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Sample records for adolescent clinical inventory

  1. A review of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) and the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) with an emphasis on juvenile justice samples.

    PubMed

    Baum, Linda J; Archer, Robert P; Forbey, Johnathan D; Handel, Richard W

    2009-12-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) and Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) are frequently used objective personality self-report measures. Given their widespread use, the purpose of the current study was to examine and compare the literature base for the two instruments. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted between the years 1992 and 2007 using the PsycINFO Database. Results indicate the publication of 277 articles, books, book chapters, monographs, and dissertation abstracts on the MMPI-A. This was compared with the results of a comparable search for the MACI, which yielded 84 citations. The literature was further explored by determining the content of the topic areas addressed for both instruments. A particular focus was placed on the utility of the instruments with juvenile justice populations; scale means, standard deviations, and effect sizes calculated from this literature were examined. Results indicate that the use of the MMPI-A is supported by a substantial literature and a growing research base is also available for the MACI. Both instruments appear to provide useful results in juvenile justice settings.

  2. Obsessions and compulsions: normative data on the Padua Inventory from an Italian non-clinical adolescent sample.

    PubMed

    Mancini, F; Gragnani, A; Orazi, F; Pietrangeli, M G

    1999-10-01

    In the present study the structure of obsessive-compulsive phenomena in non-clinical adolescents was investigated by 'The Padua Inventory' (PI). The PI is a self-report measure of obsessive and compulsive symptoms which is used in clinical and research settings. The use of PI in adolescents has been limited by the lack of normative data. Consequently, adolescent validation has both theoretical and practical implications. PI was administered to 566 normal Italian high school subjects, ranging in age from 15 to 18 years. The mean total score of PI and the mean score of 'mental activities', 'becoming contaminated' and 'urges and worries' sub-scales points to significant differences between males and females. Females reported more obsessions and cleaning rituals than males. Males show more urges and fears than females. Moreover, our data underline that younger subjects get higher mean scores than older subjects in all scales.

  3. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Clinically-Identified Sample of Mexican American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanVoorhis, Carmen R. Wilson; Blumentritt, Tracie L.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the internal consistency reliability, convergent and divergent validity, and factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) in a sample of 131 Mexican American youth. The BDI-II demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability (alpha = 0.90) and solid convergent and divergent validity with various clinical scales…

  4. A Study of the Predictive Validity of the Children's Depression Inventory for Major Depression Disorder in Puerto Rican Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Medina, Carmen L.; Bernal, Guillermo; Rossello, Jeannette; Cumba-Aviles, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the predictive validity of the Children's Depression Inventory items for major depression disorder (MDD) in an outpatient clinic sample of Puerto Rican adolescents. The sample consisted of 130 adolescents, 13 to 18 years old. The five most frequent symptoms of the Children's Depression Inventory that best predict the…

  5. Predictive Validity Test of the Adolescent Domain Screening Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses the Adolescent Domain Screening Inventory (ADSI) to identify adolescents at high risk of substance use. Method: The sampling frame consisted of 26,781 surveys, and a secondary analysis was conducted. A random 25% sample was used, leaving 6,661 cases. Binary logistic regressions were run to determine the predictive…

  6. A Spanish Validation of the Canadian Adolescent Gambling Inventory (CAGI).

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Stinchfield, Randy; Tremblay, Joël; Del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Moragas, Laura; Savvidou, Lamprini G; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Tárrega, Salomé; Gunnard, Katarina; Martín-Romera, Virginia; Steward, Trevor; Mestre-Bach, Gemma; Menchón, José M

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Large-scale epidemiological studies show a significant prevalence of gambling disorder (GD) during adolescence and emerging adulthood, and highlight the need to identify gambling-related behaviors at early ages. However, there are only a handful of screening instruments for this population and many studies measuring youth gambling problems use adult instruments that may not be developmentally appropriate. The aim of this study was to validate a Spanish version of the Canadian Adolescent Gambling Inventory (CAGI) among late adolescent and young adults and to explore its psychometric properties. Methods: The sample (16-29 years old) included a clinical group (n = 55) with GD patients and a control group (n = 340). Results: Exploratory factor analysis yielded one factor as the best model. This 24-item scale demonstrated satisfactory reliability (internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha, α = 0.91), satisfactory convergent validity as measured by correlation with South Oaks Gambling Screen (r = 0.74), and excellent classification accuracy (AUC = 0.99; sensitivity = 0.98; and specificity = 0.99). Conclusion: Our results provide empirical support for our validation of the Spanish version of the CAGI. We uphold that the Spanish CAGI can be used as a brief, reliable, and valid instrument to assess gambling problems in Spanish youth.

  7. A Spanish Validation of the Canadian Adolescent Gambling Inventory (CAGI)

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Stinchfield, Randy; Tremblay, Joël; del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Moragas, Laura; Savvidou, Lamprini G.; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Tárrega, Salomé; Gunnard, Katarina; Martín-Romera, Virginia; Steward, Trevor; Mestre-Bach, Gemma; Menchón, José M.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Large-scale epidemiological studies show a significant prevalence of gambling disorder (GD) during adolescence and emerging adulthood, and highlight the need to identify gambling-related behaviors at early ages. However, there are only a handful of screening instruments for this population and many studies measuring youth gambling problems use adult instruments that may not be developmentally appropriate. The aim of this study was to validate a Spanish version of the Canadian Adolescent Gambling Inventory (CAGI) among late adolescent and young adults and to explore its psychometric properties. Methods: The sample (16–29 years old) included a clinical group (n = 55) with GD patients and a control group (n = 340). Results: Exploratory factor analysis yielded one factor as the best model. This 24-item scale demonstrated satisfactory reliability (internal consistency, Cronbach’s alpha, α = 0.91), satisfactory convergent validity as measured by correlation with South Oaks Gambling Screen (r = 0.74), and excellent classification accuracy (AUC = 0.99; sensitivity = 0.98; and specificity = 0.99). Conclusion: Our results provide empirical support for our validation of the Spanish version of the CAGI. We uphold that the Spanish CAGI can be used as a brief, reliable, and valid instrument to assess gambling problems in Spanish youth. PMID:28223961

  8. The Risk-Taking and Self-Harm Inventory for Adolescents: Development and Psychometric Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vrouva, Ioanna; Fonagy, Peter; Fearon, Pasco R. M.; Roussow, Trudie

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we report on the development and psychometric evaluation of the Risk-Taking (RT) and Self-Harm (SH) Inventory for Adolescents (RTSHIA), a self-report measure designed to assess adolescent RT and SH in community and clinical settings. 651 young people from secondary schools in England ranging in age from 11.6 years to 18.7 years and…

  9. The Development of the Adolescent Parenting Inventory (API): Identification of High Risk Adolescents Prior to Parenthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavolek, Stephen J.; And Others

    The monograph describes the development of the Adolescent Parenting Inventory (API), an instrument designed to prevent child abuse by identifying adolescents in need of acquiring appropriate child rearing and parenting skills. Field testing of the API with approximately 3,000 adolescents is explained to have revealed substantial content validity,…

  10. Predicting Adolescent Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome with the Personal Experience Inventory (PEI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinchfield, Randy; Winters, Ken C.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the clinical utility of the Personal Experience Inventory (PEI) Psychosocial scales to predict adolescent drug abuse treatment outcome. The role of psychosocial risk factors in predicting treatment outcome also has theoretical interest given that such factors have been associated with the development of…

  11. Validating the Measurement and Structure of the Beck Depression Inventory across English and French Nonclinical Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Barbara M.; Baron, Pierre

    The aims of the present study were threefold: (1) to test for the equivalency of an hierarchical three-factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) across English and French versions for non-clinical adolescents; (2) given evidence of poor model fit, to validate the factorial structure of the BDI French version across three independent…

  12. The Classification Accuracy of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--Adolescent: Effects of Modifying the Normative Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Cynthia G.; Archer, Robert P.; Handel, Richard W.; Forbey, Johnathan D.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) produces a high frequency of within-normal-limits basic scale profiles for adolescents with significant clinical pathology (e.g., Archer, 2005). The current study builds on the observation that the MMPI-A normative sample included participants…

  13. The validity of the Health-Relevant Personality Inventory (HP5i) and the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory (JTCI) among adolescents referred for a substance misuse problem.

    PubMed

    Hemphälä, Malin; Gustavsson, J Petter; Tengström, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to study the validity of 2 personality instruments, the Health-Relevant Personality Inventory (HP5i) and the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory (JTCI), among adolescents with a substance use problem. Clinical interviews were completed with 180 adolescents and followed up after 12 months. Discriminant validity was demonstrated in the lack of correlation to intelligence in both instruments' scales. Two findings were in support of convergent validity: Negative affectivity (HP5i) and harm avoidance (JTCI) were correlated to internalizing symptoms, and impulsivity (HP5i) and novelty seeking (JTCI) were correlated to externalizing symptoms. The predictive validity of JTCI was partly supported. When psychiatric symptoms at baseline were controlled for, cooperativeness predicted conduct disorder after 12 months. Summarizing, both instruments can be used in adolescent clinical samples to tailor treatment efforts, although some scales need further investigation. It is important to include personality assessment when evaluating psychiatric problems in adolescents.

  14. An Introduction to the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent-Restructured Form (MMPI-A-RF).

    PubMed

    Handel, Richard W

    2016-12-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent-Restructured Form (MMPI-A-RF; Archer, Handel, Ben-Porath, & Tellegen, 2016) is a new broadband measure of adolescent psychopathology and personality. The MMPI-A-RF is the adolescent counterpart of the MMPI-2-RF (Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/2011). The goal of the MMPI-2-RF development project was to capture the clinically significant substance of the MMPI-2 item pool with a psychometrically sound measure linked to contemporary models of personality and psychopathology (Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/2011). Using the MMPI-2-RF scales and development methods as models, Archer et al. (2016) developed a 241-item adolescent self-report inventory-in contrast to the 478-items of the MMPI-A-that includes 48 new and revised scales. In this manuscript, I provide an overview of the rationale for the development of the MMPI-A-RF, an abbreviated review of its development process, brief descriptions of its 48 scales, and a subset of analyses bearing on reliability and validity. As with the MMPI-2-RF, one of our primary goals was to develop scales with improved discriminant validity relative to the heterogeneous Clinical Scales of the MMPI-2 and MMPI-A. The MMPI-A-RF development process employed a large sample of 15,128 adolescents (9,286 boys and 5,842 girls) drawn from a variety of settings. In addition to the development sample, subsequent validation analyses were conducted in multiple independent samples including numerous external criterion measures. The MMPI-A-RF is designed to provide a comprehensive assessment of adolescent psychopathology and personality in a wide array of clinical and forensic settings.

  15. Parental Ratings of Children and Adolescents with Prader-Willi Syndrome on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Marnie; Pei, Jacqueline; Leung, Wing Sze Wence; Mackenzie, Michelle; Hicks, Melanie D.; Thurm, Audrey E.; Han, Joan C.; Haqq, Andrea M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated executive functioning in 25 children and adolescents with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). Significant deficits emerged, with mean scores on all but two scales reaching levels of clinical significance (T score = 65). Older children tended to have higher scores than younger…

  16. [Psychometric properties of the Beck depression inventory-II (BDI-II) among adolescent psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Besier, Tanja; Goldbeck, Lutz; Keller, Ferdinand

    2008-02-01

    A revised version of the Beck depression inventory (BDI-II) has been translated into German. Until now the BDI-II has only been evaluated in several American studies with clinical and nonclinical samples of adolescents. 111 adolescent psychiatric patients (ages ranged from 15-18 years) participated in a study to evaluate reliability, construct and factorial validity, as well as the diagnostic discrimination of the BDI-II. Internal consistency was high (alpha=0.92), showing the homogeneity of the instrument. Associations with other clinical (parent and self report) instruments point in the expected direction and support the external validity of the BDI-II. A factor-analysis generated inconclusive results. The BDI-II differentiated very well between a subsample of depressed adolescents (n=46), a subsample of non-depressed adolescent patients (n=53) and a nonclinical sample (n=31). The results of this study support the use of the BDI-II as a severity measure of depressive symptoms among adolescent psychiatric patients.

  17. The risk-taking and self-harm inventory for adolescents: development and psychometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vrouva, Ioanna; Fonagy, Peter; Fearon, Pasco R M; Roussow, Trudie

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we report on the development and psychometric evaluation of the Risk-Taking (RT) and Self-Harm (SH) Inventory for Adolescents (RTSHIA), a self-report measure designed to assess adolescent RT and SH in community and clinical settings. 651 young people from secondary schools in England ranging in age from 11.6 years to 18.7 years and 71 young people referred to mental health services for SH behavior in London between the ages of 11.9 years and 17.5 years completed the RTSHIA along with standardized measures of adolescent psychopathology. Two factors emerged from the principal axis factoring, and RT and SH were further validated by a confirmatory factor analysis as related, but different, constructs, rather than elements of a single continuum. Inter-item and test-retest reliabilities were high for both components (Cronbach's α = .85, ru = .90; Cronbach's α .93, ru = .87), and considerable evidence emerged in support of the measure's convergent, concurrent, and divergent validity. The findings are discussed with regard to potential usefulness of the RTSHIA for research and clinical purposes with adolescents.

  18. The classification accuracy of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent: effects of modifying the normative sample.

    PubMed

    Hand, Cynthia G; Archer, Robert P; Handel, Richard W; Forbey, Johnathan D

    2007-03-01

    Numerous studies have reported that the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) produces a high frequency of within-normal-limits basic scale profiles for adolescents with significant clinical pathology (e.g., Archer, 2005). The current study builds on the observation that the MMPI-A normative sample included participants who reported a recent history of referral for counseling or therapy services. The 193 adolescents who reported referral for counseling were removed from the normative sample and uniform T-score values were recalculated for basic clinical scale raw scores. The frequency of within-normal-limits profiles was only marginally reduced by using the revised MMPI-A norms. Furthermore, the overall hit rate, positive predictive power, and sensitivity were only slightly improved by removing normative participants referred for counseling and basing norms on the remaining 1,427 adolescents.

  19. Short health anxiety inventory: factor structure and psychometric properties in Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Morales, Alexandra; Espada, José P; Carballo, José L; Piqueras, José A; Orgilés, Mireia

    2015-02-01

    The Short Health Anxiety Inventory is a common screening tool for assessing health anxiety among adolescents; however, its psychometric properties and internal structure have not been evaluated within a Spanish-speaking population. The goodness of fit of four models of the latent structure of the Short Health Anxiety Inventory was tested by using confirmatory factor analysis in a sample of 832 Spanish secondary school adolescents. Based on these results, the reliability of the original two-factor model was tested. Differences in health anxiety by gender and age were also examined. The results support use of the Spanish version of the Short Health Anxiety Inventory by researchers and clinicians among Spanish adolescents.

  20. Descriptive and Psychometric Properties of the Inventory of Motivations for Suicide Attempts (IMSA) in an Inpatient Adolescent Sample

    PubMed Central

    May, Alexis M.; O'Brien, Kimberly H. McManama; Liu, Richard T.; Klonsky, E. David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about why adolescents attempt suicide. The current study examined the endorsement, structure, and clinical correlates of adolescents' suicide attempt motivations as measured by the Inventory of Motivations for Suicide Attempts (IMSA). Methods Suicidal adolescents (n = 52) in a psychiatric unit were administered the IMSA and interviewed about their suicide attempts. Results Psychache, Hopelessness, and Escape were the most strongly endorsed motivations, and Interpersonal Influence the least endorsed. IMSA scales exhibited a two-factor solution: 1) Internal and 2) Communication. Suicide intent was strongly correlated with Internal motivations and moderately inversely correlated with Communication motivations. Factor structure and mean endorsements were similar to adult samples. Conclusions The IMSA is a useful measure to assess attempt motivations in adolescents. PMID:27046630

  1. Factorial Structure and Invariance of the Academic Expectations Stress Inventory across Hispanic and Chinese Adolescent Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Rebecca P.; Huan, Vivien S.; Braman, O. Randall

    2007-01-01

    Using confirmatory factor analysis, the current study provided further evidence for the two-factor structure of the Academic Expectations Stress Inventory [AESI; Ang RP, Huan VS (2006) Educ Psych Meas 66:522-539] using a sample of 191 US Hispanic adolescents and a sample of 211 Singapore Chinese adolescents. This study also examined the…

  2. Reliability and Validity of the Beck Depression Inventory--II with Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Augustine; Kopper, Beverly A; Barrios, Frank; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Bagge, Courtney L.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to validate the Beck Depression Inventory--II (BDI-II; A. T. Beck, R. A. Steer, & G. K. Brown, 1996) in samples of adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The sample in each substudy was primarily Caucasian. In Study 1, expert raters (N=7) and adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N=13) evaluated the BDI-II items to assess…

  3. Cross-Cultural Invariance of the Academic Expectations Stress Inventory: Adolescent Samples from Canada and Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Rebecca P.; Klassen, Robert M.; Chong, Wan Har; Huan, Vivien S.; Wong, Isabella Y. F.; Yeo, Lay See; Krawchuk, Lindsey L.

    2009-01-01

    We provide further evidence for the two-factor structure of the 9-item Academic Expectations Stress Inventory (AESI) using confirmatory factor analysis on a sample of 289 Canadian adolescents and 310 Singaporean adolescents. Examination of measurement invariance tests the assumption that the model underlying a set of scores is directly comparable…

  4. Adolescent Student Burnout Inventory in Mainland China: Measurement Invariance across Gender and Educational Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Bi; Wu, Yan; Wen, Zhonglin; Wang, Mengcheng

    2014-01-01

    This article assessed the measurement in variance of the Adolescent Student Burnout Inventory (ASBI) across gender and educational track, and investigated the main and interaction effects of gender and educational track on the facets of student burnout with a sample consisting of 2,216 adolescent students from China. Multigroup confirmatory factor…

  5. Utility of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Personality Disorder Scales with Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freiheit, Stacy R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The utility of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory personality disorder scales was studied with 217 male adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Analyses of variance found patterns consistent with research on adult samples in spite of differences in factor structure. These similarities suggest that adolescent assessment may provide information…

  6. [Psychometric properties of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2) in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Schneider, Nora; Bürger, Arne; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Holzhausen, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The present study examines the psychometric properties of the German version of the Eating Disorder Inventory EDI-2 (1997) in 371 adolescents aged 13 to 18 years. Internal consistency, convergent and divergent validity were examined and a confirmatory factor analysis was conducted. Internal consistency was high for the group of patients and satisfactory for both control groups. Associations with other clinical instruments point in the expected direction and support the external validity of the EDI-2. The EDI-2 differentiated very well between the group of eating disorder patients (n=71) and the female (n=150) and male control groups (n=150). A discriminant analysis demonstrated that 86.0% of the cases were correctly classified, and a confirmatory factor analysis largely supported the six-factor structure generated by the German version of the EDI-2 (Thiel et al., 1997).

  7. [Peliosis hepatis. A clinical status inventory].

    PubMed

    Spech, H J; Liehr, H

    1982-12-01

    Peliosis hepatis is a rare condition, recognizable by macroscopical view. It is characterized by multiple blood-filled cystic spaces in the liver parenchyma. According to 49 out of 152 more recent case reports (1951-1981/82) its spontaneous occurrence is frequently associated with malignant and toxic processes. However, in about 70% peliosis may be induced by the action of certain drugs, especially by 17 alpha-alkylated steroids. Usually peliosis is found by chance at autopsy or peritoneoscopy, as the clinical picture does not provide sufficient conclusive criteria to allow a definite diagnosis. The striking macroscopical appearance contrasts to the dispute on the as yet unestablished natural history. As most important complication spontaneous intraabdominal bleeding can occur in occasional cases. On the other hand, the patients predominantly die of their underlying diseases and not of a peliosis hepatis.

  8. Psychometric Analysis of the Life Perspectives Inventory and Implications for Assessing Characteristics of Adolescent Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sink, Christopher A.; Bultsma, Shawn A.

    2014-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Life Perspectives Inventory (LPI-English language version), a new instrument designed to assess characteristics associated with nonreligious spirituality in high school-age adolescents, were examined in two phases. Phase 1 demonstrated the survey's factorial validity and internal consistency and the test-retest…

  9. Brief Symptom Inventory Factor Structure in Antisocial Adolescents: Implications for Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitt, Ahmed; Howard, Matthew O.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) is widely used in juvenile justice settings; however, little is known regarding its factor structure in antisocial youth. The authors evaluated the BSI factor structure in a state residential treatment population. Methods: 707 adolescents completed the BSI. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses…

  10. Validating the Beck Depression Inventory-II for Hong Kong Community Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Barbara M.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Lee, Peter W. H.

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to test for the validity of a Chinese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (C-BDI-II) for use with Hong Kong community (i.e., nonclinical) adolescents. Based on a randomized triadic split of the data (N = 1460), we conducted exploratory factor analysis on Group1 (n = 486) and confirmatory factor…

  11. Assessing At-Risk Youth Using the Reynolds Adolescent Adjustment Screening Inventory with a Latino Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkin, Richard S.; Cavazos, Javier, Jr.; Hernandez, Arthur E.; Garcia, Roberto; Dominguez, Denise L.; Valarezo, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Factor analyses were conducted on scores from the Reynolds Adolescent Adjustment Screening Inventory (RAASI; Reynolds, 2001) representing at-risk Latino youth. The 4-factor model of the RAASI did not exhibit a good fit. However, evidence of generalizability for Latino youth was noted. (Contains 3 tables.)

  12. School Anxiety Inventory: Reliability and Validity Evidence in a Sample of Slovenian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levpušcek, Melita Puklek; Inglés, Candido J.; Marzo, Juan C.; García-Fernández, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the School Anxiety Inventory (SAI) using a sample of 646 Slovenian adolescents (48% boys), ranging in age from 12 to 19 years. Single confirmatory factor analyses replicated the correlated four-factor structure of scores on the SAI for anxiety-provoking school situations…

  13. The Reliability and Validity of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory Scores in Academically Talented Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Frank C.; Mello, Zena R.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the reliability, structural validity, and concurrent validity of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) scores in a group of 815 academically talented adolescents. Reliability estimates of the purported factors' scores were in the low to moderate range. Exploratory factor analysis supported a five-factor…

  14. The Social Phobia Inventory: screening and cross-cultural validation in Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lopez, Luis Joaquín; Bermejo, Rosa Ma; Hidalgo, Ma Dolores

    2010-11-01

    Availability of brief, self-report measures to be used as screening instruments is crucial to detect correctly youth with social anxiety disorder and therefore, reach those otherwise under-detected and under-treated. A previous study revealed that the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) was potentially an appropriate measure for screening social anxiety among US adolescents. However, there is a lack of information concerning its properties as a screening test in other cultures and languages. This is the main objective of this study, although further validity of the scale is provided as well. The sample consisted of 192 adolescents (a sample composed of 114 subjects with a principal diagnosis of social anxiety disorder; and a group consisting of 78 subjects with no diagnosis of social phobia). Results suggest that the Social Phobia Inventory has demonstrated good psychometric properties and indeed may be used as a screening tool in Spanish-speaking adolescents.

  15. Evaluating the Validity Indices of the Personality Assessment Inventory-Adolescent Version.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Justin K; Hong, Sang-Hwang; Morey, Leslie C

    2015-08-01

    Past research has established strong psychometric properties of several indicators of response distortion on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI). However, to date, it has been unclear whether the response distortion indicators of the adolescent version of the PAI (PAI-A) operate in an equally valid manner. The current study sought to examine several response distortion indicators on the PAI-A to determine their relative efficacy at the detection of distorted responding, including both positive distortion and negative distortion. Protocols of 98 college students asked to either overreport or underreport were compared with 98 age-matched individuals sampled from the clinical standardization sample and the community standardization sample, respectively. Comparisons between groups were accomplished through the examination of effect sizes and receiver operating characteristic curves. All indicators demonstrated the ability to distinguish between actual and feigned responding, including several newly developed indicators. This study provides support for the ability of distortion indicators developed for the PAI to also function appropriately on the PAI-A.

  16. Psychometric Properties of the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Child Version (OCI-CV) in Chilean Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Agustín E.; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Tíscar; Piqueras, José A.; Vera-Villarroel, Pablo; Godoy, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a considerable increase in the development of assessment tools for obsessive-compulsive symptomatology in children and adolescents. The Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Child Version (OCI-CV) is a well-established assessment self-report, with special interest for the assessment of dimensions of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). This instrument has shown to be useful for clinical and non-clinical populations in two languages (English and European Spanish). Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the OCI-CV in a Chilean community sample. The sample consisted of 816 children and adolescents with a mean age of 14.54 years (SD = 2.21; range = 10–18 years). Factor structure, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent/divergent validity, and gender/age differences were examined. Confirmatory factor analysis showed a 6-factor structure (Doubting/Checking, Obsessing, Hoarding, Washing, Ordering, and Neutralizing) with one second-order factor. Good estimates of reliability (including internal consistency and test-retest), evidence supporting the validity, and small age and gender differences (higher levels of OCD symptomatology among older participants and women, respectively) are found. The OCI-CV is also an adequate scale for the assessment of obsessions and compulsions in a general population of Chilean children and adolescents. PMID:26317404

  17. Factorial Invariance of the Personal Strengths Inventory-2 for Children and Adolescents across School Level and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liau, Albert K.; Tan, Teck Kiang; Li, Dongdong; Khoo, Angeline

    2012-01-01

    As the Personal Strengths Inventory (PSI) was developed to assess the strengths of adolescents, the Personal Strengths Inventory-2 (PSI-2) was developed so that children could be assessed as well. The present study examined whether the five-factor structure of the PSI would be demonstrated with the PSI-2 and whether the same measurement structure…

  18. Identifying Victims of Abuse Using the Personality Inventory for Children: I. Applications for Adolescent Runaways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Michael E.; And Others

    The physical and sexual abuse of children and adolescents has been gaining attention as a national problem of social and clinical significance. In this study a model was developed in order to identify abuse (victimization) in an adolescent population (n=52). Four scales (Adjustment, Delinquency, Family Relations, and Anxiety) of the Personality…

  19. Reliability and Validity of the Beck Depression Inventory-II among Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Ho; Lee, Soo-Ji; Hwang, Soon-Taeg; Hong, Sang-Hwang

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is one of the most popular scales for evaluating the severity of depression in adolescents as well as adults. The prevalence of depression increases during adolescence, and it has shown a rapid increase with occurrence at an earlier age and a tendency to continue into adulthood. Data from an adolescent nonclinical sample provides us more information related to depressive symptoms as potential risk factors. The current study was designed to two objectives: 1) to analyze the reliability and validity the BDI-II among Korean adolescents and 2) to evaluate the factorial structure in a Korean nonclinical adolescent sample. Methods The participants included 1072 adolescent boys and girls. We assessed the internal consistency, corrected item-total correlation, and the convergent validity of the BDI-II. We also performed confirmatory factor analyses to determine the internal structure of the BDI-II for Korean adolescents using Mplus 6.1. Results The Cronbach's alpha for the BDI-II total score was 0.89. The correlation between the BDI-II and the PHQ-9 was strong (r=0.75), and anxiety-related measures were 0.68 and 0.71, which were also in the high range. Among the five different factor structures, the modified three-factor model demonstrated the best overall fit. Conclusion The BDI-II is a reliable tool for measuring the severity of depressive symptoms in Korean adolescents. Therefore, the findings can provide basic information for examining the prevalence rate, intervention strategies for depression in adolescents. PMID:28096872

  20. A Descriptive Study of the Behavior and Personality Characteristics of Adolescent Runaways Using the Personality Inventory for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Michael E.

    The phenomenon of adolescent runaway behavior is of critical concern to mental health professionals. Conceptualization, prediction, and treatment interventions are of extreme importance. This study sought to build upon prior research by using the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC). Previous research indicated that adolescent running away…

  1. Psychometric Evaluation of the Motivation to Change Inventory for Adolescents (Revised)-Icelandic Version: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sif Fridjonsdottir, Helga

    2008-01-01

    A valid and reliable instrument was needed to assess motivation level and impact of a motivational enhancing intervention for adolescents coming for treatment at a detoxification and treatment center in Iceland. This psychometric study explored the Motivation to Change Inventory for Adolescents (Revised)-Icelandic version in that setting.…

  2. Korean Version of Inventory of Complicated Grief Scale: Psychometric Properties in Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to validate the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG)-Korean version among 1,138 Korean adolescents, representing a response rate of 57% of 1,997 students. Participants completed a set of questionnaires including demographic variables (age, sex, years of education, experience of grief), the ICG, the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and the Lifetime Incidence of Traumatic Events-Child (LITE-C). Exploratory factor analysis was performed to determine whether the ICG items indicated complicated grief in Korean adolescents. The internal consistency of the ICG-Korean version was Cronbach's α=0.87. The test-retest reliability for a randomly selected sample of 314 participants in 2 weeks was r=0.75 (P<0.001). Concurrent validity was assessed using a correlation between the ICG total scores and the CDI total scores (r=0.75, P<0.001). The criterion-related validity based on the comparison of ICG total scores between adolescents without complicated grief (1.2±3.7) and adolescent with complicated grief (3.2±6.6) groups was relatively high (t=5.71, P<0.001). The data acquired from the 1,138 students was acceptable for a factor analysis (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy=0.911; Bartlett's Test of Sphericity, χ2=13,144.7, P<0.001). After omission of 3 items, the value of Cronbach's α increased from 0.87 for the 19-item ICG-Korean version to 0.93 for the 16-item ICG-Korean version. These results suggest that the ICG is a useful tool in assessing for complicated grief in Korean adolescents. However, the 16-item version of the ICG appeared to be more valid compared to the 19-item version of the ICG. We suggest that the 16-item version of the ICG be used to screen for complicated grief in Korean adolescents. PMID:26770046

  3. Cross-cultural invariance of the Academic Expectations Stress Inventory: adolescent samples from Canada and Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ang, Rebecca P; Klassen, Robert M; Chong, Wan Har; Huan, Vivien S; Wong, Isabella Y F; Yeo, Lay See; Krawchuk, Lindsey L

    2009-10-01

    We provide further evidence for the two-factor structure of the 9-item Academic Expectations Stress Inventory (AESI) using confirmatory factor analysis on a sample of 289 Canadian adolescents and 310 Singaporean adolescents. Examination of measurement invariance tests the assumption that the model underlying a set of scores is directly comparable across groups. This study also examined the cross-cultural validity of the AESI using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis across both the Canadian and Singaporean adolescent samples. The results suggested cross-cultural invariance of form, factor loadings, and factor variances and covariances of the AESI across both samples. Evidence of AESI's convergent and discriminant validity was also reported. Findings from t-tests revealed that Singaporean adolescents reported a significantly higher level of academic stress arising from self expectations, other expectations, and overall academic stress, compared to Canadian adolescents. Also, a larger cross-cultural effect was associated with academic stress arising from other expectations compared with academic stress arising from self expectations.

  4. Relations between adolescent ratings of Rothbart's temperament questionnaire and the HEXACO personality inventory.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Ann H; Brook, Christina; Dane, Andrew V; Marini, Zopito A; Volk, Anthony A

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, individual differences have been assessed using temperament measures for infants and children, and personality measures for adults. We chose to explore both temperament and personality to see whether a convergence exists specifically during adolescence. A sample of 225 adolescents completed Rothbart's Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire-Revised (EATQ-R), a 4-factor temperament scale, and the HEXACO Personality Inventory-Revised (HEXACO PI-R), a 6-factor personality scale. As hypothesized, we found significant relations between the 2 measures. However, there were some important differences between the 2 measures regarding Honesty-Humility, Openness, and Frustration that highlight the unique contributions of both instruments to understanding and measuring adolescent individual differences. As there is a relatively scant history of measuring temperament or personality in adolescence, it is sometimes difficult for researchers to decide which instrument is most appropriate. The results reported here suggest that either the EATQ-R or the HEXACO PI-R could be appropriate, depending on the specific research questions being asked.

  5. [Development and Validation of the Revenge Fantasy Inventory for Adolescents (RFI-J)].

    PubMed

    Warncke, Stephan; Klapprott, Felix; Scheithauer, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    The Revenge Fantasy Inventory for Adolescents (RFI-J) is a paper-pencil-questionnaire that aims at assessing revenge fantasies of adolescents and facilitates an interpersonal comparison of revenge fantasies. The RFI-J assesses components concerning the subjective relevance of revenge fantasies, for example a coherence with emotion regulation and adolescent's attitudes towards revenge. In addition, the content of revenge fantasies is measured. The psychometric properties of revenge fantasies were analysed in two studies: In the first study an early concept of the instrument (consisting of two parts: assessment of subjective relevance of the fantasies and assessment of revenge fantasy content) was presented to 248 students (123 males) with an average age of 14.9 years (SD=0.89; Range=14-18 years). Using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) both parts of the instrument were dimensionalised. Subsequently, scales were built and a first version of the inventory was developed. In a second study with another sample consisting of 88 students (48 males) with an average age of 14.9 years (SD=0.72; Range=14-17 years) four of the factors which had been found in the first study were replicated. Furthermore, correlations were found between the RFI-J and measures of aggression, measures of pro-sociality, as well as measures of physical and psychological complaints. The developed test in its current version consist of two parts (18 and 6 Items).

  6. The psychometrics and validity of the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory in Portuguese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Paulo A; Oliveira, João Tiago; Cloninger, Kevin M; Azevedo, Carla; Sousa, Alexandra; Castro, Jorge; Cloninger, C Robert

    2012-11-01

    Personality traits related to persistence and self-regulation of long-term goals can predict academic performance as well or better than measures of intelligence. The 5-factor model has been suggested to outperform some other personality tests in predicting academic performance, but it has not been compared to Cloninger's psychobiological model for this purpose. The aims of this study were, first, to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory (JTCI) in adolescents in Portugal, and second, to evaluate the comparative validity of age-appropriate versions of Cloninger's 7-factor psychobiological model, Costa and McCrae's five-factor NEO-Personality Inventory-Revised, and Cattell's 16-personality-factor inventory in predicting academic achievement. All dimensions of the Portuguese JTCI had moderate to strong internal consistency. The Cattell's sixteen-personality-factor and NEO inventories provided strong construct validity for the JTCI in students younger than 17 years and for the revised adult version (TCI-Revised) in those 17 years and older. High TCI Persistence predicted school grades regardless of age as much or more than intelligence. High TCI Harm Avoidance, high Self-Transcendence, and low TCI Novelty Seeking were additional predictors in students older than 17. The psychobiological model, as measured by the JTCI and TCI-Revised, performed as well or better than other measures of personality or intelligence in predicting academic achievement.

  7. An Inventory for Measuring Clinical Anxiety: Psychometric Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes development of Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), self-report inventory for measuring severity of anxiety in psychiatric populations. Describes study results which showed BAI to have high internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and to discriminate anxious diagnostic groups from nonanxious diagnostic groups. (Author/NB)

  8. Adolescent Healthful Foods Inventory: Development of an Instrument to Assess Adolescents' Willingness to Consume Healthful Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuerty, Amber B.; Cater, Melissa; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2016-01-01

    Interventions to increase adolescents' healthful food and beverage consumption often fail to demonstrate change. An alternative is to measure a shift in willingness to consume these items as an indicator of movement toward change. A survey was developed to estimate willingness to consume a variety of foods and beverages. Twenty items were…

  9. Inventory of Determinants of Obesity-Related Behaviors in Adolescents: Development and Psychometric Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Parisa; Ghofranipour, Fazlollah; Jalali-Farahani, Sara; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Hosseinpanah, Farhad; Hooman, Haidar Ali; Parvin, Parnian; Ghasemi, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rising prevalence of childhood obesity is a major health problem worldwide. Hence, there is a growing need for health professionals to become capable of assessing the factors that determine lifestyle in a culturally relevant manner. Objectives: This study aimed to develop and assess a questionnaire for measuring determinants of obesity-related behaviors in Tehranian adolescents. Patients and Methods: Based on the results of a qualitative study and an extensive literature review, the 44-item “Inventory of determinants of obesity-related behaviors in adolescents (IDOBA)” with eight subscales was developed: 1) unhealthy nutrition and physical inactivity; 2) stress-related eating; 3) perceived inability; 4) perceived lack of threat; 5) perceived priority of educational achievement; 6) perceived acceptability; 7) motivation loss; and 8) lack of support. Validity of IDOBA was assessed, utilizing face, content, and construct validity methods. To confirm face validity, ten overweight/obese adolescents completed the questionnaire. To calculate content validity ratio (CVR) and content validity index (CVI), a different panel of ten experts commented independently on the necessity, relevance, clarity, and simplicity of each item. To assess construct validity using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), a total of 478 adolescents (57.7% male) aged 13 to 18 years, who were recruited from schools, participated in the study. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test whether the data fit the hypothesized measurement model that was derived from EFA. Test-retest and internal consistency methods were used to assess reliability of the IDOBA scale. Results: All items were perceived as relevant and comprehendible by adolescents. Content validity was confirmed by the panel of experts. The internal consistency, as measured by Cronbach’s alpha coefficients, exceeded the minimum reliability standard of 0.60 for eight subscales. No ceiling effects were observed

  10. Panic Disorder in Clinically Referred Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerfler, Leonard A.; Connor, Daniel F.; Volungis, Adam M.; Toscano, Peter F., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the frequency and characteristics of panic disorder in children and adolescents who had been referred to a pediatric psychopharmacology clinic. Of the 280 children and adolescents evaluated in this clinic, 35 were diagnosed with panic disorder using a semi-structured clinical interview (K-SADS) and other objective…

  11. The Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment: Individual Differences and Their Relationship to Psychological Well-Being in Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armsden, Gay G.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    The development and validation of the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA), a self-report instrument for use with adolescents, is described. Item content of the instrument was suggested by Bowlby's theoretical formulations concerning the nature of feelings toward attachment figures. A hierarchical regression model was employed to…

  12. The Beck Depression Inventory: A Cross-Validated Test of Second-Order Factorial Structure for Bulgarian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Barbara M.; Baron, Pierre; Balev, Jorj

    1998-01-01

    The validity of a higher order factorial structure of a Bulgarian version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) (A. Beck et al, 1961) for nonclinical adolescents was studied with 3 samples totaling 691. Findings yielded strong support for the hypothesized second-order factor, adding to a growing cross-cultural agglomerate of construct validity…

  13. Identifying the Presence, Severity, and Chronicity of Psychopathological Behaviors Associated with Adolescent Runaways Using the Personality Inventory for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Michael E.; And Others

    An extensive review of the adolescent runaway literature indicated inconsistent findings regarding the presence, severity, and chronicity of psychopathological behavior among this high-risk group. Three experiments were conducted to address these issues using one personality measure, the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC). The results of the…

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Adolescent Health Concern Inventory: The Persian Version

    PubMed Central

    Baheiraei, Azam; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi; Ghofranipour, Fazlollah; Weiler, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Objective It is important to consider the health concerns of adolescents before developing and implementing public health promotion or health education curriculum programs aimed at ameliorating priority health problems experienced by adolescents. The aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the original Adolescent Health Concern Inventory (AHCI) for use with an Iranian population. Methods This was a methodological study in which 50 adolescents with age range of 14-18 years were selected using convenience sampling. The translation and cultural adaptation process of The AHCI followed recognized and established guidelines. The face and content validity was established by analyzing feedback solicited from teenagers and professionals with expertise in health, sociology and psychology. Reliability was examined using test-retest and Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency reliability. Kappa and McNemar tests were used to examine test-retest reliability for each item. Results Minor cultural differences were identified and resolved during the translation process and determining the validity of the checklist. Results from Kappa and McNemar tests indicate a high degree of test-retest reliability. Internal consistency reliability as measured by Cronbach's alpha for the subscales were between 0.68 and 0.87 with total instrument reliability of 0.96 indicating considerable overall reliability. Conclusion The Persian version of the AHCI appears valid and reliable. Hence, it can be used for filling a gap in identifying the adolescents’ health concerns in the research and community settings and school health education programs in Iran to design appropriate interventions. PMID:23682249

  15. Validation of an Italian version of the Oxford happiness inventory in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Meleddu, Mauro; Guicciardi, Marco; Scalas, L Francesca; Fadda, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    An Italian adaptation of the Oxford Happiness Inventory was administered to 782 adolescents. Exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) was used to examine the first- and second-order factorial structure of the scale and its invariance across gender; internal consistency and construct validity were also investigated. ESEM underlined a 5-factor structure (mastery and self-fulfillment, satisfaction with life, vigor, social interest, and social cheerfulness) that measures positive psychological functioning. These dimensions form a single latent construct of general psychological well-being. The scale showed adequate internal consistency values and strong measurement invariance across gender. Finally, regarding convergent validity, both total scale and subscales were positively correlated with extraversion and self-esteem, were negatively correlated with neuroticism, and displayed no correlation with psychoticism.

  16. The Female Sexual Subjectivity Inventory: Development and Validation of a Multidimensional Inventory for Late Adolescents and Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Sharon; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.

    2006-01-01

    Three studies were conducted to develop and validate a theoretically derived multidimensional inventory of females' sexual self-conceptions ("sexual subjectivity"). Study 1 revealed five factors on the Female Sexual Subjectivity Inventory (FSSI): sexual body-esteem, three factors of conceptions and expectations of sexual desire and pleasure (self,…

  17. Psychometric properties of the state-trait anxiety inventory for Asian/Pacific-islander adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hishinuma, E S; Miyamoto, R H; Nishimura, S T; Nahulu, L B; Andrade, N N; Makini, G K; Yuen, N Y; Johnson, R C; Kim, S P; Goebert, D A; Guerrero, A P

    2000-03-01

    Anxiety disorders are said to be universal across all cultures and recent reviews have found relatively high prevalence rates across different countries. However, the experience and interpretation of anxiety are strongly influenced by cultural factors. Demonstrating cross-cultural equivalence of measures of anxiety is essential to assure that comparisons between cultures will result in meaningful interpretations. Despite the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory being the most researched of anxiety measures from a cross-cultural basis, there is a lack of empirical studies on the psychometric properties of the STAI with adolescent Asian/Pacific Islanders. The present study examined the STAI using a large sample of ethnically diverse high school students in Hawaii. In general, a four-factor model (State-Anxiety Absent, State-Anxiety Present, Trait-Anxiety Absent, and Trait-Anxiety Present) provided the best fit based on a series of confirmatory factor analyses. Indicators of internal consistency supported the reliability of the factors and subscales, and the inter-factor correlations reflected positively on the concurrent validity of the different STAI factor and subscale measures. This study suggested cautious use and interpretation of one particular item (Trait Item 14 = I try to avoid facing a crisis or difficulty ), and cautious application of the STAI to Filipino adolescents (particularly Filipino males). Domains for further research are discussed.

  18. Prediction of anxiety disorders using the state-trait anxiety inventory for multiethnic adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hishinuma, E S; Miyamoto, R H; Nishimura, S T; Goebert, D A; Yuen, N Y; Makini, G K; Andrade, N N; Johnson, R C; Carlton, B S

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) in predicting DSM-III-R anxiety disorders based on the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC, Version 2.3) and using Asian/Pacific Islander adolescents. An overall prevalence rate of 9.19% for generalized anxiety disorder, overanxious disorder, or social phobia was consistent with past studies. As hypothesized, STAI negatively worded (i.e., Factor 2) items were better predictors than positively stated (i.e., Factor 1) items. The STAI State mean was a better predictor of concurrent DISC anxiety disorders as compared to STAI State Factors I or 2. In contrast, the STAI Trait Factor 2 (negatively worded) composite was the best predictor for nonconcurrent DISC anxiety disorders as compared to STAI Trait Factor 1 or the overall STAI Trait subscale. Satisfactory predictive-validity values were obtained when using the STAI State mean and Trait Factor 2 composite. Implications of these findings are discussed, including using the STAI as a screening measure for ethnically diverse adolescents.

  19. Clinical Considerations in the Assessment of Adolescent Chemical Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken

    1990-01-01

    Discusses relevant research findings of clinical assessment of adolescent chemical dependency so that service providers can better address these concerns. Three major issues are discussed: the definition of adolescent chemical dependency, clinical domains of assessment (chemical use problem severity, precipitating and perpetuating risk factors,…

  20. Factor structure and factorial invariance of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Chinese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Liu, Zhengkui

    2015-06-01

    As previous research utilizing Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Form Y; STAI-Y) has mostly involved adults or clinical groups, there have been relatively few reports assessing adolescents. This study is the first using data for children and adolescents in mainland China, from a large-scale cross-sectional survey in Beijing (Sample 1) and a longitudinal survey from the Wenchuan 512 earthquake (Sample 2), to clarify the factor structure and factorial invariance of the STAI-Y, Mandarin Chinese version. As a result, only in Sample 1 did a comparison of 11 confirmatory factor analysis models indicate the best goodness-of-fit indices shown by a two-factor structure for both state and trait anxiety, with both models reaching the selected cutoff criteria. These two optimal models were used in a subsequent simultaneous confirmatory factor analysis to test four conditions of factorial invariance, using eight participant groups divided on the basis of sex and school grade (fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh to ninth). The two-factor structure state and trait anxiety models achieved the cutoff criteria for factorial invariance, with the exception of male fourth graders. Further, it was clearly shown that in comparison with the early stage of puberty, as puberty advanced the absence of state and trait anxiety gradually decreased, while scores for the presence of anxiety gradually increased. At the same time, in the case of Sample 2, which had experienced a traumatic event, as the goodness-of-fit indices for none of the 11 models reached the cutoff criteria, the factor scores showed arbitrariness and a lack of objectivity. The authors conclude that cognitive structure with regard to the STAI-Y may change with traumatic experience or the development of secondary sex characteristics at the onset of or in the stage of puberty. Also, computing the scores according to the STAI-Y manual is problematic.

  1. Adolescent health care maintenance in a teen-friendly clinic.

    PubMed

    Chaisson, Nicole; Shore, William B

    2014-09-01

    Adolescence is marked by complex physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development, which can be stressful for families and adolescents. Before the onset of puberty, providers should clearly lay the groundwork for clinical care and office visits during the adolescent years. This article addresses the guidelines and current legal standards for confidentiality in adolescent care, the most frequently used psychosocial screening tools, and current recommendations for preventive health services and immunizations. Through the creation of teen-friendly clinics, primary care providers are well positioned to offer guidance and support to teens and their parents during this time of transition and growth.

  2. International Adaptations of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory: Construct Validity and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Gina; Derksen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the influence of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI) as a clinical and research instrument beyond the borders of the United States. The MCMI's theoretical and empirical grounding, its alignment with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), and scales that can be interpreted both categorically and dimensionally, are the primary features that make the test attractive. We begin with studies that evaluated the construct equivalence of the different language adaptations. Data from the most widely researched non English-language forms (Danish, Dutch, and Spanish) show excellent comparability with Millon's original. Nevertheless, significant problems were noted in efforts to create clinical groups that would allow for equivalence of diagnostic accuracy when using the cutoff scores. Although dimensional aspects of the scale scores were not affected by this, the adapted measures might show attenuated diagnostic accuracy compared with Millon's original. Next, we present MCMI studies conducted in clinical settings to document where the adapted tests have made their greatest impact in the international literature. A wide variety of clinical applications demonstrated broad utility, and given the high number of issues addressed, we think Millon's influence will certainly stand the test of time in different domains and settings.

  3. Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III Subtypes of Opioid Dependence: Validity and Matching to Behavioral Therapies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Samuel A.; Nich, Charla; Rounsaville, Bruce J.; Eagan, Dorothy; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2004-01-01

    The concurrent and predictive validity of 2 different methods of Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III subtyping (protocol sorting, cluster analysis) was evaluated in 125 recently detoxified opioid-dependent outpatients in a 12-week randomized clinical trial. Participants received naltrexone and relapse prevention group counseling and were…

  4. An Exploration of the Base Rate Scores of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, William M.; Vrieze, Scott I.

    2009-01-01

    The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (3rd ed.; MCMI-III) is a widely used psychological assessment of clinical and personality disorders. Unlike typical tests, the MCMI-III uses a base-rate score transformation to incorporate prior probabilities of disorder (i.e., base rates) in test output and diagnostic thresholds. The authors describe the…

  5. Forgiveness: Theory, Research, and Clinical Implications for Adolescent Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelayo, Stephanie L.

    This paper reviews the literature on the subject of forgiveness and suggests clinical implications for the treatment of adolescent offenders. Although research has been done in the areas of forgiveness, no studies have been conducted with adolescent offenders. This dearth of information points to a gap in understanding the role of forgiveness in…

  6. The Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory: Psychometric Properties and Its Relation to Substance Use and Interpersonal Style in a Dutch Sample of Non-Referred Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillege, Sanne; Das, Jacqueline; de Ruiter, Corine

    2010-01-01

    This study presents evidence on the reliability and construct validity of the Dutch version of the Youth Psychopathic traits Inventory (YPI), a self-report instrument for psychopathic traits in adolescent boys and girls. In a sample of 776 Dutch non-referred adolescents, the YPI was found to have good internal consistency. Furthermore, exploratory…

  7. Assessment of Physical Self-Concept in Adolescents with Intellectual Disability: Content and Factor Validity of the Very Short Form of the Physical Self-Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiano, Christophe; Begarie, Jerome; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Ninot, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the factor validity and reliability of the Very Short Form of the Physical Self-Inventory- (PSI-VSF) within a sample of adolescents with mild to moderate Intellectual Disability (ID). A total of 362 ID adolescents were involved in two studies. In Study 1, the content and format scale response of the PSI-VSF…

  8. Construction and Validation of the Clinical Judgment Skill Inventory: Clinical Judgment Skill Competencies That Measure Counselor Debiasing Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Bryan S.; Leahy, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To construct and validate a new self-report instrument, the Clinical Judgment Skill Inventory (CJSI), inclusive of clinical judgment skill competencies that address counselor biases and evidence-based strategies. Method: An Internet-based survey design was used and an exploratory factor analysis was performed on a sample of rehabilitation…

  9. Establishing a clinically relevant cutoff to the Dependency Scale from the dimensional clinical personality inventory.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Lucas de F; Pianowski, Giselle; Filho, Nelson H

    2017-02-03

    The Clinical Dimensional Personality Inventory (IDCP) is a 163-item self-report tool developed for the assessment of 12 dimensions of personality pathology. One of the scales comprising the instrument-the Dependency scale-is intended to provide psychometric information on traits closely related to the Dependent Personality Disorder (DPD). In the present study, we used both Item Response Theory modeling and Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis to establishing a clinically meaningful cutoff for the IDCP Dependency Scale. Participants were 2.481 adults, comprised by outpatients diagnosed with DPD, outpatients diagnosed with other PDs, and adults from the general population. The Wright's item map graphing technique revealed that outpatients were located at the very high levels in the latent scale continuum of the Dependency Scale, with a very large effect size for the mean difference between patients and non-patients. The ROC curve analysis supported a cutoff at 2.3 points in the Dependency Scale, which yielded 0.86 of sensitivity and 0.79 of specificity. Findings from the present investigation suggest the IDCP Dependency Scale is useful as a screening tool of the core features of the DPD. We address potential clinical applications for the instrument, and discuss limitations from the present study.

  10. [Clinical usefulness and psychometric properties of the Cambridge Behavioural Inventory].

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martinez, R; Kokoulina, E; Carballido-Araujo, E; Garcia-Fuertes, I; Gutierrez-Martinez, O; Santiago-Lopez, F; Vazquez-Batan, P

    2016-11-16

    Introduccion. Un area importante de la evaluacion neuropsicologica son los sintomas psicologicos y conductuales. El inventario conductual de Cambridge –Cambridge Behavioural Inventory (CBI)– es una medida de autoinforme dirigida a allegados que recoge una amplia variedad de sintomas conductuales que pueden darse en el curso de las enfermedades neurologicas. El principal objetivo del estudio es comprobar la utilidad clinica de su adaptacion al castellano. Sujetos y metodos. El CBI fue cumplimentado por 215 allegados de pacientes remitidos desde los servicios de neurologia y psiquiatria. Se compararon los perfiles del CBI de cuatro grupos de pacientes formados sobre la base de sus principales caracteristicas clinicas, datos psicometricos, pruebas de imagen y juicio clinico del profesional solicitante del estudio neuropsicologico. Resultados. La mayoria de las escalas (10 de 13) del CBI tuvo valores de consistencia interna aceptables, y las escalas de memoria y atencion/orientacion, correlaciones elevadas con medidas objetivas de memoria y orientacion temporal. Los perfiles del CBI de los grupos de pacientes con distintas condiciones (trastorno organico de la memoria, trastorno funcional de la memoria, variante conductual de demencia frontotemporal y enfermedad de Alzheimer) fueron consistentes con sus principales caracteristicas. Conclusiones. El CBI es un instrumento psicometricamente fiable y con adecuada validez convergente y discriminante que puede ser util en el proceso de evaluacion neuropsicologica, aportando informacion relevante no solo sobre el funcionamiento cognitivo y las capacidades funcionales, sino tambien sobre los sintomas conductuales y psicologicos de los pacientes con trastornos cognitivos.

  11. Evidence for the Criterion Validity and Clinical Utility of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Katherine M.; Wright, Aidan G. C.; Lukowitsky, Mark R.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Hopwood, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated aspects of criterion validity and clinical utility of the grandiosity and vulnerability components of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI) using two undergraduate samples (N = 299 and 500). Criterion validity was assessed by evaluating the correlations of narcissistic grandiosity and narcissistic…

  12. The Personality and Symptoms Scales of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory: Sensitivity to Posttreatment Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Robert C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined patterns of consistency and change on the basic personality and symptom scales of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory in alcoholics and drug abusers. Both alcohol and drug abuser samples showed significant changes on most personality and symptom scales between intake and one month into treatment. (Author/BL)

  13. The Psychometric Properties of the Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills in Clinical Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Corinna; Kuyken, Willem; Bohus, Martin; Heidenreich, Thomas; Michalak, Johannes; Steil, Regina

    2010-01-01

    The Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills (KIMS) is a well-validated multidimensional questionnaire measuring dimensions of mindfulness on four scales: Observing, Describing, Act With Awareness, and Accept Without Judgment. Even though the KIMS has been used in several clinical studies no information is available about the psychometric…

  14. Improving Nutrition in Pregnant Adolescents: Recommendations for Clinical Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Kristen S.

    2003-01-01

    Pregnancy represents an ideal time for health promotion activities. Many women, including adolescents, are interested and willing to change health behaviors to improve the chance that they will deliver a healthy infant. This paper focuses on improving nutrition in pregnant adolescents. Seven recommendations are presented to help achieve this goal: 1) Focus on foods, not nutrients; 2) individualize and work within the pregnant adolescent's current eating habits; 3) consider the context of family and peer groups; 4) reward efforts; 5) make it easy; 6) focus on weight gain patterns for optimal birth outcomes; and 7) refer to a dietician, as needed. Use of these recommendations comprehensively addresses adolescent developmental needs to improve nutrition during pregnancy. These recommendations are not meant to be all-inclusive; rather, they are meant to serve as a guide for clinical management of nutrition for pregnant adolescents. PMID:17273337

  15. Adolescent Participation in HPV Vaccine Clinical Trials: Are Parents Willing?

    PubMed

    Erves, Jennifer Cunningham; Mayo-Gamble, Tilicia L; Hull, Pamela C; Duke, Lauren; Miller, Stephania T

    2017-03-21

    Approximately one-quarter of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are acquired by adolescents, with a higher burden among racial/ethnic minorities. However, racial/ethnic minorities have been underrepresented in previous HPV vaccine trials. Ongoing and future HPV vaccine optimization trials would benefit from racially- and ethnically-diverse sample of adolescent trial participants. This study examined factors influencing parental willingness to consent to their adolescents' participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials and tested for possible racial differences. A convenience sample of parents of adolescents (N = 256) completed a cross-sectional survey. Chi square analyses were used to assess racial differences in parental HPV vaccine awareness and intentions and willingness to consent to their child participating in an HPV vaccine clinical trial. Ordinal logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with willingness. Approximately 47% of parents were willing to allow their adolescent to participate in HPV vaccine clinical trials (30.7% African American and 48.3% Caucasian, p = .081). African Americans had lower HPV vaccine awareness (p = .006) but not lower intentions to vaccinate (p = .086). Parental willingness was positively associated with the following variables: Child's age (p < .039), Perceived Advantages of HPV Vaccination for Adolescents (p = .002), Parental Trust in Medical Researchers (p < .001), and Level of Ease in Understanding Clinical Trial Information (p = .010). Educating parents about the advantages of HPV vaccines for younger adolescents using low-literacy educational materials and building trust between parents and researchers may increase parental willingness to consent to adolescent participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials.

  16. Psychometric assessment of the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory in a sample of low-income single mothers.

    PubMed

    Lutenbacher, M

    2001-01-01

    The Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory (AAPI) is a 32-item inventory widely used to identify adolescents and adults at risk for inadequate parenting behaviors. It includes four subscales representing the most frequent patterns associated with abusive parenting: (a) Inappropriate Expectations; (b) Lack of Empathy; (c) Parental Value of Corporal Punishment; and (d) Parent-Child Role Reversal. Although it has been used in a variety of samples, the psychometric properties of the AAPI have not been examined in low-income single mothers. The purposes of this study were to: (a) examine the reliability and validity of the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory (AAPI) in a sample of 206 low-income single mothers; (b) assess the mother's risk for inadequate parenting by comparing their AAPI subscale scores with normative subscale scores on the AAPI; (c) assess the construct validity of the AAPI by testing the hypothesis that mothers with lower AAPI scores have a higher level of depressive symptoms and lower self-esteem in comparison to mothers with higher AAPI scores; and (d) determine whether the 4-factor structure proposed by Bavolek (1984) could be replicated. AAPI scores indicated these mothers were at high risk for child abuse when compared with normative data for parents with no known history of abuse. Higher risk for abusive parenting was associated with a higher level of depressive symptoms, less education, and unemployment. The subscales, Inappropriate Expectations and Parental Value of Corporal Punishment demonstrated poor internal consistency with Cronbach's alphas of .40 and .54, respectively. Hypothesis testing supported the construct validity of the AAPI. Bavolek's 4-factor structure was not supported. A 19-item modified version of the AAPI with three dimensions was identified. This modified version of the AAPI may provide a more efficacious tool for use with low-income single mothers.

  17. Deviant adolescent subcultures: assessment strategies and clinical interventions.

    PubMed

    Clark, C M

    1992-01-01

    Alienation is a contributing factor in adolescents' participation in Satanism, the neo-Nazi skinhead movement, and violent street gangs. Many of their needs are met by gang and/or cult affiliation, including a sense of belonging, self-worth, companionship, and excitement. Emphasizing prevention may minimize deviant subculture involvement, but some adolescents require clinical intervention, ranging from a few outpatient sessions to lengthy inpatient hospitalization. Therapists must be knowledgeable about adolescents' involvement, empathic to their circumstances, and sophisticated in the approach to treatment.

  18. Beck Anxiety Inventory: psychometric characteristics in a sample from the clinical Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Vázquez Morejón, Antonio J; Vázquez-Morejón Jiménez, Raquel; Zanin, Gloria Bellido

    2014-10-28

    Even though the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) is one of the most popular instruments to assess anxiety today, only limited data is available about its psychometric characteristics and normative values in clinical Spanish populations. A study was conducted to test the psychometric characteristics of a Spanish adaptation of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) in a sample of 918 outpatients being treated at a community mental health center in Spain. Results confirmed the adaptation's high internal consistency (∝ = .91), substantial test-retest reliability at 8-10 weeks (r = .84, p < .01), and satisfactory convergent validity with the Anxiety (r = .86, p < .01), Somatization (r = .81, p < .01), Obsessive-compulsive (r = .60, p < .01), and Phobic Anxiety (r = .63, p < .01) dimensions of the SCL-90-R, and with the Anxious Thoughts Inventory (r = .57, p < .01). Gender differences in BAI scores did occur, so normative values appear separately for each gender.

  19. Motivations for Adolescents' First Visit to a Family Planning Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Dana Belmonte; Darabi, Katherine F.

    1986-01-01

    New adolescent patients (N=150) at a large urban clinic were interviewed to determine what events or advice led to their decision to approach a family planning clinic for the first time. The roles of pregnancy scares, advice from significant others, and situational factors in motivating service use are presented. Program implications of these…

  20. Are adolescents with internet addiction prone to aggressive behavior? The mediating effect of clinical comorbidities on the predictability of aggression in adolescents with internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae-A; Gwak, Ah Reum; Park, Su Mi; Kwon, Jun-Gun; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Dai Jin; Choi, Jung-Seok

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported associations between aggression and Internet addiction disorder (IAD), which has also been linked with anxiety, depression, and impulsiveness. However, the causal relationship between aggression and IAD has thus far not been clearly demonstrated. This study was designed to (a) examine the association between aggression and IAD and (b) investigate the mediating effects of anxiety, depression, and impulsivity in cases in which IAD predicts aggression or aggression predicts IAD. A total of 714 middle school students in Seoul, South Korea, were asked to provide demographic information and complete the Young's Internet Addiction Test (Y-IAT), the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Conners-Wells Adolescent Self-Report Scale. Three groups were identified based on the Y-IAT: the usual user group (n=487, 68.2%), the high-risk group (n=191, 26.8%), and the Internet addiction group (n=13, 1.8%). The data revealed a linear association between aggression and IAD such that one variable could be predicted by the other. According to the path analysis, the clinical scales (BAI, BDI, and CASS) had partial or full mediating effects on the ability of aggression to predict IAD, but the clinical scales had no mediating effect on the ability of IAD to predict aggression. The current findings suggest that adolescents with IAD seem to have more aggressive dispositions than do normal adolescents. If more aggressive individuals are clinically prone to Internet addiction, early psychiatric intervention may contribute to the prevention of IAD.

  1. Are Adolescents with Internet Addiction Prone to Aggressive Behavior? The Mediating Effect of Clinical Comorbidities on the Predictability of Aggression in Adolescents with Internet Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae-A; Gwak, Ah Reum; Park, Su Mi; Kwon, Jun-Gun; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Kim, Jae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported associations between aggression and Internet addiction disorder (IAD), which has also been linked with anxiety, depression, and impulsiveness. However, the causal relationship between aggression and IAD has thus far not been clearly demonstrated. This study was designed to (a) examine the association between aggression and IAD and (b) investigate the mediating effects of anxiety, depression, and impulsivity in cases in which IAD predicts aggression or aggression predicts IAD. A total of 714 middle school students in Seoul, South Korea, were asked to provide demographic information and complete the Young's Internet Addiction Test (Y-IAT), the Buss–Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the State–Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Conners–Wells Adolescent Self-Report Scale. Three groups were identified based on the Y-IAT: the usual user group (n=487, 68.2%), the high-risk group (n=191, 26.8%), and the Internet addiction group (n=13, 1.8%). The data revealed a linear association between aggression and IAD such that one variable could be predicted by the other. According to the path analysis, the clinical scales (BAI, BDI, and CASS) had partial or full mediating effects on the ability of aggression to predict IAD, but the clinical scales had no mediating effect on the ability of IAD to predict aggression. The current findings suggest that adolescents with IAD seem to have more aggressive dispositions than do normal adolescents. If more aggressive individuals are clinically prone to Internet addiction, early psychiatric intervention may contribute to the prevention of IAD. PMID:25902276

  2. Gender differences, personality and eating behaviors in non-clinical adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cuzzocrea, F; Larcan, R; Lanzarone, C

    2012-12-01

    Few studies have focused on the relationship between personality trait and eating behaviors in a normal sample of adolescents. The purpose of this research was to examine differences between male and female non-clinical adolescents in eating behaviors, personality traits and state and trait anxiety and to verify the relationship between personality traits, anxiety and eating behaviors in males and females. 592 individuals (324 male and 267 females) were selected. Participants were asked to fill: Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2), State-Training Anxiety Inventory (STAI - Forma Y) and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire - Revised (EPQ-R). The results highlighted specific differences in eating behaviors and in personality traits between genders. No statistical differences in anxiety were found. Our results underline the importance of focussing on anxiety levels for girls, while, for boys, on personality traits such as neuroticism and psychoticism. It was confirmed the opinion that, to prevent eating disorders, not only is it necessary to carry out a campaign based on proper nutrition, but also to investigate thoroughly aspects of personality that may be predictive of these disorders.

  3. Clinical Correlates of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) in an Outpatient Sample of Adolescents.

    PubMed

    García-Nieto, Rebeca; Carballo, Juan J; Díaz de Neira Hernando, Mónica; de León-Martinez, Victoria; Baca-García, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents is a major public health concern. The first goal of our study was to describe the characteristics and functions of NSSI and NSSI thoughts in an adolescent outpatient sample. The second goal was to examine which clinical factors discriminate between these two groups of patients. A group of 267 subjects was recruited from the Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatric Services, Jiménez Díaz Foundation (Madrid, Spain) from November 2011 to October 2012. All participants were administered the Spanish version of the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview (SITBI). A total of 21.7% of patients reported having engaged in NSSI at least once in their lifetime. The most strongly endorsed function for NSSI was automatic negative reinforcement. In comparison with patients in the NSSI Thoughts group and the control group, patients in the NSSI group scored higher in Internalization of Anger and in all the scales comprising the Children's Depression Inventory. Our findings on the prevalence and functions of NSSI are consistent with the literature. NSSI was mainly performed for emotion regulation purposes; specifically, NSSI seems to be used to cope with anger and depression. In addition, internalization of anger might play a significant role in the maintenance of this behavior.

  4. Deviant Adolescent Subcultures: Assessment Strategies and Clinical Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Cynthia M.

    1992-01-01

    Presents assessment strategies, preventive methods, and clinical interventions to assist clinicians working with teenagers involved with deviant subcultures: Satanism, the neo-Nazi skinhead movement, and violent street gangs. Considers role of alienation as contributing factor in adolescents' participation in these subcultures. Advises therapists…

  5. Multiple Regression Analyses in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaccard, James; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Johansson, Margaret; Bouris, Alida

    2006-01-01

    A major form of data analysis in clinical child and adolescent psychology is multiple regression. This article reviews issues in the application of such methods in light of the research designs typical of this field. Issues addressed include controlling covariates, evaluation of predictor relevance, comparing predictors, analysis of moderation,…

  6. Internalizing and Externalizing Personality Dimensions and Clinical Problems in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2010-01-01

    Ostensible psychiatric comorbidity can sometimes be explained by shared relations between diagnostic constructs and higher order internalizing and externalizing dimensions. However, this possibility has not been explored with regard to comorbidity between personality pathology and other clinical constructs in adolescents. In this study,…

  7. Developing a Valid Version of an Inventory to Measure Anger in Mexican Adolescents of Middle School Level: The ML-STAXI-MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcázar-Olán, Raúl J.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Escamilla-Tecalco, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    The goals were to develop a valid version of the Multicultural Latin American Inventory of Anger Expression and Hostility (ML-STAXI) for middle school Mexican youth (ML-STAXI-MS) and to test a new Questionnaire about Anger Expression with Physical Aggression (QAEPA). Five hundred and four adolescents (258 males, 246 females); (M[subscript age] =…

  8. Ability of Substance Abusers to Escape Detection on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) in a Juvenile Correctional Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, L. A. R.; Graham, John R.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of respondents to underreport successfully on substance abuse and validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A; Butcher et al., 1992) was evaluated. Incarcerated teens (67 substance abusing, 59 non-substance abusing) completed the MMPI-A twice: once under standard instructions (SI) and once…

  9. Early Adolescence and Stress in the School Context: An Examination of the Student Stress Inventory-Stress Manifestations (SSI-SM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortuño-Sierra, Javier; Aritio-Solana, Rebeca; Chocarro de Luis, Edurne; Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Stress suffered by adolescents is often neglected. In fact, there are very few measuring instruments that have been translated into Spanish for the assessment of stress manifestations in teenagers. Method: The main purpose of this work was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Student Stress Inventory-Stress Manifestations…

  10. The Test Anxiety Inventory for Children and Adolescents (TAICA): Examination of the Psychometric Properties of a New Multidimensional Measure of Test Anxiety among Elementary and Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Patricia A.; Lee, Steven W.; Witteborg, Kristin M.; Prichard, Keri W.; Luhr, Megan E.; Cullinan, Christopher M.; Mildren, Bethany A.; Raad, Jennifer M.; Cornelius, Rebecca A.; Janik, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The Test Anxiety Inventory for Children and Adolescents (TAICA) is a new multidimensional measure used to assess test anxiety in elementary and secondary school students. The TAICA is a 45-item self-report measure consisting of a Total Test Anxiety scale, four debilitating test anxiety subscales (Cognitive Obstruction/Inattention, Physiological…

  11. Predictors of Suicide Attempts in Clinically Depressed Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ahye; Song, Jungeun; Yook, Ki-Hwan; Jon, Duk-In; Jung, Myung Hun; Hong, Narei; Hong, Hyun Ju

    2016-01-01

    We examined predictors of suicide attempts in clinically depressed adolescents in Korea and gender differences in suicidal behavior. In total, 106 adolescents diagnosed with depressive disorder were recruited in South Korea. We assessed various variables that might affect suicide attempts, and used a structured interview for the diagnosis of depression and comorbidities and to evaluate suicidality. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the subjects were compared between suicide attempt and non-suicide attempt groups and we examined significant predictors of suicide attempts. Gender differences in suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior were also analyzed. Among 106 depressed participants, 50 (47.2%) adolescents were classified in the suicide attempt group. Generally, the suicide attempt and non-suicide attempt group shared similar clinical characteristics. The suicide attempt group had more females, more major depressive disorder diagnoses, more depressive episodes, and higher suicidal ideation than the non-suicide attempt group. Suicidal ideation was the only significant predictor of suicidal attempt, regardless of gender. Higher suicidal ideation frequency scores and more non-suicidal self-injurious behaviors were shown in the female suicide attempt group than the male suicide attempt group. It is recommended that suicidal ideation be assessed regularly and managed rigorously to decrease suicide risks in depressive adolescents. PMID:27776392

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Online versus Clinic-Based CBT for Adolescent Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Susan H.; Donovan, Caroline L.; March, Sonja; Gamble, Amanda; Anderson, Renee E.; Prosser, Samantha; Kenardy, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The study examined the relative efficacy of online (NET) versus clinic (CLIN) delivery of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in the treatment of anxiety disorders in adolescents. Method: Participants included 115 clinically anxious adolescents aged 12 to 18 years and their parent(s). Adolescents were randomly assigned to NET, CLIN, or…

  13. The Psychopathological Influence of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in Korean Male : An Analysis of Multiphasic Personal Inventory Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Shim, Yu Shik; Park, Hyeong-chun; Park, Chong Oon; Lee, Myoung Seok

    2013-01-01

    Objective There are few published studies which have documented psychopathological abnormalities in patients with of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychopathological influence of AIS in Korean 19-year-old males. Methods The authors compared the Korean military multiphasic personal inventory (KMPI) military profiles of 105 AIS cases (more than 10 degrees of Cobb's angle without surgical treatment) with the KMPI profiles of 108 normal controls. The AIS group was split depending on Cobb's angle to further evaluate this relation by the severity of AIS. Results A significantly decreased result on the faking-good response scale and an significantly increased result on the faking-bad response were observed in the AIS group compared to the control (p<0.012). The neurosis scale results, including anxiety, depression and somatization symptoms, were significantly increased in the AIS group compared to the control (p<0.010). The severity level of personality disorder and schizophrenia were also significantly increased in the AIS group (p<0.010). Differences in KMPI scale scores were not related to the severity of AIS. Conclusion Young males with AIS tend to have abnormal results on the multiphasic personal inventory test compared to normal volunteers, suggesting that AIS may be related to psychopathology in the young male group in Korea. Although these psychopathology in AIS were differently observed compared to normal controls, but not interfered with military life. Clinicians are recommended to pay attention the psychopathological traits of patients with AIS. PMID:23440382

  14. Brief Report: The Identity Style Inventory--Validation in Italian Adolescents and College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Rubini, Monica; Berzonsky, Michael D.; Meeus, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the factor structure and convergent validity of an Italian translation of the Identity Style Inventory (ISI). Confirmatory factor analyses revealed a clear three-factor structure of identity style and a mono-factor structure of commitment, not only in the overall sample, but also in gender and age…

  15. Genomic analysis and clinical management of adolescent cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Rabbie, Roy; Rashid, Mamun; Arance, Ana M; Sánchez, Marcelo; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Potrony, Miriam; Conill, Carles; van Doorn, Remco; Dentro, Stefan; Gruis, Nellele A; Corrie, Pippa; Iyer, Vivek; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Puig-Butille, Joan A; Puig, Susana; Adams, David J

    2017-01-17

    Melanoma in young children is rare, however its incidence in adolescents and young adults is rising. We describe the clinical course of a 15-year-old female diagnosed with AJCC stage IB non-ulcerated primary melanoma, who died from metastatic disease four years after diagnosis despite three lines of modern systemic therapy. We also present the complete genomic profile of her tumour and compare this to a further series of 13 adolescent melanomas, and 275 adult cutaneous melanomas. A somatic BRAF(V)(600E) mutation and a high mutational load equivalent to that found in adult melanoma, and composed primarily of C>T mutations was observed. A germline genomic analysis alongside a series of 23 children and adolescents with melanoma revealed no mutations in known germline melanoma-predisposition genes. Adolescent melanomas appear to have genomes that are as complex as those arising in adulthood, and their clinical course can, as with adults, be unpredictable. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Validity and reliability of the Very Short form of the Physical Self-Inventory among Turkish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aşçi, F Hülya; Maïano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J S; Çağlar, Emine; Bilgili, Naile

    2016-11-25

    The study aimed to test the validity and reliability of the Very Short form of the Physical Self-Inventory (PSI-VS) among a sample of 635 Turkish adolescents. These adolescents have completed the 12 original items of the PSI-VS, plus a positively worded reformulation of the single reverse-keyed item of the physical attractiveness subscale. A series of confirmatory factor analyses was used to examine the psychometric properties of the original and modified versions of the PSI-VS. Findings revealed superior psychometric properties with the modified version than with the original set of items. The modified version was thus subsequently used to examine its factor structure invariance across sexes, age groups and sport practice involvement. Results not only report that this version was fully invariant across, but also that latent means were significantly different across sexes and sport practice involvement. In sum, the Turkish modified version of the PSI-VS presents acceptable psychometric properties and may be used to repeatedly and/or intensively assess participants' physical self-perceptions in the context of sport and exercise interventions.

  17. Clinical utility of autism spectrum disorder scoring algorithms for the child symptom inventory-4.

    PubMed

    Gadow, Kenneth D; Schwartz, Joseph; Devincent, Carla; Strong, Greg; Cuva, Simone

    2008-03-01

    Few studies examine the clinical utility of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) rating scales for screening referrals to child psychiatry clinics. Parents/teachers from Long Island, NY, completed the Child Symptom Inventory-4, a DSM-IV-referenced rating scale for 6- to 12-year-old clinical referrals with an ASD (N = 317) or nonASD psychiatric (N = 191) diagnosis. Two separate groups of children attending public school, regular education classes in the same geographic area were also rated by their parents (N = 446) and teachers (N = 464). Stepwise forward regression generated a scoring algorithm based on a subset of all CSI-4 items that best differentiated ASD from nonASD children. ROC analyses indicated high levels of sensitivity/specificity for recommended ASD cutoff scores for parent and teacher ratings.

  18. Altruistic reasoning in adolescent-parent dyads considering participation in a hypothetical sexual health clinical trial for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Noé Rubén; Williams, Camille Y; Ipp, Lisa S; Catallozzi, Marina; Rosenthal, Susan L; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki

    2016-04-01

    Altruism is a well-established reason underlying research participation. Less is known about altruism in adolescent-parent decision-making about clinical trials enrolling healthy adolescents. This qualitative investigation focused on identifying spontaneous statements of altruism within adolescent-parent (dyadic) discussions of participation in a hypothetical phase I clinical trial related to adolescent sexual health. Content analysis revealed several response patterns to each other's altruistic reasoning. Across 70 adolescent-parent dyads in which adolescents were 14-17 years of age and 91% of their parents were mothers, a majority (61%) of dyadic discussions included a statement reflecting altruism. Parents responded to adolescents' statements of altruism more frequently than adolescents responded to parents' statements. Responses included: expresses concern, reiterates altruistic reasoning, agrees with altruistic reasoning, and adds to/expands altruistic reasoning. Since an altruistic perspective was often balanced with concerns about risk or study procedures, researchers cannot assume that altruism will directly lead to study participation. Optimizing the informed consent process for early phase clinical trials involving healthy adolescents may include supporting parents to have conversations with their adolescents which will enhance their capacity to consider all aspects of trial participation.

  19. Adolescent Attitudes toward Psychiatric Medication: The Utility of the Drug Attitude Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Lisa; Floersch, Jerry; Findling, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite the effectiveness of psychotropic treatment for alleviating symptoms of psychiatric disorders, youth adherence to psychotropic medication regimens is low. Adolescent adherence rates range from 10-80% (Swanson, 2003; Cromer & Tarnowski, 1989; Lloyd et al., 1998; Brown, Borden, and Clingerman, 1985; Sleator, 1985) depending on…

  20. Multiple regression analyses in clinical child and adolescent psychology.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, James; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Johansson, Margaret; Bouris, Alida

    2006-09-01

    A major form of data analysis in clinical child and adolescent psychology is multiple regression. This article reviews issues in the application of such methods in light of the research designs typical of this field. Issues addressed include controlling covariates, evaluation of predictor relevance, comparing predictors, analysis of moderation, analysis of mediation, assumption violations, outliers, limited dependent variables, and directed regression and its relation to structural equation modeling. Analytic guidelines are provided within each domain.

  1. Clinical Issues in Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Notes that psychopharmacologists have made considerable strides in establishing safety and efficacy of psychotropic drug therapy for childhood behavior disorders. Discusses controversy pertaining to appropriateness of medication or inadequacies of clinical management. Presents brief overview of the safety and efficacy of psychotropic drugs and the…

  2. Hypermentalizing, Attachment, and Epistemic Trust in Adolescent BPD: Clinical Illustrations.

    PubMed

    Bo, Sune; Sharp, Carla; Fonagy, Peter; Kongerslev, Mickey

    2015-12-21

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been shown to be a valid and reliable diagnosis in adolescents and associated with a decrease in both general and social functioning. With evidence linking BPD in adolescents to poor prognosis, it is important to develop a better understanding of factors and mechanisms contributing to the development of BPD. This could potentially enhance our knowledge and facilitate the design of novel treatment programs and interventions for this group. In this paper, we outline a theoretical model of BPD in adolescents linking the original mentalization-based theory of BPD, with recent extensions of the theory that focuses on hypermentalizing and epistemic trust. We then provide clinical case vignettes to illustrate this extended theoretical model of BPD. Furthermore, we suggest a treatment approach to BPD in adolescents that focuses on the reduction of hypermentalizing and epistemic mistrust. We conclude with an integration of theory and practice in the final section of the paper and make recommendations for future work in this area. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. Psychopathic-like traits in detained adolescents: clinical usefulness of self-report.

    PubMed

    Vahl, Pauline; Colins, Olivier F; Lodewijks, Henny P B; Markus, Monica T; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Vermeiren, Robert R J M

    2014-08-01

    Studies have demonstrated that self-report tools can be used to reliably and validly examine psychopathic-like traits in adolescents. However, it is unclear if self-report instruments are still reliable and valid when confidentiality cannot be guaranteed, such as during routine assessments in juvenile detention centres. To address this issue, the current study used data from the routine mental health screening of 365 detained male adolescents (12-18 years) in two juvenile detention centres. With the intention of gaining insight in the clinical usefulness of self-reported psychopathic-like traits, we examined relations known from literature with emotional and behavioural features. Self-reported psychopathic-like traits, measured by the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Short version (YPI-S), were uniquely associated with substance abuse, anger/irritability, conduct problems and hyperactivity, but not with internalizing problems. YPI-S-dimensions showed several specific relationships with variables of interest. For example, only the callous unemotional dimension was negatively related with prosocial behaviour and only the behavioural dimension was positively related with hyperactivity. In conclusion, self-reported psychopathic-like traits showed expected relations with relevant variables. These findings suggest that self-report can be used to identify detained youths with high levels of psychopathic-like traits outside a research context, thus, even when anonymity and confidentiality are not guaranteed.

  4. Altruistic reasoning in adolescent-parent dyads considering participation in a hypothetical sexual health clinical trial for adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, Noé Rubén; Williams, Camille Y; Ipp, Lisa S; Catallozzi, Marina; Rosenthal, Susan L; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki

    2014-01-01

    Altruism is a well-established reason underlying research participation. Less is known about altruism in adolescent-parent decision-making about clinical trials enrolling healthy adolescents. This qualitative investigation focused on identifying spontaneous statements of altruism within adolescent-parent (dyadic) discussions of participation in a hypothetical phase I clinical trial related to adolescent sexual health. Content analysis revealed several response patterns to each other’s altruistic reasoning. Across 70 adolescent-parent dyads in which adolescents were 14–17 years of age and 91% of their parents were mothers, a majority (61%) of dyadic discussions included a statement reflecting altruism. Parents responded to adolescents’ statements of altruism more frequently than adolescents responded to parents’ statements. Responses included: expresses concern, reiterates altruistic reasoning, agrees with altruistic reasoning, and adds to/expands altruistic reasoning. Since an altruistic perspective was often balanced with concerns about risk or study procedures, researchers cannot assume that altruism will directly lead to study participation. Optimizing the informed consent process for early phase clinical trials involving healthy adolescents may include supporting parents to have conversations with their adolescents which will enhance their capacity to consider all aspects of trial participation. PMID:27019669

  5. An Update on the Clinical Utility of the Children's Post-Traumatic Cognitions Inventory.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Anna; Smith, Patrick; Bryant, Richard; Salmon, Karen; Yule, William; Dalgleish, Tim; Dixon, Clare; Nixon, Reginald D V; Meiser-Stedman, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The Children's Post-Traumatic Cognitions Inventory (CPTCI) is a self-report questionnaire that measures maladaptive cognitions in children and young people following exposure to trauma. In this study, the psychometric properties of the CPTCI were examined in further detail with the objective of furthering its utility as a clinical tool. Specifically, we investigated the CPTCI's discriminant validity, test-retest reliability, and the potential for the development of a short form of the measure. Three samples (London, East Anglia, Australia) of children and young people exposed to trauma (N = 535; 7-17 years old) completed the CPTCI and a structured clinical interview to measure posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms between 1 and 6 months following trauma. Test-retest reliability was investigated in a subsample of 203 cases. The results showed that a score in the range of 46 to 48 on the CPTCI was indicative of clinically significant appraisals as determined by the presence of PTSD. The measure also had moderate-to-high test-retest reliability (r = .78) over a 2-month period. The Children's Post-Traumatic Cognitions Inventory-Short Form (CPTCI-S) had excellent internal consistency (α = .92), and moderate-to-high test-retest reliability (r = .78). The examination of construct validity showed the model had an excellent fitting factor structure (Comparative Fit index = 0.95, Tucker-Lewis index = 0.91, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation = .07). A score ranging from 16 to 18 was the best cutoff point on the CPTCI-S, in that it was indicative of clinically significant appraisals as determined by the presence of PTSD. Based on these results, we concluded that the CPTCI is a useful tool to support the practice of clinicians and that the CPTCI-S has excellent psychometric properties.

  6. Clinical Effectiveness and Changes in Care Utilization Derived from a Military Adolescent Multi-Disciplinary Headache Clinic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-07

    clinics. Chronic headaches within the adolescent population have ben shown to have great morbidity on patient lives, including but no limited to missed...school/work days, and loss of parental work time getting to appointments. Some studies have been completed regarding chronic adolescent headaches, but at...this time nothing has been published regarding multi-disciplinary chronic headache clinics for adolescent children of military personnel. The purpose

  7. Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Other Clinically Significant Body Image Concerns in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyl, Jennifer; Kittler, Jennifer; Phillips, Katharine A.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study assessed prevalence and clinical correlates of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), eating disorders (ED), and other clinically significant body image concerns in 208 consecutively admitted adolescent inpatients. It was hypothesized that adolescents with BDD would have higher levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality.…

  8. Adolescents with Special Needs: Clinical Challenges in Reproductive Health Care.

    PubMed

    Quint, Elisabeth H

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents with special needs have unique reproductive health care needs related to their physical and cognitive issues. This review discusses some of the most common concerns that are encountered in clinical practice, as the clinician will partner with the adolescent and her family to guide her through the pubertal transition and to help navigate the risks and rights of reproduction. Families often seek anticipatory guidance before menarche on menstrual hygiene, abuse risk and sexuality and can be reassured that most teens with special needs do very well with menstruation. The clinician needs to evaluate the teenager's reproductive knowledge as well her risk for abuse and coercion and her ability to consent to sexual activity, if she requests contraception. Menstrual management is mostly based on the impact of the menstrual cycles on the teenager's life and activities. The adolescents may have a decreased ability to tolerate menses or pain, or experience changes in seizure pattern or altered mood. Hormonal treatment is often used to assist with menstrual hygiene, cyclical mood changes or dysmenorrhea. The goal of treatment can be complete amenorrhea, alleviate pain or regulate and decrease menstrual flow. The unique risks and benefits of hormonal treatment for this special population are highlighted.

  9. [Fatty liver and its clinical management in obese adolescents].

    PubMed

    González Jiménez, Emilio; Schmidt Río-Valle, Jacqueline; Álvarez Ferre, Judit

    2011-01-01

    Liver steatosis, also called non-alcoholic fatty liver, is characterized by a pathological fat accumulation in the liver, leading to liver damage in the form of inflammation and fibrosis. These histological features are similar to those in alcoholic hepatitis. Obesity is known to be the most common cause of simple steatosis in the preadolescent and adolescent population with a consequent serious health risk. The aim of this study was to provide an update on the concepts, pathophysiology and clinical management of hepatic steatosis secondary to obesity at an early age.

  10. Psychometric Characteristics of the Postconcussion Symptom Inventory in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sady, Maegan D.; Vaughan, Christopher G.; Gioia, Gerard A.

    2014-01-01

    Psychometric characteristics of the Postconcussion Symptom Inventory (PCSI) were examined in both concussed (n = 633) and uninjured (n = 1,273) 5 to 18 year olds. Parent- and self-report forms were created with developmentally appropriate wording and content. Factor analyses identified physical, cognitive, emotional, and sleep factors; that did not load strongly or discriminate between groups were eliminated. Internal consistency was strong for the total scales (α = 0.8–0.9). Test–retest reliability for the self-report forms was moderate to strong (intraclass coeffecients, ICCs = 0.65–0.89). Parent and self-report concordance was moderate (r = .44–.65), underscoring the importance of both perspectives. Convergent validity with another symptom measure was good (r = .8). Classification analyses indicated greater discriminability from parent report, but caveats to this are presented. With strong psychometric characteristics, the four versions of the PCSI capture important postconcussion symptoms and can be utilized to track recovery from pediatric concussion and guide treatment recommendations. PMID:24739735

  11. Adolescent Medication Misuse: Results from the MUSC Inventory of Medication Experiences (MIME)

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A. Lee; Klintworth, Erin M.; Hinton, Jessica O.; Gray, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To survey a diverse high school population on current prescription and over-the-counter medication misuse behaviors and attitudes. Methods We administered the MUSC Inventory of Medication Experiences (MIME), a newly developed self-report instrument, in demographically diverse high schools in Charleston, SC, to assess the feasibility of its administration and determine characteristics associated with medication misuse among high school students. Results A total of 3182 students completed the MIME (93% completion rate). Nearly one-third (31%) reported misuse of a medication more than once a month. Analysis was conducted to evaluate associations between misuse and age (<15=33%, 15=32%, 16=33%, 17=30%, 18=26%, >18=34%; p=.35), grade (9=29%, 10=32%, 11=33%, 12=30%; p=.22), race (White 34%, African-American 26%, others 30%; p<.001), gender (M=32%, F=28%; p=.01), parent/guardian level of education (college=30%; p=.12), if a participant was prescribed medication (yes=46%, no=21%; p<.001), if a family member was prescribed medication (yes=40%, no=26%; p<.001), and if a family member had ever offered their prescribed medication to the student (yes=91%, no=29%; p<.001). Conclusion Medication misuse may be more pervasive than originally thought, with a notably high level among those most familiar with medications. PMID:24772383

  12. The Diagnosis of Personality Disorder: A Comparison of MMPI Profile, Millon Inventory, and Clinical Judgment in a Workers' Compensation Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repko, Glenn R.; Cooper, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Investigated information derived from a group of 100 workers' compensation cases and used clinical opinion and psychological testing to determine the presence and nature of personality disorder diagnosis. Significant differences were found on both the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and the Millon among the diagnostic groups of…

  13. The clinical usefulness of the new LPE specifier for subtyping adolescents with conduct disorder in the DSM 5.

    PubMed

    Jambroes, Tijs; Jansen, Lucres M C; Vermeiren, Robert R J M; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Colins, Olivier F; Popma, Arne

    2016-08-01

    In DSM 5, conduct disorder (CD) has been expanded with a new specifier 'with Limited Prosocial Emotions' (LPE) in addition to the age-of-onset (AoO) subtyping, and is thought to identify a severe antisocial subgroup of CD. However, research in clinical practice has been scarce. Therefore, the current study will examine differences in clinical symptoms between subtypes of CD, based on both subtyping schemes. Subsequently, it will investigate whether the LPE specifier explains unique variance in aggression, added to the AoO subtyping. A sample of 145 adolescents with CD (51 % male, mean age 15.0) from a closed treatment institution participated in this study. CD diagnoses and AoO subtype were assessed using a structured diagnostic interview. The LPE specifier was assessed using the callous-unemotional dimension of the Youth Psychopathy Traits Inventory (YPI). Self-reported proactive and reactive aggression, rule-breaking behavior and internalizing problems within the subtypes were compared. Youth with childhood-onset CD and LPE showed significantly more aggression than adolescent-onset CD without LPE (proactive aggression: F = 3.1, p < 0.05, reactive aggression: F = 3.7, p < 0.05). Hierarchical regression revealed that the LPE specifier uniquely explained 7 % of the variance in reactive aggression, additionally to the AoO subtyping. For proactive aggression, the interaction between AoO and the LPE added 4.5 % to the explained variance. Although the LPE specifier may help to identify a more aggressive subtype of CD in adolescents, the incremental utility seems to be limited. Therefore, clinical relevance of the LPE specifier in high-risk adolescent samples still needs to be investigated thoroughly.

  14. Children's Views Matter Too! A Pilot Project Assessing Children's and Adolescents' Experiences of Clinical Psychology Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael; Russo, Kate

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study explored the experiences and understanding of clinical psychology practices and services of children and adolescents attending clinical psychology outpatient appointments. Fifteen young participants took part in the study. A content analysis indicated that young children and adolescents have an appropriate understanding of the…

  15. Quantifying peer interactions for research and clinical use: the Manchester Inventory for Playground Observation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Jenny; Hussain, Jamilla; Holsgrove, Samina; Adams, Catherine; Green, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Direct observation of peer relating is potentially a sensitive and ecologically valid measure of child social functioning, but there has been a lack of standardised methods. The Manchester Inventory for Playground Observation (MIPO) was developed as a practical yet rigorous assessment of this kind for 5-11 year olds. We report on the initial reliability and validity of the MIPO and its ability to distinguish social impairments within different psychopathologies. We observed 144 clinically referred children aged 5;00-11;11 (mean 8.8) years with Externalising (n = 44), Internalising (n = 19), Autism Spectrum Disorders (n = 39) or Specific Language Impairment (n = 42), and 44 class-controls, in naturalistic playground interaction. Observers, blind to clinical diagnosis, completed the MIPO and the teacher checklist from the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS). MIPO items showed high internal consistency (alpha = .924; all 'alpha if item deleted' values>.91), inter-observer reliability (mean κ(w) = .77) and test-retest stability (over 2 weeks; mean κ(w) = .58). MIPO totals showed convergence with SSRS (n = 68, r(s) = .78, p<.01) and excellent discrimination between case and control (sensitivity = 0.75 and specificity = 0.88, AUC = .897). Externalising, Autistic Spectrum and Language Impaired groups showed distinct profiles of MIPO impairment consistent with theory:Internalising disorders less so. 65.3% of clinical cases were classified accurately for primary diagnosis. The MIPO shows reliability and validity as a measure of children's social functioning relevant in developmental research and as a clinical tool to aid differential diagnosis and intervention planning.

  16. Comorbid psychopathology and clinical symptomatology in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, D C; Korlou, S; Sakellariou, K; Kondyli, V; Sarafidou, J; Tsakanikos, E; Giannakopoulos, G; Liakopoulou, M

    2016-01-01

    Comorbid psychopathology in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been investigated in a number of studies over the last twenty years. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenomenology of illness and broader psychopathology in a group of Greek children and adolescents with OCD. The investigation of parental psychopathology in children and adolescents with OCD was a secondary aim of the present study. We studied 31 children and adolescents with OCD (n=31, age range 8-15 years) and their parents (n=62, age range 43-48 years) and compared to children and adolescents with specific reading and written expression learning disorders (n=30, age range 7-16 years) and their parents (n=58, age range 40-46 years). Appropriate testing showed specific reading and learning disorders, which were of mild to moderate severity for the 85% of this latter group. The diagnosis of learning disorder of reading and written expression was made through the use of standardized reading material, appropriate for ages 10-15 years. Reading comprehension and narration were tested. The written expression (spelling, syntax, content) was examined by a written text, in which the subject developed a certain theme from the reading material. Based on their level of education and occupation, the index families were classified as high (29%), average (45%) and low (26%) socioeconomic status, whereas 6.7% of control families belonged to high, 63.3% to average, and 30% to low status. In order to investigate psychopathology, the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children, Present and Life-time version was administered to children and their parents, as well as the Child Behavior Checklist 4/18 (CBCL) to both parents and adolescents (Youth Self-Report). Also the Yale- Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) was rated for both children and parents. Moreover, the children were given the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and the

  17. Triarchic dimensions of psychopathy in young adulthood: Associations with clinical and physiological measures after accounting for adolescent psychopathic traits.

    PubMed

    Kyranides, Melina Nicole; Fanti, Kostas A; Sikki, Maria; Patrick, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    This study examined associations of psychopathy facets of boldness, meanness, and disinhibition with clinically relevant variables and physiological reactivity to affective stimuli. These associations were examined after accounting for developmental associations with adolescent psychopathic traits, namely callous-unemotional traits, narcissism, and impulsivity. Psychopathic traits were assessed during adolescence using the Antisocial Process Screening Device and the Inventory of Callous Unemotional traits and during young adulthood via the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure. Clinical variables (N = 99, Mage = 15.91, 53% female), as well as affective and physiological responses (heart rate, skin conductance, startle modulation) to violent and erotic videos (N = 88, Mage = 19.92, 50% female) were also assessed during adulthood. After accounting for adolescent psychopathic traits, boldness was associated with high cognitive reappraisal and low anxiety, fear, and hostility, and meanness was related to callous-unemotional traits, hostility, less sympathy to victims, and less use of cognitive reappraisal. Disinhibition, by contrast, was associated with impulsivity, increased anxiety, and hostile and aggressive tendencies, as well as conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder symptoms, and cognitive suppression. In addition, evidence was found for different physiological measures operating as biological indicators of these distinctive dimensions, with reduced resting heart rate and cardiac reactivity to violent stimuli indicative of boldness, above and beyond adolescent psychopathic traits, and low startle potentiation for violent stimuli indicative of callous-unemotional traits and meanness. These findings provide evidence for the value of a multidomain approach for clarifying neurobiological mechanisms of psychopathic tendencies that can inform prevention and treatment efforts. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for ADHD in Adolescents: Clinical Considerations and a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Sprich, Susan E.; Burbridge, Jennifer; Lerner, Jonathan A.; Safren, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Although ADHD in adolescents is an impairing and prevalent condition, with community prevalence estimates between 2% and 6%, psychosocial treatments for adolescents compared to younger children are relatively understudied. Our group has successfully developed an evidence base for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for ADHD in medication-treated adults with ADHD with clinically significant symptoms. In the current paper, we describe an adaptation of this treatment to adolescents, and provide case reports on 3 adolescents who participated in an open pilot trial. The results suggest that the treatment approach was well tolerated by the adolescents and that they experienced clinical benefit. This early report of the approach in adolescents is promising and requires further efficacy testing. PMID:27616874

  19. "Youth friendly" clinics: considerations for linking and engaging HIV-infected adolescents into care.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Amanda E; Philbin, Morgan M; Duval, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2014-02-01

    Linkage and engagement in care are critical corollaries to the health of HIV-infected adolescents. The adolescent HIV epidemic and adolescents' unique barriers to care necessitates innovation in the provision of care, including the consideration of the clinical experience. Little research has addressed how "youth friendly" clinics may influence care retention for HIV-infected youth. We conducted 124 interviews with providers, outreach workers, and case managers, at 15 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network clinics. Photographs of each clinic documented the characteristics of the physical space. Constant comparison and content and visual narrative methods were utilized for data analysis. Three elements of youth friendliness were identified for clinics serving HIV-infected youth, including: (1) role of target population (e.g., pediatric, adolescent, HIV); (2) clinics' physical environment; and (3) clinics' social environment. Working to create 'youth friendly' clinics through changes in physical (e.g., space, entertainment, and educational materials) and social (e.g., staff training related to development, gender, sexual orientation) environments may help reduce HIV-infected adolescents' unique barriers to care engagement. The integration of clinic design and staff training within the organization of a clinical program is helpful in meeting the specialized needs of HIV-infected youth.

  20. Low Back Pain in Children and Adolescents: an Algorithmic Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kordi, Ramin; Rostami, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is common among children and adolescents. In younger children particularly those under 3, LBP should be considered as an alarming sign for more serious underlying pathologies. However, similar to adults, non specific low back pain is the most common type of LBP among children and adolescents. In this article, a clinical algorithmic approach to LBP in children and adolescents is presented. PMID:23056800

  1. Interpersonal Theory and Adolescents with Depression: Clinical Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellin, Elizabeth A.; Beamish, Patricia M.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides mental health counselors with information about the prevalence and course of adolescent depression, other empirically tested treatments for adolescent depression, an explanation of Interpersonal psychotherapy for adolescents (IPT-A) treatment protocol, and results of outcome studies on the effectiveness of IPT-A. Suggestions…

  2. Clinical and diagnostic characteristics of hyperprolactinemia in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Catli, Gonul; Abaci, Ayhan; Bober, Ece; Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenoma is the most common cause of hyperprolactinemia, which is a rare endocrine disorder encountered in pediatric patient care. Epidemiological and clinical information about hyperprolactinemia in childhood and adolescence is limited. Clinical signs of hyperprolactinemia are very heterogeneous. In girls, disturbances in menstrual function and galactorrhea may be seen, whereas in boys, headache, visual disturbances, delayed pubertal development and hypogonadism are often present. Owing to the ease of ordering a serum prolactin measurement, an evidence-based, cost-effective approach to the management of this endocrine disorder is required. Before a diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia is made, drug use, renal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, and parasellar tumors should be excluded. The main objectives of treatment are normalization of prolactin level, adenoma shrinkage, and recovery from clinical signs related to hyperprolactinemia. In patients with microadenoma, invasive or non-invasive macroadenoma, and even in patients with visual field defects, dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment. Surgical treatment is indicated in patients who are unresponsive or intolerant to medical treatment or who have persistent neurological signs. Radiotherapy should be considered as a supportive treatment for patients in whom surgery fails or medical response is not achieved.

  3. Neuropsychological and Clinical Profiles of Children and Adolescents Diagnosed with Childhood Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    BAYKAL, Saliha; KARABEKİROĞLU, Koray; ŞENSES, Ahmet; KARAKURT, Melih Nuri; ÇALIK, Tülay; YÜCE, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The differential features of childhood-onset obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) compared to adult-onset OCD are being more of a focus of attention in recent years. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and neuropsychological profiles of children and adolescents diagnosed with childhood-onset OCD and to investigate the association between the duration, severity, comorbidity, and family history of the disorder and clinical and neuropsychological functional impairments. Methods Thirty-five OCD patients (patient group) and 35 healthy control subjects (control group) between 8–15 years of age were included. To investigate the neuropsychological profiles, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Test, and Continuous Performance Test (CPT) were applied. To assess the clinical and behavioral profiles, the Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI), Conner’s Parent Rating Scale (CPRS-48), and the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YB-OCS) and Yale Global Tic Severity Rating Scale (YGTSRS) were given. Results Based on the performance in the WCST, Stroop Test, and SPT, the results of the study reveal that childhood-onset OCD patients have statistically significant worse performance compared to healthy controls in terms of executive functions, sustained attention, and motor inhibition tasks. Excluding the comorbid diagnoses, childhood-onset OCD patients did not show a difference in behavioral problems, but they had higher levels of anxiety compared to healthy controls. Conclusion The findings of this study reveal that independent of the duration, severity, comorbid problems, and anxiety levels, the disorder itself is associated with worse performance in executive functions, attention, and motor inhibition processes, and a positive family history of OCD is an important risk factor. Long-term follow-up studies with patients diagnosed with childhood-onset OCD would be a logical next step in order to determine the cause-effect relation

  4. Feasibility of Attachment Based Family Therapy for depressed clinic-referred Norwegian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Israel, Pravin; Diamond, Guy S

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have earned Attachment Based Family Therapy (ABFT) the designation of a promising empirically supported treatment for adolescents with depression. This study evaluated the feasibility of importing ABFT into a hospital-based outpatient clinic in Norway. This article documents the challenges of initiating and conducting research in a real world clinical setting and training staff therapists. It also reports on outcomes of a pilot randomized clinical trial. Implementation barriers rapidly emerged in relation to hospital administration, infrastructure development, and therapists. Despite these barriers, 20 clinic-referred adolescents were randomly assigned to ABFT (n= 11) or to Treatment as Usual (TAU) (n= 9). Adolescents in ABFT showed significantly better symptom reduction compared to adolescents in TAU with an effect size of 1.08. While preliminary, this study suggests that Norwegian clinical staff therapists could be engaged in learning and delivering ABFT, and in producing promising treatment results. The importance of institutional support for dissemination research is highlighted.

  5. Characteristics of Patients Visiting the Child & Adolescent Psychiatric Clinic: A 26-Year Study from North India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malhotra, Savita; Biswas, Parthasarathy; Sharan, Pratap; Grover, Sandeep

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study the sociodemographic and clinical profile of patients, who presented to the child and adolescent psychiatric services of a tertiary care centre over a 26-year period (1980-2005). Methodology: Data were abstracted retrospectively from detailed work up files of all subjects assessed in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) Clinic…

  6. The Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Demographic and Clinical Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    n/a; n/a

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study is a multicenter, randomized clinical trial sponsored by the NIMH. This study is designed to evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of four treatments for adolescents with major depressive disorder: fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, their combination, and, acutely,…

  7. Prevalence and Clinical Correlates of Deliberate Self-Harm among a Community Sample of Italian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerutti, R.; Manca, M.; Presaghi, F.; Gratz, Kim L.

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the rates of deliberate self-harm (DSH) behavior among an Italian adolescent sample, as well as to explore its clinical correlates. On a sample of 234 adolescents in Italian secondary schools (Mean age = 16.47; SD = 1.7) were assessed the DSH as well as externalizing symptoms (including both conduct…

  8. MMPI Profiles of Rheumatic Fever Adolescents and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stehbens, James A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Showed that Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) scores for adolescent and adult victims of rheumatic fever (N=162) were generally lower than Mayo Clinic norms. Significant age effects confirm findings that adolescents score higher on the MMPI. Found patients without carditis scored higher than carditis patients, contrary to…

  9. The Relationship between the Use of Health Clinics in Rural Mississippi Schools and the CHIP-AE Adolescent Health Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradford, Judith Young; O'Sullivan, Patricia S.

    2007-01-01

    School health clinics are one way to meet the objectives in "Healthy People 2010" for adolescent health. To determine the relationship between adolescent health status and use of the school health clinics in four Mississippi high schools, the Child Health and Illness Profile-Adolescent Edition (CHIP-AE) was used. The CHIP-AE identifies…

  10. School Anxiety Inventory-Short Version: Factorial Invariance and Latent Mean Differences Across Gender and Age in Spanish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingles, Candido J.; Garcia-Fernandez, Jose M.; Marzo, Juan C.; Martinez-Monteagudo, Maria C.; Estevez, Estefania

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the factorial invariance and latent mean differences of the School Anxiety Inventory-Short Version across gender and age groups for 2,367 Spanish students, ranging in age from 12 to 18 years. Configural and measurement invariance were found across gender and age samples for all dimensions of the School Anxiety Inventory-Short…

  11. Confirmatory factor analytic investigation of variance composition, gender invariance, and validity of the Male Role Norms Inventory-Adolescent-revised (MRNI-A-r).

    PubMed

    Levant, Ronald F; McDermott, Ryon C; Hewitt, Amber A; Alto, Kathleen M; Harris, Kyle T

    2016-10-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis of responses to the Male Role Norms Inventory-Adolescent-revised (MRNI-A-r) from 384 middle school students (163 boys, 221 girls) indicated that the best fit to the data was a bifactor model incorporating the hypothesized 3-factor structure while explicitly modeling an additional, general factor. Specifically, each item-level indicator loaded simultaneously on 2 factors: a general traditional masculinity ideology factor and a specific factor corresponding to 1 of the 3 hypothesized masculine norms for adolescents: Emotionally Detached Dominance, Toughness, and Avoidance of Femininity. Invariance testing across gender supported metric invariance for the general factor only. Although item loadings on the general factor were similar across boys and girls, the specific factor loadings varied substantially, with many becoming nonsignificant in the presence of the general factor for girls. A structural regression analysis predicting latent variables of the Meanings of Adolescent Masculinity Scale (MAMS), the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, and the Discipline, School Difficulties, and Positive Behavior Scale (DSDPBS) indicated that the general factor was a strong predictor of MAMS for both genders and DSDPBS for girls. Findings indicate that the MRNI-A-r general factor is a valid and reliable indicator of overall internalization of traditional masculinity ideology in adolescents; however, the specific factors may have different meanings for boys as compared with girls and lack validity in the presence of the general factor. These findings are consistent with a developmental perspective of gender ideology that views adolescence as a time when a differentiated cognitive schema of masculine norms is beginning to develop. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Evidence based clinical assessment of child and adolescent social phobia: a critical review of rating scales.

    PubMed

    Tulbure, Bogdan T; Szentagotai, Aurora; Dobrean, Anca; David, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Investigating the empirical support of various assessment instruments, the evidence based assessment approach expands the scientific basis of psychotherapy. Starting from Hunsley and Mash's evaluative framework, we critically reviewed the rating scales designed to measure social anxiety or phobia in youth. Thirteen of the most researched social anxiety scales for children and adolescents were identified. An overview about the scientific support accumulated by these scales is offered. Our main results are consistent with recent reviews that consider the Social Phobia and Anxiety Scale for Children (SPAI-C) and the Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents (SAS-A) among the most pertinent and empirically supported measures of social anxiety for youngsters. However, after considering the existing evidence, we highly recommend another couple of scales that proved to be empirically supported (i.e., the Social Phobia Inventory-SPIN, and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale for Children and Adolescents-LSAS-CA).

  13. Mind-Body Practices and the Adolescent Brain: Clinical Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anup; Newberg, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    Background Mind-Body practices constitute a large and diverse group of practices that can substantially affect neurophysiology in both healthy individuals and those with various psychiatric disorders. In spite of the growing literature on the clinical and physiological effects of mind-body practices, very little is known about their impact on central nervous system (CNS) structure and function in adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Method This overview highlights findings in a select group of mind-body practices including yoga postures, yoga breathing techniques and meditation practices. Results Mind-body practices offer novel therapeutic approaches for adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Findings from these studies provide insights into the design and implementation of neuroimaging studies for adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Conclusions Clinical neuroimaging studies will be critical in understanding how different practices affect disease pathogenesis and symptomatology in adolescents. Neuroimaging of mind-body practices on adolescents with psychiatric disorders will certainly be an open and exciting area of investigation. PMID:27347478

  14. Clinical Profile of the Adolescent/Adult Fontan Survivor

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Nancy A.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Doering, Lynn V.; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Lewis, Alan B.; Child, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The study aims to describe the clinical profile of the adult Fontan survivor and identify the worries, symptoms, and the impact of cardiac surveillance most commonly experienced. Design A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. Setting The study was performed in outpatient adult and pediatric cardiology clinics in university-affiliated and private practice offices. Patients Fifty-four adolescent and adult patients with single ventricle congenital heart disease who have undergone the Fontan procedure participated in the study. The mean age was 26 ± 9 years with 52% female and 63% Caucasian. Outcome Measures Demographic and clinical data were obtained by a standard intake form and retrospective chart reviews. The Congenital Heart Disease TNO/AZL Adult Quality Of Life questionnaire was completed to assess worries, symptoms, and the impact of cardiac surveillance. Results The majority were single (73%), employed or full-time students (93%), with health insurance (94%), had a single left ventricle (78%), the diagnosis of tricuspid atresia or double inlet left ventricle (59%), lateral tunnel Fontan type (44%), history of arrhythmias (76%), left ventricle ejection fraction percentage >50 (66%), oxygen saturations >90% (70%), frequent headaches (50%), scoliosis (22%), varicose veins, ascites, and liver cirrhosis (46%), normal body mass index (59%), and New York Heart Association class I (48%) and II–III (52%). Primary worries related to current health (83%), job/employment (69%), ability to work, (61%) and living independently (54%). The most bothersome symptoms were shortness of breath with ambulation (69%), dizziness (61%), and palpitations (61%). Conclusions Fontan survivors experience residua and sequelae from multiple surgical procedures and the natural disease course. Our results support the need for ongoing assessment of both physical symptoms and psychosocial concerns, and suggest the need for multiple risk factor intervention strategies that

  15. Functional limitations in children and adolescents suffering from chronic pain: validation and psychometric properties of the German Functional Disability Inventory (FDI-G).

    PubMed

    Offenbächer, Martin; Kohls, Niko; Walker, Lynn; Hermann, Christiane; Hügle, Boris; Jäger, Natalie; Richter, Matthias; Haas, Johannes-Peter

    2016-10-01

    Our objective was to translate the Functional Disability Inventory (FDI) into German, to evaluate its validity and to assess functional limitation in a large cohort of children and adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome (jFMS). We administered several questions (e.g., sociodemographics, school-related issues) and questionnaires to 329 patients and one parent. The questionnaires included, among others, a German version of the FDI, the CHAQ (parent report), KIDSCREEN, tender point score (TPS), Depression Inventory for Children and Adolescents (DIKJ) and others. Patients were asked about the severity of pain today (NRS = numerical rating scale) and other symptoms. Internal consistency was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha. Construct validity of the FDI was evaluated by correlating the FDI with the questionnaires as well as with the pain and other variables, e.g., days missed school. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was also performed. Mean age was 13.9 years (SD ±2.48). Means were for pain today 5.37 (±2.39) and for the TPS 39.71 (±21.56). Internal consistency was α = .90. Low-to-moderate correlations were obtained between the FDI and the CHAQ (ρ = .51**), KIDSCREEN (e.g., physical well-being ρ = -.62**; peers and social support ρ = -.28**) as well as the pain variables (NRS ρ = .24**; TPS ρ = .38**). Psychological variables were also correlated with the FDI (e.g., DIJK ρ = .28**). An EFA suggested a two-factor solution. The FDI is a valid instrument for measuring functional limitations in German children and adolescents with jFMS.

  16. Cross-linguistic validity of the French and Dutch versions of the Very Short form of the Physical Self-Inventory among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Maïano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J S; Probst, Michel

    2015-09-01

    The study tested the cross-linguistic validity of the Very Short form of the Physical Self-Inventory (PSI-VS) among 1115 Flemish (Dutch version) adolescents, and a comparison sample of 1103 French adolescents (French version; from Morin & Maïano, 2011a). Flemish adolescents also completed a positively worded reformulation of the reverse-keyed item of the physical attractiveness (PA) subscale. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) supported the factor validity and reliability (except for the Dutch PA subscale) of the PSI-VS, and its partial measurement invariance across samples. CFA conducted on the modified version of the Dutch PSI-VS (11 original items plus the positively worded replacement), presented satisfactory reliability (ω=.67-.89), and was fully invariant across sexes, age groups, and body mass index categories. Additionally, results revealed latent mean differences across sexes and body mass index categories. Therefore, the modified Dutch PSI-VS can be used whenever there is a need for a very short physical self-concept questionnaire.

  17. Clinical utility of the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory validity scales to screen for symptom exaggeration following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Brickell, Tracey A; Lippa, Sara M; French, Louis M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical utility of three recently developed validity scales (Validity-10, NIM5, and LOW6) designed to screen for symptom exaggeration using the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI). Participants were 272 U.S. military service members who sustained a mild, moderate, severe, or penetrating traumatic brain injury (TBI) and who were evaluated by the neuropsychology service at Walter Reed Army Medical Center within 199 weeks post injury. Participants were divided into two groups based on the Negative Impression Management scale of the Personality Assessment Inventory: (a) those who failed symptom validity testing (SVT-fail; n = 27) and (b) those who passed symptom validity testing (SVT-pass; n = 245). Participants in the SVT-fail group had significantly higher scores (p<.001) on the Validity-10, NIM5, LOW6, NSI total, and Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) clinical scales (range: d = 0.76 to 2.34). Similarly high sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive power (PPP), and negative predictive (NPP) values were found when using all three validity scales to differentiate SVT-fail versus SVT-pass groups. However, the Validity-10 scale consistently had the highest overall values. The optimal cutoff score for the Validity-10 scale to identify possible symptom exaggeration was ≥19 (sensitivity = .59, specificity = .89, PPP = .74, NPP = .80). For the majority of people, these findings provide support for the use of the Validity-10 scale as a screening tool for possible symptom exaggeration. When scores on the Validity-10 exceed the cutoff score, it is recommended that (a) researchers and clinicians do not interpret responses on the NSI, and (b) clinicians follow up with a more detailed evaluation, using well-validated symptom validity measures (e.g., Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form, MMPI-2-RF, validity scales), to seek confirmatory evidence to support an hypothesis of symptom exaggeration.

  18. [Diabetes mellitus in childhood and adolescence. Clinical types].

    PubMed

    Sires, J M

    1979-01-01

    It is today's general medical opinion that children's diabetes mellitus was uncommon in the past. It was generally admitted at that time the initail stages were so sudden as to make difficut its early diagnosis. It's increased incidence is at present an alarming truth; however, a parallel increase of diabetic coma or of mulminant types has rather dropped. Diabetes may be diagnosed by just considering the main symptoms at the onset which are polydipsia, polyuria and weight loss. If an early diagnosis is not made, acidosis (abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting) may appear within a few days or weeks followed by coma (Kussamul's acidotic respiration and dehydration). Coma may be avoided by an early diagnosis and a life may be saved. It must be stressed that an important percentage of children and adolescents show a slow and gradual evolution (week or months) of their diabetes: gradual weight loss, sometimes with noticeable polyphagia, occasional enuresis, but without other associated symptoms. Asymptomatic, intermittent glucosurias are also frequent; they vary in magnitude an almost always they appear without ketonuria and with fasting normal glycemia. According to our experience they may precede in weeks or months the clinical manifestations of the disease. Postprandial glycemia is a sure diagnostic resource; it is of greater trustworthines than fasting glycemia; therefore we advise it as a routine diagnostic procedure which we recommend widely. In uncertain situations, the oral glucose tolerance test is advisable.

  19. Erotomania in an Adolescent: Clinical and Theoretical Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbach, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses detailed case report of first reported occurrence of erotomania (delusional belief of being loved by another) in adolescent and one of few cases involving homosexual orientation. Discusses case in context of adolescent developmental phenomena, including "crushes," identity formation, and resolution of sexual orientation.…

  20. Clinical Issues in the Assessment of Adolescent Defendants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Dewey G.

    There are many practical difficulties in conducting forensic evaluations of adolescents charged with serious crimes. This paper addresses some of the reasons why adolescent forensic evaluations are problematic and suggests four strategies for establishing and maintaining rapport, based on a practitioner's experience in evaluating adolescents…

  1. Screening and Assessing Adolescent Substance Use Disorders in Clinical Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken C.; Kaminer, Yifrah

    2008-01-01

    The different established screening methodologies and comprehensive assessment techniques used in evaluating adolescents suspected of or known to have substance abuse disorders are discussed. Recommendations and suggestions for establishing standards of training and professional efficiency are also highlighted to treat adolescents with substance…

  2. Peer Influence and Nonsuicidal Self Injury: Longitudinal Results in Community and Clinically-Referred Adolescent Samples

    PubMed Central

    Heilbron, Nicole; Guerry, John D.; Franklin, Joseph C.; Rancourt, Diana; Simon, Valerie; Spirito, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that adolescents' engagement in nonsuicidal self-injurious (NSSI) behaviors may be increasing over time, yet little is known regarding distal longitudinal factors that may promote engagement in these behaviors. Data from two longitudinal studies are presented to examine whether NSSI may be associated with peer influence processes. Study 1 included 377 adolescents from a community-based sample; Study 2 included 140 clinically-referred adolescents recruited from a psychiatric inpatient facility. In Study 1, adolescents' NSSI was examined at baseline and one year later. Adolescents' nominated best friend reported their own levels of NSSI. In Study 2, adolescents' NSSI was examined at baseline as well as 9 and 18-months post-baseline. Adolescents' perceptions of their friends' engagement in self-injurious behavior (including suicidality) and depressed mood also were examined at all three time points. Baseline depressive symptoms were measured in both studies; gender and age were examined as moderators of peer influence effects. Results from both studies supported longitudinal peer socialization effects of friends' self-injurious behavior on adolescents' own NSSI for girls, but not for boys, even after controlling for depressive symptoms as a predictor. Study 1 suggested socialization effects mostly for younger youth. Results from Study 2 also suggested longitudinal socialization effects, as well as peer selection effects; adolescents' NSSI was associated with increasing perceptions of their friends' engagement in depressive/self-injurious thoughts and behavior. Findings contribute to the nascent literature on longitudinal predictors of NSSI and to work on peer influence. PMID:20437255

  3. Parent-Adolescent Cross-Informant Agreement in Clinically Referred Samples: Findings From Seven Societies.

    PubMed

    Rescorla, Leslie A; Ewing, Grace; Ivanova, Masha Y; Aebi, Marcel; Bilenberg, Niels; Dieleman, Gwen C; Döpfner, Manfred; Kajokiene, Ilona; Leung, Patrick W L; Plück, Julia; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Winkler Metzke, Christa; Zukauskiene, Rita; Verhulst, Frank C

    2017-01-01

    To conduct international comparisons of parent-adolescent cross-informant agreement in clinical samples, we analyzed ratings on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Youth Self-Report (YSR) for 6,762 clinically referred adolescents ages 11-18 from 7 societies (M = 14.5 years, SD = 2.0 years; 51% boys). Using CBCL and YSR data, we asked the following questions: (a) Do parents report more problems for their adolescent children than the adolescents report about themselves? (b) How do cross-informant correlations (rs) for scale scores differ by problem type and by society? (c) How well do parents and adolescents, on average, agree regarding which problems they rate as low, medium, or high? (d) How does within-dyad item agreement vary within and between societies? (e) How do societies vary in dichotomous cross-informant agreement with respect to the deviance status of the adolescents? CBCL and YSR scores were quite similar, with small and inconsistent informant effects across societies. Cross-informant rs averaged .47 across scales and societies. On average, parents and adolescents agreed well regarding which problem items received low, medium, or high ratings (M r = .87). Mean within-dyad item agreement was moderate across all societies, but dyadic agreement varied widely within every society. In most societies, adolescent noncorroboration of parent-reported deviance was more common than parental noncorroboration of adolescent-reported deviance. Overall, somewhat better parent-adolescent agreement and more consistency in agreement patterns across diverse societies were found in these seven clinical samples than in population samples studied using the same methods.

  4. Quantifying Peer Interactions for Research and Clinical Use: The Manchester Inventory for Playground Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jenny; Hussain, Jamilla; Holsgrove, Samina; Adams, Catherine; Green, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Direct observation of peer relating is potentially a sensitive and ecologically valid measure of child social functioning, but there has been a lack of standardised methods. The Manchester Inventory for Playground Observation (MIPO) was developed as a practical yet rigorous assessment of this kind for 5-11 year olds. We report on the initial…

  5. The Inventory of Pre-Marital Conflict: Clinical and Educational Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, David G.; And Others

    The Inventory of Pre-Marital Conflict (IPMC) is a systematic procedure for the diagnosis and assessment of pre-marital conflict and related issues. The self-report component of the IPMC involves a series of 18 hypothetical conflict situations. The individual responds to each of these by evaluating who is primarily responsible for the problem, and…

  6. Trauma Symptom Inventory: Psychometrics and Association with Childhood and Adult Victimization in Clinical Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briere, John; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines psychometric characteristics of the 100-item Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) in a sample of 370 psychiatric inpatients and psychotherapy outpatients. Post hoc multiple regression analyses indicated that client age, sex, inpatient versus outpatient status, childhood sexual and physical abuse, and adult sexual assault were unique predictors…

  7. Neural imaginaries and clinical epistemology: Rhetorically mapping the adolescent brain in the clinical encounter.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Mara

    2015-10-01

    The social work of brain images has taken center stage in recent theorizing of the intersections between neuroscience and society. However, neuroimaging is only one of the discursive modes through which public representations of neurobiology travel. This article adopts an expanded view toward the social implications of neuroscientific thinking to examine how neural imaginaries are constructed in the absence of visual evidence. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted over 18 months (2008-2009) in a United States multidisciplinary pediatric pain clinic, I examine the pragmatic clinical work undertaken to represent ambiguous symptoms in neurobiological form. Focusing on one physician, I illustrate how, by rhetorically mapping the brain as a therapeutic tool, she engaged in a distinctive form of representation that I call neural imagining. In shifting my focus away from the purely material dimensions of brain images, I juxtapose the cultural work of brain scanning technologies with clinical neural imaginaries in which the teenage brain becomes a space of possibility, not to map things as they are, but rather, things as we hope they might be. These neural imaginaries rely upon a distinctive clinical epistemology that privileges the creative work of the imagination over visualization technologies in revealing the truths of the body. By creating a therapeutic space for adolescents to exercise their imaginative faculties and a discursive template for doing so, neural imagining relocates adolescents' agency with respect to epistemologies of bodily knowledge and the role of visualization practices therein. In doing so, it provides a more hopeful alternative to the dominant popular and scientific representations of the teenage brain that view it primarily through the lens of pathology.

  8. Clinical neuropsychology within adolescent and young-adult psychiatry: conceptualizing theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Allott, Kelly; Proffitt, Tina-Marie; McGorry, Patrick D; Pantelis, Christos; Wood, Stephen J; Cumner, Marnie; Brewer, Warrick J

    2013-01-01

    Historically, clinical neuropsychology has made significant contributions to the understanding of brain-behavior relationships, particularly in neurological conditions. During the past several decades, neuropsychology has also become established as an important discipline in psychiatric settings. Cognition is increasingly recognized as being core to psychiatric illnesses and predictive of functional outcomes, augmenting theories regarding symptomatology and illness progression. Adult-type psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and other psychotic, mood, anxiety, eating, substance-related, and personality disorders) typically emerge during adolescence or young adulthood, a critical neurodevelopmental period. Clinical neuropsychological assessment in adolescent psychiatric patients is particularly valuable in informing clinical formulation and intervention and can be therapeutic across a number of levels. This article articulates the theoretical considerations and practical challenges and applications of clinical neuropsychology within adolescent and young-adult psychiatry. The importance of considering the neurodevelopmental context and its relationship to current theoretical models underpinning clinical practice are discussed.

  9. The Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents, Psychological Symptoms, and Clinical Status in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince-Embury, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA) are three scales for assessing the relative strength of three aspects of personal resiliency as a profile in children and adolescents. This article presents preliminary evidence to support the use of the RSCA in preventive screening. First, this article examines associations between the…

  10. Construct validity of the Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank with clinic-referred and nonreferred adolescents.

    PubMed

    Weis, Robert; Toolis, Erin E; Cerankosky, Brittany C

    2008-11-01

    We examined the construct validity of the Rotter Incomplete Sentence Blank (RISB; Rotter, Lah, & Rafferty, 1992) as a measure of psychological maladjustment in adolescents. In Study 1, we investigated the reliability and convergent and discriminant validity of the RISB with adolescents referred to treatment. In Studies 2 and 3, we examined the RISB's ability to differentiate referred and nonreferred adolescents. The RISB showed adequate interrater reliability and converged with self-reported, parent-reported, and teacher-reported social-emotional and behavioral problems. Criterion-related evidence suggests that the RISB may be useful as a screening measure for adolescents using a 135 or 140 cut score. We provide normative data to facilitate the test's use with adolescents in clinical and research settings.

  11. Substance Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: Self-Report, Health Care Providers' Clinical Impressions, and Urine Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Laurent; Pihet, Sandrine; Passini, Christina Moses; Feijo, Isabelle; Camus, Didier; Eap, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of substance use among adolescent psychiatric outpatients using a variety of data sources. Method: Using a questionnaire, 3-month prevalence of substance use data were obtained from 50 adolescents and their health care providers. Adolescents' self-reports and providers' clinical impressions were compared with…

  12. Replication study of the milwaukee inventory for subtypes of trichotillomania-adult version in a clinically characterized sample.

    PubMed

    Keuthen, Nancy J; Tung, Esther S; Woods, Douglas W; Franklin, Martin E; Altenburger, Erin M; Pauls, David L; Flessner, Christopher A

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the Milwaukee Inventory for Subtypes of Trichotillomania-Adult Version (MIST-A) in a replication sample of clinically characterized hair pullers using exploratory factor analysis (EFA; N = 193). EFA eigenvalues and visual inspection of our scree plot revealed a two-factor solution. Factor structure coefficients and internal consistencies suggested a 13-item scale with an 8-item "Intention" scale and a 5-item "Emotion" scale. Both scales displayed good construct and discriminant validity. These findings indicate the need for a revised scale that provides a more refined assessment of pulling phenomenology that can facilitate future treatment advances.

  13. Validation of the Turkish Version of the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R) in Clinical and Non-Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    AYDIN, Adem; BOYSAN, Murat; KALAFAT, Temel; SELVİ, Yavuz; BEŞİROĞLU, Lütfullah; KAGAN, Mücahit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R) is a widely used self-report instrument developed to overcome the problems with the available instruments. The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the revised Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (OCI-R) in Turkish sample. Methods The psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R) were assessed in clinical samples (n=44 for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and n=44 for patients with major depression (MD) and a non-clinical student sample (n=287). Results The confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that the original six-factor structure was valid in the Turkish sample. The overall and each of the subscales showed moderate to good internal consistency and convergent validity as well as test-retest reliability. However, the Cronbach’s alpha was excessively low for the hoarding subscale in the OCD group. The total and subscale scores of the OCI-R satisfied at discriminating patients with OCD from both patients with MD and healthy controls, with an exception of the neutralizing subscale. Conclusion The Turkish version of the OCI-R did not reveal sound psychometric properties. Findings are discussed in the light of current theoretical considerations.

  14. Effects of positive impression management on the NEO Personality Inventory--Revised in a clinical population.

    PubMed

    Ballenger, J F; Caldwell-Andrews, A; Baer, R A

    2001-06-01

    Sixty adults in outpatient psychotherapy completed the NEO Personality Inventory--Revised (NEO PI-R, P. T. Costa & R. R. McCrae, 1992a). Half were instructed to fake good and half were given standard instructions. All completed the Interpersonal Adjective Scale--Revised, Big Five (J. S. Wiggins & P. D. Trapnell, 1997) under standard instructions, and their therapists completed the observer rating form of the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. A comparison group of 30 students completed the NEO PI-R under standard instructions. Standard and fake-good participants obtained significantly different NEO PI-R domain scores. Correlations between the NEO PI-R and criterion measures were significantly lower for faking than for standard patients. Validity scales for the NEO PI-R (J. A. Schinka, B. N. Kinder, & T. Kremer, 1997) were moderately accurate in discriminating faking from standard patients, but were only marginally accurate in discriminating faking patients from students.

  15. Reliability, Factor Structure, and Associations With Measures of Problem Relationship and Behavior of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 in a Sample of Italian Community-Dwelling Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Somma, Antonella; Borroni, Serena; Maffei, Cesare; Giarolli, Laura E; Markon, Kristian E; Krueger, Robert F; Fossati, Andrea

    2017-01-10

    In order to assess the reliability, factorial validity, and criterion validity of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) among adolescents, 1,264 Italian high school students were administered the PID-5. Participants were also administered the Questionnaire on Relationships and Substance Use as a criterion measure. In the full sample, McDonald's ω values were adequate for the PID-5 scales (median ω = .85, SD = .06), except for Suspiciousness. However, all PID-5 scales showed average inter-item correlation values in the .20-.55 range. Exploratory structural equation modeling analyses provided moderate support for the a priori model of PID-5 trait scales. Ordinal logistic regression analyses showed that selected PID-5 trait scales predicted a significant, albeit moderate (Cox & Snell R(2) values ranged from .08 to .15, all ps < .001) amount of variance in Questionnaire on Relationships and Substance Use variables.

  16. The influence of clinical variables on the psychological adaptation of adolescents after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Elisa Kern; Moreno Jiménez, Bernardo

    2008-06-01

    This study assessed the influence of clinical and socio-demographic variables on the psychological adaptation of transplanted adolescents. Twenty-six transplanted adolescents and 25 healthy adolescents, aged 13-17, and their parents participated in the study. The following domains were measured: social competence, emotional/behavioral problems, self-concept, self-esteem and subjective well-being. The findings revealed that transplanted boys presented significantly less social competence (U = 26,000, p < .05) and more externalizing problems (U = 25,000, p < .05), social problems (U = 25,000, p < .05) and attention problems (U = 17,500, p < .01) than healthy boys. In contrast, transplanted girls displayed significantly more internalizing problems (U = 47,000, p < .05) and lower physical self-concept (U = 49,500, p < .05) than healthy girls. Hierarchical regression analysis showed clinical variables, especially waiting-list time, significantly predicted attention problems (beta = .364, p < .05) and negative affect (beta = .632, p < .05) in transplanted adolescents. Also, male (beta = -0.554, p < .01) and younger (beta = -0.444, p < .01) transplanted adolescents were at risk for attention problems. Our data suggest the importance of the waiting-list time for transplanted adolescents. Efforts to reduce the pretransplant phase would help adolescents achieve better psychological adaptation at long-term posttransplant.

  17. Future directions in clinical child and adolescent psychology: a Delphi survey.

    PubMed

    James, Rochelle L; Roberts, Michael C

    2009-10-01

    This study sought to identify the future directions in three domains: clinical practice, research, and training of clinical child and adolescent psychologists in the upcoming decade. Doctoral-level active members in the field were surveyed via a two-round Delphi survey (45 in round 1; 35 in round 2). Evidence-based practice received the greatest consensus by the participants and highest rank in each of the three domains. Other highly ranked clinical practice directions included prevention and early diagnosis and treatment, and clinical services for specific psychological problems. Research directions focused on biological and social factors interactions in the etiology and treatment and specific child and adolescent disorders. In the training domain, major directions included the pursuit of specialty training in child and adolescent psychology and training emphasizing the biological basis of behavior. Implications of these future directions are discussed.

  18. Psychosocial barriers and facilitators to clinical trial enrollment and adherence for adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Natasha D; Block, Rebecca; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Tai, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Adolescents (aged 15-19 years) have not experienced the same survival gains as children and older adults diagnosed with cancer. Poor clinical trial enrollment and adherence rates among adolescents may account for some of this disparity. Although biological, regulatory, systemic, and practice-related challenges to clinical trial enrollment and adherence have been examined, studies of psychosocial factors, which can serve as barriers or facilitators to enrollment and adherence, are limited. To bring attention to these psychological factors, we reviewed existing literature on psychosocial barriers and facilitators that can affect an adolescent's decision to enroll and adhere to a clinical trial. We also provide potential strategies to address psychosocial factors affecting clinical trial accrual and adherence.

  19. An adolescent vampire cult in rural America: clinical issues and case study.

    PubMed

    Miller, T W; Veltkamp, L J; Kraus, R F; Lane, T; Heister, T

    1999-01-01

    The emergence of cult related activities in rural America are examined. Cults and their attraction to adolescents are addressed as are methods of cult indoctrination and a profile of cult members and their leader. Clinical management along with a rationale for the attraction of some adolescents to cults are discussed. A case study of a vampire cult and the psychopathology identified in the leader of the cult are provided. Import for clinicians is offered.

  20. The Adolescent Health Review: Test of a Computerized Screening Tool in School-Based Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Patricia A.; Beebe, Timothy J.; Funk, Eunkyung; Rancome, Jeanne

    2003-01-01

    Implemented a computerized screening instrument, the Adolescent Health Review, in urban school-based clinics to test the viability of a stand-alone screening process and its acceptance by patients and providers, examining the relationship between health risks and the stated purpose for the clinic visit. Patients and providers readily accepted the…

  1. The Beck Depression Inventory-II: Testing for Measurement Equivalence and Factor Mean Differences across Hong Kong and American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Barbara M.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Kennard, Betsy D.; Lee, Peter W. H.

    2007-01-01

    Working within the framework of a confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) model, this study adds another dimension to construct validation of both the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) and a Chinese version of the BDI-II (C-BDI-II; Chinese Behavioral Sciences Society, 2000). Specifically, we tested for measurement…

  2. Psychometric Properties of the Children's Depression Inventory: An Item Response Theory Analysis across Age in a Nonclinical, Longitudinal, Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Sun; Krishnan, Anita; Park, Yoon Soo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate psychometric properties of the Children's Depression Inventory within a nonclinical and longitudinal sample (8th and 12th grades). Using the Rasch rating scale, most items represented one dimension. There was adequate separation among items and no overlap between ranges of item difficulties with latent…

  3. Psychometric Properties of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory: Child Version in Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anna M.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Arnold, Elysse B.; McGuire, Joseph F.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Child Version (OCI-CV) were examined in ninety-six youth with a primary/co-primary diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A confirmatory factor analysis revealed an acceptable model of fit with factors consisting of doubting/checking, obsessing, hoarding, washing,…

  4. Moral competence and character strengths among adolescents: the development and validation of the Values in Action Inventory of Strengths for Youth.

    PubMed

    Park, Nansook; Peterson, Christopher

    2006-12-01

    Moral competence among adolescents can be approached in terms of good character. Character is a multidimensional construct comprised of a family of positive traits manifest in an individual's thoughts, emotions and behaviours. The Values in Action Inventory for Youth (VIA-Youth) is a self-report questionnaire suitable for adolescents that measures 24 widely valued strength of character. Data from several samples bearing on the internal consistency, stability, and validity of the VIA-Youth are described, along with what is known about the prevalence and demographic correlates of the character strengths it measures. Exploratory factor analysis revealed an interpretable four-factor structure of the VIA-Youth subscales: temperance strengths (e.g., prudence, self-regulation), intellectual strengths (e.g., love of learning, curiosity), theological strengths (e.g., hope, religiousness, love), and other-directed (interpersonal) strengths (e.g., kindness, modesty). The uses of the VIA-Youth in research and practise are discussed along with directions for future research.

  5. Millon clinical multiaxial inventory III (MCMI-III) and communication styles in a sample of university students.

    PubMed

    Caparrós, Beatriz Caparrós; Hoz, Esperanza Villar

    2013-01-01

    Despite the controversy generated by the conceptualization of personality disorders, it is well established that the inflexibility of coping styles and dysfunctional behaviors associated with them can lead to a considerable impairment in interpersonal relationships. Although communication is one of the most important processes in relating to others, few empirical studies have been undertaken on the influence of dysfunctional personality patterns on communication styles, which is the main objective of the present cross-sectional study. A total of 529 Spanish university students were assessed using the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III (MCMI-III), Millon, Davis, and Millon, 1997, and the Communicator Style Measure (Norton, 1978). Results show statistically significant relationships between different personality patterns and styles of communication and suggest that narcissistic, histrionic and compulsive patterns are related to positive communication styles in a non-clinical sample. The implications of this study are discussed.

  6. Adolescents' Use of School-Based Health Clinics for Reproductive Health Services: Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Richard A.; St. Lawrence, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Describes adolescents' use of school-based health clinics (SBCs) for family planning and sexually transmitted disease (STD)-related services, using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Results indicated that 13 percent received family planning and 8.9 percent received STD-related services from SBCs. Factors affecting the…

  7. Effective Treatment of Depressive Disorders in Medical Clinics for Adolescents and Young Adults living with HIV: A controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Larry K.; Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Whiteley, Laura B.; Bethel, James; Xu, Jiahong; Thornton, Sarah; Tanney, Mary R.; Hawkins, Linda A.; Garvie, Patricia A.; Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Worrell, Carol J.; Stoff, Laura W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Preliminary test of a manualized, measurement-guided treatment for depression for adolescents and young adults in care at four sites of the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN). Design The U.S. sites were randomly assigned to either a 24-week, combination cognitive behavioral therapy and medication management algorithm (COMB) tailored for youth living with HIV (YLWH) or to treatment as usual (TAU). Methods Youth at TAU sites had access to therapists and medication management as needed. COMB site clinicians were trained in the manualized intervention and participated in supervision calls to monitor intervention fidelity. Results Over the course of the study with 44 participants, those in COMB, compared to those in TAU, reported fewer depressive symptoms, p<0.01 (as measured by the Quick Inventory for Depression Symptomatology) and were more likely to be in remission, p<0.001, (65% vs.10% at week 24 end of treatment, and 71% vs. 7% at week 48 final follow-up). A greater proportion of COMB participants received psychotherapy (95% vs. 45%, p<0.001) and attended more sessions (12.6 vs. 5, p<0.001) than those in TAU. Viral load decreased in both groups and was associated (p<0.05) with reduction in depressive symptoms. Conclusions A 24-week manualized, measurement-guided psychotherapy and medication management algorithm tailored for YLWH was more effective in achieving and sustaining remission from depression than treatment as usual at HIV care clinic sites. Given observed treatment efficacy, this structured combination treatment could be disseminated to medical clinics in order to successfully treat YLWH, who are at particular risk for depression. PMID:26761270

  8. Voices of Children and Adolescents in Military Families: Research and Clinical Perspectives on Adjustment and Well-being

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Voices of Children and Adolescents in Military Families: Research and Clinical Perspectives on Adjustment and Well-being. Eric M. Flake MD...AND SUBTITLE Voices of Children and Adolescents in Military Families: Research and Clinical Perspectives on Adjustment and Well-being 5a. CONTRACT...Objectives • Sensitize the community to military adolescent culture and support needs. • Candid interviews occurring at camp purple which capture the

  9. Tailoring clinical services to address the unique needs of adolescents from the pregnancy test to parenthood.

    PubMed

    Moriarty Daley, Alison; Sadler, Lois S; Dawn Reynolds, Heather

    2013-04-01

    Clinicians across disciplines and practice settings are likely to encounter adolescents who are at risk for a pregnancy. In 2010, 34.2/1000 15-19-year-old teens had a live birth in the United States, many more will seek care for a pregnancy scare or options counseling. Teen mothers are also at risk for a second or higher-order pregnancy during adolescence. This paper provides clinicians with adolescent-friendly clinical and counseling strategies for pregnancy prevention, pre- and post-pregnancy test counseling, pregnancy-related care, and a review of the developmental challenges encountered by teens in the transition to parenthood. Clinicians are in a better position to approach the developmental, health and mental health needs of adolescents related to pregnancy if they understand and appreciate the obstacles adolescents may face negotiating the healthcare system. In addition, when clinical services are specially tailored to the needs of the adolescent, fewer opportunities will be lost to prevent unintended pregnancies, assist teens into timely prenatal services, and improve outcomes for their pregnancies and the transition to parenthood.

  10. Tailoring Clinical Services to Address the Unique Needs of Adolescents from the Pregnancy Test to Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Alison Moriarty; Sadler, Lois S.; Reynolds, Heather Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians across disciplines and practice settings are likely to encounter adolescents who are at risk for a pregnancy. In 2010, 34.2/1000 15–19 year old teens had a live birth in the United States, many more will seek care for a pregnancy scare or options counseling. Teen mothers are also at risk for a second or higher order pregnancy during adolescence. This paper provides clinicians with adolescent-friendly clinical and counseling strategies for pregnancy prevention, pre- and post-pregnancy test counseling, pregnancy-related care, and a review of the developmental challenges encountered by teens in the transition to parenthood. Clinicians are in a better position to approach the developmental, health and mental health needs of adolescents related to pregnancy if they understand and appreciate the obstacles adolescents may face negotiating the health care system. In addition, when clinical services are specially tailored to the needs of the adolescent, fewer opportunities will be lost to prevent unintended pregnancies, assist teens into timely prenatal services, and improve outcomes for their pregnancies and the transition to parenthood. PMID:23522339

  11. Balanced intervention for adolescents and adults with language impairment: a clinical framework.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Karen A; Katz, Lauren A; Carlberg, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    Providing effective intervention services for adolescents and adults who struggle with spoken and written language presents a variety of unique challenges. This article discusses the 5S Framework (skills, strategies, school, student buy-in, and stakeholders) for designing and implementing balanced spoken and written language interventions for adolescents and adults. An in-depth case illustration highlights the usefulness of the framework for targeting the language and literacy skills of adolescents and young adults. By describing and illustrating the five key components of the intervention framework, the article provides a useful clinical tool to help guide clinicians and educators who serve the needs of adolescents and adults who struggle with spoken and written language.

  12. [Profile of adolescents with repeated pregnancies attended at a prenatal clinic].

    PubMed

    Persona, Lia; Shimo, Antonieta Keiko Kakuda; Tarallo, Maria Celina

    2004-01-01

    This study identified the biopsychosocial profile of adolescent with repeated pregnancies, who were attended at a prenatal clinic. Data were collected through patient records and interviews and were subject to quantitative analysis. Based on the obtained results and in accordance with literature, factors that are strongly associated with the occurrence of pregnancy repetition were selected in the adolescents' profiles. These are: early menarche; first sexual intercourse shortly after menarche; school repetition; school dropout; non remunerated occupation; low family income; involvement with older partners; living with the partner; consensual union with the partner; one partner; low condom use; family history of adolescent pregnancy; father's absence because of death or abandonment; positive family reaction to previous pregnancy; previous abortion; adolescent's positive concepts about previous delivery; and absence from previous postpartum consultations.

  13. Neural Imaginaries and Clinical Epistemology: Rhetorically Mapping the Adolescent Brain in the Clinical Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Buchbinder, Mara

    2014-01-01

    The social work of brain images has taken center stage in recent theorizing of the intersections between neuroscience and society. However, neuroimaging is only one of the discursive modes through which public representations of neurobiology travel. This article adopts an expanded view toward the social implications of neuroscientific thinking to examine how neural imaginaries are constructed in the absence of visual evidence. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted over 18 months (2008–2009) in a United States multidisciplinary pediatric pain clinic, I examine the pragmatic clinical work undertaken to represent ambiguous symptoms in neurobiological form. Focusing on one physician, I illustrate how, by rhetorically mapping the brain as a therapeutic tool, she engaged in a distinctive form of representation that I call neural imagining. In shifting my focus away from the purely material dimensions of brain images, I juxtapose the cultural work of brain scanning technologies with clinical neural imaginaries in which the teenage brain becomes a space of possibility, not to map things as they are, but rather, things as we hope they might be. These neural imaginaries rely upon a distinctive clinical epistemology that privileges the creative work of the imagination over visualization technologies in revealing the truths of the body. By creating a therapeutic space for adolescents to exercise their imaginative faculties and a discursive template for doing so, neural imagining relocates adolescents’ agency with respect to epistemologies of bodily knowledge and the role of visualization practices therein. In doing so, it provides a more hopeful alternative to the dominant popular and scientific representations of the teenage brain that view it primarily through the lens of pathology. PMID:24780561

  14. What is new in adolescent psychiatry? Literature review and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gabriel

    2013-04-01

    This article provides the adolescent medicine physician with a review of seminal psychiatric research published in 2011 and 2012 and its clinical relevance for day-to-day practice. The present review focuses on conditions commonly encountered by adolescent medicine physicians such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, bipolar disorder, tic disorders, and major depression. Additionally, there is a section that outlines specific clinical situations for which psychiatric consultation must be obtained, as well as helpful resources and suggestions to mitigate the unavailability of appointments in a mental health office.

  15. Attachment Organization and History of Suicidal Behavior in Clinical Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Kenneth S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Adolescents in psychiatric treatment (N=133) participated in a case-comparison study investigating the association of attachment patterns with a history of suicidal behaviors. Attachment patterns were assessed using the Adult Attachment Interview. In accordance with definitions provided in the scoring system, 86% of case and 78% of comparison…

  16. Emissions Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page describes the role of emission inventories in the air quality management process, a description of how emission inventories are developed, and where U.S. emission inventory information can be found.

  17. Extreme Thinking in Clinically Depressed Adolescents: Results from the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Rachel H.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Jordan, Neil; Silva, Susan G.; March, John S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine relations between extreme thinking, as measured by the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale, and the maintenance of gains among adolescents who participated in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). We examine extreme thinking among 327 adolescents (mean age = 14.56, 57% female, 75% White) who received cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine (FLX), or a combination of CBT and FLX (COMB). Among those who met remission status on the Children's Depression Rating Scale – Revised (CDRS-R ≤ 28; 56 at week 12, 79 at week 18) extreme thinking did not predict failure to maintain remission. This is in contrast to findings with depressed adults. Treatment influenced level of extreme thinking, and this appeared to be driven by greater endorsement of positively valenced beliefs as opposed to a decrease in negatively valenced beliefs. Developmental or investigation characteristics may account for the discrepancy in findings. PMID:20843506

  18. Classification of Severe Male Juvenile Offenders Using the MACI Clinical and Personality Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jeanette; Kemper, Therese Skubic; Loney, Bryan R.; Kistner, Janet A.

    2006-01-01

    Classifications for severe juvenile offenders and ones that include mental health needs are lacking. Thus, in this study, adolescent male offenders (N = 652) committed to a residential facility were clustered on personality and clinical scales of the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (Millon, 1993) into 5 groups (including 4 found in other…

  19. The interpersonal relationship in clinical practice. The Barrett-Lennard Relationship Inventory as an assessment instrument.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J; Roberge, L; Kendrick, S B; Richards, B

    1995-03-01

    The biomedical model that has long been central to medical practice is gradually being expanded to a broader biopsychosocial model. Relationship-building skills commensurate with the new paradigm need to be understood by educators and taught to medical practitioners. The person-centered, or humanistic, model of psychologist Carl Rogers provides a theoretical approach for the development of effective biopsychosocial relationships. The Barrett-Lennard Relationship Inventory (BLRI) was developed in 1962 as an assessment instrument for the person-centered model. In this article, the person-centered model and the use of the BLRI as an assessment instrument of this model are discussed. Current and potential uses of the BLRI are explored.

  20. Adolescent parricide as a clinical and legal problem.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Carl P

    2010-01-01

    Criminologists contribute to the knowledge regarding the continuing problem of parricide by way of macrostudies, utilizing large samples that reveal patterns of how such acts are carried out, gender differences, and other aspects. Clinicians have the opportunity to pursue microinvestigations into the details of how cognitive processes and emotions operate in the adolescent who engages in such behavior. Such investigations entail pursuing specifics in the psychosocial realm, such as earlier maltreatments and ongoing psychological conflicts, and also being alert to the neurobiological differences between adolescents and adults. The use of battered child syndrome as a legal defense is discussed, with contrasts made between relying on a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) approach and a duress defense, based on explanations related to shame and humiliation.

  1. The state of the art in clinical knowledge management: An inventory of tools and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F.; Wright, Adam; Simonaitis, Linas; Carpenter, James D.; Allen, George O.; Doebbeling, Bradley N.; Sirajuddin, Anwar Mohammad; Ash, Joan S.; Middleton, Blackford

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To explore the need for, and use of, high-quality, collaborative, clinical knowledge management (CKM) tools and techniques to manage clinical decision support content. Methods In order to better understand the current state of the art in CKM, we developed a survey of potential CKM tools and techniques. We conducted an exploratory study by querying a convenience sample of respondents about their use of specific practices in CKM. Results The following tools and techniques should be priorities in organizations interested in developing successful computer-based provider order entry (CPOE) and clinical decision support (CDS) implementations: 1) A multidisciplinary team responsible for creating and maintaining the clinical content; 2) An external organizational repository of clinical content with web-based viewer that allows anyone in the organization to review it; 3) An online, collaborative, interactive, internet-based tool to facilitate content development; 4) An enterprise-wide tool to maintain the controlled clinical terminology concepts. Even organizations that have been successfully using Computer-based Provider Order Entry with advanced Clinical Decision Support features for well over 15 years are not using all of the CKM tools or practices that we identified. Conclusions If we are to further stimulate progress in the area of clinical decision support, we must continue to develop and refine our understanding and use of advanced CKM capabilities. PMID:19828364

  2. Clinical study of orthokeratology in young myopic adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fan, L; Jun, J; Jia, Q; Wangqing, J; Xinjie, M; Yi, S

    1999-09-01

    This project was designed to study the efficacy of orthokeratology and its related problems in a population of young myopic adolescents. Fifty-four young myopia adolescents ages 11 to 15 years were enrolled in the study and followed over a 6-month period. The procedures included (1) baseline refraction, assessment of tear quality and quantity, and cornea examination including cornea topography, A-scan ultrasound of cornea thickness, and spectromicroscopy of the corneal endothelium; (2) diagnostic lens fitting and evaluation; (3) lens dispensing and educating the patients or their parents; (4) follow-up schedule and data analysis; and (5) maintenance lens dispensing and analysis of wearing schedules. Myopia was reduced between -1.25 and -5.00 D (-3.00 D average). Myopia reduction was almost complete in the first 6 months, with most of the reduction occurring during the first 2 weeks. Seventy-five percent of the possible reduction occurred during this 2-week time period. Tear quality and quantity influenced reduction speed and amount. Corneal thickness and endothelium remained unchanged over the study period. Subjective refraction is the most reliable method to measure the status of ocular refractive changes. Corneal staining occurred in 45% of subjects during the procedure, mainly in subjects with tear problems. Eighteen percent of the subjects showed induced astigmatism, which could be reversed by refitting the lens or changing the wearing schedule. Maintenance lenses had to be worn every night for young adolescents to maintain myopia reduction. Orthokeratology is a reliable option for reducing some myopia in young adolescents. The first 2 weeks are critical for the procedure. Complete examination and the data analysis procedures are important for monitoring prognosis and eye health.

  3. Waist circumference percentile thresholds for identifying adolescents with insulin resistance in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joyce M; Davis, Matthew M; Woolford, Susan J; Gurney, James G

    2009-08-01

    We formally evaluated waist circumference (WC) percentile cutoffs for predicting insulin resistance (IR) and whether different cutoffs should be used for adolescents of different race/ethnicities. Analysis was performed for 1575 adolescents aged 12-18 yr from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. Adolescents were classified as having IR if they had a homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance level, a validated measure of IR, of >4.39, and WC percentile was classified according to previously published universal (all races combined) and race/ethnicity-specific WC percentile cutoffs. Receiver operating characteristic curves for predicting IR were constructed comparing the race/ethnicity-specific vs. universal WC percentile cutoffs, and area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Comparing universal with race/ethnicity-specific WC percentiles, there were no significant differences in AUC for Black, Mexican-American, or White adolescents. Because race/ethnicity-specific thresholds did not discriminate better than universal WC thresholds, universal WC thresholds may be used effectively to identify adolescents with IR in primary care practices. A WC > or =75th or > or =90th percentile for all race/ethnicities combined would be appropriate to apply in clinical practice for identification of adolescents with IR, a risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes.

  4. Outcomes of antiretroviral therapy among younger versus older adolescents and adults in an urban clinic, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Takarinda, K. C.; Owiti, P.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Mugurungi, O.; Buruwe, L.; Reid, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: A non-governmental organisation-supported clinic offering health services including antiretroviral therapy (ART). Objective: To compare ART retention between younger (age 10–14 years) vs. older (age 15–19 years) adolescents and younger (age 20–29 years) vs. older (age ⩾30 years) adults and determine adolescent- and adult-specific attrition-associated factors among those initiated on ART between 2010 and 2011. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 110 (7%) adolescents and 1484 (93%) adults included in the study, no differences in retention were observed between younger vs. older adolescents at 6, 12 and 24 months. More younger adolescents were initiated with body mass index <16 kg/m2 compared with older adolescents (64% vs. 47%; P = 0.04). There were more females (74% vs. 52%, P < 0.001) and fewer patients initiating ART with CD4 count ⩽350 cells/mm3 (77% vs. 81%, P = 0.007) among younger vs. older adults. Younger adults demonstrated more attrition than older adults at all time-points. No attrition risk factors were observed among adolescents. Attrition-associated factors among adults included being younger, having a lower CD4 count and advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease at initiation, and initiation on a stavudine-based regimen. Conclusion: Younger adults demonstrated greater attrition and may require more attention. We were unable to demonstrate differences in attrition among younger vs. older adolescents. Loss to follow-up was the main reason for attrition across all age groups. Overall, earlier presentation for ART care appears important for improved ART retention among adults. PMID:27358802

  5. A Comparative Study of Clinical Correlates in Schizophrenia with Onset in Childhood, Adolescence and Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Parthasarathy; Malhotra, Savita; Malhotra, Anil; Gupta, Nitin

    2006-01-01

    Background: Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is a rare disorder. Comparative data on the effect of differential age of onset on clinical profile in schizophrenia are very few. Method: Subjects with COS (n = 15), adolescence onset schizophrenia (AdOS, n = 20) and adulthood onset schizophrenia (AOS, n = 20) were compared on socio-demographic,…

  6. Preliminary Validation of a Screening Tool for Adolescent Panic Disorder in Pediatric Primary Care Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, Alexander H.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Hershorin, Eugene R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the validity of a brief screening tool for adolescent panic disorder (PD) in a primary care setting. A total of 165 participants (ages 12-17 years) seen in two pediatric primary care clinics completed the Autonomic Nervous System Questionnaire (ANS; Stein et al. in Psychosomatic Med 61:359-364, 40). A subset of those screening…

  7. Clinical Precursors of Adolescent Conduct Disorder in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittinger, Naureen S.; Langley, Kate; Fowler, Tom A.; Thomas, Hollie V.; Thapar, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine precursors of adolescent conduct disorder (CD) in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), investigating the significance of childhood oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and ADHD. Method: A total of 151 children with ADHD recruited from child psychiatric and pediatric clinics were assessed through…

  8. Triage of Patients in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic

    PubMed Central

    ARAS, Şahbal; VAROL TAŞ, Fatma; BAYKARA, Burak

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the three-stage triage method used in a child and adolescent psychiatry outpatient clinic. Method The study investigated the new allocation process of 1482 children and adolescents who were assessed using this triage system for the duration of one year, in the year 2005. Data of 1423 children and adolescents who presented in 2003 regarding the waiting time for the first appointment and the rate of nonattendance at the first appointment were used for the comparison. In triage system, new patients presenting to the outpatient clinic in the morning four days a week were assessed by a three-stage procedure: An initial Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire screening and a structured interview administered by an intern was then followed by a clinical interview. Results Of the 1482 children and adolescents who presented to the outpatient clinic during the study period, 1291 were given further appointments. Among patients who presented in 2005, the 207 non-attendant patients were significantly more likely to have longer waiting times than the 1084 attendant patients. When compared to year 2003, it was found that there was a significant decrease in the median waiting time for the first appointment and the rate of nonattendance at the first appointment among patients who presented in 2005. Conclusion The triage procedure used in this study may constitute a model for developing countries with limited health care resources.

  9. Clinical Profile of Childhood Onset Depression Presenting to Child Adolescent and Family Services in Northampton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majumder, Pallab; Hammad, Hala

    2006-01-01

    Background: The clinical profile of depressive disorder in children and young people in Child Adolescent and Family Services (CAFS), Northampton was studied. Methods: Twenty-five patients who had attended the CAFS over a period of 2 years were analysed retrospectively. Results: The age range of subjects was 8 to 19 years. Majority of patients were…

  10. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for the Treatment of Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biegel, Gina M.; Brown, Kirk Warren; Shapiro, Shauna L.; Schubert, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that mindfulness-based treatment interventions may be effective for a range of mental and physical health disorders in adult populations, but little is known about the effectiveness of such interventions for treating adolescent conditions. The present randomized clinical trial was designed to assess the effect of the…

  11. Vitamin B12 in obese adolescents with clinical features of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mandy; Halim, Jocelyn H; Gow, Megan L; El-Haddad, Nouhad; Marzulli, Teresa; Baur, Louise A; Cowell, Chris T; Garnett, Sarah P

    2014-12-04

    Emerging evidence indicates an association between obesity, metformin use and reduced vitamin B12 status, which can have serious hematologic, neurologic and psychiatric consequences. This study aimed to examine B12 status in obese adolescents with pre-diabetes and/or clinical features of insulin resistance. Serum B12 was measured using chemiluminescence immunoassay in 103 (43 male, 60 female) obese (mean body mass index (BMI) z-score ± SD (2.36 ± 0.29)), adolescents aged 10 to 17 years, median (range) insulin sensitivity index of 1.27 (0.27 to 3.38) and 13.6% had pre-diabetes. Low B12 (<148 pmol/L) was identified in eight (7.8%) and borderline status (148 to 221 pmol/L) in an additional 25 (24.3%) adolescents. Adolescents with borderline B12 concentrations had higher BMI z-scores compared to those with normal concentrations (2.50 ± 0.22 vs. 2.32 ± 0.30, p = 0.008) or those with low B12 concentration (2.50 ± 0.22 vs. 2.27 ± 0.226, p = 0.041). In conclusion, nearly a third of obese adolescents with clinical insulin resistance had a low or borderline serum B12 status. Therefore, further investigations are warranted to explore the cause and the impact of low B12 status in obese pediatric populations.

  12. Screening for Spiritual Struggle in an Adolescent Transgender Clinic: Feasibility and Acceptability.

    PubMed

    Grossoehme, Daniel H; Teeters, Alexis; Jelinek, Sue; Dimitriou, Sophia M; Conard, Lee Ann E

    2016-01-01

    Spiritual struggles are associated with poorer health outcomes, including depression, which has higher prevalence among transgender individuals than the general population. This study's objective was to improve the quality of care in an outpatient transgender clinic by screening patients and caregivers for spiritual struggle and future intervention. The quality improvement questions addressed were whether screening for spiritual struggle was feasible and acceptable; and whether the sensitivity and specificity of the Rush Protocol were acceptable. Revision of the screening was based on cognitive interviews with the 115 adolescents and caregivers who were screened. Prevalence of spiritual struggle was 38-47%. Compared to the Negative R-COPE, the Rush Protocol screener had sensitivities of 44-80% and specificities of 60-74%. The Rush Protocol was acceptable to adolescents seen in a transgender clinic, caregivers, and clinic staff; was feasible to deliver during outpatient clinic visits, and offers a straightforward means of identifying transgender persons and caregivers experiencing spiritual struggle.

  13. Case report: imaging the clinical course of FOPE—a cause of adolescent knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Bochmann, Thomas; Forrester, Richard; Smith, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Focal periphyseal oedema (FOPE) is a rare MRI finding associated with pain in adolescent patients with very few reported cases. We present a case of FOPE in a 13-year-old girl and the only follow-up imaging available for an isolated presentation of this condition.This article describes a clinical course that correlates well with the imaging obtained. This article describes a clinical course that correlates well with the imaging obtained. PMID:27887018

  14. Parents who hit and scream: interactive effects of verbal and severe physical aggression on clinic-referred adolescents' adjustment.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, Michelle; Mahoney, Annette; Boxer, Paul; Gullan, Rebecca Lakin; Fang, Qijuan

    2014-05-01

    The goals of this study were first, to delineate the co-occurrence of parental severe physical aggression and verbal aggression toward clinic-referred adolescents, and second, to examine the interactive effects of parental severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. This research involved 239 referrals of 11- to 18-year-old youth and their dual-parent families to a non-profit, private community mental health center in a semi-rural Midwest community. Multiple informants (i.e., adolescents and mothers) were used to assess parental aggression and adolescent behavior problems. More than half of clinic-referred adolescents (51%) experienced severe physical aggression and/or high verbal aggression from one or both parents. A pattern of interactive effects of mother-to-adolescent severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent behavior problems emerged, indicating that when severe physical aggression was present, mother-to-adolescent verbal aggression was positively associated with greater adolescent behavior problems whereas when severe physical aggression was not present, the links between verbal aggression and behavior problems was no longer significant. No interactive effects were found for father-to-adolescent severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent adjustment; however, higher father-to-adolescent verbal aggression was consistently linked to behavior problems above and beyond the influence of severe physical aggression. The results of this study should promote the practice of routinely assessing clinic-referred adolescents and their parents about their experiences of verbal aggression in addition to severe physical aggression and other forms of abuse.

  15. The Inventory of Personality Organisation: its psychometric properties among student and clinical populations in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Hiromi; Kikuchi, Hiroyoshi; Kano, Rikihachiro; Mitoma, Hiroshi; Shono, Masahiro; Hasui, Chieko; Kitamura, Toshinori

    2009-01-01

    Background The Inventory of Personality Organisation (IPO) is a self-report measure that reflects personality traits, as theorised by Kernberg. Methods In study 1, the Japanese version of the IPO was distributed to a population of Japanese university students (N = 701). The students were randomly divided into two groups. The factor structure derived from an exploratory factor analysis among one subsample was tested using a confirmatory factor structure among another subsample. In study 2, the factor-driven subscales of the IPO were correlated with other variables that would function as external criteria to validate the scale in a combined population of the students used in study 1 and psychiatric outpatients (N = 177). Results In study 1 the five-factor structure presented by the original authors was replicated in exploratory factor analyses in one subgroup of students. However, this was through reduction of the number of items (the number of the primary items was reduced from 57 to 24 whereas the number of the additional items was reduced from 26 to 13) due to low endorsement frequencies as well as low factor loadings on a designated factor. The new factor structure was endorsed by a confirmatory factor analysis in the other student subgroup. In study 2 the new five subscales of the Japanese IPO were likely to be correlated with younger age, more personality psychopathology (borderline and narcissistic), more dysphoric mood, less psychological well-being, more insecure adult attachment style, lower self-efficacy, and more frequent history of childhood adversity. The IPO scores were found to predict the increase in suicidal ideation in a week's time in a longitudinal follow-up. Conclusion Although losing more than 40% of the original items, the Japanese IPO may be a reliable and valid measure of Kernberg's personality organisation for Japanese populations. PMID:19419541

  16. Development of the pediatric quality of life inventory neurofibromatosis type 1 module items for children, adolescents and young adults: qualitative methods.

    PubMed

    Nutakki, Kavitha; Varni, James W; Steinbrenner, Sheila; Draucker, Claire B; Swigonski, Nancy L

    2017-01-11

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is arguably one of the most important measures in evaluating effectiveness of clinical treatments. At present, there is no disease-specific outcome measure to assess the HRQOL of children, adolescents and young adults with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). This study aimed to develop the items and support the content validity for the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™) NF1 Module for children, adolescents and young adults. The iterative process included multiphase qualitative methods including a literature review, survey of expert opinions, semi-structured interviews, cognitive interviews and pilot testing. Fifteen domains were derived from the qualitative methods, with content saturation achieved, resulting in 115 items. The domains include skin, pain, pain impact, pain management, cognitive functioning, speech, fine motor, balance, vision, perceived physical appearance, communication, worry, treatment, medicines and gastrointestinal symptoms. This study is limited because all participants are recruited from a single-site. Qualitative methods support the content validity for the PedsQL™ NF1 Module for children, adolescents and young adults. The PedsQL™ NF1 Module is now undergoing national multisite field testing for the psychometric validation of the instrument development.

  17. The aftermath of adolescent suicide: clinical, ethical, and spiritual issues.

    PubMed

    Girard, Gustavo A; Silber, Tomas J

    2011-08-01

    The aftermath of an adolescent's suicide can be devastating to family, friends, and treating professionals, yet not much has been written on this subject. In this article, we briefly develop a conceptualization of suicide and a typology of suicide and the physicians' attitudes toward suicide. This is followed with a more detailed review of the aftermath of suicide (focusing on the suicide grievers) and the impact of suicide on clinicians. The work ends with discussion of research data and the role of spirituality as well as an outline of therapeutic interventions.

  18. Clinical Utility of the Cross-Cultural (Chinese) Personality Assessment Inventory (CPAI-2) in the Assessment of Substance Use Disorders among Chinese Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Fanny M.; Cheung, Shu Fai; Leung, Freedom

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the clinical utility of the Cross-Cultural (Chinese) Personality Inventory (CPAI-2) in differentiating the personality characteristics of Chinese men with substance use disorders from other psychiatric patients and normal control participants. The CPAI-2 profile of 121 Chinese men with substance use disorders was contrasted…

  19. Establishing the Validity of the Affirmative Training Inventory: Assessing the Relationship between Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Affirmative Training and Students' Clinical Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Thomas Stone; McGeorge, Christi R.; Toomey, Russell B.

    2013-01-01

    This study established the validity and factor structure of the Affirmative Training Inventory (ATI; T. S. Carlson, C. R. McGeorge & M. Rock, unpublished) as a measure of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) affirmative clinical training. Additionally, this study examined the latent associations among the subscales of the ATI and the Sexual…

  20. Clinical Utility of the McVaugh and Grow Rules for the Detection of Faking on the Personality Inventory for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Gordon B.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the clinical utility of the McVaugh and Grow (1983) criteria for faking in the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) in children (N=100). Results showed that profiles exceeding the fake bad criterion were found in 35 percent of the cases, but only one profile met fake good criteria. (LLL)

  1. Classroom to clinic: incorporating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into nurse practitioner education & practice.

    PubMed

    Haley, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Although nursing is well grounded in the conceptualization of person as body-mind-spirit, there is little evidence that advanced practice nurses routinely address the spirit in giving patient care, especially with adolescents in the outpatient setting. The neglect of spiritual aspects of care may be related to lack of a framework, or education/incorporation into nurse practitioner preparation. This article describes one method of integrating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into a nurse practitioner clinical course. Readings, assignments, and a grading rubric are offered.

  2. Treatment-resistant depression in adolescents: review and updates on clinical management.

    PubMed

    Maalouf, Fadi T; Atwi, Mia; Brent, David A

    2011-11-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) in adolescents is prevalent and impairing. We here review the definition, prevalence, clinical significance, risk factors, and management of TRD in adolescents. Risk factors associated with TRD include characteristics of depression (severity, level of hopelessness, and suicidal ideation), psychiatric and medical comorbidities, environmental factors (family conflict, maternal depression, and history of abuse), and pharmacokinetics and other biomarkers. Management options include review of the adequacy of the initial treatment, re-assessment for the above-noted factors that might predispose to treatment resistance, switching antidepressants, and augmentation with medication or psychotherapy. Other modalities, such as electroconvulsive therapy, vagal nerve stimulation, and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, are also reviewed.

  3. Clinical considerations in the management of inflammatory periodontal diseases in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cabanilla, Leyvee; Molinari, Gail

    2009-01-01

    Periodontal diseases and conditions, as defined by The 1999 International Workshop for Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions presented some significant paradigm shifts based on evidence that the transition from plaque-associated reversible gingival diseases to periodontitis can occur in children and adolescents with characteristics which were previously thought to be typical of adult periodontitis. The purposes of this paper are to present the periodontal diseases and conditions described in the 1999 workshop sponsored by the American Academy of Periodontology, review the risk factors for the development of periodontal diseases in the pediatric and adolescent populations, and present appropriate clinical periodontal assessment and management for these age groups.

  4. Clinical Features of Adult/Adolescent Atopic Dermatitis and Chinese Criteria for Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Zhao, Yan; Mu, Zhang-Lei; Lu, Qian-Jin; Zhang, Li; Yao, Xu; Zheng, Min; Tang, Yi-Wen; Lu, Xin-Xiang; Xia, Xiu-Juan; Lin, You-Kun; Li, Yu-Zhen; Tu, Cai-Xia; Yao, Zhi-Rong; Xu, Jin-Hua; Li, Wei; Lai, Wei; Yang, Hui-Min; Xie, Hong-Fu; Han, Xiu-Ping; Xie, Zhi-Qiang; Nong, Xiang; Guo, Zai-Pei; Deng, Dan-Qi; Shi, Tong-Xin; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by chronic recurrent dermatitis with profound itching. Most patients have personal and/or family history of atopic diseases. Several criteria have been proposed for the diagnosis of AD. Although the clinical features of childhood AD have been widely studied, there has been less large-scale study on adult/adolescent AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features of adult/adolescent patients with chronic symmetrical eczema/AD and to propose Chinese diagnostic criteria for adult/adolescent AD. Methods: A hospital-based study was performed. Forty-two dermatological centers participated in this study. Adult and adolescent patients (12 years and over) with chronic symmetrical eczema or AD were included in this study. Questionnaires were completed by both patients and investigators. The valid questionnaires were analyzed using EpiData 3.1 and SPSS 17.0 software. Results: A total of 2662 valid questionnaires were collected (1369 male and 1293 female). Of all 2662 patients, 2062 (77.5%) patients had the disease after 12 years old, while only 600 (22.5%) patients had the disease before 12 years old, suggesting late-onset eczema/AD is common. Two thousand one hundred and thirty-nine (80.4%) patients had the disease for more than 6 months. One thousand one hundred and forty-four (43.0%) patients had a personal and/or family history of atopic diseases. One thousand five hundred and forty-eight (58.2%) patients had an elevated total serum IgE and/or eosinophilia and/or positive allergen-specific IgE. Based on these clinical and laboratory features, we proposed Chinese criteria for adult/adolescent AD. Of all 2662 patients, 60.3% were satisfied with our criteria, while only 48.2% satisfied with Hanifin Rajka criteria and 32.7% satisfied with Williams criteria, suggesting a good sensitivity of our criteria in adult/adolescent AD patients. Conclusion: Late-onset of eczema or AD is

  5. Marital and severe parent-to-adolescent physical aggression in clinic-referred families: mother and adolescent reports on co-occurrence and links to child behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Annette; Donnelly, William O; Boxer, Paul; Lewis, Terri

    2003-03-01

    This study examined the interplay of marital and severe parental physical aggression, and their links to child behavior problems, in 232 families of clinic-referred adolescents. Combined reports from mothers and adolescents indicated that two thirds of adolescents exposed to marital aggression in the past year had also experienced parental aggression. Mothers and fathers who used and/or were victims of marital aggression were both more likely to direct aggression toward their adolescent. Mother and youth reports of marital aggression were tied to each party's report of greater externalizing problems and to youth reports of greater internalizing problems. Severe parental aggression uniquely predicted maternal reports of both behavior problems, after controlling for marital aggression; the reverse was not true. Also, adolescents exposed to both types of family aggression did not display greater maladjustment than those subjected to only one type of family aggression.

  6. Psychometric properties of the French version of the short form of the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory among adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Potard, Catherine; Amoura, Camille; Kubiszewski, Violaine; Le Samedy, Mathieu; Moltrecht, Brigitte; Courtois, Robert

    2015-06-01

    We examined the psychometric qualities of the Short Form of the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (SF-CSEI) in a large sample of French adolescents and young adults. A 25-item French version was administered to 1,362 participants (561 aged below 16 years and 801 aged 16-25 years). Participants also completed other scales to measure construct validity (e.g., Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and General Health Questionnaire). Factorial analysis yielded evidence for a structure with three first-order factors for the SF-CSEI: personal, social, and family-derived self-esteem. The internal consistency of the questionnaire's different dimensions was satisfactory (Cronbach's α = .68-.77). Pearson's correlation coefficients showed that the SF-CSEI had moderate to high correlations with convergent measures (r = .19-.73) and constructs related to self-esteem (r = -.23-.65). Psychiatric patients (n = 67) scored significantly lower than a control group. Test-retest reliability was good for some of the factors, especially at 5 weeks and 1 year (r = .29-.79). The French version of the SF-CSEI appears to be a useful instrument, with a cross-culturally stable factorial structure.

  7. The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 Brief Form: Evidence for Reliability and Construct Validity in a Sample of Community-Dwelling Italian Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Andrea; Somma, Antonella; Borroni, Serena; Markon, Kristian E; Krueger, Robert F

    2015-12-16

    To assess the reliability and construct validity of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 Brief Form (PID-5-BF) among adolescents, 877 Italian high school students were administered the PID-5-BF. Participants were administered also the Measure of Disordered Personality Functioning (MDPF) as a criterion measure. In the full sample, Cronbach's alpha values for the PID-5-BF scales ranged from .59 (Detachment) to .77 (Psychoticism); in addition, all PID-5-BF scales showed mean interitem correlation values in the .22 to .40 range. Cronbach's alpha values for the PID-5-BF total score was .83 (mean interitem r = .16). Although 2-month test-retest reliability could be assessed only in a small (n = 42) subsample of participants, all PID-5-BF scale scores showed adequate temporal stability, as indexed by intraclass r values ranging from .78 (Negative Affectivity) to .97 (Detachment), all ps <.001. Exploratory structural equation modeling analyses provided at least moderate support for the a priori model of PID-5-BF items. Multiple regression analyses showed that PID-5-BF scales predicted a nonnegligible amount of variance in MDPF Non-Cooperativeness, adjusted R(2) = .17, p < .001, and Non-Coping scales, adjusted R(2) = .32, p < .001. Similarly, the PID-5-BF total score was a significant predictor of both MDPF Non-Coping, and Non-Cooperativeness scales.

  8. Psychopathic-like traits among detained female adolescents: reliability and validity of the Antisocial Process Screening Device and the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory.

    PubMed

    Colins, Olivier F; Bijttebier, Patricia; Broekaert, Eric; Andershed, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Antisocial Process Screening Device-Self-Report (APSD-SR), the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI), and the YPI-Short Version (YPI-SV) in detained female adolescents aged 12 to 17 years. The proposed three-factor structure of the YPI and YPI-SV was replicated, whereas the proposed three-factor structure of the APSD-SR or alternate models did not yield adequate fit. Overall, reliability indices for the YPI and YPI-SV were higher than those reported for the APSD-SR. APSD-SR and YPI scales were positively related with each other, except the affective dimensions of the instruments. All questionnaires showed good criterion validity but the YPI's factor structure and reliability was superior to the APSD-SR. This superiority is not because of the larger number of items in the YPI, because we also demonstrated that the factor structure and reliability of the YPI-SV was better than that of the APSD-SR.

  9. The Dutch version of the Child Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory: validation in a clinical sample and a school sample

    PubMed Central

    Diehle, Julia; de Roos, Carlijn; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Boer, Frits; Lindauer, Ramón J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background With the inclusion of trauma-related cognitions in the DSM-5 criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the assessment of these cognitions has become essential. Therefore, valid tools for the assessment of these cognitions are warranted. Objective The current study aimed at validating the Dutch version of the Child Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory (CPTCI). Method We included children aged 8–19 years in our study and assessed the factor structure, reliability and validity of the CPTCI in a clinical sample (n=184) and a school sample (n=318). Results Our results supported the two-factor structure of the CPTCI and showed good internal consistency for the total scale and the two subscales. We found significant positive correlations between the CPTCI and measures of PTSD, depression, and anxiety disorder. The CPTCI correlated negatively with a measure of quality of life. Furthermore, we found significantly higher scores in the clinical sample than in the school sample. For children who received treatment, we found that a decrease in CPTCI scores was accompanied by a decrease in posttraumatic stress symptoms and comorbid problems indicating that the CPTCI is able to detect treatment effects. Conclusion Overall, our results suggest that the Dutch CPTCI is a reliable and valid instrument. PMID:25724364

  10. Psychometric properties and clinical cut-off scores of the Spanish version of the Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lopez, Luis J; Inglés, Cándido J; García-Fernández, José M; Hidalgo, María D; Bermejo, Rosa; Puklek Levpušček, Melita

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity evidence drawn from the scores of the Spanish version of the Slovenian-developed Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents (SASA; Puklek, 1997; Puklek & Vidmar, 2000) using a community sample (Study 1) and a clinical sample (Study 2). Confirmatory factor analysis in Study 1 replicated the 2-factor structure found by the original authors in a sample of Slovenian adolescents. Test-retest reliability was adequate. Furthermore, the SASA correlated significantly with other social anxiety scales, supporting concurrent validity evidence in Spanish adolescents. The results of Study 2 confirmed the correlations between the SASA and other social anxiety measures in a clinical sample. In addition, findings revealed that the SASA can effectively discriminate between adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (SAD) and those without this disorder. Finally, cut-off scores for the SASA are provided for Spanish adolescents.

  11. Clinical management of gender dysphoria in children and adolescents: the Dutch approach.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Annelou L C; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch approach on clinical management of both prepubertal children under the age of 12 and adolescents starting at age 12 with gender dysphoria, starts with a thorough assessment of any vulnerable aspects of the youth's functioning or circumstances and, when necessary, appropriate intervention. In children with gender dysphoria only, the general recommendation is watchful waiting and carefully observing how gender dysphoria develops in the first stages of puberty. Gender dysphoric adolescents can be considered eligible for puberty suppression and subsequent cross-sex hormones when they reach the age of 16 years. Currently, withholding physical medical interventions in these cases seems more harmful to wellbeing in both adolescence and adulthood when compared to cases where physical medical interventions were provided.

  12. Use of antidepressants for major depressive disorder in children and adolescents: clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Picouto, María Dolores; Braquehais, María Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a frequent condition among children and, especially, among adolescents. However, its clinical presentation usually differs from that of adults. It is also associated with other diagnoses and with an increased morbidity and mortality. However, MDD in this population remains underrecognized and undertreated. Antidepressants (ATDs) are chosen when psychoeducational, psychosocial and/or psychotherapeutic approaches have failed. ATDs are generally used in severe cases, and are always combined with psychological treatments. The objective of this work is to discuss the role of ATD in child and adolescent MDD. We focus on the recommendations of the most cited and updated clinical guidelines and discuss some controversial aspects with regards efficacy and safety issues that have been raised based on the information obtained from clinical trials. Finally, we offer some practical recommendations for clinicians. All these findings also pose some doubt on the hypothesis of MDD as a homogeneous phenomenon during the human life cycle.

  13. Clinical Hypnosis, an Effective Mind-Body Modality for Adolescents with Behavioral and Physical Complaints.

    PubMed

    Sawni, Anju; Breuner, Cora Collette

    2017-03-24

    Mind-body medicine is a system of health practices that includes meditation/relaxation training, guided imagery, hypnosis, biofeedback, yoga, art/music therapy, prayer, t'ai chi, and psychological therapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy. Clinical hypnosis is an important mind-body tool that serves as an adjunct to conventional medical care for the adolescent patient. Clinical hypnosis specifically uses self-directed therapeutic suggestions to cultivate the imagination and facilitate the mind-body connection, leading to positive emotional and physical well-being. There are many similarities between clinical hypnosis and other mind-body/self-regulatory modalities such as visual imagery, mindfulness meditation, yoga, and biofeedback that incorporate experiential learning and mechanisms for change. They may be viewed as subtypes of the hypnotic experience and share the common experience of trance as the entrée into self-empowered change in physiologic and psychological states. Clinical hypnosis can be used by health care providers to teach adolescents coping skills to deal with a wide variety of conditions such as chronic headaches, recurrent abdominal pain, anxiety, depression, grief and bereavement, phobias, anger, family stressors, sleep disorders, or enuresis. Clinical vignettes are given to help illustrate the effectiveness of hypnosis in adolescents.

  14. Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale Perfectionism: A Predictor and Partial Mediator of Acute Treatment Outcome among Clinically Depressed Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rachel H.; Silva, Susan G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Curry, John F.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of perfectionism on acute treatment outcomes was explored in a randomized controlled trial of 439 clinically depressed adolescents (12-17 years of age) enrolled in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) who received cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine, a combination of CBT and FLX, or pill placebo. Measures…

  15. Randomized Clinical Trial of Motivational Enhancement of Substance Use Treatment among Incarcerated Adolescents: Post-Release Condom Non-Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosengard, Cynthia; Stein, L. A. R.; Barnett, Nancy P.; Monti, Peter M.; Golembeske, Charles; Lebeau-Craven, Rebecca; Miranda, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Evaluated impact of motivational enhancement (ME) of substance abuse treatment compared to relaxation training (RT) on sex without condoms (overall and involving substance use) 3 months following release among incarcerated adolescents. This randomized clinical trial involved 114 incarcerated adolescents from the Northeast. Regression analyses…

  16. The MAPI as a Treatment Outcome Measure for Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piersma, Harry L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory at admission and discharge to 215 hospitalized adolescent psychiatric patients. Found significant mean score differences for both internalizing (affective disorder) and externalizing (disruptive behavior disorder) adolescents. Internalizing adolescents reported significantly greater distress at…

  17. Automatic Evaluations in Clinically Anxious and Nonanxious Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vervoort, Leentje; Wolters, Lidewij H.; Hogendoorn, Sanne M.; Prins, Pier J. M.; de Haan, Else; Nauta, Maaike H.; Boer, Frits

    2010-01-01

    Automatic evaluations of clinically anxious and nonanxious children (n = 40, aged 8-16, 18 girls) were compared using a pictorial performance-based measure of automatic affective associations. Results showed a threat-related evaluation bias in clinically anxious but not in nonanxious children. In anxious participants, automatic evaluations of…

  18. Factors affecting linkage to care and engagement in care for newly diagnosed HIV-positive adolescents within fifteen adolescent medicine clinics in the United States.

    PubMed

    Philbin, Morgan M; Tanner, Amanda E; DuVal, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan M; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill; Bethel, Jim; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2014-08-01

    Early linkage to care and engagement in care are critical for initiation of medical interventions. However, over 50 % of newly diagnosed persons do not receive HIV-related care within 6 months of diagnosis. We evaluated a linkage to care and engagement in care initiative for HIV-positive adolescents in 15 U.S.-based clinics. Structural and client-level factors (e.g. demographic and behavioral characteristics, clinic staff and location) were evaluated as predictors of successful linkage and engagement. Within 32 months, 1,172/1,679 (69.8 %) of adolescents were linked to care of which 1,043/1,172 (89 %) were engaged in care. Only 62.1 % (1,043/1,679) of adolescents were linked and engaged in care. Linkage to care failure was attributed to adolescent, provider, and clinic-specific factors. Many adolescents provided incomplete data during the linkage process or failed to attend appointments, both associated with failure to linkage to care. Additional improvements in HIV care will require creative approaches to coordinated data sharing, as well as continued outreach services to support newly diagnosed adolescents.

  19. Polyvictimization: Latent profiles and mental health outcomes in a clinical sample of adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Zachary W.; Moreland, Angela; Cohen, Joseph R.; Lee, Robert C.; Hanson, Rochelle F.; Danielson, Carla Kmett; Self-Brown, Shannon; Briggs, Ernestine C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exposure to multiple traumatic events (polyvictimization) is a reliable predictor of deleterious health outcomes and risk behaviors in adolescence. The current study extends the literature on the prevalence and consequences of adolescent trauma exposure by (a) empirically identifying and characterizing trauma exposure profiles in a large, ethnically diverse, multi-site, clinical sample of adolescents, and (b) evaluating relations among identified profiles with demographic characteristics and clinical correlates. Method Data from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network Core Data Set were used to identify and characterize victimization profiles using latent class analysis in a sample of 3,485 adolescents (ages 13–18, 63% female, 35.7% White, 23.2% Black/African American, 35.0% Hispanic/Latino). Multiple measures of psychological distress and risk behaviors were evaluated as covariates of trauma exposure classes. Results Five trauma exposure classes, or profiles, were identified. Four classes—representing approximately half the sample—were characterized by polyvictimization. Polyvictimization classes were differentiated on number of trauma types, whether emotional abuse occurred, and whether emotional abuse occurred over single or multiple developmental epochs. Unique relations with demographic characteristics and mental health outcomes were observed. Discussion Results suggest polyvictimization is not a unidimensional phenomenon but a diverse set of trauma exposure experiences with unique correlates among youth. Further research on prevention of polyvictimization and mechanisms linking chronic trauma exposure, gender, and ethnicity to negative outcomes is warranted. PMID:26958417

  20. Advancing the Scientific Foundation for Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Michael C; Blossom, Jennifer B; Evans, Spencer C; Amaro, Christina M; Kanine, Rebecca M

    2016-05-24

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) has become a central focus in clinical child and adolescent psychology. As originally defined, EBP in psychology is the integration of the best available research evidence, patient characteristics, and clinical expertise. Although evidence-based perspectives have garnered widespread acceptance in recent years, there has also been some confusion and disagreement about the 3-part definition of EBP, particularly the role of research. In this article, we first provide a brief review of the development of EBP in clinical child and adolescent psychology. Next, we outline the following 4 points to help clarify the understanding of EBP: (a) knowledge should not be confused with epistemic processes, (b) research on clinician and client factors is needed for EBP, (c) research on assessment is needed for EBP, and (d) the 3-part conceptualization of EBP can serve as a useful framework to guide research. Based on these principles, we put forth a slightly revised conceptualization of EBP, in which the role of research is expanded and more clearly operationalized. Finally, based on our review of the literature, we offer illustrative examples of specific directions for future research to advance the evidence base for EBP in clinical child and adolescent psychology.

  1. Testing Demographic Differences for Alcohol Use Initiation among Adolescents for the Decisional Balance and Situational Temptations Prevention Inventories

    PubMed Central

    Sillice, Marie A.; Paiva, Andrea L.; Babbin, Steven F.; McGee, Heather A.; Rossi, Joseph R.; Redding, Colleen A.; Meier, Kathryn S.; Oatley, Karin; Velicer, Wayne F.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use by middle school-aged students is a public health concern because of the numerous adverse social, health and psychological outcomes. Prevention programs attempt to intervene before alcohol use begins. A tailored, computer-delivered program for the prevention of alcohol use and a series of new transtheoretical model measures were developed, including decisional balance (Pros and Cons) of alcohol use and Situational Temptations to Try Alcohol. This study investigated if there were any demographic differences on these measures in a sample of 6th grade middle school students from 20 schools (N=4151) at baseline. Three factorial analysis of variance tests were conducted to explore the impact of race (whites vs. non-whites), ethnicity (Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics) and gender (males vs. females). A significant two-way interaction effect was found between gender and ethnicity for Pros of Alcohol Use. A significant three-way interaction effect was found between gender, race and ethnicity for Cons of Alcohol Use. Main effects were found for the three demographic factors for Situational Temptations to Try Alcohol. However, the effect sizes for the interaction effects and main effects were very small (all below η2=. 01), suggesting that race/ethnicity and gender alone may not be highly influential factors in the Decisional Balance for the Prevention of Alcohol and Situational Temptations to Try Alcohol in adolescence. The implications for these results and alcohol use prevention among this group are discussed. PMID:24916916

  2. Inventory Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Known as MRO for Maintenance, Repair and Operating supplies, Tropicana Products, Inc.'s automated inventory management system is an adaptation of the Shuttle Inventory Management System (SIMS) developed by NASA to assure adequate supply of every item used in support of the Space Shuttle. The Tropicana version monitors inventory control, purchasing receiving and departmental costs for eight major areas of the company's operation.

  3. The Construct Validity of the Dutch Personality Inventory for DSM-5 Personality Disorders (PID-5) in a Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Bastiaens, Tim; Claes, Laurence; Smits, Dirk; De Clercq, Barbara; De Fruyt, Filip; Rossi, Gina; Vanwalleghem, Dominique; Vermote, Rudi; Lowyck, Benedicte; Claes, Stephan; De Hert, Marc

    2016-02-01

    The factor structure and the convergent validity of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), a self-report questionnaire designed to measure personality pathology as advocated in the fifth edition, Section III of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), are already demonstrated in general population samples, but need replication in clinical samples. In 240 Flemish inpatients, we examined the factor structure of the PID-5 by means of exploratory structural equation modeling. Additionally, we investigated differences in PID-5 higher order domain scores according to gender, age and educational level, and explored convergent and discriminant validity by relating the PID-5 with the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Basic Questionnaire and by comparing PID-5 scores of inpatients with and without a DSM-IV categorical personality disorder diagnosis. Our results confirmed the original five-factor structure of the PID-5. The reliability and the convergent and discriminant validity of the PID-5 proved to be adequate. Implications for future research are discussed.

  4. Relationships among victoria symptom validity test indices and personality assessment inventory validity scales in a large clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Kathryn A; Frazier, Thomas W; Busch, Robyn M; Naugle, Richard I

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to examine the relationships among measures of cognitive symptom exaggeration (i.e., response accuracy and response latency) and (2) to examine the relationship between measures of cognitive and psychopathological symptom exaggeration. It was expected that Victoria Symptom Validity Test (VSVT) accuracy and latency measures would be significantly correlated, with invalid responders demonstrating longer response latencies. VSVT scores were also expected to correlate significantly with the Negative Impression Management (NIM) and Infrequency (INF) subscales of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI). VSVT and PAI data were collected from 300 patients during routine clinical neuropsychological evaluations. Results indicated that VSVT accuracy and latency measures were significantly and moderately correlated, and both types of VSVT scores were significantly, but modestly, related to NIM, but not INF. These findings suggest that VSVT response latencies may supplement accuracy scores in identifying patients who are exerting suboptimal effort on cognitive measures. These findings further suggest that measures of cognitive symptom validity only partially overlap with measures of psychopathological symptom exaggeration.

  5. School-Located Vaccination Clinics for Adolescents: Correlates of Acceptance Among Parents.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Lisa M; Weiss, Paul; Underwood, Natasha L; Seib, Katherine; Sales, Jessica M; Vogt, Tara M; Rask, Kimberly; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis L; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M

    2015-08-01

    Four vaccines are recommended by The Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices for adolescents: tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap), meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4), human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV), and annual seasonal influenza vaccine. However, coverage among adolescents is suboptimal. School-located vaccination clinics (SLVCs) offer vaccines to students at school, increasing access. This study seeks to determine the relationship between attitudes of parents of middle- and high-school students and acceptance of SLVCs for all four adolescent recommended vaccines. We conducted a telephone and web-based survey among parents of students enrolled in six middle and five high schools in Georgia. Analyses were conducted to examine associations between parental attitudes and willingness to allow their child to be vaccinated at school. Tdap and influenza vaccine had the highest rates of parental SLVC acceptance while HPV vaccine had the lowest. Parents who accepted SLVCs had higher perceived severity of influenza, meningococcal, and HPV illnesses compared to parents who did not accept SLVC. Intention to vaccinate was associated with SLVC acceptance for Tdap [Adjusted OR (AOR) 7.38; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.44-22.31], MCV4 (AOR 2.97; 95% CI 1.67-5.28), and HPV vaccines (AOR 7.61; 95% CI 3.43-16.89). Social norms were associated with acceptance of SLVCs for influenza vaccine (AOR 1.44; 95% CI 1.12-1.84). These findings suggest parents of adolescents are generally supportive of SLVCs for recommended adolescent vaccines. Perceived severity of illness and intention to get their adolescent vaccinated were the most consistent correlates of parental SLVC acceptance for all vaccines. Future SLVC planning should focus on perceptions of disease severity and benefits of vaccination.

  6. Menstrual disorders in a Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic: patient presentations and longitudinal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chung, P W; Chan, Symphorosa S C; Yiu, K W; Lao, Terence T H; Chung, Tony K H

    2011-10-01

    OBJECTIVE. To study the presentations, diagnoses, and outcomes in adolescents with menstrual disorders. DESIGN. Prospective cohort study. SETTING. Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic, Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS. A total of 577 adolescents aged 14 to 19 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. The presentations and diagnoses of adolescents with menstrual disorders were reviewed and their menstrual outcomes determined by a telephone survey. RESULTS. In all, 47% presented with menorrhagia, prolonged menstruation, and short menstrual cycles; 27% had secondary amenorrhoea, 12% had dysmenorrhoea, 11% had oligomenorrhoea, and 3% had primary amenorrhoea. Significant diagnoses included congenital genital tract anomalies, premature ovarian failure, anorexia nervosa, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Polycystic ovarian syndrome was diagnosed in 16% of the cohort. In all, 24% of these 577 patients had abnormal menstrual cycles 4 years later. Direct logistic regression analysis indicated a cycle length of more than 35 days at presentation (adjusted odds ratio=2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-4.5), previous diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (adjusted odds ratio=2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.4), and current body mass index of 23 kg/m(2) or higher (adjusted odds ratio=1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.0) were risk factors for persistently long menstrual cycle exceeding 35 days. Adolescents who were screened out with a definitive diagnosis after initial assessment were at low risk of persistently long menstrual cycles at follow-up (adjusted odds ratio=0.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.8). CONCLUSIONS. Adolescent menstrual disorders should not be ignored. Long cycle, diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome at first consultation, and a current body mass index of 23 kg/m(2) or higher were statistically associated with persistent problems.

  7. Healthcare Reform and Preparing the Future Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology Workforce.

    PubMed

    Janicke, David M; Fritz, Alyssa M; Rozensky, Ronald H

    2015-01-01

    The healthcare environment is undergoing important changes for both patients and providers, in part due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Ultimately the healthcare delivery system will function very differently by the end of this decade. These changes will have important implications for the education, training, scientific inquiry, and practice of clinical child and adolescent psychologists. In this article we provide a brief description of the fundamental features of the ACA, with a specific focus on critical components of the act that have important, specific implications for clinical child and adolescents psychologists. We then provide recommendations to help position our field to thrive in the evolving healthcare environment to help facilitate further awareness and promote discussion of both challenges and opportunities that face our field in this evolving health care environment.

  8. The Adolescent Substance Abuse Goal Commitment (ASAGC) Questionnaire: An Examination of Clinical Utility and Psychometric Properties.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Yifrah; Ohannessian, Christine McCauley; McKay, James R; Burke, Rebecca H

    2016-02-01

    Commitment to change is an innovative potential mediator or mechanism of behavior change that has not been examined in adolescents with substance use disorders (SUD). The Adolescent Substance Abuse Goal Commitment (ASAGC) questionnaire is a 16-item measure developed to assess an individual's commitment to his/her stated treatment goal. The objectives of this study are to explore the research and clinical utility of the commitment construct as measured by the ASAGC. During sessions 3 and 9 of a 10-week SUD treatment, therapists completed the ASAGC for 170 13-18 year-old adolescents. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the ATAGC items. Concurrent validity with related constructs, self-efficacy and motivation for change, was examined as well. At both sessions, the factor analysis resulted in two scales--Commitment to Recovery and Commitment to Harm Reduction. The ASAGC scales were found to demonstrate a high level of internal consistency (alpha coefficients ranged from .92 to .96 over time). In contrast to the Commitment to Harm Reduction scale, the Commitment to Recovery scale consistently correlated with scales from the Situational Confidence Questionnaire assessing self-efficacy, evidencing concurrent validity. Similarly, the Commitment to Recovery scale was related to the Problem Recognition Questionnaire, providing further evidence of the validity of the ASAGC. The ASAGC is a reliable and valid clinical research instrument for the assessment of adolescents' commitment to their substance abuse treatment goal. Clinical researchers may take advantage of the clinical utility of the ASAGC including its ability to differentiate between commitment to abstinence versus commitment to harm reduction.

  9. A Short-Term, Prospective Test of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Ideation in an Adolescent Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Miller, Adam Bryant; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Leichtweis, Richard N

    2016-06-01

    The present prospective study tested a portion of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS) in an adolescent clinical sample. Participants were 143 adolescents consecutively admitted to a partial hospitalization program who completed assessments at intake and discharge from the program. Results partially supported the IPTS and suggest that (1) perceived burdensomeness may be an important socially based cognition for understanding concurrent risk for suicidal ideation (SI); (2) thwarted belongingness affects depression symptom severity over time, which indirectly predicts SI over a short follow-up time frame; and (3) the IPTS constructs may function differently in a high-risk clinical adolescent sample, compared to adults, although findings are preliminary.

  10. Implementing psychophysiology in clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety: use of rater judgments based on graphical representations of psychophysiology.

    PubMed

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Augenstein, Tara M; Aldao, Amelia; Thomas, Sarah A; Daruwala, Samantha; Kline, Kathryn; Regan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Social stressor tasks induce adolescents' social distress as indexed by low-cost psychophysiological methods. Unknown is how to incorporate these methods within clinical assessments. Having assessors judge graphical depictions of psychophysiological data may facilitate detections of data patterns that may be difficult to identify using judgments about numerical depictions of psychophysiological data. Specifically, the Chernoff Face method involves graphically representing data using features on the human face (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape). This method capitalizes on humans' abilities to discern subtle variations in facial features. Using adolescent heart rate norms and Chernoff Faces, we illustrated a method for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety. Twenty-two clinic-referred adolescents completed a social anxiety self-report and provided psychophysiological data using wireless heart rate monitors during a social stressor task. We graphically represented participants' psychophysiological data and normative adolescent heart rates. For each participant, two undergraduate coders made comparative judgments between the dimensions (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape) of two Chernoff Faces. One Chernoff Face represented a participant's heart rate within a context (baseline, speech preparation, or speech-giving). The second Chernoff Face represented normative heart rate data matched to the participant's age. Using Chernoff Faces, coders reliably and accurately identified contextual variation in participants' heart rate responses to social stress. Further, adolescents' self-reported social anxiety symptoms predicted Chernoff Face judgments, and judgments could be differentiated by social stress context. Our findings have important implications for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety.

  11. Preliminary Examination of the Interpersonal Psychological Theory of Suicide in an Adolescent Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Horton, Sarah E; Hughes, Jennifer L; King, Jessica D; Kennard, Betsy D; Westers, Nicholas J; Mayes, Taryn L; Stewart, Sunita M

    2016-08-01

    This study offers a preliminary examination of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS; Joiner 2005) in an adolescent clinical sample. The IPTS offers a nuanced framework that has many conceptual and practical merits. Although this theory has a growing base of evidence among adults, it has yet to be tested in adolescents using direct measures of its central constructs. Participants were 147 adolescents (76.2 % girls) on an inpatient psychiatric unit, who completed measures of key IPTS constructs of thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, acquired capability for suicide, as well as depression severity, hopelessness, and severity of suicidal symptoms. Our findings were largely consistent with hypotheses derived from the IPTS: perceived burdensomeness, and at a marginal level, thwarted belongingness, were independently associated with current suicidal ideation. The thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness interaction marginally distinguished between adolescents with passive and active suicidal ideation. Acquired capability for suicide was associated with recent suicidal intent. Examination of all three IPTS constructs simultaneously revealed main effects of each construct (with a marginal effect of thwarted belongingness), and interaction effects for thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness, and thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness by acquired capability for suicide in association with suicidal symptom severity. Sex, age, depression severity, and hopelessness were controlled in all analyses. This study offers strong, albeit preliminary, support of the IPTS in a clinical adolescent sample. Assessment of IPTS constructs may be useful in determining persistent risk for suicide attempt. Prospective tests of the theory, and extensions to intervention and prevention should be considered in future IPTS research.

  12. Executive functions: performance-based measures and the behavior rating inventory of executive function (BRIEF) in adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Toplak, Maggie E; Bucciarelli, Stefania M; Jain, Umesh; Tannock, Rosemary

    2009-01-01

    Performance-based measures and ratings of executive functions were examined in a sample of adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comparison controls. Performance-based measures of executive function included inhibition, working memory, set shifting, and planning, and ratings of these same executive functions were completed by parents and teachers. Adolescents with ADHD demonstrated lower executive function performance than controls and displayed elevated ratings on the executive function ratings by parents and teachers. Significant associations were obtained between the performance-based measures and the parent and teacher ratings, but each measure was not uniquely associated with its respective scale on the rating scales. When performance-based measures and ratings were examined as predictors of ADHD status, the parent and teacher ratings entered as significant predictors of ADHD status. Further commonality analyses indicated that performance-based measures accounted for little unique variance in predicting ADHD status and also displayed little overlap with the behavioral ratings. These findings highlight the diagnostic utility of behavioral ratings of executive function in predicting ADHD status; however, behavioral ratings should not be assumed to be a proxy for performance on measures of executive function in clinical practice.

  13. Parent-Adolescent Communication and Its Relationship to Adolescent Depression and Suicide Proneness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stivers, Cathie

    1988-01-01

    Adolescents (N=53) and both parents completed Parent-Adolescent Communication Inventory (PACI) and Suicide-Depression Inventory (SDI). Found significant relationships between mother's and adolescent's scores, not between father's and adolescent's scores. When other independent variables were controlled, neither parents' scores were significantly…

  14. Factor Structure and Clinical Utility of the Beck Depression Inventory in Patients with Binge Eating Disorder and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Udo, Tomoko; McKee, Sherry A.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is often used to assess depression symptoms, but its factor structure and clinical utility have not been evaluated in patients with binge eating disorder (BED) and obesity. Methods 882 treatment-seeking obese patients with BED were administered structured interviews (SCID-I/P) and completed self-report questionnaires. Results Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a brief 16-item BDI version with a three-factor structure (affective, attitudinal, and somatic). Both 21- and 16-item versions showed excellent internal consistency (both α=0.89) and had significant correlation patterns with different aspects of eating disorder psychopathology; three factors showed significant but variable associations with eating disorder psychopathology. Area under the curves (AUC) for both BDI versions were significant in predicting major depressive disorder (MDD; AUC=0.773 [16-item], 73.5% sensitivity/70.2% specificity, AUC=0.769 [21-item], 79.5% sensitivity/64.1% specificity) and mood disorders (AUC=0.763 [16-item], 67.1% sensitivity/71.5% specificity, AUC=0.769 [21-item], 84.2% sensitivity/55.7% specificity). 21-item BDI (cut-off score ≥16) showed higher negative predictive values (94.0% vs. 93.0% [MDD]; 92.4% vs. 88.3% [mood disorders]) than brief 16-item BDI (cut-off score ≥13). Conclusions Both BDI versions demonstrated moderate performance as a screening instrument for MDD/mood disorders in obese patients with BED. Advantages and disadvantages for both versions are discussed. A three-factor structure has potential to inform the conceptualization of depression features. PMID:25537344

  15. Repetitive Concussions in Adolescent Athletes – Translating Clinical and Experimental Research into Perspectives on Rehabilitation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Bridgette D.; Lee, Sangmi; Sadjadi, Raha; Fritz, Nora; Carlson, Jaclyn; Griep, Carrie; Ho, Vanessa; Jang, Patrice; Lamb, Annick; Popolizio, Beth; Saini, Sonia; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.; Prins, Mayumi L.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Basso, D. Michele; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are particularly common during adolescence, a time when even mild brain injuries may disrupt ongoing brain maturation and result in long-term complications. A recent focus on the consequences of repetitive concussions among professional athletes has prompted the development of several new experimental models in rodents, as well as the revision of guidelines for best management of sports concussions. Here, we consider the utility of rodent models to understand the functional consequences and pathobiology of concussions in the developing brain, identifying the unique behavioral and pathological signatures of concussive brain injuries. The impact of repetitive concussions on behavioral consequences and injury progression is also addressed. In particular, we focus on the epidemiological, clinical, and experimental evidence underlying current recommendations for physical and cognitive rest after concussion, and highlight key areas in which further research is needed. Lastly, we consider how best to promote recovery after injury, recognizing that optimally timed, activity-based rehabilitative strategies may hold promise for the adolescent athlete who has sustained single or repetitive concussions. The purpose of this review is to inform the clinical research community as it strives to develop and optimize evidence-based guidelines for the concussed adolescent, in terms of both acute and long-term management. PMID:25883586

  16. Distinctive clinical course and pattern of relapse in adolescents with medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tabori, Uri . E-mail: uri.tabori@sickkids.ca; Sung, Lillian; Laperriere, Normand; Crooks, Bruce; Wilson, Beverly

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical course of adolescents with medulloblastoma, with specific emphasis on prognosis and pattern of relapse. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied the clinical course and outcomes of children aged 10-20 years with medulloblastoma, treated at centers throughout Canada between 1986 and 2003. To better assess time to relapse, a cohort of patients aged 3-20 years at diagnosis was generated. Results: A total of 72 adolescents were analyzed. Five-year overall survival and event-free survival rates were 78.3% {+-} 5.4% and 68.0% {+-} 6.2%, respectively. Late relapses occurred at a median of 3.0 years (range, 0.3-6.8 years). In univariate analysis, conventional risk stratification and the addition of chemotherapy to craniospinal radiation did not have prognostic significance. Female patients had improved overall survival (p = 0.007). Time to relapse increased with age in a linear fashion. After relapse, patients faired poorly regardless of treatment modality. Patients who did not receive chemotherapy initially had improved progression-free survival at relapse (p 0.05). Conclusions: Our study suggests that adolescents with medulloblastoma might have a unique prognosis and pattern of relapse, dissimilar to those in younger children. They might benefit from different risk stratifications and prolonged follow-up. These issues should be addressed in future prospective trials.

  17. Discrete subgroups of adolescents diagnosed with borderline personality disorder: a latent class analysis of personality features.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Vera; Canta, Guilherme; de Castro, Filipa; Leal, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    Research suggests that borderline personality disorder (BPD) can be diagnosed in adolescents and is marked by considerable heterogeneity. This study aimed to identify personality features characterizing adolescents with BPD and possible meaningful patterns of heterogeneity that could lead to personality subgroups. The authors analyzed data on 60 adolescents, ages 15 to 18 years, who met DSM criteria for a BPD diagnosis. The authors used latent class analysis (LCA) to identify subgroups based on the personality pattern scales from the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI). LCA indicated that the best-fitting solution was a two-class model, identifying two discrete subgroups of BPD adolescents that were described as internalizing and externalizing. The subgroups were then compared on clinical and sociodemographic variables, measures of personality dimensions, DSM BPD criteria, and perception of attachment styles. Adolescents with a BPD diagnosis constitute a heterogeneous group and vary meaningfully on personality features that can have clinical implications for treatment.

  18. Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a clinical sample of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Maisto, Stephen A; Chung, Tammy A; Cornelius, Jack R; Martin, Christopher S

    2003-06-01

    This study investigated the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES; W. R. Miller & J. S. Tonigan, 1996) in adolescents presenting for treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD). The participants were 80 males and 43 females (mean age = 16.8 years) who presented for AUD treatment (95.1% outpatient, 4.9% inpatient). Participants completed assessments at baseline and 1 year and provided information on alcohol use and related variables monthly between these 2 assessments. Principal-components and confirmatory factor analyses of the baseline SOCRATES identified 2 factors, Taking Steps and Recognition, which showed good internal consistency and concurrent and predictive evidence of validity. The results were interpreted as supporting the use of the SOCRATES with clinical samples of adolescents.

  19. The Impact of Perceived Interpersonal Functioning on Treatment for Adolescent Depression: IPT-A versus Treatment as Usual in School-Based Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunlicks-Stoessel, Meredith; Mufson, Laura; Jekal, Angela; Turner, J. Blake

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Aspects of depressed adolescents' perceived interpersonal functioning were examined as moderators of response to treatment among adolescents treated with interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A; Mufson, Dorta, Moreau, & Weissman, 2004) or treatment as usual (TAU) in school-based health clinics. Method:…

  20. MR urography in children and adolescents: techniques and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Trout, Andrew T; Smith, Ethan A

    2016-06-01

    Renal and urinary tract imaging is commonly performed in the pediatric population, particularly in the setting of suspected or known congenital anomalies. In most cases, adequate anatomic assessment can be achieved using ultrasound and fluoroscopic techniques, and evaluation of differential renal function and urinary tract drainage can be accomplished with renal scintigraphy. However, in a subset of children, anatomic or functional questions may remain after this routine evaluation. In this setting, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tailored to evaluate the kidneys and urinary tract, known as MR urography (MRU), can be used to depict the kidneys, ureters, and urinary bladder in detail and to determine differential renal function and assess urinary tract drainage. The objectives of this review article are to (1) describe pediatric-specific MRI techniques for assessment of the kidneys and urinary tract and (2) present common clinical applications for pediatric MRU where imaging can "add value" in terms of diagnosis and patient management.

  1. [Characteristics of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria referred to the Hamburg Gender Identity Clinic].

    PubMed

    Becker, Inga; Gjergji-Lama, Voltisa; Romer, Georg; Möller, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Given the increasing demand for counselling in gender dysphoria in childhood in Germany, there is a definite need for empirical data on characteristics and developmental trajectories of this clinical group. This study aimed to provide a first overview by assessing demographic characteristics and developmental trajectories of a group of gender variant boys and girls referred to the specialised Gender Identity Clinic in Hamburg. Data were extracted from medical charts, transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis methods. Categories were set up by inductive-deductive reasoning based on the patients' parents' and clinicians' information in the files. Between 2006 and 2010, 45 gender variant children and adolescents were seen by clinicians; 88.9% (n = 40) of these were diagnosed with gender identity disorder (ICD-10). Within this group, the referral rates for girls were higher than for boys (1:1.5). Gender dysphoric girls were on average older than the boys and a higher percentage of girls was referred to the clinic at the beginning of adolescence (> 12 years of age). At the same time, more girls reported an early onset age. More girls made statements about their (same-sex) sexual orientation during adolescence and wishes for gender confirming medical interventions. More girls than boys revealed self-mutilation in the past or present as well as suicidal thoughts and/or attempts. Results indicate that the presentation of clinically referred gender dysphoric girls differs from the characteristics boys present in Germany; especially with respect to the most salient age differences. Therefore, these two groups require different awareness and individual treatment approaches.

  2. Improving the Implementation of Evidence-Based Clinical Practices in Adolescent Reproductive Health Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Lisa M.; Middleton, Dawn; Mueller, Trisha; Avellino, Lia; Hallum-Montes, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purposes of the study were to describe baseline data in the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices among health center partners as part of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative and to identify opportunities for health center improvement. Methods Health center partner baseline data were collected in the first year (2011) and before program implementation of a 5-year community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative. A needs assessment on health center capacity and implementation of evidence-based clinical practices was administered with 51 health centers partners in 10 communities in the United States with high rates of teen pregnancy. Results Health centers reported inconsistent implementation of evidence-based clinical practices in providing reproductive health services to adolescents. Approximately 94.1% offered same-day appointments, 91.1% had infrastructure to reduce cost barriers, 90.2% offered after-school appointments, and 80.4% prescribed hormonal contraception without prerequisite examinations or testing. Approximately three quarters provided visual and audio privacy in examination rooms (76.5%) and counseling areas (74.5%). Fewer offered a wide range of contraceptive methods (67.8%) and took a sexual health history at every visit (54.9%). Only 45.1% reported Quick Start initiation of hormonal contraception, emergency contraception (43.1%), or intrauterine devices (12.5%) were “always” available to adolescents. Conclusions The assessment highlighted opportunities for health center improvement. Strategies to build capacity of health center partners to implement evidence-based clinical practices may lead to accessibility and quality of reproductive health services for adolescents in the funded communities. PMID:26381918

  3. Conformity of pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics to the patient-centered medical home care model.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Baligh R; Agwu, Allison L; Schranz, Asher; Korthuis, P Todd; Gaur, Aditya H; Rutstein, Richard; Sharp, Victoria; Spector, Stephen A; Berry, Stephen A; Gebo, Kelly A

    2013-05-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has been introduced as a model for providing high-quality, comprehensive, patient-centered care that is both accessible and coordinated, and may provide a framework for optimizing the care of youth living with HIV (YLH). We surveyed six pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics caring for 578 patients (median age 19 years, 51% male, and 82% black) in July 2011 to assess conformity to the PCMH. Clinics completed a 50-item survey covering the six domains of the PCMH: (1) comprehensive care, (2) patient-centered care, (3) coordinated care, (4) accessible services, (5) quality and safety, and (6) health information technology. To determine conformity to the PCMH, a novel point-based scoring system was devised. Points were tabulated across clinics by domain to obtain an aggregate assessment of PCMH conformity. All six clinics responded. Overall, clinics attained a mean 75.8% [95% CI, 63.3-88.3%] on PCMH measures-scoring highest on patient-centered care (94.7%), coordinated care (83.3%), and quality and safety measures (76.7%), and lowest on health information technology (70.0%), accessible services (69.1%), and comprehensive care (61.1%). Clinics moderately conformed to the PCMH model. Areas for improvement include access to care, comprehensive care, and health information technology. Future studies are warranted to determine whether greater clinic PCMH conformity improves clinical outcomes and cost savings for YLH.

  4. Differential Functioning of the Chinese Version of Beck Depression Inventory-II in Adolescent Gender Groups: Use of a Multiple-Group Mean and Covariance Structure Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Pei-Chen

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (a) to investigate whether items of the Chinese version of Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II-C; "Chinese Behavioral Science Corporation" in "Manual for the Beck Depression Inventory-II" [in Chinese]. The Chinese Behavioral Science Corporation, Taiwan, 2000) exhibited DIF across adolescent…

  5. One Size Does Not Fit All: Improving Clinical Practice in Older Children and Adolescents with Language and Learning Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Cheryl M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the lead article for this clinical forum, Kamhi (2014) suggests ways that current knowledge on instructional practices in learning and language can be applied to clinical practice in language disorders. I propose that Kamhi's suggestions are in need of fine-tuning for older children and adolescents with language disorders. A…

  6. Patterns and predictors of health service utilization in adolescents with pain: comparison between a community and a clinical pain sample

    PubMed Central

    Toliver-Sokol, Marisol; Murray, Caitlin B.; Wilson, Anna C.; Lewandowski, Amy; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2011-01-01

    There is limited research describing the patterns of healthcare utilization in adolescents with chronic pain. This study describes healthcare utilization in a clinical chronic pain sample, and compares the patterns of service use of this group to a community sample with intermittent pain complaints. We also investigated demographic and clinical factors that predicted healthcare visits and medication use in the clinical sample. Data on 117 adolescents (aged 12-18; n=59 clinical pain sample, n=58 community) were collected. Caregivers and adolescents reported on sociodemographics, medical visits, current medications, pain, activity limitations, and depression. As hypothesized, the clinical pain sample had higher rates of healthcare consultation on all types of medical visits (general, specialty care, complementary medicine, mental health, OT/PT), and higher medication use compared to the community sample. Regression analyses revealed that higher annual income, greater pain frequency, and higher levels of caregiver reported activity limitations were associated with a greater number of healthcare visits for the total sample. Within the clinical pain sample, higher pain frequency and greater activity limitations (caregiver-report) predicted more specialty care visits. Additionally, higher income and greater levels of depressive symptoms predicted a higher number of prescribed medications. Perspective This study contributes to the limited available data on health service and medication use in a clinical chronic pain sample versus a community sample of adolescents. We also identify clinical factors (pain frequency, parent-reported activity limitations, depressive symptoms) and demographic factors (gender, income) associated with healthcare utilization. PMID:21481647

  7. Impulsivity and Clinical Symptoms among Adolescents with Non-Suicidal Self-Injury with or without Attempted Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Donald M.; Mathias, Charles W.; Marsh-Richard, Dawn M.; Prevette, Kristen N.; Dawes, Michael A.; Hatzis, Erin S.; Palmes, Guy; Nouvion, Sylvain O.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined clinical characteristics and laboratory-measured impulsive behavior of adolescents engaging in either non-suicidal self-injury with (NSSI+SA; n = 25) or without (NSSI-Only; n = 31) suicide attempts. We hypothesized that adolescent with NSSI+SI would exhibit more severe clinical symptoms and higher levels of behavioral impulsivity compared to adolescents with NSSI-Only. Adolescents were recruited from an inpatient psychiatric hospital unit and the two groups were compared on demographic characteristics, psychopathology, self-reported clinical ratings, methods of non-suicidal self-injury, and two laboratory impulsivity measures. Primary evaluations were conducted during psychiatric hospitalization, and a subset of those tested during hospitalization was retested 4-6 weeks after discharge. During hospitalization, NSSI+SA patients reported worse depression, hopelessness, and impulsivity on standard clinical measures, and demonstrated elevated impulsivity on a reward-directed laboratory measure compared to NSSI-Only patients. In the preliminary follow-up analyses, depression, hopelessness, suicidal ideation, and laboratory impulsivity were improved for both groups, but the NSSI+SA group still exhibited significantly more depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and impulsivity than the NSSI-Only group. Risk assessments for adolescents with NSSI+SA should include consideration not only of the severity of clinical symptoms but of the current level impulsivity as well. PMID:19631392

  8. Community-Based Participatory Clinical Research in Obesity by Adolescents: Pipeline for Researchers of the Future

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Robert; Chester, Ann

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel, untapped opportunity, challenging cultural and man-power barriers to transferring advances in biomedical science knowledge that will improve community health care (Type II Clinical Translational Research) in a medically underserved community. We describe a pilot model in which adolescents apply principles of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) at the epicenter of the obesity diabetes epidemic in rural Appalachia in West Virginia. The model invites minority, financially disadvantaged, and educationally disadvantaged adolescents to become educated on ethics, then provides infrastructure to support study design and conduct of CBPR. This experience demonstrates that these adolescents can efficiently, with quality and integrity, reach into the most vulnerable of communities and their own families to show that the prevalence of obesity is at 50% and diabetes 10.4% (n = 989). Our experience illustrates the infrastructure requirements for this strategy to be successful and emphasizes the substantial benefit that could accrue if the model is successfully sustained. The benefit includes not only the translation of knowledge to influence community lifestyle behavior but also the creation of a pipeline of new biomedical scientists for the future. PMID:20443918

  9. Clinical Decision-Making Following Disasters: Efficient Identification of PTSD Risk in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Carla Kmett; Cohen, Joseph R; Adams, Zachary W; Youngstrom, Eric A; Soltis, Kathryn; Amstadter, Ananda B; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to utilize a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) approach in order to improve clinical decision-making for adolescents at risk for the development of psychopathology in the aftermath of a natural disaster. Specifically we assessed theoretically-driven individual, interpersonal, and event-related vulnerability factors to determine which indices were most accurate in forecasting PTSD. Furthermore, we aimed to translate these etiological findings by identifying clinical cut-off recommendations for relevant vulnerability factors. Our study consisted of structured phone-based clinical interviews with 2000 adolescent-parent dyads living within a 5-mile radius of tornados that devastated Joplin, MO, and northern Alabama in Spring 2011. Demographics, tornado incident characteristics, prior trauma, mental health, and family support and conflict were assessed. A subset of youth completed two behavioral assessment tasks online to assess distress tolerance and risk-taking behavior. ROC analyses indicated four variables that significantly improved PTSD diagnostic efficiency: Lifetime depression (AUC = .90), trauma history (AUC = .76), social support (AUC = .70), and family conflict (AUC = .72). Youth were 2-3 times more likely to have PTSD if they had elevated scores on any of these variables. Of note, event-related characteristics (e.g., property damage) were not related to PTSD diagnostic status. The present study adds to the literature by making specific recommendations for empirically-based, efficient disaster-related PTSD assessment for adolescents following a natural disaster. Implications for practice and future trauma-related developmental psychopathology research are discussed.

  10. Transformational Impact of Health Information Technology on the Clinical Practice of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Peters, Todd E

    2017-01-01

    Compared with other medical specialties, psychiatrists have been slower adopters of health information technology (IT) practices, such as electronic health records (EHRs). This delay in implementation could compromise patient safety and impede integration into accountable care organizations and multidisciplinary treatment settings. This article focuses on optimizing use of EHRs for clinical practice, leveraging health IT to improve quality of care, and focusing on the potential for future growth in health IT in child and adolescent psychiatric practice. Aligning with other medical fields and focusing on transparency of mental health treatment will help psychiatrists reach parity with other medical specialties.

  11. Children' Florida Obsessive Compulsive Inventory: Psychometric Properties and Feasibility of a Self-Report Measure of Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Khanna, Muniya; Merlo, Lisa J.; Loew, Benjamin A.; Franklin, Martin; Reid, Jeannette M.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the development and psychometric properties of the Children's Florida Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (C-FOCI). Designed specifically as a brief measure for assessing obsessive-compulsive symptoms, the C-FOCI was created for use in both clinical and community settings. Study 1 included 82 children and adolescents diagnosed…

  12. Norms and Screening Utility of the Dutch Version of the Children's Depression Inventory in Clinical and Nonclinical Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roelofs, Jeffrey; Braet, Caroline; Rood, Lea; Timbremont, Benedikte; van Vlierberghe, Leen; Goossens, Lien; van Breukelen, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to (a) assess relationships between the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and "DSM"-oriented depression and anxiety scales of the Youth Self Report, (b) develop reliable norms for the CDI, and (c) determine CDI cutoff scores for selecting youngsters at risk for depression and anxiety. A total of 3,073 nonclinical and…

  13. An Inventory Designed To Measure the Impact of the Threat of Nuclear War on Adolescents: Dimensions of Fear, Futurelessness, and Powerlessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanley, C. Patricia; Christie, Daniel J.

    This document reports on the history of social and behavioral research studies concerning nuclear war since 1945, highlighting those studies that focused on adolescents and their feelings of fear, hopelessness, powerlessness, and denial. A study, designed to assess the reactions of adolescents in grades six to eight to the threat of nuclear war is…

  14. Cannabis use and mood disorders: patterns of clinical presentations among adolescents in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Konings, M; Maharajh, Hari D

    2006-01-01

    Notwithstanding the increase use of cannabis among adolescents in both developing and developed countries, few studies have looked at cannabis use and mood disorders. In a series of case studies, this research project seeks to investigate patterns of clinical presentations seen among cannabis users in psychiatric outpatients in Trinidad. Five clinical patterns of presentations are identified among cannabis users and abusers based on variables of dosing, age of initial use, duration of use, tolerance and reverse tolerance and poly-drug abuse. All patients in these case studies were standardized for method of use and potency of cannabis used. Patients were screened by urine tests to determine co-morbid use of other substances. Other variables such as environmental factors and genetic vulnerability were reviewed as far as possible from historical accounts of family members. The five patterns described are low, controlled use with mild euphoria and heightened awareness, moderate use with mixed depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviour, heavy, short term use with manic symptoms, long term incremental use with psychotic symptoms due to the trumping of depressive symptoms and cannabis mixed with other substances resulting in florid psychosis. Mood disorders appear to be a common finding among adolescents using cannabis. Sensitization to symptomatic presentation and early detection of cannabis use in young adolescents are necessary. Further research is needed on the effect of cannabinoids on emotions, behaviour and thinking and its relationship to mental disorders. This study is useful as a guideline for the implementation of public health strategies and legislation concerning the use of cannabis in youths.

  15. Impact of a youth-friendly HIV clinic: 10 years of adolescent outcomes in Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Reif, Lindsey K; Bertrand, Rachel; Benedict, Charles; Lamb, Matthew R; Rouzier, Vanessa; Verdier, Rose; Johnson, Warren D; Pape, Jean W; Fitzgerald, Daniel W; Kuhn, Louise; McNairy, Margaret L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adolescents account for over 40% of new HIV infections in Haiti. This analysis compares outcomes among HIV-positive adolescents before and after implementation of an adolescent HIV clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Methods We conducted a cohort study using programmatic data among HIV-positive adolescents aged 13 to 19. Data from 41,218 adolescents who were HIV tested from January 2003 to December 2012 were included. Outcomes across the HIV care cascade were assessed before and after implementation of an adolescent clinic (2009), including HIV testing, enrolment in care, assessment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility, ART initiation and 12-month retention. Pre-ART outcomes were assessed 12 months after HIV testing. Factors associated with pre-ART and ART attrition were identified through multivariable competing risk and Cox proportional hazards regression modelling. Results Cumulatively, 1672 (4.1%) adolescents tested HIV positive (80% female, median age 16 years). Retention by cascade step comparing pre- and post-clinic included the following: 86% versus 87% of patients enrolled in care, 61% versus 79% were assessed for ART eligibility, 85% versus 92% initiated ART and 68% versus 66% were retained 12 months after ART initiation. Pre-ART attrition decreased from 61% pre-clinic to 50% post-clinic (p<0.001). Pre-ART attrition was associated with being female (sub-distributional hazard ratio (sHR): 1.59; CI: 1.31–1.93), syphilis diagnosis (sHR: 1.47; CI: 1.16–1.85) and slum residence (sHR: 0.84; CI: 0.72–0.97). ART attrition was associated with syphilis diagnosis (hazard ratio (HR): 2.23; CI: 1.35–3.68) and CD4 <50 cells/µL (HR: 1.88; CI: 1.15–3.06). Conclusions Implementation of a youth-friendly adolescent clinic improved retention in HIV care among adolescents, particularly in the assessment of ART eligibility and ART initiation. Additional interventions are needed to improve retention among pre-ART patients and support long

  16. Prosthetic inventory management.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, P; Seipel, C; Juers, A

    2001-01-01

    An improved approach to inventory management in the Operating Theatre has been initiated at Princess Alexandra Hospital. A Clinical Resource Co-ordinator (CRC) position was created to provide access to expertise in purchasing and materials management at the clinical level. A review of existing inventory management practices conducted by the CRC revealed reporting inadequacies, lack of product specialisation and inadequate control over pricing, stock levels and product usage. Through liaison with key stakeholders, a competitive tendering process was introduced which resulted in a standing offer arrangement being installed for three specialty orthopaedic areas. Outcomes of this arrangement are discussed. The importance of raising the area of prosthetic inventory management for debate in the Australian literature is also highlighted.

  17. A clinical and phenomenological study of 185 Spanish adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Toro, J; Nicolau, R; Cervera, M; Castro, J; Blecua, M J; Zaragoza, M; Toro, A

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were the following to determine the socio-familial, academic and interpersonal characteristics specific to anorexia nervosa (AN); to study comorbidity in patients with anorexia and morbidity in their parents; and to ascertain whether patients with anorexia nervosa in Spain are similar to those in other countries. The research team revised the clinical records of 185 Spanish adolescents with AN (aged 11-18 years). The results were compared with those obtained from a group of 185 psychiatric patients without AN matched by sex, age, time of consultation and centre. No significant differences were found with regard to broken home, birth order or parent-patient conflict. The parents of patients with anorexia have a higher standard of education and develop more affective disorders. When compared with other patients, the individuals with anorexia nervosa perform much better academically but are more socially withdrawn. Males with anorexia nervosa perform worse academically than females and have more anxiety diagnoses. Patients with anorexia have a high comorbidity for affective and obsessive-compulsive disorders. Sufferers from anorexia nervosa in Spain are clinically analogous to patients with anorexia in other countries. The two characteristics specific to these patients are a high standard of academic performance and an intense degree of social withdrawal, although there are certain factors common to other pathologies relating to adolescence.

  18. Clinic- and Home-Based Contingency Management Plus Parent Training for Adolescent Cannabis Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stanger, Catherine; Ryan, Stacy R.; Scherer, Emily A.; Norton, Gray E.; Budney, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conduct a randomized test comparing two multicomponent, contingency management interventions, one with and one without a full parent training curriculum, and an individual treatment for adolescent cannabis use disorders. Method 153 adolescents who met DSM-IV criteria for cannabis abuse or dependence were randomized to motivational enhancement therapy/cognitive-behavioral therapy (MET/CBT), MET/CBT+abstinence-based contingency management (CM), or MET/CBT+CM+Parent Training (PT). Results Overall, during treatment, abstinence was greater for youth receiving clinic- and home-based CM without PT compared to those who received individual MET/CBT. There was no additional benefit of the full parent training curriculum on marijuana use, youth externalizing problems, or parenting. Conclusion These results suggest that clinic- plus home-based CM for cannabis use disorders can increase rates of abstinence during treatment over and above an evidence-based treatment (individual MET/CBT), but the addition of a comprehensive parenting training curriculum did not further enhance efficacy. PMID:26004659

  19. Clinical validity of a dimensional assessment of self- and interpersonal functioning in adolescent inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Greg; Blanchard, Mark; Baity, Matthew R.; Defife, Jared A; Stein, Michelle B.; Siefert, Caleb J.; Sinclair, Samuel J.; Zodan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale-Global Rating Method (SCORS-G) is a clinical rating system assessing eight domains of self and interpersonal relational experience which can be applied to narrative response data (e.g., Thematic Apperception Test [TAT; Murray, 1943]; early memories narratives) or oral data (e.g., psychotherapy narratives, Relationship Anecdotal Paradigms). In the current study, seventy-two psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents consented and were rated by their individual and group therapist using the SCORS-G. Clinicians also rated therapy engagement, personality functioning, quality of peer relationships, school functioning, global assessment of functioning (GAF), history of eating disordered behavior and history of nonsuicidal self-injury. SCORS-G composite ratings achieved an acceptable level of inter-rater reliability and were associated with theoretically predicted variables (e.g., engagement in therapy; history of nonsuicidal self-injury). SCORS-G ratings also incrementally improved the prediction of therapy engagement and global functioning beyond what was accounted for by GAF scores. This study further demonstrates the clinical utility of the SCORS-G with adolescents. PMID:25010080

  20. Informed consent and clinical research involving children and adolescents: implications of the revised APA ethics code and HIPAA.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Celia B

    2004-12-01

    In 2003, 2 new sets of rules and regulations affecting the conduct of clinical research involving children and adolescents went into effect: the revised American Psychological Association's (APA) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA, 2002; effective June 1, 2003) and the Privacy Rule (45 CFR Part 160 and A and E of Part 164; effective April; 14, 2003) of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA: Public Law 104-191). This article highlights those APA ethical standards and HIPAA regulations relevant to clinical research involving children and adolescents and discusses how psychologists can apply these rules in ways that will ensure ethical and legal compliance.

  1. [Factors influencing the course and duration of inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric treatment: between empiricism and clinical reality].

    PubMed

    Branik, Emil

    2003-09-01

    In the last two decades considerable changes influenced the scope of inpatient treatment in child and adolescent psychiatry. Proceeding from a literature review dilemmas between available research data and clinical practice will be pointed out. Proposals will be made to take into account the complex developmental processes, the individuality and the social context by psychic impaired children and adolescents requiring hospitalisation. This could improve the transfer of research findings into the clinical practice. It will be argued against a confusion of economical interests with research findings.

  2. Clinical utility of the Tower of London--Drexel University, Second Edition (TOLDX) after adolescent traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Donders, Jacobus; Larsen, Tory

    2012-01-01

    The performance of 43 adolescents with traumatic brain injury was evaluated on the Tower of London-Drexel University, second edition (TOLDX; Culbertson & Zillmer, 2005), and compared to that of 43 demographically matched healthy controls. TOLDX variables had a classification accuracy of 69.77%, with clinical patients demonstrating deficits in pre-planning of a schema as well as keeping subgoals in spatial working memory during execution. Time to follow commands and diffuse lesions on neuroimaging accounted for moderate amounts of variance in TOLDX variables. The findings support the clinical utility of the TOLDX in the assessment of adolescents with traumatic brain injury.

  3. [Anorexia nervosa in adolescents. Clinical aspects of the diagnosis and a follow-up].

    PubMed

    Saccomani, L; Savoini, M; Naselli, A; Cirrincione, M; Matricardi, A

    1989-01-01

    In a brief review of the literature, the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic criteria of anorexia nervosa in adolescence are considered. An interdisciplinary approach (child neuropsychiatrists, clinical psychologists, auxological pediatricians) was adopted in 52 cases with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (46 females, 6 males; mean age 14). The results of the analysis of somatic disturbances (weight loss, anomalous sexual maturation), psychological aspects (cognitive level, organization of the personality), environmental implications (familial, social and school adjustment; mother-child relationship; pedagogic modalities; social and economic factors) are reported. The data from a follow-up of 29 patients (26 females, 3 males; mean age 19) are reported, and the degree of recovery assessed as follows: 1) clinical recovery at somatic-adjustment level (79% complete, 17% with atypical characteristics); 2) achievement of a harmonic organization of the personality (48%). The paper concludes with some remarks on the treatment, prognosis and prospects for prevention of the condition.

  4. A profile of young adolescents attending a teen family planning clinic.

    PubMed

    Swenson, I E

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the client records of adolescents attending a teen family planning clinic to determine the reported episodes of sexually transmitted diseases, sexual abuse, alcohol and drug use, and other dysfunctional situations in the family. In addition, information about the initiation of sexual activity and sexual partners was assessed in the record review. Data were obtained from a county health department located in a metropolitan area of a southeastern state. A review of the records of 183 adolescents 15 years of age or younger provided information on ethnicity, grade in school, and assessment data from the clinic interviews and exams. Twenty-five clients said they were not sexually active when they came to the family planning clinic for the first time, and were brought to the clinic by a parent (usually the mother). Those clients who came without parents said they were sexually active. Forty-one percent had their first sexual experience between 12 and 13 years of age, 18% between the ages of 14 and 15, and the remainder before the age of 12. While over 7% specifically stated that they had been sexually abused or raped, an additional 19% described situations in the home or exhibited symptoms associated with a history of sexual abuse. Eleven percent had a history of two to three different sexually transmitted diseases, and 26% had three or more diseases. Seventy-two percent indicated that there was conflict in the home; several had left home because of abuse. Fourteen percent admitted using drugs, mostly cocaine or marijuana, and 17% reported that they used alcohol at least occasionally.

  5. Cytogenetic abnormalities and monosomal karyotypes in children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia: correlations with clinical characteristics and outcome.

    PubMed

    Manola, Kalliopi N; Panitsas, Fotios; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Daraki, Aggeliki; Karakosta, Maria; Stavropoulou, Cryssa; Avgerinou, Georgia; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Pantelias, Gabriel; Sambani, Constantina; Pagoni, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The whole spectrum of chromosomal abnormalities and their prognostic significance in children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been fully elucidated yet, although a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained recently. Moreover, the incidence and prognostic impact of monosomal karyotypes (MKs), which are new cytogenetic categories reported recently in adults with AML, are currently unknown for childhood and adolescent AML. In this study, we investigated the cytogenetic and clinical characteristics of 140 children and adolescents (≤21 y) with AML, and correlated their cytogenetic features with both the clinical characteristics and outcomes of our patient cohort. The most frequent cytogenetic abnormality found in our study was the t(15;17), followed by the t(8;21). Striking differences in the genetic abnormalities and French-American-British subtypes were found among infants, children, and adolescents. Of 124 cases, 15 (12.1%) met the criteria of the MK definition, and 12 of the 15 MKs (80%) were complex karyotypes. Of 124 cases, 27 (21.8%) had cytogenetic abnormalities sufficient to be diagnosed as AML with myelodyspastic sydrome-related features. As expected, patients with the t(15;17) had the most favorable outcomes, whereas patients with 11q23 rearrangements and monosomy 7 had the worst outcomes. These data expand our knowledge by providing novel insights into the cytogenetic features and their correlations with clinical characteristics and outcomes in childhood and adolescent AML.

  6. Discriminant validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory to confirmed clinical diagnosis of depression and anxiety in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tina; Carter, Owen; Adams, Claire; Waterer, Grant; Chung, Li Ping; Hawkins, Maxine; Rudd, Cobie; Ziman, Mel; Strobel, Natalie

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the discriminant validity of commonly used depression and anxiety screening tools in order to determine the most suitable tool for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD patients (n = 56) completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). These scores were compared to confirmed clinical diagnoses of depression and anxiety using the Mini Neuropsychiatric Interview. HADS depression subscale (HADS-D) sensitivity/specificity was 78/81%; BDI-II 89/77%; HADS anxiety subscale (HADS-A) 71/81%; and BAI 89/62%. HADS-D sensitivity/specificity was improved (100/83%) with the removal of Q4 'I feel as if I am slowed down' and adjusted cut-off (≥5). Removal of BDI-II Q21 'Loss of interest in sex' with adjusted cut-off ≥12 resulted in similar improvement (100/79%). No problematic items were identified for HADS-A or BAI. Previously reported low sensitivity/specificity of the HADS for COPD patients was not replicated. Furthermore, simple modifications of the HADS-D markedly improved sensitivity/specificity for depression.BDI-II, HADS-A and BAI produced acceptable sensitivity/specificity unmodified. Pending further research for COPD patients we recommend continued use of the HADS-A with standard cut-off (≥8) and removal of Q4 of the HADS-D with lower cut-off ≥5.

  7. Adolescent Linkage to Care After a Large-scale Transfer From a Hospital-based HIV Clinic to the Public Sector in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Susan; Cloete, Christie; Crankshaw, Tamaryn; Rabideau, Dustin J.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Parker, Robert A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Losina, Elena; Bassett, Ingrid V.

    2017-01-01

    HIV clinics formerly supported by the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief are transferring patients to public-sector clinics. We evaluated adolescent linkage to care after a large-scale transfer from a President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief-subsidized pediatric HIV clinic in Durban, South Africa. All adolescents (11–18 years) in care at a pediatric state-subsidized, hospital-based clinic (HBC) were transferred, from May to June 2012, to government sites [primary health care (PHC) clinic; community health center (CHC); and HBCs] or private clinics. Caregivers were surveyed 7–8 months after transfer to assess their adolescents’ linkage to care and their reports were validated by clinic record audits in a subset of randomly selected clinics. Of the 309 (91%) caregivers reached, only 5 (2%) reported that their adolescent did not link. Of the 304 adolescents who linked, 105 (35%) were referred to a PHC, 73 (24%) to a CHC and 106 (35%) to a HBC. A total of 146 (48%) linked adolescents attended a different clinic than that assigned. Thirty-five (20%) of the 178 who linked and were assigned to a PHC or CHC ultimately attended a HBC. Based on clinic validation, the estimated transfer success was 88% (95% confidence interval: 77%–97%). The large majority of adolescents successfully transferred to a new HIV clinic, although nearly half attended a clinic other than that assigned. PMID:28192387

  8. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Antihyperglycemic Medications in Children and Adolescents with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Fatemeh; Matson, Kelly L; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Kelly, Meghan; Karimani, Asieh

    2016-11-10

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among children and adolescents has been rising. This condition is associated with obesity, and it's prevalence is higher among minority or female youth. Lifestyle modification including diet and exercise is only successful in a small proportion of patients; therefore, pharmacotherapy approaches are needed to treat T2DM among youth. Currently, in the USA, only metformin and insulin are approved for the treatment of T2DM in children. However, several antihyperglycemic agents including exenatide, glimepiride, glyburide, liraglutide, pioglitazone, and rosiglitazone are also used off-label in this population. Moreover, a number of clinical trials are ongoing that are aimed at addressing the safety and efficacy of newer antihyperglycemic agents in this population. Little is known about the safety, efficacy, or pharmacokinetics of antihyperglycemic agents in children or adolescents. Our ability to predict the pharmacokinetics of these agents in youth is hampered first by the lack of information about the expression and activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in this population and second by the presence of comorbid conditions such as obesity and fatty liver disease. This article reviews the prevalence of obesity and T2DM in children and adolescents (youth). We then summarize published studies on safety and effectiveness of antihyperglycemic medications in youth. Drug disposition may be affected by age or puberty and thus the expression and activity of different pathways for drug metabolism and xenobiotic transporters are compared between youth and adults followed by a summary of pharmacokinetics studies of antihyperglycemic agents currently used in this population.

  9. Clinical characteristics of children and adolescents with severe therapy-resistant asthma in Brazil *

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Andrea Mendonça; Roncada, Cristian; Santos, Giovana; Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; de Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Vargas, Mauro Henrique Moraes; Pinto, Leonardo Araújo; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Stein, Renato Tetelbom; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics, lung function, radiological findings, and the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum in children and adolescents with severe therapy-resistant asthma (STRA) treated at a referral center in southern Brazil. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed children and adolescents (3-18 years of age) with uncontrolled STRA treated with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting ß2 agonists. We prospectively collected data on disease control, lung function, skin test reactivity to allergens, the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum, chest CT findings, and esophageal pH monitoring results. Results: We analyzed 21 patients (mean age, 9.2 ± 2.98 years). Of those, 18 (86%) were atopic. Most had uncontrolled asthma and near-normal baseline lung function. In 4 and 7, induced sputum was found to be eosinophilic and neutrophilic, respectively; the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum having changed in 67% of those in whom induced sputum analysis was repeated. Of the 8 patients receiving treatment with omalizumab (an anti-IgE antibody), 7 (87.5%) showed significant improvement in quality of life, as well as significant reductions in the numbers of exacerbations and hospitalizations. Conclusions: Children with STRA present with near-normal lung function and a variable airway inflammatory pattern during clinical follow-up, showing a significant clinical response to omalizumab. In children, STRA differs from that seen in adults, further studies being required in order to gain a better understanding of the disease mechanisms. PMID:26398754

  10. Sensitivity to detect change and the correlation of clinical factors with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory in depressed inpatients.

    PubMed

    Schneibel, Rebecca; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Wilbertz, Gregor; Dykierek, Petra; Zobel, Ingo; Schramm, Elisabeth

    2012-06-30

    Discrepancies between scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), as well as differences regarding their sensitivity to detect change, have been reported. This study investigates discrepancies and their potential prediction on the basis of demographic, personality, and clinical factors in depressed inpatients and analyzes the sensitivity to change. The HAMD and the BDI were administered to 105 inpatients with major depressive disorder randomized to 5 weeks of either interpersonal psychotherapy or clinical management. Personality was assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Low extraversion and high neuroticism were associated with relatively higher endorsement of depressive symptoms on the BDI compared with the HAMD. The HAMD presented a greater reduction of symptom scores than the BDI. Patients with high BDI scores, high HAMD scores or both revealed the greatest change, possibly due to a statistical effect of regression to the mean. Restricted by sample size, analyses were not differentiated by treatment condition. Regression to the mean cannot be tested directly, but it might be considered as a possible explanation. The HAMD and the BDI should be regarded as two complementary rather than redundant or competing instruments as the discrepancy is associated with personality characteristics. Attributing large effect sizes solely to effective treatment and a sensitive measure may be misleading.

  11. Correlations between the BDI and CES-D in a Sample of Adolescent Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Holly; Field, Tiffany; Prodromidis, Margarita; Scafidi, Frank

    1998-01-01

    The adequacy of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) as screening instruments for adolescent depression is examined. Both are correlated with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, a clinical measure. BDI correlates more highly with Major Depression subscale, CES-D to Dysthymia…

  12. Depression and Its Measurement in Verbal Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotham, Katherine; Unruh, Kathryn; Lord, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In a sample of 50 verbally fluent adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorders (age: 16-31 years; verbal IQ: 72-140), we examined the pattern of response and associations between scores on common measures of depressive symptoms, participant characteristics, and clinical diagnosis of depressive disorders. Beck Depression Inventory--Second…

  13. Clinical presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in children and adolescents: Is there an age effect?

    PubMed

    Ribolsi, Michele; Lin, Ashleigh; Wardenaar, Klaas J; Pontillo, Maria; Mazzone, Luigi; Vicari, Stefano; Armando, Marco

    2017-03-01

    There is limited research on clinical features related to age of presentation of the Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in children and adolescents (CAD). Based on findings in CAD with psychosis, we hypothesized that an older age at presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome would be associated with less severe symptoms and better psychosocial functioning than presentation in childhood or younger adolescence. Ninety-four CAD (age 9-18) meeting Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome criteria participated in the study. The sample was divided and compared according to the age of presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (9-14 vs 15-18 years). The predictive value of age of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome presentation was investigated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC)-curve calculations. The two Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome groups were homogeneous in terms of gender distribution, IQ scores and comorbid diagnoses. Older Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome patients showed better functioning and lower depressive scores. ROC curves revealed that severity of functional impairment was best predicted using an age of presentation cut-off of 14.9 years for social functioning and 15.9 years for role functioning. This study partially confirmed our hypothesis; older age at presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome was associated with less functional impairment, but age was not associated with psychotic symptoms.

  14. Informed Consent and Clinical Research Involving Children and Adolescents: Implications of the Revised APA Ethics Code and HIPAA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Celia B.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, 2 new sets of rules and regulations affecting the conduct of clinical research involving children and adolescents went into effect: the revised American Psychological Association's (APA) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA, 2002; effective June 1, 2003) and the Privacy Rule (45 CFR Part 160 and A and E of Part…

  15. Conceptual Application of the Discrimination Model of Clinical Supervision for Direct Care Workers in Adolescent Residential Treatment Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Andrew M.; Sias, Shari M.

    2010-01-01

    This article applies the tenets of Bernard's in "Counselor Edu Supervision" 19:60-68, (1979) discrimination model of clinical supervision to the supervision needs of those who provide direct care to adolescents in residential treatment due to abuse, neglect, behavioral, or emotional problems. The article focuses on three areas…

  16. Effectiveness Research: Transporting Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A) From the Lab to School-Based Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mufson, Laura H.; Dorta, Kristen Pollack; Olfson, Mark; Weissman, Myrna M.; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the process of modifying and transporting an evidence-based treatment, Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A), from a university setting to school-based health clinics. It addresses conceptual issues involved in the shift from efficacy to effectiveness research as well as operational issues specific to…

  17. A Questionnaire for Screening a Broad Range of DSM-Defined Anxiety Disorder Symptoms in Clinically Referred Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muris, Peter; Dreessen, Laura; Bogels, Susan; Weckx, Miryam; van Melick, Marion

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the reliability and validity of the 66-item Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders-Revised (SCARED-R), a questionnaire for measuring a broad range of DSM-defined anxiety disorder symptoms, in a sample of clinically referred youths. Method: The SCARED-R was administered to children/adolescents and their parents…

  18. Treatment of Adolescent Marijuana Abuse: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Presentation 1: Structure of the Cannabis Youth Treatment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Janet C.; Dennis, Michael L.; Diamond, Guy; Godley, Susan H.; Babor, Thomas; Donaldson, Jean; Herrell, James; Tims, Frank; Webb, Charles

    The Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) study is a multi-site randomized field experiment examining five outpatient treatment protocols for adolescents who abuse or are dependent on marijuana. The purpose of the CYT project is twofold: (a) to test the relative clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of five promising interventions targeted at…

  19. Group-Based Preference Assessment for Children and Adolescents in a Residential Setting: Examining Developmental, Clinical, Gender, and Ethnic Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volz, Jennifer L. Resetar; Cook, Clayton R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines developmental, clinical, gender, and ethnic group differences in preference in residentially placed children and adolescents. In addition, this study considers whether residentially placed youth prefer stimuli currently being used as rewards as part of a campuswide token economy system and whether youth would identify preferred…

  20. Depression and Anxiety in Adolescents With Pediatric-Onset Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Klaas, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little is known about depression and anxiety in adolescents with spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective: To examine how depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, and usage of treatment differ by age and sex among adolescents with SCI. Method: Youth 12 to 18 years old who had acquired SCI at least 1 year prior were recruited from 3 specialty hospitals. They completed the Children’s Depression Inventory (ages 12-17 years) or Beck Depression Inventory-II (18 years), and Revised Children’s Manifest Anxiety Scale (12-18 years). Analyses assessed differences between younger and older adolescents and between males and females. Results: The 236 participants were an average age of 15.58 years (SD 1.98), 58% were male, and 60% Caucasian. Average age at injury was 10.57 years (SD 5.50), and 62% had paraplegia. For depression, 5.5% of adolescents ages 12 to 17 years exceeded the clinical cutoff and 12.7% of 18-year-old adolescents fell into a range of moderate or severe depression. For anxiety, 10.6% of adolescents ages 12 to 18 years exceeded the clinical cutoff. Univariate results revealed that older adolescents were more depressed than younger adolescents, and girls were more anxious than boys. An interaction between sex and age emerged, in that older adolescent girls were significantly more anxious than other youth. Older adolescents were also more likely to be taking medications for emotional, psychological, or behavioral reasons. Reports of suicidal ideation did not differ by adolescent age or sex. Conclusion: For these adolescents, depression differed with age, and anxiety differed based on age and sex. Implications for intervention include early identification and treatment for struggling adolescents. PMID:24574818

  1. Pharmacogenetics Informed Decision Making in Adolescent Psychiatric Treatment: A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Teri; Sharp, Susan; Manzardo, Ann M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2015-01-01

    Advances made in genetic testing and tools applied to pharmacogenetics are increasingly being used to inform clinicians in fields such as oncology, hematology, diabetes (endocrinology), cardiology and expanding into psychiatry by examining the influences of genetics on drug efficacy and metabolism. We present a clinical case example of an adolescent male with anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder who did not tolerate numerous medications and dosages over several years in attempts to manage his symptoms. Pharmacogenetics testing was performed and DNA results on this individual elucidated the potential pitfalls in medication use because of specific pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences specifically involving polymorphisms of genes in the cytochrome p450 enzyme system. Future studies and reports are needed to further illustrate and determine the type of individualized medicine approach required to treat individuals based on their specific gene patterns. Growing evidence supports this biological approach for standard of care in psychiatry. PMID:25710722

  2. Impact of Exercise on Clinical Symptom Report and Neurocognition after Concussion in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Manikas, Vicky; Babl, Franz E; Hearps, Stephen; Dooley, Julian; Anderson, Vicki

    2017-03-21

    Recovery from concussion in childhood is poorly understood, despite its importance in decisions regarding return to normal activity. Resolution of post-concussive symptoms (PCS) is widely employed as a marker of recovery in clinical practice; however, it is unclear whether subtle impairments persist only to re-emerge in the context of increased physical or cognitive demands. This study aimed to examine the effect of strenuous exercise on clinical symptom report and neurocognition in children and adolescents after PCS resolution after concussion. We recruited children and adolescents with concussion (n = 30) on presentation to an Emergency Department (ED). At Day 2 and Day 10 post-self-reported symptom resolution, participants completed a strenuous exercise protocol, and pre- and post-exercise assessment of PCS and neurocognition. Results demonstrated an overall reduction in PCS from Day 2 to Day 10 post-symptom resolution, with no evidence of symptom increase after strenuous exercise at either time point. Neurocognitive performance was linked to task complexity: on less cognitively demanding tasks, processing speed was slower post-exercise and, unexpectedly, slower on Day 10 than Day 2, while for more demanding tasks (new learning), Day 2 exercise resulted in faster responses, but Day 10 processing speed post-exercise was slower. In summary, we found the expected recovery pattern for PCS, regardless of exercise, while for neurocognition, recovery was dependent on the degree of cognitive demand, and there was an unexpected reduction in performance from Day 2 to Day 10. Findings provide some suggestion that premature return to normal activities (e.g., school) may slow neurocognitive recovery.

  3. Bulimic behaviours and psychopathology in obese adolescents and in their parents

    PubMed Central

    Isnard, Pascale; Quantin, Laure; Cortese, Samuele; Falissard, Bruno; Musher-Eizenman, Dara; Guedeney, Antoine; Frelut, Marie-Laure; Mouren, Marie-Christine

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To help identify and advance the understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying the association between parents’ and adolescents’ psychological maladjustment in obesity, we evaluated bulimic behaviours and psychopathology in a clinical sample of obese adolescents and in their parents. Methods. This is a cross-sectional cohort study including 115 severely obese, treatment-seeking adolescents aged 12–17 years (mean age: 14.2; mean body mass index z-score: 4.32), and their parents (115 mothers and 96 fathers). Adolescents filled out the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC). Their parents completed the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and the BITE. A child psychiatrist filled out the Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA) for the adolescents. Results. Obese adolescents demonstrated significant correlations between the severity of bulimic symptoms and the degree of emotional symptomatology, such as depression and anxiety, but not with the severity of obesity. Psychopathological maladjustment and bulimic symptoms in obese adolescents were significantly associated with the maternal psychopathological disturbances, especially anxiety and somatisation in mother. In fact, maternal psychopathology, not maternal bulimic symptoms, was the factor most strongly associated with bulimic behaviours in obese adolescents. Discussion. These results highlight the importance of including an adolescent and parental psychiatric assessment (bulimic, depressive and anxiety symptoms), particularly maternal psychopathology in the treatment of severely obese adolescents. PMID:20233146

  4. Empirically Derived Subtypes of Lifetime Anxiety Disorders: Developmental and Clinical Correlates in U.S. Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Marcy; Georgiades, Katholiki; Lamers, Femke; Swanson, Sonja A.; Cui, Lihong; He, Jian-Ping; Avenevoli, Shelli; Merikangas, Kathleen R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined the sex- and age-specific structure and comorbidity of lifetime anxiety disorders among U.S. adolescents. Method: The sample consisted of 2,539 adolescents (1,505 females and 1,034 males) from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement who met criteria for "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  5. Mapping the Clinical Complexities of Adolescents with Substance Use Disorders: A Typological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Kathleen; McDermott, Paul A.; Webb, Alicia; Hagan, Teresa Ann

    2006-01-01

    Because of the vast improvements in adolescent substance use assessment, it is widely recognized that adolescent substance use disorders (SUD) encompasses diverse drugs, patterns and etiologies and are characterized by extensive heterogeneity in other life domains. The next step in advancing adolescent SUD assessment is to classify adolescents…

  6. Evaluation of an Intervention among Adolescents to Reduce Preventive Misconception in HIV Vaccine Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lally, Michelle; Goldsworthy, Richard; Sarr, Moussa; Kahn, Jessica; Brown, Larry; Peralta, Ligia; Zimet, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Placebo and randomization are important concepts that must be understood before youth can safely participate in HIV vaccine studies or other biomedical trials for HIV prevention. These concepts are central to the phenomenon of preventive misconception which may be associated with an increase in risk behavior among study participants related to mistaken beliefs. Persuasive messaging, traditionally used in the field of marketing, could enhance educational efforts associated with randomized clinical trials. Methods Two educational brochures were designed to increase knowledge about HIV vaccine clinical trials via 1 and 2-sided persuasive messaging. Through the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network, 120 youth were enrolled, administered a mock HIV vaccine trial consent, and then randomized to receive either no supplemental information or one of the two brochures. Results The 2-sided brochure group in which common clinical trial misconceptions were acknowledgedand then refuted had significantly higher scores on knowledge of randomization and interpretation of side effects than the consent-only control group, and willingness to participate in an HIV vaccine trial was not decreased with the use of this brochure. Conclusion Two sided persuasive messaging improves understanding of the concepts of randomization and placebo among youth who would consider participating in an HIV vaccine trial. Further evaluation of this approach should be considered for at-risk youth participating in an actual trial of a biomedical intervention for HIV prevention. PMID:24613097

  7. The assessment and treatment of unhealthy exercise in adolescents with anorexia nervosa: A Delphi study to synthesize clinical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Noetel, Melissa; Dawson, Lisa; Hay, Phillipa; Touyz, Stephen

    2017-01-17

    This study aimed to explore and synthesize expert clinical knowledge on defining and managing unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. The Delphi methodology was used. Clinicians (n = 25) considered experts in the treatment of AN in adolescents were recruited internationally to form the panel. The first round of the questionnaires was comprised of five open-ended questions regarding defining, assessing, and treating unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. Statements were derived from this data using content analysis, and included as Likert-based items in two subsequent rounds, in which panellists were required to rate their level of agreement for each item. All 25 respondents completed the three rounds of questionnaires. Consensus was achieved for 59.0% of the items included in the second and third round of questionnaires. Although consensus was not achieved, compulsive exercise was the preferred term for the panel when referring to unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. The panel clearly delineated features of unhealthy and healthy exercise, and endorsed a number of items considered important to assess for when evaluating exercise in this clinical population. A variety of treatment approaches and strategies reached consensus. Notably, for those who are medically stable and progressing toward recovery, the panel recommended initial exercise restriction practices and reintroducing healthy exercise behaviors, rather than exercise cessation practices. The current findings can serve as preliminary treatment guidelines. A unified approach to labeling and defining unhealthy exercise in the eating disorder literature and clinical settings is required to achieve further progress.

  8. Cognitive behavioral therapy for early adolescents with autism spectrum disorders and clinical anxiety: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jeffrey J; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Alessandri, Michael; Fujii, Cori; Renno, Patricia; Laugeson, Elizabeth; Piacentini, John C; De Nadai, Alessandro S; Arnold, Elysse; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Clinically elevated anxiety is a common, impairing feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A modular CBT program designed for preteens with ASD, Behavioral Interventions for Anxiety in Children with Autism (BIACA; Wood et al., 2009) was enhanced and modified to address the developmental needs of early adolescents with ASD and clinical anxiety. Thirty-three adolescents (11-15 years old) were randomly assigned to 16 sessions of CBT or an equivalent waitlist period. The CBT model emphasized exposure, challenging irrational beliefs, and behavioral supports provided by caregivers, as well as numerous ASD-specific treatment elements. Independent evaluators, parents, and adolescents rated symptom severity at baseline and posttreatment/postwaitlist. In intent-to-treat analyses, the CBT group outperformed the waitlist group on independent evaluators' ratings of anxiety severity on the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) and 79% of the CBT group met Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale criteria for positive treatment response at posttreatment, as compared to only 28.6% of the waitlist group. Group differences were not found for diagnostic remission or questionnaire measures of anxiety. However, parent-report data indicated that there was a positive treatment effect of CBT on autism symptom severity. The CBT manual under investigation, enhanced for early adolescents with ASD, yielded meaningful treatment effects on the primary outcome measure (PARS), although additional developmental modifications to the manual are likely warranted. Future studies examining this protocol relative to an active control are needed.

  9. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Early Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Clinical Anxiety: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jeffrey J.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Alessandri, Michael; Fujii, Cori; Renno, Patricia; Laugeson, Elizabeth; Piacentini, John C.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Arnold, Elysse; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinically elevated anxiety is a common, impairing feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A modular CBT program designed for preteens with ASD, Behavioral Interventions for Anxiety in Children with Autism (BIACA; Wood et al., 2009), was enhanced and modified to address the developmental needs of early adolescents with ASD and clinical anxiety. Method Thirty-three adolescents (11–15 years old) were randomly assigned to 16 sessions of CBT or an equivalent waitlist period. The CBT model emphasized exposure, challenging irrational beliefs, and behavioral supports provided by caregivers, as well as numerous ASD-specific treatment elements. Independent evaluators, parents, and adolescents rated symptom severity at baseline and post-treatment/post-waitlist. Results In intent-to-treat analyses, the CBT group outperformed the waitlist group on independent evaluators’ ratings of anxiety severity on the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) and 79% of the CBT group met Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale criteria for positive treatment response at posttreatment, as compared to only 28.6% of the waitlist group. Group differences were not found for diagnostic remission or questionnaire measures of anxiety. However, parent-report data indicated that there was a positive treatment effect of CBT on autism symptom severity. Conclusions The CBT manual under investigation, enhanced for early adolescents with ASD, yielded meaningful treatment effects on the primary outcome measure (PARS), although additional developmental modifications to the manual are likely warranted. Future studies examining this protocol relative to an active control are needed. PMID:25526831

  10. fMRI investigation of response inhibition, emotion, impulsivity, and clinical high-risk behavior in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew R. G.; Benoit, James R. A.; Juhás, Michal; Dametto, Ericson; Tse, Tiffanie T.; MacKay, Marnie; Sen, Bhaskar; Carroll, Alan M.; Hodlevskyy, Oleksandr; Silverstone, Peter H.; Dolcos, Florin; Dursun, Serdar M.; Greenshaw, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    High-risk behavior in adolescents is associated with injury, mental health problems, and poor outcomes in later life. Improved understanding of the neurobiology of high-risk behavior and impulsivity shows promise for informing clinical treatment and prevention as well as policy to better address high-risk behavior. We recruited 21 adolescents (age 14–17) with a wide range of high-risk behavior tendencies, including medically high-risk participants recruited from psychiatric clinics. Risk tendencies were assessed using the Adolescent Risk Behavior Screen (ARBS). ARBS risk scores correlated highly (0.78) with impulsivity scores from the Barratt Impulsivity scale (BIS). Participants underwent 4.7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an emotional Go/NoGo task. This task presented an aversive or neutral distractor image simultaneously with each Go or NoGo stimulus. Risk behavior and impulsivity tendencies exhibited similar but not identical associations with fMRI activation patterns in prefrontal brain regions. We interpret these results as reflecting differences in response inhibition, emotional stimulus processing, and emotion regulation in relation to participant risk behavior tendencies and impulsivity levels. The results are consistent with high impulsivity playing an important role in determining high risk tendencies in this sample containing clinically high-risk adolescents. PMID:26483645

  11. Implementing Psychophysiology in Clinical Assessments of Adolescent Social Anxiety: Use of Rater Judgments Based on Graphical Representations of Psychophysiology

    PubMed Central

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Augenstein, Tara M.; Aldao, Amelia; Thomas, Sarah A.; Daruwala, Samantha; Kline, Kathryn; Regan, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Social stressor tasks induce adolescents’ social distress as indexed by low-cost psychophysiological methods. Unknown is how to incorporate these methods within clinical assessments. Having assessors judge graphical depictions of psychophysiological data may facilitate detections of data patterns that may be difficult to identify using judgments about numerical depictions of psychophysiological data. Specifically, the Chernoff Face method involves graphically representing data using features on the human face (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape). This method capitalizes on humans’ abilities to discern subtle variations in facial features. Using adolescent heart rate norms and Chernoff Faces, we illustrated a method for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety. METHOD Twenty-two clinic-referred adolescents completed a social anxiety self-report and provided psychophysiological data using wireless heart rate monitors during a social stressor task. We graphically represented participants’ psychophysiological data and normative adolescent heart rates. For each participant, two undergraduate coders made comparative judgments between the dimensions (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape) of two Chernoff Faces. One Chernoff Face represented a participant’s heart rate within a context (baseline, speech preparation, or speech-giving). The second Chernoff Face represented normative heart rate data matched to the participant’s age. RESULTS Using Chernoff faces, coders reliably and accurately identified contextual variation in participants’ heart rate responses to social stress. Further, adolescents’ self-reported social anxiety symptoms predicted Chernoff Face judgments, and judgments could be differentiated by social stress context. CONCLUSIONS Our findings have important implications for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety. PMID:24320027

  12. Treatment outcomes of HIV-infected adolescents attending public-sector HIV clinics across Gauteng and Mpumalanga, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Evans, Denise; Menezes, Colin; Mahomed, Kay; Macdonald, Philippa; Untiedt, Sanlie; Levin, Leon; Jaffray, Imogen; Bhana, Nainisha; Firnhaber, Cindy; Maskew, Mhairi

    2013-06-01

    There is little evidence comparing treatment outcomes between adolescents and other age groups, particularly in resource-limited settings. A retrospective analysis of data from seven HIV clinics across urban Gauteng (n=5) and rural Mpumalanga (n=2), South Africa was conducted. The analysis compared HIV-positive antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naive young adolescents (10-14 years), older adolescents (15-19), and young adults (20-24 years) to adults (≥25 years) initiated onto standard first-line ART between April 2004 and August 2010. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate relative risk (RR) of failure to suppress viral load (≥400 copies/ml) or failure to achieve an adequate CD4 response at 6 or 12 months. The effect of age group on virological failure, mortality, and loss to follow-up (LTFU; ≥90 days since scheduled visit date) was estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Of 42,427 patients initiating ART, 310 (0.7%) were young adolescents, 342 (0.8%) were older adolescents, and 1599 (3.8%) were young adults. Adolescents were similar to adults in terms of proportion male, baseline CD4 count, hemoglobin, and TB. Compared to adults, both older adolescents (6 months RR 1.75 95% CI 1.25-2.47) and young adults (6 months RR 1.33 95% CI 1.10-1.60 and 12 months RR 1.64 95% CI 1.23-2.19) were more likely to have an unsuppressed viral load and were more likely to fail virologically (HR 2.90 95% CI 1.74-4.86; HR 2.94 95% CI 1.63-5.31). Among those that died or were LTFU, the median time from ART initiation until death or LTFU was 4.7 months (IQR 1.5-13.2) and 10.9 months (IQR 5.0-22.7), respectively. There was no difference in risk of mortality by age category, compared to adults. Young adolescents were less likely to be LTFU at any time period after ART initiation (HR 0.43 95% CI 0.26-0.69) whereas older adolescents and young adults were more likely to be LTFU after ART initiation (HR 1.78 95% CI 1.34-2.36; HR 1.63 95% CI 1.41-1.89) compared to adults. HIV

  13. Poor peer relations predict parent- and self-reported behavioral and emotional problems of adolescents with gender dysphoria: a cross-national, cross-clinic comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Annelou L C; Steensma, Thomas D; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; VanderLaan, Doug P; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2016-06-01

    This study is the third in a series to examine behavioral and emotional problems in children and adolescents with gender dysphoria in a comparative analysis between two clinics in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and Amsterdam, the Netherlands. In the present study, we report Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Youth Self-Report (YSR) data on adolescents assessed in the Toronto clinic (n = 177) and the Amsterdam clinic (n = 139). On the CBCL and the YSR, we found that the percentage of adolescents with clinical range behavioral and emotional problems was higher when compared to the non-referred standardization samples but similar to the referred adolescents. On both the CBCL and the YSR, the Toronto adolescents had a significantly higher Total Problem score than the Amsterdam adolescents. Like our earlier studies of CBCL data of children and Teacher's Report Form data of children and adolescents, a measure of poor peer relations was the strongest predictor of CBCL and YSR behavioral and emotional problems in gender dysphoric adolescents.

  14. Alterations in left ventricular, left atrial, and right ventricular structure and function to cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents with type 2 diabetes participating in the TODAY clinical trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are limited. Echocardiography was performed in the last year of the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) clinical trial (median 4.5 yr from diagnosis of T2D, average age 18 yr), incl...

  15. A Comparison of the Concurrent and Predictive Validity of Three Measures of Readiness to Change Alcohol Use in a Clinical Sample of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisto, Stephen A.; Krenek, Marketa; Chung, Tammy; Martin, Christopher S.; Clark, Duncan; Cornelius, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The authors compared 3 measures of readiness to change alcohol use commonly used in clinical research and practice with adolescents: the Readiness Ruler, the SOCRATES (subscales of Recognition and Taking Steps), and a Staging Algorithm. The analysis sample consisted of 161 male and female adolescents presenting for intensive outpatient…

  16. A Manual-Based Intervention to Address Clinical Crises and Retain Patients in the Treatment of Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Diane E.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Puumala, Susan E.; Silva, Susan G.; Rezac, Amy J.; Hallin, Mary J.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Weller, Elizabeth B.; Pathak, Sanjeev; Simons, Anne D.; March, John S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe a manual-based intervention to address clinical crises and retain participants in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method: The use of adjunct services for attrition prevention (ASAP) is described for adolescents (ages 12-17 years) during the 12-week acute treatment in TADS, from 2000 to 2003.…

  17. Clinical problems encountered in the treatment of adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Susanne; Föcker, Manuel; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2013-11-01

    The conceptualization of anorexia nervosa (AN) depends on the diagnostic criteria. Most patients with teenage onset AN seem to remit within 3-10 years depending on the definitions of recovery. The mortality of adolescent onset anorexia nervosa (AN) has fortunately decreased over the last two decades. Based on randomized controlled trials, we review different treatments including individual and group psychotherapy, family therapy, psychopharmacology, and hormone therapy. Treatment settings vary over time for any individual patient. Despite high rates of inpatient treatment, the respective evidence for effectiveness is meager. In underage patients with severe AN clinical, ethical and legal aspects need to be dealt with systematically if intermittent compulsory treatment is deemed necessary. The prolonged and frequently chronic course of AN often entails therapeutic discontinuity; the transition into adulthood requires a graded therapeutic concept that considers the severity of the disorder, developmental and chronological age, and parental involvement. Finally, we consider future clinical and research options to improve treatment and outcome of this eating disorder.

  18. Clinical Correlates of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale in a Sample of Obese Adolescents Seeking Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Christina A.; Sysko, Robyn; Bush, Jennifer; Pearl, Rebecca; Puhl, Rebecca M.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Dovidio, John F.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate psychometric properties and clinical correlates of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS) in a sample of obese adolescents seeking bariatric surgery. Sixty five adolescents enrolled in a bariatric surgery program at a large, urban medical center completed psychiatric evaluations, self-report questionnaires including the WBIS and other measures of psychopathology and physical assessments. The WBIS had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = .92). As in previous research with adults, the one underlying factor structure was replicated and 10 of the original 11 items were retained. The scale had significant partial correlations with depression (r = .519), anxiety (r = .465), social and behavioral problems (r = .364), quality of life (r = −.480), and eating (r = .579), shape (r = .815), and weight concerns (r = .545), controlling for body mass index. However, WBIS scores did not predict current or past psychiatric diagnosis or treatment or past suicidal ideation. Overall, the WBIS had excellent psychometric properties in a sample of obese treatment-seeking adolescents and correlated significantly with levels of psychopathology. These findings suggest that the WBIS could be a useful tool for healthcare providers to assess internalized weight bias among treatment-seeking obese youth. Assessment of internalized weight bias among this clinical population has the potential to identify adolescents who may benefit from information on coping with weight stigma which in turn can augment weight loss efforts. PMID:21593805

  19. Network analysis of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology: Reanalysis of the STAR*D clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Madhoo, Manisha; Levine, Stephen Z

    2016-11-01

    Network analysis is yet to be used to examine patient-reported symptom severity and change during citalopram treatment for major depressive disorder. We aimed to identify: (I) network systems; (II) central symptoms; and (III) network differences, in patient-reported depression for baseline, endpoint and change scores. STAR*D data during citalopram treatment were reanalyzed to examine depression based on the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR). Network analyses were computed from the QIDS-SR item-level severity scores at baseline and endpoint, and from estimated change scores based on mixed models, adjusted for confounding by dose and baseline severity. Centrality indices for each symptom were computed. Networks were contrasted for connectivity with permutation tests. Network analyses grouped symptoms consistently as: Sleep disturbances, cognitive and physical avolition, Affect and Appetite. Symptom centrality was highest for Energy at baseline, Mood at endpoint, and Mood and Concentration on change scores. Generally, permutation tests showed that the networks all significantly (p<.05) differed. Results demonstrated: (I) a replicable network group of the symptoms of depression that modestly mapped onto well-known mechanisms for depression; (II) symptoms with high centrality that may be future treatment targets (e.g., mood); and (III) that the form of the networks differed across treatment time-points, thereby contributing centrality as a possible mechanism to the initial severity debate. These findings highlight the utility of focusing on symptoms rather than total scores to understand how treatment unfolds, and tentative mechanisms.

  20. The utility of the Beck Depression Inventory Fast Screen (BDI-FS) in a pain clinic population.

    PubMed

    Poole, Helen; Bramwell, Ros; Murphy, Peter

    2009-09-01

    This study compared the BDI-FS to the BDI-II in a sample of patients with chronic pain. The objectives were to: look at agreement between measures, determine BDI-FS cut-off scores, develop a conversion formula, consider the usefulness of the suicide ideation item and compare ability to detect clinical change. Phase I: Archival data from 1227 patients assessed for a pain management programme was analysed. The BDI-FS displayed good internal consistency (alpha=.839). ROC curve analysis showed good agreement between the BDI-II and FS and suggested a BDI-FS cut-off of four corresponded to the 19 cut-off recommended in the BDI-II manual. We recommend a cut-off of five to correspond to a BDI-II cut-off of 22 for pain clinic patients recommended by previous research. Regression suggested BDI-II score=(2.77 x BDI-FS score)+9.14. Our data support the clinical usefulness of the suicide ideation item in this population. Phase II: Archival data from 584 patients collected at baseline, following a 16 day pain management programme and at 6 months follow-up, was analysed. Effect sizes indicated equivalent sensitivity to clinical change. The BDI-FS showed good psychometric properties, strong agreement with the BDI-II and equal ability to detect clinical change in a pain clinic population. The BDI-FS has the practical advantages of faster administration and reduced patient burden.

  1. Validation study of tripartite model of anxiety and depression in children and adolescents: clinical sample in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae-Won; Hong, Sungdo D; Joung, Yoo Sook; Kim, Ji-Hae

    2006-12-01

    Although the currently available literature has provided some empirical support for a tripartite model of child and adolescent anxiety and depression, one of the limitations of these studies was that they have been conducted in America, primarily with Caucasians. In order to make this model more applicable to diverse ethnic and cultural groups, this study used a tripartite model for child and adolescent anxiety and depression in Korea, using confirmatory factor analysis with logically selected items from the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS), as well as the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). The results indicated that the model fit of a three-factor model was superior to one- and two-factor models. In addition, the findings of discriminant analysis demonstrated that the correct classification rate with three factors of the tripartite model was superior to the classification rate achievable using CDI and RCMAS. In a departure from Clark and Watson's hypothesis, however, the correlations of three factors were significantly higher than had been expected. The results are discussed on the basis of cultural background.

  2. Validation Study of Tripartite Model of Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents: Clinical Sample in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae-Won; Hong, Sungdo D.; Joung, Yoo Sook

    2006-01-01

    Although the currently available literature has provided some empirical support for a tripartite model of child and adolescent anxiety and depression, one of the limitations of these studies was that they have been conducted in America, primarily with Caucasians. In order to make this model more applicable to diverse ethnic and cultural groups, this study used a tripartite model for child and adolescent anxiety and depression in Korea, using confirmatory factor analysis with logically selected items from the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS), as well as the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). The results indicated that the model fit of a three-factor model was superior to one- and two-factor models. In addition, the findings of discriminant analysis demonstrated that the correct classification rate with three factors of the tripartite model was superior to the classification rate achievable using CDI and RCMAS. In a departure from Clark and Watson's hypothesis, however, the correlations of three factors were significantly higher than had been expected. The results are discussed on the basis of cultural background. PMID:17179694

  3. Clinical evolution and nutritional status in asthmatic children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Rosinha Yoko Matsubayaci; Strufaldi, Maria Wany Louzada; Puccini, Rosana Fiorini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical evolution and the association between nutritional status and severity of asthma in children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 219 asthmatic patients (3-17 years old) enrolled in Primary Care Services (PCSs) in Embu das Artes (SP), from 2007 to 2011. Secondary data: gender, age, diagnosis of asthma severity, other atopic diseases, family history of atopy, and body mass index. To evaluate the clinical outcome of asthma, data were collected on number of asthma exacerbations, number of emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids at follow-up visits in the 6th and 12th months. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Kappa agreement index, with 5% set as the significance level. Results: 50.5% of patients started wheezing before the age of 2 years, 99.5% had allergic rhinitis and 65.2% had a positive family history of atopy. Regarding severity, intermittent asthma was more frequent (51.6%) and, in relation to nutritional status, 65.8% of patients had normal weight. There was no association between nutritional status and asthma severity (p=0.409). After 1 year of follow-up, 25.2% of patients showed reduction in exacerbations and emergency room consultations, and 16.2% reduced the amount of inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions: The monitoring of asthmatic patients in Primary Care Services showed improvement in clinical outcome, with a decreased number of exacerbations, emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids. No association between nutritional status and asthma severity was observed in this study. PMID:26316387

  4. Evaluation of clinical and laboratory markers of cardiometabolic risk in overweight and obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha Palhares, Heloísa Marcelina; da Silva, Adriana Paula; Resende, Daniela Cristina Silva; de Araújo Pereira, Gilberto; Rodrigues-Júnior, Virmondes; de Fátima Borges, Maria

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study analyzed the frequency of cardiometabolic risk markers and metabolic syndrome occurrence in overweight and obese children and adolescents. METHODS: The participants included 161 overweight (n=65) and obese (n=96) individuals aged between 5 and 19 years. Clinical markers were assessed (body mass index, body fat percentage, waist circumference, acanthosis, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, laboratory parameters [glucose, insulin, cholesterol (total and fractions) and triglyceride levels and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index] and leptin and adiponectin levels). The frequency of changes, odds ratios and correlations among markers were determined. Metabolic syndrome was assessed according to International Diabetes Federation criteria. RESULTS: A high frequency of acanthosis (51.6%); increased waist circumference (45.4%), systolic blood pressure / diastolic blood pressure (8.1% / 9.3%), glucose (10%), insulin (36.9%) and HOMA-IR (44.3%) values; and reduced high-density lipoprotein levels (47.2%) were observed. Leptin levels were increased in 95% of obese and in 66% of overweight subjects. Adiponectin was decreased in 29.5% of obese and in 34% of overweight subjects. An odd ratio analysis revealed a greater probability of increased waist circumference (9.0), systolic blood pressure (4.1), triglyceride (2.3) and insulin (2.9) levels and HOMA-IR (3.0) in the obese group than in the overweight group. The clinical and laboratory parameters and leptin levels exhibited significant correlations, whereas adiponectin was negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure. The occurrence rate of metabolic syndrome was 13.6%. CONCLUSIONS: The high frequency of changes in clinical, laboratory and adipokine markers indicates the need for early interventions aimed at preventing cardiometabolic complications in adulthood. PMID:28226031

  5. Empirical Derivation and Validation of a Clinical Case Definition for Neuropsychological Impairment in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Miriam H; Brooks, Brian L; Barrowman, Nick; Aglipay, Mary; Keightley, Michelle; Anderson, Peter; Yeates, Keith O; Osmond, Martin H; Zemek, Roger

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychological assessment aims to identify individual performance profiles in multiple domains of cognitive functioning; however, substantial variation exists in how deficits are defined and what cutoffs are used, and there is no universally accepted definition of neuropsychological impairment. The aim of this study was to derive and validate a clinical case definition rule to identify neuropsychological impairment in children and adolescents. An existing normative pediatric sample was used to calculate base rates of abnormal functioning on eight measures covering six domains of neuropsychological functioning. The dataset was analyzed by varying the range of cutoff levels [1, 1.5, and 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the mean] and number of indicators of impairment. The derived rule was evaluated by bootstrap, internal and external clinical validation (orthopedic and traumatic brain injury). Our neuropsychological impairment (NPI) rule was defined as "two or more test scores that fall 1.5 SDs below the mean." The rule identifies 5.1% of the total sample as impaired in the assessment battery and consistently targets between 3 and 7% of the population as impaired even when age, domains, and number of tests are varied. The NPI rate increases in groups known to exhibit cognitive deficits. The NPI rule provides a psychometrically derived method for interpreting performance across multiple tests and may be used in children 6-18 years. The rule may be useful to clinicians and scientists who wish to establish whether specific individuals or clinical populations present within expected norms versus impaired function across a battery of neuropsychological tests.

  6. Vestibular Migraine in Children and Adolescents: Clinical Findings and Laboratory Tests

    PubMed Central

    Langhagen, Thyra; Lehrer, Nicole; Borggraefe, Ingo; Heinen, Florian; Jahn, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common cause of episodic vertigo in children. We summarize the clinical findings and laboratory test results in a cohort of children and adolescents with VM. We discuss the limitations of current classification criteria for dizzy children. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 118 children with migraine related vertigo at a tertiary care center. Patients were grouped in the following categories: (1) definite vestibular migraine (dVM); (2) probable vestibular migraine (pVM); (3) suspected vestibular migraine (sVM); (4) benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV); and (5) migraine with/without aura (oM) plus vertigo/dizziness according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version). Results: The mean age of all patients was 12 ± 3 years (range 3–18 years, 70 females). 36 patients (30%) fulfilled criteria for dVM, 33 (28%) for pVM, 34 (29%) for sVM, 7 (6%) for BPV, and 8 (7%) for oM. Somatoform vertigo (SV) co-occurred in 27% of patients. Episodic syndromes were reported in 8%; the family history of migraine was positive in 65%. Mild central ocular motor signs were found in 24% (most frequently horizontal saccadic pursuit). Laboratory tests showed that about 20% had pathological function of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex, and almost 50% had abnormal postural sway patterns. Conclusion: Patients with definite, probable, and suspected VM do not differ in the frequency of ocular motor, vestibular, or postural abnormalities. VM is the best explanation for their symptoms. It is essential to establish diagnostic criteria in clinical studies. In clinical practice, however, the most reasonable diagnosis should be made in order to begin treatment. Such a procedure also minimizes the fear of the parents and children, reduces the need to interrupt leisure time and school activities, and prevents the development of SV. PMID:25674076

  7. Clinical vs. Self-report Versions of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology in a Public Sector Sample

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Ira H.; Rush, A. John; Carmody, Thomas J.; Woo, Ada; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Recent work using classical test theory (CTT) and item response theory (IRT) has found that the self-report (QIDS-SR16) and clinician-rated (QIDS-C16) versions of the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology were generally comparable in outpatients with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder (MDD). This report extends this comparison to a less well-educated, more treatment-resistant sample that included more ethnic/racial minorities using IRT and selected classical test analyses. Methods The QIDS-SR16 and QIDS-C16 were obtained in a sample of 441 outpatients with nonpsychotic MDD seen in the public sector in the Texas Medication Algorithm Project (TMAP). The Samejima graded response IRT model was used to compare the QIDS-SR16 and QIDS-C16. Results The nine symptom domains in the QIDS-SR16 and QIDS-C16 related well to overall depression. The slopes of the item response functions a), which index the strength of relationship between overall depression and each symptom, were extremely similar with the two measures. Likewise, the CTT and IRT indices of symptom frequency (item means and locations of the item response functions, bi) were also similar with these two measures. For example, sad mood and difficulty with concentration/decision making were highly related to the overall depression severity with both the QIDS-C16 and QIDS-SR16. Likewise, sleeping difficulties were commonly reported, even though they were not as strongly related to overall magnitude of depression. Conclusion In this less educated, socially disadvantaged sample, differences between the QIDS-C16 and QIDS-SR16 were minor. The QIDS-SR16 is a satisfactory substitute for the more time-consuming QIDS-C16 in a broad range of adult, nonpsychotic, depressed outpatients. PMID:16716351

  8. Adolescent care

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Andrée; Maheux, Brigitte; Frappier, Jean-Yves; Haley, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate how often family physicians see adolescents with mental health problems and how they manage these problems. DESIGN Mailed survey completed anonymously. SETTING Province of Quebec. PARTICIPANTS All 358 French-speaking family physicians who practise primarily in local community health centres (CLSCs), including physicians working in CLSC youth clinics, and 749 French-speaking practitioners randomly selected from private practice. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Frequency with which physicians saw adolescents with mental health problems, such as depression, suicidal thoughts, behavioural disorders, substance abuse, attempted suicide, or suicide, during the last year or since they started practice. RESULTS Response rate was 70%. Most physicians reported having seen adolescents with mental health problems during the last year. About 10% of practitioners not working in youth clinics reported seeing adolescents with these disorders at least weekly. Anxiety was the most frequently seen problem. A greater proportion of physicians working in youth clinics reported often seeing adolescents for all the mental health problems examined in this study. Between 8% and 33% of general practitioners not working in youth clinics said they had not seen any adolescents with depression, behavioural disorders, or substance abuse. More than 80% of physicians had seen adolescents who had attempted suicide, and close to 30% had had adolescent patients who committed suicide. CONCLUSION Family physicians play a role in adolescent mental health care. The prevalence of mental health problems seems higher among adolescents who attend youth clinics. Given the high prevalence of these problems during adolescence, we suggest on the basis of our results that screening for these disorders in primary care could be improved. PMID:17279202

  9. Profiles of Personal Resiliency for Normative and Clinical Samples of Youth Assessed by the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince-Embury, Sandra; Steer, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Cluster analyses with the three global scores of the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents[TM] (RSCA) were used to determine personal resiliency profiles within normative (641) and outpatient clinical (285) samples of youth aged 9 to 18 years. Normative and clinical profiles were compared with each other and the clinical profiles were…

  10. Citrus Inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Florida's Charlotte County Property Appraiser is using an aerial color infrared mapping system for inventorying citrus trees for valuation purposes. The ACIR system has significantly reduced the time and manpower required for appraisal. Aerial photographs are taken and interpreted by a video system which makes it possible to detect changes from previous years. Potential problems can be identified. KSC's TU Office has awarded a contract to the Citrus Research and Education Center to adapt a prototype system which would automatically count trees and report totals.

  11. Linking HIV-positive adolescents to care in 15 different clinics across the United States: creating solutions to address structural barriers for linkage to care.

    PubMed

    Philbin, Morgan M; Tanner, Amanda E; Duval, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Linkage to care is a critical corollary to expanded HIV testing, but many adolescents are not successfully linked to care, in part due to fragmented care systems. Through a collaboration of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Adolescent Trials Network (ATN), a linkage to care outreach worker was provided to ATN clinics. Factors related to linkage were explored to better understand how to improve retention rates and health outcomes for HIV-positive adolescents. We conducted 124 interviews with staff at 15 Adolescent Trials Network clinics to better understand linkage to care processes, barriers, and facilitators. Content analysis was conducted focusing on structural barriers to care and potential solutions, specifically at the macro-, meso-, and micro-levels. Macro-level barriers included navigating health insurance policies, transportation to appointments, and ease of collecting and sharing client-level contact information between testing agencies, local health departments and clinics; meso-level barriers included lack of youth friendliness within clinic space and staff, and duplication of linkage services; micro-level barriers included adolescents' readiness for care and adolescent developmental capacity. Staff initiated solutions included providing transportation for appointments and funding clinic visits and tests with a range of grants and clinic funds while waiting for insurance approval. However, such solutions were often ad hoc and partial, using micro-level solutions to address macro-level barriers. Comprehensive initiatives to improve linkage to care are needed to address barriers to HIV-care for adolescents, whose unique developmental needs make accessing care particularly challenging. Matching the level of structural solution to the level of structural barriers (i.e., macro-level with macro-level), such as creating policy to address needed youth healthcare entitlements versus covering

  12. "Teens Talk Healthy Weight": the impact of a motivational digital video disc on parental knowledge of obesity-related diseases in an adolescent clinic.

    PubMed

    Windham, Meghan E; Hastings, Elisabeth S; Anding, Roberta; Hergenroeder, Albert C; Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Wiemann, Constance M

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the impact of a 7-minute educational and motivational weight-management digital video disc (DVD) that uses real patient/parent testimonials and provider-patient interactions, on adolescent and parent knowledge of obesity-related diseases; readiness, motivation, and self-efficacy to lose weight; connectedness to care provider; and likelihood of return to clinic for follow-up care. A randomized controlled trial was conducted among 40 overweight/obese adolescent participants (22.5% male, 77.5% female, mean age=15.43 years) and their parents (n=38) who visited a referral-only adolescent clinic for the first time from October 2009 to March 2010. Adolescents were randomly assigned by a research assistant to standard care alone or standard care plus DVD. Standard care (protocol-driven medical and nutritional assessment and counseling) was provided to all adolescents by a registered dietitian nutritionist and physician or nurse practitioner. Adolescents in the intervention group also viewed the DVD. Adolescents and parents completed assessments pre- and post-clinic visit. Repeated measures analysis of covariance was used to evaluate group differences, while controlling for race/ethnicity and age. Parents who viewed the DVD experienced greater improvements in obesity-related disease knowledge than parents who did not view the DVD. Adolescents in both groups improved on measures of motivation to lose weight and dieting self-efficacy, based on pre and post-test questionnaires. A 7-minute educational and motivational DVD helped improve parent knowledge, but was not more powerful than standard care alone in changing other weight-related outcomes in this adolescent clinic. Because it led to increased parental knowledge, incorporating the DVD into clinical practice could also allow more time for health providers to focus on specific obesity-related treatment/education. Future research might examine whether the DVD has more utility in

  13. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cimino, Nina; Di Pietro, Elena; Pollutri, Gabriella; Neviani, Vittoria; Ferri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT), and in the residential facility for adolescents, “The Medlar”, located in Modena. The sample was constituted by all adolescent patients (n=101, age range 14–18) who had acute hospitalizations (n=140) in SPDT and had been successively transferred to “The Medlar” (n=83), from February 2, 2010 to January 31, 2015. From clinical charts, we extracted demographic and anamnestic characteristics of patients and clinical variables related to hospitalizations. Data were statistically analyzed. Results Sixty-one percent of our patients lived with one divorced parent, with adoptive or immigrant family, or in institutions; 51% had experienced stressful events during childhood; 81% had a normal intellective level, but only 6% presented regular school performance. Parental psychiatric illness was negatively related, in a statistically significantly way, with onset age of adolescent mental disorders (coefficient −2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −3.53 to 1.01, P<0.001, single linear regression; odds ratio: 4.39, 95% CI: 1.43–13.47, P<0.010, single logistic regression). The most frequent reasons for admission were aggressive behavior in males and suicide risk in females (P=0.002). The most frequent psychiatric diagnosis at SPDT discharge was “conduct disorder”, more frequent in males, followed by “adjustment disorder”, more frequent in females (P=0.001). In SPDT, the adolescent hospitalizations progressively increased fivefold at the end of the observation period

  14. Nigerian Physiotherapy Clinical Students' Perception of Their Learning Environment Measured by the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odole, Adesola C.; Oyewole, Olufemi O.; Ogunmola, Oluwasolape T.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of the learning environment and the understanding of how students learn will help teacher to facilitate learning and plan a curriculum to achieve the learning outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate undergraduate physiotherapy clinical students' perception of University of Ibadan's learning environment. Using the…

  15. Clinical and Cognitive Characteristics Associated with Mathematics Problem Solving in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Tasha M; Beck, Jonathan S; Iosif, Ana-Maria; McCauley, James B; Gilhooly, Leslie J; Matter, John C; Solomon, Marjorie

    2016-04-01

    Mathematics achievement in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been understudied. However, the ability to solve applied math problems is associated with academic achievement, everyday problem-solving abilities, and vocational outcomes. The paucity of research on math achievement in ASD may be partly explained by the widely-held belief that most individuals with ASD are mathematically gifted, despite emerging evidence to the contrary. The purpose of the study was twofold: to assess the relative proportions of youth with ASD who demonstrate giftedness versus disability on applied math problems, and to examine which cognitive (i.e., perceptual reasoning, verbal ability, working memory) and clinical (i.e., test anxiety) characteristics best predict achievement on applied math problems in ASD relative to typically developing peers. Twenty-seven high-functioning adolescents with ASD and 27 age- and Full Scale IQ-matched typically developing controls were assessed on standardized measures of math problem solving, perceptual reasoning, verbal ability, and test anxiety. Results indicated that 22% of the ASD sample evidenced a mathematics learning disability, while only 4% exhibited mathematical giftedness. The parsimonious linear regression model revealed that the strongest predictor of math problem solving was perceptual reasoning, followed by verbal ability and test anxiety, then diagnosis of ASD. These results inform our theories of math ability in ASD and highlight possible targets of intervention for students with ASD struggling with mathematics.

  16. Implementing Dialectical Behavior Therapy with Adolescents and Their Families in a Community Outpatient Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodberry, Kristen A.; Popenoe, Ellen J.

    2008-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an empirically supported treatment for adult women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD), has been increasingly adapted for use with adolescents across a variety of settings. This article describes a community-based application of DBT principles and strategies for adolescents and their families.…

  17. Association of Educational Attainment and Adolescent Substance Use Disorder in a Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apantaku-Olajide, Tunde; James, Philip D.; Smyth, Bobby P.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores substance use, psychosocial problems, and the relationships to educational status in 193 adolescents (school dropouts, 63; alternative education, 46; mainstream students, 84) who attended a substance abuse treatment facility in Dublin, Ireland, within a 42-month period. For each adolescent, data on demographics, family…

  18. Capoeira as a Clinical Intervention: Addressing Adolescent Aggression with Brazilian Martial Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Isaac; Butler, S. Kent

    2011-01-01

    Aggression in adolescents is harmful and emotionally devastating to youth and surrounding communities. This article integrates martial arts and therapeutic principles into a culturally sensitive model that cultivates change in the aggressive behaviors of disenfranchised adolescents. The art form of Capoeira is proposed for promoting positive…

  19. Depressive Symptoms and Clinical Status during the Treatment of Adolescent Suicide Attempters (TASA) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitiello, Benedetto; Brent, David A.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Emslie, Graham; Wells, Karen; Walkup, John T.; Stanley, Barbara; Bukstein, Oscar; Kennard, Betsy D.; Compton, Scott; Coffey, Barbara; Cwik, Mary F.; Posner, Kelly; Wagner, Ann; March, John S.; Riddle, Mark; Goldstein, Tina; Curry, John; Capasso, Lisa; Mayes, Taryn; Shen, Sa; Gugga, S. Sonia; Turner, J. Blake; Barnett, Shannon; Zelazny, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the course of depression during the treatment of adolescents with depression who had recently attempted suicide. Method: Adolescents (N = 124), ages 12 to 18 years, with a 90-day history of suicide attempt, a current diagnosis of depressive disorder (96.0% had major depressive disorder), and a Children's Depression Rating…

  20. Adolescents and the Media: Medical and Psychological Impact. Developmental Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasburger, Victor C.

    Aimed at primary care physicians and nurses, educators, and parents, this book reviews media effects on adolescent behavior and psychology. The book notes that television is a powerful medium to which adolescents are uniquely susceptible and how studies have shown television's ability to shape social attitudes. Theories of how television affects…

  1. Demographic influences and suggested cut-scores for the Beck Depression Inventory in a non-clinical Spanish speaking population from the US-Mexico border region.

    PubMed

    Dawes, S E; Suarez, P; Vaida, F; Marcotte, T D; Atkinson, J H; Grant, I; Heaton, R; Cherner, M

    2010-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-I (BDI-I) is a self-report measure of depressive symptomatology that is widely used in both research and clinical settings. While the Spanish language version of the BDI-I is frequently used in the USA, there are currently no available guidelines to determine depressive symptomatology base rates in Spanish speaking populations using this instrument. In the present study, base rates of depressive symptoms and demographic influences on the BDI-I were measured in a non-clinical Spanish speaking population from the US-Mexico border region. A sample of 198 neurologically normal Spanish speaking individuals, mostly of Mexican decent, completed the BDI-I as part of a larger neuropsychological norming study. The results indicated that while there were no effects of age or education on overall BDI-I scores, those with lower education tended to report higher severity of individual symptoms. Consistent with findings in other populations, women endorsed a greater number of depressive symptoms. Therefore separate cut-scores were derived for men and women to represent these differences. Future research should assess the impact of acculturation and socioeconomic stressors on the BDI scores in this mostly immigrant population.

  2. Demographic influences and suggested cut-scores for the Beck Depression Inventory in a non-clinical Spanish speaking population from the US-Mexico border region

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, S. E.; Suarez, P.; Vaida, F.; Marcotte, T. D.; Atkinson, J. H.; Grant, I.; Heaton, R.; Cherner, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-I (BDI-I) is a self-report measure of depressive symptomatology that is widely used in both research and clinical settings. While the Spanish language version of the BDI-I is frequently used in the USA, there are currently no available guidelines to determine depressive symptomatology base rates in Spanish speaking populations using this instrument. In the present study, base rates of depressive symptoms and demographic influences on the BDI-I were measured in a non-clinical Spanish speaking population from the US-Mexico border region. A sample of 198 neurologically normal Spanish speaking individuals, mostly of Mexican decent, completed the BDI-I as part of a larger neuropsychological norming study. The results indicated that while there were no effects of age or education on overall BDI-I scores, those with lower education tended to report higher severity of individual symptoms. Consistent with findings in other populations, women endorsed a greater number of depressive symptoms. Therefore separate cut-scores were derived for men and women to represent these differences. Future research should assess the impact of acculturation and socioeconomic stressors on the BDI scores in this mostly immigrant population. PMID:24432048

  3. Research on Clinical Preventive Services for Adolescents and Young Adults: Where Are We and Where Do We Need to Go?

    PubMed

    Harris, Sion K; Aalsma, Matthew C; Weitzman, Elissa R; Garcia-Huidobro, Diego; Wong, Charlene; Hadland, Scott E; Santelli, John; Park, M Jane; Ozer, Elizabeth M

    2017-03-01

    We reviewed research regarding system- and visit-level strategies to enhance clinical preventive service delivery and quality for adolescents and young adults. Despite professional consensus on recommended services for adolescents, a strong evidence base for services for young adults, and improved financial access to services with the Affordable Care Act's provisions, receipt of preventive services remains suboptimal. Further research that builds off successful models of linking traditional and community clinics is needed to improve access to care for all youth. To optimize the clinical encounter, promising clinician-focused strategies to improve delivery of preventive services include screening and decision support tools, particularly when integrated into electronic medical record systems and supported by training and feedback. Although results have been mixed, interventions have moved beyond increasing service delivery to demonstrating behavior change. Research on emerging technology-such as gaming platforms, mobile phone applications, and wearable devices-suggests opportunities to expand clinicians' reach; however, existing research is based on limited clinical settings and populations. Improved monitoring systems and further research are needed to examine preventive services facilitators and ensure that interventions are effective across the range of clinical settings where youth receive preventive care, across multiple populations, including young adults, and for more vulnerable populations with less access to quality care.

  4. A clinic-based youth development program to reduce sexual risk behaviors among adolescent girls: prime time pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sieving, Renee E; Bernat, Debra H; Resnick, Michael D; Oliphant, Jennifer; Pettingell, Sandra; Plowman, Shari; Skay, Carol

    2012-07-01

    Multifaceted, sustained efforts are needed to reduce early pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases among high-risk adolescents. An important area for research is testing youth development interventions offered through clinic settings, where access to high-risk adolescents is plentiful and few efforts have rigorously evaluated a dual approach of building protective factors while addressing risk. This article presents findings from a pilot study of Prime Time, a clinic-based youth development intervention to reduce sexual risk behaviors among girls at risk for early pregnancy. Girls aged 13 to 17 years meeting specified risk criteria were assigned to Prime Time treatment groups. The Prime Time intervention included a combination of case management services and peer leadership groups. Participants completed self-report surveys at baseline, 12 and 18 months following enrollment. At 12 months, the intervention group reported significantly fewer sexual partners than the control group. At 18 months, the intervention group reported significantly more consistent condom use with trends toward more consistent hormonal and dual method use. Dose-response analyses suggested that relatively high levels of exposure to a youth development intervention were needed to change contraceptive use behaviors among adolescents at risk for early pregnancy. Given promising findings, further testing of the Prime Time intervention is warranted.

  5. An evaluation of nonassaultive, assaultive, and sexually assaultive adolescents at pretrial sentencing: a comparison on cognition, personality, aggression, and criminal sentiments.

    PubMed

    Valliant, Paul M; Clark, Lisa M

    2009-12-01

    This study evaluated male adolescents who were convicted of offenses. Test scores of 12 nonassaultive, 14 assaultive, and 13 sexual offenders were compared prior to sentencing. A battery of psychometric tests evaluating cognition, scholastic ability, personality, aggression, and criminal sentiments were administered. Significant differences were noted for the subtest Block Design of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children. Significant personality measures were also noted for Social Introversion and Addiction Acknowledgement of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent Form, and the Inhibited, Sexual Discomfort, Peer Insecurity, Substance Abuse Proneness, and Anxious Feelings of the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory. There were significant differences noted for the State Anger, Feel Like Expressing Anger Verbally, Feel Like Expressing Anger Physically, Trait Anger, Angry Temperament, Angry Reaction, Anger Expression-Out, and Anger Expression Index of the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Discriminant analyses showed the three groups could be separated by stepwise procedure.

  6. Developmentally informed research on the effectiveness of clinical trials: a primer for assessing how developmental issues may influence treatment responses among adolescents with alcohol use problems.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Eric F

    2008-04-01

    The goal of this article is to familiarize readers with the adolescent developmental issues and processes most likely to affect responses to treatment for alcohol use problems. Although the need for research that blends developmental science and treatment outcome research is widely acknowledged, scant information exists about developmentally informed approaches to treatment research with alcohol-abusing teens. Exactly how developmental issues may influence treatment responses among adolescents with alcohol use problems remains an open question. In the hope of moving developmentally informed research forward, this article reports findings from a literature review regarding the degree to which developmental issues and processes have been considered in adolescent alcohol treatment research. Moreover, promising concepts and methods from applied developmental science are discussed, as are various developmental processes and transitions that may influence adolescent risk behavior. Finally, guidance is provided regarding how applied developmental science conceptualizations and methods may be incorporated successfully into randomized, clinical trials with adolescents with alcohol use problems.

  7. Progestin only contraceptives and their use in adolescents: clinical options and medical indications.

    PubMed

    Burkett, Amy M; Hewitt, Geri D

    2005-10-01

    Some adolescents use progestin only contraceptive products because of an underlying medical condition; others simply prefer them. Current options include pills, a long -acting intramuscular injection, an implant, and a progestin-releasing intrauterine device. Also available is Plan B, a progestin only emergency contraceptive option. Although these products vary in efficacy, they are generally safe and well tolerated by adolescents. The implants and intramuscular injections are particularly well suited for adolescent use because of their need for little compliance, well-tolerated adverse effect profile, and excellent efficacy rates.

  8. Reliability and Validity Study of Clinical Ultrasound Imaging on Lateral Curvature of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Li, M.; Lou, Edmond H. M.; Wong, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-ionizing radiation imaging assessment has been advocated for the patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). As one of the radiation-free methods, ultrasound imaging has gained growing attention in scoliosis assessment over the past decade. The center of laminae (COL) method has been proposed to measure the spinal curvature in the coronal plane of ultrasound image. However, the reliability and validity of this ultrasound method have not been validated in the clinical setting. Objectives To evaluate the reliability and validity of clinical ultrasound imaging on lateral curvature measurements of AIS with their corresponding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Methods Thirty curves (ranged 10.2°–68.2°) from sixteen patients with AIS were eligible for this study. The ultrasound scan was performed using a 3-D ultrasound unit within the same morning of MRI examination. Two researchers were involved in data collection of these two examinations. The COL method was used to measure the coronal curvature in ultrasound image, compared with the Cobb method in MRI. The intra- and inter-rater reliability of the COL method was evaluated by intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). The validity of this method was analyzed by paired Student’s t-test, Bland–Altman statistics and Pearson correlation coefficient. The level of significance was set as 0.05. Results The COL method showed high intra- and inter-rater reliabilities (both with ICC (2, K) >0.9, p<0.05) to measure the coronal curvature. Compared with Cobb method, COL method showed no significant difference (p<0.05) when measuring coronal curvature. Furthermore, Bland-Altman method demonstrated an agreement between these two methods, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) was high (r>0.9, p<0.05). Conclusion The ultrasound imaging could provide a reliable and valid measurement of spinal curvature in the coronal plane using the COL method. Further research is needed to validate the

  9. Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents--a comprehensive review of biology, clinical course and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Ananth; Daw, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (nLPHL) is a unique variant of Hodgkin lymphoma with an overall good prognosis. It is conspicuously different from classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and is now recognized as distinctive form of B cell lymphoma. Although it has an indolent clinical course, it has a propensity for multiple and often late relapses. Although the majority of children present with early stage disease and without B symptoms, treatment strategy has, until recently, been identical to that used for cHL. This approach is excessively toxic as it predisposes these children and adolescents to serious late effects including end organ damage to heart, gonads, lungs, thyroid and second malignant neoplasms. The aim of this article is to review the published literature on the treatment outcomes of nLPHL in affected children and adolescents, and discuss the options for treatment including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted anti-CD 20 antibody therapy.

  10. [Consensus document on the clinical use of melatonin in children and adolescents with sleep-onset insomnia].

    PubMed

    Pin Arboledas, G; Merino Andreu, M; de la Calle Cabrera, T; Hidalgo Vicario, M I; Rodríguez Hernández, P J; Soto Insuga, V; Madrid Pérez, J A

    2014-11-01

    Sleep problems are highly prevalent among our children and adolescents. Its treatment is mainly based on cognitive behavioural therapies and habit modification procedures. However, the use of sleep promoting drugs and substances is widespread without being supported by clinical guidelines. Exogenous melatonin is a neurohormone marketed as a nutritional supplement that is being increasingly used in the management of sleep problems, and with no control over its use. The consensus document is presented on the use of melatonin in sleep-onset insomnia prepared by representatives of the Spanish Paediatric Association, the Spanish Society of Sleep, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Outpatients and Primary Care, the Spanish Society for Adolescent Medicine, the Spanish Society of Child Psychiatry, and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Neurology.

  11. Assessment of suicidality in children and adolescents with diagnosis of high functioning autism spectrum disorder in a Turkish clinical sample

    PubMed Central

    Karakoç Demirkaya, Sevcan; Tutkunkardaş, Mustafa Deniz; Mukaddes, Nahit Motavalli

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Considering that suicide is one of the most common reasons of adolescent death worldwide, there is a lack of clinical awareness on suicidal behaviors of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study aims to assess the rate of suicidality (suicidal ideation, behaviors and attempts) and associated risk factors for suicidality in high functioning ASD. Methods Medical records of 55 adolescents (six girls, 49 boys), aged between 7–20 years, with diagnosis of ASD were reviewed. The participants were all able to speak fluently and had no significant limitations in intellectual functioning. Clinical assessment of participants was carried out on the basis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition, Text Revision criteria and Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version. Eskin’s Suicide Screening Questionnaire and sociodemographic data form including detailed history of suicidal behaviors were used. The study group was also divided into suicidal and non-suicidal groups for the purpose of comparing the results. Results The rate of suicidal behaviors was 29% and suicide attempt was 12.7%. Types of suicidality were behaviors (43.7%), thoughts (37.5%), and verbal declarations (18.7%). A number of bizarre acts were recorded. Rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders and disruptive behaviors were 23.6%, 43.6% and 65.4% respectively. Groups with the psychotic features, positive family history for suicidal behaviors and completed suicide showed more suicidality than the non-suicidal group. Conclusion Consistent with the previous findings, rate of suicidality is higher in individuals with ASD. The type of suicidal behaviors showed some differences compared to typically developing individuals. The presence of psychotic features and positive family history for suicidality may be risk factors for suicidality in

  12. Predictors of self-esteem in adolescents with a psychiatric referral.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Devrim; Çak, Tuna; Aslan, Cihan; Aydos, Büşra Sultan; Nalbant, Kevser; Çuhadaroğlu-Çetin, Füsun

    2016-01-01

    In the literature self-esteem is found to be lower in clinically referred adolescents compared to adolescents without any psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study is to examine self-esteem and associated socio-demographical and psychological factors in clinically referred adolescents in Turkey. Three hundred forty-nine adolescents aged between 12 and 18 years admitted to the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry with a psychiatric complaint were enrolled. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), Parenting Style Scale (PSS) and Sense of Identity Assessment Form (SIAF) were used for the evaluation. Self-esteem was lower in: girls, adolescents without siblings, living in non-nuclear families, with a past suicide attempt, and with history of a non-suicidal self-injurious behavior (NSSI). Self-esteem was negatively correlated with identity confusion on SIAF and positively correlated with acceptance/involvement on PSS. Significant predictors of self-esteem were gender, presence of a sibling, history of a NSSI and SIAF scores. Interactions between self-esteem and gender, psychiatric symptoms, parenting and identity development are complex in clinically referred adolescents. Further elucidation of the mechanisms through which these characteristics modify self-esteem will be necessary to guide families and clinicians to help adolescents to maintain high self-esteem levels.

  13. An Attempt to Validate a Measure of Structure in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabassol, David J.

    1975-01-01

    Eighty male adolescents were given a structure inventory (CASI) devised by the author, and also the Locus Of Control (I-E) instrument, and the Adjective Check List (ACL), in an attempt to validate the first-named inventory. (Editor)

  14. Substance Abuse Prevention Program for Children and Adolescents in a Community-Based Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Andrea; Harvin, Sheila; White, Janeana

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a community-based substance abuse prevention program utilizing a cognitive-behavioral curriculum to children and adolescents affected by a substance use disorder in a parent or caretaker.

  15. Clinical variability in cardiovascular disease risk factor screening and management in adolescent and young adult women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Tamara E.; Milliren, Carly E.; Walls, Courtney; DiVasta, Amy D.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives To review the clinical presentation, evaluation and management of normal-weight, overweight and obese adolescent and young adult women with PCOS over 2-year follow-up. Design Retrospective chart review Participants 173 adolescent and young adult women, aged 12–22 years, diagnosed with PCOS Interventions Demographic, health data, and laboratory measures were abstracted from 3 clinic visits: baseline and 1- and 2- year follow-up. Subjects were classified as normal-weight (NW), overweight (OW) or obese (OB). Longitudinal data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Main Outcome Measures BMI, self-reported concerns, lifestyle changes. Results Most patients (73%) were OW or OB. Family history of type II diabetes was greater in OW (38%) and OB (53%) as compared to NW (22%) patients (p=0.002). Acanthosis nigricans was identified in OW (62%) and OB (21%) patients, but not NW patients (0%; p <0.001). OW and OB patients had higher fasting insulin (p<0.001) and lower HDL cholesterol (p=0.005) than NW patients, although screening rates were low. BMI Z-scores decreased in both OW and OB patients over time (0.07 units/year; p<0.001). Conclusions Most patients with PCOS were OW/OB. Substantial clinical variability existed in CVD screening; among those screened, OW and OB patients had greater CVD risk factors. Despite self-reported concerns about weight and diabetes risk among OW/OB patients, no clinically significant change in BMI percentile occurred. Evidence-based interventions and recommendations for screening tests are needed to address CVD risk in adolescents and young adults with PCOS. PMID:26081478

  16. Analysis of some clinical and laboratory aspects of adolescent patients with thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gurgey, Aytemiz; Balta, Gunay; Gumruk, Fatma; Altay, Cigdem

    2004-10-01

    A total of 360 pediatric patients aged 1 month to 18 years were diagnosed as having thrombosis between January 1998 and April 2003. Of these patients, those aged 11-18 years (n=131) were regarded as adolescents and the rest as children. The proportion of adolescents in the whole group excluding the neonates was 36%. The peak age of diagnosis in adolescents was 11-14 years, comprising 58% of all thrombotic events in adolescents. In 73% of the adolescents, there was at least one risk factor. The four most common underlying disorders were infection, malignancy, connective tissue and cardiac disorders, in decreasing order of frequency. In children, on the other hand, infection was followed by congenital heart disease, malignancy and liver disease. Three common types of thrombosis in adolescents were deep venous thrombosis, cerebro-vascular events and portal venous thrombosis, while cerebro-vascular events were the most common in children. The frequency of factor V G1691A mutation in the adolescents (22.1%) was significantly higher than that found in a group of healthy controls (7.4%) and this mutation was associated with a 3.6-fold increase in the risk of developing thrombosis (95% confidence interval, 1.4-9.0). The carrier frequency of prothrombin G20210A mutation (3.1%) in adolescents did not differ significantly from that of the healthy population (2.3%) and no association was observed between this mutation and a risk of developing thrombosis in this group (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.2-7.5). The rate of recurrent thrombosis was 6%.

  17. Intervention with Substance Abusing Runaway Adolescents and their Families: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Erdem, Gizem; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Brigham, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the efficacy of three theoretically distinct interventions among substance-abusing runaway adolescents and to explore individual differences in trajectories of change. Methods Adolescents (N=179) between the ages of 12–17 were recruited from a runaway shelter in a Midwestern city. The sample included 94 females (52.5%) and 85 males (47.5%), the majority of the adolescents were African American (n= 118, 65.9%). Adolescents were randomly assigned to the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA, n = 57), Motivational Interviewing (MI, n = 61), or Ecologically-Based Family Therapy (EBFT, n = 61). Substance use was assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months via Form 90 and urine screens. Results Hierarchical linear modeling revealed statistically significant improvement in frequency of substance use among runaways in all three treatment groups with a slight increase at post-treatment. Latent trajectory profile analysis explored individual differences in change trajectories and yielded a 3 class model. The majority of adolescents (n = 136, 76%) showed reductions in substance use over time with a slight increase at follow-up (Class 1: Decreasing). Twenty-four (13.4%) adolescents had shown high levels of substance use over time with patterns of increase and decrease (Class 2: Fluctuating high users), and 19 (10.6%) decreased but returned to baseline levels by two years post-baseline (Class 3: U shaped). Few differences among treatment conditions were noted; within the “decreasing” group, adolescents in MI treatment showed a quicker decline in their substance use but a faster relapse compared to those receiving EBFT. Conclusions These findings suggest that CRA, EBFT and MI are viable treatments for runaway substance-abusing adolescents. PMID:23895088

  18. The Five-Factor Narcissism Inventory (FFNI): a test of the convergent, discriminant, and incremental validity of FFNI scores in clinical and community samples.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joshua D; Few, Lauren R; Wilson, Lauren; Gentile, Brittany; Widiger, Thomas A; Mackillop, James; Keith Campbell, W

    2013-09-01

    The five-factor narcissism inventory (FFNI) is a new self-report measure that was developed to assess traits associated with narcissistic personality disorder (NPD), as well as grandiose and vulnerable narcissism from a five-factor model (FFM) perspective. In the current study, the FFNI was examined in relation to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) NPD, DSM-5 (http://www.dsm5.org) NPD traits, grandiose narcissism, and vulnerable narcissism in both community (N = 287) and clinical samples (N = 98). Across the samples, the FFNI scales manifested good convergent and discriminant validity such that FFNI scales derived from FFM neuroticism were primarily related to vulnerable narcissism scores, scales derived from FFM extraversion were primarily related to grandiose scores, and FFNI scales derived from FFM agreeableness were related to both narcissism dimensions, as well as the DSM-IV and DSM-5 NPD scores. The FFNI grandiose and vulnerable narcissism composites also demonstrated incremental validity in the statistical prediction of these scores, above and beyond existing measures of DSM NPD, grandiose narcissism, and vulnerable narcissism, respectively. The FFNI is a promising measure that provides a comprehensive assessment of narcissistic pathology while maintaining ties to the significant general personality literature on the FFM.

  19. Changes in Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory scores among opiate addicts as a function of retention in methadone maintenance treatment and recent drug use.

    PubMed

    Calsyn, D A; Wells, E A; Fleming, C; Saxon, A J

    2000-05-01

    The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI) was administered to 144 men and 86 women within 1 month of admission to methadone maintenance treatment and was readministered 18 months following admission. Based on prior research, we hypothesized there would be significant decreases on scales measuring affective disturbance, anxiety, and social isolation and little change in scales measuring antisocial and narcissistic traits. In addition, it was hypothesized that changes on the MCMI would be related to retention in treatment and illicit drug use during the interim between initial assessment and follow-up. Data were analyzed using a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) for repeated measures. There was an overall decrease in MCMI scores, indicating less psychopathology between initial assessment and follow-up. MCMI scales did not change as a function of retention status, but decreases in MCMI scale scores were greater for subjects who were light drug users in the 6 months prior to the follow-up compared to heavy users. Inspection of individual MCMI scales supported our hypothesis; there were decreases on scales measuring affective disturbance, anxiety, and social isolation, but not on scales measuring antisocial and narcissistic traits.

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) in a Community Sample and a Multi-Ethnic Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Abrahamse, Mariëlle E; Junger, Marianne; Leijten, Patty H O; Lindeboom, Robert; Boer, Frits; Lindauer, Ramón J L

    The Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) is an established parent rating scale to measure disruptive behavior problems in children aged between 2 and 16 years. The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Dutch translation, including analysis on the one-dimensional structure of the ECBI scales using item response theory. Data from two samples from the Netherlands were used, a community sample (N = 326; 51 % boys) and a multi-ethnic clinical sample (N = 197; 62 % boys). The one-dimensional structure of the ECBI Intensity and Problem Scales were confirmed in both of these samples. The results also indicated good internal consistency, test-retest reliability (community sample), and good convergent and divergent validity. The ECBI Intensity Scale was able to differentiate between diagnostic groups (no diagnosis, ADHD, ODD, and CD symptoms), demonstrating good discriminative validity. Findings support the use of the ECBI as a reliable measure for child disruptive behavior problems in a Dutch population. Suggestions for the optimal use of the both ECBI scales for research and screening purposes are made. Also, cultural issues regarding the use of the ECBI are discussed and additional research into the validity of the ECBI is recommended.

  1. The feasibility of a clinic-based parent intervention to prevent HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancies among Latino and African American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bouris, Alida; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Jaccard, James; McCoy, Wanda; Aranda, Diane; Pickard, Angela; Boyer, Cherrie B

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the feasibility of conducting a parent-based intervention in a pediatric health clinic to prevent HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and unintended pregnancies among urban African American and Latino youth. Eight focus groups were conducted with health care providers, adolescent patients and the mothers of adolescent patients (n = 41) from December 2007 to February 2008. All participants were recruited from a community-based pediatric health clinic in the Bronx, New York. Content analysis of focus group transcripts identified results in three primary areas: (1) the role of parents and providers in preventing HIV, STDs and unintended pregnancies among adolescents, (2) feasibility of the intervention in the clinic setting; and (3) optimal recruitment, retention and intervention delivery strategies. Study results suggest that a parent-based intervention delivered in a community-based pediatric health clinic setting is feasible. Focused recommendations for intervention recruitment, delivery, and retention are provided.

  2. The Posttraumatic Growth Inventory: Factor Structure and Invariance in a Sample of Breast Cancer Patients and in a Non-Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Catarina; Leal, Isabel; Marôco, Ana Lúcia; Tedeschi, Richard G

    2016-10-03

    The Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) is frequently used to assess positive changes following a traumatic event. The aim of the study is to examine the factor structure and the latent mean invariance of PTGI. A sample of 205 (M age = 54.3, SD = 10.1) women diagnosed with breast cancer and 456 (M age = 34.9, SD = 12.5) adults who had experienced a range of adverse life events were recruited to complete the PTGI and a socio-demographic questionnaire. We use Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to test the factor-structure and multi-sample CFA to examine the invariance of the PTGI between the two groups. The goodness of fit for the five-factor model is satisfactory for breast cancer sample (χ2(175) = 396.265; CFI = .884; NIF = .813; RMSEA [90% CI] = .079 [.068, .089]), and good for non-clinical sample (χ2(172) = 574.329; CFI = .931; NIF = .905; RMSEA [90% CI] = .072 [.065, .078]). The results of multi-sample CFA show that the model fit indices of the unconstrained model are equal but the model that uses constrained factor loadings is not invariant across groups. The findings provide support for the original five-factor structure and for the multidimensional nature of posttraumatic growth (PTG). Regarding invariance between both samples, the factor structure of PTGI and other parameters (i.e., factor loadings, variances, and co-variances) are not invariant across the sample of breast cancer patients and the non-clinical sample.

  3. Validation of a Short Version of the Revised Drug Use Screening Inventory (DUSI-R) in a Brazilian Sample of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Fidalgo, Thiago Marques; Tarter, Ralph; da Silveira, Evelyn Doering; Kirisci, Levent; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The revised Drug Use Screening Inventory (DUSI-R) is a self-report questionnaire designed to quantify the severity of problems that are commonly associated with consumption of alcohol and other drugs. This study extends research conducted on the U.S. population to determines whether the DUSI-R’s substance abuse scale discriminates Brazilian youths in treatment (N=41) from a general population sample (N=43). A Portuguese translation of the substance abuse scale was administered in paper and pencil format at the time of intake into treatment and to randomly selected youths in school. The mean score on the 15-item substance abuse scale in the treatment group was 6.7 compared to 1.9 in the comparison group (t=6.78; p<0.001). The optimal cut-off score of two positive endorsements has 85% sensitivity and 70% specificity. This study demonstrates that the DUSI-R’s substance abuse scale is valid for screening Brazilian youths who require treatment. PMID:20653645

  4. Anger in Adolescent Communities: How Angry Are They?

    PubMed

    Pullen, Lisa; Modrcin, Mary Anne; McGuire, Sandra L; Lane, Karen; Kearnely, Melissa; Engle, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Anger is a common factor in two causes of death in adolescence: homicide and suicide. This study looked at the level of anger in non-clinical convenience sample of adolescents (N = 139) between the ages of 12 and 19 years (early: 12 to 14 years, mid: 15 to 16 years, late: 17 to 19 years) from a large Southeastern Baptist church. Participants completed the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, Beck and Children's Depression Inventories, and Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST). The level of self-reported anger was low. The difference in anger between the three age groups was not statistically significant. Differences in gender were generally not significant statistically. A strong correlation exists between stress and anger. A minor relationship between parental drinking behaviors, as measured by the CAST, and anger was found. A significant relationship between anger and depression, and frequency of participation in religious activity and decreased anger was established. By increasing the current knowledge of anger in adolescents, it may be possible to gain insight into risk factors or triggers that cause anger. Interventions must be implemented early to prevent juvenile detention and to help adolescents remain in the community. Public policies addressing anger in adolescents are essential. Health care providers must work together to identify adolescents with disorders or feelings of isolation or disconnect and provide treatment based in communities so adolescents can still function and not be isolated. It is relevant that a mentor or someone that can be trusted is provided to build a safe and secure environment. This greater knowledge may aid in assessment and treatment of adolescents with dysfunctional anger.

  5. Behavioral Risk Elicits Selective Activation of the Executive System in Adolescents: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Yaxley, Richard H.; Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E.; Bergman, Sara; Hooper, Stephen R.; Huettel, Scott A.; De Bellis, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated adolescent brain processing of decisions under conditions of varying risk, reward, and uncertainty. Adolescents (n = 31) preformed a Decision–Reward Uncertainty task that separates decision uncertainty into behavioral and reward risk, while they were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Behavioral risk trials involved uncertainty about which action to perform to earn a fixed monetary reward. In contrast, during reward risk the decision that might lead to a reward was known, but the likelihood of earning a reward was probabilistically determined. Behavioral risk trials evoked greater activation than the reward risk and no risk conditions in the anterior cingulate, medial frontal gyrus, bilateral frontal poles, bilateral inferior parietal lobe, precuneus, bilateral superior-middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and insula. Our results were similar to those of young adults using the same task (Huettel, 2006) except that adolescents did not show significant activation in the posterior supramarginal gyrus during behavioral risk. During the behavioral risk condition regardless of reward outcome, overall mean frontal pole activity showed a positive correlation with age during the behavioral and reward risk conditions suggesting a developmental difference of this region of interest. Additionally, reward response to the Decision–Reward Uncertainty task in adolescents was similar to that seen in young adults (Huettel, 2006). Our data did not show a correlation between age and mean ventral striatum activity during the three conditions. While our results came from a healthy high functioning non-maltreated sample of adolescents, this method can be used to address types of risks and reward processing in children and adolescents with predisposing vulnerabilities and add to the paucity of imaging studies of risk and reward processing during adolescence. PMID:22194728

  6. Parent-youth agreement on symptoms and diagnosis: assessment with a diagnostic interview in an adolescent inpatient clinical population.

    PubMed

    Lauth, Bertrand; Arnkelsson, Guðmundur B; Magnússon, Páll; Skarphéðinsson, Guðmundur Á; Ferrari, Pierre; Pétursson, Hannes

    2010-12-01

    Diagnostic information on adolescents may be elicited from both youths and their parents, especially for depressive and suicidal symptomatology. The objective of this study was to examine the degree of agreement between parent and adolescent reports of major psychiatric disorders, at the diagnostic and at the symptom level, in a severely affected inpatient clinical population. 64 parent-adolescent pairs were interviewed separately with the semi-structured diagnostic interview Kiddie-SADS-PL. Symptomatology was also assessed with 11 self-report and parent-report scales, all translated, adapted and in most cases validated in Iceland. A total of 25 subscales were included to assess emotional dimensions such as depression or anxiety and cognitive dimensions such as attention deficit or self-concept. Good agreement was found for social phobia and fair agreement for generalized anxiety disorder. Although parent-youth agreement was poor in most cases at the symptoms level, significant correlations indicated consistency for most severity scores, except those related to depressive symptomatology, attention deficit, separation anxiety or conduct disorder. The low agreement between reports of suicidal ideation is in line with results from previous studies and suggests that parents might under- or over-estimate this symptomatology. The combination of data obtained with diagnostic interviews and rating-scales confirmed results from prior empirical work, giving greater weight to parents' reports of observable behavior and to adolescents' reports of subjective experiences, especially depressive symptomatology. Our findings suggest that both parent and child informants are necessary to obtain adequate assessments in adolescents. Further research should explore the correspondence between discrepant diagnoses and external criteria such as parental psychopathology or parent-child relationships and attachment. Psychoanalysis could benefit from cognitive neuroscience and use cognitive

  7. Distinguishing Primary and Secondary Variants of Callous Unemotional Traits among Adolescents in a Clinic-referred Sample

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Rachel E.; Frick, Paul J.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Youngstrom, Jennifer Kogos; Feeny, Norah C.; Findling, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The current study used model-based cluster analyses to determine if there are two distinct variants of adolescents (ages 11 - 18) high on callous-unemotional (CU) traits that differ on their level of anxiety and history of trauma. The sample (n = 272) consisted of clinic-referred youths who were primarily African-American (90%) and from low income families. Consistent with hypotheses, three clusters emerged, including a group low on CU traits, as well as two groups high on CU traits that differed in their level of anxiety and past trauma. Consistent with past research on incarcerated adults and adolescents, the group high on anxiety (i.e., secondary variant) was more likely to have histories of abuse and had higher levels of impulsivity, externalizing behaviors, aggression, and behavioral activation. In contrast, the group low on anxiety (i.e., primary variant) scored lower on a measure of behavioral inhibition. On measures of impulsivity and externalizing behavior, the higher scores for the secondary cluster only were found for self-report measures, not on parent-report measures. Youths in the primary cluster also were perceived as less credible reporters than youth in the secondary or cluster low on CU traits. These reporter and credibility differences suggest that adolescents within the primary variant may underreport their level of behavioral disturbance, which has important assessment implications. PMID:23647031

  8. Epigenetic and genetic variants in the HTR1B gene and clinical improvement in children and adolescents treated with fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Gassó, Patricia; Rodríguez, Natalia; Blázquez, Ana; Monteagudo, Ana; Boloc, Daniel; Plana, Maria Teresa; Lafuente, Amalia; Lázaro, Luisa; Arnaiz, Joan Albert; Mas, Sergi

    2017-04-03

    The serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1B) is important to both the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder and the antidepressant effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Although fluoxetine has been shown to be effective and safe in children and adolescents, not all patients experience a proper clinical response, which has led to further study into the main factors involved in this inter-individual variability. Our aim was to study the effect of epigenetic and genetic factors that could affect 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1B (HTR1B) gene expression, and thereby response to fluoxetine. A total of 83 children and adolescents were clinically assessed 12weeks after of initiating an antidepressant treatment with fluoxetine for the first time. We evaluated the influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) specifically located in transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) on their clinical improvement. A combined genetic analysis considering the significant SNPs together with the functional variant rs130058 previously associated in our population was also performed. Moreover, we assessed, for the first time in the literature, whether methylation levels of the HTR1B promoter region could be associated with the pharmacological response. Two, rs9361233 and rs9361235, were significantly associated with clinical improvement after treatment with fluoxetine. The heterozygous genotype combination analysis showed a negative correlation with clinical improvement. The lowest improvement was experienced by patients who were heterozygous for all three SNPs. Moreover, a negative correlation was found between clinical improvement and the average methylation level of the HTR1B promoter. These results give new evidence for the role of epigenetic and genetic factors which could modulate HTR1B expression in the pharmacological response to antidepressants.

  9. Clinical Strategies for Integrating Medication Interventions Into Behavioral Treatment for Adolescent ADHD: The Medication Integration Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Aaron; Bobek, Molly; Tau, Gregory Z.; Levin, Frances R.

    2014-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is highly prevalent among adolescents enrolled in behavioral health services but remains undertreated in this age group. Also the first-line treatment for adolescent ADHD, stimulant medication, is underutilized in routine practice. This article briefly describes three behavioral interventions designed to promote stronger integration of medication interventions into treatment planning for adolescent ADHD: family ADHD psychoeducation, family-based medication decision-making, and behavior therapist leadership in coordinating medication integration. It then introduces the Medication Integration Protocol (MIP), which incorporates all three interventions into a five-task protocol: ADHD Assessment and Medication Consult; ADHD Psychoeducation and Client Acceptance; ADHD Symptoms and Family Relations; ADHD Medication and Family Decision-Making; and Medication Management and Integration Planning. The article concludes by highlighting what behavior therapists should know about best practices for medication integration across diverse settings and populations: integrating medication interventions into primary care, managing medication priorities and polypharmacy issues for adolescents with multiple diagnoses, providing ADHD medications to adolescent substance users, and the compatibility of MIP intervention strategies with everyday practice conditions. PMID:25505817

  10. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder among adolescents: a review of the diagnosis, treatment, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Wolraich, Mark L; Wibbelsman, Charles J; Brown, Thomas E; Evans, Steven W; Gotlieb, Edward M; Knight, John R; Ross, E Clarke; Shubiner, Howard H; Wender, Esther H; Wilens, Timothy

    2005-06-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common mental disorder in childhood, and primary care clinicians provide a major component of the care for children with ADHD. However, because of limited available evidence, the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines did not include adolescents and young adults. Contrary to previous beliefs, it has become clear that, in most cases, ADHD does not resolve once children enter puberty. This article reviews the current evidence about the diagnosis and treatment of adolescents and young adults with ADHD and describes how the information informs practice. It describes some of the unique characteristics observed among adolescents, as well as how the core symptoms change with maturity. The diagnostic process is discussed, as well as approaches to the care of adolescents to improve adherences. Both psychosocial and pharmacologic interventions are reviewed, and there is a discussion of these patients' transition into young adulthood. The article also indicates that research is needed to identify the unique adolescent characteristics of ADHD and effective psychosocial and pharmacologic treatments.

  11. The eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic: an interdisciplinary model of care for children and adolescents with sex chromosome aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Nicole; Howell, Susan; Wilson, Rebecca; Janusz, Jennifer; Boada, Richard; Martin, Sydney; Frazier, Jacqueline B; Pfeiffer, Michelle; Regan, Karen; McSwegin, Sarah; Zeitler, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are born with an atypical number of X and/or Y chromosomes, and present with a range of medical, developmental, educational, behavioral, and psychological concerns. Rates of SCA diagnoses in infants and children are increasing, and there is a need for specialized interdisciplinary care to address associated risks. The eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic was established to provide comprehensive and experienced care for children and adolescents with SCA, with an interdisciplinary team composed of developmental–behavioral pediatrics, endocrinology, genetic counseling, child psychology, pediatric neuropsychology, speech–language pathology, occupational therapy, nursing, and social work. The clinic model includes an interdisciplinary approach to care, where assessment results by each discipline are integrated to develop unified diagnostic impressions and treatment plans individualized for each patient. Additional objectives of the eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic program include prenatal genetic counseling, research, education, family support, and advocacy. Methods Satisfaction surveys were distributed to 496 patients, and responses were received from 168 unique patients. Results Satisfaction with the overall clinic visit was ranked as “very satisfied” in 85%, and as “satisfied” in another 9.8%. Results further demonstrate specific benefits from the clinic experience, the importance of a knowledgeable clinic coordinator, and support the need for similar clinics across the country. Three case examples of the interdisciplinary approach to assessment and treatment are included. PMID:26229481

  12. Psychological Characteristics of Adolescent Steroid Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Kent F.; Kleiman, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    Used Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory and Profile of Mood States to assess psychological characteristics in 72 adolescent males: 24 adolescent athletes who reported steroid use, 24 athletes with no steroid use, and 24 nonathletes. Although some personality variables differentiated between athletes and nonathletes, no personality variables…

  13. Clinical assessment of attachment patterns and personality disorder in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Westen, Drew; Nakash, Ora; Thomas, Cannon; Bradley, Rebekah

    2006-12-01

    The relevance of attachment theory and research for practice has become increasingly clear. The authors describe a series of studies with 3 aims: (a) to validate measures of attachment for use by clinicians with adolescents and adults, (b) to examine the relation between attachment and personality pathology, and (c) to ascertain whether factor analysis can recover dimensions of attachment reflecting both interpersonal and narrative style. In 3 studies, experienced clinicians provided psychometric data using 1 of 4 attachment questionnaires (2 adolescent and 2 adult samples). Attachment dimensions predicted both personality pathology and developmental experiences in predictable ways. Factor analysis identified 4 dimensions that replicated across adolescent and adult samples on the basis of a combination of interpersonal and narrative indicators: secure, dismissing, preoccupied, and incoherent/disorganized.

  14. Physical, clinical, and psychosocial parameters of adolescents with different degrees of excess weight☆

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Vanessa Drieli Seron; da Silva, Danilo Fernandes; Bianchini, Josiane Aparecida Alves; Lopera, Carlos Andres; Moreira, Amanda Caroline Teles; Locateli, João Carlos; Nardo, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare body composition, hemodynamic parameters, health-related physical fitness, and health-related quality of life of adolescents with anthropometric diagnosis of overweight, obesity, and severe obesity. METHODS: 220 adolescents with excess body weight were enrolled. They were beginners in a intervention program that included patients based on age, availability, presence of excess body weight, place of residence, and agreement to participate in the study . This study collected anthropometric and hemodynamic variables, health-related physical fitness, and health-related quality of life of the adolescents. To compare the three groups according to nutritional status, parametric and non-parametric tests were applied. Significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in resting heart rate, health-related physical fitness, relative body fat, absolute and relative lean mass, and health-related quality of life between overweight, obese, and severely obese adolescents (p>0.05). Body weight, body mass index, waist and hip circumference, and systolic blood pressure increased as degree of excess weightincreased (p<0.05). Dyastolic blood pressure of the severe obesity group was higher than the other groups (p<0.05). There was an association between the degree of excess weight and the prevalence of altered blood pressure (overweight: 12.1%; obesity: 28.1%; severe obesity: 45.5%; p<0.001). The results were similar when genders were analyzed separately. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that overweight adolescents presented similar results compared to obese and severely obese adolescents in most of the parameters analyzed. PMID:25510998

  15. A comparison between the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and the 'Mensana Clinic Back Pain Test' for validating the complaint of chronic back pain.

    PubMed

    Hendler, N; Mollett, A; Talo, S; Levin, S

    1988-02-01

    Reports on the efficacy of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) for selecting patients with valid complaints of pain have been equivocal. The Mensana Clinic Back Pain Test (MPT) was able to predict, with some degree of success, patients who had a definite organic pathologic condition. However, the MMPI measures personality traits, whereas the MPT measures the impact of pain on a patient's life. To determine which of the two tests would be a better predictor of actual physical abnormalities, and hence valid pain complaints, a comparison was undertaken between the two tests. The charts of 83 patients admitted to the Neurosurgery Service of Johns Hopkins Hospital with complaints of back pain were assessed. MMPI test results, as well as test results for the MPT, were compared to the presence or absence of pathologic conditions on electromyography, nerve conduction velocity studies, thermography, myelogram, or computerized axial tomography scan. The MPT had a correlation factor of -.59700, that was significant as P = .000005. Of the 52 patients scoring 17 points or less on the MPT, 85% had objective physical abnormalities, considered moderate or severe by blind review. Of the 31 patients scoring 18 points or greater on the MPT, only 26% had objective physical findings that were considered moderate or severe. Only the F scale (faking badly) of the MMPI correlated with objective physical abnormalities (r = .21340, P less than .033). However, 60% of the patients with T scores of less than 70 on the F scale had objective findings, whereas 75% of patients with T scores greater than 70 had objective physical findings.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Development of an Easy to Use Tool to Assess HIV Treatment Readiness in Adolescent Clinical Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, M. Isabel; Hosek, Sybil; Warren, Jacob C.; Jacobs, Robin J.; Hernandez, Nilda; Martinez, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Optimal management of HIV disease requires high levels of lifelong adherence once a patient initiates highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Because suboptimal adherence to HAART is associated with adverse consequences, many providers are hesitant to prescribe HAART for patients whom they perceive as not being ready to initiate treatment. Accurately predicting HIV treatment readiness is challenging. Despite the importance of this construct, few reliable and valid instruments to assess HIV treatment readiness have been developed; none of these have been validated with adolescents and young adults, who comprise an increasing proportion of new HIV cases diagnosed. As a first step to achieve this goal, we developed the HIV Treatment Readiness Measure (HTRM) for administration via audio-computer-assisted self interview and conducted a study to examine its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, acceptability, and preliminary factor structure. We recruited 201 youth from 15 adolescent medicine clinics that were part of the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV Interventions. Youth completed the initial assessment and two weeks later the re-test assessment. The refined HTRM had high internal consistency (α = 0.84). Test-retest reliability using both sum scores and mean scores were high. The HTRM was also highly acceptable and feasible to use in routine clinical practice. In exploratory factor analysis we found that a five-factor solution was the best fit; each of the subscales (Disclosure, Psychosocial Issues, Connection with Care, HIV Medication Beliefs, Alcohol and Drugs) had good to acceptable alphas and eigenvalues greater than 2.0. Our findings support conducting a future study to examine the tool’s predictive validity. PMID:22022853

  17. Danish clinical guidelines for examination and treatment of overweight and obese children and adolescents in a pediatric setting.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Anders; Holm, Jens-Christian; Pearson, Seija; Kjærsgaard, Mimi; Larsen, Lone Marie; Højgaard, Birgitte; Cortes, Dina

    2015-05-01

    Overweight children are at an increased risk of becoming obese adults, which may lead to shorter life expectancies in the current generation of children as compared to their parents. Furthermore, being an overweight child has a negative psycho-social impact. We consider obesity in children and adolescents a chronic illness, which is in line with the American Medical Society. We summarize the evidence for the efficacy of a combination of diet, physical activity and behavior-focused interventions in a family-based setting. The present guidelines propose a multidisciplinary service implemented as a "chronic care model" based on "best clinical practice" inspired by an American expert committee and the daily practice of The Children's Obesity Clinic at Copenhagen University Hospital Holbaek. Children and adolescents should be referred for examination and treatment in a pediatric setting when BMI corresponds to an isoBMI of minimum 30 or BMI corresponds to an isoBMI of 25 and complex obesity is suspected. Obtaining a thorough medical history is pivotal. We propose a structured interview to ensure collection of all relevant information. We recommend physical examination focused on BMI, waist circumference, growth, pubertal stage, blood pressure, neurology and skin and provide comprehensive paraclinical investigations for obesity and obesity related conditions. Treatment of obesity in children and adolescents is fully dependent on the combined effort of the entire family. This cannot be overemphasized! The main principle of the treatment is developing an individual detailed plan for every patient to reduce caloric intake whilst increasing physical activity, leaving no ambiguity with the recommendations.

  18. Quality of Life in Epilepsy: A Study of Brazilian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Nathália F.; Oliveira, Fernando L. B. B.; Siqueira, Jorge A.; de Souza, Elisabete Abib Pedroso

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our objectives were: to assess the QOL of Brazilian adolescents with epilepsy with a specific QOL assessment tool; to compare the adolescents with epilepsy and healthy adolescents using a generic QOL assessment tool; to correlate the 2 different QOL assessment tools (the generic and the epilepsy-specific); and to correlate QOL scores of the adolescents with epilepsy obtained by both tools with physical, psychological and social variables of the disease. Methods Fifty subjects (case group) attending the outpatient clinic of epilepsy of the Clinics Hospital of UNICAMP, Campinas-SP, answered the Brazilian version of the QOL inventory for adolescents with epilepsy - QOLIE-AD-48 and the QOL Questionnaire - WHOQOL – BREF – Portuguese version. Fifty-one subjects (control group) from public schools in Campinas-SP answered only the WHOQOL-BREF. Results The results showed that adolescents with epilepsy presented a good score of QOL in both tools; overall scores for both groups with WHOQOL-BREF were good, but a statistically significant difference was seen with regards to the Psychological domain of the WHOQOL-BREF favoring the control group. Significant correlations between QOLIE-AD-48 Total and WHOQOL domains were found. Adolescents that were considered seizure-free (P = 0.001), had good perception of seizure control (P = 0.012) and had not had occurrence of seizures in public places (P = 0.001) presented better QOL scores. Conclusions Brazilian adolescents with epilepsy may present good QOL scores when they themselves consider the disease as under control; physical, social and especially psychological variables associated to the disease may play an important role in these results. As a generic QOL tool, WHOQOL-BREF was sufficient to allow for a comparison between chronic disease bearers and healthy adolescents and showed that the gap in QOL between both populations is not as extensive as once was thought, probably due to better support and

  19. Indian scales and inventories

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, S.

    2010-01-01

    This conceptual, perspective and review paper on Indian scales and inventories begins with clarification on the historical and contemporary meanings of psychometry before linking itself to the burgeoning field of clinimetrics in their applications to the practice of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Clinimetrics is explained as a changing paradigm in the design, administration, and interpretation of quantitative tests, techniques or procedures applied to measurement of clinical variables, traits and processes. As an illustrative sample, this article assembles a bibliographic survey of about 105 out of 2582 research papers (4.07%) scanned through 51 back dated volumes covering 185 issues related to clinimetry as reviewed across a span of over fifty years (1958-2009) in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry. A content analysis of the contributions across distinct categories of mental measurements is explained before linkages are proposed for future directions along these lines. PMID:21836709

  20. Clinical intake of child and adolescent consumers in a rural community mental health center: does wait-time predict attendance?

    PubMed

    Sherman, Marne L; Barnum, David D; Buhman-Wiggs, Adam; Nyberg, Erik

    2009-02-01

    This study examines the clinic variable of wait-time as a predictor of intake attendance in a rural community mental health center (CMHC) serving child and adolescent consumers. Data from 1,317 contacts seeking services for a child or adolescent (ages 2-17) were examined. In logistic regression analysis, wait-time between initial consumer contact and intake appointment was identified as a significant predictor of appointment attendance, even after accounting for consumer variables. The impact of wait-time on the likelihood of intake appointment attendance was not moderated by the urgency of consumer need. Findings elucidate the odds of intake attendance versus non-attendance associated with each day of wait-time and clarify the impact of this clinic variable on pre-intake attrition above and beyond more often studied consumer variables. These results provide information that can assist rural CMHCs in assessing the costs and benefits of steps to reduce wait-time or its impact.

  1. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-5 Internet Gaming Disorder: Development and Validation for Diagnosing IGD in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hoon Jung; Han, Doug Hyun; Park, Sung-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to develop and validate a Structured Clinical Interview for Internet Gaming Disorder (SCI-IGD) in adolescents. Methods First, we generated preliminary items of the SCI-IGD based on the information from the DSM-5 literature reviews and expert consultations. Next, a total of 236 adolescents, from both community and clinical settings, were recruited to evaluate the psychometric properties of the SCI-IGD. Results First, the SCI-IGD was found to be consistent over the time period of about one month. Second, diagnostic concordances between the SCI-IGD and clinician's diagnostic impression were good to excellent. The Likelihood Ratio Positive and the Likelihood Ratio Negative estimates for the diagnosis of SCI-IGD were 10.93 and 0.35, respectively, indicating that SCI-IGD was ‘very useful test’ for identifying the presence of IGD and ‘useful test’ for identifying the absence of IGD. Third, SCI-IGD could identify disordered gamers from non-disordered gamers. Conclusion The implications and limitations of the study are also discussed. PMID:28096871

  2. Resource list: Clinical care programs for gender-nonconforming children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sam; Leininger, Jennifer

    2014-06-01

    Locating specialized services for gender-nonconforming children and adolescents can be challenging. The following resource list--organized by U.S. and Canada geographical region--serves to help clinicians access the most up-to-date information on this special population and pass it along to their patients and families.

  3. Readiness to Change in Adolescents Screening Positive for Substance Use in Urban Primary Care Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Jack; McGeehan, Jennifer; Kelleher, Kelly J.

    2010-01-01

    Primary care physicians often perceive patients as unlikely to decrease their substance use and suggest this reluctance to change diminishes their willingness to screen and intervene. The literature on readiness to change has primarily focused on adults, and the available studies on adolescents have largely included hospitalized and/or…

  4. Adolescents' Physical Aggression toward Parents in a Clinic-Referred Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxer, Paul; Gullan, Rebecca Lakin; Mahoney, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Physical aggression directed toward parents by their adolescents is a serious issue both practically and scientifically. In contrast to the extensive literature on other forms of aggression within families (e.g., marital violence, child physical abuse) as well as youth aggression construed broadly, a major gap exists in our knowledge of…

  5. To Befriend or Not: Naturally Developing Friendships Amongst a Clinical Group of Adolescents with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Forgeron, Paula A; MacLaren Chorney, Jill; Carlson, Torie E; Dick, Bruce D; Plante, Erica

    2015-10-01

    Adolescents with chronic pain frequently perceive a lack of support from friends. Support from a peer with a shared experience has been found to provide emotional, informational, and appraisal support. We sought to quantify the frequency with which adolescents with chronic pain want to befriend other adolescents with chronic pain, and to describe the features of these friendships. Adolescents with chronic pain who had attended a 10-week structured self-management program from 3 sites were invited to complete an online survey. Forty teens participated, 95% (n = 38) were girls; 32% (n = 13) befriended another; 52% (n = 21) were interested in befriending another but did not; 15% (n = 6) were not interested in befriending anyone. Over half (62%) of the friendships lasted at least 1 year (n = 8), but only 2 intermingled these with their regular friendships. Pain was discussed frequently during interactions. The most common reasons for not forming friendships were no time to exchange contact information during group and not having things in common. Reasons for not being interested in forming a friendship also included not having anything in common apart from pain. The majority of participants were interested in befriending another. Emotional support, by feeling understood and discussing pain without fear that the other is disinterested, was the main peer support provided. Without common interests, this form of friendship may not last and is at risk for being overly solicitous by focusing on pain. It remains unclear whether the benefits of peer support translate into improved function.

  6. Peer Influence and Nonsuicidal Self Injury: Longitudinal Results in Community and Clinically-Referred Adolescent Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prinstein, Mitchell J.; Heilbron, Nicole; Guerry, John D.; Franklin, Joseph C.; Rancourt, Diana; Simon, Valerie; Spirito, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that adolescents' engagement in nonsuicidal self-injurious (NSSI) behaviors may be increasing over time, yet little is known regarding distal longitudinal factors that may promote engagement in these behaviors. Data from two longitudinal studies are presented to examine whether NSSI may be associated with peer influence…

  7. Treating Children and Adolescents in Residential and Inpatient Settings. Developmental Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry. Volume 36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Robert D.; Campbell, Nancy R.

    This book examines the various components of hospital, residential, and outpatient treatments for children and adolescents with mental disorders. Options and settings for residential care are presented, including the principles and practical issues, such as providing continuing education, that underlie the decision making for placement of youth in…

  8. Mother-Daughter Communication about Sexuality in a Clinical Sample of Hispanic Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Lucia F.; Jaramillo, Beatriz M. S.; Moreau, Donna; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.

    1999-01-01

    Surveys of 110 inner-city Hispanic adolescent girls referred for psychiatric assessment and their mothers found that the quality of mother/daughter communication in general was more useful in predicting onset of sexual experiences than aspects of later sexual experiences. However, specific communication about sexuality was not related to…

  9. Teens Who Hurt: Clinical Interventions to Break the Cycle of Adolescent Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Kenneth V.; Laszloffy, Tracey A.

    2005-01-01

    Offering a fresh perspective on treatment, this book presents an overarching framework and many specific strategies for working with violent youth and their families. The authors shed light on the complex interplay of individual, family, community, and societal forces that lead some adolescents to hurt others or themselves. Effective ways to…

  10. Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Developments: Implications for Clinical Assessment in Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciccia, Angela Hein; Meulenbroek, Peter; Turkstra, Lyn S.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of significant physical, social, and emotional developments, accompanied by changes in cognitive and language skills. Underlying these are significant developments in brain structures and functions including changes in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter tracts. Among the brain regions that develop during…

  11. Pursuit of Muscularity in Adolescent Boys: Relations among Biopsychosocial Variables and Clinical Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cafri, Guy; van den Berg, Patricia; Thompson, J. Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Adolescent boys (n = 269) were assessed for levels of several risky behaviors related to the pursuit of muscularity, including substance use (anabolic steroids, prohormones, and ephedrine) dieting to gain weight, and symptoms of muscle dysmorphia (MD). The association between these behaviors and a variety of putative biological, psychological, and…

  12. Clinical Assessment of Attachment Patterns and Personality Disorder in Adolescents and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westen, Drew; Nakash, Ora; Thomas, Cannon; Bradley, Rebekah

    2006-01-01

    The relevance of attachment theory and research for practice has become increasingly clear. The authors describe a series of studies with 3 aims: (a) to validate measures of attachment for use by clinicians with adolescents and adults (b) to examine the relation between attachment and personality pathology, and (c) to ascertain whether factor…

  13. Early Onset Recurrent Subtype of Adolescent Depression: Clinical and Psychosocial Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A.; Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Herr, Nathaniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Evaluated trajectories of adolescent depression and their correlates in a longitudinal study of a community sample: early onset (by age 15) with major depression (MDE) recurrence between 15 and 20; early onset with no recurrence; later onset of major depression after age 15 with and without recurrence by 20; and never-depressed.…

  14. Adiposity in children and adolescents: Correlates and clinical consequences of fat stored in specific body depots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2011 Pennington Biomedical Research Center's Scientific Symposium focused on adiposity in children and adolescents. The symposium was attended by 15 speakers and other invited experts. The specific objectives of the symposium were to (i) integrate the latest published and unpublished findings on...

  15. Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Mary N.; Peterson, John; Sheldon, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Depression in adolescence and adulthood is common, afflicting up to 20 percent of these populations. It represents a significant public health concern and is associated with considerable suffering and functional impairment. Adolescent-onset depression tends to be a particularly malignant and recalcitrant condition, increasing the likelihood of recurrence and chronicity in adulthood. Clinical presentations for various medical and psychiatric conditions, as well as reactions to psychosocial stressors, can mimic or confound the picture of depression in adolescents. Therefore, careful assessment and differential diagnosis is essential. Effective treatments, both pharmacological and psychosocial in nature, exist, and so early detection and intervention is paramount. This article presents an overview of optimal prevention, assessment, and clinical decision-making strategies for managing depression in adolescents. PMID:19855857

  16. Enhancing Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Research Within the National Clinical Trials Network: Rationale, Progress, and Emerging Strategies.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Aaron R; Nichols, Craig R; Freyer, David R

    2015-10-01

    Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (AYAO, including patients 15-39 years of age) is an emerging discipline in the field of cancer treatment and research. Poorer survival outcomes for this population and characteristic age-related challenges in care have called attention to the need for increased AYAO research. This chapter outlines pressing questions and reviews recent progress in AYAO research within the current organizational structure of the federal clinical trials enterprise, emphasizing how the United States National Cancer Institute's National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) has created novel opportunities for collaborative AYAO research among the pediatric and adult NCTN groups. Potential strategies for expanding AYAO research, both within the NCTN and with other partners in the federal and advocacy domains are identified.

  17. Group-based preference assessment for children and adolescents in a residential setting: examining developmental, clinical, gender, and ethnic differences.

    PubMed

    Resetar Volz, Jennifer L; Cook, Clayton R

    2009-11-01

    This study examines developmental, clinical, gender, and ethnic group differences in preference in residentially placed children and adolescents. In addition, this study considers whether residentially placed youth prefer stimuli currently being used as rewards as part of a campuswide token economy system and whether youth would identify preferred stimuli that are not currently offered. The article discusses a survey devised specifically for the purpose of this study. Stimuli currently offered as rewards are listed and rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Results indicate that the majority of stimuli available within the token economy system were rated as preferred. Also, significant developmental, clinical, gender, and ethnic group differences are found, indicating the benefit of considering group-level characteristics when designing and implementing a groupwide token economy system. The implications of the results and directions for future research are discussed.

  18. Improving glycaemic control and life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A randomised, controlled intervention study using the Guided Self-Determination-Young method in triads of adolescents, parents and health care providers integrated into routine paediatric outpatient clinics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescents with type 1 diabetes face demanding challenges due to conflicting priorities between psychosocial needs and diabetes management. This conflict often results in poor glycaemic control and discord between adolescents and parents. Adolescent-parent conflicts are thus a barrier for health care providers (HCPs) to overcome in their attempts to involve both adolescents and parents in improvement of glycaemic control. Evidence-based interventions that involve all three parties (i.e., adolescents, parents and HCPs) and are integrated into routine outpatient clinic visits are lacking. The Guided Self-Determination method is proven effective in adult care and has been adapted to adolescents and parents (Guided Self-Determination-Young (GSD-Y)) for use in paediatric diabetes outpatient clinics. Our objective is to test whether GSD-Y used in routine paediatric outpatient clinic visits will reduce haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations and improve adolescents' life skills compared with a control group. Methods/Design Using a mixed methods design comprising a randomised controlled trial and a nested qualitative evaluation, we will recruit 68 adolescents age 13 - 18 years with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c > 8.0%) and their parents from 2 Danish hospitals and randomise into GSD-Y or control groups. During an 8-12 month period, the GSD-Y group will complete 8 outpatient GSD-Y visits, and the control group will completes an equal number of standard visits. The primary outcome is HbA1c. Secondary outcomes include the following: number of self-monitored blood glucose values and levels of autonomous motivation, involvement and autonomy support from parents, autonomy support from HCPs, perceived competence in managing diabetes, well-being, and diabetes-related problems. Primary and secondary outcomes will be evaluated within and between groups by comparing data from baseline, after completion of the visits, and again after a 6-month follow-up. To illustrate how GSD

  19. Outcomes of antiretroviral therapy among younger versus older adolescents and adults in an urban clinic, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Matyanga, C M J; Takarinda, K C; Owiti, P; Mutasa-Apollo, T; Mugurungi, O; Buruwe, L; Reid, A J

    2016-06-21

    Contexte : Un centre de santé soutenu par une organisation non gouvernementale offrant des services de santé, notamment les services de traitement antirétroviral (TAR).Objectif : Comparer la rétention du TAR entre des adolescents plus jeunes (10–14 ans) et plus âgés (15–19 ans) et des adultes plus jeunes (20–29 ans) et plus âgés (⩾30 ans) et déterminer les facteurs associés à l'attrition et spécifiques des adolescents et des adultes parmi ceux qui ont mis en route du TAR en 2010–2011.Schéma : Etude rétrospective de cohorte.Résultats : L'étude a inclus 110 (7%) adolescents et 1484 (93%) adultes. Aucune différence en termes de rétention n'a été observée entre les adolescents plus jeunes et plus âgés à 6, 12 et 24 mois. Davantage des plus jeunes adolescents ont été initiés au traitement avec un index de masse corporelle <16 kg/m(2) comparé aux adolescents plus âgés (64% contre 47% ; P = 0,04). Il y avait plus de femmes (74% contre 52% ; P < 0,001) et moins de patients démarrant le TAR avec un comptage de CD4 ⩽ 350 cellules/mm(3) (77% contre 81% ; P = 0,007) parmi les adultes plus jeunes comparés aux plus âgés. Les adultes plus jeunes ont eu davantage d'attrition à tout moment que les plus âgés. Aucun facteur de risque d'attrition n'a été observé parmi les adolescents. Chez les adultes, les facteurs associés à l'attrition ont inclus l'âge plus jeune, un comptage de CD4 plus faible et une infection au virus de l'immunodéficience humaine plus avancée lors de la mise en route du traitement et son initiation dans le cadre d'un protocole basé sur la stavudine.Conclusion : Les adultes plus jeunes ont eu davantage d'attrition et devraient susciter davantage d'attention. Nous n'avons pas pu démontrer de différences d'attrition entre les adolescents plus jeunes et plus âgés. La perte de vue a été la cause principale d'attrition dans tous les groupes d'âge. Dans l'ensemble, un démarrage plus précoce du TAR parait

  20. Randomized Clinical Trial of Family-Based Treatment and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Le Grange, Daniel; Lock, James; Agras, W. Stewart; Bryson, Susan W.; Jo, Booil

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is a paucity of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN). Prior studies suggest cognitive-behavioral therapy adapted for adolescents (CBT-A) and family-based treatment (FBT-BN) could be effective for this patient population. The objective of this study was to compare the relative efficacy of these two specific therapies, FBT-BN and CBT-A. In addition, a smaller group was randomized to a non-specific treatment (supportive psychotherapy [SPT]), whose data were to be used if there were no differences between FBT-BN and CBT-A at end of treatment (EOT). Method This two-site RCT (Chicago and Stanford) randomized 130 participants (aged 12–18 years) meeting DSM, 4th Edition criteria for BN or partial BN (binge eating and purging ≥once per week for six months). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, EOT, 6 and 12 months post treatment. Treatments involved 18 outpatient sessions over 6 months. Primary outcome was defined as abstinence from binge eating and purging for 4 weeks prior to assessment, using the Eating Disorder Examination. Results Participants in FBT-BN achieved higher abstinence rates than in CBT-A at EOT (39% vs. 20%; p=.040, number needed to treat [NNT]=5) and at 6-month follow-up (44% vs. 25%; p=.030, NNT=5). Abstinence rates between these two groups did not differ statistically at 12- month follow-up (49% vs. 32%; p=.130, NNT=6). Conclusion FBT-BN is more effective in promoting abstinence from binge eating and purging than CBT-A in adolescent BN at EOT and 6-month follow-up. By 12-month follow-up there were no statistically significant differences between the two treatments. PMID:26506579

  1. Feasibility of activity-promoting video games among obese adolescents and young adults in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Radon, Katja; Fürbeck, Barbara; Thomas, Silke; Siegfried, Wolfgang; Nowak, Dennis; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    One component of the recent obesity epidemic is the sedentary behaviour of children and adolescents e.g., use of video games consoles. The new generation of video games requires body movements and might thus increase activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such games could have an effect on physical activity in obese adolescents in a clinical setting. Between March and May 2007 activity-promoting video games ("apvg") were offered to all 84 inpatients (aged 13-28 years) registered in a long-term rehabilitation programme on a voluntary base. Reasons for (non-)attendance were assessed. Frequency and duration of use of the activity-promoting video game sessions were documented. Furthermore, heart rate and activity counts during use of "apvg", endurance training, and strength training were measured. Of 84 inpatients, 51 used the "apvg" at least once (69%) over the study period. The median weekly use of the intervention was 27 min during the first week (range 0-182 min), declining to zero (range 0-74 min) in week four. Mean heart rate during the sessions (mean 115 bpm; 95% confidence interval 108-122 bpm) was similar to the heart rate during strength training (106 bpm; 101-112 bpm). The results indicate that the video games could have an impact on the activity of obese adolescents and young adults. However, as the interest in the devices seems to be too low the suitability of them for weight reduction programmes in young people cannot be ensured.

  2. Prevalence, clinical characteristics, and prognosis of GATA2-related myelodysplastic syndromes in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wlodarski, Marcin W; Hirabayashi, Shinsuke; Pastor, Victor; Starý, Jan; Hasle, Henrik; Masetti, Riccardo; Dworzak, Michael; Schmugge, Markus; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; Ussowicz, Marek; De Moerloose, Barbara; Catala, Albert; Smith, Owen P; Sedlacek, Petr; Lankester, Arjan C; Zecca, Marco; Bordon, Victoria; Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Kühl, Jörn Sven; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Albert, Michael H; Przychodzien, Bartlomiej; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Schwarz, Stephan; Göhring, Gudrun; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Cseh, Annámaria; Noellke, Peter; Yoshimi, Ayami; Locatelli, Franco; Baumann, Irith; Strahm, Brigitte; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2016-03-17

    Germline GATA2 mutations cause cellular deficiencies with high propensity for myeloid disease. We investigated 426 children and adolescents with primary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 82 cases with secondary MDS enrolled in 2 consecutive prospective studies of the European Working Group of MDS in Childhood (EWOG-MDS) conducted in Germany over a period of 15 years. Germline GATA2 mutations accounted for 15% of advanced and 7% of all primary MDS cases, but were absent in children with MDS secondary to therapy or acquired aplastic anemia. Mutation carriers were older at diagnosis and more likely to present with monosomy 7 and advanced disease compared with wild-type cases. For stratified analysis according to karyotype, 108 additional primary MDS patients registered with EWOG-MDS were studied. Overall, we identified 57 MDS patients with germline GATA2 mutations. GATA2 mutations were highly prevalent among patients with monosomy 7 (37%, all ages) reaching its peak in adolescence (72% of adolescents with monosomy 7). Unexpectedly, monocytosis was more frequent in GATA2-mutated patients. However, when adjusted for the selection bias from monosomy 7, mutational status had no effect on the hematologic phenotype. Finally, overall survival and outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were not influenced by mutational status. This study identifies GATA2 mutations as the most common germline defect predisposing to pediatric MDS with a very high prevalence in adolescents with monosomy 7. GATA2 mutations do not confer poor prognosis in childhood MDS. However, the high risk for progression to advanced disease must guide decision-making toward timely HSCT.

  3. Recruitment Strategies and the Retention of Obese Urban Racial/Ethnic Minority Adolescents in Clinical Trials: The FIT Families Project, Michigan, 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Jacques-Tiura, Angela J.; Naar-King, Sylvie; Ellis, Deborah A.; Jen, Kai-Lin Catherine; Marshall, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The successful recruitment and retention of participants is integral to the translation of research findings. We examined the recruitment and retention rates of racial/ethnic minority adolescents at a center involved in the National Institutes of Health Obesity Research for Behavioral Intervention Trials (ORBIT) initiative by the 3 recruitment strategies used: clinic, informatics, and community. Methods During the 9-month study, 186 family dyads, each composed of an obese African American adolescent and a caregiver, enrolled in a 6-month weight-loss intervention, a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial. We compared recruitment and retention rates by recruitment strategy and examined whether recruitment strategy was related to dyad baseline characteristics. Results Of the 186 enrolled families, 110 (59.1%) were recruited through clinics, 53 (28.5%) through informatics, and 23 (12.4%) through community. Of those recruited through community, 40.4% enrolled in the study, compared with 32.7% through clinics and 8.2% through informatics. Active refusal rate was 3%. Of the 1,036 families identified for the study, 402 passively refused to participate: 290 (45.1%) identified through informatics, 17 (29.8%) through community, and 95 (28.3%) through clinics. Recruitment strategy was not related to the age of the adolescent, adolescent comorbidities, body mass index of the adolescent or caregiver, income or education of the caregiver, or retention rates at 3 months, 7 months, or 9 months. Study retention rate was 87.8%. Conclusion Using multiple recruitment strategies is beneficial when working with racial/ethnic minority adolescents, and each strategy can yield good retention. Research affiliated with health care systems would benefit from the continued specification, refinement, and dissemination of these strategies. PMID:25695260

  4. American Academy of Pediatrics. Clinical report--gynecologic examination for adolescents in the pediatric office setting.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Paula K; Breech, Lesley

    2010-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics promotes the inclusion of the gynecologic examination in the primary care setting within the medical home. Gynecologic issues are commonly seen by clinicians who provide primary care to adolescents. Some of the most common concerns include questions related to pubertal development; menstrual disorders such as dysmenorrhea, amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, and abnormal uterine bleeding; contraception; and sexually transmitted and non-sexually transmitted infections. The gynecologic examination is a key element in assessing pubertal status and documenting physical findings. Most adolescents do not need an internal examination involving a speculum or bimanual examination. However, for cases in which more extensive examination is needed, the primary care office with the primary care clinician who has established rapport and trust with the patient is often the best setting for pelvic examination. This report reviews the gynecologic examination, including indications for the pelvic examination in adolescents and the approach to this examination in the office setting. Indications for referral to a gynecologist are included. The pelvic examination may be successfully completed when conducted without pressure and approached as a normal part of routine young women's health care.

  5. NARSTO EMISSION INVENTORY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NARSTO Ozone and Particulate Matter Assessments emphasized that emission inventories are critical to the success of air quality management programs and that emissions inventories in Canada, Mexico, and the United States need improvement to meet expectations for quality, timel...

  6. Science Inventory | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Science Inventory is a searchable database of research products primarily from EPA's Office of Research and Development. Science Inventory records provide descriptions of the product, contact information, and links to available printed material or websites.

  7. Do gender and age moderate the symptom structure of PTSD? Findings from a national clinical sample of children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Ateka A; Layne, Christopher M; Steinberg, Alan M; Ostrowski, Sarah A; Ford, Julian D; Elhai, Jon D

    2013-12-30

    A substantial body of evidence documents that the frequency and intensity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are linked to such demographic variables as female sex (e.g., Kaplow et al., 2005) and age (e.g., Meiser-Stedman et al., 2008). Considerably less is known about relations between biological sex and age with PTSD's latent factor structure. This study systematically examined the roles that sex and age may play as candidate moderators of the full range of factor structure parameters of an empirically supported five-factor PTSD model (Elhai et al., 2011). The sample included 6591 trauma-exposed children and adolescents selected from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network's Core Data Set. Confirmatory factor analysis using invariance testing (Gregorich, 2006) and comparative fit index difference values (Cheung and Rensvold, 2002) reflected a mixed pattern of test item intercepts across age groups. The adolescent subsample produced lower residual error variances, reflecting less measurement error than the child subsample. Sex did not show a robust moderating effect. We conclude by discussing implications for clinical assessment, theory building, and future research.

  8. Adolescents and Young Adults with Down Syndrome Presenting to a Medical Clinic with Depression: Phenomenology and Characterization Using the Reiss Scales and Aberrant Behavior Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, George T.; Aidikoff, Jenna M.; Goyal, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Caretakers of adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome (DS) may report the onset of a depressive illness in previously mentally well individuals. However, the behavioral phenomenology of these conditions has not been well characterized. We ascertained a cohort of DS patient-subjects presenting to a specialty clinic with medical and/or…

  9. Sources of Site Differences in the Efficacy of a Multisite Clinical Trial: The Treatment of SSRI-Resistant Depression in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spirito, Anthony; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Iyengar, Satish; Brent, David; Vitiello, Benedetto; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan; Emslie, Graham; Keller, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Site differences in treatment outcomes are not often highlighted when the results of multisite randomized clinical trials (MRCTs) are reported. The primary analyses of a 6-site MRCT, the Treatment of SSRI-Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) study, showed substantial variation by site in the performance of a medication-only condition and a…

  10. The Role of Co-Occurring Disruptive Behavior in the Clinical Presentation of Children and Adolescents with Anxiety in the Context of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Arnold, Elysse B.; Jones, Anna M.; Ale, Chelsea M.; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Lewin, Adam B.; Mutch, P. Jane; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the impact of disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) comorbidity on theoretically relevant correlates among 87 children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and clinically significant anxiety. Relative to youth with ASD and anxiety alone, participants with ASD, anxiety, and DBD: (a) presented with significantly more…

  11. The NEO Five-Factor Inventory: Latent Structure and Relationships with Dimensions of Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in a Large Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosellini, Anthony J.; Brown, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the latent structure of the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO FFI) and relations between the five-factor model (FFM) of personality and dimensions of "DSM-IV" anxiety and depressive disorders (panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder [GAD], obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia [SOC], major depressive disorder…

  12. The Behavior Problems Inventory-Short Form for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: Part I--Development and Provisional Clinical Reference Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojahn, J.; Rowe, E. W.; Sharber, A. C.; Hastings, R.; Matson, J. L.; Didden, R.; Kroes, D. B. H.; Dumont, E. L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Behavior Problems Inventory-01 (BPI-01) is an informant-based behaviour rating instrument that was designed to assess maladaptive behaviours in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). Its items fall into one of three sub-scales: "Self-injurious Behavior" (14 items), "Stereotyped Behavior" (24 items),…

  13. Curriculum development: Preparing trainees to care for children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Foley, Kimberly P; Haggerty, Treah S; Harrison, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Family physicians provide care for about one-third of the children and adolescents in the United States, many of whom present with psychological concerns. Family physicians often do not recognize these psychological disorders and therefore do not diagnose or treat them. This report describes the implementation of a curriculum designed to increase family medicine trainees' level of awareness that children/adolescents experience psychiatric conditions. This goal is achieved through the addition of a clinical child/adolescent psychologist faculty member, resident self-assessment of training needs and subsequent development of didactic presentations to address these needs. The curriculum relies on the acquisition of child/adolescent psychiatric screeners, development of child/adolescent-focused bibliotherapy materials, and the development of a longitudinal behavioral sciences curriculum. To facilitate the screening of child/adolescent psychiatric disorders, a comprehensive collection of age-appropriate psychiatric screeners were compiled and made readily available in all precepting areas. To assist with the identification of specific child/adolescent psychiatric deficit areas, family medicine resident physicians were presented with an inventory of child/adolescent psychiatric, psychosocial, and behavioral topics, based upon American Academy of Family Practice guidelines and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition psychiatric disorders, and self-selected training deficiencies.

  14. [Dysmenorrhea in adolescents: epidemio-clinical study at the referral health center, Bamako District. Report of 300 cases].

    PubMed

    Diarra, I; Kouyaté, Y M; Sow, S A; Maiga, M K

    2009-01-01

    This clinical epidemiological study has been conducted at the district hospital of Commune II in Bamako area.Dysmenorrhea has become a very common feature during out patients consultation. It affects almost one adolescent out of 3 examined during this study which represent 42, 8% of the studied population ranged from 10 to 19 years, with a men age of 16 years. Most of them were household women (50%),never pregnant (60%) and never delivery (64%). Most of them have been mainly claiming about contraction pain (33%) and discomfort (17,3%). The pain has been followed by asthenia (86,7%), and irritability (87,7%).Dysmenorrhea was a major cause of absenteism (48,3%). The factors influencing this type of dysmenorhea was the age and psychological stress.

  15. Perceived problems with computer gaming and internet use among adolescents: measurement tool for non-clinical survey studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Existing instruments for measuring problematic computer and console gaming and internet use are often lengthy and often based on a pathological perspective. The objective was to develop and present a new and short non-clinical measurement tool for perceived problems related to computer use and gaming among adolescents and to study the association between screen time and perceived problems. Methods Cross-sectional school-survey of 11-, 13-, and 15-year old students in thirteen schools in the City of Aarhus, Denmark, participation rate 89%, n = 2100. The main exposure was time spend on weekdays on computer- and console-gaming and internet use for communication and surfing. The outcome measures were three indexes on perceived problems related to computer and console gaming and internet use. Results The three new indexes showed high face validity and acceptable internal consistency. Most schoolchildren with high screen time did not experience problems related to computer use. Still, there was a strong and graded association between time use and perceived problems related to computer gaming, console gaming (only boys) and internet use, odds ratios ranging from 6.90 to 10.23. Conclusion The three new measures of perceived problems related to computer and console gaming and internet use among adolescents are appropriate, reliable and valid for use in non-clinical surveys about young people’s everyday life and behaviour. These new measures do not assess Internet Gaming Disorder as it is listed in the DSM and therefore has no parity with DSM criteria. We found an increasing risk of perceived problems with increasing time spent with gaming and internet use. Nevertheless, most schoolchildren who spent much time with gaming and internet use did not experience problems. PMID:24731270

  16. Developmental Trajectories of Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social-Cognitive Problem Solving in Emerging Adolescents with Clinically Elevated ADHD Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Michael J.; Larsen, Ross; Sarver, Dustin E.; Tolan, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    Middle school is a critical yet understudied period of social behavioral risks and opportunities that may be particularly difficult for emerging adolescents with ADHD given their childhood social difficulties. Although childhood ADHD has been associated with increased aggression and peer relational difficulties, relatively few ADHD studies have examined social behavior beyond the elementary years, or examined aspects of positive (prosocial) behavior. In addition, social-cognitive problem solving has been implicated in ADHD; however, its longitudinal impact on prosocial and aggressive behavior is unclear. The current study examined how middle school students with clinically elevated ADHD symptoms differ from their non-ADHD peers on baseline (sixth grade) and age-related changes in prosocial and aggressive behavior, and the extent to which social-cognitive problem solving strategies mediate these relations. Emerging adolescents with (n = 178) and without (n = 3,806) clinically elevated, teacher-reported ADHD inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive symptoms were compared longitudinally across sixth through eighth grades using parallel process latent growth curve modeling, accounting for student demographic characteristics, ODD symptoms, deviant peer association, school climate, and parental monitoring. Sixth graders with elevated ADHD symptoms engaged in somewhat fewer prosocial behaviors (d= −0.44) and more aggressive behavior (d= 0.20) relative to their peers. These small social behavioral deficits decreased but were not normalized across the middle school years. Contrary to hypotheses, social-cognitive problem solving was not impaired in the ADHD group, and did not mediate the association between ADHD and social behavior during the middle school years. ADHD and social-cognitive problem solving contributed independently to social behavior, both in sixth grade and across the middle school years; the influence of social-cognitive problem solving on social behavior was

  17. Modafinil as a treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in children and adolescents: a double blind, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Shahrokh; Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Nouroozinejad, Gholam-Hossein; Kahbazi, Manijeh; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2008-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most prevalent psychiatric disorder currently afflicting children and is among the most common chronic conditions affecting school-age children. Modafinil is structurally different from the psychostimulants that are typically used to treat ADHD and has been reported to be effective in improving the symptoms of ADHD. The aim of the present study was to further evaluate, under double blind and controlled conditions, the efficacy of modafinil for ADHD in children and adolescents as compared to methylphenidate. Patients included 60 outpatients, children (47 boys and 13 girls) between the ages of 6-15 who clearly met the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for ADHD. Subjects were recruited from an outpatient child and adolescent clinic for a 6 week double blind, randomized clinical trial. All study subjects were randomly assigned to receive either treatment with modafinil film coated tablet (in doses of 200-300 mg/day) depending on weight (200 mg/day for <30 kg and 300 mg/day for >30 kg) (group 1) or methylphenidate (in doses of 20-30 mg/day) depending on weight (20 mg/day for <30 kg and 30 mg/day for >30 kg) (group 2). The principal measure of outcome was the Teacher and Parent ADHD Rating Scale-IV. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 21 and 42 days after the medication started. No significant differences were observed between the two groups on the Parent and Teacher Rating Scale scores. Side effects of decreased appetite and difficulty falling asleep were observed more in the methylphenidate group. The results of this study indicate that modafinil significantly improved symptoms of ADHD and was well tolerated and it is beneficial in the treatment of children with ADHD.

  18. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents: a relatively new clinical problem within pediatric practice

    PubMed Central

    Temneanu, OR; Trandafir, LM; Purcarea, MR

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex, chronic metabolic disease, presents a heterogeneous etiology, with risk factors at the social level and behavioral, environmental, and genetic susceptibility. It is associated with serious complications, but the early diagnosis and initiation of therapy may prevent or delay the onset of long-term complications. In children and adolescents, it was observed in particular increasing the prevalence of T2DM along with obesity, which is associated with insulin resistance. Patient and family education for a young person with T2DM is very important and will focus on behavioral changes (diet and activity). PMID:27974926

  19. Death after closed adolescent knee injury and popliteal artery occlusion: a case report and clinical review.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jeremy J; Kremen, Thomas J; Oppenheim, William L

    2013-11-01

    A healthy adolescent male soccer player sustained a radiograph-negative, effusion-negative physeal injury of the proximal tibia from a ground-level fall with traumatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. Orthopaedic evaluation and arteriography were delayed for 72 hours after the injury. He arrived at a tertiary referral center in multisystem organ failure secondary to lower extremity ischemic necrosis, septic pulmonary thromboembolism, and systemic shock. Emergent medical evaluation, a high index of suspicion, and a careful neurovascular examination are imperative after every closed knee injury in the young athlete.

  20. Validation of the Pediatric Cardiac Quality of Life Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Bradley S.; Tomlinson, Ryan S.; Wernovsky, Gil; Drotar, Dennis; Newburger, Jane W.; Mahony, Lynn; Mussatto, Kathleen; Tong, Elizabeth; Cohen, Mitchell; Andersen, Charlotte; Shera, David; Khoury, Philip R.; Wray, Jo; Gaynor, J. William; Helfaer, Mark A.; Kazak, Anne E.; Shea, Judy A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this multicenter study was to confirm the validity and reliability of the Pediatric Cardiac Quality of Life Inventory (PCQLI). METHODS Seven centers recruited pediatric patients (8–18 years of age) with heart disease (HD) and their parents to complete the PCQLI and generic health-related quality of life (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory [PedsQL]) and non–quality of life (Self-Perception Profile for Children [SPPC]/Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents [SPPA] and Youth Self-Report [YSR]/Child Behavior Checklist [CBCL]) tools. PCQLI construct validity was assessed through correlations of PCQLI scores between patients and parents and with severity of congenital HD, medical care utilization, and PedsQL, SPPC/SPPA, and YSR/CBCL scores. PCQLI test-retest reliability was evaluated. RESULTS The study enrolled 1605 patient-parent pairs. Construct validity was substantiated by the association of lower PCQLI scores with Fontan palliation and increased numbers of cardiac operations, hospital admissions, and physician visits (P < .001); moderate to good correlations between patient and parent PCQLI scores (r = 0.41–0.61; P <.001); and fair to good correlations between PCQLI total scores and PedsQL total (r = 0.70–0.76), SPPC/SPPA global self-worth (r = 0.43–0.46), YSR/CBCL total competency (r = 0.28–0.37), and syndrome and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition-oriented scale (r = −0.58 to −0.30; P < .001) scores. Test-retest reliability correlations were excellent (r = 0.78–0.90; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS PCQLI scores are valid and reliable for children and adolescents with congenital and acquired HD and may be useful for future research and clinical management. Pediatrics 2010;126:498–508 PMID:20805147

  1. Clinical utility of valsartan in treatment of children and adolescents with high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Manu; Mohiuddin, Syed M

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of hypertension in the pediatric population has been increasing secondary to lifestyle changes in children and adolescents. Recent studies have enhanced our understanding of the treatment of pediatric hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have traditionally been the most commonly used class of medication in children with hypertension. This is partly due to the important role of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system pathway in the mediation of pediatric hypertension. Angiotensin receptor blockers provide a reasonable alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The need for better tolerated antihypertensives had led to development of many new antihypertensives. Valsartan is a relatively novel angiotensin receptor blocker that has been shown to be effective in the treatment of pediatric hypertension. Two recent trials have demonstrated the efficacy of valsartan monotherapy in the pediatric population aged 1-16 years. Once-daily oral preparations of valsartan achieve adequate blood pressure control in the pediatric population. Lack of generic formulations is an important disadvantage. Plasma levels are predictable and clearance is primarily by the liver. Valsartan should be prescribed cautiously for sexually active adolescent females due to concern about angiotensin receptor blocker fetopathy. Otherwise, the drug has infrequent side effects. In summary, valsartan is a new and useful alternative to conventional antihypertensive therapy in pediatric population.

  2. American Academy of Pediatrics. Clinical report--sport-related concussion in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Mark E; Walter, Kevin D

    2010-09-01

    Sport-related concussion is a "hot topic" in the media and in medicine. It is a common injury that is likely underreported by pediatric and adolescent athletes. Football has the highest incidence of concussion, but girls have higher concussion rates than boys do in similar sports. A clear understanding of the definition, signs, and symptoms of concussion is necessary to recognize it and rule out more severe intracranial injury. Concussion can cause symptoms that interfere with school, social and family relationships, and participation in sports. Recognition and education are paramount, because although proper equipment, sport technique, and adherence to rules of the sport may decrease the incidence or severity of concussions, nothing has been shown to prevent them. Appropriate management is essential for reducing the risk of long-term symptoms and complications. Cognitive and physical rest is the mainstay of management after diagnosis, and neuropsychological testing is a helpful tool in the management of concussion. Return to sport should be accomplished by using a progressive exercise program while evaluating for any return of signs or symptoms. This report serves as a basis for understanding the diagnosis and management of concussion in children and adolescent athletes.

  3. Adolescent Outpatient Treatment and Continuing Care: Main Findings from a Randomized Clinical Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Godley, Susan H.; Garner, Bryan R.; Passetti, Lora L.; Funk, Rodney R.; Dennis, Michael L.; Godley, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two types of outpatient treatment with and without Assertive Continuing Care (ACC) for 320 adolescents with substance use disorders. Study participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (a) Chestnut’s Bloomington Outpatient Treatment (CBOP) without ACC; (b) CBOP with ACC; (c) Motivational Enhancement Therapy/Cognitive Behavior Therapy-7 session model (MET/CBT7) without ACC; and (d) MET/CBT7 with ACC. All study conditions attained high rates of participant engagement and retention. Follow-up interviews were completed with over 90% of the adolescents at three, six, nine, and twelve months after treatment admission. There was a significant time by condition effect over 12 months, with CBOP having a slight advantage for average percentage of days abstinent. Unlike previous findings that ACC provided incremental effectiveness following residential treatment, there were no statistically significant findings with regard to the incremental effectiveness of ACC following outpatient treatment. Analysis of the costs of each intervention combined with its outcomes revealed that the most cost-effective condition was MET/CBT7 without ACC. PMID:20219293

  4. Effect of Orem’s Self-Care Model on Self-Esteem of Adolescents with Asthma Referred to an Asthma and Allergy Clinic in Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Zeinab; Mosaviasl, Fatemeh Sadat; Abasi, Samira; Ghazavi, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquisition of chronic diseases such as asthma leads to psychological, mental and physical complications in adolescents, and hence their self-esteem may be compromised. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the effect of Orem’s self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma. Materials and Methods: This semi-experimental study enrolled 64 asthmatic adolescents referred to Shariati Hospital, Isfahan. Subjects were assigned to two groups of control and intervention consecutively. Then, the self-care training program was conducted according to Orem’s self-care model in eight two-hour sessions based on self-care needs, and self-esteem was measured in the two groups prior to and two months after the last training session. The data were collected by a questionnaire of demographic characteristics and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventories (CSEI) and analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results: Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean score of self-esteem between the intervention and control groups after the training (P<0.05), but the difference was not statistically significant prior to the intervention. Paired t-test showed a significant difference in the mean score of self-esteem before and after the training in the intervention group (P<0.01), but this difference was not statistically significant in the control group (P>0.05). Conclusion: Regarding the effect of Orem’s self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma, we recommend the use of this model as a care intervention in healthcare centers to promote adolescents’ health. PMID:27114724

  5. Internalizing and externalizing personality and subjective effects in a sample of adolescent cannabis users.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Sara; Matalí, Josep Lluís; Martín-Fernández, María; Pardo, Marta; Lleras, Maria; Castellano-Tejedor, Carmina; Haro, Josep Maria

    2016-10-06

    Cannabis is the illicit substance most widely used by adolescents. Certain personality traits such as impulsivity and sensation seeking, and the subjective effects experienced after substance use (e.g. euphoria or relaxation) have been identified as some of the main etiological factors of consumption. This study aims to categorize a sample of adolescent cannabis users based on their most dominant personality traits (internalizing and externalizing profile). Then, to make a comparison of both profiles considering a set of variables related to consumption, clinical severity and subjective effects experienced. From a cross-sectional design, 173 adolescents (104 men and 69 women) aged 13 to 18 asking for treatment for cannabis use disorder in an Addictive Behavior Unit (UCAD) from the hospital were recruited. For the assessment, an ad hoc protocol was employed to register consumption, the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) and the Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI) 49-item short form were also administered. Factor analysis suggested a two-profile solution: Introverted, Inhibited, Doleful, Dramatizing (-), Egotistic (-), Self-demeaning and Borderline tendency scales composed the internalizing profile, and Submissive (-), Unruly, Forceful, Conforming (-) and Oppositional scales composed the externalizing profile. The comparative analysis showed that the internalizing profile has higher levels of clinical severity and more subjective effects reported than the externalizing profile. These results suggest the need to design specific intervention strategies for each profile.

  6. Schizotypal Estimators in Adolescence: The Concurrent Validity of the RISC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rust, John; Chiu, Herbert

    1988-01-01

    Administered Minnesota Counseling Inventory and Rust Inventory of Schizotypal Cognition (RISC) to 174 adolescents in Hong Kong. Results showed that negative schizophrenic symptoms of social dysfunction and emotional instability as measured by Minnesota Counseling Inventory were positively and significantly correlated with positive schizotypal…

  7. Patch test results in children and adolescents. Study from the Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte Dermatology Clinic, Brazil, from 2003 to 2010*

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Dulcilea Ferraz; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patch testing is an efficient method to identify the allergen responsible for allergic contact dermatitis. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the results of patch tests in children and adolescents comparing these two age groups' results. METHODS Cross-sectional study to assess patch test results of 125 children and adolescents aged 1-19 years, with suspected allergic contact dermatitis, in a dermatology clinic in Brazil. Two Brazilian standardized series were used. RESULTS Seventy four (59.2%) patients had "at least one positive reaction" to the patch test. Among these positive tests, 77.0% were deemed relevant. The most frequent allergens were nickel (36.8%), thimerosal (18.4%), tosylamide formaldehyde resin (6.8%), neomycin (6.4%), cobalt (4.0%) and fragrance mix I (4.0%). The most frequent positive tests came from adolescents (p=0.0014) and females (p=0.0002). There was no relevant statistical difference concerning contact sensitizations among patients with or without atopic history. However, there were significant differences regarding sensitization to nickel (p=0.029) and thimerosal (p=0.042) between the two age groups under study, while adolescents were the most affected. CONCLUSION Nickel and fragrances were the only positive (and relevant) allergens in children. Nickel and tosylamide formaldehyde resin were the most frequent and relevant allergens among adolescents. PMID:26560213

  8. Paediatric Parenting Stress in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Application of the Pediatric Inventory for Parents

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, Shanna M.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The psychosocial functioning of caregivers of adolescents managing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been understudied; yet, poor caregiver functioning can place youth at risk for compromised disease management. The current study addressed this limitation by examining a sample of caregivers of adolescents with IBD. Study aims included: 1) document rates of paediatric parenting stress, 2) identify associated sociodemographic predictors of parenting stress, and 3) compare previously published rates of parenting stress to those within other paediatric chronic conditions, including cancer, type 1 diabetes, obesity, sickle cell disease, bladder exstrophy. Methods Caregivers of adolescents with an IBD diagnosis (Mage = 15.4±1.4, 44.4% female, 88.7% Caucasian) and receiving tertiary care within a gastroenterology clinic (N = 62) completed the Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP) as a measure of paediatric parenting stress with Frequency and Difficulty as PIP subscales. Paediatric gastroenterologists provided disease severity assessments. Results Adolescents with IBD were experiencing relatively mild disease activity. Bivariate correlations revealed that PIP-Difficulty was positively associated with Crohn’s disease severity (r = 0.38, p < 0.01). Caregiver age was negatively associated with the frequency of parenting stress total (r = −.25, p = .05) and communication scores (r = −.25, p <.05). The frequency and difficulty of parenting stressors within the IBD sample were similar to rates within type 1 diabetes, but were significantly lower to rates identified in other paediatric chronic conditions. Conclusions Caregivers of adolescents with IBD seem to experience low rates of parenting stress when their adolescents are receiving outpatient care and during phases of IBD relative inactivity. The sociodemographic characteristics of IBD families (i.e., primarily Caucasian, well-educated, and higher socioeconomic status) likely encourage greater access to

  9. Challenges in Conducting A Multi-Site Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Treatments for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Harry; Woodside, Blake; Agras, Stewart; Halmi, Katherine; Johnson, Craig; Kaye, Walter; Wilfley, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe obstacles in the implementation of a controlled treatment trial of adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN). Method The original aim was to enter 240 participants with AN to one of 4 cells: Behavioral family therapy (BFT) plus fluoxetine; BFT plus placebo; systems family therapy (SFT) plus fluoxetine; SFT plus placebo. Results Recruitment was delayed pending a satisfactory resolution concerning participant safety. After 6 months of recruitment it became clear that the medication was associated with poor recruitment leading to a study redesign resulting in a comparison of two types of family therapy with a projected sample size of 160. One site was unable to recruit and was replaced. Discussion Problems with the delineation of safety procedures, recruitment, re-design of the study, and replacement of a site, were the main elements resulting in a 1-year delay. Suggestions are made for overcoming such problems in future AN trials. PMID:21495052

  10. Post-adolescent acne in women: more common and more clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Grace K; Michaels, Brent B

    2012-06-01

    Current evidence suggests that post-adolescent acne in women is on the rise. Acne in this subgroup of patients commonly follows a specific pattern that can often be treatment resistant and/or prone to relapse, including after oral isotretinoin therapy. With a plethora of medications to choose from for acne treatment, many of which have been used in the past by patients without success, dermatology practitioners often find oral contraceptives and spironolactone to be of benefit in otherwise healthy adult females. Also, some of these patients may have concurrent hormonal anomalies such as polycystic ovarian syndrome or other underlying endocrine disorders, which should also be appropriately worked up by the clinician and managed accordingly. This article reviews some of the underlying pathophysiological factors, available treatment options, and screening guidelines to assist clinicians in the management of acne in adult females.

  11. Complications and comorbidities of T2DM in adolescents: findings from the TODAY clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Tryggestad, Jeanie B; Willi, Steven M

    2015-03-01

    With the rise in childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been recognized to occur in adolescents with increasing frequency. Although much is known about T2DM in adults, few studies have examined the treatment and complications of T2DM in youth. The Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of various treatments and provided a unique opportunity to study the disease progression and appearance of complications in a pediatric cohort with recent onset of the disease. In the TODAY study, hypertension was present in 11.6% of the population at baseline and increased to 33.8% by the end of the study. Prevalence of high-risk LDL-cholesterol rose from 4.5% at baseline to 10.7% at the end of the study. Microalbuminuria was found in 6.3% of the cohort at baseline and increased to 16.6%. Retinopathy was not assessed upon entry into TODAY, but was present in 13.9% of the TODAY cohort at the end of the study. Experience to date indicates that these complications and comorbidities are similar to those seen in adults, but occur on an accelerated timeline. The early manifestation of diabetes complications in youth-onset T2DM suggests that this group will be burdened with the tangible consequences of cardiovascular disease, nephropathy, and retinopathy in the third and fourth decades of life. It is hoped that through an early, aggressive approach to treatment and prevention, we may be able to curb the onset and progression of these potentially devastating outcomes.

  12. Low Enrollment of Adolescents and Young Adults Onto Cancer Trials: Insights From the Community Clinical Oncology Program

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Michael E.; O’Mara, Ann M.; Seibel, Nita L.; Dickens, David S.; Langevin, Anne-Marie; Pollock, Brad H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stagnant outcomes for adolescents and young adults (AYAs; 15 to 39 years old) with cancer are partly attributed to poor enrollment onto clinical trials. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) was developed to improve clinical trial participation in the community setting, where AYAs are most often treated. Further, many CCOP sites had pediatric and medical oncologists with collaborative potential for AYA recruitment and care. For these reasons, we hypothesized that CCOP sites enrolled proportionately more AYAs than non-CCOP sites onto Children’s Oncology Group (COG) trials. Methods: For the 10-year period 2004 through 2013, the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention database was queried to evaluate enrollments into relevant COG studies. The proportional enrollment of AYAs at CCOP and non-CCOP sites was compared and the change in AYA enrollment patterns assessed. All sites were COG member institutions. Results: Although CCOP sites enrolled a higher proportion of patients in cancer control studies than non-CCOP sites (3.5% v 1.8%; P < .001), they enrolled a lower proportion of AYAs (24.1% v 28.2%, respectively; P < .001). Proportional AYA enrollment at CCOP sites decreased during the intervals 2004 through 2008 and 2009 through 2013 (26.7% v 21.7%; P < .001). Conclusion: Despite oncology practice settings that might be expected to achieve otherwise, CCOP sites did not enroll a larger proportion of AYAs in clinical trials than traditional COG institutions. Our findings suggest that the CCOP (now the NCI Community Oncology Research Program) can be leveraged for developing targeted interventions for overcoming AYA enrollment barriers. PMID:27026648

  13. Comparison of Commercial Wrist-Based and Smartphone Accelerometers, Actigraphy, and PSG in a Clinical Cohort of Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Toon, Elicia; Davey, Margot J.; Hollis, Samantha L.; Nixon, Gillian M.; Horne, Rosemary S.C.; Biggs, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare two commercial sleep devices, an accelerometer worn as a wristband (UP by Jawbone) and a smartphone application (MotionX 24/7), against polysomnography (PSG) and actigraphy (Actiwatch2) in a clinical pediatric sample. Methods: Children and adolescents (n = 78, 65% male, mean age 8.4 ± 4.0 y) with suspected sleep disordered breathing (SDB), simultaneously wore an actiwatch, a commercial wrist-based device and had a smartphone with a sleep application activated placed near their right shoulder, during their diagnostic PSG. Outcome variables were sleep onset latency (SOL), total sleep time (TST), wake after sleep onset (WASO), and sleep efficiency (SE). Paired comparisons were made between PSG, actigraphy, UP, and MotionX 24/7. Epoch-by-epoch comparisons determined sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy between PSG, actigraphy, and UP. Bland-Altman plots determined level of agreement. Differences in bias between SDB severity and developmental age were assessed. Results: No differences in mean TST, WASO, or SE between PSG and actigraphy or PSG and UP were found. Actigraphy overestimated SOL (21 min). MotionX 24/7 underestimated SOL (12 min) and WASO (63 min), and overestimated TST (106 min) and SE (17%). UP showed good sensitivity (0.92) and accuracy (0.86) but poor specificity (0.66) when compared to PSG. Bland-Altman plots showed similar levels of bias in both actigraphy and UP. Bias did not differ by SDB severity, however was affected by age. Conclusions: When compared to PSG, UP was analogous to Actiwatch2 and may have some clinical utility in children with sleep disordered breathing. MotionX 24/7 did not accurately reflect sleep or wake and should be used with caution. Citation: Toon E, Davey MJ, Hollis SL, Nixon GM, Horne RS, Biggs SN. Comparison of commercial wrist-based and smartphone accelerometers, actigraphy, and PSG in a clinical cohort of children and adolescents. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):343–350. PMID:26446248

  14. The Effect of Sertraline on the Quality of Life for Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    ÇAKIN MEMİK, Nursu; KARAKAYA, Işık; YILDIZ, Özlem; ŞIŞMANLAR, Şahika; ÇAĞLAYAN, Çiğdem; AĞAOĞLU, Belma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we aimed to determine the changes in quality of life of children/adolescents with anxiety disorders during six months of sertraline treatment, to investigate parent-child/adolescent concordance in perception of quality of life and to examine the effect of treatment on children/adolescents. Methods In this study, 30 patients with anxiety disorders according to criteria specified in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th. Edition (DSM-IV) were assigned to sertraline treatment. The patients were evaluated using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children, Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) and the Children’s Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) at 0th, 2nd and 6th months. Results PedsQL total scores increased significantly with the treatment in children and adolescents (p<.001), however, no differences were observed in parent proxy report (p=.326). The mean CGAS score was 59.85±7.73 at the beginning of treatment and 73.70±7.01 at the end of treatment (p<.001). The average CGI score decreased from 4.68±.96 to 2.27±.84. Conclusion It was observed that perception of quality of life in children and adolescents with anxiety disorders increased with the treatment.

  15. Comparing Postoperative Pain Experiences of the Adolescent and Adult Athlete After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stanish, William D.; Reardon, Gerald; Coady, Catherine; Sullivan, Michael J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To examine age-related differences in pain, catastrophizing, and affective distress (depression and anxiety) after athletic injury and knee surgery. Design and Setting: Participants were assessed with measures of pain intensity, pain-related catastrophizing, depression, and anxiety symptoms at 24 hours after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Subjects: Twenty patients (10 adolescents, 10 adults) with an acute complete tear of the ACL. Measurements: Pain was assessed by Visual Analog Scale (VAS), catastrophizing with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), depressive symptoms with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and anxiety with the state form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S). Results: At 24 hours postsurgery, adolescents reported greater pain, catastrophizing, and anxiety than adults. Ancillary analyses showed that helplessness and rumination were significant contributors to the differences in catastrophizing. Further, an analysis of covariance showed that controlling for the effects of catastrophizing, the adolescent and adult differences in pain scores were reduced to a null effect. Conclusions: After ACL surgery, athletic adolescents and adults differed significantly in pain, catastrophizing, and anxiety. Catastrophizing seemed to be a particularly strong factor in postoperative pain differences between adolescents and adults, with clinical-management implications. These data indicate the need for continued research into specific pain- and age-related factors during the acute postoperative period for athletes undergoing ACL surgery. PMID:12937527

  16. Motivational Interviewing and Adolescent Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilallo, John J.; Weiss, Gony

    2009-01-01

    The use of motivational interviewing strategies in the practice of adolescent psychopharmacology is described. Motivational interviewing is an efficient and collaborative style of clinical interaction and this helps adolescent patients to integrate their psychiatric difficulties into a more resilient identity.

  17. Child and Adolescent Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chats with Experts Clinical Trials Share Child and Adolescent Mental Health Overview Teen Depression Study: Understanding Depression ... Continue reading Recruitment Begins for Landmark Study of Adolescent Brain Development September 13, 2016 • Press Release The ...

  18. A Clinical Pilot Study of Individual and Group Treatment for Adolescents with Chronic Pain and Their Parents: Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Kanstrup, Marie; Wicksell, Rikard K.; Kemani, Mike; Wiwe Lipsker, Camilla; Lekander, Mats; Holmström, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric chronic pain is common and can result in substantial long-term disability. Previous studies on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) have shown promising results in improving functioning in affected children, but more research is still urgently needed. In the current clinical pilot study, we evaluated an ACT-based interdisciplinary outpatient intervention (14 sessions), including a parent support program (four sessions). Adolescents were referred to the clinic if they experienced disabling chronic pain. They were then randomized, along with their parents, to receive group (n = 12) or individual (n = 18) treatment. Adolescent pain interference, pain reactivity, depression, functional disability, pain intensity and psychological flexibility, along with parent anxiety, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility were assessed using self-reported questionnaires. There were no significant differences in outcomes between individual and group treatment. Analyses illustrated significant (p < 0.01) improvements (medium to large effects) in pain interference, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. Additionally, analyses showed significant (p < 0.01) improvements (large effects) in parent pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. On all significant outcomes, clinically-significant changes were observed for 21%–63% of the adolescents across the different outcome measures and in 54%–76% of the parents. These results support previous findings and thus warrant the need for larger, randomized clinical trials evaluating the relative utility of individual and group treatment and the effects of parental interventions. PMID:27854323

  19. A Clinical Pilot Study of Individual and Group Treatment for Adolescents with Chronic Pain and Their Parents: Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Functioning.

    PubMed

    Kanstrup, Marie; Wicksell, Rikard K; Kemani, Mike; Wiwe Lipsker, Camilla; Lekander, Mats; Holmström, Linda

    2016-11-16

    Pediatric chronic pain is common and can result in substantial long-term disability. Previous studies on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) have shown promising results in improving functioning in affected children, but more research is still urgently needed. In the current clinical pilot study, we evaluated an ACT-based interdisciplinary outpatient intervention (14 sessions), including a parent support program (four sessions). Adolescents were referred to the clinic if they experienced disabling chronic pain. They were then randomized, along with their parents, to receive group (n = 12) or individual (n = 18) treatment. Adolescent pain interference, pain reactivity, depression, functional disability, pain intensity and psychological flexibility, along with parent anxiety, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility were assessed using self-reported questionnaires. There were no significant differences in outcomes between individual and group treatment. Analyses illustrated significant (p < 0.01) improvements (medium to large effects) in pain interference, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. Additionally, analyses showed significant (p < 0.01) improvements (large effects) in parent pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. On all significant outcomes, clinically-significant changes were observed for 21%-63% of the adolescents across the different outcome measures and in 54%-76% of the parents. These results support previous findings and thus warrant the need for larger, randomized clinical trials evaluating the relative utility of individual and group treatment and the effects of parental interventions.

  20. Interactive inventory monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan M. (Inventor); Udoh, Usen E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for monitoring present location and/or present status of a target inventory item, where the inventory items are located on one or more inventory shelves or other inventory receptacles that communicate with an inventory base station through use of responders such as RFIDs. A user operates a hand held interrogation and display (IAD) module that communicates with, or is part of, the base station, to provide an initial inquiry. Information on location(s) of the target inventory item is also indicated visibly and/or audibly on the receptacle(s) for the user. Status information includes an assessment of operation readiness and a time, if known, that the specified inventory item or class was last removed or examined or modified. Presentation of a user access level may be required for access to the target inventory item. Another embodiment provides inventory information for a stack as a sight-impaired or hearing-impaired person passes adjacent to that stack.

  1. Clinical significance of psychiatric comorbidity in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder: subtyping a complex disorder.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A E; Morer, A; Moreno, E; Plana, M T; Cordovilla, C; Lázaro, L

    2016-04-01

    A promising approach in relation to reducing phenotypic heterogeneity involves the identification of homogeneous subtypes of OCD based on age of onset, gender, clinical course and comorbidity. This study aims to assess the sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features of OCD patients in relation to gender and the presence or absence of another comorbid disorder. The sample comprised 112 children and adolescents of both sexes and aged 8-18 years, all of whom had a diagnosis of OCD. Overall, 67 % of OCD patients had one comorbid diagnosis, 20.5 % had two such diagnoses and 2.6 % had three comorbid diagnoses. The group of OCD patients with a comorbid neurodevelopmental disorder had significantly more family history of OCD in parents (p = .049), as compared with the no comorbidity group and the group with a comorbid internalizing disorder, and they also showed a greater predominance of males (p = .013) than did the group with a comorbid internalizing disorder. The group of OCD patients with internalizing comorbidity had a later age of onset of OCD (p = .001) compared with both the other groups. Although the initial severity was similar in all three groups, the need for pharmacological treatment and for hospitalization due to OCD symptomatology was greater in the groups with a comorbid neurodevelopmental disorder (p = .038 and p = .009, respectively) and a comorbid internalizing disorder (p = .008 and p = .004, respectively) than in the group without comorbidity. Our findings suggest that two subtypes of OCD can be defined on the basis of the comorbid pathology presented. The identification of different subtypes according to comorbidity is potentially useful in terms of understanding clinical variations, as well as in relation to treatment management and the use of therapeutic resources.

  2. Academic Expectations Stress Inventory: Development, Factor Analysis, Reliability, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Rebecca P.; Huan, Vivien S.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the development and initial validation of obtained scores from the Academic Expectations Stress Inventory (AESI), which measures expectations as a source of academic stress in middle and high school Asian students. In the first study, exploratory factor analysis results from 721 adolescents suggested a nine-item scale with…

  3. Development and Preliminary Psychometric Evaluation of the Children's Saving Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Muroff, Jordana; Lewin, Adam B.; Geller, Daniel; Ross, Abigail; McCarthy, Katherine; Morgan, Jessica; Murphy, Tanya K.; Frost, Randy; Steketee, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the development and initial psychometric properties of the Children's Saving Inventory (CSI), a parent-rated measure designed to assess child hoarding behaviors. Subjects included 123 children and adolescents diagnosed with primary Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and their parents. Trained clinicians administered the…

  4. Comparing landslide inventory maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Mirco; Ardizzone, Francesca; Cardinali, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto; Reichenbach, Paola

    Landslide inventory maps are effective and easily understandable products for both experts, such as geomorphologists, and for non experts, including decision-makers, planners, and civil defense managers. Landslide inventories are essential to understand the evolution of landscapes, and to ascertain landslide susceptibility and hazard. Despite landslide maps being compiled every year in the word at different scales, limited efforts are made to critically compare landslide maps prepared using different techniques or by different investigators. Based on the experience gained in 20 years of landslide mapping in Italy, and on the limited literature on landslide inventory assessment, we propose a general framework for the quantitative comparison of landslide inventory maps. To test the proposed framework we exploit three inventory maps. The first map is a reconnaissance landslide inventory prepared for the Umbria region, in central Italy. The second map is a detailed geomorphological landslide map, also prepared for the Umbria region. The third map is a multi-temporal landslide inventory compiled for the Collazzone area, in central Umbria. Results of the experiment allow for establishing how well the individual inventories describe the location, type and abundance of landslides, to what extent the landslide maps can be used to determine the frequency-area statistics of the slope failures, and the significance of the inventory maps as predictors of landslide susceptibility. We further use the results obtained in the Collazzone area to estimate the quality and completeness of the two regional landslide inventory maps, and to outline general advantages and limitations of the techniques used to complete the inventories.

  5. Impact of Gender, Age at Onset, and Lifetime Tic Disorders on the Clinical Presentation and Comorbidity Pattern of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Adaletli, Hilal; Gunes, Hatice; Kilicoglu, Ali Guven; Mutlu, Caner; Bahali, Mustafa Kayhan; Aytemiz, Tugce; Uneri, Ozden Sukran

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a heterogeneous disorder; therefore, there is a need for identifying more homogeneous subtypes. This study aimed to examine the clinical characteristics and comorbidity pattern of a large sample of pediatric OCD subjects, and to examine the impact of gender, age at onset, and lifetime tic disorders on the clinical presentation and comorbidity pattern. Methods: A total of 110 children and adolescents diagnosed with OCD were assessed using the Kiddle Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL) for psychiatric comorbidity, and a clinical data form was filled out. The cutoff for differentiating prepubertal from adolescent onset was 11 years of age. Results: A total of 83.6% of the subjects had at least one comorbid psychiatric disorder. Oppositional defiant disorder and contamination/somatic obsessions were significantly higher in males (p=0.036 and p=0.03, respectively) than in females. Depressive disorders and religious obsessions were significantly higher in the adolescent-onset group (p=0.02, p=0.05, respectively) whereas disruptive behavior disorders were higher in the prepubertal-onset group (p=0.037). Disruptive behavior disorders were significantly more frequent in the tic (+) group than in tic (-) group (p=0.021). Conclusions: There were differences in the comorbidity pattern and clinical expression between genders and between prepubertal and adolescent-onset cases. Findings of this study supported the introduction of tic-related OCD as a specifier in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed. (DSM-5), and the necessity of a detailed assessment of other psychiatric disorders in youth with OCD. PMID:26091196

  6. Early Parenting Practices and Outcomes for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Amy; Dunham, Mardis

    2011-01-01

    This study compared early parenting practices and adolescent behavior to determine whether parental attachment-promoting behaviors in the first year of life were associated with psychosocial adjustment in teenagers. The mothers of 22 adolescents completed a behavioral assessment of their teenager and an inventory of their recollected parenting…

  7. Risk Behavior and Personal Resiliency in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince-Embury, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between self-reported risk behaviors and personal resiliency in adolescents; specifically whether youth with higher personal resiliency report less frequent risk behaviors than those with lower personal resiliency. Self-reported risk behavior is surveyed by the "Adolescent Risk Behavior Inventory"…

  8. Adolescent Self-Esteem, Attachment and Loneliness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhal, Anubha; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sharma, Vidhi; Gupta, Priyanka

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To assess self-esteem, loneliness and attachment styles among adolescents and examine their association with each other and with age and gender. Method: Adolescents (55 males and 55 females) from a public school in Delhi, aged 10-13 years were administered Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (School Form), Attachment Scale and UCLA…

  9. Types of Empathy and Adolescent Sexual Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varker, Tracey; Devilly, Grant J.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine general empathy, general victim empathy and own victim empathy in adolescent sexual offenders. Sixteen adolescent sexual offenders completed the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI), the Personal Reaction Inventory, a "general sexual abuse victim" form of the Victim Empathy Distortions Scale…

  10. Diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in children and adolescents: clinical picture limitations☆

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Aurelino Rocha; Oliveira, Cláudia Di Lorenzo; Fontes, Maria Jussara Fernandes; Lasmar, Laura Maria de Lima Bezário Facury; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the utility of clinical features for diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in pediatrics. METHODS: A total of 335 children aged 1-18 years old and presenting clinical manifestations of acute pharyngotonsillitis (APT) were subjected to clinical interviews, physical examinations, and throat swab specimen collection to perform cultures and latex particle agglutination tests (LPATs) for group A streptococcus (GAS) detection. Signs and symptoms of patients were compared to their throat cultures and LPATs results. A clinical score was designed based on the multivariate logistic regression analysis and also was compared to throat cultures and LPATs results. Positive throat cultures and/or LPATs results were used as a reference standard to establish definitive streptococcal APT diagnosis. RESULTS: 78 children (23.4%) showed positivity for GAS in at least one of the two diagnostic tests. Coryza absence (odds ratio [OR]=1.80; p=0.040), conjunctivitis absence (OR=2.47; p=0.029), pharyngeal erythema (OR=3.99; p=0.006), pharyngeal exudate (OR=2.02; p=0.011), and tonsillar swelling (OR=2.60; p=0.007) were significantly associated with streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis. The highest clinical score, characterized by coryza absense, pharyngeal exudate, and pharyngeal erythema had a 45.6% sensitivity, a 74.5% especificity, and a likelihood ratio of 1.79 for streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical presentation should not be used to confirm streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis, because its performance as a diagnostic test is low. Thus, it is necessary to enhance laboratory test availability, especially of LPATs that allow an acurate and fast diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsilitis. PMID:25510990

  11. The Preschool Interest Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugg, Mary E.; Wood, Sue Sims

    The Preschool Interest Inventory (PSII) has been developed to meet the need for an informal measure of the interests, play behaviors, and communication skills of young children between the ages of 2 and 6 years, particularly those exhibiting delays in language development. The first step in the Inventory process is the Caregiver Interview. In the…

  12. Epigenetics in clinical management of children and adolescents with brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Morales La Madrid, Andres; Kieran, Mark W

    2017-02-03

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors represent the second most prevalent group of cancers in children and adolescents, yet account for the majority of childhood cancer-related deaths and considerable morbidity among survivors, due to high-intensity non-selective standard therapies delivered to immature nervous system structures undergoing development. These tumors arise at different ages -not infrequently very early in life-, in different locations and cellular contexts, have varied cell types of origin, and have heterogeneous responses to the "classic" current therapeutic approaches. Demographic, radiologic and morphological characterization have several limitations, putting into the "classic boxes" heterogeneous tumors that are diverse in their genetic and epigenetic background and that will likely behave biologically differently. Given that epigenetic disruption (i.e. DNA methylation, histone modification and chromatin remodeling) is a common feature identified more and more frequently in pediatric cancer, it is logical to speculate that interrogating epigenetic marks may help to further define the molecular profile, and therefore tumor biology, evolution and treatment of these tumors. An integrated approach that incorporates traditional features complemented with genetic and epigenenetic specific markers offers tremendous promise to "risk-group" stratification and better prognostication. Also, it will help unveil key driver pathways for tumor formation and for the discovery of targeted therapy for neoplasms that appear in the developing brain, facilitating early identification of therapy responders and track accurately disease progression. In this paper, we will review the most representative pediatric brain tumors where epigenetic alterations have been identified as initiating or driving events in tumor development, maintenance or progression.

  13. Bullying behavior in relation to psychiatric disorders and physical health among adolescents: a clinical cohort of 508 underage inpatient adolescents in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Räsänen, Pirkko; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa

    2010-06-30

    The aim was to investigate the association of bullying behavior with psychiatric disorders and physical health in a sample of adolescent psychiatric patients, as there have to our knowledge been no previous studies using actual psychiatric diagnoses examining this relationship in boys and girls. We studied 508 Finnish adolescents (age 12-17) admitted to psychiatric inpatient care between April 2001 and March 2006 from the geographically large area of Northern Finland. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) was used to obtain psychiatric diagnoses of adolescents according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) and information on bullying behavior. Logistic regression analyses showed that having an externalizing disorder increased the likelihood of being a bully or a bully-victim (i.e. a person who is both a bully and a victim of bullying) among both the boys (odds ratio, OR=14.4, P=0.001) and the girls (OR=10.0, P<0.001). In addition, having an internalizing disorder increased the likelihood of being a victim of bullying among the boys (OR=3.4, P=0.008), but not the girls. Chronic somatic diseases were also significantly associated with being bullied among the boys (OR=2.5, P=0.041). Our results suggest that adolescents who are involved in bullying behavior should be evaluated psychiatrically, as this might be an early marker of psychiatric disorders.

  14. Los Angeles Free Clinic [and]"Adolescent Health Care Programs That Work."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainwater, Mary; De Caprio, Chris

    The first paper describes The Los Angeles Free Clinic and its services, which are specifically designed to respond to the needs of low-income and homeless youth within the community. The paper describes a free-of-charge, free-of-judgment comprehensive response system that exists because of collaboration with other health facilities such as…

  15. Clinical Commentary by Dorothy Judd, Child and Adolescent and Couple Psychotherapist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's observations on a clinical extract which describes a child psychotherapist working with Maya, a seriously ill child, in a hospital. The author said that the hospital setting raises the question of what it is like to apply child psychotherapists' thinking within a hospital setting, and how they adapt the way they…

  16. Clinical Implications of DSM-IV Subtyping of Bipolar Disorders in Referred Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Gabriele; Perugi, Giulio; Millepiedi, Stefania; Mucci, Maria; Pari, Cinzia; Pfanner, Chiara; Berloffa, Stefano; Toni, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Objective: According to DSM-IV, bipolar disorders (BDs) include four subtypes, BD I, BD II, cyclothymic disorder, and BD not otherwise specified (NOS). We explore the clinical implications of this subtyping in a naturalistic sample of referred youths with BD I, BD II, and BD-NOS. Method: The sample consisted of 217 patients, 135 males and 82…

  17. Aripiprazole versus risperidone for treating children and adolescents with tic disorder: a randomized double blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Haghighi, Alireza

    2014-10-01

    There are some uncontrolled studies about the efficacy and safety of both aripiprazole and risperidone for treating tic disorder. Moreover, the efficacy of these medications has never been compared. This is the first double blind randomized clinical trial comparing the safety and efficacy of aripiprazole and risperidone for treating patients with tic disorder. Sixty children and adolescents with tic disorder were randomly allocated into one of the two groups to receive either aripiprazole or risperidone for 2 months. The primary outcome measure was the score of Yale Global Tic Severity Scale. In addition, health related quality of life and adverse events were assessed. Both aripiprazole and risperidone decreased the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score during this trial. Moreover, both medications increased the health related quality of life score. Both aripiprazole and risperidone were tolerated well. Aripiprazole [3.22 (1.9) mg/day] decreased tic score as much as risperidone [0.6 (0.2) mg/day]. Their adverse effects and their effects on health related quality of life were comparable. However, risperidone increased the patients' social functioning more than aripiprazole in short term.

  18. Social anxiety in high-functioning children and adolescents with Autism and Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuusikko, Sanna; Pollock-Wurman, Rachel; Jussila, Katja; Carter, Alice S; Mattila, Marja-Leena; Ebeling, Hanna; Pauls, David L; Moilanen, Irma

    2008-10-01

    We examined social anxiety and internalizing symptoms using the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C), the Social Anxiety Scale for Children -Revised (SASC-R), and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) in a sample of fifty-four high-functioning subjects with autism or Asperger syndrome (HFA/AS) (M = 11.2 +/- 1.7 years) and 305 community subjects (M = 12.2 +/- 2.2 years). Children and adolescents completed the SPAI-C and SASC-R, and their parents completed the CBCL Internalizing scale. Adolescents with HFA/AS scored higher than the community sample on all measures. Behavioural avoidance and evaluative social anxiety increased by age within the HFA/AS group, whereas behavioural avoidance decreased by age in control participants. Data support that HFA/AS in adolescents may be associated with clinically relevant social anxiety symptoms.

  19. Associations Between Parental Attachment and Course of Depression Between Adolescence and Young Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Agerup, Tea; Lydersen, Stian; Wallander, Jan; Sund, Anne Mari

    2015-08-01

    A study of the associations of maternal, paternal and peer attachment with the course of depression from adolescence to young adulthood. In the Youth and Mental Health study 242 adolescents completed the Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime version for depressive disorders at age 15 and 20. Attachment was measured with the inventory for parent and peer attachment, separately for mother, father, and peers, at age 15. Multinomial logistic regression, indicated insecure attachment relationships with both parents, but not with peers, and were associated with the course of depression. Less secure attachment to mothers was associated with becoming depressed. Less secure attachment to both parents was associated with becoming well and remaining depressed. These results suggest attachment relationships with parents as potential influences on the course of depression and may provide important framework for clinical work with adolescents and young adults.

  20. SAPHO syndrome in an adolescent: a clinical case with unusual severe systemic impact.

    PubMed

    Freira, Sílvia; Fonseca, Helena; Ferreira, Pedro Dias; Vasconcelos, Pedro; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2014-08-01

    SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) syndrome includes both dermatological and rheumatologic symptoms. Being a rare condition, the diagnosis is frequently late. The authors report a case of a 13-year-old boy diagnosed with synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis syndrome with unusual severe systemic repercussions. The patient presented with acne conglobata, inability to walk due to pain and weakness and weight loss. Bone scintigraphy was suggestive of sacroiliitis, and lumbar spine x-ray showed signs of hyperostosis. His clinical state improved after treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, methotrexate, clindamycin, and isotretinoin. A review of the clinical aspects of this syndrome is presented, emphasizing how this underdiagnosed syndrome can lead to severe weight loss and significant functional and psychological impairment at an early age.

  1. Clinical features and associated abnormalities in children and adolescents with corpus callosal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Uhk; Park, Eun Sook; Jung, Soojin; Suh, Miri; Choi, Hyo Seon; Rha, Dong-Wook

    2014-02-01

    Callosal anomalies are frequently associated with other central nervous system (CNS) and/or somatic anomalies. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical features of corpus callosal agenesis/hypoplasia accompanying other CNS and/or somatic anomalies. We reviewed the imaging and clinical information of patients who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging in our hospital, between 2005 and 2012. Callosal anomalies were isolated in 13 patients, accompanied by other CNS anomalies in 10 patients, associated with only non-CNS somatic anomalies in four patients, and with both CNS and non-CNS abnormalities in four patients. Out of 31 patients, four developed normally, without impairments in motor or cognitive functions. Five of nine patients with cerebral palsy were accompanied by other CNS and/or somatic anomalies, and showed worse Gross Motor Function Classification System scores, compared with the other four patients with isolated callosal anomaly. In addition, patients with other CNS anomalies also had a higher seizure risk.

  2. [Diabetes mellitus: clinical presentation and differential diagnosis of hyperglycemia in childhood and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Rubio Cabezas, O; Argente, J

    2012-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood. Despite being a clinical and etiopathogenically heterogeneous disorder, type 1 autoimmune diabetes accounts for more than 95% of cases in children. Recent advances have meant that a growing number of patients have been assigned to other subtypes of diabetes. In such cases, the correct diagnosis is facilitated by the fact that many of these rare causes of diabetes are associated with specific clinical syndromes or may present at a certain age. Many of them are also subsidiaries of molecular diagnosis. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge in this field of pediatric diabetes, in an attempt to determine the most accurate diagnosis and its implications on appropriate treatment and prognosis.

  3. The Forgiveness Reconciliation Inventory: An Instrument to Process through Issues of Forgiveness and Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkin, Richard S.; Harris, Nephaterria A.; Freeman, Stephen J.; Huntington, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The Forgiveness Reconciliation Inventory is a theoretically derived instrument. Participants included individuals from clinical and nonclinical populations. Confirmatory factor analysis along with correlational designs and between-group comparisons indicate strong psychometric properties of the Forgiveness Reconciliation Inventory. The authors…

  4. Adolescent development

    MedlinePlus

    Development - adolescent; Growth and development - adolescent ... During adolescence, children develop the ability to: Understand abstract ideas. These include grasping higher math concepts, and developing moral ...

  5. Interactive Inventory Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garud, Sumedha

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for monitoring present location and/or present status of a target inventory item, where the inventory items are located on one or more inventory shelves or other inventory receptacles that communicate with an inventory base station through use of responders such as RFIDs. A user operates a hand held interrogation and display (lAD) module that communicates with, or is part of the base station to provide an initial inquiry. lnformation on location(s) of the larget invenlory item is also indicated visibly and/or audibly on the receptacle(s) for the user. Status information includes an assessment of operation readiness and a time, if known, that the specified inventory item or class was last removed or examined or modified. Presentation of a user access level may be required for access to the target inventgory item. Another embodiment provides inventory informatin for a stack as a sight-impaired or hearing-impaired person adjacent to that stack.

  6. Neurocognitive and Clinical Predictors of Long-Term Outcome in Adolescents at Ultra-High Risk for Psychosis: A 6-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Schothorst, Patricia; Sprong, Mirjam; van Engeland, Herman; Kahn, René; Durston, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background Most studies aiming to predict transition to psychosis for individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) have focused on either neurocognitive or clinical variables and have made little effort to combine the two. Furthermore, most have focused on a dichotomous measure of transition to psychosis rather than a continuous measure of functional outcome. We aimed to investigate the relative value of neurocognitive and clinical variables for predicting both transition to psychosis and functional outcome. Methods Forty-three UHR individuals and 47 controls completed an extensive clinical and neurocognitive assessment at baseline and participated in long-term follow-up approximately six years later. UHR adolescents who had converted to psychosis (UHR-P; n = 10) were compared to individuals who had not (UHR-NP; n = 33) and controls on clinical and neurocognitive variables. Regression analyses were performed to determine which baseline measures best predicted transition to psychosis and long-term functional outcome for UHR individuals. Results Low IQ was the single neurocognitive parameter that discriminated UHR-P individuals from UHR-NP individuals and controls. The severity of attenuated positive symptoms was the only significant predictor of a transition to psychosis and disorganized symptoms were highly predictive of functional outcome. Conclusions Clinical measures are currently the most important vulnerability markers for long-term outcome in adolescents at imminent risk of psychosis. PMID:24705808

  7. Etiological Classification and Clinical Assessment of Children and Adolescents with Disorders of Sex Development

    PubMed Central

    Erdoğan, Sema; Kara, Cengiz; Uçaktürk, Ahmet; Aydın, Murat

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In 2006, the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society (LWPES) and the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE) published a consensus statement on management of intersex disorders. The aim of our study was to determine the etiological distribution of disorders of sex development (DSD) according to the new DSD classification system and to evaluate the clinical features of DSDs in our patient cohort. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients followed up during the past three years. The subjects were divided into three etiologic groups according to their karyotypes. The definite diagnosesin each subgroup were established by clinical and laboratory investigations including abdominopelvic imaging as well as basal and stimulated hormone measurements. Molecular genetic testing, except for CYP21A2 gene, could not be performed. Results: Out of a total of 95 patients, 26 had sex chromosome DSD, 45 had 46,XY DSD and 24 had 46,XX DSD. The most common causes of DSDs were Turner’s syndrome (TS), congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). There was a wide variation in age of presentation ranging from 1 day to 17.5 years with a mean of 6.5±6.5 years. The most frequent complaints at presentation were ambiguous genitalia, isolated perineal hypospadias and short stature. Conclusion: The results of our study demonstrate that the new DSD classification system leads to a major change in the distribution of etiological diagnoses of DSDs, which is exemplified by the significant frequencies of TS and vanishing testes syndrome. This alteration expands the clinical spectrum and increases the mean age at diagnosis. However, the most common causes of ambiguous genitalia, such as CAH and AIS, remain unchanged. Further studies using molecular genetic analyses are needed to give a more precise distribution of etiologies of DSDs, especially in 46,XY patients. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21750636

  8. Predictors and Moderators of Agreement between Clinical and Research Diagnoses for Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Jensen-Doss, Amanda; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Youngstrom, Jennifer Kogos; Feeny, Norah C.; Findling, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Diagnoses play an important role in treatment planning and monitoring, but extensive research has shown low agreement between clinician-generated diagnoses and those from structured diagnostic interviews. However, most prior studies of agreement have not used research diagnoses based on gold standard methods, and research needs to identify characteristics of diagnostically challenging clients. This study examined agreement between youth diagnoses generated through the research-based LEAD (Longitudinal, Expert, and All Data) Standard to clinician diagnoses. Method Participants were 391 families seeking outpatient community mental health services for youths ages 6-18 (39.1% female, 88.2% African American). Youths and parents completed research interviews and clinic diagnoses were extracted from clinic records. LEAD diagnoses synthesized results of the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children- Present and Lifetime (KSADS-PL) and the youth's developmental, family, and psychiatric history. Results Agreement between the LEAD and chart diagnoses was low, not exceeding “poor” agreement for most diagnostic categories (κ = .10-.46, median = .37). Disagreement was largely driven by missed diagnoses, although clinicians also did assign extra diagnoses for some clients. Fewer diagnostic errors occurred when the youth's clinical picture was more clear (e.g., high or low symptom severity, lower comorbidity), when the youth was older, when the family was higher functioning, and when the parent had more depression. However, youth and family characteristics explained very little of the variability in diagnostic errors. Conclusions Results support the need to investigate strategies to improve clinician diagnostic accuracy. PMID:24773574

  9. Video games use patterns and parenteral supervision in a clinical sample of Hispanic adolescents 13-17 years old.

    PubMed

    Colón-de Martí, Luz N; Rodríguez-Figueroa, Linnette; Nazario, Lelis L; Gutiérrez, Roberto; González, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Video games have become a popular entertainment among adolescents. Although some video games are educational, there are others with high content of violence and the potential for other harmful effects. Lack of appropriate supervision of video games use during adolescence, a crucial stage of development, may lead to serious behavioral consequences in some adolescents. There is also concern about time spent playing video games and the subsequent neglect of more developmentally appropriate activities, such as completing academic tasks. Self-administered questionnaires were used to assess video game use patterns and parental supervision among 55 adolescent patients 13-17 years old (mean age 14.4 years; 56.4% males) and their parents. Parental supervision /monitoring of the adolescents video games use was not consistent and gender related differences were found regarding their video game use. Close to one third (32%) of the participants reported video game playing had interfered with their academic performance. Parents who understood video games rating system were more likely to prohibit their use due to rating. These findings underscore the need for clear and consistently enforced rules and monitoring of video games use by adolescents. Parents need to be educated about the relevance of their supervision, video games content and rating system; so they will decrease time playing and exposure to potentially harmful video games. It also supports the relevance of addressing supervision, gender-based parental supervisory styles, and patterns of video games use in the evaluation and treatment of adolescents.

  10. Psychometric Properties of Three Measures of Protective Factors for Depression and Suicidal Behaviour Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Labelle, Réal; Breton, Jean-Jacques; Berthiaume, Claude; Royer, Chantal; Raymond, Sylvie; Cournoyer, Marilou; Balan, Bogdan; Zaloum, Terry; Bibaud, Antoine; Gauvin, Geoffrey; Janelle, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the reliability of French versions of the Adolescent Coping Scale (ACS), the Reasons for Living Inventory for Adolescents (RFL-A), and the Spirituality Scale (SS); to examine the construct validity of these psychometric instruments; and to determine their convergent validity with French versions of the Life Events Questionnaire for Adolescents (LEQ-A), the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II), and the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) among French-Canadian adolescents. Methods: Participants were 429 adolescents from high schools (n = 283) and the Mood Disorder Clinic (n = 146) in Montreal. The instruments were translated into French following the back-translation method. The internal consistency was assessed through Cronbach alpha coefficients. Exploratory analyses were conducted to document the content of their dimensions. Convergent validity was examined by correlating the ACS, the RFL-A, and the SS with the French versions of the LEQ-A, the BDI-II, and the BHS. Results: The findings confirm that the ACS, RFL-A, and SS are psychometric instruments well suited to assess protective factors for depression and suicidal behaviour among French-speaking adolescents in community and clinical settings. However, results must be interpreted with some circumspection as 2 SS subscales obtained reliability coefficients in the moderate range only and the instructions for the RFL-A were reframed in response to ethical considerations. Conclusions: Our results add to those already available on the original English versions of the ACS, RFL-A, and SS and advance the knowledge of the psychometric properties of protective measures. PMID:25886667

  11. Graphical representations of adolescents' psychophysiological reactivity to social stressor tasks: Reliability and validity of the Chernoff Face approach and person-centered profiles for clinical use.

    PubMed

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Aldao, Amelia; Qasmieh, Noor; Dunn, Emily J; Lipton, Melanie F; Hartman, Catharina; Youngstrom, Eric A; Dougherty, Lea R; Lerner, Matthew D

    2017-04-01

    Low-cost methods exist for measuring physiology when clinically assessing adolescent social anxiety. Two barriers to widespread use involve lack of (a) physiological expertise among mental health professionals, and (b) techniques for modeling individual-level physiological profiles. We require a "bridge approach" for interpreting physiology that does not require users to have a physiological background to make judgments, and is amenable to developing individual-level physiological profiles. One method-Chernoff Faces-involves graphically representing data using human facial features (eyes, nose, mouth, face shape), thus capitalizing on humans' abilities to detect even subtle variations among facial features. We examined 327 adolescents from the Tracking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) study who completed baseline social anxiety self-reports and physiological assessments within the social scenarios of the Groningen Social Stressor Task (GSST). Using heart rate (HR) norms and Chernoff Faces, 2 naïve coders made judgments about graphically represented HR data and HR norms. For each adolescent, coders made 4 judgments about the features of 2 Chernoff Faces: (a) HR within the GSST and (b) aged-matched HR norms. Coders' judgments reliably and accurately identified elevated HR relative to norms. Using latent class analyses, we identified 3 profiles of Chernoff Face judgments: (a) consistently below HR norms across scenarios (n = 193); (b) above HR norms mainly when speech making (n = 35); or (c) consistently above HR norms across scenarios (n = 99). Chernoff Face judgments displayed validity evidence in relation to self-reported social anxiety and resting HR variability. This study has important implications for implementing physiology within adolescent social anxiety assessments. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Klapp method effect on idiopathic scoliosis in adolescents: blind randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Diego De Sousa; De Assis, Sanderson José Costa; Baroni, Marina Pegoraro; Lopes, Johnnatas Mikael; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Cacho, Roberta De Oliveira; Pereira, Silvana Alves

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To estimate the effect of Klapp method on idiopathic scoliosis in school students. [Subjects and Methods] A single-blind randomized clinical trial with 22 students randomly divided into intervention group (n=12) and inactive control group (n=10). Exercise protocol consisted of Klapp method, 20 sessions, three times a week for intervention group, and inactivity for control group. Dorsal muscle strength was measured by dynamometer; body asymmetries and gibbosity angles were measured by biophotogrammetry. Data were obtained by Generalized Estimated Equation, with 5% significance level. Clinical impact for dependent variables was estimated by “d” Cohen. [Results] There was no change in intragroup analysis and intergroup for all postural symmetry variables. However, it was detected intergroup difference in extensor muscle strength and intergroup difference with marginal significance of gibbosity angles. Regarding extensor muscle strength, intervention group produced average improvement of 7.0 kgf compared to control group. Gibbosity angles progressed less in intervention group, with 5.71° average delay compared to control group. [Conclusion] Klapp method was effective for gibbosity stabilization and it improves spine extensor muscle strength. PMID:28210027

  13. Klapp method effect on idiopathic scoliosis in adolescents: blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Diego De Sousa; De Assis, Sanderson José Costa; Baroni, Marina Pegoraro; Lopes, Johnnatas Mikael; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Cacho, Roberta De Oliveira; Pereira, Silvana Alves

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To estimate the effect of Klapp method on idiopathic scoliosis in school students. [Subjects and Methods] A single-blind randomized clinical trial with 22 students randomly divided into intervention group (n=12) and inactive control group (n=10). Exercise protocol consisted of Klapp method, 20 sessions, three times a week for intervention group, and inactivity for control group. Dorsal muscle strength was measured by dynamometer; body asymmetries and gibbosity angles were measured by biophotogrammetry. Data were obtained by Generalized Estimated Equation, with 5% significance level. Clinical impact for dependent variables was estimated by "d" Cohen. [Results] There was no change in intragroup analysis and intergroup for all postural symmetry variables. However, it was detected intergroup difference in extensor muscle strength and intergroup difference with marginal significance of gibbosity angles. Regarding extensor muscle strength, intervention group produced average improvement of 7.0 kgf compared to control group. Gibbosity angles progressed less in intervention group, with 5.71° average delay compared to control group. [Conclusion] Klapp method was effective for gibbosity stabilization and it improves spine extensor muscle strength.

  14. Clinical Course of Hyperprolactinemia in Children and Adolescents: A Review of 21 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Erdal; Yapıcı, Şenay; Çakır, Esra Deniz Papatya; Ceylan, Latife Aytekin; Sağlam, Halil; Tarım, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Hyperprolactinemia may be due to various etiological factors and may present with different signs and symptoms. It is relatively less frequent in childhood than in adulthood. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the clinical course and outcome of hyperprolactinemia in pediatric patients. Methods: We investigated the records of 21 patients with hyperprolactinemia who attended a tertiary hospital. Results: Menstrual problems, galactorrhea , and headache were the most common presenting symptoms. Hyperprolactinemia was due to microadenoma in 10, macroadenoma in 7, and was drug-induced in 4 patients. Bromocriptine and cabergoline were equally effective in lowering serum prolactin levels. Surgical treatment in children with macroprolactinoma was not curative and dopamine agonist therapy was required postoperatively. Conclusion: In the presence of any clinical symptom or sign suggestive of suppression of the pituitary-gonadal axis, hyperprolactinemia should not be forgotten as a probable diagnosis. Medical therapy seems effective in microadenoma. Surgical therapy may not be successful in macroadenoma and recurrence is frequent. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21750634

  15. Effect of Automated Online Counseling on Clinical Outcomes and Quality of Life Among Adolescents With Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Tuong, William; Wang, Audrey S.; Armstrong, April W.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Effective patient education is necessary for treating patients with acne vulgaris. Automated online counseling simulates face-to-face encounters and may be a useful tool to deliver education. OBJECTIVE To compare the effectiveness of a standard educational website with that of an automated-counseling website in improving clinical outcomes and quality of life among adolescents with acne. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial conducted between March 27, 2014, and June 27, 2014, including a 12-week follow-up in a local inner-city high school. Ninety-eight students aged at least 13 years with mild to moderate acne were eligible for participation. A per-protocol analysis of the evaluable population was conducted on clinical outcome data. INTERVENTIONS Participants viewed either a standard educational website or an automated-counseling website. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was the total acne lesion count. Secondary measures included the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) scores and general skin care behavior. RESULTS Forty-nine participants were randomized to each group. At baseline, the mean (SD) total acne lesion count was not significantly different between the standard-website group and the automated-counseling–website group (21.33 [10.81] vs 25.33 [12.45]; P = .10). Improvement in the mean (SD) acne lesion count was not significantly different between the standard-website group and the automated-counseling–website group (0.20 [9.26] vs 3.90 [12.19]; P = .10). The mean (SD) improvement in CDLQI score for the standard-website group was not significantly different from that of the automated-counseling–website group (0.17 [2.64] vs 0.39 [2.94]; P = .71). After 12 weeks, a greater proportion of participants in the automated-counseling–website group maintained or adopted a recommended anti-acne skin care routine compared with the standard-website group (43% vs 22%; P = .03). CONCLUSIONS AND

  16. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Mounerou; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Butel, Christelle; Vidal, Nicole; Serrano, Laetitia; Takassi, Elom; Konou, Abla A; Houndenou, Spero; Dapam, Nina; Singo-Tokofaï, Assetina; Pitche, Palokinam; Atakouma, Yao; Prince-David, Mireille; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2016-01-01

    their current ART regimen. Conclusions Our study provided important information on virological outcome on lifelong ART in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents who were still on ART and continued to attend antiretroviral (ARV) clinics for follow-up visits. Actual conditions for scaling up and monitoring lifelong ART in children in resource-limited countries can have dramatic long-term outcomes and illustrate that paediatric ART receives inadequate attention. PMID:27125320

  17. Rasch Analysis of the Arabic Language Version of the Functional Disability Inventory.

    PubMed

    Madi, Dina; Clinton, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It is important for the responsive and effective treatment of pediatric cancer patients that functional disability is successfully measured, but no measures of functional disability have been validated for use with Arabic-speaking children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric characteristics of the first Arabic translation of the Functional Disability Inventory (FDI). A methodological study limited to the secondary analysis of functional disability data on 62 pediatric patients in Lebanon using the rating scale model and WINSTEPS Rasch analysis software was used. Disordered responses to 4 FDI times suggest that the Arabic translation of the rating scale categories might need revision or supplementation with a visual analogue scale. The dimensionality of the FDI needs further exploration because principal component analyses of residuals suggested the presence of secondary and possibly higher order dimensions. Additional FDI items are needed to improve targeting if low levels of functional disability are demonstrated to be clinically important for patient assessment and pain management. The FDI-A is suitable for clinical assessment and for monitoring the outcomes of pain management in Lebanese pediatric cancer patients. Our findings support the construct validity of the FDI-A and acceptable reliability for the 15-item scale, Cronbach α .93 and .85 for 4 of the item subsets we examined. Rating scale categories and the dimensionality of the FDI-A require further examination. The clinical relevance of distinctions between levels of functional disability in children and adolescents with cancer pain remains to be established.

  18. Gender differences in defense mechanisms, ways of coping with stress and sense of identity in adolescent suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Foto-Özdemir, Dilşad; Akdemir, Devrim; Çuhadaroğlu-Çetin, Füsun

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the gender differences in defense mechanisms, ways of coping with stress and identity formation in relation to adolescent suicidal behavior. This study involved 64 adolescents between 12-17 years of age, who were admitted to the emergency service with a suicide attempt. They were evaluated with a semi-structured clinical interview (K-SADS), Ways of Coping Inventory (WCI), Defense Mechanisms Inventory (DMI) and Sense of Identity Assessment Form (SIAF). 60.9% (n = 39) of the adolescents were female, and 39.1% (n=25) were male. There were no statistically significant differences between the girls and the boys with respect to the clinical characteristics of the suicide attempt and the rate of psychiatric disorders. Of the 64 adolescents with suicide attempt, 47 (73.4%) had at least one, and 26 (40.6%) had more than one psychiatric disorder according to K-SADS. Disruptive behavior disorders were more frequent in males, whereas depression was more frequent in girls. The data indicated the importance of identity confusion, major depression and ADHD in adolescents with suicide attempt in both genders. 43.6% (n=17) of the girls and 36% (n=9) of the boys obtained scores higher than the cut-off point of SIAF indicating identity confusion. Professional help seeking and NSSI behaviors before the suicide attempt were more common in adolescents with identity confusion. While there were differences between genders with respect to the defense mechanisms used, no significant difference was found in terms of ways of coping. Evaluation of DMI scores revealed that the turning against object subscale score was significantly higher in boys compared to girls. While evaluating the adolescents at risk, their defense mechanisms, way of coping and sense of identity, as well as their psychiatric diagnosis should be assessed in detail in order to identify the suicidal thoughts and prevent possible suicide attempts.

  19. The effects of violent media on adolescent inkblot responses: implications for clinical and forensic assessments.

    PubMed

    Hess, T H; Hess, K D; Hess, A K

    1999-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the degree to which violent media stimulate violent fantasy as depicted on inkblot responses. In Experiment I, 41 gifted high school students were exposed to a bucolic or violent film clip and then were asked to produce inkblot responses. In Experiment II, a second sample of 43 additional students were exposed to a verbal description of the bucolic or violent scene to assess whether the "hot" or "cooler" media (McLuhan, 1964) had different effects on the inkblot responses. In both experiments, the media exposure led to increased levels of violent responses, and in both cases males produced more violent responses. There was no sex by media interaction effect. Implications for clinical and forensic assessments are presented.

  20. Health protection well inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, J.

    1989-03-01

    This report is an inventory of the wells contained in Health Protection (HP) documents since the startup of the Savannah River Plan (SRP) and includes wells monitored by special request and SRL research wells.

  1. Shuttle Inventory Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Inventory Management System (SIMS) consists of series of integrated support programs providing supply support for both Shuttle program and Kennedy Space Center base opeations SIMS controls all supply activities and requirements from single point. Programs written in COBOL.

  2. Inventory count strategies.

    PubMed

    Springer, W H

    1996-02-01

    An important principle of accounting is that asset inventory needs to be correctly valued to ensure that the financial statements of the institution are accurate. Errors is recording the value of ending inventory in one fiscal year result in errors to published financial statements for that year as well as the subsequent fiscal year. Therefore, it is important that accurate physical counts be periodically taken. It is equally important that any system being used to generate inventory valuation, reordering or management reports be based on consistently accurate on-hand balances. At the foundation of conducting an accurate physical count of an inventory is a comprehensive understanding of the process coupled with a written plan. This article presents a guideline of the physical count processes involved in a traditional double-count approach.

  3. The Italian version of the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems Personality Disorders Scales (IIP-47): psychometric properties and clinical usefulness as a screening measure.

    PubMed

    Ubbiali, Alessandro; Chiorri, Carlo; Donati, Deborah

    2011-08-01

    The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-47 (IIP-47) is a brief and valid self-report measure for screening Personality Disorders (PDs). This study examined internal consistency, factor structure, criterion validity, temporal stability, and operating characteristics of the Italian version of the IIP-47 in two independent samples: PD subjects (n = 120) and nonclinical subjects (n = 475). Alpha coefficients ranged from .70 to .90. Multiple-Group Confirmatory Factor Analyses showed that the five-correlated-factor model reported in literature had the highest measurement invariance across the two groups. Criterion validity was supported by correlations among IIP-47 scale scores and scores on established measures of personality dimensions and pathology. Test-retest indices ranged from .71 to .95. PD subjects scored significantly higher than nonclinical subjects on all IIP-47 scales and cut-off scores for different levels of specificity and sensibility are reported. It is concluded that the psychometric properties of the original IIP-47 were preserved in its Italian version.

  4. Clinical and psychosocial correlates of non-suicidal self-injury within a sample of children and adolescents with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Goldstein, Tina; Birmaher, Boris; Goldstein, Benjamin; Hunt, Jeffrey; Ryan, Neal; Axelson, David; Strober, Michael; Gill, Mary Kay; Hanley, Andrea; Keller, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence and correlates of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among children and adolescents diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BP). Methods Four hundred-thirty two youth with a diagnosis of BP and their parents, including 193 children and 239 adolescents, completed a diagnostic interview and instruments to assess youth clinical and illness history, youth comorbidity, parental mood disorder, and psychosocial functioning. Results Approximately 22% of children and 22% of adolescents reported NSSI during the course of their most recent mood episode. In a multivariate model controlling for global impairment, among children, a BPI or BPII diagnosis (versus BPNOS), psychosis, separation anxiety disorder, and greater severity of depressive symptoms were found to be associated with NSSI. Among adolescents, a mixed episode, a suicide attempt, greater severity of depressive symptoms, and poor psychosocial functioning were found to be associated with NSSI. Neither the presence of a youth comorbid disruptive behavior disorder nor a parental mood disorder was associated with NSSI. Limitations The primary limitations of this study include the use of a cross-sectional study design, lack of a control group, and limited generalizability of study results to non-clinical and ethnically diverse samples. Conclusions NSSI is not uncommon among youth with BP, particularly those who present with BPI or BPII, psychosis, a mixed episode, suicidal behavior, severe depressive symptoms, separation anxiety, and/or poor psychosocial functioning. However, the relative importance of these factors in relation to NSSI may vary with age. Treatments for BP that are developmentally sensitive, examine the function of NSSI for each youth, and teach adaptive skills to address emotional and social needs, may prove to be most successful. PMID:20089313

  5. Clinical normative data for eating disorder examination questionnaire and eating disorder inventory for DSM-5 feeding and eating disorder classifications: a retrospective study of patients formerly diagnosed via DSM-IV.

    PubMed

    Brewin, Nicola; Baggott, Jonathan; Dugard, Pat; Arcelus, Jon

    2014-07-01

    Normative data for measures of eating disorder (ED) psychopathology provide a fundamental description of a presentation and a means to establish clinically significant change following an intervention. Clinical norms for the ED population are lacking and out of date following the publication of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders (DSM) 5. This study aimed to show that scores from the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-q) and the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) differ across ED diagnosis groups and provide norm data for DSM-5 ED diagnoses. Patients (n = 932) presenting to an out-patient service over 5 years were retrospectively re-diagnosed based on DSM-5 criteria. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference on most subscale scores of the EDE-q and the EDI across diagnosis. Means, standard deviations and percentile ranks are presented by diagnosis. The norms detailed contribute to improving the accuracy with which scores are interpreted when using DSM-5 and aid with the assessment of clinically significant change following treatment.

  6. Essentials of Millon Inventories Assessment. Essentials of Psychological Assessment Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strack, Stephen

    This step-by-step reference guide to the five key Millon personality inventories includes vital information about each of the tests, including information on psychometric characteristics, special populations, assets-limitations, reliability-validity, and interpretation. The tests are: the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III (MCMI-III); the…

  7. Adolescent Images of Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falchikov, Nancy

    1989-01-01

    Examined extent to which Scottish adolescents (N=40) were influenced by negative images of adolescence present in the culture, investigating self-images by means of Q sort. Eleven factors emerged from analysis, six of which met criterion that distinguishes common factors. Little evidence was found to suggest that adolescents were influenced by…

  8. Concordance between self-report and urine drug screen data in adolescent opioid dependent clinical trial participants.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Claire E; Bogenschutz, Michael P; Nakazawa, Masato; Woody, George

    2013-10-01

    Objective measures of drug use are very important in treatment outcome studies of persons with substance use disorders, but obtaining and interpreting them can be challenging and not always practical. Thus, it is important to determine if, and when, drug-use self-reports are valid. To this end we explored the relationships between urine drug screen results and self-reported substance use among adolescents and young adults with opioid dependence participating in a clinical trial of buprenorphine-naloxone. In this study, 152 individuals seeking treatment for opioid dependence were randomized to a 2-week detoxification with buprenorphine-naloxone (DETOX) or 12weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP), each with weekly individual and group drug counseling. Urine drug screens and self-reported frequency of drug use were obtained weekly, and patients were paid $5 for completing weekly assessments. At weeks 4, 8, and 12, more extensive assessments were done, and participants were reimbursed $75. Self-report data were dichotomized (positive vs. negative), and for each major drug class we computed the kappa statistic and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of self-report using urine drug screens as the "gold standard". Generalized linear mixed models were used to explore the effect of treatment group assignment, compensation amounts, and participant characteristics on self-report. In general, findings supported the validity of self-reported drug use. However, those in the BUP group were more likely to under-report cocaine and opioid use. Therefore, if used alone, self-report would have magnified the treatment effect of the BUP condition.

  9. High hyperdiploidy among adolescents and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL): cytogenetic features, clinical characteristics and outcome.

    PubMed

    Chilton, L; Buck, G; Harrison, C J; Ketterling, R P; Rowe, J M; Tallman, M S; Goldstone, A H; Fielding, A K; Moorman, A V

    2014-07-01

    High hyperdiploidy (HeH, 51-65 chromosomes) is an established genetic subtype of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The clinical and cytogenetic features as well as outcome of HeH among adolescents and adults have not been thoroughly investigated. Among 1232 B-cell precursor ALL patients (15-65 years) treated in the UKALLXII/ECOG2993 trial, 160 (13%) had a HeH karyotype, including 80 patients aged >24 years. The frequency of HeH was the same in Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive and -negative cases, but Ph-positive patients were older. The cytogenetic profiles of Ph-positive and Ph-negative HeH cases were similar, although trisomy 2 was strongly associated with Ph-positive HeH. Overall, Ph-positive HeH patients did not have an inferior overall survival compared with Ph-negative patients (P=0.2: 50 vs 57% at 5 years). Trisomy of chromosome 4 was associated with a superior outcome in Ph-negative patients, whereas +5 and +20 were associated with an inferior outcome in Ph-positive and Ph-negative patients, respectively. All three markers retained significance in multivariate analysis adjusting for age and white cell count: hazard ratio for risk of death 0.47 (95% CI: 0.27-0.84) (P=0.01), 3.73 (1.51-9.21) (P=0.004) and 2.63 (1.25-5.54) (P=0.01), respectively. In conclusion, HeH is an important subtype of ALL at all ages and displays outcome heterogeneity according to chromosomal gain.

  10. Assessment of PIC and MMPI Scales in Adolescent Psychosis: A Caution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Allison; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigated sensitivity of Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) in assessing psychotic states in adolescents. Results from comparison of 29 psychotic and 58 nonpsychotic adolescent psychiatric inpatients suggest the need for a profile-analytic approach to PIC and MMPI interpretation in…

  11. Assessing Factors in Adolescent Adjustment as Precursors to Recidivism in Court-Referred Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkin, Richard S.; Miller, Janeen; Ricard, Richard J.; Garcia, Roberto; Lancaster, Chloe

    2011-01-01

    Court-referred youth participated in an intervention program and completed the Reynolds Adolescent Adjustment Screening Inventory. Reoffending rates were tracked for 2 years. Antisocial behavior, anger control, and emotional distress were influencing characteristics for recidivism. The Reynolds Adolescent Adjustment Screening Inventory may serve…

  12. Buddy Study: Partners for better health in adolescents with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sylvetsky, Allison C; Nandagopal, Radha; Nguyen, Tammy T; Abegg, Marisa R; Nagarur, Mahathi; Kaplowitz, Paul; Rother, Kristina I

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether assigning young, healthy and motivated lay volunteer partners (“buddies”) to adolescents with type 2 diabetes improves hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). METHODS: Adolescents with type 2 diabetes were randomized to partnering with a “buddy” or to conventional treatment. During the initial screening visit, which coincided with a routine outpatient diabetes clinic visit, patients with type 2 diabetes underwent a physical examination, detailed medical history, laboratory measurement of HbA1c, and completed two questionnaires (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory and Children’s Depression Inventory) to assess their overall quality of life and the presence of depressive symptoms. Patients were then randomized to the intervention (the buddy system) or conventional treatment (standard care). All patients were scheduled to return for follow-up at 3- and 6-mo after their initial visit. HbA1c was determined at all visits (i.e., at screening and at the 3- and 6-mo follow-up visits) and quality of life and depressive symptoms were evaluated at the screening visit and were reassessed at the 6-mo visit. RESULTS: Ten adolescents, recruited from a pool of approximately 200 adolescents, enrolled over a two-year time period, leading to premature termination of the study. In contrast, we easily recruited motivated lay volunteers. We found no change in HbA1c from the initial to the 6-mo visit in either group, yet our small sample size limited systematic assessment of this outcome. Participants repeatedly missed clinic appointments, failed to conduct self-glucose-monitoring and rarely brought their glucometers to clinic visits. Total quality of life scores (72.6 ± 6.06) at screening were similar to previously reported scores in adolescents with type 2 diabetes (75.7 ± 15.0) and lower than scores reported in normal-weight (81.2 ± 0.9), overweight (83.5 ± 1.8), and obese youths without diabetes (78.5 ± 1.8) or in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (80.5 ± 13

  13. Personality Characteristics of Black Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Nina W.

    Four hundred and forty-six poor black urban and rural adolescents ages 15-18 enrolled in a summer poverty-work program are administered Gough's Adjective Checklist (ACL) and Holland's Vocatonal Preference Inventory (VPI) to determine their personality profile, to ascertain differences between this gorup and blacks attending colleges, and to study…

  14. Personality Characteristics of Black Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Nina W.

    1977-01-01

    This research attempted to determine 1) the personality profiles of disadvantaged Black adolescents on Holland's Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI) and Gough's Adjective Checklist (ACL), 2) if this group differed significantly on the VPI from Blacks attending college, and 3) what implications for programming and planning could be determined…

  15. MACVIA clinical decision algorithm in adolescents and adults with allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Jean; Schünemann, Holger J; Hellings, Peter W; Arnavielhe, Sylvie; Bachert, Claus; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Brozek, Jan; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, G Walter; Casale, Thomas B; Chavannes, Niels H; Cox, Linda; Chrystyn, Henry; Cruz, Alvaro A; Dahl, Ronald; De Carlo, Giuseppe; Demoly, Pascal; Devillier, Phillipe; Dray, Gérard; Fletcher, Monica; Fokkens, Wytske J; Fonseca, Joao; Gonzalez-Diaz, Sandra N; Grouse, Lawrence; Keil, Thomas; Kuna, Piotr; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Lodrup Carlsen, Karin C; Meltzer, Eli O; Mullol, Jaoquim; Muraro, Antonella; Naclerio, Robert N; Palkonen, Susanna; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Price, David; Ryan, Dermot; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Scadding, Glenis K; Sheikh, Aziz; Spertini, François; Valiulis, Arunas; Valovirta, Erkka; Walker, Samantha; Wickman, Magnus; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Haahtela, Tari; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    The selection of pharmacotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) depends on several factors, including age, prominent symptoms, symptom severity, control of AR, patient preferences, and cost. Allergen exposure and the resulting symptoms vary, and treatment adjustment is required. Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) might be beneficial for the assessment of disease control. CDSSs should be based on the best evidence and algorithms to aid patients and health care professionals to jointly determine treatment and its step-up or step-down strategy depending on AR control. Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif en Languedoc-Roussillon (MACVIA-LR [fighting chronic diseases for active and healthy ageing]), one of the reference sites of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing, has initiated an allergy sentinel network (the MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel Network). A CDSS is currently being developed to optimize AR control. An algorithm developed by consensus is presented in this article. This algorithm should be confirmed by appropriate trials.

  16. The Beck Depression Inventory II and the Beck Anxiety Inventory in People with Intellectual Disabilities: Factor Analyses and Group Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.; Skene, Danielle D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: There have been several developments in research on emotional disorders in people with intellectual disability (ID). Although a large amount of work has been completed in mainstream clinical fields on the "Beck Anxiety Inventory" (BAI) and the "Beck Depression Inventory"-2nd Edition (BDI-II), to date there has been…

  17. Psychometric Characteristics of the Revised Procrastination Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Erica M.; Green, Kathy E.; Kluever, Raymond C.

    2000-01-01

    The Procrastination Inventory developed for use with doctoral students in clinical psychology was modified for use with all-but-dissertation students and doctoral graduates in a college of education. Factor and Rasch analyses of the revised measure identified three subscales: (1) procrastination, (2) perfectionism, and (3) graduate school comfort.…

  18. Coeliac disease in children and adolescents with IDDM: clinical characteristics and response to gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Acerini, C L; Ahmed, M L; Ross, K M; Sullivan, P B; Bird, G; Dunger, D B

    1998-01-01

    A total of 167 children and adolescents with insulin-dependent (Type 1) diabetes mellitus (97 males; age range 1.9-22.4 yrs) in a UK paediatric diabetic clinic were screened for coeliac disease using the IgA endomysial (EMA) test, or, in IgA deficient subjects, the IgG antigliadin (AGA) test. Antibody positive subjects were selected for small bowel biopsy, and confirmed coeliac cases started on a gluten free diet. Clinical features, height (Ht) standard deviation score (SDS), body mass index (BMI) SDS, HbA1c, insulin requirements' haemoglobin (Hb), mean red cell volume (MCV), serum folate and ferritin levels were evaluated at diagnosis and thereafter at 3-6 month intervals. A total of 156 subjects (93.4%) were antibody negative. Eleven (6.6%) were antibody positive (10 EMA/1 AGA; 6 males), of whom 9 had biopsies: 1 normal: 8 coeliac (4.8%; 5 males; 1 'classical'; 1 anaemia; 3 'atypical'; 3 asymptomatic). Seven coeliac subjects were followed during 12-24 months of dietary therapy. Pretreatment mean (range) Ht SDS = 0.08 (-1.66 to 1.88); BMI SDS = 0.32 (-0.82 to 1.29); HbA1c = 8.9 (6.2 to 11.3%); insulin dose = 0.98 (0.51 to 1.29) U kg(-1) day(-1). During treatment antibody status reverted to and remained negative, and symptoms resolved. By 24 months, there was a trend towards increased BMI SDS (mean (range) 1.31 (0.47 to 2.29), p = 0.248) and to reductions in HbA1c (8.1 (6.4-10.8), p = 0.697). Repeat small bowel biopsies were normal in 6 subjects (1 refused). No statistically significant changes occurred in any other parameters. In conclusion, serological screening is effective, although the therapeutic benefit of dietary therapy in asymptomatic cases remains uncertain.

  19. Case study of an adolescent Cambodian refugee: a clinical, developmental and cultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Bemak, F; Timm, J

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of Tu, a Cambodian man who came to the US as an unaccompanied war refugee when he was 15 years old after experiencing severe trauma. Tu was diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder and underwent 2.5 years of therapy with a clinical consultant. At this point, Tu became somewhat acculturated and resolved but found the process of self-evaluation too painful to continue. The therapist moved away and lost track of Tu for 7 years until contacted by his current therapist for a conference because Tu's period of adjustment had ended and his serious mental health problems were causing problematic deviant behavior. Initial therapy had allowed Tu to replace aggressive behavior with a moderate depression caused by his inability to adjust to life in the US. During the 4 years between therapists, Tu moved from place to place and experienced increasingly severe problems, including arrests. The success of the early therapy was achieved by establishing a climate of trust and safety with a therapist who understood Tu's cultural background and allowed Tu to control the pace of therapy. Non-Western interventions, such as using Tu's Cambodian caseworker as a partner in the healing process and enlisting the aid of a Buddhist monk also proved of value. Tu's continuing difficulties occurred because his therapeutic sessions ended before he could achieve the developmental stage that would have allowed him to believe that his new world was safe and, perhaps, because his new therapist was a woman (as was the head of his foster home). Understanding of cultural issues, including the gender roles of women in patriarchal Cambodia, may have helped Tu's counselors succeed in providing the ongoing support needed by all patients suffering post-traumatic stress disorder.

  20. A study of Hungarian adolescent outpatients suffering from self-injurious behaviour.

    PubMed

    Csorba, János; Dinya, Elek; Ferencz, Edit; Páli, Eszter; Nagy, Edit; Horváth, Agnes; Vados, Mariann

    2010-03-01

    In this pilot study (Study A), the authors administered the Hungarian standard version of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the translated version of the Ottawa Self Injury Inventory (OSI) to students of 3 educational facilities in a county town. Fourteen to eighteen year old pupils were tested in order to measure the key symptoms of depression and the frequency and characteristics of self-injurious behaviour among this sample of the high school population. Twentysix youngsters were found to have had any form of self-injurious actions in their life-time. The paper presents descriptive data on the basis of statistics of symptom occurence. Although the depressive symptoms have an expected correlation with the self-injurious ideas,depression seems not to have the same relationships with actual self-harm action. In study B, the authors present descriptive statistics on the data of 48 female outpatients from the total pool of 72 adolescents aged 14 through to-18 years (average age 16.1 years) showing symptoms of self-injurious behavior according to the Ottawa Self Injury Inventory (OSI). All patients were recruited from a one-year clinical,representative sample of the "Pannonia" multicentre adolescent psychiatry survey. Ten point two percent of consecutively referred and 25.6% of treated adolescent patients had symptoms of self-injurious behavior over a one-year period in 4 Transdanubian Child Psychiatric Centers, which is more frequent than the expected rate. Referring to the clinical diagnoses of adolescents confirmed by M.I.N.I. Plus Diagnostic Interview, the authors estimate, that the majority of these young people suffered from episode(s) of present or past major depression, from whatever form of anxiety disorder and/or from suicidal behaviour. The study presents details of risk behavior including motivations, frequency of acts, ideas, afflicted body regions, emotional correlates, secondary obtained benefits , escalation of problem behavior and consequences in

  1. Nutrition in the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R

    1999-02-01

    This article reviews the nutritional requirements of puberty and the clinical assessment of nutritional status, and discusses the nutritional risks imposed by vegetarian diets, pregnancy, and athletic involvement. Energy (calories) and protein are essential in pubertal development. Adolescent females require approximately 2200 calories/day, whereas male adolescents require 2500-3000 calories/day. Additional intake requirements include fat, calcium, iron, zinc, vitamins, and fiber. The clinical assessment of nutritional status begins with obtaining a good diet history of the patient and this could be offered by the body mass index. Nutritional deficiencies and poor eating habits established during adolescence can have long-term consequences, including delayed sexual maturation, loss of final adult height, osteoporosis, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. As for vegetarian adolescents, nutritional risks include lack of iodine, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and some essential fatty acids. In addition, substances in some grains reduce gut absorption, thus increasing mineral deficiencies. Pregnancy may also be a risk factor for poor nutrition during adolescence. A pregnant adolescent has different nutritional needs because she is still growing. Among adolescent athletes many are turning to nutritional supplements in an attempt to improve athletic performance. A balanced, varied diet provides adequate calories and nutrition to meet the needs of most adolescents. They also have greater water needs than do adult athletes. Details on adolescent health concerns are further discussed in this article.

  2. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    SciTech Connect

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as

  3. Sources of Site Differences in the Efficacy of a Multi-site Clinical Trial: The Treatment of SSRI Resistant Depression in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Spirito, Anthony; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Iyengar, Satish; Brent, David; Vitiello, Benedetto; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan; Emslie, Graham; Keller, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Site differences in treatment outcomes are not often highlighted when the results of multisite randomized clinical trials (MRCTs) are reported. In the primary analyses of a six-site MRCT, the Treatment of SSRI-resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA), there was substantial variation by site in the performance of a medication-only condition and a combined medication plus Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) condition. Two potential primary causes of site differences in MRCT outcomes are examined in this paper: sampling factors, particularly clinical characteristics of participants, and treatment protocol factors, particularly fidelity. We found that differences in the clinical characteristics of participants at baseline across-site and within-site/across conditions were the most salient explanators for site differences and differences within sites across conditions in outcome. Study findings are discussed with respect to the overall study outcomes in TORDIA as well as MRCTs in general. PMID:19485586

  4. The effect of an energy restricted low glycemic index diet on blood lipids, apolipoproteins and lipoprotein (a) among adolescent girls with excess weight: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Kelishadi, Roya; Hashemipour, Mahin; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Azadbakht, Leila

    2013-12-01

    Some studies focused on the effect of the dietary glycemic index on lipoproteins and apolipoproteins in adults; however, little evidence exists among adolescents regarding the effect of a low glycemic index (LGI) diet on apolipoproteins and lipoprotein (a) (Lpa). This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of an LGI diet on the lipid profile, apolipoproteins and Lpa among overweight and obese adolescent girls. For this parallel designed randomized clinical trial, 50 healthy overweight/obese girls at pubertal ages were randomly allocated to an LGI or a healthy nutritional recommendations (HNR) based diet. Equal macronutrient distributed diets were prescribed to both groups. Biochemical measurements included lipid profile, apolipoprotein A, apolipoprotein B and Lpa were conducted before and after 10 weeks of intervention. Forty one adolescent girls completed the study. The dietary glycemic index in the LGI group was 42.67 ± 0.067. There were no differences in the mean of blood lipid indices baseline and after intervention between two groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding lipid profiles, apolipoproteins and Lpa. There were no significant differences in lipid profiles, apolipoproteins and Lpa between the LGI diet and the HNR-based diet and the impact of these two diets on lipid profile was equal in this trial.

  5. Minimizing the problem of poor compliance in adolescents. Clinical experience with a modern low-dose gestodene-containing oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Brill, K

    1997-06-17

    Adolescents represent a particularly difficult group with respect to compliance. Not only is incorrect pill intake a common problem, but unnecessary discontinuation also occurs regularly. Reasons for poor compliance are varied, but inadequate information and problems with cycle control and weight gain are particularly important. Choosing a well-tolerated oral contraceptive can help to improve compliance, and clinical experience from a large, multicenter trial suggests that monophasic gestodene (75 micrograms gestodene/30 micrograms ethinylestradiol) is a suitable preparation for this group of women. An investigation of 5,602 adolescents with an average age of 16.4 years found good contraceptive reliability and excellent cycle control. The incidence of spotting and breakthrough bleeding was low and declined during the course of the study. The preparation was tolerated well, and the incidence of adverse events was low, with only 4.4% of women withdrawing from the study due to adverse events. An increase in body weight was uncommon. At the end of the study, 85.0% of adolescents rated monophasic gestodene as good and 9.6% as satisfactory.

  6. The Social Appearance Anxiety Scale in Italian Adolescent Populations: Construct Validation and Group Discrimination in Community and Clinical Eating Disorders Samples.

    PubMed

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Carrà, Giuseppe; Calogero, Rachel; Zanetti, M Assunta; Volpato, Chiara; Riva, Giuseppe; Clerici, Massimo; Cipresso, Pietro

    2016-02-01

    Anxiety in situations where one's overall appearance (including body shape) may be negatively evaluated is hypothesized to play a central role in Eating Disorders (EDs) and in their co-occurrence with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). Three studies were conducted among community (N = 1995) and clinical (N = 703) ED samples of 11- to 18-year-old Italian girls and boys to (a) evaluate the psychometric qualities and measurement equivalence/invariance (ME/I) of the Social Appearance Anxiety (SAA) Scale (SAAS) and (b) determine to what extent SAA or other situational domains of social anxiety related to EDs distinguish adolescents with an ED only from those with SAD. Results upheld the one-factor structure and ME/I of the SAAS across samples, gender, age categories, and diagnostic status (i.e., ED participants with and without comorbid SAD). The SAAS demonstrated high internal consistency and 3-week test-retest reliability. The strength of the inter-relationships between SAAS and measures of body image, teasing about appearance, ED symptoms, depression, social anxiety, avoidance, and distress, as well as the ability of SAAS to discriminate community adolescents with high and low levels of ED symptoms and community participants from ED participants provided construct validity evidence. Only SAA strongly differentiated adolescents with any ED from those with comorbid SAD (23.2 %). Latent mean comparisons across all study groups were performed and discussed.

  7. PCP Use among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    This article, aimed at professionals in the field of adolescent psychology, briefly reviews the use of phencyclidine (PCP), its pharmacology, clinical effects, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. (Author/BN)

  8. Lack of guilt, guilt, and shame: a multi-informant study on the relations between self-conscious emotions and psychopathology in clinically referred children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter; Meesters, Cor; Heijmans, Jolina; van Hulten, Sandra; Kaanen, Linsy; Oerlemans, Birgit; Stikkelbroeck, Tessa; Tielemans, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The present study examined the relationships between dysregulations in self-conscious emotions and psychopathology in clinically referred children and adolescents. For this purpose, parent-, teacher-, and self-report Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment data of 1000 youth aged 4-18 years was analyzed as this instrument not only provides information on the intensity levels of lack of guilt, guilt, and shame, but also on the severity of various types of psychopathology. The results first of all indicated that dysregulations of self-conscious emotions were more common in this clinical sample than in the general population. Further, a consistent pattern was found with regard to the relationships between self-conscious emotions and childhood psychopathology. That is, lack of guilt was predominantly associated with oppositional defiant and conduct (i.e., externalizing) problems, while guilt and shame were primarily linked with affective and anxiety (i.e., internalizing) problems. By and large, these findings confirm what has been found in non-clinical youth, and suggest that self-conscious emotions play a small but significant role in the psychopathology of children and adolescents.

  9. A systematic review of clinical practice guidelines and best practice statements for the diagnosis and management of varicocele in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Roque, Matheus; Esteves, Sandro C

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify and qualitatively analyze the methods as well as recommendations of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) and Best Practice Statements (BPS) concerning varicocele in the pediatric and adolescent population. An electronic search was performed with the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Direct, and Scielo databases, as well as guidelines' Web sites until September 2015. Four guidelines were included in the qualitative synthesis. In general, the recommendations provided by the CPG/BPS were consistent despite the existence of some gaps across the studies. The guidelines issued by the American Urological Association (AUA) and American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) did not provide evidence-based levels for the recommendations given. Most of the recommendations given by the European Association of Urology (EAU) and European Society of Pediatric Urology (ESPU) were derived from nonrandomized clinical trials, retrospective studies, and expert opinion. Among all CPG/BPS, only one was specifically designed for the pediatric population. The studied guidelines did not undertake independent cost-effectiveness and risk-benefit analysis. The main objectives of these guidelines were to translate the best evidence into practice and provide a framework of standardized care while maintaining clinical autonomy and physician judgment. However, the limitations identified in the CPG/BPS for the diagnosis and management of varicocele in children and adolescents indicate ample opportunities for research and future incorporation of higher quality standards in patient care.

  10. Design, Development, and Psychometric Analysis of a General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry Topic Inventory Based on the Identified Main Chemistry Topics Relevant to Nursing Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.

    2013-01-01

    This two-stage study focused on the undergraduate nursing course that covers topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry. In the first stage, the central objective was to identify the main concepts of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was based on open-ended interviews of both nursing…

  11. [Early detection of major depression in paediatric care: validity of the beck depression inventory-second edition (BDI-II) and the beck depression inventory-fast screen for medical patients (BDI-FS)].

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Kathrin; Hoyler, Anne; Frühe, Barbara; Kruse, Joachim; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin

    2012-11-01

    This study investigates the ability of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) and the Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen for Medical Patients (BDI-FS) to discriminate between depressed and non-depressed youths. 5.7% of 314 adolescents, aged 13-16 years, from paediatric and paediatric surgery clinics were suffering from a Major Depression according to the diagnostic interview Kinder-DIPS. By means of this gold standard Receiver Operating Characteristic curves, the Area Under the Curve (AUC) and the optimal cut-offs were calculated. The validity of BDI-II was excellent (AUC=0.93, sensitivity=0.86 and specificity=0.93 at the optimal cut-off ≥19). The validity of BDI-FS did not differ significantly from BDI-II (AUC=0.92, sensitivity=0.81, specificity=0.90). For the first time we present cut-offs for the German version of BDI-II and the 7-item BDI-FS that are suitable for the early detection of depressed adolescents in paediatric care.

  12. The Impact of a Low Glycemic Index Diet on Inflammatory Markers and Serum Adiponectin Concentration in Adolescent Overweight and Obese Girls: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, M H; Kelishadi, R; Hashemipour, M; Esmaillzadeh, A; Surkan, P J; Keshavarz, A; Azadbakht, L

    2016-04-01

    Although the effects of dietary glycemic index (GI) on insulin resistance are well documented in adults, the complex interaction among glucose intolerance, inflammatory markers, and adipokine concentration has not been well studied, especially among adolescents. We investigated the effect of a low glycemic index (LGI) diet on insulin concentration, fasting blood sugar (FBS), inflammatory markers, and serum adiponectin concentration among healthy obese/overweight adolescent females. In this parallel randomized clinical trial, 2 different diets, an LGI diet and a healthy nutritional recommendation diet (HNRD) with similar macronutrient composition were prescribed to 50 obese and overweight adolescent girls with the same pubertal status. Biochemical markers FBS, serum insulin concentration, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and adiponectin were measured before and after a 10 week intervention. Using an intention-to-treat analysis, data from 50 subjects were analyzed. According to a dietary assessment, GI in the LGI group was 43.22±0.54. While the mean for FBS, serum insulin concentration, the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and adiponectin concentration did not differ significantly within each group, the average hs-CRP and IL-6 decreased significantly in the LGI diet group after the 10 week intervention (p=0.009 and p=0.001; respectively). Comparing percent changes, we found a marginally significant decrease in hs-CRP in the LGI group compared with the HNRD group after adjusting for confounders. Compliance with an LGI diet may have favorable effect on inflammation among overweight and obese adolescent girls.

  13. How do different dimensions of adolescent narcissism impact the relation between callous-unemotional traits and self-reported aggression?

    PubMed

    Lee-Rowland, Lauren M; Barry, Christopher T; Gillen, Christopher T A; Hansen, Laura K

    2017-01-01

    The current study examined the moderating influence that different aspects of narcissism have on the relation between callous-unemotional (CU) traits and aggression in a sample of 720 adolescents (500 males), ages 16-19 enrolled in a 22-week residential program. Findings from the two studies revealed that psychopathy-linked narcissism as assessed by the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; Frick & Hare, 2001; Antisocial process screening device. Toronto: Multi-Health Systems.) and vulnerable narcissism as assessed using the Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI; Pincus et al., 2009; Initial construction and validation of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory. Psychological Assessment, 21, 365-379) significantly moderated the relation between CU traits and aggression in adolescents. Conversely, non-pathological narcissism assessed by the Narcissistic Personality Inventory for Children (NPIC; Barry, Frick, & Killian, 2003; The relation of narcissism and self-esteem to conduct problems in children. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 32, 139-152) and PNI grandiose narcissism did not significantly impact this relation. These results suggest that forms of narcissism most closely connected to internalizing problems combined with CU traits are associated with relatively heightened aggression in youth. The implications of these findings are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 43:14-25, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Gender Incongruence of Adolescence and Adulthood: Acceptability and Clinical Utility of the World Health Organization's Proposed ICD-11 Criteria.

    PubMed

    Beek, Titia F; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Bouman, Walter P; de Vries, Annelou L C; Steensma, Thomas D; Witcomb, Gemma L; Arcelus, Jon; Richards, Christina; Elaut, Els; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is currently updating the tenth version of their diagnostic tool, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD, WHO, 1992). Changes have been proposed for the diagnosis of Transsexualism (ICD-10) with regard to terminology, placement and content. The aim of this study was to gather the opinions of transgender individuals (and their relatives/partners) and clinicians in the Netherlands, Flanders (Belgium) and the United Kingdom regarding the proposed changes and the clinical applicability and utility of the ICD-11 criteria of 'Gender Incongruence of Adolescence and Adulthood' (GIAA). A total of 628 participants were included in the study: 284 from the Netherlands (45.2%), 8 from Flanders (Belgium) (1.3%), and 336 (53.5%) from the UK. Most participants were transgender people (or their partners/relatives) (n = 522), 89 participants were healthcare providers (HCPs) and 17 were both healthcare providers and (partners/relatives of) transgender people. Participants completed an online survey developed for this study. Most participants were in favor of the proposed diagnostic term of 'Gender Incongruence' and thought that this was an improvement on the ICD-10 diagnostic term of 'Transsexualism'. Placement in a separate chapter dealing with Sexual- and Gender-related Health or as a Z-code was preferred by many and only a small number of participants stated that this diagnosis should be excluded from the ICD-11. In the UK, most transgender participants thought there should be a diagnosis related to being trans. However, if it were to be removed from the chapter on "psychiatric disorders", many transgender respondents indicated that they would prefer it to be removed from the ICD in its entirety. There were no large differences between the responses of the transgender participants (or their partners and relatives) and HCPs. HCPs were generally positive about the GIAA diagnosis; most thought the diagnosis was clearly defined and easy

  15. A randomized crossover clinical study showing that methylphenidate-SODAS improves attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in adolescents with substance use disorder.

    PubMed

    Szobot, C M; Rohde, L A; Katz, B; Ruaro, P; Schaefer, T; Walcher, M; Bukstein, O; Pechansky, F

    2008-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a long-acting formulation of methylphenidate (MPH-SODAS) on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in an outpatient sample of adolescents with ADHD and substance use disorders (SUD). Secondary goals were to evaluate the tolerability and impact on drug use of MPH-SODAS. This was a 6-week, single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study assessing efficacy of escalated doses of MPH-SODAS on ADHD symptoms in 16 adolescents with ADHD/SUD. Participants were randomly allocated to either group A (weeks 1-3 on MPH-SODAS, weeks 4-6 on placebo) or group B (reverse order). The primary outcome measures were the Swanson, Nolan and Pelham Scale, version IV (SNAP-IV) and the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI). We also evaluated the adverse effects of MPH-SODAS using the Barkley Side Effect Rating Scale and subject reports of drug use during the study. The sample consisted of marijuana (N = 16; 100%) and cocaine users (N = 7; 43.8%). Subjects had a significantly greater reduction in SNAP-IV and CGI scores (P < 0.001 for all analyses) during MPH-SODAS treatment compared to placebo. No significant effects for period or sequence were found in analyses with the SNAP-IV and CGI scales. There was no significant effect on drug use. MPH-SODAS was well tolerated but was associated with more severe appetite reduction than placebo (P < 0.001). MPH-SODAS was more effective than placebo in reducing ADHD symptoms in a non-abstinent outpatient sample of adolescents with comorbid SUD. Randomized clinical trials, with larger samples and SUD intervention, are recommended.

  16. A new brace treatment similar for adolescent scoliosis and kyphosis based on restoration of thoracolumbar lordosis. Radiological and subjective clinical results after at least one year of treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Study design A prospective treatment study with a new brace was conducted Objective. To evaluate radiological and subjective clinical results after one year conservative brace treatment with pressure onto lordosis at the thoracolumbar joint in children with scoliosis and kyphosis. Summary of background data Conservative brace treatment of adolescent scoliosis is not proven to be effective in terms of lasting correction. Conservative treatment in kyphotic deformities may lead to satisfactory correction. None of the brace or casting techniques is based on sagittal forces only applied at the thoracolumbar spine (TLI= thoracolumbar lordotic intervention). Previously we showed in patients with scoliosis after forced lordosis at the thoracolumbar spine a radiological instantaneous reduction in both coronal curves of double major scoliosis. Methods A consecutive series of 91 children with adolescent scoliosis and kyphosis were treated with a modified symmetric 30 degrees Boston brace to ensure only forced lordosis at the thoracolumbar spine. Scoliosis was defined with a Cobb angle of at least one of the curves [greater than or equal to] 25 degrees and kyphosis with or without a curve <25 degrees in the coronal plane. Standing radiographs were made i) at start, ii) in brace at beginning and iii) after one year treatment without brace. Results Before treatment start ‘in brace’ radiographs showed a strong reduction of the Cobb angles in different curves in kyphosis and scoliosis groups (sagittal n = 5 all p < 0.001, pelvic obliquity p < 0.001). After one year of brace treatment in scoliosis and kyphosis group the measurements on radiographs made without brace revealed an improvement in 3 Cobb angles each. Conclusion Conservative treatment using thoracolumbar lordotic intervention in scoliotic and kyphotic deformities in adolescence demonstrates a marked improvement after one year also in clinical and postural criteria. An effect not obtained with current brace techniques

  17. An Examination of the Factorial Invariance and Refinement of the Multidimensional School Anger Inventory for Five Pacific Rim Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, Michael J.; You, Sukkyung; Smith, Douglas C.; Gonzalez, Victoria; Boman, Peter; Shimoda, Yoshiyuki; Terasaka, Akiko; Merino, Cesar; Grazioso, María del Pilar

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the Multidimensional School Anger Inventory (MSAI) was examined with adolescents from 5 Pacific Rim countries (N = 3,181 adolescents; age, M = 14.8 years; 52% females). Confirmatory factor analyses examined configural invariance for the MSAI's anger experience, hostility, destructive expression, and anger coping subscales. The…

  18. An Investigation of the Construct Validity of the Teenage Inventory of Social Skills: A Convergent Multivariate Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inderbitzen, Heidi M.; Garbin, Calvin P.

    In an attempt to determine the subscale structures most useful for identifying adolescents with social skill deficits, this study investigated the factor structure of the Teenage Inventory of Social Skills (TISS) and its relationship to two measures of adolescent social competence. Two measures were completed by 1,142 ninth-grade students (577…

  19. Personality Heterogeneity in Female Adolescent Inpatients with Features of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Ansell, Emily B.; Fehon, Dwain C.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examined evidence for personality variability in adolescents with eating disorder features based in light of previous evidence that personality variability in adult women with eating pathology carries important clinical implications. Method Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory personality data from adolescent girls with disturbed eating who were psychiatrically hospitalized were cluster analyzed and resulting groups were compared in terms of eating and comorbid pathology. Results Three sub-groups were identified among the 153 patients with eating disorder features: high-functioning, internalizing, and externalizing. The internalizing group was marked by eating-related and mood dysfunction, the externalizing group by elevated eating and mood pathology as well as impulsivity, aggression, and substance use, and the high-functioning group by lower levels of psychopathology and relatively high self-esteem. Conclusions These findings converge with previous research using different personality models in adult samples and highlight the clinical utility of considering personality heterogeneity among adolescent and adult women with disturbed eating. PMID:20965304

  20. Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Kamryn T.; Doyle, Angela Celio; Hoste, Renee Rienecke; Herzog, David B.; Le Grange, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    A study to examine the kind of eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) among adolescents encountered during treatment at an outpatient eating disorder clinic is conducted. Results indicate that EDNOS is more predominant among adolescents seeking treatment for eating disorders.