 38 healthy controls) underwent 3T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (2x2x4.5cm3) using a 2-D JPRESS sequence. Lactate and glutathione were quantified using the ProFit software program. Results: Bipolar disorder patients had higher dorsal anterior cingulate cortex lactate levels compared with controls. Glutathione levels did not differ between euthymic bipolar disorder and controls. There was a positive correlation between lactate and glutathione levels specific to bipolar disorder. No influence of medications on metabolites was observed. Conclusion: This is the most extensive magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of lactate and glutathione in bipolar disorder to date, and results indicated that euthymic bipolar disorder patients had higher levels of lactate, which might be an indication of altered mitochondrial function. Moreover, lactate levels correlated with glutathione levels, indicating a compensatory mechanism regardless of bipolar disorder diagnosis. PMID:27207914

  19. [Neuroprogression and cognition in Bipolar Disorders: A systematic review of cognitive performance in euthymic patients].

    PubMed

    Lolich, María; Holtzman, Jessica N; Rago, Carlo M; Vázquez, Gustavo H

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, investigators have begun to consider the possibility of explaining the physiopathology of bipolar disorder from a neuroprogressive perspective. The evidence that supports the feasibility of such an approach is varied, and arises from neuroimaging studies, batteries of neurocognitive evaluations, and tests to identify the specific biomarkers of the disorder. The present article seeks to perform a review of the research that investigates the cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder. A bibliographic revision was performed of articles published between 1990 and 2015. Levels of cognitive performance were explored in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. The compiled studies signal the presence of altered cognitive function, even during periods of euthymia. However, there are contradictory results as to whether bipolar disorder presents a degenerative course. New lines of investigation suggest that only a percentage of individuals with bipolar disorder are affected in a progressive manner. It is of paramount importance to perform new longitudinal studies in high-risk populations, so as to validate or refute a neuroprogressive model of cognitive deficits in patients with bipolar disorder. PMID:26672503

  20. [Neuroprogression and cognition in Bipolar Disorders: A systematic review of cognitive performance in euthymic patients].

    PubMed

    Lolich, María; Holtzman, Jessica N; Rago, Carlo M; Vázquez, Gustavo H

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, investigators have begun to consider the possibility of explaining the physiopathology of bipolar disorder from a neuroprogressive perspective. The evidence that supports the feasibility of such an approach is varied, and arises from neuroimaging studies, batteries of neurocognitive evaluations, and tests to identify the specific biomarkers of the disorder. The present article seeks to perform a review of the research that investigates the cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder. A bibliographic revision was performed of articles published between 1990 and 2015. Levels of cognitive performance were explored in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. The compiled studies signal the presence of altered cognitive function, even during periods of euthymia. However, there are contradictory results as to whether bipolar disorder presents a degenerative course. New lines of investigation suggest that only a percentage of individuals with bipolar disorder are affected in a progressive manner. It is of paramount importance to perform new longitudinal studies in high-risk populations, so as to validate or refute a neuroprogressive model of cognitive deficits in patients with bipolar disorder.