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Sample records for adolescent meth users

  1. Methamphetamine (Meth)

    MedlinePlus

    ... but will still get the rest of the drug's effects. After the first rush, a meth high is ... away, even after a user stops taking the drug. One well-known effect of methamphetamine use is severe dental problems, also ...

  2. Methamphetamine (Meth)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Methamphetamine (Meth) KidsHealth > For Teens > Methamphetamine (Meth) A A ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Meth What Is Methamphetamine? Methamphetamine, or meth, is a powerful stimulant drug. ...

  3. Crystal Meth

    MedlinePlus

    ... from Other Parents Stories of Hope Crystal meth Crystal meth Story of Hope by giovanni January 3, ... about my drug addiction having to deal with Crystal meth. I am now in recovery and fighting ...

  4. Crystal Meth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Home / Stories of Hope / Crystal meth Crystal meth Story Of Hope By giovanni January 3rd, 2013 ... my drug addiction having to deal with Crystal meth. I am now in recovery and fighting my ...

  5. Characteristics of Steroid Users in an Adolescent School Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlaf, Edward M.; Smart, Reginald G.

    1992-01-01

    Examined rates of steroid use among Ontario adolescent students. Findings from 3,892 students revealed that 1.1 percent reported using steroids over past year. Steroid users were significantly more likely to use stimulants, caffeine, and relaxants than were nonsteroid users. Demographically, steroid users were significantly more likely to be male…

  6. Psychological Characteristics of Adolescent Steroid Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Kent F.; Kleiman, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    Used Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory and Profile of Mood States to assess psychological characteristics in 72 adolescent males: 24 adolescent athletes who reported steroid use, 24 athletes with no steroid use, and 24 nonathletes. Although some personality variables differentiated between athletes and nonathletes, no personality variables…

  7. Abnormal striatal circuitry and intensified novelty seeking among adolescents who abuse methamphetamine and cannabis.

    PubMed

    Churchwell, John C; Carey, Paul D; Ferrett, Helen L; Stein, Dan J; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that changes in striatal-mediated dopamine modulation during adolescence may increase the risk for initiating substance abuse as a result of its fundamental role in arbitrating reward sensitivity and motivation during learning and decision making. However, substance abuse during adolescence may also significantly modify striatal structure and function and concomitantly alter reward sensitivity and action control while this brain region is undergoing remodeling. In the present investigation, to assess the relationship of methamphetamine (Meth) or Meth and cannabis (CA) abuse to regional striatal morphology, we acquired structural magnetic resonance images, using a 3T Siemens Trio scanner, from three groups of adolescents composed of healthy controls (n = 10), Meth abusers (n = 9) and combined Meth and CA abusers (Meth+CA, n = 8). We also assessed novelty seeking using the novelty seeking subscale of Cloninger's Tridimensional Character Inventory. The results indicate that adolescent Meth+CA abusers have increased regional striatal volume and show intensified novelty seeking in contrast to the controls. The degree of Meth exposure was also positively correlated with regional striatal volume and novelty seeking in both the Meth and Meth+CA users. These preliminary findings support theories that propose a role for the striatum in adolescent substance abuse and further indicate that novelty seeking may be related to the initiation of, or sustained, drug use.

  8. Abnormal cerebellar morphometry in abstinent adolescent marijuana users

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Krista Lisdahl; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Functional neuroimaging data from adults have, in general, found frontocerebellar dysfunction associated with acute and chronic marijuana (MJ) use (Loeber & Yurgelun-Todd, 1999). One structural neuroimaging study found reduced cerebellar vermis volume in young adult MJ users with a history of heavy polysubstance use (Aasly et al., 1993). The goal of this study was to characterize cerebellar volume in adolescent chronic MJ users following one month of monitored abstinence. Method Participants were MJ users (n=16) and controls (n=16) aged 16-18 years. Extensive exclusionary criteria included history of psychiatric or neurologic disorders. Drug use history, neuropsychological data, and structural brain scans were collected after 28 days of monitored abstinence. Trained research staff defined cerebellar volumes (including three cerebellar vermis lobes and both cerebellar hemispheres) on high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Results Adolescent MJ users demonstrated significantly larger inferior posterior (lobules VIII-X) vermis volume (p<.009) than controls, above and beyond effects of lifetime alcohol and other drug use, gender, and intracranial volume. Larger vermis volumes were associated with poorer executive functioning (p’s<.05). Conclusions Following one month of abstinence, adolescent MJ users had significantly larger posterior cerebellar vermis volumes than non-using controls. These greater volumes are suggested to be pathological based on linkage to poorer executive functioning. Longitudinal studies are needed to examine typical cerebellar development during adolescence and the influence of marijuana use. PMID:20413277

  9. ALTERED PREFRONTAL AND INSULAR CORTICAL THICKNESS IN ADOLESCENT MARIJUANA USERS

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Larson, Melissa P.; Bogorodzki, Piotr; Rogowska, Jadwiga; McGlade, Erin; King, Jace B.; Terry, Janine; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There are limited data regarding the impact of marijuana (MJ) on cortical development during adolescence. Adolescence is a period of substantial brain maturation and cortical thickness abnormalities may be indicative of disruptions of normal cortical development. This investigation applied cortical-surface based techniques to compare cortical thickness measures in MJ using adolescents compared to non-using controls. Methods Eighteen adolescents with heavy MJ use and 18 non-using controls similar in age received MRI scans using a 3T Siemens scanner. Cortical reconstruction and volumetric segmentation was performed with FreeSurfer. Group differences in cortical thickness were assessed using statistical difference maps covarying for age and gender. Results Compared to non-users, MJ users had decreased cortical thickness in right caudal middle frontal, bilateral insula and bilateral superior frontal corticies. Marijuana users had increased cortical thickness in the bilateral lingual, right superior temporal, right inferior parietal and left paracentral regions. In the MJ users, negative correlations were found between frontal and lingual regions for urinary cannabinoid levels and between age of onset of use and the right superior frontal gyrus. Conclusion This is one of the first studies to evaluate cortical thickness in a group of adolescents with heavy MJ use compared to non-users. Our findings are consistent with prior studies that documented abnormalities in prefrontal and insular regions. Our results suggest that age of regular use may be associated with altered prefrontal cortical gray matter development in adolescents. Furthermore, reduced insular cortical thickness may be a biological marker for increased risk of substance dependence. PMID:21310189

  10. Factors That Affect Adolescent Drug Users' Suicide Attempts.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Song, Hokwang

    2016-05-01

    Drug abuse has been widely linked to suicide risk. We examined the factors that affect adolescent drug users' suicide attempts in South Korea. This study analyzed the data of 311 adolescents who had used drugs such as inhalants, psychotropic drugs, and marijuana (195 males and 116 females). Among 311 subjects, 109 (35.0%) had attempted suicide during the last 12 months. After adjusting for other variables, depressive mood (OR=19.79) and poly-drug use (OR=2.79), and low/middle levels of academic achievement compared with a high level (OR=3.72 and 4.38) were independently associated with increased odds of a suicide attempt, while better perceived health (OR=0.32) was independently associated with reduced odds of a suicide attempt. For adolescent drug users, preventive work should be directed toward the active treatment of drug use, depression, and physical health and reinforcing proper coping strategies for academic and other stress.

  11. Do Australian Adolescent Female Fake Tan (Sunless Tan) Users Practice Better Sun-Protection Behaviours than Non-Users?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Melinda; Jones, Sandra C.; Caputi, Peter; Iverson, Don

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine differences in sun-protection behaviours, and incidence of sunburn, between Australian adolescent female fake tan users and non-users. Design: Cross sectional survey. Method: 398 adolescent females aged 12 to 18 years participated in a survey at public venues, schools, and online. The main outcome measures were…

  12. Identification and Characterization of Adolescent Internet User's Profiles.

    PubMed

    Rial, Antonio; Gómez, Patricia; Picón, Eduardo; Braña, Teresa; Varela, Jesús

    2015-07-14

    The percentages of adolescent Internet use in general terms have been measured for nearly two decades now; however, it might be thought that not every teenager behaves online in the same way. This study aims to identify the different types or profiles of adolescents and to characterize them from an attitudinal, behavioral and socio-demographic viewpoint. A questionnaire was applied to a representative sample of 2,339 Compulsory Secondary School students (M = 13.77 years old) from Galicia (a North-Western region of Spain) for this purpose. A two-stage cluster analysis, based on the response pattern in relation to their attitudes toward Internet, was carried out. Four different segments with specific characteristics were identified: the first steppers, the trainees, the sensible users, and the heavy users. Besides the relevance of descriptive data, these results are of particular interest at an applied level, because they could lead to a better fit of programs to prevent risky behaviors and problematic Internet use in adolescents.

  13. Meth math: modeling temperature responses to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zaretskaia, Maria V; Zaretsky, Dmitry V

    2014-04-15

    Methamphetamine (Meth) can evoke extreme hyperthermia, which correlates with neurotoxicity and death in laboratory animals and humans. The objective of this study was to uncover the mechanisms of a complex dose dependence of temperature responses to Meth by mathematical modeling of the neuronal circuitry. On the basis of previous studies, we composed an artificial neural network with the core comprising three sequentially connected nodes: excitatory, medullary, and sympathetic preganglionic neuronal (SPN). Meth directly stimulated the excitatory node, an inhibitory drive targeted the medullary node, and, in high doses, an additional excitatory drive affected the SPN node. All model parameters (weights of connections, sensitivities, and time constants) were subject to fitting experimental time series of temperature responses to 1, 3, 5, and 10 mg/kg Meth. Modeling suggested that the temperature response to the lowest dose of Meth, which caused an immediate and short hyperthermia, involves neuronal excitation at a supramedullary level. The delay in response after the intermediate doses of Meth is a result of neuronal inhibition at the medullary level. Finally, the rapid and robust increase in body temperature induced by the highest dose of Meth involves activation of high-dose excitatory drive. The impairment in the inhibitory mechanism can provoke a life-threatening temperature rise and makes it a plausible cause of fatal hyperthermia in Meth users. We expect that studying putative neuronal sites of Meth action and the neuromediators involved in a detailed model of this system may lead to more effective strategies for prevention and treatment of hyperthermia induced by amphetamine-like stimulants.

  14. Meth math: modeling temperature responses to methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Molkov, Yaroslav I.; Zaretskaia, Maria V.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) can evoke extreme hyperthermia, which correlates with neurotoxicity and death in laboratory animals and humans. The objective of this study was to uncover the mechanisms of a complex dose dependence of temperature responses to Meth by mathematical modeling of the neuronal circuitry. On the basis of previous studies, we composed an artificial neural network with the core comprising three sequentially connected nodes: excitatory, medullary, and sympathetic preganglionic neuronal (SPN). Meth directly stimulated the excitatory node, an inhibitory drive targeted the medullary node, and, in high doses, an additional excitatory drive affected the SPN node. All model parameters (weights of connections, sensitivities, and time constants) were subject to fitting experimental time series of temperature responses to 1, 3, 5, and 10 mg/kg Meth. Modeling suggested that the temperature response to the lowest dose of Meth, which caused an immediate and short hyperthermia, involves neuronal excitation at a supramedullary level. The delay in response after the intermediate doses of Meth is a result of neuronal inhibition at the medullary level. Finally, the rapid and robust increase in body temperature induced by the highest dose of Meth involves activation of high-dose excitatory drive. The impairment in the inhibitory mechanism can provoke a life-threatening temperature rise and makes it a plausible cause of fatal hyperthermia in Meth users. We expect that studying putative neuronal sites of Meth action and the neuromediators involved in a detailed model of this system may lead to more effective strategies for prevention and treatment of hyperthermia induced by amphetamine-like stimulants. PMID:24500434

  15. Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use Hurts Other People Drug Use Hurts ... This Section Signs of Meth Use and Addiction Effects of Meth on Brains and Bodies Previous Index Next ... About the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) | About This Website Tools and Resources | ...

  16. Risk and protective factors of adolescent exclusive snus users compared to non-users of tobacco, exclusive smokers and dual users of snus and cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Larsen, E; Rise, J; Lund, K E

    2013-07-01

    The use of snus is increasing in Norway. In this study we examined differences between adolescents who were exclusive snus users, and adolescent non-users, smokers and dual users of snus and cigarettes on a number of psychosocial factors, categorized as risk variables and protective variables associated with involvement in health compromising behavior. We applied separate logistic regression models, where exclusive snus users (n=740) were compared with non-users (n=904), smokers (n=219), and dual users (n=367). Compared to non-users, the group of exclusive snus users was associated with variables traditionally predicting health risk behavior, such as smoking friends (OR=1.74, SD 1.27-2.38) and truancy (OR=2.12, SD 1.65-2.78). Compared to smokers, exclusive snus users were related to variables traditionally associated with protection against involvement in health risk behavior, e.g. higher academic orientation (OR=1.66, SD 1.12-2.45). Associations with protective factors were also observed when exclusive snus users were compared with dual users. While the group of exclusive snus users was associated with a pattern of psychosocial risk compared to non-users, they showed a more conventional pattern when compared to smokers and dual users. The group of exclusive snus users may be described on a continuum varying from psychosocial risk factors to protective factors of risk involvement depending on the group of comparison.

  17. Characteristics of Marijuana Acquisition among a National Sample of Adolescent Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Keith A.; Merianos, Ashley L.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Because marijuana is becoming more accessible and perceived norms of use are becoming increasingly more favorable, research is needed to understand characteristics of marijuana acquisition among adolescents. Purpose: The study purpose was to examine whether sources and locations where adolescent users obtain and use marijuana differed…

  18. Actor Vocal Training for the Habilitation of Speech in Adolescent Users of Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Colleen M.; Dowell, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined changes to speech production in adolescents with hearing impairment following a period of actor vocal training. In addition to vocal parameters, the study also investigated changes to psychosocial factors such as confidence, self-esteem, and anxiety. The group were adolescent users of cochlear implants (mean age at commencement…

  19. Childhood trauma and METH abuse among men who have sex with men: Implications for intervention.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Patton, Maria; Kumar, Mahendra; Jones, Deborah; Fonseca, Marla; Kumar, Adarsh M; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) has become one of the most widely abused drugs in South Florida, particularly among MSM who may or may not be HIV seropositive. High rates of childhood trauma have been reported among HIV-infected MSM (Chartier et al., 2010), but, the association of childhood trauma, and mood disorders with methamphetamine use in HIV-infected men, has not been comprehensively explored. A better understanding of the association between these factors could improve existing substance abuse treatment intervention strategies and medical treatment programs (e.g., medication adherence; Carrico, 2010) to enhance positive health outcomes for male meth abusers living with the psychological consequences of childhood abuse. This study, as part of a larger study, examined the occurrence of childhood trauma and depression in a group of HIV seropositive METH abusing MSM. Significantly higher levels of depression symptom severity were found among METH users relative to non-METH users (p < .001). Irrespective of HIV status, METH users also reported higher frequencies of emotional, physical and sexual child abuse relative to non-METH users (p < .001). Among meth users, depression was predicted by childhood emotional neglect. These results suggest that childhood maltreatment may be implicated in the development of emotional distress (e.g., depression) and higher prevalence of methamphetamine/drug abuse in this population. These findings have important implications for substance abuse interventions, specifically targeting METH addiction among MSM. Addressing childhood trauma and depression may play a key role in enhancing the effectiveness of interventions for methamphetamine addiction.

  20. Neurocognitive Correlates of White Matter Quality in Adolescent Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bava, Sunita; Jacobus, Joanna; Mahmood, Omar; Yang, Tony T.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Progressive myelination during adolescence implicates an increased vulnerability to neurotoxic substances and enduring neurocognitive consequences. This study examined the cognitive manifestations of altered white matter microstructure in chronic marijuana and alcohol-using (MJ + ALC) adolescents. Methods: Thirty-six MJ + ALC…

  1. Adolescents' Beliefs about Marijuana Use: A Comparison of Regular Users, Past Users and Never/Occasional Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plancherel, Bernard; Bolognini, Monique; Stephan, Philippe; Laget, Jacques; Chinet, Leonie; Bernard, Mathieu; Halfon, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    A questionnaire investigating adolescents' opinions and experiences regarding marijuana use was administered to 163 adolescents and young adults (96 boys and 67 girls) aged 13 to 20 (mean age = 16.8, s.d. = 1.5). Items referred to marijuana and other substances' dangerousness, representations regarding the positive and negative consequences of…

  2. Brain responses to musical feature changes in adolescent cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Bjørn; Weed, Ethan; Sandmann, Pascale; Brattico, Elvira; Hansen, Mads; Sørensen, Stine Derdau; Vuust, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are primarily designed to assist deaf individuals in perception of speech, although possibilities for music fruition have also been documented. Previous studies have indicated the existence of neural correlates of residual music skills in postlingually deaf adults and children. However, little is known about the behavioral and neural correlates of music perception in the new generation of prelingually deaf adolescents who grew up with CIs. With electroencephalography (EEG), we recorded the mismatch negativity (MMN) of the auditory event-related potential to changes in musical features in adolescent CI users and in normal-hearing (NH) age mates. EEG recordings and behavioral testing were carried out before (T1) and after (T2) a 2-week music training program for the CI users and in two sessions equally separated in time for NH controls. We found significant MMNs in adolescent CI users for deviations in timbre, intensity, and rhythm, indicating residual neural prerequisites for musical feature processing. By contrast, only one of the two pitch deviants elicited an MMN in CI users. This pitch discrimination deficit was supported by behavioral measures, in which CI users scored significantly below the NH level. Overall, MMN amplitudes were significantly smaller in CI users than in NH controls, suggesting poorer music discrimination ability. Despite compliance from the CI participants, we found no effect of the music training, likely resulting from the brevity of the program. This is the first study showing significant brain responses to musical feature changes in prelingually deaf adolescent CI users and their associations with behavioral measures, implying neural predispositions for at least some aspects of music processing. Future studies should test any beneficial effects of a longer lasting music intervention in adolescent CI users.

  3. Brain Responses to Musical Feature Changes in Adolescent Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Bjørn; Weed, Ethan; Sandmann, Pascale; Brattico, Elvira; Hansen, Mads; Sørensen, Stine Derdau; Vuust, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are primarily designed to assist deaf individuals in perception of speech, although possibilities for music fruition have also been documented. Previous studies have indicated the existence of neural correlates of residual music skills in postlingually deaf adults and children. However, little is known about the behavioral and neural correlates of music perception in the new generation of prelingually deaf adolescents who grew up with CIs. With electroencephalography (EEG), we recorded the mismatch negativity (MMN) of the auditory event-related potential to changes in musical features in adolescent CI users and in normal-hearing (NH) age mates. EEG recordings and behavioral testing were carried out before (T1) and after (T2) a 2-week music training program for the CI users and in two sessions equally separated in time for NH controls. We found significant MMNs in adolescent CI users for deviations in timbre, intensity, and rhythm, indicating residual neural prerequisites for musical feature processing. By contrast, only one of the two pitch deviants elicited an MMN in CI users. This pitch discrimination deficit was supported by behavioral measures, in which CI users scored significantly below the NH level. Overall, MMN amplitudes were significantly smaller in CI users than in NH controls, suggesting poorer music discrimination ability. Despite compliance from the CI participants, we found no effect of the music training, likely resulting from the brevity of the program. This is the first study showing significant brain responses to musical feature changes in prelingually deaf adolescent CI users and their associations with behavioral measures, implying neural predispositions for at least some aspects of music processing. Future studies should test any beneficial effects of a longer lasting music intervention in adolescent CI users. PMID:25705185

  4. Metabolic alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex and related cognitive deficits in late adolescent methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun E; Kim, Geon Ha; Hwang, Jaeuk; Kim, Jung Yoon; Renshaw, Perry F; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A; Kim, Binna; Kang, Ilhyang; Jeon, Saerom; Ma, Jiyoung; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Yoon, Sujung

    2016-11-04

    The adolescent brain, with ongoing prefrontal maturation, may be more vulnerable to drug use-related neurotoxic changes as compared to the adult brain. We investigated whether the use of methamphetamine (MA), a highly addictive psychostimulant, during adolescence affect metabolic and cognitive functions of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). In adolescent MA users (n = 44) and healthy adolescents (n = 53), the levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), a neuronal marker, were examined in the ACC using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The Stroop color-word task was used to assess Stroop interference, which may reflect cognitive functions of behavior monitoring and response selection that are mediated by the ACC. Adolescent MA users had lower NAA levels in the ACC (t = -2.88, P = 0.005) and relatively higher interference scores (t = 2.03, P = 0.045) than healthy adolescents. Moreover, there were significant relationships between lower NAA levels in the ACC and worse interference scores in adolescent MA users (r = -0.61, P < 0.001). Interestingly, early onset of MA use, as compared to late onset, was related to both lower NAA levels in the ACC (t = -2.24, P = 0.03) as well as lower performance on interference measure of the Stroop color-word task (t = 2.25, P = 0.03). The current findings suggest that metabolic dysfunction in the ACC and its related cognitive impairment may play an important role in adolescent-onset addiction, particularly during early adolescence.

  5. Functional Activation and Effective Connectivity Differences in Adolescent Marijuana Users Performing a Simulated Gambling Task

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Kimberly L.; Hines, Christina S.; Li, Karl; Dawes, Michael A.; Mathias, Charles W.; Dougherty, Donald M.; Laird, Angela R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adolescent marijuana use is associated with structural and functional differences in forebrain regions while performing memory and attention tasks. In the present study, we investigated neural processing in adolescent marijuana users experiencing rewards and losses. Fourteen adolescents with frequent marijuana use (>5 uses per week) and 14 nonuser controls performed a computer task where they were required to guess the outcome of a simulated coin flip while undergoing magnetic resonance imaging. Results. Across all participants, “Wins” and “Losses” were associated with activations including cingulate, middle frontal, superior frontal, and inferior frontal gyri and declive activations. Relative to controls, users had greater activity in the middle and inferior frontal gyri, caudate, and claustrum during “Wins” and greater activity in the anterior and posterior cingulate, middle frontal gyrus, insula, claustrum, and declive during “Losses.” Effective connectivity analyses revealed similar overall network interactions among these regions for users and controls during both “Wins” and “Losses.” However, users and controls had significantly different causal interactions for 10 out of 28 individual paths during the “Losses” condition. Conclusions. Collectively, these results indicate adolescent marijuana users have enhanced neural responses to simulated monetary rewards and losses and relatively subtle differences in effective connectivity. PMID:25692068

  6. Bis(6-meth-oxy-2-{[tris-(hydroxy-meth-yl)-meth-yl]-imino-meth-yl}phenolato)-copper(II) dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiutang; Wei, Peihai; Dou, Jianmin; Li, Bin; Hu, Bo

    2009-01-08

    In the title compound, [Cu(C(12)H(16)NO(5))(2)]·2H(2)O, the Cu(II) ion adopts a trans-CuN(2)O(4) octa-hedral geometry arising from two N,O,O'-tridentate 6-meth-oxy-2-{[tris-(hydroxy-meth-yl)meth-yl]-imino-meth-yl}phenolate ligands. The Jahn-Teller distortion of the copper centre is unusally small. In the crystal structure, O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, some of which are bifurcated, link the component species.

  7. Adolescents' Attitudes toward Wheelchair Users: A Provincial Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Kelly P.

    2010-01-01

    The study aims were to examine (i) adolescents' attitudes towards family members who use a wheelchair in relation to other health problems and conditions, and (ii) the association between perceived wheelchair stigma and socio-demographic factors. Data were based on surveys from 2790 seventh to 12th grade students derived from the 2007 cycle of the…

  8. Helium inhalation in adolescents: characteristics of users and prevalence of use.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Ahmed; Garland, Eric L; Howard, Matthew O

    2012-01-01

    Although helium-related fatalities and concerns about potentially harmful effects of helium use have increased in recent years, virtually nothing is known about the epidemiology of helium inhalation in adolescents. This exploratory investigation examined the prevalence and correlates of helium inhalation in a large sample of at-risk youth. Study participants were 723 Missouri adolescents (M age = 15.5, SD = 1.2) in residential treatment for delinquent behavior. More than one-in-nine (N = 81, 11.5%) adolescents had inhaled helium with the intention of getting high, and one-third (N = 27, 34.2%) of helium users reported they actually did get high when they inhaled helium. Helium users were significantly more likely to be Caucasian, to live in rural/small town areas, and to have histories of mental illness, auditory hallucinations, and alcohol and marijuana use than nonusers. Helium users also reported significantly more current psychiatric distress, suicidality, traumatic life experiences, and antisocial attitudes, traits, and behaviors than nonusers. Helium inhalation was prevalent in this sample and many such users reported getting high while using helium. Helium users had psychosocial profiles similar to those of volatile solvent users, suggesting that they may be at substantial risk for a variety of adverse health outcomes.

  9. Trafficking in Meth: An Analysis of the Differences between Male and Female Dealers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senjo, Scott R.

    2005-01-01

    Male and female meth dealers exhibit numerous common characteristics and patterns. For example, both can be relatively heavy users and both have similar (long) criminal records. However, both groups show important distinctions in their drug dealing patterns. This exploratory study compares 34 male and 26 female meth dealers (N = 60) who were…

  10. The Association between Internet User Characteristics and Dimensions of Internet Addiction among Greek Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreou, Eleni; Svoli, Hionia

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how internet users' psychological characteristics, amount of internet use and demographic factors contribute to particular dimensions of internet addiction. The sample consisted of 384 adolescents, ranging in age from 15 to 18 years. Participants were asked to complete the Internet Addiction Test (IAT), measures of Locus of…

  11. Cortical thickness in adolescent marijuana and alcohol users: A three-year prospective study from adolescence to young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Jacobus, Joanna; Squeglia, Lindsay M; Meruelo, Alejandro D; Castro, Norma; Brumback, Ty; Giedd, Jay N; Tapert, Susan F

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest marijuana impacts gray and white matter neural tissue development, however few prospective studies have determined the relationship between cortical thickness and cannabis use spanning adolescence to young adulthood. This study aimed to understand how heavy marijuana use influences cortical thickness trajectories across adolescence. Subjects were adolescents with heavy marijuana use and concomitant alcohol use (MJ+ALC, n=30) and controls (CON, n=38) with limited substance use histories. Participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging and comprehensive substance use assessment at three independent time points. Repeated measures analysis of covariance was used to look at main effects of group, time, and Group × Time interactions on cortical thickness. MJ+ALC showed thicker cortical estimates across the brain (23 regions), particularly in frontal and parietal lobes (ps<.05). More cumulative marijuana use was associated with increased thickness estimates by 3-year follow-up (ps<.05). Heavy marijuana use during adolescence and into young adulthood may be associated with altered neural tissue development and interference with neuromaturation that can have neurobehavioral consequences. Continued follow-up of adolescent marijuana users will help understand ongoing neural changes that are associated with development of problematic use into adulthood, as well as potential for neural recovery with cessation of use.

  12. The Importance of Family Relations for Cannabis Users: The Case of Serbian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    TERZIC SUPIC, Zorica; SANTRIC MILICEVIC, Milena; SBUTEGA, Isidora; VASIC, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Background Adolescence is transitional stage of physical and mental human development occuring between childhood and adult life. Social interactions and environmental factors together are important predictors of adolescent cannabis use. This study aimed to examine the relationship between the social determinants and adolescents behavior with cannabis consumption. Methods: A cross sectional study as part of the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and other Drugs was conducted among 6.150 adolescents aged 16 years in three regions of Serbia, and three types of schools (gymnasium, vocational – professional, and vocational – handicraft) during May – June 2008. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out to obtain adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals in which the dependent variable was cannabis consumption non-user and user. Results: Among 6.7% of adolescents who had tried cannabis at least one in their lives, boys were more involved in cannabis use than girls, especially boys from gymnasium school. Well off family, lower education of mother, worse relations with parents were significantly associated with cannabis use (P < 0.05). Behaviors like skipping from schools, frequent evening outs, and playing on slot machines were also related to cannabis use (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The study confirmed the importance of family relationship development. Drug use preventive programmes should include building interpersonal trust in a family lifecycle and school culture. PMID:23641402

  13. Risk perceptions of smokeless tobacco among adolescents and adult users and nonusers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sherry T.; Nemeth, Julianna M.; Klein, Elizabeth G.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Kwan, Mei-Po; Wewers, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth in smokeless tobacco (ST) consumption has raised questions about consumer risk perceptions of ST products, especially in high-risk vulnerable populations. This qualitative study examined risk perceptions of ST among adolescent and adult users and non-users in Ohio Appalachia. Focus groups and interviews were held with adolescents (n=53; mean age of 17 years) and adults (n=63; mean age of 34 years) from four Ohio Appalachian counties. Participants were asked about their perceptions of ST-related health risks, ST safety, and the relative safety of ST compared to cigarettes. Transcriptions were coded independently by two individuals. Overall, participants were knowledgeable about health problems from ST use (e.g., oral cancers, periodontal disease). Nearly all participants stated that ST use is not safe; however, there was disagreement about its relative safety. Some perceived all tobacco products as equally harmful; others believed that ST is safer than cigarettes for either the user or those around the user. Disagreements about ST relative safety may reflect mixed public health messages concerning the safety of ST. Comprehensive consumer messages about the relative safety of ST compared to cigarettes are needed. Messages should address the effect of ST on the health of the user as well as those exposed to the user. PMID:25832126

  14. Craving is associated with amygdala volumes in adolescent marijuana users during abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Padula, Claudia B.; McQueeny, Tim; Lisdahl, Krista M.; Price, Jenessa S.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Amygdala volume abnormalities have been reported in relation to craving in substance-dependent adults, but it remains unclear if these effects are seen in adolescent marijuana (MJ) users, particularly following abstinence. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between amygdala volume and craving during 28 days of abstinence in adolescent MJ users. Methods MJ-using adolescents (n = 22) aged 16–19 were recruited as part of a larger study on brain function in teen drug users. Craving measures were collected twice per week throughout a 28-day abstinence period. High-resolution anatomical magnetic resonance imaging data were collected at the end of the 28 days of confirmed abstinence. Left and right amygdala volumes were traced by hand (ICC>0.86). Composite scores for self-reported craving and withdrawal symptoms throughout the 28-day abstinence period were calculated to provide four composite measures of total craving, mood, sleep, and somatic complaints. Results Results revealed that greater craving during abstinence was significantly associated with smaller left and right amygdala volumes, after controlling for age and gender. Other measures of withdrawal, including mood, somatic complaints and sleep problems, were not related to amygdala morphometry. Conclusion These results are consistent with previous findings in adult alcohol-and cocaine-dependent individuals, who demonstrated a relationship between reduced amygdala volumes and increased craving. Future studies are needed to determine if these brain-behavior relationships are attributable to MJ use or predate the onset of substance use. PMID:25668330

  15. Mental Health Characteristics and Health-Seeking Behaviors of Adolescent School-Based Health Center Users and Nonusers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaral, Gorette; Geierstanger, Sara; Soleimanpour, Samira; Brindis, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to compare the mental health risk profile and health utilization behaviors of adolescent school-based health center (SBHC) users and nonusers and discuss the role that SBHCs can play in addressing adolescent health needs. Methods: The sample included 4640 students in grades 9 and 11 who completed the…

  16. Follow-up of adolescent oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Delmore, T; Kalagian, W F; Loewen, I R

    1991-01-01

    Clients in birth control centers (St. Catharines, Niagara Falls, and Welland) in Ontario, Canada were profiled in 1989; factors affecting compliance with the use of oral contraceptives (OCs) were investigated. Compliance was assessed for those 16 years and after 3 months of OC use. A control group and 2 study groups were randomly formed. 1 group was told about a follow up telephone call if the 3-month checkup appointment was not kept and the other not told. Compliance was determined by keeping the follow-up appointment and taking the pill as directed. Self-administered questionnaires were obtained at the 1st appointment and the 2nd study group was interviewed at the 3-month appointment time. Of the 334 intake interviews, 28.4% were adolescents 16 years old. Information on birth control came most frequently from friends (78.7%; then high school classmates, 61.4% grade school classmates, 61.4%; and family, 38.0%). 94.3% had a boyfriend, primarily a steady one. 82.4% were sexually active before the Center visit. 21.3% had had sex when 15 years old. 9.2% of those sexually active had never used birth control. 85.2% of those using contraception had used a condom at least once, and 33.9% used withdrawal. In the preceding month, birth control was used 60% of the time. 46% of mothers and 25% of fathers were considered supportive of birth control. 228 16 years participated in the compliance study. The 2 study groups and the control group were not significantly different in their compliance. The only statistically significant predictor of compliance (from the intake interview) was the previous use of the condom. Those more likely to be compliant were the 10.9% sexually active who had never used a condom. Continuing with the family doctor, not sexually active, advice to stop, side effects concerns, and remembering to take the pill were the most common reasons for noncompliance. The implication for health and sex education is that emphasis needs to the placed on the risks taken

  17. The Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach for Adolescent Cannabis Users, Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godley, Susan Harrington; Meyers, Robert J.; Smith, Jane Ellen; Karvinen, Tracy; Titus, Janet C.; Godley, Mark D.; Dent, George; Passetti, Lora; Kelberg, Pamela

    This publication was written for therapists and their supervisors who may want to implement the adolescent community reinforcement approach intervention, which was one of the five interventions tested by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment's (CSAT's) Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Project. The CYT Project provided funding to support a study…

  18. A Statewide Profile of Frequent Users of School-Based Health Centers: Implications for Adolescent Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Kevin T.; Ramos, Mary M.; Fowler, Tara T.; Oreskovich, Kristin; McGrath, Jane; Fairbrother, Gerry

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to describe patterns of care and service use among adolescent school-based health center (SBHC) users in New Mexico and contrast patterns and services between frequent and infrequent users. Methods: Medical claims/encounter data were analyzed from 59 SBHCs located in secondary schools in New Mexico during…

  19. Internalizing and externalizing personality and subjective effects in a sample of adolescent cannabis users.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Sara; Matalí, Josep Lluís; Martín-Fernández, María; Pardo, Marta; Lleras, Maria; Castellano-Tejedor, Carmina; Haro, Josep Maria

    2016-10-06

    Cannabis is the illicit substance most widely used by adolescents. Certain personality traits such as impulsivity and sensation seeking, and the subjective effects experienced after substance use (e.g. euphoria or relaxation) have been identified as some of the main etiological factors of consumption. This study aims to categorize a sample of adolescent cannabis users based on their most dominant personality traits (internalizing and externalizing profile). Then, to make a comparison of both profiles considering a set of variables related to consumption, clinical severity and subjective effects experienced. From a cross-sectional design, 173 adolescents (104 men and 69 women) aged 13 to 18 asking for treatment for cannabis use disorder in an Addictive Behavior Unit (UCAD) from the hospital were recruited. For the assessment, an ad hoc protocol was employed to register consumption, the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) and the Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI) 49-item short form were also administered. Factor analysis suggested a two-profile solution: Introverted, Inhibited, Doleful, Dramatizing (-), Egotistic (-), Self-demeaning and Borderline tendency scales composed the internalizing profile, and Submissive (-), Unruly, Forceful, Conforming (-) and Oppositional scales composed the externalizing profile. The comparative analysis showed that the internalizing profile has higher levels of clinical severity and more subjective effects reported than the externalizing profile. These results suggest the need to design specific intervention strategies for each profile.

  20. Abstinent adolescent marijuana users show altered fMRI response during spatial working memory☆

    PubMed Central

    Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Schweinsburg, Brian C.; Park, Ann; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Marijuana is the most widely used illicit substance among teenagers, yet little is known about the possible neural influence of heavy marijuana use during adolescence. We previously demonstrated an altered functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity related to spatial working memory (SWM) among adolescents who were heavy users of after an average of 8 days of abstinence, but the persisting neural effects remain unclear. To characterize the potentially persisting neurocognitive effects of heavy marijuana use in adolescence, we examined fMRI response during SWM among abstinent marijuana-using teens. Participants were 15 MJ teens and 17 demographically similar non-using controls, ages 16–18. Teens underwent biweekly urine toxicology screens to ensure abstinence for 28 days before fMRI acquisition. Groups performed similarly on the SWM task, but MJ teens demonstrated lower activity in right dorsolateral prefrontal and occipital cortices, yet significantly more activation in right posterior parietal cortex. MJ teens showed abnormalities in brain response during a SWM task compared with controls, even after 1 month of abstinence. The activation pattern among MJ teens may reflect different patterns of utilization of spatial rehearsal and attention strategies, and could indicate altered neurodevelopment or persisting abnormalities associated with heavy marijuana use in adolescence. PMID:18356027

  1. 4-Meth-oxy-3-(meth-oxy-meth-yl)benzalde-hyde.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Chao; Sun, Jun; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Guang-Lin; Guo, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, C10H12O3, the dihedral angle between the benzene ring and the meth-oxy-methyl side chain is 9.7 (2)°. The O atom of the aldehyde group and the C atom of the meth-oxy group deviate from the plane of the ring by 0.039 (3) and 0.338 (4) Å, respectively. The only inter-molecular inter-actions are very weak C-H⋯π inter-actions.

  2. The Influence of Recency of Use on fMRI Response During Spatial Working Memory in Adolescent Marijuana Users

    PubMed Central

    Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; Schweinsburg, Brian C.; Medina, Krista Lisdahl; McQueeny, Tim; Brown, Sandra A.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Some neurocognitive recovery occurs within a month of abstinence from heavy marijuana use, yet functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revealed altered activation among recent and abstinent adult users. Here, we compared fMRI response during a spatial working memory (SWM) task between adolescent marijuana users with brief and sustained durations of abstinence. Participants were 13 recent users (2 – 7 days abstinent), 13 abstinent users (27 – 60 days abstinent), and 18 non-using controls, all ages 15 – 18. Groups were similar on demographics, had no psychiatric or medical disorders, and user groups were similar on substance histories. Teens performed a 2-back SWM task during fMRI. Groups performed similarly on the task, but recent users showed greater fMRI response in medial and left superior prefrontal cortices, as well as bilateral insula. Abstinent users had increased response in the right precentral gyrus (clusters ≥1328 μl, p<.05). This cross-sectional study did not examine changes in brain response among the same participants over time. Yet results suggests that adolescents who recently used marijuana show increased brain activity in regions associated with working memory updating and inhibition, compared to users with weeks to months of abstinence. This study preliminarily suggests that (1) recent marijuana use may disrupt neural connections associated with SWM and result in compensatory brain response, and (2) sustained abstinence from marijuana may be associated with improvements in SWM response among adolescents. PMID:21053763

  3. Influence of Handrim Wheelchair Propulsion Training in Adolescent Wheelchair Users, A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dysterheft, Jennifer L.; Rice, Ian M.; Rice, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Ten full-time adolescent wheelchair users (ages 13–18) completed a total of three propulsion trials on carpet and tile surfaces, at a self-selected velocity, and on a concrete surface, at a controlled velocity. All trials were performed in their personal wheelchair with force and moment sensing wheels attached bilaterally. The first two trials on each surface were used as pre-intervention control trials. The third trial was performed after receiving training on proper propulsion technique. Peak resultant force, contact angle, stroke frequency, and velocity were recorded during all trials for primary analysis. Carpet and tile trials resulted in significant increases in contact angle and peak total force with decreased stroke frequency after training. During the velocity controlled trials on concrete, significant increases in contact angle occurred, as well as decreases in stroke frequency after training. Overall, the use of a training video and verbal feedback may help to improve short-term propulsion technique in adolescent wheelchair users and decrease the risk of developing upper limb pain and injury. PMID:26042217

  4. Influence of handrim wheelchair propulsion training in adolescent wheelchair users, a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dysterheft, Jennifer L; Rice, Ian M; Rice, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    Ten full-time adolescent wheelchair users (ages 13-18) completed a total of three propulsion trials on carpet and tile surfaces, at a self-selected velocity, and on a concrete surface, at a controlled velocity. All trials were performed in their personal wheelchair with force and moment sensing wheels attached bilaterally. The first two trials on each surface were used as pre-intervention control trials. The third trial was performed after receiving training on proper propulsion technique. Peak resultant force, contact angle, stroke frequency, and velocity were recorded during all trials for primary analysis. Carpet and tile trials resulted in significant increases in contact angle and peak total force with decreased stroke frequency after training. During the velocity controlled trials on concrete, significant increases in contact angle occurred, as well as decreases in stroke frequency after training. Overall, the use of a training video and verbal feedback may help to improve short-term propulsion technique in adolescent wheelchair users and decrease the risk of developing upper limb pain and injury.

  5. Patterns of concurrent substance use among adolescent nonmedical ADHD stimulant users

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lian-Yu; Crum, Rosa M.; Strain, Eric C.; Martins, Silvia S.; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There are growing concerns about nonmedical use of ADHD stimulants among adolescents; yet, little is known whether there exist heterogeneous subgroups among adolescents with nonmedical ADHD stimulant use according to their concurrent substances use. Methods We used latent class analysis (LCA) to examine patterns of past-year problematic substance use (meeting any criteria for abuse or dependence) in a sample of 2,203 adolescent participants from the National Surveys on Drug Use and Health 2006–2011 who reported past-year nonmedical use of ADHD stimulants. Multivariable latent regression was used to assess the association of socio-demographic characteristics, mental health and behavioral problems with the latent classes. Results The model fit indices favored a four-class model, including a large class with frequent concurrent use of alcohol and marijuana (Alcohol/Marijuana class; 41.2%), a second large class with infrequent use of other substances (Low substance class, 36.3%), a third class characterized by more frequent misuse of prescription drugs as well as other substances (Prescription drug+ class; 14.8%), and finally a class characterized by problematic use of multiple substances (Multiple substance class; 7.7%). Compared with individuals in Low substance class, those in the other three classes were all more likely to report mental health problems, deviant behaviors and substance abuse service use. Conclusions Adolescent nonmedical ADHD stimulants users are a heterogeneous group with distinct classes with regard to concurrent substance use, mental health and behavioral problems. The findings have implications for planning of tailored prevention and treatment programs to curb stimulant use for this age group. PMID:26026384

  6. Prevalence of internet addiction and its association with stressful life events and psychological symptoms among adolescent internet users.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Yu, Yizhen; Du, Yukai; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Dongying; Wang, Jiaji

    2014-03-01

    Internet addiction (IA) among adolescents is a serious public health problem around the world. However, there have been few studies that examine the association between IA and stressful life events and psychological symptoms among Chinese adolescent internet users. We examined the association between IA and stressful life events and psychological symptoms among a random sample of school students who were internet users (N=755) in Wuhan, China. Internet addiction, stressful life events, coping style and psychological symptoms were measured by self-rated scales. The prevalence rate of internet addiction was 6.0% among adolescent internet users. Logistic regression analyses indicated that stressors from interpersonal problem and school related problem and anxiety symptoms were significantly associated with IA after controlling for demographic characteristics. Analyses examining the coping style with the IA revealed that negative coping style may mediate the effects of stressful life events to increase the risk of IA. However, no significant interaction of stressful life events and psychological symptoms was found. These findings of the current study indicate a high prevalence of internet addiction among Chinese adolescent internet users and highlight the importance of stressors from interpersonal problem and school related problem as a risk factor for IA which mainly mediated through negative coping style.

  7. Traffic injury mortality trends in children and adolescents in Lithuania among road users.

    PubMed

    Strukcinskiene, Birute; Uğur-Baysal, Serpil; Raistenskis, Juozas

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes traffic mortality trends among road users from 1998 to 2012 in children and adolescents aged 0-19 years in Lithuania. National mortality data of pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists, and car occupants were used to compare trend lines. The study revealed that 56% of the deceased in road traffic crashes were car occupants, while 24% were pedestrians. The incidence of death from traffic injury was 2.5 times higher in boys than girls. Traffic injury mortality and pedestrian mortality rates declined significantly in the total group. There was also a significant decline in mortality among cyclists for the total group and female subgroup. Trends in mortality rates among motorcyclists and car occupants showed no significant changes. A long-term decline is more likely to be affected by efforts in the promotion of sustainable and permanent road safety. The reduced risk exposure may also have been influenced by the economic recession.

  8. Does information matter? The effect of the Meth Project on meth use among youths.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D Mark

    2010-09-01

    Are demand-side interventions effective at curbing drug use? To the extent demand-side programs are successful, their cost effectiveness can be appealing from a policy perspective. Established in 2005, the Montana Meth Project (MMP) employs a graphic advertising campaign to deter meth use among teens. Due to the MMP's apparent success, seven other states have adopted Meth Project campaigns. Using data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS), this paper investigates whether the MMP reduced methamphetamine use among Montana's youth. When accounting for a preexisting downward trend in meth use, effects on meth use are statistically indistinguishable from zero. These results are robust to using related changes of meth use among individuals without exposure to the campaign as controls in a difference-in-difference framework. A complementary analysis of treatment admissions data from the Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) confirms the MMP has had no discernable impact on meth use.

  9. Dimensions of Treatment Quality Most Valued by Adolescent Substance Users and their Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sara J; Midoun, Miriam M; Zeithaml, Valarie A; Clark, Melissa A; Spirito, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Professional psychologists are increasingly encouraged to document and evaluate the quality of the treatment they provide. However, there is a significant gap in knowledge about the extent to which extant definitions of treatment quality converge with patient perceptions. The primary goal of this study was to examine how adolescent substance users (ASU) and their caregivers perceive treatment quality. The secondary goal was to determine how these perceptions align with expert-derived definitions of ASU treatment quality and dimensions of perceived quality used frequently in other service disciplines. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 24 ASU and 29 caregivers to explore how participants conceptualize a quality treatment experience. Content analysis identified three major dimensions of perceived treatment quality, each of which contained three sub-dimensions: Therapeutic Relationship (i.e., Acceptance, Caring, Connection), Provider Characteristics (i.e., Experience, Communication Skills, Accessibility), and Treatment Approach (i.e., Integrated Care, Use of Structure, and Parent Involvement). Results revealed modest convergence between patient perceptions and existing definitions of quality, with several meaningful discrepancies. Most notably, the Therapeutic Relationship was the most important dimension to ASU and their caregivers, while expert-derived definitions emphasized the Treatment Approach. Implications for practicing psychologists to enhance training and supervision, quality improvement, and health education initiatives are discussed.

  10. Dimensions of Treatment Quality Most Valued by Adolescent Substance Users and their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Sara J.; Midoun, Miriam M.; Zeithaml, Valarie A.; Clark, Melissa A.; Spirito, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Professional psychologists are increasingly encouraged to document and evaluate the quality of the treatment they provide. However, there is a significant gap in knowledge about the extent to which extant definitions of treatment quality converge with patient perceptions. The primary goal of this study was to examine how adolescent substance users (ASU) and their caregivers perceive treatment quality. The secondary goal was to determine how these perceptions align with expert-derived definitions of ASU treatment quality and dimensions of perceived quality used frequently in other service disciplines. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 24 ASU and 29 caregivers to explore how participants conceptualize a quality treatment experience. Content analysis identified three major dimensions of perceived treatment quality, each of which contained three sub-dimensions: Therapeutic Relationship (i.e., Acceptance, Caring, Connection), Provider Characteristics (i.e., Experience, Communication Skills, Accessibility), and Treatment Approach (i.e., Integrated Care, Use of Structure, and Parent Involvement). Results revealed modest convergence between patient perceptions and existing definitions of quality, with several meaningful discrepancies. Most notably, the Therapeutic Relationship was the most important dimension to ASU and their caregivers, while expert-derived definitions emphasized the Treatment Approach. Implications for practicing psychologists to enhance training and supervision, quality improvement, and health education initiatives are discussed. PMID:27524856

  11. Social Representations Used by the Parents of Mexican Adolescent Drug Users under Treatment to Explain Their Children's Drug Use: Gender Differences in Parental Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuno-Gutierrez, Bertha Lidia; Alvarez-Nemegyei, Jose; Rodriguez-Cerda, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the social representations used by the parents of adolescent drug users to explain the onset of drug use. Differences in explanations between the parents of male and female adolescents were also explored. Sixty parents who accompanied their children to four rehabilitation centers in 2004 completed two…

  12. Poly(meth)acrylate-based coatings.

    PubMed

    Nollenberger, Kathrin; Albers, Jessica

    2013-12-05

    Poly(meth)acrylate coatings for pharmaceutical applications were introduced in 1955 with the launch of EUDRAGIT(®) L and EUDRAGIT(®) S, two types of anionic polymers. Since then, by introducing various monomers into their polymer chains and thus altering their properties, diverse forms with specific characteristics have become available. Today, poly(meth)acrylates function in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract and/or release the drug in a time-controlled manner. This article reviews the properties of various poly(meth)acrylates and discusses formulation issues as well as application possibilities.

  13. Effects of Parental Use of Meth on Children in My Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKellar, Nancy A.

    2009-01-01

    Of all the videos that the author shows in psychopathology class, the one that her graduate students invariably find the most disturbing is "Crank: Made in America" (Yates, 2003). Long-time users of methamphetamine (meth) candidly tell their stories in this HBO film. The author still finds it very unsettling to watch it, even though she…

  14. The Meth Project and Teen Meth Use: New Estimates from the National and State Youth Risk Behavior Surveys.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D Mark; Elsea, David

    2015-12-01

    In this note, we use data from the national and state Youth Risk Behavior Surveys for the period 1999 through 2011 to estimate the relationship between the Meth Project, an anti-methamphetamine advertising campaign, and meth use among high school students. During this period, a total of eight states adopted anti-meth advertising campaigns. After accounting for pre-existing downward trends in meth use, we find little evidence that the campaign curbed meth use in the full sample. We do find, however, some evidence that the Meth Project may have decreased meth use among White high school students.

  15. A Longitudinal Study of Speech Perception Skills and Device Characteristics of Adolescent Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Elizabeth J.; Davidson, Lisa S.; Uchanski, Rosalie M.; Brenner, Christine M.; Geers, Ann E.

    2012-01-01

    Background For pediatric cochlear implant (CI) users, CI processor technology, map characteristics and fitting strategies are known to have a substantial impact on speech perception scores at young ages. It is unknown whether these benefits continue over time as these children reach adolescence. Purpose To document changes in CI technology, map characteristics, and speech perception scores in children between elementary grades and high school, and to describe relations between map characteristics and speech perception scores over time. Research Design A longitudinal design with participants 8–9 years old at session 1 and 15–18 years old at session 2. Study Sample Participants were 82 adolescents with unilateral CIs, who are a subset of a larger longitudinal study. Mean age at implantation was 3.4 years (range: 1.7 – 5.4), and mean duration of device use was 5.5 years (range: 3.8–7.5) at session 1 and 13.3 years (range: 10.9–15) at session 2. Data Collection and Analysis Speech perception tests at sessions 1 and 2 were the Lexical Neighborhood word Test (LNT-70) and Bamford-Kowal-Bench sentences in quiet (BKB-Q), presented at 70 dB SPL. At session 2, the LNT was also administered at 50 dB SPL (LNT-50) and BKB sentences were administered in noise with a +10 dB SNR (BKB-N). CI processor technology type and CI map characteristics (coding strategy, number of electrodes, map threshold levels [T levels], and map comfort levels [C levels]) were obtained at both sessions. Electrical dynamic range [EDR] was computed [C level – T level], and descriptive statistics, correlations, and repeated-measures ANOVAs were employed. Results Participants achieved significantly higher LNT and BKB scores, at 70 dB SPL, at ages 15-18 than at ages 8-9 years. Forty-two participants had 1-3 electrodes either activated or deactivated in their map between test sessions, and 40 had no change in number of active electrodes (mean change: -0.5; range: -3 to +2). After conversion from

  16. Individual Characteristics of Adolescent Methamphetamine Users in Relation to Self-Reported Trouble with the Police

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gassman, Ruth; Nowicke, Carole E.; Jun, Mi Kung

    2010-01-01

    Survey responses by nonexperimental drug users in grades 6-12 were examined to determine whether MA users and nonusers with shared individual characteristics experience differential rates of police trouble, and whether specific factors place some users at greater risk than others. Findings showed that police trouble is pronounced for MA users,…

  17. Are Adolescent Substance Users Less Satisfied with Life as Young Adults and if so, Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogart, Laura M.; Collins, Rebecca L.; Ellickson, Phyllis L.; Klein, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated whether adolescent cigarette, alcohol, marijuana, and hard drug use predicts life satisfaction in young adulthood. Survey data were used from a longitudinal cohort of 2376 adolescents at ages 18 and 29, originally recruited from California and Oregon middle schools at age 13. Results of multivariate models indicated…

  18. Surrender To Win: How Adolescent Drug and Alcohol Users Change Their Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Courtney; Long, Wesley

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the uniqueness and complexity of adolescent drug and alcohol abuse recovery, particularly the early years and events catalyzing the surrender process. Offers individual interviews of seven adolescents who surrendered their alcohol and drug addictions and constructed sober identities through participation in Alcoholics Anonymous. (GCP)

  19. Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Adolescent Marijuana Users: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Denise D.; Roffman, Roger A.; Stephens, Robert S.; Wakana, Kim; Berghuis, James

    2006-01-01

    This study's aims were (a) to investigate the feasibility of a school-based motivational enhancement therapy (MET) intervention in voluntarily attracting adolescents who smoke marijuana regularly but who are not seeking formal treatment and (b) to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention in reducing marijuana use. Ninety-seven adolescents who had…

  20. Family Support Network for Adolescent Cannabis Users, Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Nancy L.; Brantley, Laura Bunch; Tims, Frank M.; Angelovich, Nancy; McDougall, Barbara

    Substance-abusing adolescents experiencing inadequate family structure and functioning will be at a serious disadvantage with regard to recovery. The family support network (FSN) intervention seeks to extend the focus of treatment beyond the world of the adolescent by engaging the family, a major system in his or her life. Designed to increase…

  1. A Comparison of the Family Environments of Black Male and Female Adolescent Alcohol Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinson, Jesse A.

    1991-01-01

    Examined African-American adolescents' use of alcohol and their perceptions of their family environments. Alcohol-using adolescents (n=71) completed Family Environment Scale (FES). Analyses of data revealed that females differed significantly from males on 4 of 10 FES subscales. Findings support view that alcohol affects perception of family…

  2. Structural and Functional Imaging Studies in Chronic Cannabis Users: A Systematic Review of Adolescent and Adult Findings

    PubMed Central

    Batalla, Albert; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Yücel, Murat; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Crippa, Jose Alexandre; Nogué, Santiago; Torrens, Marta; Pujol, Jesús; Farré, Magí; Martin-Santos, Rocio

    2013-01-01

    Background The growing concern about cannabis use, the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide, has led to a significant increase in the number of human studies using neuroimaging techniques to determine the effect of cannabis on brain structure and function. We conducted a systematic review to assess the evidence of the impact of chronic cannabis use on brain structure and function in adults and adolescents. Methods Papers published until August 2012 were included from EMBASE, Medline, PubMed and LILACS databases following a comprehensive search strategy and pre-determined set of criteria for article selection. Only neuroimaging studies involving chronic cannabis users with a matched control group were considered. Results One hundred and forty-two studies were identified, of which 43 met the established criteria. Eight studies were in adolescent population. Neuroimaging studies provide evidence of morphological brain alterations in both population groups, particularly in the medial temporal and frontal cortices, as well as the cerebellum. These effects may be related to the amount of cannabis exposure. Functional neuroimaging studies suggest different patterns of resting global and brain activity during the performance of several cognitive tasks both in adolescents and adults, which may indicate compensatory effects in response to chronic cannabis exposure. Limitations However, the results pointed out methodological limitations of the work conducted to date and considerable heterogeneity in the findings. Conclusion Chronic cannabis use may alter brain structure and function in adult and adolescent population. Further studies should consider the use of convergent methodology, prospective large samples involving adolescent to adulthood subjects, and data-sharing initiatives. PMID:23390554

  3. Frequent Users of Pornography. A Population Based Epidemiological Study of Swedish Male Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svedin, Carl Goran; Akerman, Ingrid; Priebe, Gisela

    2011-01-01

    Frequent use of pornography has not been sufficiently studied before. In a Swedish survey 2015 male students aged 18 years participated. A group of frequent users of pornography (N = 200, 10.5%) were studied with respect to background and psychosocial correlates. The frequent users had a more positive attitude to pornography, were more often…

  4. Altered cortical maturation in adolescent cannabis users with and without schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Katherine A; Kumra, Sanjiv

    2015-03-01

    During late adolescence, progressive cortical thinning occurs in heteromodal association cortex (HASC) that is thought to subserve cognitive development. However, the impact of cannabis use disorder (CUD) upon cortical gray matter development in both healthy adolescents and adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) is unclear. T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired from 79 adolescents at baseline and after an 18-month follow-up: 17 with EOS, 17 with CUD, 11 with EOS+CUD, and 34 healthy controls (HC). Mean age at baseline was 16.4years (CUD+) and 17.0years (CUD-). Using FreeSurfer, measures of cortical thickness for ROIs within HASC were obtained. A 2 (EOS versus no EOS)×2 (CUD versus no CUD) multivariate analysis of covariance was applied to change scores from baseline to follow-up to test for main effects of EOS and CUD and an interaction effect. After adjusting for covariates, a significant main effect of CUD was observed. Adolescents with CUD showed an attenuated loss of cortical thickness in the left and right supramarginal, left and right inferior parietal, right pars triangularis, left pars opercularis, left superior frontal, and left superior temporal regions compared to non-using subjects. Stepwise linear regression analysis indicated that greater cumulative cannabis exposure predicted greater cortical thickness in both the left (p=.008) and right (p=.04) superior frontal gyri at study endpoint after adjusting for baseline cortical thickness for the entire sample. These preliminary longitudinal data demonstrate an atypical pattern of cortical development in HASC in adolescents with CUD relative to non-using subjects, across diagnostic groups. Additional studies are needed to replicate these data and to clarify the clinical significance of these findings.

  5. Peer Network Counseling with Urban Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Moderate Substance Users.

    PubMed

    Mason, Michael; Light, John; Campbell, Leah; Keyser-Marcus, Lori; Crewe, Stephanie; Way, Thomas; Saunders, Heather; King, Laura; Zaharakis, Nikola M; McHenry, Chantal

    2015-11-01

    Close peer networks can affect adolescents' health behaviors by altering their social environments, and thus their risk for and protection against substance use involvement. We tested a 20 minute intervention named Peer Network Counseling that integrates motivational interviewing and peer network strategies with 119 urban adolescents who reported occasional or problem substance use. Adolescents presenting at primary care clinic were randomized to intervention or control conditions and followed for 6 months. Mixed-effect latent growth models were used to evaluate intervention effects on trajectories of alcohol and marijuana use, offers to use substances, and moderation models to test for interactions between intervention condition and peer network characteristics. A significant intervention effect was found for boys for offers to use alcohol from friends (p<.05), along with a trend significant effect for alcohol use (p<.08). Intervention was more effective in reducing marijuana use, vs. control, for participants with more peer social support (p<.001) and with more peer encouragement for prosocial behavior (school, clubs, sports, religious activities); however, intervention did not affect these network characteristics. Results provide support to continue this line of research to test brief interventions that activate protective peer network characteristics among at-risk adolescents, while also raising some interesting gender-based intervention questions for future research.

  6. Reduction in Emergency Presentations by Adolescent Poly-Drug Users: A Case-Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tait, Robert J.; Hulse, Gary K.

    2005-01-01

    The objectives were, firstly, to describe the frequency and type of hospital emergency department (ED) admissions in a small number of alcohol and other drug (AOD) using adolescents who accounted for a high number of ED and other hospital presentations. Secondly, to identify interventions that impacted on these repeat ED presentations. An earlier…

  7. Service Users' Experiences of a Brief Intervention Service for Children and Adolescents: A Service Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Jen; Schlösser, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Ten per cent of young people experience mental health difficulties at any one time. Prevention and early intervention leads to better prognosis for young people's mental well-being in the short and long term. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) must be able to provide swift and effective interventions for a range of difficulties to…

  8. Under Pressure: Adolescent Substance Users Show Exaggerated Neural Processing of Aversive Interoceptive Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Lotte; Stewart, Jennifer L.; May, April C.; Wiers, Reinout W.; Davenport, Paul W.; Paulus, Martin P.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Adolescents with substance use disorders (SUD) exhibit hyposensitivity to pleasant internally generated (interoceptive) stimuli and hypersensitivity to external rewarding stimuli. It is unclear whether similar patterns exist for aversive interoceptive stimuli. We compared activation in the insular cortex and other brain regions during the anticipation and experience of aversive stimuli between adolescents with SUD and those without. Design and participants Cross-sectional experimental study with two groups: Adolescents (ages 15–17) with an alcohol or marijuana SUD (n=18) and healthy comparison subjects (CON, n=15). Participants were recruited by distributing flyers at local high schools. Setting Keck Imaging Center, University of California San Diego, USA. Measurements Behavioral and neural responses to a continuous performance task with inspiratory breathing load recorded during an fMRI session. Questionnaires assessed lifetime drug use, anxiety, sensation seeking, impulsivity, affect, and bodily awareness. Visual analogue scales assessed drug craving and breathing load responses. Findings Across subjects, experience of breathing load elicited greater bilateral anterior and posterior insula (AI and PI, respectively) activation than anticipation (F(1,31)=4.16, p<.05). SUD exhibited greater left AI and bilateral PI activation during breathing load than anticipation, compared with CON (F(1,31)=4.16, p<.05). In contrast, CON showed greater activation during anticipation than breathing load in left PI, compared with SUD (F(1,31)=4.16, p<.05). Conclusions Adolescents with alcohol and marijuana substance use disorders may be hypersensitive to aversive interoceptive stimuli. PMID:26234745

  9. Social Support among Late Adolescent Users of Alcohol and Other Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmon, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of data on 1,121 older adolescents and young adults from a national longitudinal survey examined effects of community involvement, social satisfaction, social network size, race, gender, and age on use of alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine. Social support did influence use of alcohol and other drugs, but the direction of influence varied by…

  10. Examining Correlates of Methamphetamine and Other Drug Use in Pregnant American Indian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Allison; Mullany, Britta C.; Neault, Nicole; Davis, Yvonne; Billy, Trudy; Hastings, Ranelda; Coho-Mescal, Valerie; Lake, Kristin; Powers, Julia; Clouse, Emily; Reid, Raymond; Walkup, John T.

    2010-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents have high rates of pregnancy, as well as alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and, increasingly, methamphetamine (meth) use. The progression of adolescent drug use to meth use could have devastating impacts on AI communities, particularly when youth are simultaneously at risk for teen childbearing. In…

  11. Bis(6-meth-oxy-2-{[tris-(hydroxy-meth-yl)methyl-κO]imino-meth-yl}phenolato-κN,O)nickel(II) dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Zhou, Ru-Jin; An, Zhe

    2009-06-17

    In the title compound, [Ni(C(12)H(16)NO(5))(2)]·2H(2)O, the Ni(II) atom is coordinated by four O atoms and two N atoms from the two 6-meth-oxy-2-{[tris-(hydroxy-meth-yl)meth-yl]imino-meth-yl}phenolate ligands in a distorted octa-hedral coordination geometry. O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the complexes and uncoordinated water mol-ecules into two-dimensional networks parallel to (001).

  12. [Psychosocial Care Centers for Children and Adolescents in Brazil: geographic distribution and user profile].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Grey Yuliet Ceballos; Santos, Darci Neves; Machado, Daiane Borges

    2015-12-01

    Few Brazilian studies have addressed the use of mental health services for children and adolescents. This study aimed to characterize the national distribution of Psychosocial Care Centers for Children and Adolescents (CAPSi) and describe the patient profile in this age group between 2008 and 2012. An ecological study was carried out, using records from the Authorizations for High-Complexity Procedures (APAC) system and the Brazilian National Registry of Healthcare Organizations (CNES). Socio-demographics and disease profile were analyzed. In 2014, 208 CAPSi were recorded in the CNES, distributed across 23 of Brazil's 27 states. Treatments included predominantly behavioral disorders (29.7%), developmental disorders (23.6%), and mental retardation (12.5%). CAPSi are insufficient and unequally distributed. The disease profile suggests the need for linkage between specialized mental health services and primary care, in addition to the inclusion of inter-sector work.

  13. Focus Groups of Alaska Native Adolescent Tobacco Users: Preferences for Tobacco Cessation Interventions and Barriers to Participation

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Christi A.; Enoch, Carrie; Renner, Caroline C.; Offord, Kenneth P.; Nevak, Caroline; Kelley, Stacy F.; Thomas, Janet; Decker, Paul A.; Hurt, Richard D.; Lanier, Anne; Kaur, Judith S.

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco cessation interventions developed for Alaska Native adolescents do not exist. This study employed focus group methodology to explore preferences for tobacco cessation interventions and barriers to participation among 49 Alaska Natives (61% female) with a mean age of 14.6 (SD = 1.6) who resided in western Alaska. Using content analysis, themes from the 12 focus groups were found to be consistent across village, gender, and age groups. Program location or site (e.g., away from the village, hunting, fishing), a group-based format, and inclusion of medication and personal stories were reported to be important attributes of cessation programs. Motivators to quit tobacco were the perceived adverse health effects of tobacco, improved self-image and appearance, and the potential to be a future role model as a non–tobacco user for family and friends. Parents were perceived as potentially supportive to the adolescent in quitting tobacco. The findings will be used to develop tobacco cessation programs for Alaska Native youth. PMID:18048549

  14. Frequent users of pornography. A population based epidemiological study of Swedish male adolescents.

    PubMed

    Svedin, Carl Göran; Akerman, Ingrid; Priebe, Gisela

    2011-08-01

    Frequent use of pornography has not been sufficiently studied before. In a Swedish survey 2015 male students aged 18 years participated. A group of frequent users of pornography (N = 200, 10.5%) were studied with respect to background and psychosocial correlates. The frequent users had a more positive attitude to pornography, were more often "turned on" viewing pornography and viewed more often advanced forms of pornography. Frequent use was also associated with many problem behaviours. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that frequent users of pornography were more likely to be living in a large city, consuming alcohol more often, having greater sexual desire and had more often sold sex than other boys of the same age. High frequent viewing of pornography may be seen as a problematic behaviour that needs more attention from both parents and teachers and also to be addressed in clinical interviews.

  15. Mephedrone in adolescent rats: residual memory impairment and acute but not lasting 5-HT depletion.

    PubMed

    Motbey, Craig P; Karanges, Emily; Li, Kong M; Wilkinson, Shane; Winstock, Adam R; Ramsay, John; Hicks, Callum; Kendig, Michael D; Wyatt, Naomi; Callaghan, Paul D; McGregor, Iain S

    2012-01-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone, MMC) is a popular recreational drug, yet its potential harms are yet to be fully established. The current study examined the impact of single or repeated MMC exposure on various neurochemical and behavioral measures in rats. In Experiment 1 male adolescent Wistar rats received single or repeated (once a day for 10 days) injections of MMC (30 mg/kg) or the comparator drug methamphetamine (METH, 2.5 mg/kg). Both MMC and METH caused robust hyperactivity in the 1 h following injection although this effect did not tend to sensitize with repeated treatment. Striatal dopamine (DA) levels were increased 1 h following either METH or MMC while striatal and hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) levels were decreased 1 h following MMC but not METH. MMC caused greater increases in 5-HT metabolism and greater reductions in DA metabolism in rats that had been previously exposed to MMC. Autoradiographic analysis showed no signs of neuroinflammation ([(125)I]CLINDE ligand used as a marker for translocator protein (TSPO) expression) with repeated exposure to either MMC or METH. In Experiment 2, rats received repeated MMC (7.5, 15 or 30 mg/kg once a day for 10 days) and were examined for residual behavioral effects following treatment. Repeated high (30 mg/kg) dose MMC produced impaired novel object recognition 5 weeks after drug treatment. However, no residual changes in 5-HT or DA tissue levels were observed at 7 weeks post-treatment. Overall these results show that MMC causes acute but not lasting changes in DA and 5-HT tissue concentrations. MMC can also cause long-term memory impairment. Future studies of cognitive function in MMC users are clearly warranted.

  16. Mephedrone in Adolescent Rats: Residual Memory Impairment and Acute but Not Lasting 5-HT Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Motbey, Craig P.; Karanges, Emily; Li, Kong M.; Wilkinson, Shane; Winstock, Adam R.; Ramsay, John; Hicks, Callum; Kendig, Michael D.; Wyatt, Naomi; Callaghan, Paul D.; McGregor, Iain S.

    2012-01-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone, MMC) is a popular recreational drug, yet its potential harms are yet to be fully established. The current study examined the impact of single or repeated MMC exposure on various neurochemical and behavioral measures in rats. In Experiment 1 male adolescent Wistar rats received single or repeated (once a day for 10 days) injections of MMC (30 mg/kg) or the comparator drug methamphetamine (METH, 2.5 mg/kg). Both MMC and METH caused robust hyperactivity in the 1 h following injection although this effect did not tend to sensitize with repeated treatment. Striatal dopamine (DA) levels were increased 1 h following either METH or MMC while striatal and hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) levels were decreased 1 h following MMC but not METH. MMC caused greater increases in 5-HT metabolism and greater reductions in DA metabolism in rats that had been previously exposed to MMC. Autoradiographic analysis showed no signs of neuroinflammation ([125I]CLINDE ligand used as a marker for translocator protein (TSPO) expression) with repeated exposure to either MMC or METH. In Experiment 2, rats received repeated MMC (7.5, 15 or 30 mg/kg once a day for 10 days) and were examined for residual behavioral effects following treatment. Repeated high (30 mg/kg) dose MMC produced impaired novel object recognition 5 weeks after drug treatment. However, no residual changes in 5-HT or DA tissue levels were observed at 7 weeks post-treatment. Overall these results show that MMC causes acute but not lasting changes in DA and 5-HT tissue concentrations. MMC can also cause long-term memory impairment. Future studies of cognitive function in MMC users are clearly warranted. PMID:23029034

  17. [Satisfaction with child and adolescent mental health services by user and clinician sex].

    PubMed

    Bunge, Eduardo L; Barilá, Carina V; Sánchez, Natalia A; Maglio, Ana L

    2014-01-01

    Client Satisfaction with mental health services is an important aspect in the evaluation of quality of those services. In youth mental health field, a few studies had being made about this characteristic. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between satisfaction of parents, children and adolescents according to sex of patients and therapists. The sample included 382 subjects who attended to Buenos Aires private services who completed the questionnaire of experiences with the service. The results in teenagers' group showed differences in the satisfaction with the service matching the sex of teenagers with the sex of therapist, however in children and parent groups we haven't found significant differences. We discuss the implications of the results in order to improve the services given in youth area.

  18. Patterns of Oral Contraceptive Pill-taking and Condom Use among Adolescent Contraceptive Pill Users

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Jennifer L.; Shew, Marcia L.; Tu, Wanzhu; Ofner, Susan; Ott, Mary A.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Imperfect oral contraceptive pill (OCP) regimen adherence may impair contraceptive effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to describe daily adherence patterns of OCP use, to analyze OCP protection on an event level basis, and to examine pill-taking and condom use during method transitions. Methods Women (n = 123, ages 14–17 years) completed quarterly interviews to classify OCP method choice into four categories: stable, initiated, stopped, and discordant use. Within each OCP category, daily diaries were used to assess occurrence of coitus, condom use, and patterns of day-to-day OCP use (i.e., consecutive days of OCP use reported with no more than two consecutive days of nonuse). A coital event was OCP protected if pills were used on both the day of the coitus and the day preceding. Results There were 123 participants who reported at least some OCP use in 210 diary periods (average diary length = 75.5 days). Fifty-three participants categorized as stable users reported 87 diary periods: the average interval of consecutive OCP use in this group was 32.5 days. Among stable users, only 45% of coital events were associated with both OCP and condom use. Over one-fifth of coital events in all groups were protected by no method of contraception. Conclusion Dual use of OCP and barrier contraception remains an elusive goal. The time during OCP adoption or discontinuation is often unprotected by condoms. However, concurrent missed pills and condom nonuse increase pregnancy and infection risk even among stable OCP users. Understanding motivation for method usage may improve education and prevention techniques. PMID:16919800

  19. Promoting Reduced and Discontinued Substance Use among Adolescent Substance Users: Effectiveness of a Universal Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Nieri, Tanya; Yabiku, Scott; Stromwall, Layne K.; Marsiglia, Flavio Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to address youth substance use have focused on prevention among non-users and treatment among severe users with less attention given to youth occupying the middle ground who have used substances but not yet progressed to serious abuse or addiction. Using a sample from 35 middle schools of 1,364 youth who reported using substances, this study examined the effectiveness of a universal youth substance use prevention program, the SAMHSA Model Program keepin’ it REAL, in promoting reduced or recently discontinued alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use. Discrete-time event history methods modeled the rates of reduced and recently discontinued use across four waves of data. Each substance (alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana) was modeled separately. Beginning at the second wave, participants who reported use at wave 1 were considered at risk of reducing or discontinuing use. Since the data sampled students in schools, multi-level models accounted for the nesting of data at the school level. Results indicated that prevention program participation influenced the rates of reduced and recently discontinued use only for alcohol, controlling for baseline use severity, age, grades, socioeconomic status, ethnicity and gender. Among youth who reported use of alcohol in wave 1 (N= 1,028), the rate of reducing use for program participants was 72% higher than the rate for control students. The rate of discontinuing use was 66% higher than the rate for control students. Among youth who reported use of one or more of the three substances in wave 1 (N = 1,364), the rate of discontinuing all use was 61% higher for program participants than for control students. Limitations and implications of these findings and plans for further research are discussed. PMID:17096196

  20. 4-Meth-oxy-benzamidinium bromide.

    PubMed

    Irrera, Simona; Portalone, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The title salt, C8H11N2O(+)·Br(-), was synthesized by the reaction between 4-meth-oxy-benzamidine (4-amidino-anisole) and hydro-bromic acid. In the cation, the amidinium group has two similar C-N bonds [1.304 (2) and 1.316 (2) Å], and its plane forms a dihedral angle of 31.08 (5)° with the benzene ring. The ions are associated in the crystal into a three-dimension hydrogen-bonded supra-molecular network featuring N-H(+)⋯Br(-) inter-actions.

  1. Cognitive functioning in children and adolescents in their first episode of psychosis: differences between previous cannabis users and nonusers.

    PubMed

    de la Serna, Elena; Mayoral, María; Baeza, Inmaculada; Arango, Celso; Andrés, Patricia; Bombin, Igor; González, Cristina; Rapado, Marta; Robles, Olalla; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Jose Manuel; Zabala, Arantzazu; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between cognition and prior cannabis use in children and adolescents presenting a first episode of psychosis. A total of 107 patients with first episode of psychosis and 96 healthy controls, aged 9 to 17 years, were interviewed about their previous substance use and to assess their cognitive functions. Patients were assessed while not using cannabis by means of a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. They were divided into 2 groups depending on the history of prior cannabis use: cannabis users (CU) and cannabis nonusers (CNU). Significant differences were found in all areas evaluated between the 3 groups. Both CU and CNU patients obtained lower scores than controls on verbal learning and memory and working memory. Patients with prior cannabis use performed better on some tests of attention (Continuous performance test (CPT) number of correct responses, p = 0.002; CPT average reaction time, p < 0.001) and executive functions (Trail Making Test, part B (TMT-B) number of mistakes, p < 0.001; Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) number of categories completed, p < 0.001) than CNU patients. CU patients performed better than CNU subjects on some cognitive measures. This may indicate lower individual vulnerability for psychosis in CU patients in whom cannabis use can be a precipitating factor of psychotic episodes.

  2. Cycloolefin effect in cycloolefin-(meth)acryl copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun Soon; Seo, Dong Chul; Lee, Chang Soo; Park, Sang Wok; Kim, Sang Jin; Shin, Dae Hyeon; Shin, Jin Bong; Park, Joo Hyun

    2008-11-01

    One of the most important factors in ArF resist development is a resin platform, which dominates a lot of parts of resist characteristics. It has been much changed in order to improve their physical properties such as resolution, pattern profile, etch resistance and line edge roughness. Through the low etch resistance in ArF initial (meth)acryl type copolymer and low transmittance in COMA type copolymer most researchers were interested in developing of (meth)acryl type copolymer again for ArF photoresist. On the other hand, we have studied various polymer platforms suitable ArF photoresist except for meth(acryl) type copolymer. As a result of this study we had developed ROMA type polymers and cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymers. Among the polymers cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymer has many attractions such as etch roughness, resist reflow which needs low glass transition temperature and solvent solubility. In this study, we intend to find out cycloolefin-(meth)acryl copolymer characteristics compared with (meth)acryl copolymer. And, we have tried to find out any differences between acrylate type copolymer and cycloolefin-(meth)acrylate type copolymer with various evaluation results. As a result of this study we are going to talk about the reason that the resist using acrylate type copolymer and cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymer show good pattern profile while acrylate type copolymer show poor pattern profile. We also intend to explain the role of cycloolefin as a function of molecular weight variation and substitution ratio variation of cycloolefin in cycloolefin-(meth)acrylate resin.One of the most important factors in ArF resist development is a resin platform, which dominates a lot of parts of resist characteristics. It has been much changed in order to improve their physical properties such as resolution, pattern profile, etch resistance and line edge roughness. Through the low etch resistance in ArF initial (meth)acryl type copolymer and low

  3. Independent and co-morbid HIV infection and Meth use disorders on oxidative stress markers in the cerebrospinal fluid and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Panee, Jun; Pang, Xiaosha; Munsaka, Sody; Berry, Marla J; Chang, Linda

    2015-03-01

    Both HIV infection and Methamphetamine (Meth) use disorders are associated with greater depressive symptoms and oxidative stress; whether the two conditions would show additive or interactive effects on the severity of depressive symptoms, and whether this is related to the level of oxidative stress in the CNS is unknown. 123 participants were evaluated, which included 41 HIV-seronegative subjects without substance use disorders (Control), 25 with recent (<6 months) moderate to severe Meth use disorders (Meth), 34 HIV-seropositive subjects without substance use disorders (HIV) and 23 HIV+Meth subjects. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), and oxidative stress markers were evaluated with glutathione (GSH), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), and activities of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Compared with Controls, HIV subjects had higher levels of HNE (+350%) and GGT (+27%), and lower level of GSH (-34%), while Meth users had higher levels of GPx activity (+23%) and GSH (+30 %). GGT correlated with GPx, and with age, across all subjects (p < 0.0001). CES-D scores correlated with CSF HNE levels only in Control and HIV groups, but not in Meth and HIV+Meth groups. HIV and Meth use had an interactive effects on depressive symptoms, but did not show additive or interactive effects on oxidative stress. The differential relationship between depressive symptoms and oxidative stress response amongst the four groups suggest that depressive symptoms in these groups are mediated through different mechanisms which are not always related to oxidative stress.

  4. Spontaneous hybridization of macrophages and Meth A sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Busund, Lill-Tove R; Killie, Mette K; Bartnes, Kristian; Olsen, Randi; Seljelid, Rolf

    2002-04-01

    We present evidence of hybridization between Meth A sarcoma cells and syngeneic as well as semigeneic peritoneal macrophages. The resultant hybrids are characterized by morphology, membrane markers, ploidy, chromosomal content and functional features. Briefly, after a few days of coculture, cells appeared with morphology intermediate between the 2 original cell types. Typical macrophage surface molecules appeared in the hybrids. Meth A cells were labeled with red fluorescence and macrophages with green fluorescence. After 4 days in vitro, hybrids with yellow fluorescence appeared. Macrophages from BALB.K mice (H-2 K(k)) were cocultivated with Meth A cells from BALB/c mice (H-2 K(d)). The semigeneic hybrids displayed both specificities, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. The hybrids appeared moderately phagocytic, less so than the macrophages and markedly more so than the essentially nonphagocytic Meth A cells. The hybrids had a mean number of 76 chromosomes, as opposed to 53 in the Meth A cells and 40 in the macrophages. The macrophage DNA index was set at 1; Meth A cells were found to have an index of 1.6 in G1 phase, and the hybrids had a 2.6 index. The hybrids grew more slowly in vitro than Meth A cells, but grew faster in vivo.

  5. Social representations used by the parents of Mexican adolescent drug users under treatment to explain their children's drug use: gender differences in parental narratives.

    PubMed

    Nuño-Gutiérrez, Bertha Lidia; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José; Rodriguez-Cerda, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the social representations used by the parents of adolescent drug users to explain the onset of drug use. Differences in explanations between the parents of male and female adolescents were also explored. Sixty parents who accompanied their children to four rehabilitation centers in 2004 completed two semi-structured questionnaires. In addition, indepth interviews were applied to a subsample. The explanation of the drug use was carried out through two social representations: the neglectful family and the son or daughter as an inexperienced teen. The parents-son model was well structured; however, the parents-daughter was unstructured, which suggests a higher resonance in the familial group.

  6. rac-2-{[1-(1-Adamant-yl)eth-yl]imino-meth-yl}-5-meth-oxy-phenol.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xu-Dong; Wang, Hai-Bo; Jin, Yue-Hong

    2011-09-01

    A novel Schiff base compound, C(20)H(27)NO(2), was obtained by a condensation of rimantadine and 2-hy-droxy-4-meth-oxy-benzaldehyde. An intra-molecular O-H⋯N hydrogen bond supports the phenol-imine tautomeric form. The adamantane and imino-methyl-4-meth-oxy-phenol units are arranged in a folded conformation [C-N-C-C torsion angle = 110.9 (3)°]. In the crystal, highly hydro-phobic adamantane moieties are inserted between the imino-methyl-4-meth-oxy-phenol units in a sandwich-like arrangement along the c axis.

  7. The Uses and Effects of Video Viewing among Swedish Adolescents. An Ethnographic Study of Adolescent Video Users. Media Panel Report No. 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roe, Keith; Salomonsson, Karin

    This report is one in a series dealing with Swedish adolescents' uses of video based upon the Media Panel research program, a three-wave, longitudinal research program on video use conducted at the Department of Sociology, the University of Lund, and the Department for Information Techniques, the University College of Vaxjo, Sweden. Data were…

  8. Randomized controlled trial of motivational enhancement therapy with nontreatment-seeking adolescent cannabis users: a further test of the teen marijuana check-up.

    PubMed

    Walker, Denise D; Stephens, Robert; Roffman, Roger; Demarce, Josephine; Lozano, Brian; Towe, Sheri; Berg, Belinda

    2011-09-01

    Cannabis use adversely affects adolescents and interventions that are attractive to adolescents are needed. This trial compared the effects of a brief motivational intervention for cannabis use with a brief educational feedback control and a no-assessment control. Participants were randomized into one of three treatment conditions: Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET), Educational Feedback Control (EFC), or Delayed Feedback Control (DFC). Those who were assigned to MET and EFC were administered a computerized baseline assessment immediately following randomization and completed assessments at the 3- and 12-month follow-up periods. Participants in the DFC condition were not assessed until the 3-month follow-up. Following the completion of treatment sessions, all participants were offered up to four optional individual treatment sessions aimed at cessation of cannabis use. The research was conducted in high schools in Seattle, Washington. The participant s included 310 self-referred adolescents who smoked cannabis regularly. The main outcome measures included days of cannabis use, associated negative consequences, and engagement in additional treatment. At the 3-month follow-up, participants in both the MET and EFC conditions reported significantly fewer days of cannabis use and negative consequences compared to those in the DFC. The frequency of cannabis use was less in MET relative to EFC at 3 months, but it did not translate to differences in negative consequences. Reductions in use and problems were sustained at 12 months, but there were no differences between MET and EFC interventions. Engagement in additional treatment was minimal and did not differ by condition. Brief interventions can attract adolescent cannabis users and have positive impacts on them, but the mechanisms of the effects are yet to be identified.

  9. Poly(meth)acrylates obtained by cascade reaction.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Dragos; Keul, Helmut; Moeller, Martin

    2011-04-04

    Preparation, purification, and stabilization of functional (meth)acrylates with a high dipole moment are complex, laborious, and expensive processes. In order to avoid purification and stabilization of the highly reactive functional monomers, a concept of cascade reactions was developed comprising enzymatic monomer synthesis and radical polymerization. Transacylation of methyl acrylate (MA) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) with different functional alcohols, diols, and triols (1,2,6-hexanetriol and glycerol) in the presence of Novozyme 435 led to functional (meth)acrylates. After the removal of the enzyme by means of filtration, removal of excess (meth)acrylate and/or addition of a new monomer, e.g., 2-hydroxyethyl (meth)acrylate the (co)polymerization via free radical (FRP) or nitroxide mediated radical polymerization (NMP) resulted in poly[(meth)acrylate]s with predefined functionalities. Hydrophilic, hydrophobic as well as ionic repeating units were assembled within the copolymer. The transacylation of MA and MMA with diols and triols carried out under mild conditions is an easy and rapid process and is suitable for the preparation of sensitive monomers.

  10. Focus Groups of Alaska Native Adolescent Tobacco Users: Preferences for Tobacco Cessation Interventions and Barriers to Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Christi A.; Enoch, Carrie; Renner, Caroline C.; Offord, Kenneth P.; Nevak, Caroline; Kelley, Stacy F.; Thomas, Janet; Decker, Paul A.; Hurt, Richard D.; Lanier, Anne; Kaur, Judith S.

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco cessation interventions developed for Alaska Native adolescents do not exist. This study employed focus group methodology to explore preferences for tobacco cessation interventions and barriers to participation among 49 Alaska Natives (61% female) with a mean age of 14.6 (SD = 1.6) who resided in western Alaska. Using content analysis,…

  11. [Psychological violence and the family context of adolescent users of outpatient services in a public tertiary pediatric hospital].

    PubMed

    de Abranches, Cecy Dunshee; de Assis, Simone Gonçalves; Pires, Thiago de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    The scope of this research was to investigate the association of psychological violence (PV) during adolescence with social and demographic factors, family structure/relationships and with other forms of maltreatment. A questionnaire was applied to 229 adolescents (11-18 years) in outpatient services in a state-run tertiary pediatric hospital. It was found that 26.4% of respondents suffered severe PV in the family context, and only 5 of the respondents reported they did not suffer any PV in the family context, illustrating how this kind of violence is seen as commonplace in the family relationship. The most common forms of PV behavior were: being criticized for what one does or says; not being encouraged when trying to act autonomously; being called nasty names, and having an adult saying one is wrong when one tries to act. Dissatisfaction of parents with the adolescent, the nuclear family structure, the position of the child among siblings sharing the same parents were associated with PV occurring within the family context. In order to enable it to detect signs of PV, the health sector can promote the right to comprehensive health of adolescents, confirming itself as one of the main social sectors capable of acting preventively on the forms of violence suffered and practiced by the family group.

  12. Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Cannabis Users: 5 Sessions. Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampl, Susan; Kadden, Ronald

    This manual is designed to help train substance abuse treatment counselors to conduct a brief five-session treatment intervention for adolescents with cannabis use disorders presenting for outpatient treatment. It combines two sessions of motivational enhancement therapy provided individually and three sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy…

  13. Treatment outcomes for methamphetamine users: California Proposition 36 and comparison clients.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Urada, Darren

    2011-09-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a major drug of abuse in California and several other states, particularly among criminal offender populations. Over the past decade, substance abuse treatment systems have had to adapt to and accommodate the increasing needs of meth users and, in California, deal with the impact of Proposition 36, which has resulted in a greater number of criminal offenders entering the treatment system. This study examines selected treatment performance and outcome indicators for California Proposition 36 offenders entering substance abuse treatment for meth use and compares their performance and outcomes to other subgroups of California treatment clients differentiated by whether or not they were admitted to treatment through Proposition 36 and whether or not their primary substance was meth. Significant improvements in all outcome domains were seen across the populations, and treatment performance and outcomes were not substantively inferior for the offender or meth-using groups.

  14. N-(4-Meth-oxy-phen-yl)-6-methyl-2-phenyl-5-{[4-(tri-fluoro-meth-yl)anilino]meth-yl}pyrimidin-4-amine.

    PubMed

    Cieplik, Jerzy; Pluta, Janusz; Bryndal, Iwona; Lis, Tadeusz

    2013-11-27

    The title compound, C26H23F3N4O, crystallizes with two symmetry-independent mol-ecules in the asymmetric unit, denoted A and B, which differ mainly in the rotation of the meth-oxy-phenyl ring. The -CF3 group of mol-ecule B is disordered by rotation, with the F atoms split over two sets of sites; the occupancy factor for the major component is 0.853 (4). The dihedral angles between the pyrimidine ring and the attached phenyl, meth-oxy-phenyl and tri-fluoro-methyl-phenyl rings are 8.1 (2), 37.5 (2) and 70.7 (2)°, respectively, in mol-ecule A, and 9.3 (2), 5.3 (2) and 79.7 (2)° in mol-ecule B. An intra-molecular N-H⋯N hydrogen bond occurs in each mol-ecule. In the crystal, two crystallographically independent mol-ecules associate into a dimer via a pair of N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, with a resulting R 2 (2)(12) ring motif and π-π stacking inter-actions [centroid-centroid distance = 3.517 (4) Å] between the pyrimidine rings. For the A mol-ecules, there are inter-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between an aryl C atom of meth-oxy-phenyl ring and a meth-oxy O atom of an adjacent mol-ecule. A similar inter-action is lacking in the B mol-ecules.

  15. Zwitterionic 4-bromo-6-meth-oxy-2-{[tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)methyl]-iminiumyl-meth-yl}phenolate: crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, See Mun; Lo, Kong Mun; Tan, Sang Loon; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2016-08-01

    In the solid state, the title compound, C12H16BrNO5 [systematic name: 4-bromo-2-((1E)-{[1,3-dihy-droxy-2-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propan-2-yl]iminium-yl}meth-yl)-6-meth-oxy-benzen-1-olate], C12H16BrNO5, is found in the keto-amine tautomeric form, with an intra-molecular iminium-N-H⋯O(phenolate) hydrogen bond and an E conformation about the C=N bond. Both gauche (two) and anti relationships are found for the methyl-hydroxy groups. In the crystal, a supra-molecular layer in the bc plane is formed via hy-droxy-O-H⋯O(hy-droxy) and charge-assisted hy-droxy-O-H⋯O(phenolate) hydrogen-bonding inter-actions; various C-H⋯O inter-actions provide additional cohesion to the layers, which stack along the a axis with no directional inter-actions between them. A Hirshfeld surface analysis confirms the lack of specific inter-actions in the inter-layer region.

  16. The Effects of Childhood Exposure to Drug Users and Religion on Drug Use in Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Sung Joon; Johnson, Byron R.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research finds drug-using peers and religiosity to be key predictors of drug use among youth, but the effects of childhood exposure to drug users and religion on later drug use have been understudied. The authors hypothesize a child's exposure to parental drug use and religious upbringing have a causal influence on drug use in youth…

  17. Comprehensive dental treatment for "meth mouth": a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Panpan; Chen, Xinmei; Zheng, Liwei; Guo, Lan; Li, Xin; Shen, Simin

    2014-11-01

    Methamphetamine-induced caries (MIC) is the rampant caries often found in methamphetamine (MA) users and is often called "meth mouth". It leads to devastating effects on dentition and is the major reason that brings patients to professional help. Dental management of these patients is challenging and the most important factor is cessation of MA use. Dentists must be aware of the signs and medical risks associated with this serious condition. If duly attended to, the dental team can help patients on many levels. Treatment plans can be simplified, so that each visit does not last too long. Finally, more attention should be paid topostoperative care. This case report presents a 40-year-old man with rampant caries caused by MA abuse with poor oral hygiene and smoking habits. He was advised to stop the drug abuse and the affected teeth underwent endodontic, restorative and prosthetic rehabilitation. One year later, the patient had some secondary caries but had stopped all drug abuse.

  18. White matter integrity as a link in the association between motivation to abstain and treatment outcome in adolescent substance users.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tammy; Pajtek, Stefan; Clark, Duncan B

    2013-06-01

    Readiness to change constitutes an important treatment target. This study examined white matter (WM) integrity as a possible link in the pathway between motivation to abstain and treatment outcome. Adolescents (age 14-18 years, n = 32) were recruited from intensive outpatient (IOP) substance use treatment and reported on motivation to abstain from alcohol and marijuana shortly after treatment admission (i.e., at baseline). Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected approximately 7 weeks after starting IOP and were used to quantify WM integrity (indexed by fractional anisotropy, FA) using a region of interest (ROI) approach. Treatment outcomes were assessed 6 months after baseline. Indirect effects analyses tested FA in prefrontal, orbitofrontal, and temporal ROIs as a linking variable in the pathway from motivation to abstain to alcohol and marijuana outcomes. Bivariate correlations indicated that greater motivation to abstain from alcohol was associated with lower FA in prefrontal, orbitofrontal, and temporal ROIs and that lower FA in these three ROIs was associated with greater 6-month alcohol problem severity. The indirect effect of FA was significant for the prefrontal ROI in the pathway from motivation to outcome for alcohol. FA values were not associated with motivation to abstain from marijuana or marijuana-related outcomes. Results suggest that lower WM integrity, particularly in the prefrontal brain region, may help to explain greater alcohol problem severity at 6 months despite higher motivation to abstain from alcohol. Interventions that aim to enhance WM integrity warrant attention to improve adolescent treatment outcomes.

  19. 6,12,18,24-Tetra-meth-oxy-4,10,16,22-tetra-kis-[(meth-oxy-carbon-yl)meth-oxy]-2,8,14,20-tetra-kis-(2-phenyl-eth-yl)resorcin[4]arene.

    PubMed

    Pansuriya, Pramod B; Friedrich, Holger B; Maguire, Glenn E M

    2012-01-01

    The title compound, C(76)H(80)O(16), is a macrocyclic structure. This novel resorcin[4]arene derivative has (meth-oxy-carbon-yl)meth-oxy 'head' groups on the upper rim. The compound has a C(2v) 'boat' geometry and there are a range of C-H⋯O contacts in the crystal structure.

  20. Inhibition of DNA synthesis in Meth A cells by chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, T; Natori, S; Sekimizu, K

    1993-10-01

    We examined the influence of chlorpromazine, a phenothiazine derivative, on DNA synthesis in Meth A cells. Pulse-labelling experiments with [3H]thymidine showed that chlorpromazine inhibited DNA synthesis in cells cultured in vitro. The drug also inhibited DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei. Observation by fluorescence microscopy of fibroblastic cells stained with chlorpromazine indicated that the drug was localized in the cytoplasm and nuclear membranes, suggesting that it inhibited DNA synthesis in a manner dependent on the interaction of replication proteins with nuclear membranes. Meth A sarcomas growing in the endoderm of BALB/c mice regressed on intra-tumor injection of chlorpromazine, indicating that the drug has an anticancer action.

  1. Criminality among Rural Stimulant Users in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oser, Carrie; Leukefeld, Carl; Staton-Tindall, Michele; Duvall, Jamieson; Garrity, Thomas; Stoops, William; Falck, Russel; Wang, Jichuan; Carlson, Robert; Sexton, Rocky; Wright, Patricia; Booth, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increase in media attention on "meth cooking" in rural areas of the United States, little is known about rural stimulant use--particularly, the criminality associated with stimulant use. Data were collected from community stimulant users in rural Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky (N = 709). Findings from three logistic regression…

  2. Effects of hyperthermia and calcium channel blocker co-therapy on mice injected with Meth A solid of Meth A ascites tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effectiveness of treating tumor-injected mice with verapamil, a calcium antagonist, and hyperthermia. The co-treatment reduced the incidence of tumors in animals injected with Meth A solid cells. It was shown that the decrease in tumors corresponded to increases in natural killer (NK) cell activity measured in a /sup 51/Cr release assay, in the amount of anti-Meth A antibody measured in an immunofluorescence assay, and a decrease in the amount of intra-tumor cyclic AMP measured by radioimmunoassay in co-treated compared to untreated sarcoma-injected animals. A role of the immune system for mediating the prevention of sarcoma growth was indicated by Winn assays. Splenocytes sensitized in vivo against Meth A solid cells for 14 days exhibited an enhanced cytotoxic activity against syngeneic target cells compared to untreated tumor-sensitized splenocytes following heat-drug co-treatment. It was established that the stimulation of cytotoxic T cells against a histocompatibility antigen (H-2/sup d/) present on Meth A sarcoma cells resulted in tumor cell lysis. Animals bearing established Meth A solid sarcomas did not manifest tumor regressions following the administration of co-treatment alone or the adoptive transfer of co-treated tumor-sensitized splenocytes. The growth of Meth A ascites and Meth A ascites-derived solid sarcomas, unlike Meth A solid cell tumors, were not prevented in Winn assays. Additionally, the lifespan of animals injected with Meth A ascites cells was reduced by 50% compared to animals injected with Meth A solid sarcoma cells.

  3. (E)-4-Meth-oxy-N'-(2,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-benzyl-idene)benzohydrazide hemihydrate.

    PubMed

    Chantrapromma, Suchada; Boonnak, Nawong; Horkaew, Jirapa; Quah, Ching Kheng; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2014-02-01

    The title compound crystallizes as a hemihydrate, C18H20N2O5·0.5H2O. The mol-ecule exists in an E conformation with respect to the C=N imine bond. The 4-meth-oxy-phenyl unit is disordered over two sets of sites with a refined occupancy ratio of 0.54 (2):0.46 (2). The dihedral angles between the benzene rings are 29.20 (9) and 26.59 (9)°, respectively, for the major and minor components of the 4-meth-oxy-substituted ring. All meth-oxy substituents lie close to the plane of the attached benzene rings [the Cmeth-yl-O-C-C torsion angles range from -4.0 (12) to 3.9 (2)°]. In the crystal, the components are linked into chains propagating along [001] via N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and weak C-H⋯O inter-actions.

  4. Methamphetamine Users in a Community-Based Drug Court: Does Gender Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Jennifer L.; Listwan, Shelley Johnson; Shaffer, Deborah Koetzle

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines men and women methamphetamine (meth) users who participated in a community-based drug court. The treatment of female drug users is a particularly salient issue because of the concerns with relapse and recidivism. For the current study, we studied the impact of the drug court by gender on a group of high-risk/high-need meth…

  5. Comparative Effectiveness of Web-Based vs. Educator-Delivered HIV Prevention for Adolescent Substance Users: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marsch, Lisa A.; Guarino, Honoria; Grabinski, Michael J.; Syckes, Cassandra; Dillingham, Elaine T.; Xie, Haiyi; Crosier, Benjamin S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Young people who engage in substance use are at risk for becoming infected with HIV and diseases with similar transmission dynamics. Effective disease prevention programs delivered by prevention specialists exist but are rarely provided in systems of care due to staffing/resource constraints and operational barriers - and are thus of limited reach. Web-based prevention interventions could possibly offer an effective alternative to prevention specialist-delivered interventions and may enable widespread, cost-effective access to evidence-based prevention programming. Previous research has shown the HIV/disease prevention program within the web-based Therapeutic Education System (TES) to be an effective adjunct to a prevention specialist-delivered intervention. The present study was the first randomized, clinical trial to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of this web-based intervention as a standalone intervention relative to a traditional, prevention specialist-delivered intervention. Methods Adolescents entering outpatient treatment for substance use participated in this multi-site trial. Participants were randomly assigned to either a traditional intervention delivered by a prevention specialist (n = 72) or the web-delivered TES intervention (n = 69). Intervention effectiveness was assessed by evaluating changes in participants’ knowledge about HIV, hepatitis, and sexually transmitted infections, intentions to engage in safer sex, sex-related risk behavior, self-efficacy to use condoms, and condom use skills. Findings Participants in the TES intervention achieved significant and comparable increases in HIV/disease-related knowledge, condom use self-efficacy, and condom use skills and comparable decreases in HIV risk behavior relative to participants who received the intervention delivered by a prevention specialist. Participants rated TES as easier to understand. Conclusion This study indicates that TES is as effective as HIV/disease prevention

  6. (E)-2-Meth-oxy-9-(2-meth-oxy-9H-xanthen-9-yl-idene)-9H-xanthene.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiang-Yu; Song, Qin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, C28H20O4, was synthesized by a bimolecular Zn-HCl reduction in glacial acetic acid using the meth-oxy-substituted xanthone as a starting material. The crystal structure shows that the 2,2'-meth-oxy-bixanthenyl-idene unit is an E-type conformation anti-folded conformer. The mol-ecule lies on an inversion center. The meth-oxy group is almost coplanar with the attached benzene ring, with a C-O-C-C torsion angle of 179.38 (14)°.

  7. Crystal structure of 2-[chloro-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)meth-yl]-2-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)-5,5-di-methyl-cyclo-hexane-1,3-dione.

    PubMed

    Chelli, Saloua; Troshin, Konstantin; Lakhdar, Sami; Mayr, Herbert; Mayer, Peter

    2016-03-01

    In the title compound, C23H25ClO4, the cyclo-hexane ring adopts a chair conformation with the 4-meth-oxy-phenyl substituent in an axial position and the chloro-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)methyl substituent in an equatorial position. The packing features inversion dimers formed by pairs of C-H⋯O contacts and strands along [100] and [010] established by further C-H⋯O and C-H⋯Cl contacts, respectively.

  8. Reactivity of Monovinyl (Meth)Acrylates Containing Cyclic Carbonates.

    PubMed

    Berchtold, Kathryn A; Nie, Jun; Stansbury, Jeffrey W; Bowman, Christopher N

    2008-12-09

    The tremendous diversity of materials properties available with polymers is due in large part to the ability to design structures from the monomeric state. The ease of use of comonomer mixtures only expands this versatility. While final polymer properties are obviously important in the selection or development of a material for a given purpose, for a number of applications, such as optical fiber coatings, photolithography and microelectronics, the additional requirement of a very rapid polymerization process may be equally critical. A class of unusually reactive mono-(meth)acrylate monomers bearing secondary functionality that includes carbonates, carbamates and oxazolidones, has been demonstrated but not fully explained. Here, the influence of an integral cyclic carbonate functional group on (meth)acrylate photopolymerization kinetics is examined in detail with respect to monomers with a wide variety of alternative secondary functionality structure as well as in comparison to conventional mono- and di-(meth)acrylates. The kinetic results from full cure studies of several cyclic carbonate-containing monomers clearly highlight specific structural variations that effectively promote monomer reactivity. Copolymerizations with tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate reflect similar dramatic kinetic effects associated with the novel monomers while partial cure homopolymerization studies reveal exceptional dark cure behavior linked to observations of uncommonly low ratios of termination to propagation rates throughout the conversion profile. Temperature effects on reaction kinetics, including both reaction rate and the individual kinetic parameters, as well as the temperature dependence of hydrogen bonding interactions specifically involving the secondary functional groups are probed as a means to understand better the fundamentally interesting and practically important behavior of these monomers.

  9. Crystal structure of 4-meth-oxy-quinazoline.

    PubMed

    El-Hiti, Gamal A; Smith, Keith; Hegazy, Amany S; Alshammari, Mohammed B; Kariuki, Benson M

    2014-12-01

    The title compound, C9H8N2O, is almost planar, with the C atom of the meth-oxy group deviating from the mean plane of the quinazoline ring system (r.m.s. deviation = 0.011 Å) by 0.068 (4) Å. In the crystal, mol-ecules form π-π stacks parallel to the b-axis direction [centroid-centroid separation = 3.5140 (18) Å], leading to a herringbone packing arrangement.

  10. Differentiating Characteristics of Juvenile Methamphetamine Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fass, Daniel; Calhoun, Georgia B.; Glaser, Brian A.; Yanosky, Daniel J., II

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the differences in characteristics and risk behaviors endorsed by detained adolescent methamphetamine users and compared them with other drug users. Subjects completed the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory and a questionnaire in which sociodemographics and behavioral information were explored and compared. Multivariate…

  11. (E)-1-[2-Hy-droxy-4,6-bis-(meth-oxy-meth-oxy)phen-yl]-3-phenyl-prop-2-en-1-one.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chao; Liu, Y Q; He, Y W; Aisa, H A

    2013-05-01

    The title compound, C19H20O6, consists of a tetra-substituted benzene ring with one substituent being an α,β-unsaturated cinnamoyl group, which forms an extended conjugated system in the mol-ecule. In addition, two meth-oxy-meth-oxy and one hy-droxy group are bonded to the central benzene ring. The dihedral angle between eh rings is 10.22 (10)°. An intra-molecular hydrogen bond is observed between the hy-droxy group and the carbonyl O atom. One of the meth-oxy-meth-oxy substituents is conformationally disordered over two sets of sites with site-occupation factors of 0.831 (3) and 0.169 (3).

  12. 40 CFR 721.4840 - Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane. 721.4840 Section 721.4840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.4840 Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new...

  13. Methamphetamine abuse and oral health: a pilot study of "meth mouth".

    PubMed

    Ravenel, Michele C; Salinas, Carlos F; Marlow, Nicole M; Slate, Elizabeth H; Evans, Zachary P; Miller, Peter M

    2012-03-01

    Abuse of methamphetamine (meth), a potent central nervous system stimulant, has been associated with significant dental disease. Current descriptions of "meth mouth" are limited in their scope and fail to illuminate the potential pathogenic mechanisms of meth for oral disease. The purpose of this pilot study was to characterize the oral health of subjects with a history of meth abuse as compared to nonabusing control subjects. A total of 28 meth abusers and 16 control subjects were enrolled. Interviews and surveys regarding meth abuse, dental history, oral hygiene, and diet were collected. A comprehensive oral cavity examination including salivary characterization was completed. We observed significantly higher rates of decayed surfaces, missing teeth, tooth wear, plaque, and calculus among meth abusers. No significant difference in salivary flow rates were noted, yet results showed significant trends for lower pH and decreased buffering capacity. These findings suggest that salivary quality may play a more important role in meth mouth than previously considered. Salivary analysis may be useful when managing a dental patient with history of methamphetamine abuse.

  14. 40 CFR 721.4840 - Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane. 721.4840 Section 721.4840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.4840 Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4840 - Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane. 721.4840 Section 721.4840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.4840 Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new...

  16. Proteomic analyses of methamphetamine (METH)-induced differential protein expression by immature dendritic cells (IDC).

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jessica L; Mahajan, Supriya D; Sykes, Donald E; Schwartz, Stanley A; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2007-04-01

    In the US, the increase in methamphetamine (METH) use has been associated with increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection. Dendritic cells (DC) are the first line of defense against HIV-1. DC play a critical role in harboring HIV-1 and facilitate the infection of neighboring T cells. However, the role of METH on HIV-1 infectivity and the expression of the proteome of immature dendritic cells (IDC) has not been elucidated. We hypothesize that METH modulates the expression of a number of proteins by IDC that foster the immunopathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. We utilized LTR amplification, p24 antigen assay and the proteomic method of difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) combined with protein identification through high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to analyze the effects of METH on HIV-1 infectivity (HIV-1 IIIB; CXCR4-tropic, X4 strain) and the proteomic profile of IDC. Our results demonstrate that METH potentiates HIV-1 replication in IDC. Furthermore, METH significantly differentially regulates the expression of several proteins including CXCR3, protein disulfide isomerase, procathepsin B, peroxiredoxin and galectin-1. Identification of unique, METH-induced proteins may help to develop novel markers for diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic targeting in METH using subjects.

  17. 40 CFR 721.4840 - Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane. 721.4840 Section 721.4840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.4840 Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4840 - Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane. 721.4840 Section 721.4840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.4840 Substituted tri-phenyl-meth-ane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new...

  19. Methamphetamine abuse and “meth mouth” in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Geraldine-A.; Mancinelli, Luca; Pagano, Stefano; Eramo, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    With easy chemical synthesis from its precursor, methamphetamine (MA) is now widespread in many countries. The abuse of methamphetamine is associated with several negative effects on health, because MA is a neurotoxin and a dangerous central nervous system stimulant. It changes levels of neurotransmitters in the brain, releasing dopamine and inhibiting nor epinephrine uptake which increases sympathetic nervous system activity and can lead to cardiac arrhythmia, hypertension and tachypnea. The consequences of MA abuse are clearly manifested in oral diseases (like “meth mouth”) which is characterised by extensive caries, teeth grinding with ensuing dental wear and trismus. The present review was designed to fill the gap in knowledge about methamphetamine abuse in the European Union (EU) and to illustrate the main clinical effects of prolonged use. After describing the pharmacology and systemic effects of methamphetamine and concentrating on its effects on the mouth, the present review compares the epidemiology and incidence of abuse in the world, particularly the USA and the EU. Key words:Methamphetamine, “Meth mouth”, drug abuse, oral health. PMID:25662544

  20. Characterization of cloned class I MHC-restricted, CD8+ anti-Meth A cytotoxic T-lymphocytes: recognition of an epitope derived from the Meth A gp110 tumor rejection antigen.

    PubMed

    Fassanito, M A; Loftus, D; De Leo, R M; Law, L W; Appella, E; De Leo, A B

    1994-08-15

    Meth A gp110 has been tentatively identified as a tumor rejection antigen. Following isolation of a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, CD8+ anti-Meth A cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL), we sought to determine whether the determinant recognized by this CTL was: (a) functional in tumor rejection of Meth A sarcoma; and (b) derived from Meth A gp110. Initially, we isolated an anti-Meth A CTL-resistant variant of Meth A sarcoma, Meth A4R, by immunoselection. The results of the subsequent analysis of Meth A4R cells showed the CTL-defined determinant as having a functional role in transplantation rejection of Meth A sarcoma. Walker et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 89: 7915-7918, 1993) showed that the cationic lipid, N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N- trimethylammonium-methyl sulfate, mediated delivery of a recombinant glycoprotein into the cytosol of target cells, making it available for processing and presentation by class I MHC molecules. As a result, the cells were sensitized for cytolysis by a class I MHC-restricted CD8+ CTL, which recognized an epitope expressed by the glycoprotein. In a similar manner, we treated the SV40-transformed BALB/c cell line, SVBalb, which is relatively insensitive to cytolysis by the anti-Meth A CTL, with Meth A gp110 and N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium methyl sulfate. The sensitivities of the treated cells and control cell lines to the anti-Meth A CTL were then examined. The results of these experiments permit us to conclude that the determinant recognized by the anti-Meth A CTL line is derived from Meth A gp110.

  1. Crystal structure of 1-meth­oxy­pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Espinoza, Eric G.; Rivera, Ernesto; Reyes-Martínez, Reyna; Hernández-Ortega, Simón; Morales-Morales, David

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C17H12O, crystallized with three independent mol­ecules (A, B and C) in the asymmetric unit. In the crystal, the three independent mol­ecules are linked by π–π inter­actions [centroid–centroid distances = 3.551 (3)–3.977 (2) Å], which lead to the formation of trimers. Between the trimers there are a number of C—H⋯π inter­actions generating a laminar arrangement parallel to (010). The meth­oxy­methyl group in mol­ecule A is disordered over two sets of sites, with an occupancy ratio of 0.56 (9):0.44 (9). PMID:25844253

  2. 4-Meth­oxy­benzamidinium bromide

    PubMed Central

    Irrera, Simona; Portalone, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The title salt, C8H11N2O+·Br−, was synthesized by the reaction between 4-meth­oxy­benzamidine (4-amidino­anisole) and hydro­bromic acid. In the cation, the amidinium group has two similar C—N bonds [1.304 (2) and 1.316 (2) Å], and its plane forms a dihedral angle of 31.08 (5)° with the benzene ring. The ions are associated in the crystal into a three-dimension hydrogen-bonded supra­molecular network featuring N—H+⋯Br− inter­actions. PMID:23476438

  3. Effects of prolonged abstinence from METH on the hippocampal BDNF levels, neuronal numbers and apoptosis in methamphetamine-sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Hajheidari, Samira; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein

    2017-04-03

    Methamphetamine (METH) use is associated with neuronal damage in various regions of brain, while effects of prolonged abstinence on METH-induced damage are not quite clear. This study evaluated serum and hippocampal BDNF levels, neuronal numbers and apoptosis in METH-sensitized and abstinent rats. Rats were sensitized to METH (2mg/kg, daily/18 days, s.c.). All rats were evaluated for neuron counting, the TUNEL test and serum and hippocampal BDNF levels after 30 days of forced abstinence from METH. The results showed that increased BDNF levels in the hippocampus and serum of METH-sensitized rats returned to control level after 30 days of abstinence. The number of neurons in the DG and CA1 of hippocampus and also, the total hippocampal perimeter and area in METH-sensitized rats were significantly lower than the saline rats. While, the number of neurons was not significantly increased in the hippocampus after prolonged abstinence from METH. Also, METH-sensitized rats showed a significant increase in TUNEL-positive cells, whereas METH-abstinent rats showed a slight but significant decrease in TUNEL-positive cells in the DG and CA3 of hippocampus. These results suggest that despite the reduction in BDNF levels, reducing the number of neurons, perimeter and area of the hippocampus were stable after abstinence. Thus, the degenerative effects of METH have been sustained even after prolonged abstinence in the hippocampus.

  4. (E)-1-{4-[Bis(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)meth-yl]piperazin-1-yl}-3-(4-eth-oxy-3-meth-oxy-phen-yl)prop-2-en-1-one.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Wu, Bin

    2012-04-01

    In the mol-ecule of the title compound, C(31)H(36)N(2)O(5), the piperazine ring displays a chair conformation. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings of the bis-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)methyl group is 83.42 (15)°. In the crystal, centrosymmetric-ally related mol-ecules are linked through pairs of C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into dimers, generating an R(2) (2)(10) ring motif. The dimers are further connected into chains parallel to [2-10] by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds involving the meth-oxy groups.

  5. 2-[(4-Meth­oxy-2-nitro­phen­yl)imino­meth­yl]phenol

    PubMed Central

    Khalaji, Aliakbar Dehno; Nikookar, Mahsa; Fejfarová, Karla; Dušek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, C14H12N2O4, contains four crystallographically independent mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit. All the mol­ecules have similar conformations; the dihedral angles between the aromatic rings are 33.1 (1), 33.76 (9), 31.41 (9) and 32.56 (10)°. Intra­molecular O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds form S(6) ring motifs in each molecule. In the crystal, there are two pairs of pseudo-inversion-related mol­ecules. Along the c axis, mol­ecules are stacked with π–π inter­actions between the 2-hy­droxy­phenyl and 4-meth­oxy-2-nitro­phenyl rings [centroid–centroid distances = 3.5441 (12)–3.7698 (12) Å]. PMID:22904892

  6. Genome-wide profiling identifies a subset of methamphetamine (METH)-induced genes associated with METH-induced increased H4K5Ac binding in the rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background METH is an illicit drug of abuse that influences gene expression in the rat striatum. Histone modifications regulate gene transcription. Methods We therefore used microarray analysis and genome-scale approaches to examine potential relationships between the effects of METH on gene expression and on DNA binding of histone H4 acetylated at lysine 4 (H4K5Ac) in the rat dorsal striatum of METH-naïve and METH-pretreated rats. Results Acute and chronic METH administration caused differential changes in striatal gene expression. METH also increased H4K5Ac binding around the transcriptional start sites (TSSs) of genes in the rat striatum. In order to relate gene expression to histone acetylation, we binned genes of similar expression into groups of 100 genes and proceeded to relate gene expression to H4K5Ac binding. We found a positive correlation between gene expression and H4K5Ac binding in the striatum of control rats. Similar correlations were observed in METH-treated rats. Genes that showed acute METH-induced increased expression in saline-pretreated rats also showed METH-induced increased H4K5Ac binding. The acute METH injection caused similar increases in H4K5Ac binding in METH-pretreated rats, without affecting gene expression to the same degree. Finally, genes that showed METH-induced decreased expression exhibited either decreases or no changes in H4K5Ac binding. Conclusion Acute METH injections caused increased gene expression of genes that showed increased H4K5Ac binding near their transcription start sites. PMID:23937714

  7. Tris(2-{[2-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)eth-yl]imino-meth-yl}phenolato-κ(2)N,O(1))cobalt(III).

    PubMed

    Ourari, Ali; Ouennoughi, Yasmina; Bouacida, Sofiane

    2012-06-01

    In the title compound, [Co(C(16)H(16)NO(2))(3)], the Co(III) atom is six-coordinated in an irregular octa-hedral geometry by three N,O-chelating 2-{[2-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)eth-yl]imino-meth-yl}phenolate groups. One of the three meth-oxy group is disordered over two sets of sites with an occupancy ratio of 0.768 (5):0.232 (5). The crystal packing can be described by alternating zigzag layers of organic ligands and CoN(3)O(3) octa-hedra along the c axis. There are no classical hydrogen bonds in the structure, but C-H⋯π inter-actions occur.

  8. Crystal structure of 3,4-di-meth-oxy-phenol.

    PubMed

    Mills-Robles, Heather A; Desikan, Vasumathi; Golen, James A; Manke, David R

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, C8H10O3, has two planar mol-ecules in the asymmetric unit possessing mean deviations from planarity of 0.051 and 0.071 Å. In the crystal, there are two distinct infinite chains, both along [010]. The chains are formed by O-H⋯O inter-actions between the phenol and both the 3-meth-oxy and the 4-meth-oxy groups.

  9. Crystal structure of 3,4-di­meth­oxy­phenol

    PubMed Central

    Mills-Robles, Heather A.; Desikan, Vasumathi; Golen, James A.; Manke, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C8H10O3, has two planar mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit possessing mean deviations from planarity of 0.051 and 0.071 Å. In the crystal, there are two distinct infinite chains, both along [010]. The chains are formed by O—H⋯O inter­actions between the phenol and both the 3-meth­oxy and the 4-meth­oxy groups. PMID:26870474

  10. The Feasibility of Interventions to Reduce HIV Risk and Drug Use among Heterosexual Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, Karen F.; Lehman, Wayne E.; Min, Sung-Joon; Lance, Shannon P.; Speer, Nicole; Booth, Robert E.; Shoptaw, Steve

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a feasibility study that examined contingency management among out-of-treatment, heterosexual methamphetamine users and the reduction of drug use and HIV risk. Fifty-eight meth users were recruited through street outreach in Denver from November 2006 through March 2007. The low sample size reflects that this was a pilot study to see if CM is feasible in an out-of-treatment, street-recruited population of meth users. Secondary aims were to examine if reductions and drug use and risk behavior could be found. Subjects were randomly assigned to contingency management (CM) or CM plus strengths-based case management (CM/SBCM), with follow-up at 4 and 8 months. Participants were primarily White (90%), 52% male and averaged 38 years old. Eighty-three percent attended at least one CM session, with 29% attending at least fifteen. All participants reduced meth use significantly at follow-up. Those who attended more sessions submitted more stimulant-free urines than those who attended fewer sessions. Participants assigned to CM/SBCM attended more sessions and earned more vouchers than clients in CM. Similarly, participants reported reduced needle-sharing and sex risk. Findings demonstrate that CM and SBCM may help meth users reduce drug use and HIV risk. PMID:23493796

  11. Adolescent Steroid Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    The study focused on non-medical steroid use by adolescents according to data obtained from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, professional literature, 30 key informants knowledgeable in steroid issues, and 72 current or former steroid users. The findings indicated: (1) over 250,000 adolescents, primarily males, used or have used steroids, and…

  12. Spontaneously formed tumorigenic hybrids of Meth A sarcoma cells and macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Busund, Lill-Tove R; Killie, Mette K; Bartnes, Kristian; Seljelid, Rolf

    2003-08-20

    We have recently demonstrated that malignant cells can hybridize with tissue macrophages in vitro, giving rise to tumorigenic hybrids. We now demonstrate that this can occur spontaneously in vivo as a result of fusion between inoculated Meth A sarcoma cells and host cells, presumably macrophages. Thus, from tumor cell suspensions prepared by collagenase perfusion and density centrifugation, hybrid cells could be isolated that were neoplastic but in contrast to Meth A expressed macrophage markers and had phagocytic capacity. Their morphologic features were intermediate between Meth A and macrophages. By taking advantage of a semiallogeneic experimental system by inoculation of Meth A cells from BALB/c (H-2 K(d)) into (BALB.K x BALB/c) F(1) (H-2(k/d)), hybrid cells from these tumors could be shown to express MHC antigens of both the Meth A and the host haplotypes. Hybrid cells grew faster than Meth A cells in vivo, indicating acquisition of growth-promoting properties through heterotypic cell fusion.

  13. Predicting attitude toward methamphetamine use: the role of antidrug campaign exposure and conversations about meth in Montana.

    PubMed

    Richards, Adam S

    2014-01-01

    This investigation utilized the integrative model of behavioral prediction to assess the Montana Meth Project (MMP) campaign by testing theoretical antecedents of attitude toward methamphetamine (meth) use. College students in Montana (N = 403) were surveyed about their exposure to MMP ads and communication about meth in conversation. Structural equation modeling showed that the data fit the specified model well. Significant parameters indicated that only beliefs about the negative relational outcomes of meth use, and not about personal well-being or physical appearance, were related to attitude. Attention, rather than encoded exposure, to MMP ads related to each belief about meth use. Conversation frequency related to engagement with MMP ads, and a conversational partner's conveyed attitude toward meth use related to personal and physical beliefs as well as attitudes. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  14. The long-term effects of methamphetamine exposure during pre-adolescence on depressive-like behaviour in a genetic animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Moné; Harvey, Brian H; Cockeran, Marike; Brink, Christiaan B

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant and drug of abuse, commonly used early in life, including in childhood and adolescence. Adverse effects include psychosis, anxiety and mood disorders, as well as increased risk of developing a mental disorder later in life. The current study investigated the long-term effects of chronic METH exposure during pre-adolescence in stress-sensitive Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats (genetic model of depression) and control Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats. METH or vehicle control was administered twice daily from post-natal day 19 (PostND19) to PostND34, followed by behavioural testing at either PostND35 (early effects) or long-lasting after withdrawal at PostND60 (early adulthood). Animals were evaluated for depressive-like behaviour, locomotor activity, social interaction and object recognition memory. METH reduced depressive-like behaviour in both FSL and FRL rats at PostND35, but enhanced this behaviour at PostND60. METH also reduced locomotor activity on PostND35 in both FSL and FRL rats, but without effect at PostND60. Furthermore, METH significantly lowered social interaction behaviour (staying together) in both FRL and FSL rats at PostND35 and PostND60, whereas self-grooming time was significantly reduced only at PostND35. METH treatment enhanced exploration of the familiar vs. novel object in the novel object recognition test (nORT) in FSL and FRL rats on PostND35 and PostND60, indicative of reduced cognitive performance. Thus, early-life METH exposure induce social and cognitive deficits. Lastly, early-life exposure to METH may result in acute antidepressant-like effects immediately after chronic exposure, whereas long-term effects after withdrawal are depressogenic. Data also supports a role for genetic predisposition as with FSL rats.

  15. Crystal structures of three 3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-benzamide-based derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ligia R; Low, John Nicolson; Oliveira, Catarina; Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-05-01

    The crystal structures of three benzamide derivatives, viz. N-(6-hy-droxy-hex-yl)-3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-benzamide, C16H25NO5, (1), N-(6-anilinohex-yl)-3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-benzamide, C22H30N2O4, (2), and N-(6,6-di-eth-oxy-hex-yl)-3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-benzamide, C20H33NO6, (3), are described. These compounds differ only in the substituent at the end of the hexyl chain and the nature of these substituents determines the differences in hydrogen bonding between the mol-ecules. In each mol-ecule, the m-meth-oxy substituents are virtually coplanar with the benzyl ring, while the p-meth-oxy substituent is almost perpendicular. The carbonyl O atom of the amide rotamer is trans related with the amidic H atom. In each structure, the benzamide N-H donor group and O acceptor atoms link the mol-ecules into C(4) chains. In 1, a terminal -OH group links the mol-ecules into a C(3) chain and the combined effect of the C(4) and C(3) chains is a ribbon made up of screw related R 2 (2)(17) rings in which the ⋯O-H⋯ chain lies in the centre of the ribbon and the tri-meth-oxy-benzyl groups forms the edges. In 2, the combination of the benzamide C(4) chain and the hydrogen bond formed by the terminal N-H group to an O atom of the 4-meth-oxy group link the mol-ecules into a chain of R 2 (2)(17) rings. In 3, the mol-ecules are linked only by C(4) chains.

  16. Facile Fabrication of Gradient Surface Based on (meth)acrylate Copolymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Yang, H.; Wen, X.-F.; Cheng, J.; Xiong, J.

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a simple and economic approach for fabrication of surface wettability gradient on poly(butyl acrylate - methyl methacrylate) [P (BA-MMA)] and poly(butyl acrylate - methyl methacrylate - 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [P (BA-MMA-HEMA)] films. The (meth)acrylate copolymer [including P (BA-MMA) and P (BA-MMA-HEMA)] films are hydrolyzed in an aqueous solution of NaOH and the transformation of surface chemical composition is achieved by hydrolysis in NaOH solution. The gradient wetting properties are generated based on different functional groups on the P (BA-MMA) and P (BA-MMA-HEMA) films. The effects of both the surface chemical and surface topography on wetting of the (meth)acrylate copolymer film are discussed. Surface chemical composition along the materials length is determined by XPS, and surface topography properties of the obtained gradient surfaces are analyzed by FESEM and AFM. Water contact angle system (WCAs) results show that the P (BA-MMA-HEMA) films provide a larger slope of the gradient wetting than P (BA-MMA). Moreover, this work demonstrates that the gradient concentration of chemical composition on the poly(meth) acrylate films is owing to the hydrolysis processes of ester group, and the hydrolysis reactions that have negligible influence on the surface morphology of the poly(meth) acrylate films coated on the glass slide. The gradient wettability surfaces may find broad applications in the field of polymer coating due to the compatibility of (meth) acrylate polymer.

  17. THE MULTIPLE TRUTHS ABOUT CRYSTAL METH AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE ENTRENCHED IN AN URBAN DRUG SCENE: A LONGITUDINAL ETHNOGRAPHIC INVESTIGATION

    PubMed Central

    Fast, Danya; Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan; Small, Will

    2014-01-01

    Transitions into more harmful forms of illicit drug use among youth have been identified as important foci for research and intervention. In settings around the world, the transition to crystal methamphetamine (meth) use among youth is considered a particularly dangerous and growing problem. Epidemiological evidence suggests that, particularly among young, street-involved populations, meth use is associated with numerous sex- and drug-related “risks behaviors” and negative health outcomes. Relatively few studies, however, have documented how youth themselves understand, experience and script meth use over time. From 2008 to 2012, we conducted over 100 in-depth interviews with 75 street-entrenched youth in Vancouver, Canada, as well as ongoing ethnographic fieldwork, in order to examine youth's understandings and experiences of meth use in the context of an urban drug scene. Our findings revealed positive understandings and experiences of meth in relation to other forms of drug addiction and unaddressed mental health issues. Youth were simultaneously aware of the numerous health-related harms and social costs associated with heavy meth use. Over time, positive understandings of meth may become entirely contradictory to a lived reality in which escalating meth use is a factor in further marginalizing youth, although this may not lead to cessation of use. Recognition of these multiple truths about meth, and the social structural contexts that shape the scripting of meth use among youth in particular settings, may help us to move beyond moralizing debates about how to best educate youth on the “risks” associated with meth, and towards interventions that are congruent with youth’s lived experiences and needs across the lifecourse. PMID:24721446

  18. The multiple truths about crystal meth among young people entrenched in an urban drug scene: a longitudinal ethnographic investigation.

    PubMed

    Fast, Danya; Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan; Small, Will

    2014-06-01

    Transitions into more harmful forms of illicit drug use among youth have been identified as important foci for research and intervention. In settings around the world, the transition to crystal methamphetamine (meth) use among youth is considered a particularly dangerous and growing problem. Epidemiological evidence suggests that, particularly among young, street-involved populations, meth use is associated with numerous sex- and drug-related "risks behaviors" and negative health outcomes. Relatively few studies, however, have documented how youth themselves understand, experience and script meth use over time. From 2008 to 2012, we conducted over 100 in-depth interviews with 75 street-entrenched youth in Vancouver, Canada, as well as ongoing ethnographic fieldwork, in order to examine youth's understandings and experiences of meth use in the context of an urban drug scene. Our findings revealed positive understandings and experiences of meth in relation to other forms of drug addiction and unaddressed mental health issues. Youth were simultaneously aware of the numerous health-related harms and social costs associated with heavy meth use. Over time, positive understandings of meth may become entirely contradictory to a lived reality in which escalating meth use is a factor in further marginalizing youth, although this may not lead to cessation of use. Recognition of these multiple truths about meth, and the social structural contexts that shape the scripting of meth use among youth in particular settings, may help us to move beyond moralizing debates about how to best educate youth on the "risks" associated with meth, and towards interventions that are congruent with youth's lived experiences and needs across the lifecourse.

  19. Crystal structure of bis-(2-{[1,1-bis-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)-2-oxidoeth-yl]imino-meth-yl}-6-meth-oxy-phenolato)manganese(IV) 0.39-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Buvaylo, Elena A; Vassilyeva, Olga Yu; Skelton, Brian W

    2015-11-01

    The title compound, [Mn(C12H15NO5)2]·0.39H2O, is a 0.39 hydrate of the isostructural complex bis-(2-{[1,1-bis-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)-2-oxidoeth-yl]imino-meth-yl}-6-meth-oxy-phenolato)manganese(IV) that has previously been reported by Back, Oliveira, Canabarro & Iglesias [Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. (2015), 641, 941-947], based on room-temperature data. The current structure that was determined at 100 K reveals a lengthening of the c cell parameter compared with the published one due to the incorporation of the partial occupancy water mol-ecule. The title compound crystallizes in the tetra-gonal chiral space group P41212; the neutral [Mn(IV)(C12H15NO5)2] mol-ecule is situated on a crystallographic C 2 axis. The overall geometry about the central manganese ion is octa-hedral with an N2O4 core; each ligand acts as a meridional ONO donor. The coordination environment of Mn(IV) at 100 K displays a difference in one of the two Mn-O bond lengths, compared with the room-temperature structure. In the crystal, the neutral mol-ecules are stacked in a helical fashion along the c-axis direction.

  20. Zwitterionic 4-bromo-6-meth­oxy-2-{[tris­(hy­droxy­meth­yl)methyl]­iminiumyl­meth­yl}phenolate: crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, See Mun; Lo, Kong Mun; Tan, Sang Loon; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2016-01-01

    In the solid state, the title compound, C12H16BrNO5 [systematic name: 4-bromo-2-((1E)-{[1,3-dihy­droxy-2-(hy­droxy­meth­yl)propan-2-yl]iminium­yl}meth­yl)-6-meth­oxy­benzen-1-olate], C12H16BrNO5, is found in the keto–amine tautomeric form, with an intra­molecular iminium-N—H⋯O(phenolate) hydrogen bond and an E conformation about the C=N bond. Both gauche (two) and anti relationships are found for the methyl­hydroxy groups. In the crystal, a supra­molecular layer in the bc plane is formed via hy­droxy-O—H⋯O(hy­droxy) and charge-assisted hy­droxy-O—H⋯O(phenolate) hydrogen-bonding inter­actions; various C—H⋯O inter­actions provide additional cohesion to the layers, which stack along the a axis with no directional inter­actions between them. A Hirshfeld surface analysis confirms the lack of specific inter­actions in the inter-layer region. PMID:27536419

  1. Hybrid thiol-ene network nanocomposites based on multi(meth)acrylate POSS.

    PubMed

    Li, Liguo; Liang, Rendong; Li, Yajie; Liu, Hongzhi; Feng, Shengyu

    2013-09-15

    First, multi(meth)acrylate functionalized POSS monomers were synthesized in this paper. Secondly, FTIR was used to evaluate the homopolymerization behaviors of multi(meth)acrylate POSS and their copolymerization behaviors in the thiol-ene reactions with octa(3-mercaptopropyl) POSS in the presence of photoinitiator. Results showed that the photopolymerization rate of multimethacrylate POSS was faster than that of multiacrylate POSS. The FTIR results also showed that the copolymerizations were dominant in the thiol-ene reactions with octa(3-mercaptopropyl) POSS, different from traditional (meth)acrylate-thiol system, in which homopolymerizations were predominant. Finally, the resulted hybrid networks based on POSS were characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, DSC, and TGA. The characterization results showed that hybrid networks based on POSS were homogeneous and exhibited high thermal stability.

  2. Effect of prenatal methadone on reinstated behavioral sensitization induced by methamphetamine in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chih-Shung; Lee, Yih-Jing; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Fan, Lir-Wan; Ho, Ing-Kang; Tien, Lu-Tai

    2014-01-01

    It has been known that methadone maintenance treatment is the standard treatment of choice for pregnant opiate addicts. However, there are few data on newborn outcomes especially in the cross talk with other addictive agents. The present study was to investigate the effect of prenatal exposure to methadone on methamphetamine (METH)-induced behavioral sensitization as an indicator of drug addiction in later life. Pregnant rats received saline or methadone (7 mg/kg, s.c.) twice daily from E3 to E20. To induce behavioral sensitization, offspring (5 weeks old) were treated with METH (1mg/kg, i.p.) or saline once daily for 5 consecutive days. Ninety-six hours (day 9) after the 5th treatment with METH or saline, animals received a single dose of METH (1mg/kg, i.p.) or saline to induce the reinstated behavioral sensitization. Prenatal methadone treatment enhanced the level of development of locomotor behavioral sensitization to METH administration in adolescent rats. Prenatal methadone treatment also enhanced the reinstated locomotor behavioral sensitization in adolescent rats after the administration had ceased for 96 h. These results indicate that prenatal methadone exposure produces a persistent lesion in the dopaminergic system, as indicated by enhanced METH-induced locomotor behavioral sensitization (before drug abstinence) and reinstated locomotor behavioral sensitization (after short term drug abstinence) in adolescent rats. These findings show that prenatal methadone exposure may enhance susceptibility to the development of drug addiction in later life. This could provide a reference for drug usage such as methamphetamine in their offspring of pregnant woman who are treating with methadone.

  3. (E)-3-[3,4-Bis(meth-oxy-methoxy)phen-yl]-1-(7-hy-droxy-5-meth-oxy-2,2-dimethyl-chroman-8-yl)prop-2-en-1-one.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Nur Athirah; Ahmad, Farediah; Basar, Norazah; Awang, Khalijah; Ng, Seik Weng

    2011-09-01

    The reaction of 5,6-(2,2-dimethyl-chroman-yl)-2-hy-droxy-4-meth-oxy-acetophenone and 3,4-bis-(meth-oxy-meth-yloxy)benzaldehyde affords the intense orange title chalcone derivative, C(25)H(30)O(8). The two benzene rings are connected through a -C(=O)-CH=CH- (propenone) unit, which is in an E conformation; the ring with the hy-droxy substitutent is aligned at 19.5 (2)° with respect to this unit, whereas the ring with the meth-oxy-meth-yloxy substituent is aligned at 9.3 (3)°. The dihedral angle between the rings is 19.38 (10)°. The hy-droxy group engages in an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond with the carbonyl O atom of the propenone unit, generating an S(5) ring.

  4. Brief exposure to methamphetamine (METH) and phencyclidine (PCP) during late development leads to long-term learning deficits in rats.

    PubMed

    White, Ilsun M; Minamoto, Takehiro; Odell, Joseph R; Mayhorn, Joseph; White, Wesley

    2009-04-17

    Exposure to methamphetamine (METH) and phencyclidine (PCP) during early development is thought to produce later behavioral deficits. We postulated that exposure to METH and PCP during later development would produce similar behavioral deficits, particularly learning deficits in adulthood. Wistar rats were treated with METH (9 mg/kg), PCP (9 mg/kg), or saline during later development, postnatal days (PD) 50-51, and subsequent behavioral changes were examined including: locomotor activity during the acute drug state (PD 50-51) and the post-drug phase (PD 50-80); social interaction on PD 54-80; and spatial discrimination and reversal in adulthood (after PD 90). METH and PCP differentially affected locomotion during the acute state, but not during the post-drug phase. METH decreased social interaction throughout tests two weeks after drug treatment, whereas PCP decreased social interaction only during the first 8 min of tests. Neither METH nor PCP impaired initial acquisition of spatial discrimination. However, reversal was significantly impaired by PCP, whereas METH produced a mild deficit, compared to controls. Our data provide evidence that exposure to PCP and METH during later development lead to enduring cognitive deficits in adulthood. Selective impairment of reversal may reflect neurological damage in the prefrontal cortex due to early exposure to drugs.

  5. Transcriptional start and MetR binding sites on the Escherichia coli metH gene.

    PubMed

    Marconi, R; Wigboldus, J; Weissbach, H; Brot, N

    1991-03-29

    The 5' upstream region of the Escherichia coli metH gene has been sequenced. Primer extension analysis revealed a transcription start site at 324 bases upstream of the initiator codon. An 8 base sequence homologous to the MetR binding region on the E. coli metE gene is present 217 bp downstream of the transcription start site. Gel retardation experiments showed that purified MetR protein could bind to a 30 base oligonucleotide containing the putative MetR binding region. No "met box" was present which explains the relative lack of regulation of the expression of the metH gene by methionine.

  6. N-[(9H-Fluoren-9-yl-idene)(2-meth-oxy-phen-yl)meth-yl]-1,1,1-tri-methyl-silanamine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Yuan; Wang, Peng; Chen, Xia

    2014-01-01

    The title mol-ecule, C24H25NOSi, is a hydrolysis product of the reaction between 9-tri-methyl-silyfluorenyl lithium and 2-meth-oxy-benzo-nitrile. The fluorene ring system is substanti-ally planar, with an r.m.s. deviation of 0.0288 Å from the best-fit plane through its 13 C atoms. This plane forms a dihedral angle of 58.07 (7)° with the 2-meth-oxy-benzyl-amine ring plane. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by N-H⋯π and C-H⋯π inter-actions, which leads to the formation of two-dimensional network lying parallel to the bc plane.

  7. Crystal structure of 2-meth-oxy-2-[(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-phenyl-ethanone.

    PubMed

    Caracelli, Ignez; Olivato, Paulo R; Traesel, Henrique J; Valença, Jéssica; Rodrigues, Daniel N S; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2015-09-01

    In the title β-thio-carbonyl compound, C16H16O3S, the adjacent meth-oxy and carbonyl O atoms are synperiplanar [the O-C-C-O torsion angle is 19.8 (4)°] and are separated by 2.582 (3) Å. The dihedral angle between the rings is 40.11 (16)°, and the meth-oxy group is coplanar with the benzene ring to which it is connected [the C-C-O-C torsion angle is 179.1 (3)°]. The most notable feature of the crystal packing is the formation of methine and methyl C-H⋯O(carbon-yl) inter-actions that lead to a supra-molecular chain with a zigzag topology along the c axis. Chains pack with no specific inter-molecular inter-actions between them.

  8. Crystal structure of 2-meth­oxy-2-[(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)sulfan­yl]-1-phenyl­ethanone

    PubMed Central

    Caracelli, Ignez; Olivato, Paulo R.; Traesel, Henrique J.; Valença, Jéssica; Rodrigues, Daniel N. S.; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2015-01-01

    In the title β-thio­carbonyl compound, C16H16O3S, the adjacent meth­oxy and carbonyl O atoms are synperiplanar [the O—C—C—O torsion angle is 19.8 (4)°] and are separated by 2.582 (3) Å. The dihedral angle between the rings is 40.11 (16)°, and the meth­oxy group is coplanar with the benzene ring to which it is connected [the C—C—O—C torsion angle is 179.1 (3)°]. The most notable feature of the crystal packing is the formation of methine and methyl C—H⋯O(carbon­yl) inter­actions that lead to a supra­molecular chain with a zigzag topology along the c axis. Chains pack with no specific inter­molecular inter­actions between them. PMID:26396889

  9. Correlates of nonmedical use of stimulants and methamphetamine use in a national sample

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lian-Yu; Strain, Eric C.; Alexandre, Pierre Kébreau; Alexander, G. Caleb; Mojtabai, Ramin; Martins, Silvia S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite chemical similarities, ADHD stimulants and methamphetamine have distinct use patterns in the community. This study compared the characteristics of nonmedical ADHD stimulants users and methamphetamine users in a household sample. Methods In data from the 2009–2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, adult and adolescent stimulant users were categorized into three mutually exclusive subgroups: nonmedical ADHD stimulant users only (STM users), methamphetamine users (METH users), and both nonmedical ADHD stimulant and methamphetamine users (STM/METH users). Multivariate logistic regression analyses identified the substance comorbidity, mental health, and deviant behavior characteristics associated with these three groups. Results Compared to adolescent STM users, STM/METH users were more likely to be female, younger and uninsured while METH users were more likely to be younger, in a minority group and from a higher-income family. Compared to adult STM users, METH and STM/METH users were more likely to be male, older, uninsured, no longer married, and to be from rural areas. Adolescent METH users were more likely than STM users to report illegal drug use while adult METH users were less likely to report prescription drug use than their STM user counterparts. Overall, adult and adolescent STM/METH users were more likely to report substance use, mental health problems and deviant behaviors compared to STM users. Conclusion The characteristics of STM users differ from METH and STM/METH users, and their associations with substance use and psychiatric comorbidities differ by age. Findings have implications for understanding the risks for stimulant use in different age subgroups. PMID:24583271

  10. Relational Inquiry: Generating New Knowledge with Adolescent Girls Who Use Crystal Meth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbury, Janet; Hoskins, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative research is continuously evolving and expanding as researchers seek methodologies that reflect the intersubjective nature of experience. "Relational inquiry" is an approach which considers the relationships (a) between researchers and participants, (b) among multiple dimensions of the participant's lived experience, and (c) between the…

  11. Methamphetamine and cannabis abuse in adolescence: a quasi-experimental study on specific and long-term neurocognitive effects

    PubMed Central

    Cuzen, Natalie L; Koopowitz, Sheri-Michelle; Ferrett, Helen L; Stein, Dan J; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Methamphetamine abuse affects brain structure and function. Although methamphetamine and cannabis are commonly abused together, few studies have investigated the differential neurocognitive consequences of methamphetamine abuse with or without cannabis. Furthermore, the effects of drug use on the developing adolescent brain remain poorly understood. We compared neurocognitive function between adolescents with ‘pure’ methamphetamine abuse, those with comorbid methamphetamine and cannabis abuse, and healthy controls at baseline and follow-up. Methods Individuals residing in the greater Cape Town region, between the ages of 13 and 18 years, were recruited into either Methamphetamine only group (Meth-only; n=10), Methamphetamine and cannabis group (Meth-cann; n=10) or healthy control (n=20) groups using a quasi-experimental design. All participants underwent a comprehensive neurocognitive assessment. Substance-use variables and psychiatric symptom counts were also recorded. A portion of the Meth-only and control participants completed 12-month follow-up assessments. Results While the Meth-cann group demonstrated widespread neurocognitive deficits at baseline, these deficits were restricted to the self-monitoring domain in the Meth-only group at baseline and at follow-up. Conclusions Methamphetamine abuse with cannabis abuse is associated with significantly more neurocognitive impairment than methamphetamine abuse alone, and such deficits may be enduring. PMID:25636791

  12. Conversion of (Meth)acrylic acids to methane granular sludge: Initiation by specific anerobic microflora

    SciTech Connect

    Shtarkman, N.B.; Obraztova, A.Y.; Laurinavichyus, K.S.; Galushko, A.S.; Akimenko, V.K.

    1995-03-01

    The role of a specific anaerobic microflora in the initiation of degradation of (meth)acrylic acids to methane by granular sludge from a UASB reactor was investigated. Associations of anaerobic bacteria isolated from the anaerobic sludge, which was used for a long time for treatment of wastewater from (meth)acrylate production, were able to realize the initial stage of (meth)acrylic acid decomposition, i.e., a conversion of acrylic and methacrylic acids to propionic and isobutyric acids, respectively. When added to granules, these association played a role of an {open_quotes}initiator{close_quotes} of the degradation process, which was then continued by the granular sludge microflora utilizing propionate and isobutyrate. Some characteristics of the granules adapted to propionate or isobutyrate are presented. The rates of propionate and isobutyrate consumption by adapted granules is, respectively, 21 and 53 times higher than the values obtained for nonadapted granules. A combined use of {open_quotes}initiating{close_quotes} bacteria and adapted granules provided degradation of (meth)acrylic acids with a maximum methane yield. The possibility is discussed of employing the granules, which are adapted to short-chain fatty acids, and the {open_quotes}initiating{close_quotes} bacteria, which accomplish the initial steps of the organic material decomposition to lower fatty acids, for the conversion of various chemical compounds to methane. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Chromatin remodeling by rosuvastatin normalizes TSC2-/meth cell phenotype through the expression of tuberin.

    PubMed

    Lesma, Elena; Ancona, Silvia; Orpianesi, Emanuela; Grande, Vera; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; Gorio, Alfredo

    2013-05-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multi-systemic syndrome caused by mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 gene. In TSC2-null cells, Rheb, a member of the Ras family of GTPases, is constitutively activated. Statins inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and block the synthesis of isoprenoid lipids with inhibition of Rheb farnesylation and RhoA geranylgeranylation. The effects of rosuvastatin on the function of human TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) α-actin smooth muscle (ASM) cells have been investigated. The TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells, previously isolated in our laboratory from the renal angiomyolipoma of two TSC patients, do not express tuberin and bear loss of heterozigosity caused by a double hit on TSC2 and methylation of TSC2 promoter, respectively. Exposure to rosuvastatin affected TSC2(-/meth) ASM cell growth and promoted tuberin expression by acting as a demethylating agent. This occurred without changes in interleukin release. Rosuvastatin also reduced RhoA activation in TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells, and it required coadministration with the specific mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor rapamycin to be effective in TSC2(-/-) ASM cells. Rapamycin enhanced rosuvastatin effect in inhibiting cell proliferation in TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells. Rosuvastatin alone did not alter phosphorylation of S6 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and at the higher concentration, rosuvastatin and rapamycin slightly decreased ERK phosphorylation. These results suggest that rosuvastatin may potentially represent a treatment adjunct to the therapy with mTOR inhibitors now in clinical development for TSC. In particular, rosuvastatin appears useful when the disease is originated by epigenetic defects.

  14. (2-Meth­oxy­benz­yl)(2-meth­oxy­benzyl­idene)aza­nium (2-meth­oxy­phen­yl)methanaminium tetra­chloridozincate(II) monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    El Glaoui, Meher; Jeanneau, Erwann; Zeller, Matthias; Lefebvre, Frederic; Ben Nasr, Cherif

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, (C8H12NO)(C16H18NO2)[ZnCl4]·H2O, was obtained as a by-product of the Zn2+ and HCl catalyzed condensation of (2-meth­oxy­phen­yl)methanamine in water. Both cations feature an intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond. In the crystal, the components are linked by an extensive three-dimensional network of N—H⋯O, O—H⋯Cl and N—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds (three of them bifurcated). Weak C—H⋯O intera­ctions also occur. PMID:21587715

  15. Immunological mechanisms of antitumor activity of some kinds of Chinese herbs: Meth A-induced delayed type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mori, H; Xu, Q A; Sakamoto, O; Uesugi, Y; Ono, Y; Koda, A; Nishioka, I

    1988-09-01

    In the present paper, we confirmed that a delayed type hypersensitivity response can be elicited against Meth A tumor (Meth A-DTH) in BALB/c mice bearing the primary tumor. This response was augmented by lipopolysaccharide. We examined the effects of 4 kinds of Chinese herbs including A. capillaris, S. doederleinii, A. macrocephala and S. subprostrata on the Meth A-DTH, and the results were compared with that of the herbs on picryl chloride-induced delayed type hypersensitivity (PC-DTH). All of the herbs examined augmented the Meth A-DTH 10 days after the primary tumor transplantation, and S. doederleinii, A. macrocephala and S. subprostrata prevented the decay of the response on the 20th day, but A. capillaris did not. On the other hand, none of the herbs affected the PC-DTH. When both DTH responses were caused simultaneously in the same mouse, Meth A-DTH decayed 20 days after the transplantation but PC-DTH did not. In this case, the effects of these 4 herbs on Meth A-DTH and PC-DTH were essentially the same as those seen in the case of separate experiments. The previous and present results suggest that A. capillaris shows antitumor activity mainly through a direct cytotoxicity, although this herb might have certain components to enhance Meth A-DTH, and the other herbs display the activity through the enhancement of T cell-mediated tumor immunity, particularly tumor specific DTH.

  16. Online Communication and Adolescent Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Greenfield, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade, technology has become increasingly important in the lives of adolescents. As a group, adolescents are heavy users of newer electronic communication forms such as instant messaging, e-mail, and text messaging, as well as communication-oriented Internet sites such as blogs, social networking, and sites for sharing photos and…

  17. Adolescent development

    MedlinePlus

    Development - adolescent; Growth and development - adolescent ... During adolescence, children develop the ability to: Understand abstract ideas. These include grasping higher math concepts, and developing moral ...

  18. Marijuana use in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, Roger S

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of marijuana use by adolescents has fluctuated in recent decades, but, overall, has increased significantly. In a study of adolescent health status and risk behaviours among students in grades 7 to 12 in British Columbia, it was found that the patterns of marijuana use had changed, especially among early adolescents. An earlier age of onset of use and an increased frequency of use were noted. The present paper examines the clinical and psychosocial implications of early age of onset of marijuana use, and reports important differences in risky behaviours between users and nonusers. The prevailing attitude that marijuana is a ‘safe, recreational’ drug is challenged. PMID:20046275

  19. The effects of GABAA and NMDA receptors in the shell-accumbens on spatial memory of METH-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Heysieattalab, Soomaayeh; Naghdi, Nasser; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Haghparast, Abbas; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive and neurotoxic psychostimulant. Its use in humans is often associated with neurocognitive impairment and deficits in hippocampal plasticity. Striatal dopamine system is one of the main targets of METH. The dopamine neurons in the striatum directly or indirectly regulate the GABA and glutamatergic signaling in this region and thus their outputs. This is consistent with previous reports showing modification of neuronal activity in the striatum modulates the expression of hippocampal LTP and hippocampal-dependent memory tasks such as Morris water maze (MWM). Therefore, reversing or preventing METH-induced synaptic modifications via pharmacological manipulations of the shell-nucleus accumbens (shell-NAc) may introduce a viable therapeutic target to attenuate the METH-induced memory deficits. This study is designed to investigate the role of intra-shell NAc manipulation of GABAA and NMDA receptors and their interaction with METH on memory performance in MWM task. Pharmacological manipulations were performed in rats received METH or saline. We found systemic saline plus intra-shell NAc infusions of muscimol dose-dependently impaired performance, while bicuculline had no effect. Surprisingly, the intra-NAc infusions of 0.005μg/rat muscimol that has no effect on memory performance (ineffective dose) prevented METH-induced memory impairment. In the contrary, the intra-NAc infusions of bicuculline (0.2μg/rat) increased METH-induced memory impairment. However, pre-training intra-NAc infusions of D-AP5 dose-dependently impaired performance, while NMDA had no effect in rats received systemic saline (control group). The intra-NAc infusions with an ineffective dose of NMDA (0.1μg/rat) increased METH-induced memory impairment. Furthermore, intra-NAc infusions of D-AP5 with an ineffective dose (0.1μg/rat) prevented METH-induced memory impairment. Our result is consistent with the interpretation that METH-mediated learning deficit

  20. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  1. A kryptoracemic salt: 2-{[2,8-bis-(tri-fluoro-meth-yl)quinolin-4-yl](hy-droxy)meth-yl}piperidin-1-ium (+)-3,3,3-tri-fluoro-2-meth-oxy-2-phenyl-propanoate.

    PubMed

    Wardell, James L; Wardell, Solange M S V; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C17H17F6N2O(+)·C10H8F3O3 (-), comprises two piperidin-1-ium cations and two carboxyl-ate anions. The cations, each having an l-shaped conformation owing to the near orthogonal relationship between the quinolinyl and piperidin-1-ium residues, are pseudo-enanti-omeric. The anions have the same absolute configuration but differ in the relative orientations of the carboxyl-ate, meth-oxy and benzene groups. Arguably, the most prominent difference between the anions occurs about the Cq-Om bond as seen in the Cc-Cq-Om-Cm torsion angles of -176.1 (3) and -67.1 (4)°, respectively (q = quaternary, m = meth-oxy and c = carboxyl-ate). The presence of Oh-H⋯Oc and Np-H⋯Oc hydrogen bonds leads to the formation of a supra-molecular chain along the a axis (h = hy-droxy and p = piperidin-1-ium); weak intra-molecular Np-H⋯Oh hydrogen bonds are also noted. Chains are connected into a three-dimensional architecture by C-H⋯F inter-actions. Based on a literature survey, related mol-ecules/cations adopt a uniform conformation in the solid state based on the letter L.

  2. The neurotoxicity of amphetamines during the adolescent period.

    PubMed

    Teixeira-Gomes, Armanda; Costa, Vera Marisa; Feio-Azevedo, Rita; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Carvalho, Félix; Capela, João Paulo

    2015-04-01

    Amphetamine-type psychostimulants (ATS), such as amphetamine (AMPH), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and methamphetamine (METH) are psychoactive substances widely abused, due to their powerful central nervous system (CNS) stimulation ability. Young people particularly use ATS as recreational drugs. Moreover, AMPH is used clinically, particularly for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and has the ability to cause structural and functional brain alterations. ATS are known to interact with monoamine transporter sites and easily diffuse across cellular membranes, attaining high levels in several tissues, particularly the brain. Strong evidence suggests that ATS induce neurotoxic effects, raising concerns about the consequences of drug abuse. Considering that many teenagers and young adults commonly use ATS, our main aim was to review the neurotoxic effects of amphetamines, namely AMPH, MDMA, and METH, in the adolescence period of experimental animals. Reports agree that adolescent animals are less susceptible than adult animals to the neurotoxic effects of amphetamines. The susceptibility to the neurotoxic effects of ATS seems roughly located in the early adolescent period of animals. Many authors report that the age of exposure to ATS is crucial for the neurotoxic outcome, showing that the stage of brain maturity has a strong importance. Moreover, recent studies have been undertaken in young adults and/or consumers during adolescence that clearly indicate brain or behavioural damage, arguing for long-term neurotoxic effects in humans. There is an urgent need for more studies during the adolescence period, in order to unveil the mechanisms and the brain dysfunctions promoted by ATS.

  3. Continuous process of preparation of n-butyl(meth)acrylate by esterification of (meth)acrylic acid by butanol on thermostable sulfo-cation exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Zheleznaya, L.L.; Karakhanov, R.A.; Lunin, A.F.; Magadov, R.S.; Meshcheryakov, S.V.; Mkrtychan, V.R.; Fomin, V.A.

    1987-11-10

    The authors propose an effective thermostable sulfo-cation exchanger based on polymers with a system of conjugated bonds, sulfopolyphenylene ketone (SPP) differing from the known cation exchangers by the high thermostability (up to 250/sup 0/C), and also having the effect of the stabilization of the double bond in unsaturated monomers. The combination of inhibiting and cation exchange properties makes it also possible to use these sulfo-cation exchangers in the processes of esterification of (meth)acrylic acids by alcohols without addition of special inhibitors. The SPP catalyst was tested in esterification processes of acrylic an methacrylic acid by butanol at a pilot plant.

  4. Adolescent Images of Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falchikov, Nancy

    1989-01-01

    Examined extent to which Scottish adolescents (N=40) were influenced by negative images of adolescence present in the culture, investigating self-images by means of Q sort. Eleven factors emerged from analysis, six of which met criterion that distinguishes common factors. Little evidence was found to suggest that adolescents were influenced by…

  5. 2-(4-Meth-oxy-phen-yl)-1-pentyl-4,5-di-phenyl-1H-imidazole.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Jim; Mohamed, Shaaban K; Marzouk, Adel A; Talybov, Avtandil H; Abdelhamid, Antar A

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, C27H28N2O, is a lophine (2,4,5-triphenyl-1H-imidazole) derivative with an n-pentyl chain on the amine N atom and a 4-meth-oxy substituent on the benzene ring. The two phenyl and meth-oxy-benzene rings are inclined to the imidazole ring at angles of 25.32 (7), 76.79 (5) and 35.42 (7)°, respectively, while the meth-oxy substituent lies close to the plane of its benzene ring, with a maximum deviation of 0.126 (3) Å for the meth-oxy C atom. In the crystal, inversion dimers linked by pairs of C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds generate R2(2)(22) loops. These dimers are stacked along the a-axis direction.

  6. The control region of the metH gene of Salmonella typhimurium LT2: an atypical met promoter.

    PubMed

    Urbanowski, M L; Stauffer, G V

    1988-12-15

    The control region of the Salmonella typhimurium metH gene was sequenced and the transcription start point was determined by S1 nuclease mapping experiments. Activation of the metH gene by the metR gene product was shown to occur at the level of transcription. The translation start site was determined by amino acid sequence analysis of the amino terminus of a chimeric Met-Lac fusion protein encoded by a metH-lacZ gene fusion. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the metH promoter region showed that two sequence elements, present in the promoters of all other met biosynthetic genes thus far examined, are not present in the metH promoter region, namely, the repeated MetJ repressor recognition sequence 5'-AGACGTCT-3' and a highly conserved sequence 5'-TGGA----TAAAC-3' of unknown function.

  7. Crystal structure of (E)-4-hy-droxy-N'-(3-meth-oxy-benzyl-idene)benzohydrazide.

    PubMed

    Chantrapromma, Suchada; Prachumrat, Patcharawadee; Ruanwas, Pumsak; Boonnak, Nawong; Kassim, Mohammad B

    2016-09-01

    The title compound, C15H14N2O3, crystallizes with two independent mol-ecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit that differ in the orientation of the 3-meth-oxy-phenyl group with respect to the methyl-idenebenzohydrazide unit. The dihedral angles between the two benzene rings are 24.02 (10) and 29.30 (9)° in mol-ecules A and B, respectively. In mol-ecule A, the meth-oxy group is twisted slightly relative to its bound benzene ring, with a Cmeth-yl-O-C-C torsion angle of 14.2 (3)°, whereas it is almost co-planar in mol-ecule B, where the corresponding angle is -2.4 (3)°. In the crystal, the mol-ecules are linked by N-H⋯O, O-H⋯N and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, as well as by weak C-H⋯O inter-actions, forming sheets parallel to the bc plane. The N-H⋯O hydrogen bond and weak C-H⋯O inter-action link different mol-ecules (A⋯B) whereas both O-H⋯N and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link like mol-ecules (A⋯A) and (B⋯B). Pairs of inversion-related B mol-ecules are stacked approximately along the a axis by π-π inter-actions in which the distance between the centroids of the 3-meth-oxy-phenyl rings is 3.5388 (12) Å. The B mol-ecules also participate in weak C-H⋯π inter-actions between the 4-hy-droxy-phenyl and the 3-meth-oxy-phenyl rings.

  8. Crystal structures of 4-meth-oxy-N-(4-methyl-phenyl)benzene-sulfonamide and N-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-4-meth-oxy-benzene-sulfonamide.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vinola Z; Preema, C P; Naveen, S; Lokanath, N K; Suchetan, P A

    2015-11-01

    Crystal structures of two N-(ar-yl)aryl-sulfonamides, namely, 4-meth-oxy-N-(4-methyl-phen-yl)benzene-sulfonamide, C14H15NO3S, (I), and N-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)-4-meth-oxy-benzene-sulfonamide, C13H12FNO3S, (II), were determined and analyzed. In (I), the benzene-sulfonamide ring is disordered over two orientations, in a 0.516 (7):0.484 (7) ratio, which are inclined to each other at 28.0 (1)°. In (I), the major component of the sulfonyl benzene ring and the aniline ring form a dihedral angle of 63.36 (19)°, while in (II), the planes of the two benzene rings form a dihedral angle of 44.26 (13)°. In the crystal structure of (I), N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds form infinite C(4) chains extended in [010], and inter-molecular C-H⋯πar-yl inter-actions link these chains into layers parallel to the ab plane. The crystal structure of (II) features N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming infinite one dimensional C(4) chains along [001]. Further, a pair of C-H⋯O inter-molecular inter-actions consolidate the crystal packing of (II) into a three-dimensional supra-molecular architecture.

  9. Crystal structure of (E)-2-hy-droxy-4'-meth-oxy-aza-stilbene.

    PubMed

    Chantrapromma, Suchada; Kaewmanee, Narissara; Boonnak, Nawong; Chantrapromma, Kan; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2015-06-01

    The title aza-stilbene derivative, C14H13NO2 {systematic name: (E)-2-[(4-meth-oxy-benzyl-idene)amino]-phenol}, is a product of the condensation reaction between 4-meth-oxy-benzaldehyde and 2-amino-phenol. The mol-ecule adopts an E conformation with respect to the azomethine C=N bond and is almost planar, the dihedral angle between the two substituted benzene rings being 3.29 (4)°. The meth-oxy group is coplanar with the benzene ring to which it is attached, the Cmeth-yl-O-C-C torsion angle being -1.14 (12)°. There is an intra-molecular O-H⋯N hydrogen bond generating an S(5) ring motif. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming zigzag chains along [10-1]. The chains are linked via C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming a three-dimensional structure.

  10. QMRPACK user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, R.W.; Nachtigal, N.M.; Reeb, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    QMRPACK is a library of FORTRAN 77 subroutines that may be used to solve linear systems of equations with the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) method and to compute eigenvalue approximations. This User`s Guide is designed to be an overview of the codes contained in QMRPACK. Installation information is provided, and the example matrix format is discussed. The relative merits of each algorithm, as well as usage criterion are described. The authors also provide instructions for making the test drivers, as well as test output from several machines.

  11. 40 CFR 721.9730 - 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6-substituted-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9730 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6... substances generically identified as 1,3,5-triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6-substituted- (PMN Nos....

  12. 40 CFR 721.9730 - 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6-substituted-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9730 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6... substances generically identified as 1,3,5-triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6-substituted- (PMN Nos....

  13. 40 CFR 721.9730 - 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6-substituted-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9730 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6... substances generically identified as 1,3,5-triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6-substituted- (PMN Nos....

  14. 40 CFR 721.9730 - 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6-substituted-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9730 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6... substances generically identified as 1,3,5-triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6-substituted- (PMN Nos....

  15. Monthly oceanic rainfall based on METH techniques: DMSP SSM/I V6 and SSMIS continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, L. S.; Gao, S.; Shin, D.-B.; Cho, Y.-J.; Adler, R. F.; Huffman, G.; Bolvin, D.; Nelkin, E.

    2012-04-01

    As part of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), our group have been producing oceanic rainfall over 2.5 and 5 degree boxes by applying the Microwave Emission brightness Temperature (Tb) Histogram, or METH technique to the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data taken on board the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite series. Recently, the rainfall series have been updated using the V6 SSM/I provided by RSS (Chiu and Chokngamwong., 2010). With the demise of the F15 SSM/I sensor, we examine the use of the SSMIS series to continue the DMSP time series. With its long duration, the DMSP satellite sensors constitute a unique data set capable of producing microwave-based products for climate studies. We compared the F13 SSM/I and F17 SSMIS for the period January 2008 - September 2009. The METH technique matches the histogram of Tb (twice 19V minus 22V) to a mixed-distribution of rain rates and estimates the parameters of the rain rate distribution. Mathematical convergence of the matching procedure is reached when a certain Chi-square threshold is reached. The important parameters are the Tb of the non-raining pixels (To) and the freezing level (FL) of the grid box considered. The sample size of the SSMIS is much larger than the SSM/I, hence the convergence criteria is relaxed by changing the Chi-square threshold. Preliminary results show a slight shift of the To (~0.8K). By adjusting To by a constant, the domain average SSMIS rain rates and FL are computed to within 2% and 1% of the SSM/I rain rates, respectively. Further investigation of the SSMIS METH rain rate will involve the comparison of the 19V and 22V and fine tuning the Chi-square parameter.

  16. Adolescents and Steroids: A User Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids ("steroids") are synthetic derivatives of the natural male hormone testosterone. They were first used non-medically by elite athletes seeking to improve performance. More recently, however, steroid use has filtered down to high school and junior high school levels. The purpose of this study was to describe…

  17. Crystal structure of 4-(4-meth-oxy-phen-oxy)benzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Andreas; Iovkova-Berends, Ljuba; Gilke, Stefan; Kossmann, Paul; Preut, Hans; Hiersemann, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, C14H12O3, was synthesized via the nucleophilic addition of 4-meth-oxy-phenol to 4-fluoro-benzaldehyde. The dihedral angle between the least-squares planes of the benzene rings is 71.52 (3)° and the C-O-C angle at the central O atom is 118.82 (8)°. In the crystal, weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the molecules to generate supra-molecular layers in the bc plane. The layers are linked by weak C-H⋯π inter-actions.

  18. Crystal structure of 4-(4-meth­oxy­phen­oxy)benzaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Andreas; Iovkova-Berends, Ljuba; Gilke, Stefan; Kossmann, Paul; Preut, Hans; Hiersemann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C14H12O3, was synthesized via the nucleophilic addition of 4-meth­oxy­phenol to 4-fluoro­benzaldehyde. The dihedral angle between the least-squares planes of the benzene rings is 71.52 (3)° and the C—O—C angle at the central O atom is 118.82 (8)°. In the crystal, weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the molecules to generate supra­molecular layers in the bc plane. The layers are linked by weak C—H⋯π inter­actions. PMID:26870476

  19. 2-Benzyl-5-meth-oxy-isoindoline-1,3-dione.

    PubMed

    Vila, Noemi; Costas-Lago, María Carmen; Besada, Pedro; Terán, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The title N-benzyl-phthalimide derivative, C16H13NO3, consists of two planar moieties, viz. the phthalimide system (r.m.s. deviation = 0.007 Å) and the phenyl ring, which make a dihedral angle of 84.7 (6)°. The meth-oxy group is almost coplanar with the phathalimide ring, as shown by the C-C-O-C torsion angle of -171.5 (2)°. In the crystal, the mol-ecules are self-assembled via non-classical C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a tape motif along [110].

  20. Bis[(E)-4-(hydroxy-imino-meth-yl)pyridinium] oxalate.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Rüdiger W; Winter, Manuela V; Oppel, Iris M

    2007-12-06

    The formula unit of the title compound, 2C(6)H(7)N(2)O(+)·C(2)O(4) (2-), comprises two symmetry-equivalent 4-(hydroxy-imino-meth-yl)-pyridinium cations on general positions, linked through hydrogen bonding via an oxalate anion that resides on a crystallographic centre of symmetry. The crystal structure consists of infinite chains of cations and oxalate anions directed by O-H⋯O and multicentre N-H⋯O inter-molecular hydrogen-bonding inter-actions.

  1. [4-(4-Meth-oxy-phen-yl)-2-(pyridin-3-yl)-1,3-thia-zol-5-yl][4-(tri-fluoro-meth-yl)phen-yl]methanone.

    PubMed

    Pampa, K J; Abdoh, M M M; Swaroop, T R; Rangappa, K S; Lokanath, N K

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, C23H15F3N2O2S, the thia-zole ring makes dihedral angles of 12.98 (13), 49.30 (11) and 49.83 (12)° with the pyridine ring, the meth-oxy-phenyl ring and the (tri-fluoro-meth-yl)phenyl ring, respectively. In the crystal, mol-ecules are connected via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [010]. There are also C-H⋯π and C-F⋯π inter-actions present, forming a three-dimensional structure.

  2. Crystal structure of (E)-N-[(E)-3-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)allyl-idene]naphthalen-1-amine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Kyun; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cho, Yong Seo; Min, Sun-Joon; Lee, Joon Kyun

    2014-11-01

    In the title compound, C20H17NO, the dihedral angle between the mean planes of the 4-meth-oxy-phenyl ring and the naphthalene ring is 69.50 (7)°. The meth-oxy group is almost coplanar with the benzene ring to which it is connected [Cb-Cb-Om-Cm torsion angle of -7.9 (2)°; b = benzene and m = meth-oxy] and the imine group displays a C-C-N=C torsion angle is -57.2 (2)°. The imine (C=N) group has an E conformation. In the crystal, weak π-π inter-actions between the benzene rings [centroid-centroid distance = 3.7781 (10) Å] are observed.

  3. 2,2,6,6-Tetra-bromo-3,4,4,5-tetra-meth-oxy-cyclo-hexa-none.

    PubMed

    Faizi, Md Serajul Haque; Mashrai, Ashraf; Shahid, M

    2014-07-01

    In the title compound, C10H14Br4O5, synthesized from the meth-oxy Schiff base N-(pyridin-2-ylmeth-yl)meth-oxy-aniline and mol-ecular bromine, the cyclo-hexa-none ring has a chair conformation with one of the four meth-oxy groups equatorially orientated with respect to the carbonyl group and the others axially orientated. The C-Br bond lengthsvary from 1.942 (4) to1.964 (4) Å. In the crystal, weak C-H⋯Ocarbon-yl hydrogen-bonding inter-actions generate chains extending along the b-axis direction. Also present in the structure are two short inter-molecular Br⋯Ometh-oxy inter-actions [3.020 (3) and 3.073 (4) Å].

  4. 40 CFR 721.2275 - N,N,N′,N′-Tetrakis(oxi-ranyl- methyl)-1,3-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false N,N,Nâ²,Nâ²-Tetrakis(oxi-ranyl- methyl)-1,3-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine. 721.2275 Section 721.2275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2275 - N,N,N′,N′-Tetrakis(oxi-ranyl- methyl)-1,3-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false N,N,Nâ²,Nâ²-Tetrakis(oxi-ranyl- methyl)-1,3-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine. 721.2275 Section 721.2275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2275 - N,N,N′,N′-Tetrakis(oxi-ranyl- methyl)-1,3-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false N,N,Nâ²,Nâ²-Tetrakis(oxi-ranyl- methyl)-1,3-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine. 721.2275 Section 721.2275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2275 - N,N,N′,N′-Tetrakis(oxi-ranyl- methyl)-1,3-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false N,N,Nâ²,Nâ²-Tetrakis(oxi-ranyl- methyl)-1,3-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine. 721.2275 Section 721.2275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2275 - N,N,N′,N′-Tetrakis(oxi-ranyl- methyl)-1,3-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false N,N,Nâ²,Nâ²-Tetrakis(oxi-ranyl- methyl)-1,3-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine. 721.2275 Section 721.2275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-cyclohexane di-meth-anamine. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1)...

  9. Crystal structure of ethyl (E)-4-(4-chlorophen-yl)-4-meth-oxy-2-oxobut-3-enoate.

    PubMed

    Flores, Darlene Correia; Vicenti, Juliano Rosa de Menezes; Pereira, Bruna Ávila; da Silva, Gabriele Marques Dias; Zambiazi, Priscilla Jussiane

    2014-09-01

    In the title compound, C13H13ClO4, the dihedral angle between the chloro-benezene ring and the least-squares plane through the 4-meth-oxy-2-oxobut-3-enoate ethyl ester residue (r.m.s. deviation = 0.0975 Å) is 54.10 (5)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are connected by meth-oxy-ketone and benzene-carboxyl-ate carbonyl C-H⋯O inter-actions, generating a supra-molecular layer in the ac plane.

  10. Justine user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    Justine is the graphical user interface to the Los Alamos Radiation Modeling Interactive Environment (LARAMIE). It provides LARAMIE customers with a powerful, robust, easy-to-use, WYSIWYG interface that facilitates geometry construction and problem specification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with LARAMIE, and the transport codes available, i.e., MCNPTM and DANTSYSTM. No attempt is made in this manual to describe these codes in detail. Information about LARAMIE, DANTSYS, and MCNP are available elsewhere. It i also assumed that the reader is familiar with the Unix operating system and with Motif widgets and their look and feel. However, a brief description of Motif and how one interacts with it can be found in Appendix A.

  11. Crystal structure of 3-(2,5-di-meth-oxy-phen-yl)propionic acid.

    PubMed

    Bugenhagen, Bernhard; Al Jasem, Yosef; AlAzani, Mariam; Thiemann, Thies

    2015-05-01

    In the crystal of the title compound, C11H14O4, the aromatic ring is almost coplanar with the 2-position meth-oxy group with which it subtends a dihedral of 0.54 (2)°, while the 5-position meth-oxy group makes a corresponding dihedral angle of just 5.30 (2)°. The angle between the mean planes of the aromatic ring and the propionic acid group is 78.56 (2)°. The fully extended propionic side chain is in a trans configuration with a C-C-C-C torsion angle of -172.25 (7)°. In the crystal, hydrogen bonding is limited to dimer formation via R 2 (2)(8) rings. The hydrogen-bonded dimers are stacked along the b axis. The average planes of the two benzene rings in a dimer are parallel to each other, but at an offset of 4.31 (2) Å. Within neighbouring dimers along the [101] direction, the average mol-ecular benzene planes are almost perpendicular to each other, with a dihedral angle of 85.33 (2)°.

  12. Nitric oxide synthesis contributes to IL-2-induced antitumor responses against intraperitoneal Meth A tumor.

    PubMed

    Yim, C Y; McGregor, J R; Kwon, O D; Bastian, N R; Rees, M; Mori, M; Hibbs, J B; Samlowski, W E

    1995-11-01

    IL-2 therapy is a potent inductive stimulus for nitric oxide (NO.) synthesis in mice and humans. It is not yet clear whether NO. can contribute to IL-2-induced therapeutic responses. The murine skin cancer Meth A is relatively resistant to lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell killing, allowing evaluation of the role of IL-2-induced NO. synthesis in vivo, without contribution by LAK cells. Subcutaneous IL-2 treatment of mice bearing i.p. Meth A tumor increased nitrite production by cells derived from ascites (63 +/- 14 microM vs 3.2 +/- 1.5 microM in untreated controls). N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine (MLA), NO. synthase inhibitor, prevented this increase. NO. production correlated in an inverse fashion with tumor cell proliferation in vitro. Evidence for IL-2-induced heme nitrosylation was demonstrated in tumor cells by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. By immunomagnetic depletion experiments, macrophages were implicated as a major source of NO. synthesis. Cytologic and flow-cytometric evaluation revealed that IL-2 treatment resulted in enhanced lymphocyte and macrophage recruitment into malignant ascites, and decreases in tumor cell recovery. MLA administration further increased host cell recovery. Subcutaneous IL-2 therapy increased urinary nitrate excretion up to eightfold in mice, and appeared to produce a significant survival advantage that was prevented by MLA administration.

  13. N-(4-Meth-oxy-benz-yl)phthalimide: a triclinic polymorph.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki

    2012-08-01

    THE TITLE COMPOUND [SYSTEMATIC NAME: 2-(4-meth-oxy-benz-yl)-isoindoline-1,3-dione], C(16)H(13)NO(3), represents a triclinic polymorph of the previously reported monoclinic form [Warzecha et al. (2006 ▶). Acta Cryst. E62, o5450-o5452]. The reaction of potassium phthalimide and 4-meth-oxy-benzyl chloride in dimethyl-formamide gave platelet-shaped crystals; these were harvested and then needle-shaped crystals were deposited. The platelet- and needle-shaped crystals correspond to the triclinic and monoclinic forms, respectively. The N-C-C(ar)-C(ar) torsion angles between the ring systems are -82.66 (14) and 95.28 (13)°, resulting in a roof-shaped conformation. In the crystal, mol-ecules are accumulated by offset face-face π-π inter-actions between phthalimide units [centroid-centroid distances = 3.640 (2) and 3.651 (2) Å], with inter-planar distances of 3.321 (1) and 3.435 (1) Å. Weak inter-molecular C(ar-yl)-H⋯O=C and C(alk-yl)-H⋯O=C contacts form C(8) and C(11) infinite chain motifs, respectively.

  14. Crystal structure of 2-[chloro­(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)meth­yl]-2-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)-5,5-di­methyl­cyclo­hexane-1,3-dione

    PubMed Central

    Chelli, Saloua; Troshin, Konstantin; Lakhdar, Sami; Mayr, Herbert; Mayer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the title compound, C23H25ClO4, the cyclo­hexane ring adopts a chair conformation with the 4-meth­oxy­phenyl substituent in an axial position and the chloro­(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)methyl substituent in an equatorial position. The packing features inversion dimers formed by pairs of C—H⋯O contacts and strands along [100] and [010] established by further C—H⋯O and C—H⋯Cl contacts, respectively. PMID:27006792

  15. Methamphetamine (Meth)

    MedlinePlus

    ... from heart attack or stroke caused by the drug’s effects on the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, which raises heart beat ... know that methamphetamine is "worse" than any other drug, but its effects can last longer than some. I think the ...

  16. Crystal structure of poly[[μ-4-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)pyridine-κ(2) N:O][4-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)pyridine-κN](μ-thio-cyanato-κ(2) N:S)(thio-cyanato-κN)cadmium].

    PubMed

    Werner, Julia; Jess, Inke; Näther, Christian

    2015-06-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, [Cd(NCS)2(C6H7NO)2] n is made up of Cd(2+) cations that are coordinated by three thio-cyanate ligands and three 4-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)pyridine ligands within distorted N4OS octa-hedra. The asymmetric unit consists of one Cd(2+) cation, two thio-cyanate anions and two 4-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)pyridine ligands in general positions. Two Cd(2+) cations are linked by two μ-1,3 N- and S-bonding thio-ycanate anions into dimers which are further linked into branched chains along [100] by two μ-1,6 N- and O-bonding 4-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)pyridine ligands. One additional N-bonded 4-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)pyridine ligand and one additional N-bonded thio-cyanate anion are only terminally bonded to the metal cation. Inter-chain O-H⋯S hydrogen bonds between the hy-droxy H atoms and one of the thio-cyanate S atoms connect the chains into a three-dimensional network.

  17. Crystal structure of 1-(8-meth-oxy-2H-chromen-3-yl)ethanone.

    PubMed

    Koh, Dongsoo

    2014-09-01

    In the structure of the title compound, C12H12O3, the di-hydro-pyran ring is fused with the benzene ring. The di-hydro-pyran ring is in a half-chair conformation, with the ring O and methyl-ene C atoms positioned 1.367 (3) and 1.504 (4) Å, respectively, on either side of the mean plane formed by the other four atoms. The meth-oxy group is coplanar with the benzene ring to which it is connected [Cb-Cb-Om-Cm torsion angle = -0.2 (4)°; b = benzene and m = meth-oxy], and similarly the aldehyde is coplanar with respect to the double bond of the di-hydro-pyran ring [Cdh-Cdh-Ca-Oa = -178.1 (3)°; dh = di-hydro-pyran and a = aldehyde]. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by weak meth-yl-meth-oxy C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into supra-molecular chains along the a-axis direction.

  18. DiseaseMeth version 2.0: a major expansion and update of the human disease methylation database

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yichun; Wei, Yanjun; Gu, Yue; Zhang, Shumei; Lyu, Jie; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Chuangeng; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Yihan; Liu, Hongbo; Zhang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The human disease methylation database (DiseaseMeth, http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/diseasemeth/) is an interactive database that aims to present the most complete collection and annotation of aberrant DNA methylation in human diseases, especially various cancers. Recently, the high-throughput microarray and sequencing technologies have promoted the production of methylome data that contain comprehensive knowledge of human diseases. In this DiseaseMeth update, we have increased the number of samples from 3610 to 32 701, the number of diseases from 72 to 88 and the disease–gene associations from 216 201 to 679 602. DiseaseMeth version 2.0 provides an expanded comprehensive list of disease–gene associations based on manual curation from experimental studies and computational identification from high-throughput methylome data. Besides the data expansion, we also updated the search engine and visualization tools. In particular, we enhanced the differential analysis tools, which now enable online automated identification of DNA methylation abnormalities in human disease in a case-control or disease–disease manner. To facilitate further mining of the disease methylome, three new web tools were developed for cluster analysis, functional annotation and survival analysis. DiseaseMeth version 2.0 should be a useful resource platform for further understanding the molecular mechanisms of human diseases. PMID:27899673

  19. Different manner of DNA synthesis in polyploidizations of meth-A and B16F10 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa-Yamamoto, K; Zong, Z; Murakami, M; Odashima, S

    1997-10-01

    Polyploidization of Meth-A and B16-F10 cells by demecolcine was examined using flow cytometry (FCM). In the presence of demecolcine, both cell lines were polyploidized to more than 16c DNA content. A marked difference was observed in the durations of S phase of polyploidy. The S-phase duration of Meth-A cells was doubly increased with ploidy, but that of B16F10 cells remained constant. When the rate of DNA synthesis in the polyploidizing cells was examined through the BrdU-uptake experiments, it was confirmed that the level of DNA-synthesis rate was constant in Meth-A cells but increased in B16F10 cells. The cellular content of c-Myc protein in polyploidized cells was also examined using anti-c-Myc monoclonal antibody. The c-Myc level of Meth-A cells was constant regardless of the ploidy but that of B16F10 cells increased with ploidy. Thus, the c-Myc content seems to be related to the duration of S phase in polyploidy.

  20. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development

  1. AthMethPre: a web server for the prediction and query of mRNA m(6)A sites in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shunian; Yan, Zhangming; Liu, Ke; Zhang, Yaou; Sun, Zhirong

    2016-10-18

    N(6)-Methyladenosine (m(6)A) is the most prevalent and abundant modification in mRNA that has been linked to many key biological processes. High-throughput experiments have generated m(6)A-peaks across the transcriptome of A. thaliana, but the specific methylated sites were not assigned, which impedes the understanding of m(6)A functions in plants. Therefore, computational prediction of mRNA m(6)A sites becomes emergently important. Here, we present a method to predict the m(6)A sites for A. thaliana mRNA sequence(s). To predict the m(6)A sites of an mRNA sequence, we employed the support vector machine to build a classifier using the features of the positional flanking nucleotide sequence and position-independent k-mer nucleotide spectrum. Our method achieved good performance and was applied to a web server to provide service for the prediction of A. thaliana m(6)A sites. The server also provides a comprehensive database of predicted transcriptome-wide m(6)A sites and curated m(6)A-seq peaks from the literature for query and visualization. The AthMethPre web server is the first web server that provides a user-friendly tool for the prediction and query of A. thaliana mRNA m(6)A sites, which is freely accessible for public use at .

  2. Crystal structures of three 3,4,5-tri­meth­oxy­benzamide-based derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ligia R.; Low, John Nicolson; Oliveira, Catarina; Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of three benzamide derivatives, viz. N-(6-hy­droxy­hex­yl)-3,4,5-tri­meth­oxy­benzamide, C16H25NO5, (1), N-(6-anilinohex­yl)-3,4,5-tri­meth­oxy­benzamide, C22H30N2O4, (2), and N-(6,6-di­eth­oxy­hex­yl)-3,4,5-tri­meth­oxy­benzamide, C20H33NO6, (3), are described. These compounds differ only in the substituent at the end of the hexyl chain and the nature of these substituents determines the differences in hydrogen bonding between the mol­ecules. In each mol­ecule, the m-meth­oxy substituents are virtually coplanar with the benzyl ring, while the p-meth­oxy substituent is almost perpendicular. The carbonyl O atom of the amide rotamer is trans related with the amidic H atom. In each structure, the benzamide N—H donor group and O acceptor atoms link the mol­ecules into C(4) chains. In 1, a terminal –OH group links the mol­ecules into a C(3) chain and the combined effect of the C(4) and C(3) chains is a ribbon made up of screw related R 2 2(17) rings in which the ⋯O—H⋯ chain lies in the centre of the ribbon and the tri­meth­oxy­benzyl groups forms the edges. In 2, the combination of the benzamide C(4) chain and the hydrogen bond formed by the terminal N—H group to an O atom of the 4-meth­oxy group link the mol­ecules into a chain of R 2 2(17) rings. In 3, the mol­ecules are linked only by C(4) chains. PMID:27308017

  3. Novel (meth)acrylate monomers for ultrarapid polymerization and enhanced polymer properties

    SciTech Connect

    Beckel, E. R.; Berchtold, K. A.; Nie, J.; Lu, H.; Stansbury, J. W.; Bowman, C. N.

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet light is known to be one of the most efficient methods to initiatc polymeric reactions in the presence of a photonitiator. Photopolymerizations are advantageous because the chemistry of the materials can be tailored to design liquid monomers for ultrarapid polymerization into a solid polymer material. One way to achieve rapid photopolymerizations is to utilize multifunctional (meth)acrylate monomers. which form highly crosslinked polymers; however, these monomers typically do not achieve complete functional group conversion. Recently, Decker et al. developed novel monovinyl acrylate monomers that display polyriicrization kinetics that rival those of multifunctional acrylate monomers. These novel acrylate monomers incorporate secondary functionalities and end groups such as carbonates, carbamates, cyclic carbonates and oxazolidone which promote the increased polymerization kinetics of these monomers. In addition to thc polynierization kinetics, these novel monovinyl monomers form crosslinked polymers, which are characterized by having high strength and high flexibility. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the polymerization kinetics and crosslinking are not well understood.

  4. The effects of D3R on TLR4 signaling involved in the regulation of METH-mediated mast cells activation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li; Geng, Yan; Li, Ming; Jin, Yao-Feng; Ren, Hui-Xun; Li, Xia; Wu, Feng; Wang, Biao; Cheng, Wei-Ying; Chen, Teng; Chen, Yan-Jiong

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating studies have revealed that the dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) plays an important role in methamphetamine (METH) addiction. However, the action of D3R on METH-mediated immune response and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. Mast cells (MCs) are currently identified as effector cells in many processes of immune responses, and MC activation is induced by various stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, CD117 and FcεRI are known as MC markers due to their specific expression in MCs. To investigate the effects of D3R on METH-mediated alteration of LPS-induced MCs activation and the underlying mechanism, in this study, we examined the expression of CD117 and FcεRI in the intestines of wild-type (D3R(+/+)) and D3R-deficient (D3R(-/-)) mice. We also measured the production of MC-derived cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, IL-13 and CCL-5, in the bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) of WT and D3R(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we explored the effects of D3R on METH-mediated TLR4 and downstream MAPK and NF-κB signaling induced by LPS in mouse BMMCs. We found that METH suppressed MC activation induced by LPS in the intestines of D3R(+/)mice. In contrast, LPS-induced MC activation was less affected by METH in D3R(-/-) mice. Furthermore, METH altered LPS-induced cytokine production in BMMCs of D3R(+/+) mice but not D3R(-/-) mice. D3R was also involved in METH-mediated modulation of LPS-induced expression of TLR4 and downstream MAPK and NF-κB signaling molecules in mouse BMMCs. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the effect of D3R on TLR4 signaling may be implicated in the regulation of METH-mediated MCs activation induced by LPS.

  5. Adding a user and changing user roles

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Webmasters can add users to a web area, and assign or change roles, which define the actions a user is able to take in the web area. Non-webmasters must use a request form to add users and change roles.

  6. Self-initiation of UV photopolymerization reactions using tetrahalogenated bisphenol A (meth)acrylates.

    PubMed

    Pelras, Théophile; Knolle, Wolfgang; Naumov, Sergej; Heymann, Katja; Daikos, Olesya; Scherzer, Tom

    2017-02-17

    The potential of tetrachlorinated and tetrabrominated bisphenol A diacrylates and dimethacrylates for self-initiation of a radical photopolymerization was investigated. The kinetics of the photopolymerization of an acrylic model varnish containing halogenated monomers was studied by real-time FTIR spectroscopy, whereas the formation of reactive species and secondary products was elucidated by laser flash photolysis and product analysis by GC-MS after steady-state photolysis. The interpretation of the experimental data and the analysis of possible reaction pathways were assisted by quantum chemical calculations. It was shown that all halogenated monomers lead to a significant acceleration of the photopolymerization kinetics at a minimum concentration of 5 wt%. Steady-state and laser flash photolysis measurements as well as quantum chemical calculations showed that brominated and chlorinated samples do not follow the same pathway to generate radical species. Whereas chlorinated (meth)acrylates may cleave only at the C-O bonds of the carboxyl groups resulting in acrolein and oxyl radicals for initiation, brominated monomers may cleave either at the C-O bonds or at the C-Br bonds delivering aryl and bromine radicals. The quantum yields for the photolysis of the halogenated monomers were found to be in the order of 0.1 for acrylates and 0.2 for methacrylates (with an estimated error of 25%), independently of the attached Br and Cl halogens. Finally, the trihalogenated bisphenol A di(meth)acrylate radicals and the acrolein radicals were found to show the highest efficiencies for the reaction with another acrylic double bond leading to the formation of a polymer network.

  7. User Working Group Charter

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-29

    ... Amended 2010   The Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) User Working Group (UWG) is chartered by the Earth Observing ... of the ASDC user interface, development of the Information Management System (IMS), and ASDC user conferences requirements for and ...

  8. Recognizing the adolescent drug abuser.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, R G; Jacobs, E A

    1987-03-01

    Adolescents are at high risk for using and abusing illicit drugs. Guidelines for recognizing drug abusers are presented as well as a staging process for progression of drug use. The family physician is in an ideal position to identify young users/abusers and to assist them and their families in obtaining much needed assistance.

  9. Intravenous Prenatal Nicotine Exposure Alters METH-Induced Hyperactivity, Conditioned Hyperactivity, and BDNF in Adult Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Ryan T; Brown, Russell W; Morgan, Amanda J; Mactutus, Charles F; Harrod, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    In the USA, approximately 15% of women smoke tobacco cigarettes during pregnancy. In utero tobacco smoke exposure produces somatic growth deficits like intrauterine growth restriction and low birth weight in offspring, but it can also negatively influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in later stages of life, such as an increased incidence of obesity and drug abuse. Animal models demonstrate that prenatal nicotine (PN) alters the development of the mesocorticolimbic system, which is important for organizing goal-directed behavior. In the present study, we determined whether intravenous (IV) PN altered the initiation and/or expression of methamphetamine (METH)-induced locomotor sensitization as a measure of mesocorticolimbic function in adult rat offspring. We also determined whether PN and/or METH exposure altered protein levels of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) in the nucleus accumbens, the dorsal striatum, and the prefrontal cortex of adult offspring. BDNF was of interest because of its role in the development and maintenance of the mesocorticolimbic pathway and its ability to modulate neural processes that contribute to drug abuse, such as sensitization of the dopamine system. Dams were injected with IV nicotine (0.05 mg/kg/injection) or saline, 3×/day on gestational days 8-21. Testing was conducted when offspring reached adulthood (around postnatal day 90). Following 3 once daily habituation sessions the animals received a saline injection and baseline locomotor activity was measured. PN and prenatal saline (PS)-exposed offspring then received 10 once daily injections of METH (0.3 mg/kg) to induce locomotor sensitization. The animals received a METH injection (0.3 mg/kg) to assess the expression of sensitization following a 14-day period of no injections. A day later, all animals were injected with saline and conditioned hyperactivity was assessed. Brain tissue was harvested 24 h later. PN animals habituated more slowly to the activity chambers

  10. The User Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    User experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of user experience and discusses the design of user experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of user experience design: (1)…

  11. Franklin: User Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun; Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-07

    The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

  12. 40 CFR 721.6120 - Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. 721.6120 Section 721.6120 Protection of Environment...-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  13. 40 CFR 721.6120 - Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. 721.6120 Section 721.6120 Protection of Environment...-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  14. 40 CFR 721.6120 - Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. 721.6120 Section 721.6120 Protection of Environment...-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6120 - Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. 721.6120 Section 721.6120 Protection of Environment...-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  16. 40 CFR 721.6120 - Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, 1,2-eth-a-ne-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. 721.6120 Section 721.6120 Protection of Environment...-diyl tet-ra-kis(2-chloro-1-meth-yl-ethyl) ester. (a) Chemical substances and significant new...

  17. Crystal structure of 3-{[4-(2-meth-oxy-phen-yl)piperazin-1-yl]meth-yl}-5-(thio-phen-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxa-diazole-2(3H)-thione.

    PubMed

    Al-Alshaikh, Monirah A; Abuelizz, Hatem A; El-Emam, Ali A; Abdelbaky, Mohammed S M; Garcia-Granda, Santiago

    2016-02-01

    The title compound, C18H20N4O2S2, is a new 1,3,4-oxa-diazole and a key pharmacophore of several biologically active agents. It is composed of a meth-yl(thio-phen-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxa-diazole-2(3H)-thione moiety linked to a 2-meth-oxy-phenyl unit via a piperazine ring that has a chair conformation. The thio-phene ring mean plane lies almost in the plane of the oxa-diazole ring, with a dihedral angle of 4.35 (9)°. The 2-meth-oxy-phenyl ring is almost normal to the oxa-diazole ring, with a dihedral angle of 84.17 (10)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by weak C-H⋯S hydrogen bonds and C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming layers parallel to the bc plane. The layers are linked via weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and slipped parallel π-π inter-actions [inter-centroid distance = 3.6729 (10) Å], forming a three-dimensional structure. The thio-phene ring has an approximate 180° rotational disorder about the bridging C-C bond.

  18. Crystal structure of tetra-kis-(μ3-2-{[1,1-bis-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)-2-oxidoeth-yl]imino-meth-yl}phenolato)tetra-copper(II) ethanol monosolvate 2.5-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weilun; Ran, Jingwen

    2015-05-01

    The title compound, [Cu4(C11H13NO4)4]·CH3CH2OH·2.5H2O, is an electronically neutral tetra-nuclear copper(II) complex with a cubane-like Cu4O4 core. The complete molecule has point group symmetry 2. The phenol hy-droxy group and one of the three alcohol hy-droxy groups of each 2-{[tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)meth-yl]imino-meth-yl}phenol ligand are depro-ton-ated, while the secondary amine and the other two hy-droxy groups remain unchanged. The Cu(II) atoms in the Cu4O4 core are connected by four μ3-O atoms from the deprotonated alcohol hy-droxy groups. Each of the penta-coordinated Cu(II) ions has an NO4 distorted square-pyramidal environment through coordination to the tridentate Schiff base ligands. The Cu-N/O bond lengths span the range 1.902 (4)-1.955 (4) Å, similar to values reported for related structures. There are O-H⋯O hydrogen-bond inter-actions between the complex molecules and the ethanol and water solvent molecules, leading to the formation of a three-dimensional network. The ethanol solvent molecule is disordered about a twofold rotation axis. One of the two independent water molecules is also located on this twofold rotation axis and shows half-occupancy.

  19. Bis{μ-2-[(pyrimidin-2-yl)amino-meth-yl]phenolato}-κ(2) N (1):O;κ(2) O:N (1)-bis-({2-[(pyrimidin-2-yl-κN)amino-meth-yl]phenol}silver(I)) dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Ng, Seik Weng

    2012-12-01

    The Ag(I) atom in the title centrosymmetric dinuclear compound, [Ag2(C11H10N3O)2(C11H11N3O)2]·2H2O, shows a T-shaped coordination arising from bonding to the N atom of a neutral 2-[(pyrimidin-2-yl)amino-meth-yl]phenol ligand, the N atom of the 2-[(pyrimidin-2-yl)amino-meth-yl]phenolate anion [N-Ag-N = 171.8 (1)°] and the terminal O atom of the other anion [Ag-O = 2.606 (3) Å]. A pair of 2-[(pyrimidin-2-yl)amino-meth-yl]phenolate anions link the two Ag(I) atoms to form the dinuclear compound. In the crystal, adjacent dinuclear mol-ecules are linked to the lattice water mol-ecules, generating an O-H⋯O- and N-H⋯O-connected three-dimensional network. In the crystal, the hy-droxy H atom is disordered over two positions in a 1:1 ratio; one half-occupancy H atom is connected to one hy-droxy group, whereas the other half-occupancy H atom is connected to another hy-droxy group.

  20. Mechanisms of action of (meth)acrylates in hemolytic activity, in vivo toxicity and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes determined using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Seiichiro; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the quantitative structure-activity relationships between hemolytic activity (log 1/H(50)) or in vivo mouse intraperitoneal (ip) LD(50) using reported data for α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds such as (meth)acrylate monomers and their (13)C-NMR β-carbon chemical shift (δ). The log 1/H(50) value for methacrylates was linearly correlated with the δC(β) value. That for (meth)acrylates was linearly correlated with log P, an index of lipophilicity. The ipLD(50) for (meth)acrylates was linearly correlated with δC(β) but not with log P. For (meth)acrylates, the δC(β) value, which is dependent on the π-electron density on the β-carbon, was linearly correlated with PM3-based theoretical parameters (chemical hardness, η; electronegativity, χ; electrophilicity, ω), whereas log P was linearly correlated with heat of formation (HF). Also, the interaction between (meth)acrylates and DPPC liposomes in cell membrane molecular models was investigated using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The log 1/H(50) value was related to the difference in chemical shift (ΔδHa) (Ha: H (trans) attached to the β-carbon) between the free monomer and the DPPC liposome-bound monomer. Monomer-induced DSC phase transition properties were related to HF for monomers. NMR chemical shifts may represent a valuable parameter for investigating the biological mechanisms of action of (meth)acrylates.

  1. IL-7 inhibits tumor growth by promoting T cell-mediated antitumor immunity in Meth A model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian-Cai; Shen, Guo-Bo; Wang, Shi-Min; Wan, Yong-Sheng; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Immune suppression is well documented during tumor progression, which includes loss of effect of T cells and expansion of T regulatory (Treg) cells. IL-7 plays a key role in the proliferation, survival and homeostasis of T cells and displays a potent antitumor activity in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of IL-7 in Meth A model. IL-7 inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice with corresponding increases in the frequency of CD4 and CD8 T cells, Th1 (CD4(+)IFN-γ(+)), Tc1 (CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)) and T cells cytolytic activity against Meth A cells. Neutralization of CD4 or CD8 T cells reversed the antitumor benefit of IL-7. Furthermore, IL-7 decreased regulatory T Foxp3 as well as cells suppressive activity with a reciprocal increase in SMAD7. In addition, we observed an increase of the serum concentrations of IL-6 and IFN-γ, and a significant decrease of TGF-β and IL-10 after IL-7 treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that IL-7 augments T cell-mediated antitumor immunity and improves the effect of antitumor in Meth A model.

  2. From the N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Catalyzed Conjugate Addition of Alcohols to the Controlled Polymerization of (Meth)acrylates.

    PubMed

    Ottou, Winnie Nzahou; Bourichon, Damien; Vignolle, Joan; Wirotius, Anne-Laure; Robert, Fredéric; Landais, Yannick; Sotiropoulos, Jean-Marc; Miqueu, Karinne; Taton, Daniel

    2015-06-22

    Among various N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) tested, only 1,3-bis(tert-butyl)imidazol-2-ylidene (NHC(tBu) ) proved to selectively promote the catalytic conjugate addition of alcohols onto (meth)acrylate substrates. This rather rare example of NHC-catalyzed 1,4-addition of alcohols was investigated as a simple means to trigger the polymerization of both methyl methacrylate and methyl acrylate (MMA and MA, respectively). Well-defined α-alkoxy poly(methyl (meth)acrylate) (PM(M)A) chains, the molar masses of which could be controlled by the initial [(meth)acrylate]0/[ROH]0 molar ratio, were ultimately obtained in N,N-dimethylformamide at 25 °C. A hydroxyl-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-OH) macro-initiator was also employed to directly access PEO-b-PMMA amphiphilic block copolymers. Investigations into the reaction mechanism by DFT calculations revealed the occurrence of two competitive concerted pathways, involving either the activation of the alcohol or that of the monomer by NHC(tBu) .

  3. Adolescent contraception: review and guidance for pediatric clinicians.

    PubMed

    Potter, J; Santelli, J S

    2015-02-01

    The majority of adolescents initiate sexual activity during their teenage years, making contraception an important aspect of routine adolescent health care. Despite common misperceptions, all available methods of reversible contraception are appropriate for adolescent use. Contraceptive side effects profiles and barriers to use of certain methods should be considered when providing contraceptives to adolescents. In particular, ease of use, confidentiality, and menstrual effects are main concerns of adolescents. Contraceptive counseling with adolescents should describe method efficacy, discuss user preferences, explore barriers to use, counsel regarding sexually transmitted infection prevention, and consider what to do if contraception fails. Emergency contraception should be widely discussed with adolescents, as it is appropriate for use during gaps in other contraceptive use, method failure, and adolescents who are not using another form of contraception. Dual method use (condom plus a highly effective method of contraception) is the gold standard for prevention of both pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.

  4. N-[(R)-(6-Bromo-2-meth­oxy­quinolin-3-yl)(phen­yl)meth­yl]-N-[(S)-1-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)eth­yl]-2-(piperazin-1-yl)acetamide

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lei; Wang, Rui; Li, Chang-Yi; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Sun, Tie-Min

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound, C32H35BrN4O3, the piperazine ring exists in a chair conformation. The quinoline ring system is oriented at dihedral angles of 82.70 (17) and 19.54 (17)° to the phenyl and meth­oxy­phenyl rings, respectively. Weak inter­molecular C—H⋯π inter­actions are present in the crystal structure. PMID:22219953

  5. “… you would probably want to do it. Cause that’s what made them popular”: Exploring Perceptions of Inhalant Utility Among Young Adolescent Nonusers and Occasional Users

    PubMed Central

    SIEGEL, JASON T.; ALVARO, EUSEBIO M.; PATEL, NEIL; CRANO, WILLIAM D.

    2011-01-01

    With an eye toward future primary prevention efforts, this study explores perceptions of inhalant utility among young adolescents in the United States. The study makes use of data gathered via nine focus groups conducted in Tucson, Arizona in 2004 (N = 47, mean age = 13.2 years). Three main themes emerged concerning the perceived utility of inhalant use: (1) Inhalant use as a means of mental escape, (2) Inhalant use as a social tool, and (3) Inhalant use as a parental relations tool. Additionally, participants discussed an interaction hypothesis regarding inhalant use and popularity. Implications for future research are suggested and limitations described. PMID:19360535

  6. Crystal structure of 4-(meth-oxy-carbon-yl)phenyl-boronic acid.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Keith J; Senge, Mathias O

    2015-10-01

    In the title compound, C8H9BO4, the meth-oxy-carbonyl group is rotated out of the plane of the benzene ring by 7.70 (6)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked via pairs of O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, involving the boronic acid OH groups, forming inversion dimers. The dimers are linked via O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, involving a boronic acid OH group and the carbonyl O atom, forming undulating sheets parallel to (10-2). Within the sheets there are also C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds present, also involving the carbonyl O atom. The sheets are linked via C-H⋯π and offset face-to-face π-inter-actions between inversion-related mol-ecules [inter-centroid distance = 3.7843 (16) Å, inter-planar distance = 3.3427 (4) Å and offset = 1.744 Å], forming a three-dimensional structure.

  7. Side-Chain Liquid Crystalline Poly(meth)acrylates with Bent-Core Mesogens

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,X.; Tenneti, K.; Li, C.; Bai, Y.; Wan, X.; Fan, X.; Zhou, Q.; Rong, L.; Hsiao, B.

    2007-01-01

    We report the design, synthesis, and characterization of side-chain liquid crystalline (LC) poly(meth)acrylates with end-on bent-core liquid crystalline (BCLC) mesogens. Both conventional free radical polymerization and atom transfer radical polymerization have been used to synthesize these liquid crystalline polymers (LCP). The resulting polymers exhibit thermotropic LC behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermopolarized light microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction, and small-angle X-ray scattering were used to characterize the LC structure of both monomers and polymers. The electro-optic (EO) measurement was carried out by applying a triangular wave and measuring the LC EO response. SmCP (Smectic C indicates the LC molecules are tilted with respect to the layer normal; P denotes polar ordering) phases were observed for both monomers and polymers. In LC monomers, typical antiferroelectric switching was observed. In the ground state, SmCP{sub A} (A denotes antiferroelectric) was observed which switched to SmCP{sub F} (F denotes ferroelectric) upon applying an electric field. In the corresponding LCP, a unique bilayer structure was observed, which is different from the reported BCLC bilayer SmCG (G denotes generated) phase. Most of the LCPs did not switch upon applying electric field while weak AF switching was observed in a low molecular weight poly{l_brace}3'-[4-(4-n-dodecyloxybenzoyloxy)benzoyloxy]-4-(12-acryloyloxydodecyloxy)benzoyloxybiphenyl{r_brace} sample.

  8. Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Poly((meth)acrylic acid) Brushes.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhenyuan; Xu, Hong; Gu, Hongchen

    2015-07-15

    Poly((meth)acrylic acid) (P(M)AA) brushes possess a number of distinctive properties that are particularly attractive for biomedical applications. This minireview summarizes recent advances in the synthesis and biomedical applications of P(M)AA brushes and brushes containing P(M)AA segments. First, we review different surface-initiated polymerization (SIP) methods, with a focus on recent progress in the surface-initiated controlled/living radical polymerization (SI-CLRP) techniques used to generate P(M)AA brushes with a tailored structure. Next, we discuss biomolecule immobilization methods for P(M)AA brushes, including physical adsorption, covalent binding, and affinity interactions. Finally, typical biomedical applications of P(M)AA brushes are reviewed, and their performance is discussed based on their unique properties. We conclude that P(M)AA brushes are promising biomaterials, and more potential biomedical applications are expected to emerge with the further development of synthetic techniques and increased understanding of their interactions with biological systems.

  9. Crystal structure of 2-meth­oxy-1-nitro­naphthalene

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Hasna; Khouili, Mostafa; El Ammari, Lahcen; Saadi, Mohamed; Ketatni, El Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C11H9NO3, contains two mol­ecules, A and B. In mol­ecule A, the dihedral angle between the planes of the naphthalene ring system (r.m.s. deviation = 0.003 Å) and the nitro group is 89.9 (2)°, and the C atom of the meth­oxy group deviates from the naphthyl plane by 0.022 (2) Å. Equivalent data for mol­ecule B are 0.008 Å, 65.9 (2)° and −0.198 (2) Å, respectively. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by weak C—H⋯O inter­actions, forming [100] chains of alternating A and B mol­ecules. Weak aromatic π–π stacking contacts, with a range of centroid–centroid distances from 3.5863 (9) to 3.8048 (9) Å, are also observed. PMID:26594431

  10. User interface user's guide for HYPGEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Ing-Tsau

    1992-01-01

    The user interface (UI) of HYPGEN is developed using Panel Library to shorten the learning curve for new users and provide easier ways to run HYPGEN for casual users as well as for advanced users. Menus, buttons, sliders, and type-in fields are used extensively in UI to allow users to point and click with a mouse to choose various available options or to change values of parameters. On-line help is provided to give users information on using UI without consulting the manual. Default values are set for most parameters and boundary conditions are determined by UI to further reduce the effort needed to run HYPGEN; however, users are free to make any changes and save it in a file for later use. A hook to PLOT3D is built in to allow graphics manipulation. The viewpoint and min/max box for PLOT3D windows are computed by UI and saved in a PLOT3D journal file. For large grids which take a long time to generate on workstations, the grid generator (HYPGEN) can be run on faster computers such as Crays, while UI stays at the workstation.

  11. Adolescent Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leftwich, Heidi K; Alves, Marcus Vinicius Ortega

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent pregnancy, although on the decline, represents a significant public health concern. Often adolescents present late to prenatal care, either from lack of knowledge, fear of consequences, limited access, stigma, or all of the above. Although multifaceted, there are many risks both to mother and child that are increased in adolescent pregnancy. Many are unintended and are at risk for repeat adolescent pregnancy, especially within the first 2 years. Risks include but are not limited to: low birth weight, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and preeclampsia, as well as feelings of social isolation, delayed or neglected educational goals, and maternal depression.

  12. Cannabis and adolescent brain development.

    PubMed

    Lubman, Dan I; Cheetham, Ali; Yücel, Murat

    2015-04-01

    Heavy cannabis use has been frequently associated with increased rates of mental illness and cognitive impairment, particularly amongst adolescent users. However, the neurobiological processes that underlie these associations are still not well understood. In this review, we discuss the findings of studies examining the acute and chronic effects of cannabis use on the brain, with a particular focus on the impact of commencing use during adolescence. Accumulating evidence from both animal and human studies suggests that regular heavy use during this period is associated with more severe and persistent negative outcomes than use during adulthood, suggesting that the adolescent brain may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of cannabis exposure. As the endocannabinoid system plays an important role in brain development, it is plausible that prolonged use during adolescence results in a disruption in the normative neuromaturational processes that occur during this period. We identify synaptic pruning and white matter development as two processes that may be adversely impacted by cannabis exposure during adolescence. Potentially, alterations in these processes may underlie the cognitive and emotional deficits that have been associated with regular use commencing during adolescence.

  13. NASCAP user's manual, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, J. J., III

    1978-01-01

    NASCAP simulates the charging process for a complex object in either tenuous plasma (geosynchronous orbit) or ground test (electron gun source) environment. Program control words, the structure of user input files, and various user options available are described in this computer programmer's user manual.

  14. Adolescents and Cyber Bullying: The Precaution Adoption Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, John

    2016-01-01

    A survey of adolescents (N = 1,488) documented Facebook use and experience with cyber bullying. The study found that 84% of adolescents (middle school through college undergraduates) use Facebook, and that most users log on daily. While 30% of the sample reported being cyber bullied, only 12.5% quit using the site, and only 18% told a parent or…

  15. DOSFAC2 user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.L.; Chanin, D.

    1997-12-01

    This document describes the DOSFAC2 code, which is used for generating dose-to-source conversion factors for the MACCS2 code. DOSFAC2 is a revised and updated version of the DOSFAC code that was distributed with version 1.5.11 of the MACCS code. included are (1) an overview and background of DOSFAC2, (2) a summary of two new functional capabilities, and (3) a user`s guide. 20 refs., 5 tabs.

  16. Adolescent care

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Andrée; Maheux, Brigitte; Frappier, Jean-Yves; Haley, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate how often family physicians see adolescents with mental health problems and how they manage these problems. DESIGN Mailed survey completed anonymously. SETTING Province of Quebec. PARTICIPANTS All 358 French-speaking family physicians who practise primarily in local community health centres (CLSCs), including physicians working in CLSC youth clinics, and 749 French-speaking practitioners randomly selected from private practice. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Frequency with which physicians saw adolescents with mental health problems, such as depression, suicidal thoughts, behavioural disorders, substance abuse, attempted suicide, or suicide, during the last year or since they started practice. RESULTS Response rate was 70%. Most physicians reported having seen adolescents with mental health problems during the last year. About 10% of practitioners not working in youth clinics reported seeing adolescents with these disorders at least weekly. Anxiety was the most frequently seen problem. A greater proportion of physicians working in youth clinics reported often seeing adolescents for all the mental health problems examined in this study. Between 8% and 33% of general practitioners not working in youth clinics said they had not seen any adolescents with depression, behavioural disorders, or substance abuse. More than 80% of physicians had seen adolescents who had attempted suicide, and close to 30% had had adolescent patients who committed suicide. CONCLUSION Family physicians play a role in adolescent mental health care. The prevalence of mental health problems seems higher among adolescents who attend youth clinics. Given the high prevalence of these problems during adolescence, we suggest on the basis of our results that screening for these disorders in primary care could be improved. PMID:17279202

  17. Adolescent Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ippolito, Jacy, Ed.; Steele, Jennifer L., Ed.; Samson, Jennifer F., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Adolescent Literacy" initially appeared as a special issue of the "Harvard Educational Review". It explores key issues and debates in the adolescent literacy crisis, the popular use of cognitive strategies, and disciplinary and content-area literacy. Also examined are alternative forms of literacy, afterschool interventions, new instruction…

  18. Adolescent Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Susan; Seligman, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Discusses legal and developmental aspects of adolescent abuse, as distinguished from child abuse. The role of the school counselor in identifying and counseling abused adolescents and their families is discussed and several forms of intervention and support services are described. (JAC)

  19. Adolescent Loneliness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Sheila

    Research has suggested that the incidence of loneliness peaks at adolescence and decreases with age. Changes in the determinants of loneliness during adolescence were investigated for grade 8, grade 11, and university students. Subjects (N=410) completed a written questionnaire which included ten items from the UCLA Loneliness Scale, the…

  20. Adolescent Turmoil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offer, Daniel

    1982-01-01

    Examines recent empirical evidence to test theories postulated in separate works by G. Stanley Hall and Anna Freud that adolescents must experience psychological turbulence in the transition to adulthood. Concludes that turmoil is no longer a necessary condition of adolescence and that those who do experience it need psychiatric attention.…

  1. Amino-functionalized (meth)acryl polymers by use of a solvent-polarity sensitive protecting group (Br-t-BOC).

    PubMed

    Ritter, Helmut; Tabatabai, Monir; Herrmann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of bromo-tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Br-t-BOC)-amino-protected monomers 2-((1-bromo-2-methylpropan-2-yl)oxycarbonylamino)ethyl (meth)acrylate 3a,b. For this purpose, 2-isocyanatoethyl (meth)acrylate 1a,b was reacted with 1-bromo-2-methylpropan-2-ol (2a). The free radical polymerization of (Br-t-BOC)-aminoethyl (meth)acrylates 3a,b yielded poly((Br-t-BOC)-aminoethyl (meth)acrylate) 6a,b bearing protected amino side groups. The subsequent solvolysis of the Br-t-BOC function led to the new polymers poly(2-aminoethyl (meth)acrylate) 8a,b with protonated free amino groups. The monomers and the resulting polymers were thoroughly characterized by (1)H NMR, IR, GPC and DSC methods. The kinetics of the deprotection step was followed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The solvent polarity and neighboring group effects on the kinetics of deprotection are discussed.

  2. Amino-functionalized (meth)acryl polymers by use of a solvent-polarity sensitive protecting group (Br-t-BOC)

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Monir; Herrmann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Summary We describe the synthesis of bromo-tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Br-t-BOC)-amino-protected monomers 2-((1-bromo-2-methylpropan-2-yl)oxycarbonylamino)ethyl (meth)acrylate 3a,b. For this purpose, 2-isocyanatoethyl (meth)acrylate 1a,b was reacted with 1-bromo-2-methylpropan-2-ol (2a). The free radical polymerization of (Br-t-BOC)-aminoethyl (meth)acrylates 3a,b yielded poly((Br-t-BOC)-aminoethyl (meth)acrylate) 6a,b bearing protected amino side groups. The subsequent solvolysis of the Br-t-BOC function led to the new polymers poly(2-aminoethyl (meth)acrylate) 8a,b with protonated free amino groups. The monomers and the resulting polymers were thoroughly characterized by 1H NMR, IR, GPC and DSC methods. The kinetics of the deprotection step was followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The solvent polarity and neighboring group effects on the kinetics of deprotection are discussed. PMID:26977183

  3. Crystal structure of (E)-1-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethanone O-de-hydro-abietyloxime.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiao-Ping; Cui, Yan-Jie; Zheng, Jian-Qiang

    2014-09-01

    In the title compound, C29H37NO3 {systematic name: (E)-1-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethanone O-[(1R,4aS,10aR)-7-isopropyl-1,4a-dimethyl-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octa-hydro-phenanthrene-1-carbon-yl]oxime}, a new derivative of de-hydro-abietic acid, the two cyclo-hexane rings exhibit a trans-ring junction and are in chair and half-chair conformations. The C=N double bond exhibits an E conformation.

  4. Chemical Modification of Recombinant Interleukin 2 by Polyethylene Glycol Increases Its Potency in the Murine Meth A Sarcoma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katre, Nandini V.; Knauf, Michael J.; Laird, Walter J.

    1987-03-01

    Recombinant human interleukin 2 purified from Escherichia coli has limited solubility at neutral pH and a short circulatory half-life. This recombinant interleukin 2 was chemically modified by an active ester of polyethylene glycol. The modified interleukin 2 was purified by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. This conjugate was compared to unmodified recombinant interleukin 2 in vitro and in vivo. Covalent attachment of the hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol enhanced the solubility of interleukin 2, decreased its plasma clearance, and increased its antitumor potency in the Meth A murine sarcoma model.

  5. Stages of Adolescence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Stages of Adolescence Page Content Article Body Adolescence, these years from puberty to adulthood, may be roughly divided into three stages: early adolescence, generally ages eleven to fourteen; middle adolescence, ages ...

  6. Crystal structure of 4,5-bis-(3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phen-yl)-2H-1,2,3-triazole methanol monosolvate.

    PubMed

    Madadi, Nikhil Reddy; Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Bommagani, Shobanbabu; Parkin, Sean; Crooks, Peter A

    2014-10-01

    The title compound, C20H23N3O6·CH3OH, was synthesized by [3 + 2] cyclo-addition of (Z)-2,3-bis-(3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phen-yl)acrylo-nitrile with sodium azide and ammonium chloride in DMF/water. The central nitro-gen of the triazole ring is protonated. The dihedral angles between the triazole ring and the 3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phenyl ring planes are 34.31 (4) and 45.03 (5)°, while that between the 3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phenyl rings is 51.87 (5)°. In the crystal, the mol-ecules, along with two methanol solvent mol-ecules are linked into an R (4) 4(10) centrosymmetric dimer by N-H⋯O and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds.

  7. Emergence of foreign H-2-like cytotoxicity and transplantation targets on vaccinia and Moloney virus-infected Meth. A tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Matossian-Rogers, A; Garrido, F; Festenstein, H

    1977-01-01

    Using cytotoxic effector cells of different anti-H-2 specificities, new cell-mediated lympholysis targets, normally undetected on Meth. A tumour cells, were shown after passage with vaccinia or Moloney virus. The H-2d CML targets on Meth. A cells recognized by B10.BR anti-B10.D2 effector cells were presented only after simultaneous vaccinia virus passage, while passage with Moloney virus caused the emergence of H-2b targets. Small but significant killing of vaccinia virus-passaged Meth.A was also obtained by anti-H-2k effector cells. These results are discussed in relation to in vivo experiments: retardation of tumour growth was noted in mice which had received several injections of vaccinia or Moloney virus, showing that the new CML targets were probably acting as transplantation targets.

  8. Crystal structure of (E)-N-[(E)-3-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)allyl­idene]naphthalen-1-amine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Kyun; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cho, Yong Seo; Min, Sun-Joon; Lee, Joon Kyun

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound, C20H17NO, the dihedral angle between the mean planes of the 4-meth­oxy­phenyl ring and the naphthalene ring is 69.50 (7)°. The meth­oxy group is almost coplanar with the benzene ring to which it is connected [Cb—Cb—Om—Cm torsion angle of −7.9 (2)°; b = benzene and m = meth­oxy] and the imine group displays a C—C—N=C torsion angle is −57.2 (2)°. The imine (C=N) group has an E conformation. In the crystal, weak π–π inter­actions between the benzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.7781 (10) Å] are observed. PMID:25484813

  9. MADS Users' Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moerder, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    MADS (Minimization Assistant for Dynamical Systems) is a trajectory optimization code in which a user-specified performance measure is directly minimized, subject to constraints placed on a low-order discretization of user-supplied plant ordinary differential equations. This document describes the mathematical formulation of the set of trajectory optimization problems for which MADS is suitable, and describes the user interface. Usage examples are provided.

  10. LIMS user acceptance testing.

    PubMed

    Klein, Corbett S

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) play a key role in the pharmaceutical industry. Thorough and accurate validation of such systems is critical and is a regulatory requirement. LIMS user acceptance testing is one aspect of this testing and enables the user to make a decision to accept or reject implementation of the system. This paper discusses key elements in facilitating the development and execution of a LIMS User Acceptance Test Plan (UATP).

  11. Crystal structures of 4-meth­oxy-N-(4-methyl­phenyl)benzene­sulfonamide and N-(4-fluoro­phenyl)-4-meth­oxy­benzene­sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Vinola Z.; Preema, C. P.; Naveen, S.; Lokanath, N. K.; Suchetan, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Crystal structures of two N-(ar­yl)aryl­sulfonamides, namely, 4-meth­oxy-N-(4-methyl­phen­yl)benzene­sulfonamide, C14H15NO3S, (I), and N-(4-fluoro­phen­yl)-4-meth­oxy­benzene­sulfonamide, C13H12FNO3S, (II), were determined and analyzed. In (I), the benzene­sulfonamide ring is disordered over two orientations, in a 0.516 (7):0.484 (7) ratio, which are inclined to each other at 28.0 (1)°. In (I), the major component of the sulfonyl benzene ring and the aniline ring form a dihedral angle of 63.36 (19)°, while in (II), the planes of the two benzene rings form a dihedral angle of 44.26 (13)°. In the crystal structure of (I), N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form infinite C(4) chains extended in [010], and inter­molecular C—H⋯πar­yl inter­actions link these chains into layers parallel to the ab plane. The crystal structure of (II) features N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming infinite one dimensional C(4) chains along [001]. Further, a pair of C—H⋯O inter­molecular inter­actions consolidate the crystal packing of (II) into a three-dimensional supra­molecular architecture. PMID:26594517

  12. 4-Hy-droxy-5-meth-oxy-N,1-dimethyl-2-oxo-N-[4-(tri-fluoro-meth-yl)phen-yl]-1,2-di-hydro-quinoline-3-carboxamide.

    PubMed

    Akinboye, Emmanuel S; Butcher, Ray J; Yildirim, Sema Ozturk; Isaacs, John T

    2014-03-01

    The title compound, C20H17F3N2O4, named tasquinimod, is a second-generation oral quinoline-3-carboxamide analogue, which is currently in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. The quinoline unit is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation of fitted atoms = 0.0075 Å). The carboxamide side chain, substituted at position 3, is tilted by 88.07 (7)° to the quinoline plane. Both the methyl and carbonyl groups of this carboxamide side chain are in a syn conformation. The 4-(tri-fluoro-meth-yl)phenyl plane is inclined at 50.62 (17)° to the plane of the carboxamide side chain, and at 87.14 (4)° to the plane of the quinoline ring system. The 4-hy-droxy H atom acts as a double proton donor in an intra-molecular hydrogen bond to the 5-position meth-oxy O atom and in an inter-molecular contact to the 2-oxo group, generating a chain along [010] in the crystal structure.

  13. Bis{bis-[1-meth-oxy-2-(2-meth-oxy-eth-oxy)ethane-κ(3) O,O',O'']sodium} 1,1,2,2-tetra-phenyl-ethane-1,2-diide.

    PubMed

    Minyaev, Mikhail E; Ellis, John E

    2014-07-01

    Crystals of the title salt, [Na(C6H14O3)2]2(C26H20), were grown from a tetra-hydro-furan/diglyme/Et2O solvent mixture [diglyme is 1-meth-oxy-2-(2-meth-oxy-eth-oxy)ethane]. The cations and dianion are separated in the crystal structure, unlike in the other three structurally characterized dialkali metal tetra-phenyl-ethyl-ene salts. The asymmetric unit contains one [Na(diglyme)2](+) cation and one half of the [Ph2CCPh2](2-) dianion. The latter lies on a twofold rotation axis. C-C bond-length redistribution displays that excessive electron density of the dianion is predominantly located at the C atoms of a former double bond and at all eight ortho positions. The studied crystal was a twin, with the ratio of two major components being 0.2143 (9):0.7857 (9). The twin operation is a twofold rotation around the a axis.

  14. Preliminary ISIS users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, C.

    1979-01-01

    The Interactive Software Invocation (ISIS), an interactive data management system, was developed to act as a buffer between the user and host computer system. The user is provided by ISIS with a powerful system for developing software or systems in the interactive environment. The user is protected from the idiosyncracies of the host computer system by providing such a complete range of capabilities that the user should have no need for direct access to the host computer. These capabilities are divided into four areas: desk top calculator, data editor, file manager, and tool invoker.

  15. User Registration in EOSDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. J.; Mitchell, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    Throughout the lifetime of EOSDIS the topic of user registration has received varied attention. Initially, for example, users ordering data from the Earth Science Data Gateway were required to register for delivery of media orders, to check order status and save profile information for future interactions. As EOSDIS embraced evolution of its data systems, the mostly centralized search and order system was replaced with a more diverse set of interfaces allowing (mostly) anonymous online access to data, tools and services. The changes to EOSDIS were embraced by users but the anonymous nature of the interaction made it more difficult to characterize users, capture metrics and provide customized services that benefit users. Additionally, new tools and interfaces have been developed without a centralized registration system. Currently a patchwork of independent registration systems exists throughout EOSDIS for ordering data and interacting with online tools and services. Each requires a separate username and password that must be managed by users. A consolidation of registration systems presents an opportunity to improve not only the user experience through tool customization and simplification of password management, but the understanding of users. This work discusses the options for implementing a common user registration for the EOSDIS, anticipated benefits and pitfalls.

  16. Pulling habits out of rats: adenosine 2A receptor antagonism in dorsomedial striatum rescues meth-amphetamine-induced deficits in goal-directed action.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Teri M; Supit, Alva S A; Corbit, Laura H; Killcross, Simon; Balleine, Bernard W

    2017-01-01

    Addiction is characterized by a persistent loss of behavioral control resulting in insensitivity to negative feedback and abnormal decision-making. Here, we investigated the influence of methamphetamine (METH)-paired contextual cues on decision-making in rats. Choice between goal-directed actions was sensitive to outcome devaluation in a saline-paired context but was impaired in the METH-paired context, a deficit that was also found when negative feedback was provided. Reductions in c-Fos-related immunoreactivity were found in dorsomedial striatum (DMS) but not dorsolateral striatum after exposure to the METH context suggesting this effect reflected a loss specifically in goal-directed control in the METH context. This reduction in c-Fos was localized to non-enkephalin-expressing neurons in the DMS, likely dopamine D1-expressing direct pathway neurons, suggesting a relative change in control by the D1-direct versus D2-indirect pathways originating in the DMS may have been induced by METH-context exposure. To test this suggestion, we infused the adenosine 2A receptor antagonist ZM241385 into the DMS prior to test to reduce activity in D2 neurons relative to D1 neurons in the hope of reducing the inhibitory output from this region of the striatum. We found that this treatment fully restored sensitivity to negative feedback in a test conducted in the METH-paired context. These results suggest that drug exposure alters decision-making by downregulation of the circuitry mediating goal-directed action, an effect that can be ameliorated by acute A2A receptor inhibition in this circuit.

  17. Cannabis Use in Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study (VAHCS) is a long-term Australian cohort study that has documented cannabis use in young Australians from the mid-teens to the mid-30s. The study findings have described the natural history of early cannabis use, remission, and escalation and the social and mental health consequences of different patterns of use. The adverse consequences of cannabis use are most clear-cut in heavy early adolescent users. These consequences include educational failure, persisting mental health problems, and progression to other substance use. For later onset and occasional users, the risks are lower and appear to entail modest elevations in risk for other drug use compared with never users. With growing evidence of health consequences, there is a strong case for actions around early heavy adolescent users. Prevention of early use, identification and treatment of early heavy users, and harm reduction through diversion of early heavy users away from the custodial justice system into health care are all priority responses. PMID:27254840

  18. Anabolic Steroid Use: Indications of Habituation among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yesalis, Charles E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Identified characteristics of adolescent male anabolic steroid (AS) user and addictive potential. Found AS user population different from nonuser in self-perceptions of health and strength, interest in controlling AS use, and perception of peer AS use. Found subgroups with significantly different attitudes and/or behaviors. Suggests prevention…

  19. Improving Access to Standardized Fertility Preservation Information for Older Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: Using a User-Centered Approach with Young Adult Patients, Survivors, and Partners to Refine Fertility Knowledge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Tam, Seline; Puri, Natasha; Stephens, Derek; Mitchell, Laura; Giuliani, Meredith; Papadakos, Janet; Gupta, Abha A

    2016-09-27

    Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients under 40 should be made aware of their fertility risks and preservation options throughout their care. However, discussions on fertility preservation (FP) do not routinely occur. With a dearth of FP resources, oncology providers may lack knowledge around FP. Thus, informational needs can be unmet, leading to anxiety and distress in patients. Provision of pertinent and timely information can help patients cope better with their diagnosis. FP pamphlets were developed for men and women with cancer. A cross-sectional in-house survey, using convenience sampling, evaluated the pamphlets' effectiveness and measured ease of understanding, acceptability, and perceived utility. Patients and partners were also asked to provide recommendations and complete the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) measuring health literacy level. This helps determine if health literacy influences perception of pamphlet effectiveness. All participants (n = 56) reviewed both pamphlets. Fifty-four participants (96 %) found the pamphlet for men useful, while 29 participants (52 %) improved their male fertility knowledge. The pamphlet for women was useful for 52 participants (93 %) and improved knowledge in 35 (63 %) of them. Although the majority of participants had adequate health literacy (98 %), there was insufficient sample diversity to determine if health literacy influenced the pamphlet's effectiveness. Participants indicated preference in receiving verbal (73 %) and written (66 %) information over watching videos or in-class education. They recommended including fertility clinics, financial resources, and statistics in the brochures. These FP pamphlets were concluded as effective in supporting patients in making FP decisions.

  20. Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Mary N.; Peterson, John; Sheldon, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Depression in adolescence and adulthood is common, afflicting up to 20 percent of these populations. It represents a significant public health concern and is associated with considerable suffering and functional impairment. Adolescent-onset depression tends to be a particularly malignant and recalcitrant condition, increasing the likelihood of recurrence and chronicity in adulthood. Clinical presentations for various medical and psychiatric conditions, as well as reactions to psychosocial stressors, can mimic or confound the picture of depression in adolescents. Therefore, careful assessment and differential diagnosis is essential. Effective treatments, both pharmacological and psychosocial in nature, exist, and so early detection and intervention is paramount. This article presents an overview of optimal prevention, assessment, and clinical decision-making strategies for managing depression in adolescents. PMID:19855857

  1. Crystal structures of two bis-(iodo-meth-yl)benzene derivatives: similarities and differences in the crystal packing.

    PubMed

    McAdam, C John; Hanton, Lyall R; Moratti, Stephen C; Simpson, Jim

    2015-12-01

    The isomeric derivatives 1,2-bis-(iodo-meth-yl)benzene, (I), and 1,3-bis-(iodo-meth-yl)benzene (II), both C8H8I2, were prepared by metathesis from their di-bromo analogues. The ortho-derivative, (I), lies about a crystallographic twofold axis that bis-ects the C-C bond between the two iodo-methyl substituents. The packing in (I) relies solely on C-H⋯I hydrogen bonds supported by weak parallel slipped π-π stacking inter-actions [inter-centroid distance = 4.0569 (11) Å, inter-planar distance = 3.3789 (8) Å and slippage = 2.245 Å]. While C-H⋯I hydrogen bonds are also found in the packing of (II), type II, I⋯I halogen bonds [I⋯I = 3.8662 (2) Å] and C-H⋯π contacts feature prominently in stabilizing the three-dimensional structure.

  2. NASTRAN: Users' experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on NASA Structural Analysis (NASTRAN) to analyze the experiences of users of the program are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) statics and buckling, (2) vibrations and dynamics, (3) substructing, (4) new capability, (5) user's experience, and (6) system experience. Specific applications of NASTRAN to spacecraft, aircraft, nuclear power plants, and materials tests are reported.

  3. User's Guide for SKETCH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgley, David R., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A user's guide for the computer program SKETCH is presented on this disk. SKETCH solves a popular problem in computer graphics-the removal of hidden lines from images of solid objects. Examples and illustrations are included in the guide. Also included is the SKETCH program, so a user can incorporate the information into a particular software system.

  4. LANES 1 Users' Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J.

    1985-01-01

    This document is intended for users of the Local Area Network Extensible Simulator, version I. This simulator models the performance of a Fiber Optic network under a variety of loading conditions and network characteristics. The options available to the user for defining the network conditions are described in this document. Computer hardware and software requirements are also defined.

  5. User Language Specification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-30

    this can be assisted by using an automated complaint log for user comments. User acceptance of a language is almost impossible to verify in the...of libaries of pro- grams where each library represents a coherent set of data types and parameterized nodes which operate on those types. * Allow

  6. SOSS User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Zhifan; Gridnev, Sergei; Windhorst, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    This User Guide describes SOSS (Surface Operations Simulator and Scheduler) software build and graphic user interface. SOSS is a desktop application that simulates airport surface operations in fast time using traffic management algorithms. It moves aircraft on the airport surface based on information provided by scheduling algorithm prototypes, monitors separation violation and scheduling conformance, and produces scheduling algorithm performance data.

  7. KDYNA user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Levatin, J.A.L.; Attia, A.V.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1990-09-28

    This report is a complete user's manual for KDYNA, the Earth Sciences version of DYNA2D. Because most features of DYNA2D have been retained in KDYNA much of this manual is identical to the DYNA2D user's manual.

  8. Adolescent sexuality.

    PubMed

    Grant, L M; Demetriou, E

    1988-12-01

    The consequences of adolescent sexual behavior are an enormous burden both for the adolescent and society. The problem is not that teens are sexually active but rather that they have little preparation and guidance in developing responsible sexual behavior. Developmentally, adolescents reach physical maturity before they are cognitively able to appreciate the consequences of their behavior. A teenager's primary source of information regarding sexuality is his or her peer group, all of whom are experiencing and reinforcing the same behaviors. The family, the major socializer of other behaviors, is not as powerful a force in shaping responsible sexual behavior because of parental discomfort with sex education and sexual discussions. This is the result of a social milieu in which sex is frequently portrayed but rarely linked with responsible behavior or accurate, nonjudgmental information. The pediatric practitioner is in an ideal position to intervene in these dynamics. In the office, the practitioner can provide accurate sexual information to both parents and adolescents, support parental-child communication on sexual issues, and provide appropriate services or referral. In the community, the practitioner can advocate for school-based sex education as well as act as an information resource. Finally, the practitioner can advocate for the health care needs for adolescents on a national level, supporting legislation that provides adolescents with information and access to services necessary to make responsible sexual decisions.

  9. User interface support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Clayton; Wilde, Nick

    1989-01-01

    Space construction will require heavy investment in the development of a wide variety of user interfaces for the computer-based tools that will be involved at every stage of construction operations. Using today's technology, user interface development is very expensive for two reasons: (1) specialized and scarce programming skills are required to implement the necessary graphical representations and complex control regimes for high-quality interfaces; (2) iteration on prototypes is required to meet user and task requirements, since these are difficult to anticipate with current (and foreseeable) design knowledge. We are attacking this problem by building a user interface development tool based on extensions to the spreadsheet model of computation. The tool provides high-level support for graphical user interfaces and permits dynamic modification of interfaces, without requiring conventional programming concepts and skills.

  10. The PANTHER User Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Coram, Jamie L.; Morrow, James D.; Perkins, David Nikolaus

    2015-09-01

    This document describes the PANTHER R&D Application, a proof-of-concept user interface application developed under the PANTHER Grand Challenge LDRD. The purpose of the application is to explore interaction models for graph analytics, drive algorithmic improvements from an end-user point of view, and support demonstration of PANTHER technologies to potential customers. The R&D Application implements a graph-centric interaction model that exposes analysts to the algorithms contained within the GeoGraphy graph analytics library. Users define geospatial-temporal semantic graph queries by constructing search templates based on nodes, edges, and the constraints among them. Users then analyze the results of the queries using both geo-spatial and temporal visualizations. Development of this application has made user experience an explicit driver for project and algorithmic level decisions that will affect how analysts one day make use of PANTHER technologies.

  11. Adolescents' Dialogic Composing with Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This 14-month study examined the phone-based composing practice of three adolescents. Given the centrality of mobile phones to youth culture, the researcher sought to create a description of the participants' composing practices with these devices. Focal participants were users of Twitter and Instagram, two social media platforms that are usually…

  12. Seat Belt Use and Stress in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schichor, Aric; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Explored adolescent seat belt use and psychosocial risk factors in urban minority population (n=541). Found seat belt use reported by 49 percent of respondents. Those reporting no or intermittent seat belt use were significantly more likely than seat belt users to feel down, have decreased home support, have problems with school and the law, and…

  13. A kryptoracemic salt: 2-{[2,8-bis­(tri­fluoro­meth­yl)quinolin-4-yl](hy­droxy)meth­yl}piperidin-1-ium (+)-3,3,3-tri­fluoro-2-meth­oxy-2-phenyl­propanoate

    PubMed Central

    Wardell, James L.; Wardell, Solange M. S. V.; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C17H17F6N2O+·C10H8F3O3 −, comprises two piperidin-1-ium cations and two carboxyl­ate anions. The cations, each having an l-shaped conformation owing to the near orthogonal relationship between the quinolinyl and piperidin-1-ium residues, are pseudo-enanti­omeric. The anions have the same absolute configuration but differ in the relative orientations of the carboxyl­ate, meth­oxy and benzene groups. Arguably, the most prominent difference between the anions occurs about the Cq—Om bond as seen in the Cc—Cq—Om—Cm torsion angles of −176.1 (3) and −67.1 (4)°, respectively (q = quaternary, m = meth­oxy and c = carboxyl­ate). The presence of Oh—H⋯Oc and Np—H⋯Oc hydrogen bonds leads to the formation of a supra­molecular chain along the a axis (h = hy­droxy and p = piperidin-1-ium); weak intra­molecular Np—H⋯Oh hydrogen bonds are also noted. Chains are connected into a three-dimensional architecture by C—H⋯F inter­actions. Based on a literature survey, related mol­ecules/cations adopt a uniform conformation in the solid state based on the letter L. PMID:27308063

  14. Crystal structure of (E)-2-[(2-bromopyridin-3-yl)methyl-idene]-6-meth-oxy-3,4-di-hydro-naphthalen-1(2H)-one and 3-[(E)-(6-meth-oxy-1-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetra-hydro-naphthalen-2-ylidene)meth-yl]pyridin-2(1H)-one.

    PubMed

    Zingales, Sarah K; Moore, Morgan E; Goetz, Andrew D; Padgett, Clifford W

    2016-07-01

    The title compounds C17H14BrNO2, (I), and C17H15NO3, (II), were obtained from the reaction of 6-meth-oxy-3,4-di-hydro-2H-naphthalen-1-one and 2-bromo-nicotinaldehyde in ethanol. Compound (I) was the expected product and compound (II) was the oxidation product from air exposure. In the crystal structure of compound (I), there are no short contacts or hydrogen bonds. The structure does display π-π inter-actions between adjacent benzene rings and adjacent pyridyl rings. Compound (II) contains two independent mol-ecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit; both are non-planar, the dihedral angles between the meth-oxy-benzene and 1H-pyridin-2-one mean planes being 35.07 (9)° in A and 35.28 (9)°in B. In each mol-ecule, the 1H-pyridin-2-one unit participates in inter-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding to another mol-ecule of the same type (A to A or B to B). The structure also displays π-π inter-actions between the pyridyl and the benzene rings of non-equivalent mol-ecules (viz., A to B and B to A).

  15. User`s guide to MIDAS

    SciTech Connect

    Tisue, S.A.; Williams, N.B.; Huber, C.C.; Chun, K.C.

    1995-12-01

    Welcome to the MIDAS User`s Guide. This document describes the goals of the Munitions Items Disposition Action System (MIDAS) program and documents the MIDAS software. The main text first describes the equipment and software you need to run MIDAS and tells how to install and start it. It lists the contents of the database and explains how it is organized. Finally, it tells how to perform various functions, such as locating, entering, viewing, deleting, changing, transferring, and printing both textual and graphical data. Images of the actual computer screens accompany these explanations and guidelines. Appendix A contains a glossary of names for the various abbreviations, codes, and chemicals; Appendix B is a list of modem names; Appendix C provides a database dictionary and rules for entering data; and Appendix D describes procedures for troubleshooting problems associated with connecting to the MIDAS server and using MIDAS.

  16. MFIX documentation: User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Syamlal, M.

    1994-11-01

    MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase exchanges) is a general-purpose hydro-dynamic model for describing chemical reactions and heat transfer in dense or dilute fluid-solids flows, which typically occur in energy conversion and chemical processing reactors. MFIX calculations give time-dependent information on pressure, temperature, composition, and velocity distributions in the reactors. The theoretical basis of the calculations is described in the MFIX Theory Guide. This report, which is the MFIX User`s Manual, gives an overview of the numerical technique, and describes how to install the MFIX code and post-processing codes, set up data files and run MFIX, graphically analyze MFIX results, and retrieve data from the output files. Two tutorial problems that highlight various features of MFIX are also discussed.

  17. Quality user support: Supporting quality users

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, T.C.

    1994-12-31

    During the past decade, fundamental changes have occurred in technical computing in the oil industry. Technical computing systems have moved from local, fragmented quantity, to global, integrated, quality. The compute power available to the average geoscientist at his desktop has grown exponentially. Technical computing applications have increased in integration and complexity. At the same time, there has been a significant change in the work force due to the pressures of restructuring, and the increased focus on international opportunities. The profile of the user of technical computing resources has changed. Users are generally more mature, knowledgeable, and team oriented than their predecessors. In the 1990s, computer literacy is a requirement. This paper describes the steps taken by Oryx Energy Company to address the problems and opportunities created by the explosive growth in computing power and needs, coupled with the contraction of the business. A successful user support strategy will be described. Characteristics of the program include: (1) Client driven support; (2) Empowerment of highly skilled professionals to fill the support role; (3) Routine and ongoing modification to the support plan; (4) Utilization of the support assignment to create highly trained advocates on the line; (5) Integration of the support role to the reservoir management team. Results of the plan include a highly trained work force, stakeholder teams that include support personnel, and global support from a centralized support organization.

  18. Aztec user`s guide. Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S.

    1995-10-01

    Aztec is an iterative library that greatly simplifies the parallelization process when solving the linear systems of equations Ax = b where A is a user supplied n x n sparse matrix, b is a user supplied vector of length n and x is a vector of length n to be computed. Aztec is intended as a software tool for users who want to avoid cumbersome parallel programming details but who have large sparse linear systems which require an efficiently utilized parallel processing system. A collection of data transformation tools are provided that allow for easy creation of distributed sparse unstructured matrices for parallel solution. Once the distributed matrix is created, computation can be performed on any of the parallel machines running Aztec: nCUBE 2, IBM SP2 and Intel Paragon, MPI platforms as well as standard serial and vector platforms. Aztec includes a number of Krylov iterative methods such as conjugate gradient (CG), generalized minimum residual (GMRES) and stabilized biconjugate gradient (BICGSTAB) to solve systems of equations. These Krylov methods are used in conjunction with various preconditioners such as polynomial or domain decomposition methods using LU or incomplete LU factorizations within subdomains. Although the matrix A can be general, the package has been designed for matrices arising from the approximation of partial differential equations (PDEs). In particular, the Aztec package is oriented toward systems arising from PDE applications.

  19. Radiological Toolbox User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, KF

    2004-07-01

    A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide users access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides users, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the user can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  20. 1-(2,4-Di-nitro-phen-yl)-2-[(E)-(3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-benzyl-idene)]hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Chantrapromma, Suchada; Ruanwas, Pumsak; Boonnak, Nawong; Chidan Kumar, C S; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2014-02-01

    Mol-ecules of the title compound, C16H16N4O7, are not planar with a dihedral angle of 5.50 (11)° between the substituted benzene rings. The two meta-meth-oxy groups of the 3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-benzene moiety lie in the plane of the attached ring [Cmeth-yl-O-C-C torsion angles -0.1 (4)° and -3.7 (3)°] while the para-meth-oxy substituent lies out of the plane [Cmeth-yl-O-C-C, -86.0 (3)°]. An intra-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bond involving the 2-nitro substituent generates an S(6) ring motif. In the crystal structure, mol-ecules are linked by weak C-H⋯O inter-actions into screw chains, that are arranged into a sheet parallel to the bc plane. These sheets are connected by π-π stacking inter-actions between the nitro and meth-oxy substituted aromatic rings with a centroid-centroid separation of 3.9420 (13) Å. C-H⋯π contacts further stabilize the two-dimensional network.

  1. Tetra-μ3-methano­lato-tetra­kis­[(2-formyl-6-meth­oxy­phenolato)methano­lnickel(II)

    PubMed Central

    Ayikoe, Kouassi; Butcher, Ray J.; Gultneh, Yilma

    2010-01-01

    The molecule of the title compound, [Ni4(CH3O)4(C8H7O3)4(CH3OH)4], has S 4 symmetry. Each of the four NiII atoms occupies every other corner of a cube, with the alternate corners occupied by μ3-methano­late bridging groups linking to three NiII atoms. Each NiII atom is in an O6 octa­hedral coordination environment formed by three O atoms from three μ3-methano­late groups, one from methanol, and two others from a bidentate 2-formyl-6-meth­oxy­phenolate ligand. The Ni—O bond distances range from 2.0020 (14) to 2.0938 (14) Å, the cis bond angles range from 81.74 (6) to 97.63°, and the trans bond angles range from 168.76 (5) to 175.22 (6)°. There are bifurcated hydrogen-bonding inter­actions between the coordinated methanol OH groups and both the phenolic and meth­oxy O atoms of an adjoining 2-formyl-6-meth­oxy­phenolate moiety. In addition, there are weak inter­molecular C—H⋯O inter­actions involving the meth­oxy O atoms. PMID:21588902

  2. 40 CFR 721.9730 - 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6-substituted-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9730 1,3,5-Triazin-2-amine, 4-di-meth-yl-a-mino-6-substituted-. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34638, June 18, 2014. (a) Chemical substance...

  3. Changes in cellular components of spleen and lymph node cells and the effector cells responsible for Meth A tumor eradication induced by zinostatin stimalamer.

    PubMed

    Masuda, E; Maeda, H

    1996-04-15

    We reported previously that pretreatment with zinostatin stimalamer (ZSS) eradicated Meth A tumors in BALB/c mice. We herein investigated cellular components of spleen and lymph node cells of Meth A-bearing ZSS-pretreated mice by flow cytometry; the antitumor effector cells by in vivo depletion of T cells, NK cells, or macrophages; and host-mediated antitumor activity associated with ZSS treatment after tumor transplantation. ZSS given on day-3 transiently decreased the number of spleen cells. The percentage of T cells increased, but B cells and macrophages decreased. B cells decreased in inguinal lymph nodes in Meth A-bearing ZSS-pretreated mice, but increased in Meth A-bearing control mice. In vivo depletion experiments using antibodies or carrageenan showed that antitumor effector cells for tumor eradication are Thy1.2+/Lyt2.2+ and that at least a part of them are asialo GM1+. Thy1.2+/Lyt2.2+/asialoGM1- cells are important in generation of the antitumor activity of ZSS; however, L3T4+ T cells are also involved in initiation of tumor eradication. The result of ZSS treatment after tumor transplantation suggests that ZSS might exhibit antitumor activity by augementating host-mediated antitumor resistance, as well as its intrinsic cytocidal activity.

  4. Crystal structure of {[2-hy­droxy-2-(3-meth­oxy­phen­yl)cyclo­hex­yl]meth­yl}di­methyl­ammonium benzoate

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, S. N.; Nagendra, P.; Siddaraju, B. P.; Hemakumar, K. H.; Byrappa, K.; Lokanath, N. K.; Madan Kumar, S.

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C16H26NO2 +·C7H5O2 −, is a benzoate salt of the painkiller Tramadol. The six-membered cyclo­hexane ring of the cation adopts a slightly distorted chair conformation and carries OH and 3-meth­oxy­phenyl substituents at the 2-position and a protonated methyl­aza­niumylmethyl group at the 3-position. In addition, a weak intra­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed in the cation. In the crystal, weak O—H⋯O, N—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the components into chains along [010]. A C—H⋯π contact is also observed. PMID:26594567

  5. Crystal structure of 3-meth-oxy-carbonyl-2-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)-8-oxo-1-aza-spiro[4.5]deca-1,6,9-trien-1-ium-1-olate.

    PubMed

    Martins, Lucimara Julio; Simoni, Deborah de Alencar; Aparicio, Ricardo; Coelho, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    The title compound, C18H17NO5, was prepared by a synthetic strategy based on the Heck reaction from Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts. The five-membered ring adopts a slightly twisted conformation on the Ca-Cm (a = aromatic and m = methyl-ene) bond. The dihedral angle between the five-membered ring and the spiro aromatic ring is 89.35 (7)°; that between the five-membered ring and the 4-meth-oxy-benzene ring is 4.65 (7)°. Two short intra-molecular C-H⋯O contacts occur. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to generate a three-dimensional network.

  6. Smoking behaviors and intentions among current e-cigarette users, cigarette smokers, and dual users: A national survey of U.S. high school seniors.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; Veliz, Phil; McCabe, Vita V; Boyd, Carol J

    2017-03-01

    E-cigarette use among adolescents has increased significantly in recent years, but it remains unclear whether cigarette smoking behaviors and intentions for future cigarette smoking differ among current (i.e., 30-day) non-users, only e-cigarette users, only cigarette smokers, and dual users. A nationally representative sample of 4385 U.S. high school seniors were surveyed during the spring of their senior year via self-administered questionnaires in 2014. An estimated 9.6% of U.S. high school seniors reported current e-cigarette use only, 6.3% reported current cigarette smoking only, and 7.2% reported current dual use of e-cigarettes and cigarette smoking. There were no significant differences between current only cigarette smokers and dual users in the odds of early onset of cigarette smoking, daily cigarette smoking, intentions for future cigarette smoking, friends' cigarette smoking behaviors, attempts to quit cigarette smoking, or the inability to quit cigarette smoking. Adolescents who only used e-cigarettes had higher odds of intentions for future cigarette smoking in the next 5years (AOR=2.57, 95% CI: 1.21-5.24) than current non-users. Dual users and only cigarette smokers had higher odds of cigarette smoking behaviors and intentions for future cigarette smoking than non-users or only e-cigarette users. Adolescents who engage in current dual use have cigarette smoking behaviors and intentions for future cigarette smoking that more closely resemble cigarette smokers than e-cigarette users. Adolescents who only use e-cigarettes have higher intentions to engage in future cigarette smoking relative to their peers who do not engage in e-cigarette use or cigarette smoking.

  7. Crystal structure of 2-((1E)-{2-[bis-(2-methyl-benzyl-sulfan-yl)methyl-idene]hydrazin-1-yl-idene}meth-yl)-6-meth-oxy-phenol.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Enis Nadia Md; Ravoof, Thahira Begum S A; Tahir, Mohamed Ibrahim Mohamed; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2015-04-01

    In the title compound, C25H26N2O2S2, the central CN2S2 atoms are almost coplanar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.0058 Å). One phenyl ring clearly lies to one side of the central plane, while the other is oriented in the plane but splayed. Despite the different relative orientations, the phenyl rings form similar dihedral angles of 64.90 (3) and 70.06 (3)° with the central plane, and 63.28 (4)° with each other. The benzene ring is twisted with respect to the central plane, forming a dihedral angle of 13.17 (7)°. The S2C=N, N-N and N-N=C bond lengths of 1.2919 (19), 1.4037 (17) and 1.2892 (19) Å, respectively, suggest limited conjugation over these atoms; the configuration about the N-N=C bond is E. An intra-molecular O-H⋯N hydrogen bond is noted. In the crystal, phen-yl-meth-oxy C-H⋯O and phen-yl-phenyl C-H⋯π inter-actions lead to supra-molecular double chains parallel to the b axis. These are connected into a layer via meth-yl-phenyl C-H⋯π inter-actions, and layers stack along the a axis, being connected by weak π-π inter-actions between phenyl rings [inter-centroid distance = 3.9915 (9) Å] so that a three-dimensional architecture ensues.

  8. ARM User Survey Report

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, LR

    2010-06-22

    The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to, among other things, determine how to organize the exponentially growing data within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, and identify users’ preferred data analysis system. The survey findings appear to have met this objective, having received approximately 300 responses that give insight into the type of work users perform, usage of the data, percentage of data analysis users might perform on an ARM-hosted computing resource, downloading volume level where users begin having reservations, opinion about usage if given more powerful computing resources (including ability to manipulate data), types of tools that would be most beneficial to them, preferred programming language and data analysis system, level of importance for certain types of capabilities, and finally, level of interest in participating in a code-sharing community.

  9. Interactive Office user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E.; Lowers, Benjamin; Nabors, Terri L.

    1990-01-01

    Given here is a user's manual for Interactive Office (IO), an executive office tool for organization and planning, written specifically for Macintosh. IO is a paperless management tool to automate a related group of individuals into one productive system.

  10. EPA User Personas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn how EPA's three web user personas (Information Consumer, Information Intermediary, and Information Interpreter) can help you identify appropriate top audiences and top tasks for a topic or web area.

  11. Bevalac user's handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This report is a users manual on the Bevalac accelerator facility. This paper discuses: general information; the Bevalac and its operation; major facilities and experimental areas; and experimental equipment.

  12. VOLTTRON: User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lutes, Robert G.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Akyol, Bora A.; Tenney, Nathan D.; Haack, Jereme N.; Monson, Kyle E.; Carpenter, Brandon J.

    2014-04-24

    This document is a user guide for the deployment of the Transactional Network platform and agent/application development within the VOLTTRON. The intent of this user guide is to provide a description of the functionality of the Transactional Network Platform. This document describes how to deploy the platform, including installation, use, guidance, and limitations. It also describes how additional features can be added to enhance its current functionality.

  13. ULDA user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Charleen; Driessen, Cornelius; Pasian, Fabio

    1989-01-01

    The Uniform Low Dispersion Archive (ULDA) is a software system which, in one sitting, allows one to obtain copies on one's personal computer of those International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) low dispersion spectra that are of interest to the user. Overviews and use instructions are given for two programs, one to search for and select spectra, and the other to convert those spectra into a form suitable for the user's image processing system.

  14. Hanford inventory program user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkelman, K.C.

    1994-09-12

    Provides users with instructions and information about accessing and operating the Hanford Inventory Program (HIP) system. The Hanford Inventory Program is an integrated control system that provides a single source for the management and control of equipment, parts, and material warehoused by Westinghouse Hanford Company in various site-wide locations. The inventory is comprised of spare parts and equipment, shop stock, special tools, essential materials, and convenience storage items. The HIP replaced the following systems; ACA, ASP, PICS, FSP, WSR, STP, and RBO. In addition, HIP manages the catalog maintenance function for the General Supplies inventory stocked in the 1164 building and managed by WIMS.

  15. Crystal structure of (E)-13-{4-[(Z)-2-cyano-2-(3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethen-yl]phen-yl}parthenolide methanol hemisolvate.

    PubMed

    Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Bommagani, Shobanbabu; Janganati, Venumadhav; Parkin, Sean; Crooks, Peter A

    2014-10-01

    The title compound, C33H35NO6 [systematic name: (Z)-3-(4-{(E)-[(E)-1a,5-dimethyl-9-oxo-2,3,7,7a-tetra-hydro-oxireno[2',3':9,10]cyclo-deca-[1,2-b]furan-8(1aH,6H,9H,10aH,10bH)-yl-idene]meth-yl}phen-yl)-2-(3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phen-yl)acrylo-ni-trile methanol hemisolvate], C33H35NO6·0.5CH3OH, was prepared by the reaction of (Z)-3-(4-iodo-phen-yl)-2-(3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phen-yl)acrylo-nitrile with parthenolide [systematic name: (E)-1a,5-dimethyl-8-methyl-ene-2,3,6,7,7a,8,10a,10b-octa-hy-dro-oxireno[2',3':9,10]cyclo-deca-[1,2-b]furan-9(1aH)-one] under Heck reaction conditions. The mol-ecule is built up from fused ten-, five- (lactone) and three-membered (epoxide) rings with a {4-[(Z)-2-cyano-2-(3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethen-yl]phen-yl}methyl-idene group as a substituent. The 4-[(Z)-2-cyano-2-(3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethen-yl]phenyl group on the parthenolide exocyclic double bond is oriented in a trans position to the lactone ring to form the E isomer. The dihedral angle between the benzene ring of the phenyl moiety and the lactone ring mean plane is 21.93 (4)°.

  16. A theory of adolescent substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Spotts, J V; Shontz, F C

    1985-01-01

    This report applies a theory of psychological individuation to inferences drawn from an 8-year series of clinical studies of men who practice heavy, chronic use of different drugs. Each man was studied intensively over a period of 4-5 months, using interviews and a comprehensive battery of dimensional and morphogenic assessment procedures. Users of barbiturates and sedative hypnotics were found to be least mature, followed by users of opiates, users of amphetamine, users of cocaine, and nonusers of drugs, who were found to be most mature. A theory is described which conceives adolescent substance abuse as rooted in dysfunctional relationships with parental figures which block or delay the normal individuation process. Comparable sets of representative case studies of heavy, chronic users of alcohol and marihuana are recommended to facilitate the development of treatment programs that take into account the special needs of persons who practice heavy, chronic use of different substances.

  17. Crystal structure of dimethyl 4,4'-di-meth-oxy-biphenyl-3,3'-di-carboxyl-ate.

    PubMed

    Lundvall, Fredrik; Dietzel, Pascal D C; Fjellvåg, Helmer

    2016-03-01

    In the title compound, C18H18O6, the benzene rings are coplanar due to the centrosymmetric nature of the mol-ecule, with an inversion centre located at the midpoint of the C-C bond between the two rings. Consequently, the methyl carboxyl-ate substituents are oriented in a trans fashion with regards to the bond between the benzene rings. The methyl carboxyl-ate and meth-oxy substituents are rotated slightly out of plane relative to their parent benzene rings, with dihedral and torsion angles of 18.52 (8) and -5.22 (15)°, respectively. The shortest O⋯H contact between neighbouring mol-ecules is about 2.5 Å. Although some structure-directing contributions from C-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter-actions are possible, the crystal packing seems primarily directed by weak van der Waals forces.

  18. Crystal structure of 1,3-bis-[(E)-4-meth-oxy-benzyl-idene-amino]-propan-2-ol.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Augusto; Miranda-Carvajal, Ingrid; Ríos-Motta, Jaime; Bolte, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The title Schiff base, C19H22N2O3, was synthesized via the condensation reaction of 1,3-di-amino-propan-2-ol with 4-meth-oxy-benzaldehyde using water as solvent. The mol-ecule exists in an E,E conformation with respect to the C=N imine bonds and the dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 37.25 (15)°. In the crystal, O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds link the mol-ecules into infinite C(5) chains propagating along the a-axis direction. The packing of these chains is consolidated by C-H⋯O inter-actions and C-H⋯π short contacts, forming a three-dimensional network.

  19. Crystal structure of non-centrosymmetric bis-(4-meth-oxy-benzyl-ammonium) tetra-chlorido-zincate.

    PubMed

    Mahbouli Rhouma, Najla; Rayes, Ali; Mezzadri, Francesco; Calestani, Gianluca; Loukil, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    The structure of the title non-centrosymmetric organic-inorganic hybrid salt, (C8H12NO)2[ZnCl4], consists of two 4-meth-oxy-benzyl-ammonium cations sandwiched between anionic layers, formed by isolated tetra-chlorido-zincate tetra-hedra. The double layers extend parallel to the ac plane. The crystal packing is assured by Coulombic inter-actions and by a complex N-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯Cl hydrogen-bonding system mostly involving the positively charged ammonium groups and the chloride ligands of the isolated tetra-hedral [ZnCl4](2-) units. One of the methyl-ene-ammonium groups is disordered over two sets of sites in a 0.48 (2):0.52 (2) ratio. The crystal investigated was twinned by non-merohedry with a twin component ratio of 0.738 (2):0.262 (2).

  20. Crystal structure of 2-(5-meth-oxy-1-benzo-furan-3-yl)acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Ramakrishna; Gowda, K V Arjuna; Reddy, M Keshava; Basanagouda, Mahantesha

    2015-12-01

    The benzo-furan residue in the title compound, C11H10O4, is essentially planar (the r.m.s. deviation for the nine non-H atoms = 0.011 Å). While the meth-oxy group is coplanar with the fused ring system [C-C-O-C torsion angle = 3.1 (3)°], the acetic acid residue occupies a position almost prime [C-C-C-C = 77.0 (2)°]. In the crystal, centrosymmetrically related mol-ecules are linked by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form eight-membered {⋯HOCO}2 synthons. The dimeric aggregates assemble into supra-molecular layers in the ab plane via benzene-C-H⋯O(ring) inter-actions.

  1. Crystal structure of 2-(5-meth­oxy-1-benzo­furan-3-yl)acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Ramakrishna; Gowda, K. V. Arjuna; Reddy, M. Keshava; Basanagouda, Mahantesha

    2015-01-01

    The benzo­furan residue in the title compound, C11H10O4, is essentially planar (the r.m.s. deviation for the nine non-H atoms = 0.011 Å). While the meth­oxy group is coplanar with the fused ring system [C—C—O—C torsion angle = 3.1 (3)°], the acetic acid residue occupies a position almost prime [C—C—C—C = 77.0 (2)°]. In the crystal, centrosymmetrically related mol­ecules are linked by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form eight-membered {⋯HOCO}2 synthons. The dimeric aggregates assemble into supra­molecular layers in the ab plane via benzene-C—H⋯O(ring) inter­actions. PMID:26870494

  2. trans-Dichloridobis[tris-(4-meth-oxy-lphen-yl)phosphane-κP]platinum(II) acetone disolvate.

    PubMed

    Muller, Alfred

    2012-12-01

    In the title compound, [PtCl2(C21H21O3P)2]·2C3H6O, the asymmetric unit contains a Pt(II) ion situated on an inversion center, one chloride anion, one tris-(4-meth-oxy-lphen-yl)phosphane (L) ligand and one acetone solvent mol-ecule. The Pt(II) ion is coordinated by two P atoms [Pt-P = 2.3196 (5) Å] from two L ligands and two chloride anions [Pt-Cl = 2.3075 (5) Å] in a distorted square-planar geometry with P-Pt-Cl angles of 88.016 (16) and 91.984 (16)°. The effective cone angle of the phosphane ligand was calculated to be 156°. Weak C-H⋯O and C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds hold mol-ecules together.

  3. Predisposition to and effects of methamphetamine use on the adolescent brain.

    PubMed

    Lyoo, I K; Yoon, S; Kim, T S; Lim, S M; Choi, Y; Kim, J E; Hwang, J; Jeong, H S; Cho, H B; Chung, Y A; Renshaw, P F

    2015-12-01

    Adolescence is a period of heightened vulnerability both to addictive behaviors and drug-induced brain damage. Yet, only limited information exists on the brain mechanisms underlying these adolescent-specific characteristics. Moreover, distinctions in brain correlates between predisposition to drug use and effects of drugs in adolescents are unclear. Using cortical thickness and diffusion tensor image analyses, we found greater and more widespread gray and white matter alterations, particularly affecting the frontostriatal system, in adolescent methamphetamine (MA) users compared with adult users. Among adolescent-specific gray matter alterations related to MA use, smaller cortical thickness in the orbitofrontal cortex was associated with family history of drug use. Our findings highlight that the adolescent brain, which undergoes active myelination and maturation, is more vulnerable to MA-related alterations than the adult brain. Furthermore, MA-use-related executive dysfunction was greater in adolescent MA users than in adult users. These findings may provide explanation for the severe behavioral complications and relapses that are common in adolescent-onset drug addiction. Additionally, these results may provide insights into distinguishing the neural mechanisms that underlie the predisposition to drug addiction from effects of drugs in adolescents.

  4. Treating Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children and Adolescents Go Back Treating Children and Adolescents Email Print + Share For the most part, the ... tailored, based upon the child's weight. Children and adolescents are moving through a period of physical and ...

  5. Adolescent violence.

    PubMed

    Williams-Evans, Shiphrah A; Myers, Joy Sher'ron

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of the rising occurrences of adolescent violence in the American school systems and how various theories can be used to assist in understanding this phenomenon. The authors have become increasingly interested in this topic, after direct involvement in the summer of 2001. There were a number of students who were attending summer school as a result of consistent out-of-school suspensions for violent acts. The procedure to process through the system with these students was to suspend them, resulting in the student subsequently failing their present grade. The school was located in a community known for its high rate of violence and criminal activity. Various types of adolescent violence exist in our schools. Studies have reported that violent adolescents may come from familial environments that are full of social and interpersonal conflicts (Gray & Foshee, 1999). This paper discusses the development of a research plan to investigate the number and type of adolescent violent occurrences in a southern middle school setting.

  6. Adolescent homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Stronski Huwiler, S M; Remafedi, G

    1998-01-01

    Homosexuality has existed in all civilizations, but societal disapproval and cultural taboos have negatively influenced its recognition. A significant percentage of youths identify themselves as homosexual, and even more experience sex with the same sex or are confused about sexual feelings. A unifying etiological theory attributes the expression of sexual orientation to genes that shape the central nervous system's development, organization, and structure via prenatal sex steroids. Environmental factors may influence the expression of genetic potential. Several models of psychosocial development describe initial stages of awareness and confusion about same-sex attractions, followed by acknowledgement of homosexuality, disclosure to others, and eventual integration of sexual identity into a comprehensive sense of self. Stressors related to isolation, stigma, and violence may predispose homosexual adolescents to impaired social, emotional, and physical health, resulting in depression and suicide, school problems, substance abuse, running away eating disorders, risky sexual behavior, and illegal conduct. As with all adolescents, the overall goals in the care of homosexual youth are to promote normal adolescent development, social and emotional well-being, and physical health. A comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach is required to address medical, mental health, and psychosocial issues within the context of the adolescents' community and culture.

  7. TWEAT `95: User`s documentation update

    SciTech Connect

    Robertus, B.; Lambert, R.

    1996-03-01

    This report is designed to be a supplement to TWEAT`94 (PVTD-C94-05.01K Rev.1). It is intended to describe the primary features of the Ternary Waste Envelope Assessment Tool software package that have been added in FY`95 and how to use them. It contains only minimal duplication of information found in TWEAT`94 even though all features of TWEAT`94 will still be available. Emphasis on this Update is the binary plotting capability and the OWL Import modifications. Like it`s predecessors, this manual does not provide instructions for modifying the program code itself. The user of TWEAT`95 is expected to be familiar with the basic concepts and operation of the TWEAT software as discussed in TWEAT`94. Software and hardware requirements have not changed since TWEAT`94. TWEAT has now been tested using Macintosh System software versions 6.05 through 7.5.

  8. Evaluating User Participation and User Influence in an Enterprise System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Does user influence have an impact on the data quality of an information systems development project? What decision making should users have? How can users effectively be engaged in the process? What is success? User participation is considered to be a critical success factor for Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) projects, yet there is little…

  9. Creating User-Centered Instructions for Novice End-Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahl, Diane

    1999-01-01

    Discusses written instructional materials created by librarians for end users searching database systems. Highlights include novice user studies; the importance of print instruction in digital information environments; a paradigm shift from system-centered to user-centered focuses in technical writing and user documentation for software; and…

  10. End User Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jay, Caroline; Lunn, Darren; Michailidou, Eleni

    As new technologies emerge, and Web sites become increasingly sophisticated, ensuring they remain accessible to disabled and small-screen users is a major challenge. While guidelines and automated evaluation tools are useful for informing some aspects of Web site design, numerous studies have demonstrated that they provide no guarantee that the site is genuinely accessible. The only reliable way to evaluate the accessibility of a site is to study the intended users interacting with it. This chapter outlines the processes that can be used throughout the design life cycle to ensure Web accessibility, describing their strengths and weaknesses, and discussing the practical and ethical considerations that they entail. The chapter also considers an important emerging trend in user evaluations: combining data from studies of “standard” Web use with data describing existing accessibility issues, to drive accessibility solutions forward.

  11. GRSAC Users Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, S.J.; Nypaver, D.J.

    1999-02-01

    An interactive workstation-based simulation code (GRSAC) for studying postulated severe accidents in gas-cooled reactors has been developed to accommodate user-generated input with ''smart front-end'' checking. Code features includes on- and off-line plotting, on-line help and documentation, and an automated sensitivity study option. The code and its predecessors have been validated using comparisons with a variety of experimental data and similar codes. GRSAC model features include a three-dimensional representation of the core thermal hydraulics, and optional ATWS (anticipated transients without scram) capabilities. The user manual includes a detailed description of the code features, and includes four case studies which guide the user through four different examples of the major uses of GRSAC: an accident case; an initial conditions setup and run; a sensitivity study; and the setup of a new reactor model.

  12. Prevalence of problematic mobile phone use in British adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Fernandez, Olatz; Honrubia-Serrano, Luisa; Freixa-Blanxart, Montserrat; Gibson, Will

    2014-02-01

    The problematic use of mobile phones among adolescents has not been widely studied. There are very few instruments for assessing potential technological addiction to mobile phones, or for categorizing different types of users or uses. The most widely used scale is the Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale (MPPUS), which is used to study adult populations, and has been applied in various forms in international contexts. The aims of this study were to adapt the Spanish version of this scale (MPPUSA) to British adolescents, and then to estimate the prevalence of possible problematic users. A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 1,529 secondary school pupils aged between 11 and 18 years, with 1,026 completed questionnaires being collected. The analysis showed that the factor and construct validity and reliability were comparable to those obtained in previous studies. The prevalence of problematic users among the students was 10%, and the typical problematic user tended to be an adolescent between 11 and 14 years old, studying in a public school, who considered themselves to be an expert user of this technology, who made extensive use of his/her mobile phone, and who attributed the same problem of use among their peers. These users presented notable scores in all the symptoms covered by the scale used to assess problematic use. In conclusion, the adaptation of the MPPUSA as a screening scale for British adolescents presents good sensitivity and specificity for detecting the main addictive symptoms proposed in this validated version.

  13. CARE 3 User's Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A user's workshop for CARE 3, a reliability assessment tool designed and developed especially for the evaluation of high reliability fault tolerant digital systems, was held at NASA Langley Research Center on October 6 to 7, 1987. The main purpose of the workshop was to assess the evolutionary status of CARE 3. The activities of the workshop are documented and papers are included by user's of CARE 3 and NASA. Features and limitations of CARE 3 and comparisons to other tools are presented. The conclusions to a workshop questionaire are also discussed.

  14. RADTRAN 5 user guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanipe, Frances L.; Neuhauser, Karen Sieglinde

    2003-07-01

    This User Guide for the RADTRAN 5 computer code for transportation risk analysis describes basic risk concepts and provides the user with step-by-step directions for creating input files by means of either the RADDOG input file generator software or a text editor. It also contains information on how to interpret RADTRAN 5 output, how to obtain and use several types of important input data, and how to select appropriate analysis methods. Appendices include a glossary of terms, a listing of error messages, data-plotting information, images of RADDOG screens, and a table of all data in the internal radionuclide library.

  15. TIA Software User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Syed, Hazari I.

    1995-01-01

    This user's manual describes the installation and operation of TIA, the Thermal-Imaging acquisition and processing Application, developed by the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. TIA is a user friendly graphical interface application for the Macintosh 2 and higher series computers. The software has been developed to interface with the Perceptics/Westinghouse Pixelpipe(TM) and PixelStore(TM) NuBus cards and the GW Instruments MacADIOS(TM) input-output (I/O) card for the Macintosh for imaging thermal data. The software is also capable of performing generic image-processing functions.

  16. MERBoard User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Shab, Ted; Vera, Alonso; Gaswiller, Rich; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An important goal of MERBoard is to allow users to quickly and easily share information. The front-end interface is physically a large plasma computer display with a touch screen, allowing multiple people to interact shoulder-to-shoulder or in a small meeting area. The software system allows people to interactively create digital whiteboards, browse the web, give presentations and connect to personal computers (for example, to run applications not on the MERBoard computer itself). There are four major integrated applications: a browser; a remote connection to another computer (VNC); a digital whiteboard; and a digital space (MERSpace), which is a digital repository for each individual user.

  17. The LERIX User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Seidler, G.T.; Fister, T.T.; Cross, J.O.; Nagle, K.P.

    2007-01-18

    We describe the lower energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (LERIX) spectrometer, located at sector 20 PNC-XOR of the Advanced Photon Source. This instrument, which is now available to general users, is the first user facility optimized for high throughput measurements of momentum transfer dependent nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) from the core shell electrons of relatively light elements or the less-tightly bound electrons of heavier elements. By means of example, we present new NRIXS measurements of the near-edge structure for the L-edges of Al and the K-edge in Si.

  18. Crystal structures of two mononuclear complexes of terbium(III) nitrate with the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane.

    PubMed

    Gregório, Thaiane; Giese, Siddhartha O K; Nunes, Giovana G; Soares, Jaísa F; Hughes, David L

    2017-02-01

    Two new mononuclear cationic complexes in which the Tb(III) ion is bis-chelated by the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane (H3L(Et), C6H14O3) were prepared from Tb(NO3)3·5H2O and had their crystal and mol-ecular structures solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis after data collection at 100 K. Both products were isolated in reasonable yields from the same reaction mixture by using different crystallization conditions. The higher-symmetry complex dinitratobis[1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane]-terbium(III) nitrate di-meth-oxy-ethane hemisolvate, [Tb(NO3)2(H3L(Et))2]NO3·0.5C4H10O2, 1, in which the lanthanide ion is 10-coordinate and adopts an s-bicapped square-anti-prismatic coordination geometry, contains two bidentate nitrate ions bound to the metal atom; another nitrate ion functions as a counter-ion and a half-mol-ecule of di-meth-oxy-ethane (completed by a crystallographic twofold rotation axis) is also present. In product aqua-nitratobis[1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane]-terbium(III) dinitrate, [Tb(NO3)(H3L(Et))2(H2O)](NO3)2, 2, one bidentate nitrate ion and one water mol-ecule are bound to the nine-coordinate terbium(III) centre, while two free nitrate ions contribute to charge balance outside the tricapped trigonal-prismatic coordination polyhedron. No free water mol-ecule was found in either of the crystal structures and, only in the case of 1, di-meth-oxy-ethane acts as a crystallizing solvent. In both mol-ecular structures, the two tripodal ligands are bent to one side of the coordination sphere, leaving room for the anionic and water ligands. In complex 2, the methyl group of one of the H3L(Et) ligands is disordered over two alternative orientations. Strong hydrogen bonds, both intra- and inter-molecular, are found in the crystal structures due to the number of different donor and acceptor groups present.

  19. Adolescents Who Wouldn't Have Smoked May Be Drawn to E-Cigarettes

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog post on a recent study that suggest adolescents are not just using e-cigarettes as a substitute for conventional cigarettes but that e-cigarettes are attracting new users to tobacco products.

  20. User Centric Policy Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Gorrell P.

    2013-01-01

    Internet use, in general, and online social networking sites, in particular, are experiencing tremendous growth with hundreds of millions of active users. As a result, there is a tremendous amount of privacy information and content online. Protecting this information is a challenge. Access control policy composition is complex, laborious and…

  1. User Working Group Members

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-29

    User Working Group Members   Mail for the entire group may be directed to:  larc-asdc-uwg@lists.nasa.gov   Member Status Affiliation E-mail Contact Bob Holz (Co-Chair in 2010) Co-Chair University of ...

  2. CTF Preprocessor User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Avramova, Maria; Salko, Robert K.

    2016-05-26

    This document describes how a user should go about using the CTF pre- processor tool to create an input deck for modeling rod-bundle geometry in CTF. The tool was designed to generate input decks in a quick and less error- prone manner for CTF. The pre-processor is a completely independent utility, written in Fortran, that takes a reduced amount of input from the user. The information that the user must supply is basic information on bundle geome- try, such as rod pitch, clad thickness, and axial location of spacer grids|the pre-processor takes this basic information and determines channel placement and connection information to be written to the input deck, which is the most time-consuming and error-prone segment of creating a deck. Creation of the model is also more intuitive, as the user can specify assembly and water-tube placement using visual maps instead of having to place them by determining channel/channel and rod/channel connections. As an example of the bene t of the pre-processor, a quarter-core model that contains 500,000 scalar-mesh cells was read into CTF from an input deck containing 200,000 lines of data. This 200,000 line input deck was produced automatically from a set of pre-processor decks that contained only 300 lines of data.

  3. Educating the Music User

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    To better serve students' evolving needs in music, music educators must connect classroom learning with how students use and interact with music in their daily lives. One way to accomplish this is by approaching classrooms with the music user in mind, which can open new possibilities for meaningful music making and remove students from the…

  4. User Authentication. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plum, Terry, Comp.; Bleiler, Richard, Comp.

    2001-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to examine the systems research libraries use to authenticate and authorize the users of their online networked information resources. A total of 52 of 121 ARL member libraries responded to…

  5. HEMPDS user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, K.H.

    1983-02-01

    HEMPDS, the double-slide version of two-dimensional HEMP, allows the intersection of slide lines and slide lines in any direction, thus making use of triangular zones. this revised user's manual aids the physicist, computer scientist, and computer technician in using, maintaining, and coverting HEMPDS. Equations, EOS models, and sample problems are included.

  6. Empowering the User.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Terrence J.; Mechley, Victor P.

    With respect to the college's information systems, there were three major challenges facing Ohio's Cincinnati Technical College (CTC) in 1991. The expanding use of personal computers (PC's) and non-integrated systems often duplicated efforts and data on CTC's existing computer systems, users were demanding more access to data and more integration…

  7. User's guide to SSARRMENU

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, M.C.; Le, Thanh

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pierce County Department of Public Works, Washington, has developed an operational tool called the Puyallup Flood-Alert System to alert users of impending floods in the Puyallup River Basin. The system acquires and incorporates meteorological and hydrological data into the Streamflow Synthesis and Reservoir Regulation (SSARR) hydrologic flow-routing model to simulate floods in the Puyallup River Basin. SSARRMENU is the user-interactive graphical interface between the user, the input and output data, and the SSARR model. In a companion cooperative project with Pierce County, the SSARR model for the Puyallup River Basin was calibrated and validated. The calibrated model is accessed through SSARRMENU, which has been specifically programed for the Puyallup River and the needs of Pierce County. SSARRMENU automates the retrieval of data from ADAPS (Automated DAta Processing System, the U.S. Geological Survey?s real-time hydrologic database), formats the data for use with SSARR, initiates SSARR model runs, displays alerts for impending floods, and provides utilities to display the simulated and observed data. An on-screen map of the basin and a series of menu items provide the user wi

  8. Power User Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) is a system of middleware, written for expert users in the Earth-science community, PUI enables expedited ordering of data granules on the basis of specific granule-identifying information that the users already know or can assemble. PUI also enables expert users to perform quick searches for orderablegranule information for use in preparing orders. PUI 5.0 is available in two versions (note: PUI 6.0 has command-line mode only): a Web-based application program and a UNIX command-line- mode client program. Both versions include modules that perform data-granule-ordering functions in conjunction with external systems. The Web-based version works with Earth Observing System Clearing House (ECHO) metadata catalog and order-entry services and with an open-source order-service broker server component, called the Mercury Shopping Cart, that is provided separately by Oak Ridge National Laboratory through the Department of Energy. The command-line version works with the ECHO metadata and order-entry process service. Both versions of PUI ultimately use ECHO to process an order to be sent to a data provider. Ordered data are provided through means outside the PUI software system.

  9. TOTAL user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sally C.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1994-01-01

    Semi-Markov models can be used to analyze the reliability of virtually any fault-tolerant system. However, the process of delineating all of the states and transitions in the model of a complex system can be devastatingly tedious and error-prone. Even with tools such as the Abstract Semi-Markov Specification Interface to the SURE Tool (ASSIST), the user must describe a system by specifying the rules governing the behavior of the system in order to generate the model. With the Table Oriented Translator to the ASSIST Language (TOTAL), the user can specify the components of a typical system and their attributes in the form of a table. The conditions that lead to system failure are also listed in a tabular form. The user can also abstractly specify dependencies with causes and effects. The level of information required is appropriate for system designers with little or no background in the details of reliability calculations. A menu-driven interface guides the user through the system description process, and the program updates the tables as new information is entered. The TOTAL program automatically generates an ASSIST input description to match the system description.

  10. Future User Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, Lee

    2002-10-01

    The southeastern part of the U.S. is blessed with an array of national user facilities that are accessible to scientists in the region. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates 17 officially designated user facilities for the Department of Energy, the Jefferson Lab operates the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and a number of universities have forefront experimental facilities that are widely accessible. The long lead time necessary to originate and construct new user facilities makes it imperative to consider the needs of the physical sciences 10 to 20 years in the future. The construction of the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL positions the southeast to lead in neutron science. Upgrades are desired for CEBAF and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (ORNL). The more future possibilities are less clear, but are becoming a focus of strategic planning among the national laboratories. Possibilities may arise in the U.S. for next-generation light sources, large computational centers, advanced fusion devices, nanotechnology centers, and perhaps facilities that are not yet contemplated. A regional discussion of the needs for large-scale user facilities in the southeast is important.

  11. EREP users handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Revised Skylab spacecraft, experiments, and mission planning information is presented for the Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP) users. The major hardware elements and the medical, scientific, engineering, technology and earth resources experiments are described. Ground truth measurements and EREP data handling procedures are discussed. The mission profile, flight planning, crew activities, and aircraft support are also outlined.

  12. SHARP User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y. Q.; Shemon, E. R.; Thomas, J. W.; Mahadevan, Vijay S.; Rahaman, Ronald O.; Solberg, Jerome

    2016-03-31

    SHARP is an advanced modeling and simulation toolkit for the analysis of nuclear reactors. It is comprised of several components including physical modeling tools, tools to integrate the physics codes for multi-physics analyses, and a set of tools to couple the codes within the MOAB framework. Physics modules currently include the neutronics code PROTEUS, the thermal-hydraulics code Nek5000, and the structural mechanics code Diablo. This manual focuses on performing multi-physics calculations with the SHARP ToolKit. Manuals for the three individual physics modules are available with the SHARP distribution to help the user to either carry out the primary multi-physics calculation with basic knowledge or perform further advanced development with in-depth knowledge of these codes. This manual provides step-by-step instructions on employing SHARP, including how to download and install the code, how to build the drivers for a test case, how to perform a calculation and how to visualize the results. Since SHARP has some specific library and environment dependencies, it is highly recommended that the user read this manual prior to installing SHARP. Verification tests cases are included to check proper installation of each module. It is suggested that the new user should first follow the step-by-step instructions provided for a test problem in this manual to understand the basic procedure of using SHARP before using SHARP for his/her own analysis. Both reference output and scripts are provided along with the test cases in order to verify correct installation and execution of the SHARP package. At the end of this manual, detailed instructions are provided on how to create a new test case so that user can perform novel multi-physics calculations with SHARP. Frequently asked questions are listed at the end of this manual to help the user to troubleshoot issues.

  13. Online communication and adolescent relationships.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Greenfield, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade, technology has become increasingly important in the lives of adolescents. As a group, adolescents are heavy users of newer electronic communication forms such as instant messaging, e-mail, and text messaging, as well as communication-oriented Internet sites such as blogs, social networking, and sites for sharing photos and videos. Kaveri Subrahmanyam and Patricia Greenfield examine adolescents' relationships with friends, romantic partners, strangers, and their families in the context of their online communication activities. The authors show that adolescents are using these communication tools primarily to reinforce existing relationships, both with friends and romantic partners. More and more they are integrating these tools into their "offline" worlds, using, for example, social networking sites to get more information about new entrants into their offline world. Subrahmanyam and Greenfield note that adolescents' online interactions with strangers, while not as common now as during the early years of the Internet, may have benefits, such as relieving social anxiety, as well as costs, such as sexual predation. Likewise, the authors demonstrate that online content itself can be both positive and negative. Although teens find valuable support and information on websites, they can also encounter racism and hate messages. Electronic communication may also be reinforcing peer communication at the expense of communication with parents, who may not be knowledgeable enough about their children's online activities on sites such as the enormously popular MySpace. Although the Internet was once hailed as the savior of education, the authors say that schools today are trying to control the harmful and distracting uses of electronic media while children are at school. The challenge for schools is to eliminate the negative uses of the Internet and cell phones in educational settings while preserving their significant contributions to education and social

  14. Factors Associated with Homelessness of Adolescents under Supervision of the Youth Protection System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert, Marie; Pauze, R.; Fournier, L.

    2005-01-01

    There are two factors that limit our knowledge of the risk factors associated with homelessness among runaway adolescents, namely (1) the samples used are often composed of youth homeless service users and/or youths living on the streets (visible homelessness), whereas most adolescents in fact use ''private'' resources (hidden homelessness), and…

  15. Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment in the United States: Exemplary Models from a National Evaluation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Sally J.; Morral, Andrew R.

    This book provides detailed descriptions of exemplary adolescent drug treatment models and gives the latest information on substance use and its consequences. The examinations of treatment models included in this book include programs serving adolescent substance users from a wide range of ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Chapters include: (1)…

  16. Understanding Adolescent Caffeine Use: Connecting Use Patterns with Expectancies, Reasons, and Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludden, Alison Bryant; Wolfson, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about adolescents' caffeine use, yet caffeinated soda, and more recently coffee and energy drinks, are part of youth culture. This study examines adolescents' caffeine use and, using cluster analysis, identifies three groups of caffeine users who differed in their reasons for use, expectancies, and sleep behaviors. In this high…

  17. Crystal structure of bis-(1,3-di-meth-oxy-imidazolin-2-yl-idene)silver(I) hexa-fluorido-phosphate, N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex.

    PubMed

    Rietzler, Barbara; Laus, Gerhard; Kahlenberg, Volker; Schottenberger, Herwig

    2015-12-01

    The title salt, [Ag(C5H8N2O2)2]PF6, was obtained by deprotonation and metalation of 1,3-di-meth-oxy-imidazolium hexa-fluorido-phosphate using silver(I) oxide in methanol. The C-Ag-C angle in the cation is 178.1 (2)°, and the N-C-N angles are 101.1 (4) and 100.5 (4)°. The meth-oxy groups adopt an anti conformation. In the crystal, anions (A) are sandwiched between cations (C) in a layered arrangement {C…A…C} n stacked along [001]. Within a C…A…C layer, the hexafluoridophosphate anions accept several C-H⋯F hydrogen bonds from the cationic complex.

  18. Alcohol and Other Drug Resistance Strategies Employed by Rural Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Krieger, Janice; Hecht, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to identify how rural adolescents make health decisions and utilize communication strategies to resist influence attempts in offers of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (ATOD). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 113 adolescents from rural school districts to solicit information on ATOD norms, past ATOD experiences, and substance offer-response episodes. Rural youths’ resistance strategies were similar to previous findings with urban adolescents – refuse, explain, avoid, and leave (the REAL typology) – while unique features of these strategies were identified including the importance of personal narratives, the articulation of a non-user identity, and being “accountable” to self and others. PMID:21552345

  19. Crystal structure of (E)-4-hy­droxy-N′-(3-meth­oxy­benzyl­idene)benzohydrazide1

    PubMed Central

    Chantrapromma, Suchada; Prachumrat, Patcharawadee; Ruanwas, Pumsak; Boonnak, Nawong; Kassim, Mohammad B.

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, C15H14N2O3, crystallizes with two independent mol­ecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit that differ in the orientation of the 3-meth­oxy­phenyl group with respect to the methyl­idenebenzohydrazide unit. The dihedral angles between the two benzene rings are 24.02 (10) and 29.30 (9)° in mol­ecules A and B, respectively. In mol­ecule A, the meth­oxy group is twisted slightly relative to its bound benzene ring, with a Cmeth­yl—O—C—C torsion angle of 14.2 (3)°, whereas it is almost co-planar in mol­ecule B, where the corresponding angle is −2.4 (3)°. In the crystal, the mol­ecules are linked by N—H⋯O, O—H⋯N and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, as well as by weak C—H⋯O inter­actions, forming sheets parallel to the bc plane. The N—H⋯O hydrogen bond and weak C—H⋯O inter­action link different mol­ecules (A⋯B) whereas both O—H⋯N and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link like mol­ecules (A⋯A) and (B⋯B). Pairs of inversion-related B mol­ecules are stacked approximately along the a axis by π–π inter­actions in which the distance between the centroids of the 3-meth­oxy­phenyl rings is 3.5388 (12) Å. The B mol­ecules also participate in weak C—H⋯π inter­actions between the 4-hy­droxy­phenyl and the 3-meth­oxy­phenyl rings. PMID:27920930

  20. Crystal structure of a mixed-ligand dinuclear Ba-Zn complex with 2-meth-oxy-ethanol having tri-phenyl-acetate and chloride bridges.

    PubMed

    Utko, Józef; Sobocińska, Maria; Dobrzyńska, Danuta; Lis, Tadeusz

    2015-07-01

    The dinuclear barium-zinc complex, μ-chlorido-1:2κ(2) Cl:Cl-chlorido-2κCl-bis-(2-meth-oxy-ethanol-1κO)bis-(2-meth-oxy-ethanol-1κ(2) O,O')bis-(μ-tri-phenyl-acetato-1:2κ(2) O:O')bariumzinc, [BaZn(C20H15O2)2Cl2(C3H8O2)4], has been synthesized by the reaction of barium tri-phenyl-acetate, anhydrous zinc chloride and 2-meth-oxy-ethanol in the presence of toluene. The barium and zinc metal cations in the dinuclear complex are linked via one chloride anion and carboxyl-ate O atoms of the tri-phenyl-acetate ligands, giving a Ba⋯Zn separation of 3.9335 (11) Å. The irregular nine-coordinate BaO8Cl coordination centres comprise eight O-atom donors, six of them from 2-meth-oxy-ethanol ligands (four from two bidentate O,O'-chelate inter-actions and two from monodentate inter-actions), two from bridging tri-phenyl-acetate ligands and one from a bridging Cl donor. The distorted tetra-hedral coordination sphere of zinc comprises two O-atom donors from the tri-phenyl-acetate ligands and two Cl donors (one bridging and one terminal). In the crystal, O-H⋯Cl, O-H⋯O and C-H⋯Cl inter-molecular inter-actions form a layered structure, lying parallel to (001).

  1. Adolescent sexual activity.

    PubMed

    Braverman, P K; Strasburger, V C

    1993-11-01

    Adolescents are becoming sexually active at younger ages. One half of the adolescents in the United States are sexually active. This article reviews adolescent sexual activity, including rates of sexual activity, sexual practices, gay and lesbian youth, and factors affecting the initiation of sexual activity. In addition, adolescent pregnancy, with possible outcomes and effects on teen parents and their offspring, is discussed.

  2. Crystal structures of bis-[(9S,13S,14S)-3-meth-oxy-17-methyl-morphinanium] tetra-chlorido-cobaltate and tetra-chlorido-cuprate.

    PubMed

    Gauchat, Eric; Nazarenko, Alexander Y

    2017-01-01

    (9S,13S,14S)-3-Meth-oxy-17-methyl-morphinan (dextromethorphan) forms two isostructural salts with (a) tetra-chlorido-cobaltate, namely bis-[(9S,13S,14S)-3-meth-oxy-17-methyl-morphinanium] tetra-chlorido-cobaltate, (C18H26NO)2[CoCl4], and (b) tetra-chlorido-cuprate, namely bis-[(9S,13S,14S)-3-meth-oxy-17-methyl-morphinanium] tetra-chlorido-cuprate, (C18H26NO)2[CuCl4]. The distorted tetra-hedral anions are located on twofold rotational axes. The dextromethorphan cation can be described as being composed of two ring systems, a tetra-hydro-naphthalene system A+B and a deca-hydro-isoquinolinium subunit C+D, that are nearly perpendicular to one another: the angle between mean planes of the A+B and C+D moieties is 78.8 (1)° for (a) and 79.0 (1)° for (b). Two symmetry-related cations of protonated dextromethorphan are connected to the tetra-chlorido-cobaltate (or tetra-chlorido-cuprate) anions via strong N-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, forming neutral ion associates. These associates are packed in the (001) plane with no strong attractive bonding between them. Both compounds are attractive crystalline forms for unambiguous identification of the dextromethorphan and, presumably, of its optical isomer, levomethorphan.

  3. Methionine synthesis in Escherichia coli: effect of the MetR protein on metE and metH expression.

    PubMed

    Cai, X Y; Maxon, M E; Redfield, B; Glass, R; Brot, N; Weissbach, H

    1989-06-01

    Studies by Urbanowski et al. [Urbanowski, M. L., Stauffer, L. T., Plamann, L. S. & Stauffer, G. V. (1987) J. Bacteriol. 169, 1391-1397] have identified a regulatory locus, called metR, required for the expression of the metE and metH genes. We recently purified the MetR protein from Escherichia coli and showed that it could stimulate the in vitro expression of the metE gene and autoregulate its own synthesis. In the present study, the purified MetR protein has been shown to stimulate the in vitro expression of the metH gene. Also, the in vitro synthesized MetE, MetH, and MetR proteins were shown to be biologically active. The transcription start sites for the metE and metR genes have been determined, and DNA footprinting experiments have identified regions in the metE-metR intergenic sequence that are protected by either the MetR or MetJ proteins.

  4. ASSIST user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sally C.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1995-01-01

    Semi-Markov models can be used to analyze the reliability of virtually any fault-tolerant system. However, the process of delineating all the states and transitions in a complex system model can be devastatingly tedious and error prone. The Abstract Semi-Markov Specification Interface to the SURE Tool (ASSIST) computer program allows the user to describe the semi-Markov model in a high-level language. Instead of listing the individual model states, the user specifies the rules governing the behavior of the system, and these are used to generate the model automatically. A few statements in the abstract language can describe a very large, complex model. Because no assumptions are made about the system being modeled, ASSIST can be used to generate models describing the behavior of any system. The ASSIST program and its input language are described and illustrated by examples.

  5. The ISABEL user survey.

    PubMed

    Briggs, J S; Fitch, C J

    2005-06-01

    ISABEL is a web-based clinical decision-support system for use by health care professionals. The Web site has been developed by the ISABEL Medical Charity. The system has come to the attention of the Department of Health, which is examining its potential effectiveness in the wider clinical context and exploring options for promoting its wider use in the NHS. The objectives of the work reported here were to review the existing use of ISABEL and to identify impediments to its development. A questionnaire was sent by e-mail to selected users of the system. Based on an analysis of the results (n=518), we found ISABEL to be a useful tool with many users. We believe that there is evidence of its success sufficient to support its continued availability and development. However, the largest hurdles to its increased use are systemic ones within the NHS and the way services are delivered.

  6. Trilinos users guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Willenbring, James M.; Heroux, Michael Allen

    2003-08-01

    The Trilinos Project is an effort to facilitate the design, development, integration and ongoing support of mathematical software libraries. A new software capability is introduced into Trilinos as a package. A Trilinos package is an integral unit usually developed by a small team of experts in a particular algorithms area such as algebraic preconditioners, nonlinear solvers, etc. The Trilinos Users Guide is a resource for new and existing Trilinos users. Topics covered include how to configure and build Trilinos, what is required to integrate an existing package into Trilinos and examples of how those requirements can be met, as well as what tools and services are available to Trilinos packages. Also discussed are some common practices that are followed by many Trilinos package developers. Finally, a snapshot of current Trilinos packages and their interoperability status is provided, along with a list of supported computer platforms.

  7. RELAP-7 User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua; Zou, Ling; Andrs, David; Berry, Ray Alden; Martineau, Richard Charles

    2014-12-01

    The document contains a user's guide on how to run the RELAP-7 code. The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. RELAP-7 will become the main reactor systems simulation toolkit for the LWRS (Light Water Reactor Sustainability) program’s RISMC (Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization) effort and the next generation tool in the RELAP reactor safety/systems analysis application series. RELAP-7 is written with object oriented programming language C++. A number of example problems and their associated input files are presented in this document to guide users to run the RELAP-7 code starting with simple pipe problems to problems with increasing complexity.

  8. Outside users payload model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The outside users payload model which is a continuation of documents and replaces and supersedes the July 1984 edition is presented. The time period covered by this model is 1985 through 2000. The following sections are included: (1) definition of the scope of the model; (2) discussion of the methodology used; (3) overview of total demand; (4) summary of the estimated market segmentation by launch vehicle; (5) summary of the estimated market segmentation by user type; (6) details of the STS market forecast; (7) summary of transponder trends; (8) model overview by mission category; and (9) detailed mission models. All known non-NASA, non-DOD reimbursable payloads forecast to be flown by non-Soviet-block countries are included in this model with the exception of Spacelab payloads and small self contained payloads. Certain DOD-sponsored or cosponsored payloads are included if they are reimbursable launches.

  9. CSTEM User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, M.; McKnight, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    This manual is a combination of a user manual, theory manual, and programmer manual. The reader is assumed to have some previous exposure to the finite element method. This manual is written with the idea that the CSTEM (Coupled Structural Thermal Electromagnetic-Computer Code) user needs to have a basic understanding of what the code is actually doing in order to properly use the code. For that reason, the underlying theory and methods used in the code are described to a basic level of detail. The manual gives an overview of the CSTEM code: how the code came into existence, a basic description of what the code does, and the order in which it happens (a flowchart). Appendices provide a listing and very brief description of every file used by the CSTEM code, including the type of file it is, what routine regularly accesses the file, and what routine opens the file, as well as special features included in CSTEM.

  10. IAC user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Beste, D. L.; Gregg, J.

    1984-01-01

    The User Manual for the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) Level 1 system is presented. The IAC system currently supports the thermal, structures, controls and system dynamics technologies, and its development is influenced by the requirements for design/analysis of large space systems. The system has many features which make it applicable to general problems in engineering, and to management of data and software. Information includes basic IAC operation, executive commands, modules, solution paths, data organization and storage, IAC utilities, and module implementation.

  11. User Interface Software Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    97. 19. Mark A. Flecchia and R. Daniel Bergeron. Specifying Complex Dialogs in ALGAE. Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI+GI󈨛, Toronto, Ont...Spreadsheet Model. Tech. Rept. GIT-GVU-93-20, Georgia Tech Graphics, Visualization and Usability Center, May, 1993. 35. Daniel H.H. Ingalls. "I’he Smalltalk...Interactive Graphical Applications". Comm. ACM 36,4 (April 1993), 41-55. User Interface Software Tools -39 38. Anthony Karrer and Walt Scacchi . Requirements

  12. User Interface Design Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    the beginning of our research) led us to Glade (glade.gnome.org), a cross- platform GUI builder platform that saves its descriptive files in XML format...Major consideration was initially given to Java Netbeans and Java Eclipse, and later extended to Glade .) The saved XML files fully describe... Glade -designed user interfaces. Glade libraries are available for numerous programming languages on many computing platforms. This makes the choice of

  13. Salinas - User's Notes

    SciTech Connect

    ALVIN,KENNETH F.; BHARDWAJ,MANOJ K.; DRIESSEN,BRIAN; REESE,GARTH M.; SEGALMAN,DANIEL J.

    1999-11-01

    Salinas provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of weapons systems. This document provides a users guide to the input for Salinas. Details of input specifications for the different solution types, output options, element types and parameters are included. The appendices contain detailed examples, and instructions for running the software on parallel platforms.

  14. Magnetic tape user guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A. B.; Lee, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    This User Guide provides a general introduction to the structure, use, and handling of magnetic tapes at Langley Research Center (LaRC). The topics covered are tape terminology, physical characteristics, error prevention and detection, and creating, using, and maintaining tapes. Supplementary documentation is referenced where it might be helpful. The documentation is included for the tape utility programs, BLOCK, UNBLOCK, and TAPEDMP, which are available at the Central Scientific Computing Complex at LaRC.

  15. PISCES 2 users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Terrence W.

    1987-01-01

    PISCES 2 is a programming environment and set of extensions to Fortran 77 for parallel programming. It is intended to provide a basis for writing programs for scientific and engineering applications on parallel computers in a way that is relatively independent of the particular details of the underlying computer architecture. This user's manual provides a complete description of the PISCES 2 system as it is currently implemented on the 20 processor Flexible FLEX/32 at NASA Langley Research Center.

  16. PARFUME User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Hamman

    2010-09-01

    PARFUME, a fuel performance analysis and modeling code, is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for evaluating gas reactor coated particle fuel assemblies for prismatic, pebble bed, and plate type fuel geometries. The code is an integrated mechanistic analysis tool that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of coated fuel particles (TRISO) and the probability for fuel failure given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise during the fuel fabrication process. Using a robust finite difference numerical scheme, PARFUME is capable of performing steady state and transient heat transfer and fission product diffusion analyses for the fuel. Written in FORTRAN 90, PARFUME is easy to read, maintain, and modify. Currently, PARFUME is supported only on MS Windows platforms. This document represents the initial version of the PARFUME User Guide, a supplement to the PARFUME Theory and Model Basis Report which describes the theoretical aspects of the code. User information is provided including: 1) code development, 2) capabilities and limitations, 3) installation and execution, 4) user input and output, 5) sample problems, and 6) error messages. In the near future, the INL plans to release a fully benchmarked and validated beta version of PARFUME.

  17. Ayahuasca in adolescence: a neuropsychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Doering-Silveira, Evelyn; Lopez, Enrique; Grob, Charles S; de Rios, Marlene Dobkin; Alonso, Luisa K; Tacla, Cristiane; Shirakawa, Itiro; Bertolucci, Paulo H; Da Silveira, Dartiu X

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate neuropsychologically adolescents who use ayahuasca in a religious context. A battery of neuropsychological tests was administered to adolescents who use ayahuasca. These subjects were compared to a matched control group of adolescents who did not use ayahuasca. The controls were matched with regards to sex, age, and education. The neuropsychological battery included tests of speeded attention, visual search, sequencing, psychomotor speed, verbal and visual abilities, memory, and mental flexibility. The statistical results for subjects from matched controls on neuropsychological measures were computed using independent t-tests. Overall, statistical findings suggested that there was no significant difference between the two groups on neuropsychological measures. Even though, the data overall supports that there was not a difference between ayahuasca users and matched controls on neuropsychological measures, further studies are necessary to support these findings.

  18. Contraception-related venous thromboembolism in adolescents.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2014-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a rare but serious complication of combined hormonal contraception. While the absolute risk of VTE is low in adolescents, thrombotic events in contraception users younger than the age of 20 years account for 5 to 10% of total contraception-related VTE events in population studies, because of the high frequency of contraception use in adolescents. An increased risk of VTE exists not only with oral contraceptives, but also the contraceptive patch and vaginal ring. Most adolescents who experience contraception-related VTE have additional transient or inherited thrombotic risk factors at the time of VTE. Although the presence of inherited thrombophilia impacts the risk of contraception-related VTE, thrombophilia screening before contraception prescribing should be targeted only to high-risk populations. Pediatric institutions, caregivers, and young women need to be aware of the risk of VTE with estrogen-containing contraception, and maintain a high index of suspicion for this complication in women using these agents.

  19. Medical Misuse of Controlled Medications Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; West, Brady T.; Cranford, James A.; Ross-Durow, Paula; Young, Amy; Teter, Christian J.; Boyd, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the past-year medical misuse prevalence for 4 controlled medication classes (pain, stimulant, sleeping, and antianxiety) among adolescents, and to assess substance use outcomes among adolescents who report medical misuse. Design A Web-based survey was self-administered by 2744 secondary school students in 2009-2010. Setting Two southeastern Michigan school districts. Participants The sample had a mean age of 14.8 years and was 51.1% female. The racial/ethnic distribution was 65.0% white, 29.5% African American, 3.7% Asian, 1.3% Hispanic, and 0.5% other. Main Outcome Measures Past-year medical use and misuse of 4 controlled medication classes. Results Eighteen percent of the sample reported past-year medical use of at least 1 prescribed controlled medication. Among past-year medical users, 22.0% reported misuse of their controlled medications, including taking too much, intentionally getting high, or using to increase alcohol or other drug effects. Medical misusers were more likely than nonmisusers to divert their controlled medications and to abuse other substances. The odds of a positive screening result for drug abuse were substantially higher among medical misusers (adjusted odds ratio, 7.8; 95% confidence interval, 4.3-14.2) compared with medical users who used their controlled medications appropriately. The odds of drug abuse did not differ between medical users who used their controlled medications appropriately and nonusers. Conclusions Most adolescents who used controlled medications took their medications appropriately. Substance use and diversion of controlled medications were more prevalent among adolescents who misused their controlled medications. Careful therapeutic monitoring could reduce medical misuse and diversion of controlled medications among adolescents. PMID:21810634

  20. Tobacco point of sale advertising increases positive brand user imagery

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, R; Jancey, J; Jones, S

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the potential impact of point of sale advertising on adolescents so as to inform changes to the Tobacco Control Act. Design: Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. In the control condition, students were exposed to a photograph of a packet of cigarettes; in the intervention condition, students were exposed to an ad for cigarettes, typical of point of sale advertising posters. All students then rated the brand user on a set of 12 bipolar adjectives. Two brands were used in the study: Benson & Hedges, and Marlboro. Subjects: One hundred year (grade) 6 and 7 students (age range 10–12 years), from four Western Australian metropolitan primary schools, participated in the study. Results: In a majority of the brand user descriptions, the cigarette advertisements increased brand user imagery in a positive way, especially for Benson & Hedges. For example, participants viewing the Benson & Hedges advertisement, as distinct from those viewing the Benson & Hedges pack only, were more likely to describe the Benson & Hedges user as relaxed, interesting, cool, rich, adventurous, and classy. Relative to the Marlboro pack only, the Marlboro ad increased positive perceptions of the Marlboro user on adventurous, interesting, and relaxed. Conclusions: The results presented here support restrictions being placed on advertising at point of sale, since such ads have the potential to increase positive brand user imagery directly in the situation where a product purchase can take place, and hence the potential to increase the likelihood of impulse purchasing. PMID:12198267

  1. Reasoning about Users' Actions in a Graphical User Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virvou, Maria; Kabassi, Katerina

    2002-01-01

    Describes a graphical user interface called IFM (Intelligent File Manipulator) that provides intelligent help to users. Explains two underlying reasoning mechanisms, one an adaptation of human plausible reasoning and one that performs goal recognition based on the effects of users' commands; and presents results of an empirical study that…

  2. Application of Targeted Molecular and Material Property Optimization to Bacterial Attachment-Resistant (Meth)acrylate Polymers.

    PubMed

    Adlington, Kevin; Nguyen, Nam T; Eaves, Elizabeth; Yang, Jing; Chang, Chien-Yi; Li, Jianing; Gower, Alexandra L; Stimpson, Amy; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Davies, Martyn C; Hook, Andrew L; Williams, Paul; Alexander, Morgan R; Irvine, Derek J

    2016-09-12

    Developing medical devices that resist bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation is highly desirable. In this paper, we report the optimization of the molecular structure and thus material properties of a range of (meth)acrylate copolymers which contain monomers reported to deliver bacterial resistance to surfaces. This optimization allows such monomers to be employed within novel coatings to reduce bacterial attachment to silicone urinary catheters. We show that the flexibility of copolymers can be tuned to match that of the silicone catheter substrate, by copolymerizing these polymers with a lower Tg monomer such that it passes the flexing fatigue tests as coatings upon catheters, that the homopolymers failed. Furthermore, the Tg values of the copolymers are shown to be readily estimated by the Fox equation. The bacterial resistance performance of these copolymers were typically found to be better than the neat silicone or a commercial silver containing hydrogel surface, when the monomer feed contained only 25 v% of the "hit" monomer. The method of initiation (either photo or thermal) was shown not to affect the bacterial resistance of the copolymers. Optimized synthesis conditions to ensure that the correct copolymer composition and to prevent the onset of gelation are detailed.

  3. Crystal structure of N,N'-bis-[(pyridin-4-yl)meth-yl]naphthalene di-imide.

    PubMed

    Nicolas-Gomez, Mariana; Martínez-Otero, Diego; Dorazco-González, Alejandro

    2014-09-01

    In the centrosymmetric title compound, C26H16N4O4 {systematic name: 6,13-bis-[(pyridin-4-yl)meth-yl]-6,13-di-aza-tetra-cyclo-[6.6.2.0(4,16)0(11,15)]hexa-deca-1,3,8,10,15-pantaene-5,7,12,14-tetrone}, the central ring system is essentially planar [maximum deviation = 0.0234 (8) Å] and approximately perpendicular to the terminal pyridine ring [dihedral angle = 84.38 (3)°]. The mol-ecules displays a trans conformation with the (pyridin-4-yl)methyl groups on both sides of the central naphthalene di-imide plane. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by π-π stacking between parallel pyridine rings [centroid-centroid distances = 3.7014 (8) and 3.8553 (8) Å] and weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supra-molecular architecture.

  4. Crystal structure of N,N′-bis­[(pyridin-4-yl)meth­yl]naphthalene di­imide

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas-Gomez, Mariana; Martínez-Otero, Diego; Dorazco-González, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    In the centrosymmetric title compound, C26H16N4O4 {systematic name: 6,13-bis­[(pyridin-4-yl)meth­yl]-6,13-di­aza­tetra­cyclo­[6.6.2.04,16011,15]hexa­deca-1,3,8,10,15-pantaene-5,7,12,14-tetrone}, the central ring system is essentially planar [maximum deviation = 0.0234 (8) Å] and approximately perpendicular to the terminal pyridine ring [dihedral angle = 84.38 (3)°]. The mol­ecules displays a trans conformation with the (pyridin-4-yl)methyl groups on both sides of the central naphthalene di­imide plane. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by π–π stacking between parallel pyridine rings [centroid–centroid distances = 3.7014 (8) and 3.8553 (8) Å] and weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supra­molecular architecture. PMID:25309294

  5. Developing a biohybrid lung - sufficient endothelialization of poly-4-methly-1-pentene gas exchange hollow-fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Wiegmann, Bettina; von Seggern, Heide; Höffler, Klaus; Korossis, Sotirios; Dipresa, Daniele; Pflaum, Michael; Schmeckebier, Sabrina; Seume, Jörg; Haverich, Axel

    2016-07-01

    Working towards establishing a biohybrid lung with optimized hemocompatibility, this study analyzed the feasibility of establishing flow-resistant endothelium on heparin/albumin coated poly-4-methly-1-pentene hollow fiber gas exchange membranes (PMP-HFs). The seeding efficiency and proliferation of human cord blood derived endothelial cells (HCBEC) on PMP-HFs were analyzed under static conditions by WST-8 cell proliferation assay and fluorescence microscopy. The HCBEC monolayer integrity under different flow conditions was also assessed. Endothelial-specific phenotype verification, expression activation levels and thrombogenic state markers were quantified by real-time RT-PCR for cell-to-PMP-HF contact under static and dynamic conditions. The results demonstrated the feasibility of establishing a viable, confluent, and flow-resistant endothelial monolayer on the blood-contact surface of PMP-HFs, which maintained a physiological response to TNFα-stimulation and flow conditions. The endothelial phenotype, expression levels of adhesion molecules and thrombogenic state markers were unaffected by cell-to-PMP-HFs contact. These results represent a significant step towards establishing a biohybrid lung.

  6. Recrystallization of water in non-water-soluble (meth)acrylate polymers is not rare and is not devitrification.

    PubMed

    Gemmei-Ide, Makoto; Ohya, Atsushi; Kitano, Hiromi

    2012-02-16

    Change in the state of water sorbed into four kinds of non-water-soluble poly(meth)acrylates with low water content by temperature (T) perturbation was examined on the basis of T variable mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy. Many studies using differential scanning calorimetry suggested that there was no change in the state. T dependence of their MIR spectra, however, clearly demonstrated various changes in the state. Furthermore, recrystallization, which was crystallization during heating, was observed in all four polymers. The recrystallization observed in this study was not devitrification, which is the change in the state from glassy water to crystalline water, but vapor deposition during heating (vapor re-deposition). There were only two reports about recrystallization of water in a non-water-soluble polymer before this report; therefore, it might be considered to be a rare phenomenon. However, as demonstrated in this study, it is not a rare phenomenon. Recrystallization (vapor re-deposition) of water in the polymer matrices is related to a balance between flexibility and strength of the electrostatic interaction sites of polymer matrices but might not be related to the biocompatibility of polymers.

  7. Nitric oxide synthesis contributes to inhibition of graft-versus-tumor-effects against intraperitoneal Meth A tumor.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun-Kee; Lee, Na-Ri; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Yim, Chang-Yeol

    2004-08-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in graft-versus-tumor-effect (GVT) was evaluated in the present study. GVT was induced by intravenous injection of C57BL/6J (H-2b) mouse splenocytes to {C57BL/6J (H-2b) x BALB/c (H-2d)} F1 mice bearing Meth A (H-2d) ascites tumors. Induction of GVT increased nitrite production and expression of inducible NO synthase by ascites cells. The increased nitrite production was inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (MLA). Experiments employing immunomagnetic depletion of Mac-1+ cells from ascites indicated that macrophages were a major cellular source of the nitrite production. Interferon-gamma levels were increased in both serum and ascites fluid during GVT. Induction of GVT prolonged survival of ascites-bearing mice, and increased urinary nitrate excretion. MLA administration inhibited GVT-induced increase in urinary nitrate excretion, and further prolonged GVT-induced increase in survival. These results indicate that NO synthesis is induced in tumors during GVT, and the NO acts as an inhibitor of GVT.

  8. Crystal structure of 2-amino-4,6-di-meth-oxy-pyrimidinium thio-phene-2-carboxyl-ate.

    PubMed

    Rajam, Ammaiyappan; Muthiah, P T; Butcher, Ray J; Jasinski, Jerry P

    2015-07-01

    In the title salt, C6H10N3O2 (+)·C5H3O2S(-), the 2-amino-4,6-di-meth-oxy-pyrimidinium cation inter-acts with the carboxyl-ate group of the thio-phene-2-carboxyl-ate anion through a pair of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. These motifs are centrosymmetrically paired via N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a complementary DDAA array. The separate DDAA arrays are linked by π-π stacking inter-actions between the pyrimidine rings, as well as by a number of weak C-H⋯O and N-H⋯O inter-actions. In the anion, the dihedral angle between the ring plane and the CO2 group is 11.60 (3)°. In the cation, the C atoms of methoxy groups deviate from the ring plane by 0.433 (10) Å.

  9. 2,3-Diamino­pyridinium 4-meth­oxy­quinoline-2-carboxyl­ate

    PubMed Central

    Thanigaimani, Kaliyaperumal; Khalib, Nuridayanti Che; Arshad, Suhana; Razak, Ibrahim Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In the 4-meth­oxy­quinoline-2-carboxyl­ate anion of the title salt, C5H8N3 +·C11H8NO3 −, the dihedral angle between the quinoline ring system and the carboxyl­ate group is 16.54 (15)°. In the crystal, the cations and anions are linked via N—H⋯O and N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming a centrosymmetric 2 + 2 aggregate with R 2 2(9) and R 4 2(8) ring motifs. These units are further connected via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a layer parallel to the bc plane. The crystal structure is also stabilized by weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and π–π inter­actions between pyridine rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.5886 (8) Å] and between pyridine and benzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.6328 (8) Å]. PMID:23476259

  10. [Effect of solcoseryl and combined therapy of solcoseryl and FT-207 for mice bearing meth-A tumor].

    PubMed

    Iwasa, H; Mimura, K; Ohsaki, Y; Kanabe, S; Hiraide, H; Mizoguchi, O; Tamaki, K; Kurokawa, T; Hatsuse, K; Kadota, T; Ezoe, I; Tsuru, S; Zinnaka, Y

    1983-02-01

    The effects of a combined chemotherapy of solcoseryl and FT-207 on tumor growth, delayed hypersensitivity and cell population of the spleen were studied using inbred BALB/c mice. Meth-A tumor cells (2 X 10(6] were inoculated into the back of 5 to 6 week old BALB/c male mouse. Animals were divided into three groups: Solcoseryl group, in which 0.04 mg of solcoseryl was injected intravenously three times before inoculation and four times after inoculation; Combined group, in which 1.2 mg of FT-207 and 0.04 mg of solcoseryl were injected intravenously four times after inoculation; FT-207 group, in which 1.2 mg of FT-207 was injected four times after inoculation, with out solcoseryl administration. Following results were obtained: Solcoseryl group showed enhanced immunity and tumor suppression; Decreased immunity due to FT-207 was recovered by administration of solcoseryl but no tumor suppression was observed and, Decreased T-cell population of spleen due to FT-207 was recovered by administration of solcoseryl. These facts suggested that solcoseryl was useful because of making recovery possible from decreased immunity due to chemotherapy.

  11. Psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent electronic and conventional cigarette use.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Strong, David R; Sussman, Steve; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Unger, Jennifer B; Barrington-Trimis, Jessica L; Audrain-McGovern, Janet

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of electronic (e-) cigarettes has greatly increased recently, particularly in adolescents. However, the extent of psychiatric comorbidity with adolescent e-cigarette use and dual use of conventional (combustible) and e-cigarettes is unknown. This study characterized psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent conventional and e-cigarette use. Ninth grade students attending high schools in Los Angeles, CA (M age = 14) completed self-report measures of conventional/e-cigarette use, emotional disorders, substance use/problems, and transdiagnostic psychiatric phenotypes consistent with the NIMH-Research Domain Criteria Initiative. Outcomes were compared by lifetime use of: (1) neither conventional nor e-cigarettes (non-use; N = 2557, 77.3%); (2) e-cigarettes only (N = 412, 12.4%); (3) conventional cigarettes only (N = 152, 4.6%); and (4) conventional and e-cigarettes (dual use; N = 189, 5.6%). In comparison to adolescents who used conventional cigarettes only, e-cigarette only users reported lower levels of internalizing syndromes (depression, generalized anxiety, panic, social phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder) and transdiagnostic phenotypes (i.e., distress intolerance, anxiety sensitivity, rash action during negative affect). Depression, panic disorder, and anhedonia were higher in e-cigarette only vs. non-users. For several externalizing outcomes (mania, rash action during positive affect, alcohol drug use/abuse) and anhedonia, an ordered pattern was observed, whereby comorbidity was lowest in non-users, moderate in single product users (conventional or e-cigarette), and highest in dual users. These findings: (1) raise question of whether emotionally-healthier ('lower-risk') adolescents who are not interested in conventional cigarettes are being attracted to e-cigarettes; (2) indicate that research, intervention, and policy dedicated to adolescent tobacco-psychiatric comorbidity should distinguish conventional cigarette, e-cigarette, and dual use.

  12. User computer system pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Eimutis, E.C.

    1989-09-06

    The User Computer System (UCS) is a general purpose unclassified, nonproduction system for Mound users. The UCS pilot project was successfully completed, and the system currently has more than 250 users. Over 100 tables were installed on the UCS for use by subscribers, including tables containing data on employees, budgets, and purchasing. In addition, a UCS training course was developed and implemented.

  13. To tweet, or not to tweet: gender differences and potential positive and negative health outcomes of adolescents' social internet use.

    PubMed

    Pujazon-Zazik, Melissa; Park, M Jane

    2010-03-01

    Adolescents and young adults are avid Internet users. Online social media, such as social networking sites (e.g., Facebook, MySpace), blogs, status updating sites (e.g., Twitter) and chat rooms, have become integral parts of adolescents' and young adults' lives. Adolescents are even beginning to enter the world of online dating with several websites dedicated to "teenage online dating." This paper reviews recent peer-reviewed literature and national data on 1) adolescents use of online social media, 2) gender differences in online social media and 3) potential positive and negative health outcomes from adolescents' online social media use. We also examine parental monitoring of adolescents' online activities. Given that parental supervision is a key protective factor against adolescent risk-taking behavior, it is reasonable to hypothesize that unmonitored Internet use may place adolescents' at significant risk, such as cyberbullying, unwanted exposure to pornography, and potentially revealing personal information to sexual predators.

  14. Prism users guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Weirs, V. Gregory

    2012-03-01

    Prism is a ParaView plugin that simultaneously displays simulation data and material model data. This document describes its capabilities and how to use them. A demonstration of Prism is given in the first section. The second section contains more detailed notes on less obvious behavior. The third and fourth sections are specifically for Alegra and CTH users. They tell how to generate the simulation data and SESAME files and how to handle aspects of Prism use particular to each of these codes.

  15. User and technical documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The program LP1 calculates outbound and return trajectories between low earth orbit (LEO) and libration point no. 1 (L1). Libration points (LP) are defined as locations in space that orbit the Earth such that they are always stationary with respect to the Earth-Moon line. L1 is located behind the Moon such that the pull of the Earth and Moon together just cancel the centrifugal acceleration associated with the libration point's orbit. The input required from the user to define the flight is described. The contents of the six reports produced as outputs are presented. Also included are the instructions needed to execute the program.

  16. The SYSGEN user package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    The user documentation of the SYSGEN model and its links with other simulations is described. The SYSGEN is a production costing and reliability model of electric utility systems. Hydroelectric, storage, and time dependent generating units are modeled in addition to conventional generating plants. Input variables, modeling options, output variables, and reports formats are explained. SYSGEN also can be run interactively by using a program called FEPS (Front End Program for SYSGEN). A format for SYSGEN input variables which is designed for use with FEPS is presented.

  17. XTV users guide

    SciTech Connect

    Dearing, J.F.; Johns, R.C.

    1996-09-01

    XTV is an X-Windows based Graphical User Interface for viewing results of Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) calculations. It provides static and animated color mapped visualizations of both thermal-hydraulic and heat conduction components in a TRAC model of a nuclear power plant, as well as both on-screen and hard copy two-dimensional plot capabilities. XTV is the successor to TRAP, the former TRAC postprocessor using the proprietary DISSPLA graphics library. This manual describes Version 2.0, which requires TRAC version 5.4.20 or later for full visualization capabilities.

  18. XMGR5 users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.R.; Fisher, J.E.

    1997-03-01

    ACE/gr is XY plotting tool for workstations or X-terminals using X. A few of its features are: User defined scaling, tick marks, labels, symbols, line styles, colors. Batch mode for unattended plotting. Read and write parameters used during a session. Polynomial regression, splines, running averages, DFT/FFT, cross/auto-correlation. Hardcopy support for PostScript, HP-GL, and FrameMaker.mif format. While ACE/gr has a convenient point-and-click interface, most parameter settings and operations are available through a command line interface (found in Files/Commands).

  19. Adolescents' and parents' views of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Coyne, I; McNamara, N; Healy, M; Gower, C; Sarkar, M; McNicholas, F

    2015-10-01

    Service user involvement is essential for quality care in the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). This study was conducted to explore adolescents' and parents' experiences of CAMHS in relation to accessibility, approachability and appropriateness. This study used a descriptive qualitative design, and focus groups and single interviews were conducted with adolescents (n = 15) and parents (n = 32) from three mental health clinics. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Accessing mental health services was a challenging experience for many parents and adolescents due to knowledge deficit, lack of information and limited availability of specialist services. Some parents and adolescents reported positive experiences while others reported negative experiences. They expressed a need for more information, involvement in decision making, flexible scheduling of appointments, school support and parent support groups. The nature and quality of the relationship with staff was critical to positive experience with the service; therefore, frequent changes of medical staff was disruptive. Mental health nurses can play a vital role in ensuring continuity, assessing adolescents' participation preferences and advocating for their information needs with other members of the interdisciplinary team.

  20. Longitudinal Trajectories of Marijuana Use from Adolescence to Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Passarotti, A.M.; Crane, Natania A.; Hedeker, Donald; Mermelstein, Robin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Marijuana use is increasingly widespread among adolescents and young adults; however, few studies have examined longitudinal trajectories of marijuana use during this important developmental period. As such, we examined adolescent trajectories of marijuana use and the psychosocial factors that may differentiate individuals who escalate their marijuana use over adolescence and young adulthood from those who do not. Methods Participants were 1,204 9th and 10th graders at baseline who were over-sampled for cigarette use and were followed over 6-years, as part of an extensive longitudinal study, the Social and Emotional Contexts of Adolescent Smoking Patterns (SECASP) study. Growth Mixture Modeling (GMM) was used to model trajectories of marijuana use and Mixed Effects Regression analyses were used to examine psychosocial correlates of marijuana use escalation over time. Results Our results revealed three trajectories of non-escalating users (low users, medium users, and high users) and one escalating user trajectory. We found that relative to Non-escalators the Escalators had higher cigarette smoking (p<.0001), novelty-seeking (p=.02), aggressive and anti-social behavior (p<.007), and problem behavior related to peer context (p=.04). Moreover, there were important time and group by time interactions in some of these relationships. On the other hand, parental control and depression did not differ between escalators and low and medium non-escalating users. Conclusions Cigarette smoking, novelty-seeking, aggressive and anti-social behavior, and peer influence are related to ‘escalating’ marijuana use throughout adolescence and young adulthood. PMID:25792233

  1. The LATDYN user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Mcgowan, P. E.; Abrahamson, A. L.; Powell, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    The LATDYN User's Manual presents the capabilities and instructions for the LATDYN (Large Angle Transient DYNamics) computer program. The LATDYN program is a tool for analyzing the controlled or uncontrolled dynamic transient behavior of interconnected deformable multi-body systems which can undergo large angular motions of each body relative other bodies. The program accommodates large structural deformation as well as large rigid body rotations and is applicable, but not limited to, the following areas: (1) development of large flexible space structures; (2) slewing of large space structure components; (3) mechanisms with rigid or elastic components; and (4) robotic manipulations of beam members. Presently the program is limited to two dimensional problems, but in many cases, three dimensional problems can be exactly or approximately reduced to two dimensions. The program uses convected finite elements to affect the large angular motions involved in the analysis. General geometry is permitted. Detailed user input and output specifications are provided and discussed with example runstreams. To date, LATDYN has been configured for CDC/NOS and DEC VAX/VMS machines. All coding is in ANSII-77 FORTRAN. Detailed instructions regarding interfaces with particular computer operating systems and file structures are provided.

  2. Electronic Commerce user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    This User Manual supports the Electronic Commerce Standard System. The Electronic Commerce Standard System is being developed for the Department of Defense of the Technology Information Systems Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. The Electronic Commerce Standard System, or EC as it is known, provides the capability for organizations to conduct business electronically instead of through paper transactions. Electronic Commerce and Computer Aided Acquisition and Logistics Support, are two major projects under the DoD`s Corporate Information Management program, whose objective is to make DoD business transactions faster and less costly by using computer networks instead of paper forms and postage. EC runs on computers that use the UNIX operating system and provides a standard set of applications and tools that are bound together by a common command and menu system. These applications and tools may vary according to the requirements of the customer or location and may be customized to meet the specific needs of an organization. Local applications can be integrated into the menu system under the Special Databases & Applications option on the EC main menu. These local applications will be documented in the appendices of this manual. This integration capability provides users with a common environment of standard and customized applications.

  3. Electronic Commerce user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    This User Manual supports the Electronic Commerce Standard System. The Electronic Commerce Standard System is being developed for the Department of Defense of the Technology Information Systems Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. The Electronic Commerce Standard System, or EC as it is known, provides the capability for organizations to conduct business electronically instead of through paper transactions. Electronic Commerce and Computer Aided Acquisition and Logistics Support, are two major projects under the DoD's Corporate Information Management program, whose objective is to make DoD business transactions faster and less costly by using computer networks instead of paper forms and postage. EC runs on computers that use the UNIX operating system and provides a standard set of applications and tools that are bound together by a common command and menu system. These applications and tools may vary according to the requirements of the customer or location and may be customized to meet the specific needs of an organization. Local applications can be integrated into the menu system under the Special Databases Applications option on the EC main menu. These local applications will be documented in the appendices of this manual. This integration capability provides users with a common environment of standard and customized applications.

  4. Photovoltaics information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marie, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1980-10-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on photovoltaics (PV) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. It covers these technological areas: photovoltaics, passive solar heating and cooling, active solar heating and cooling, biomass energy, solar thermal electric power, solar industrial and agricultural process heat, wind energy, ocean energy, and advanced energy storage. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from seven PV groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Researchers Working for Manufacturers, Representatives of Other Manufacturers, Representatives of Utilities, Electric Power Engineers, and Educators.

  5. User and technical documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The program LIBRATE calculates velocities for trajectories from low earth orbit (LEO) to four of the five libration points (L2, L3, L4, and L5), and from low lunar orbit (LLO) to libration points L1 and L2. The flight to be analyzed departs from a circular orbit of any altitude and inclination about the Earth or Moon and finishes in a circular orbit about the Earth at the desired libration point within a specified flight time. This program produces a matrix of the delta V's needed to complete the desired flight. The user specifies the departure orbit, and the maximum flight time. A matrix is then developed with 10 inclinations, ranging from 0 to 90 degrees, forming the columns, and 19 possible flight times, ranging from the flight time (input) to 36 hours less than the input value, in decrements of 2 hours, forming the rows. This matrix is presented in three different reports including the total delta V's, and both of the delta V components discussed. The input required from the user to define the flight is discussed. The contents of the three reports that are produced as outputs are also described. The instructions are also included which are needed to execute the program.

  6. ARDS User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Personal computers (PCs) are now used extensively for engineering analysis. their capability exceeds that of mainframe computers of only a few years ago. Programs originally written for mainframes have been ported to PCs to make their use easier. One of these programs is ARDS (Analysis of Rotor Dynamic Systems) which was developed at Arizona State University (ASU) by Nelson et al. to quickly and accurately analyze rotor steady state and transient response using the method of component mode synthesis. The original ARDS program was ported to the PC in 1995. Several extensions were made at ASU to increase the capability of mainframe ARDS. These extensions have also been incorporated into the PC version of ARDS. Each mainframe extension had its own user manual generally covering only that extension. Thus to exploit the full capability of ARDS required a large set of user manuals. Moreover, necessary changes and enhancements for PC ARDS were undocumented. The present document is intended to remedy those problems by combining all pertinent information needed for the use of PC ARDS into one volume.

  7. User interface enhancement report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Gangel, J.; Shields, G.; Fala, G.

    1985-01-01

    The existing user interfaces to TEMPUS, Plaid, and other systems in the OSDS are fundamentally based on only two modes of communication: alphanumeric commands or data input and grapical interaction. The latter are especially suited to the types of interaction necessary for creating workstation objects with BUILD and with performing body positioning in TEMPUS. Looking toward the future application of TEMPUS, however, the long-term goals of OSDS will include the analysis of extensive tasks in space involving one or more individuals working in concert over a period of time. In this context, the TEMPUS body positioning capability, though extremely useful in creating and validating a small number of particular body positions, will become somewhat tedious to use. The macro facility helps somewhat, since frequently used positions may be easily applied by executing a stored macro. The difference between body positioning and task execution, though subtle, is important. In the case of task execution, the important information at the user's level is what actions are to be performed rather than how the actions are performed. Viewed slightly differently, the what is constant over a set of individuals though the how may vary.

  8. TRLAN User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kesheng; Simon, H.

    1999-03-09

    TRLAN is a program designed to find a small number of extreme eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenvectors of a real symmetric matrix. Denote the matrix as A, the eigenvalue as {lambda}, and the corresponding eigenvector as x, they are defined by the following equation, Ax = {lambda}x. There are a number of different implementations of the Lanczos algorithm available. Why another one? Our main motivation is to develop a specialized version that only target the case where one wants both eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a large real symmetric eigenvalue problems that can not use the shift-and-invert scheme. In this case the standard non-restarted Lanczos algorithm requires one to store a large number of Lanczos vectors which can cause storage problem and make each iteration of the method very expensive. The underlying algorithm of TRLAN is a dynamic thick-restart Lanczos algorithm. Like all restarted methods, the user can choose how many vectors can be generated at once. Typically, th e user chooses a moderate size so that all Lanczos vectors can be stored in core. This allows the restarted methods to execute efficiently. This implementation of the thick-restart Lanczos method also uses the latest restarting technique, it is very effective in reducing the time required to compute a desired solutions compared to similar restarted Lanczos schemes, e.g., ARPACK.

  9. Nephrolithiasis in topiramate users.

    PubMed

    Maalouf, Naim M; Langston, Joshua P; Van Ness, Paul C; Moe, Orson W; Sakhaee, Khashayar

    2011-08-01

    Topiramate is a neuromodulatory agent increasingly prescribed for a number of neurological and non-neurological indications. Topiramate-treated patients are at risk for nephrolithiasis due to hypocitraturia and high urine pH. However, the prevalence of symptomatic stone disease in TPM users is generally perceived to be low. This study was undertaken to assess in topiramate-treated patients the prevalence of symptomatic nephrolithiasis (by history) and of asymptomatic nephrolithiasis by computed tomography (CT) scan. Topiramate users were identified from a database of patients with neurological disorders at a single university hospital. Among 75 topiramate-treated adult patients with a median daily dose of 300 mg and median treatment duration of 48 months, the prevalence of symptomatic nephrolithiasis was 10.7%. In a subset of topiramate-treated patients and no history of symptomatic stone disease, the prevalence of asymptomatic nephrolithiasis detected by CT scan was 20%. The prevalence of symptomatic nephrolithiasis with long-term topiramate use is higher than reported in short-term studies. Furthermore, clinical prevalence is underestimated due to asymptomatic nephrolithiasis.

  10. A user's Perspective on Software

    SciTech Connect

    Isadoro T. Carlino

    2006-10-24

    The user is often the most overlooked component of control system design. At Jefferson Lab the control system is almost entirely digital in nature, with little feedback except that which is deliberately designed into the control system. In the complex control room environment a good design can enhance the user's abilities to preform good science. A bad design can leave the user frustrated and contribute significantly to down time, when science is not being done. Key points of use and design from the user's perspective are discussed, along with some techniques which have been adopted at Jefferson Lab to improve the user experience and produce better, more usable software.

  11. The Developmental Significance of Late Adolescent Substance Use for Early Adult Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englund, Michelle M.; Siebenbruner, Jessica; Oliva, Elizabeth M.; Egeland, Byron; Chung, Chu-Ting; Long, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the predictive significance of late adolescent substance use groups (i.e., abstainers, experimental users, at-risk users, and abusers) for early adult adaptation. Participants (N = 159) were drawn from a prospective longitudinal study of first-born children of low-income mothers. At 17.5 years of age, participants were assigned…

  12. The Relationship of Internet Use to Depression and Social Isolation among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Christopher E.; Field, Tiffany M.; Diego, Miguel; Kaplan, Michele

    2000-01-01

    Investigates whether higher levels of Internet use are associated with depression and social isolation among adolescents. Eighty-nine high school seniors were administered a questionnaire that measured Internet use; relationships with mother, father, and peers; and depression. Low Internet users, as compared with high users, reported better…

  13. The Co-Use of Tobacco and Cannabis among Adolescents over a 30-Year Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Lauren; Chaiton, Michael; Kirst, Maritt

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study explores the patterns of use and co-use of tobacco and cannabis among Ontario adolescents over 3 decades and if characteristics of co-users and single substance users have changed. Methods: Co-use trends for 1981-2011 were analyzed using the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey,…

  14. Crystal structures of (Z)-5-[2-(benzo[b]thio-phen-2-yl)-1-(3,5-di-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethen-yl]-1H-tetra-zole and (Z)-5-[2-(benzo[b]thio-phen-3-yl)-1-(3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethen-yl]-1H-tetra-zole.

    PubMed

    Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Yadlapalli, Jaishankar K B; Parkin, Sean; Crooks, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    (Z)-5-[2-(Benzo[b]thio-phen-2-yl)-1-(3,5-di-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethen-yl]-1H-tetrazole methanol monosolvate, C19H16N4O2S·CH3OH, (I), was prepared by the reaction of (Z)-3-(benzo[b]thio-phen-2-yl)-2-(3,5-di-meth-oxy-phen-yl)acrylo-nitrile with tri-butyl-tin azide via a [3 + 2]cyclo-addition azide condensation reaction. The structurally related compound (Z)-5-[2-(benzo[b]thio-phen-3-yl)-1-(3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethen-yl]-1H-tetra-zole, C20H18N4O3S, (II), was prepared by the reaction of (Z)-3-(benzo[b]thio-phen-3-yl)-2-(3,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-phen-yl)acrylo-nitrile with tri-butyl-tin azide. Crystals of (I) have two mol-ecules in the asymmetric unit (Z' = 2), whereas crystals of (II) have Z' = 1. The benzo-thio-phene rings in (I) and (II) are almost planar, with r.m.s deviations from the mean plane of 0.0084 and 0.0037 Å in (I) and 0.0084 Å in (II). The tetra-zole rings of (I) and (II) make dihedral angles with the mean planes of the benzo-thio-phene rings of 88.81 (13) and 88.92 (13)° in (I), and 60.94 (6)° in (II). The di-meth-oxy-phenyl and tri-meth-oxy-phenyl rings make dihedral angles with the benzo-thio-phene rings of 23.91 (8) and 24.99 (8)° in (I) and 84.47 (3)° in (II). In both structures, mol-ecules are linked into hydrogen-bonded chains. In (I), these chains involve both tetra-zole and methanol, and are parallel to the b axis. In (II), mol-ecules are linked into chains parallel to the a axis by N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds between adjacent tetra-zole rings.

  15. Cannabis Use in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: A Review of Findings from the Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Carolyn; Patton, George C

    2016-06-01

    The Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study (VAHCS) is a long-term Australian cohort study that has documented cannabis use in young Australians from the mid-teens to the mid-30s. The study findings have described the natural history of early cannabis use, remission, and escalation and the social and mental health consequences of different patterns of use. The adverse consequences of cannabis use are most clear-cut in heavy early adolescent users. These consequences include educational failure, persisting mental health problems, and progression to other substance use. For later onset and occasional users, the risks are lower and appear to entail modest elevations in risk for other drug use compared with never users. With growing evidence of health consequences, there is a strong case for actions around early heavy adolescent users. Prevention of early use, identification and treatment of early heavy users, and harm reduction through diversion of early heavy users away from the custodial justice system into health care are all priority responses.

  16. [Contraception and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Amate, P; Luton, D; Davitian, C

    2013-06-01

    The mean age of first sexual intercourse is still around 17 in France, but a lot of teenagers are concerned by contraception before, with approximately 25% of sexually active 15-year-old girls. The contraceptive method must take into consideration some typical features of this population, as sporadic and non-planned sexual activity, with several sexual partners in a short period of time. In 2004, the "Haute Autorité de santé" has recommended, as first-line method, combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills, in association with male condoms. Copper-containing intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and etonogestrel-containing subcutaneous implant have been suggested but not recommended. However, oral contraceptive pill, as a user-based method, carries an important typical-use failure rate, because remembering taking a daily pill, and dealing with stop periods, may be challenging. Some easier-to-use method should be kept in mind, as 28-day COC packs, transdermal contraceptive patches, and vaginal contraceptive rings. Moreover, American studies have shown that long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), i.e. IUCD and implant, have many advantages for teenagers: very effective, safe, invisible. They seem well-fitted for this population, with high satisfaction and continuation rates, as long as side effects are well explained. Thus, LARC methods should be proposed more widely to teenagers. Anyway, before prescribing a contraceptive method, it is important to determine the specific situation of every teenager, to let them choose the method that they consider as appropriate in their own case, and to think about the availability of the chosen method. It is necessary to explain how to handle mistakes or misses with user-based contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception can be anticipated and prescribed in advanced provision. The use of male condoms should be encouraged for adolescents, with another effective contraceptive method, in order to reduce the high risk

  17. Rivet user manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Andy; Butterworth, Jonathan; Grellscheid, David; Hoeth, Hendrik; Lönnblad, Leif; Monk, James; Schulz, Holger; Siegert, Frank

    2013-12-01

    This is the manual and user guide for the Rivet system for the validation and tuning of Monte Carlo event generators. As well as the core Rivet library, this manual describes the usage of the rivet program and the AGILe generator interface library. The depth and level of description is chosen for users of the system, starting with the basics of using validation code written by others, and then covering sufficient details to write new Rivet analyses and calculational components. Catalogue identifier: AEPS_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPS_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 571126 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4717522 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, Python. Computer: PC running Linux, Mac. Operating system: Linux, Mac OS. RAM: 20 MB Classification: 11.9, 11.2. External routines: HepMC (https://savannah.cern.ch/projects/hepmc/), GSL (http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/manual/gsl-ref.html), FastJet (http://fastjet.fr/), Python (http://www.python.org/), Swig (http://www.swig.org/), Boost (http://www.boostsoftware.com/), YAML (http://www.yaml.org/spec/1.2/spec.html) Nature of problem: Experimental measurements from high-energy particle colliders should be defined and stored in a general framework such that it is simple to compare theory predictions to them. Rivet is such a framework, and contains at the same time a large collection of existing measurements. Solution method: Rivet is based on HepMC events, a standardised output format provided by many theory simulation tools. Events are processed by Rivet to generate histograms for the requested list of analyses, incorporating all experimental phase space cuts and histogram definitions. Restrictions: Cannot calculate

  18. Predicting Young Adult Degree Attainment by Late Adolescent Marijuana Use

    PubMed Central

    Staff, Jeremy; Kloska, Deborah D.; Patrick, Megan E.; O’Malley, Patrick M.; Schulenberg, John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Assess whether infrequent and frequent marijuana use at age 19/20 predicts receipt of educational degrees by the mid 20s, independent of confounding age 18 adolescent risk factors. Methods Data were from the Monitoring the Future study, an annual nationally-representative survey of high school seniors followed into adulthood. Thirteen cohorts (1990 to 2002) of high school seniors were followed longitudinally to their mid 20s (n=4,925; 54% female). We used logistic regression and propensity score matching with successive inclusion of age 18 risk factors and substance use to compare age 19/20 frequent marijuana users (6+ occasions in past 30 days) to non-users, frequent users to infrequent users (1 to 6 occasions), and infrequent users to non-users on their likelihood of degree attainment by the mid 20s. Results Frequent marijuana users were less likely than infrequent users and non-users to earn Bachelor’s degrees, even after controlling for a host of age 18 risk factors (e.g., family socioeconomic background, academic performance, educational expectations, truancy). However, these differences were reduced in magnitude to statistical non-significance when we controlled for age 18 substance use. Across analyses, the proportion reaching this educational milestone did not differ significantly between infrequent users and non-users. Conclusions Results support a growing body of work suggesting that frequent marijuana use predicts a lower likelihood of post-secondary educational attainment, and this difference may originate during secondary school. PMID:26206441

  19. Adolescent cocaine abuse. Addictive potential, behavioral and psychiatric effects.

    PubMed

    Estroff, T W; Schwartz, R H; Hoffmann, N G

    1989-12-01

    Four hundred seventy-nine drug abusing adolescent patients enrolled in seven Straight, Inc. Adolescent Drug-Abuse Treatment Programs in five geographic regions across the United States were studied to determine the severity and patterns of cocaine abuse. Of these, 341 admitted to cocaine use and became part of this survey. Cocaine use was categorized as heavy, intermediate, or light. Areas examined were the addictive spectrum, psychosocial dysfunction, and psychiatric symptoms. Intermediate and heavy users of cocaine abused significantly less marijuana and inhalants than light cocaine abusers. Heavy and intermediate users were more likely to use cocaine intravenously and to use crack. They developed tachyphylaxis more frequently, progressed to weekly use in less than 3 months more frequently, and became preoccupied with obtaining and using cocaine significantly more frequently. They used more sedative hypnotics to calm themselves and engaged in more criminal behavior, such as stealing from parents and stores and passing bad checks. They had more arrests for possession of drugs, stole more cars, sold more drugs, and were more likely to trade sexual favors to obtain the drug. Heavy and intermediate users were significantly more psychiatrically disturbed than light users, becoming more suspicious, nervous, aggressive, and demonstrating increased symptoms of fatigue, sleeplessness, decreased appetite, and increasing cocaine dysphoria. All of these symptoms could be mistaken for psychiatric disorders. This study suggests that cocaine is as addictive in adolescents as in adults; possibly more so. It also causes psychosocial dysfunction and psychiatric symptoms. Further research into cocaine addiction among adolescents is indicated.

  20. Social Bonds and Internet Pornographic Exposure among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesch, Gustavo S.

    2009-01-01

    Concern has grown regarding possible harm to the social and psychological development of children and adolescents exposed to Internet pornography. Parents, academics and researchers have documented pornography from the supply side, assuming that its availability explains consumption satisfactorily. The current paper explored the user's dimension,…

  1. An Investigation of Alcohol Use among Turkish High School Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gursoy, Figen; Bicacki, Mudriye Yildiz; Aral, Neriman

    2007-01-01

    Among the chief reasons for adolescent alcohol use are demographic characteristics, family relationships, social relationships, peer relationships, low self-esteem, social pressure, rebellion, and depression. It has been shown that alcohol users display a tendency for violence and aggressive behavior. The present study explores the relationship…

  2. Association between maltreatment and polydrug use among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Alonso, M J; Jurado-Barba, R; Martinez-Martin, N; Espin-Jaime, J C; Bolaños-Porrero, C; Ordoñez-Franco, A; Rodriguez-Lopez, J A; Lora-Pablos, D; de la Cruz-Bértolo, J; Jimenez-Arriero, M A; Manzanares, J; Rubio, G

    2016-01-01

    Different studies have related sexual and physical abuse during childhood and adolescence to the development of substance abuse disorders. Nevertheless, we are not aware of the role that other more common maltreatment types, such as neglect, will play among the most risky pattern of consumption: the polydrug use. A clinical sample of 655 adolescents, divided into two groups: polydrug users and non-polydrug users, were assessed on their pattern of drug consumption, history of childhood maltreatment, current psychopathology and their family history of alcoholism. Polydrug users had a greater prevalence of all types of maltreatment, although the most associated to this group were sexual abuse and emotional neglect. Other relevant variables to adolescent consumption were: the diagnosis of depressive disorder, the presence of anxiety traits and the family history of alcohol dependence. Polydrug users have higher risks of having had problems during infancy and adolescence, such as maltreatment and other psychopathological conditions, with the addition of family history of alcoholism. Accordingly, practitioners should take into account that those variables may influence polydrug abuse because it is the most risky pattern for subsequent dependence of substances, and they should always be considered during treatment.

  3. SWITCH user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The planning program, SWITCH, and its surrounding changed-goal-replanning program, Runaround, are described. The evolution of SWITCH and Runaround from an earlier planner, DEVISER, is recounted. SWITCH's plan representation, and its process of building a plan by backward chaining with strict chronological backtracking, are described. A guide for writing knowledge base files is provided, as are narrative guides for installing the program, running it, and interacting with it while it is running. Some utility functions are documented. For the sake of completeness, a narrative guide to the experimental discrepancy-replanning feature is provided. Appendices contain knowledge base files for a blocksworld domain, and a DRIBBLE file illustrating the output from, and user interaction with, the program in that domain.

  4. Adolescent and School Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Adolescent and School Health Note: Javascript is disabled or ... help strengthen their capacity to improve child and adolescent health. More > DASH Home About DASH At A ...

  5. Adolescent attraction to cults.

    PubMed

    Hunter, E

    1998-01-01

    This article details the reasons behind adolescents' attraction to cults. It is recommended that parents, teachers, and counselors familiarize themselves with the warning signs. Suggestions are offered on how to make adolescents less vulnerable to cult overtures.

  6. Adolescent health psychology.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paula G; Holmbeck, Grayson N; Greenley, Rachel Neff

    2002-06-01

    In this article, a biopsychosocial model of adolescent development is used as an organizing framework for a review of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention research with adolescent populations. During adolescence many critical health behaviors emerge, affecting future disease outcomes in adulthood. In addition, most of the predominant causes of morbidity and mortality in adolescence are unique to this period of development, indicating that health-focused interventions must be tailored specifically to adolescents. Moreover, it is during adolescence that lifelong patterns of self-management of and adjustment to chronic health conditions are established. Thus, an increased focus on adolescence in health psychology research is important both to improve the health of adolescents per se and to optimize health trajectories into adulthood.

  7. (μ2-2-Meth-oxy-ethanol-κ(3) O (1):O (1),O (3))(2-meth-oxy-ethanol-κO (1))tris-(μ2-3,4,5,6-tetra-fluoro-o-phenyl-ene-κ(2) C (1):C (2))trimercury(II).

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Raúl; Draguta, Sergiu; Yakovenko, Andrey; Fonari, Marina; Timofeeva, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    In the title compound, [Hg3(C6F4)3(C3H8O2)2], two O atoms from one 2-meth-oxy-ethanol ligand and one O atom from the second 2-meth-oxy-ethanol ligand coordinate three Hg(II) atoms [Hg-O = 2.765 (7)-2.890 (8) Å] in the trimeric organomercurial Lewis acid (o-C6F4Hg)3. The hy-droxy groups are involved in formation of intra- and inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds; the latter link two mol-ecules into centrosymmetric dimers. An extensive net of weak inter-molecular C-H⋯F inter-actions further consolidates the crystal packing.

  8. Adolescence and Mythology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasopoulos, Dimitris; Soumaki, Eugenia; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    The article begins with a brief exploration of the various aspects of adolescent's psychic qualities as these are described in Greek mythology. It is argued that myths are an integral part of the way that adolescence is perceived and myths play an important role in adolescents' psychic and external world, as well as in their mythological thinking.…

  9. Demystifying the Adolescent Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the nature of brain development in adolescence helps explain why adolescents can vacillate so often between mature and immature behavior. Early and middle adolescence, in particular, are times of heightened vulnerability to risky and reckless behavior because the brain's reward center is easily aroused, but the systems that control…

  10. Preventing Adolescent Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capuzzi, David

    The adolescent at risk for suicidal preoccupation and behavior has become an increasing concern for schools and communities. This paper presents some of the causes of teen suicide, things adults should know about adolescent suicide prevention, and what can be done to help such youth. The transition to adolescence is a complex time when many values…

  11. The Adolescent Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, William A., Jr.

    Written to orient the physician and paramedical personnel to the adolescent patient, the book provides information concerning the changes of adolescence, and age-related problems and illnesses. Part 1 discusses the essence of adolescence by describing physical, mental, and emotional growth and development. Part 2, the major section, consists of 21…

  12. 2007 Maryland Adolescent Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Periodically, Maryland's sixth, eighth, tenth, and twelfth graders are surveyed to determine the nature, extent, and trend of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use among adolescents. The "2007 Maryland Adolescent Survey (MAS)" presents the latest findings regarding ATOD use by Maryland's adolescents and compares State and local…

  13. Adolescents and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasburgber, Victor C., Ed.; Comstock, George A., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    In the 1990s, the media represent the single most easily modifiable influence on children and adolescents. This series of articles offers medically oriented practitioners a review of current research on the influence of the media on children and adolescents. The 13 articles are: (1) "Children, Adolescents, and the Media: Five Crucial…

  14. Information spreadsheet for Verify user registration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In this spreadsheet, user(s) provide their company’s manufacturer code, user contact information for Verify, and user roles. This spreadsheet is used for the Company Authorizing Official (CAO), CROMERR Signer, and Verify Submitters.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of parenterally administered human alpha-lymphotoxin in normal and meth-A tumor-bearing BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Averbook, B.J.; Jeffes, E.B.; Yamamoto, R.S.; Masunaka, I.; Kobayashi, M.; Granger, G.A. )

    1989-08-01

    These in vivo studies examine the pharmacokinetics of parenterally administered purified, native human alpha-lymphotoxin (LT) in normal and Meth-A bearing BALB/c mice. We found that the lytic activity of alpha-LT was inactivated within 5 h in the blood of both normal and tumor-bearing mice in vivo. However, LT bioactivity in vitro was not affected by incubation with fresh serum. Radioiodinated LT was rapidly sequestered in the kidneys of both normal and tumor-bearing animals. Systemically administered, radioiodinated LT did not selectively localize in tumor tissues.

  16. Crystal structure of 2-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)-6-nitro­imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-carbaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Koudad, Mohamed; Elaatiaoui, Abdelmalik; Benchat, Noureddine; Saadi, Mohamed; El Ammari, Lahcen

    2015-01-01

    In the title compound, C15H11N3O4, the imidazo[1,2-a] pyridine ring system is almost planar [r.m.s. deviation = 0.028 (2) Å]. Its mean plane makes dihedral angles of 33.92 (7) and 34.56 (6)° with the meth­oxy­phenyl ring and the nitro group, respectively. The cohesion of the crystal structure is ensured by C—H⋯N and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming layers almost parallel to the ac plane. PMID:26870561

  17. Crystal structure of (E)-4,6-dimeth­oxy-2-(4-meth­oxy­styr­yl)-3-methyl­benzaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seunghyun; Lim, Yoongho; Koh, Dongsoo

    2015-01-01

    In the title mol­ecule, C19H20O4, the central C=C double bond adopts an E configuration. The dihedral angle formed by the planes of the two benzene rings is 83.57 (12)°. The three meth­oxy groups are essentially coplanar with the benzene rings to which they are attached, with C C—O—C torsion angles of −0.2 (3), −2.3 (3) and −4.1 (3)°. PMID:26594470

  18. Crystal structure of 2-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)-6-nitro-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-carbaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Koudad, Mohamed; Elaatiaoui, Abdelmalik; Benchat, Noureddine; Saadi, Mohamed; El Ammari, Lahcen

    2015-12-01

    In the title compound, C15H11N3O4, the imidazo[1,2-a] pyridine ring system is almost planar [r.m.s. deviation = 0.028 (2) Å]. Its mean plane makes dihedral angles of 33.92 (7) and 34.56 (6)° with the meth-oxy-phenyl ring and the nitro group, respectively. The cohesion of the crystal structure is ensured by C-H⋯N and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming layers almost parallel to the ac plane.

  19. Crystal structure of N-(3-chloro-1-methyl-1H-indazol-5-yl)-4-meth­oxy­benzene­sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Chicha, Hakima; Rakib, El Mostapha; Gamouh, Ahmed; Saadi, Mohamed; El Ammari, Lahcen

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound, C15H14ClN3O3S, the dihedral angle between the planes of the indazole ring system (r.m.s. deviation = 0.007 Å) and the benzene ring is 89.05 (7)°. The meth­oxy C atom deviates from its attached ring by 0.196 (3) Å. In the crystal, inversion dimers linked by pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds generate R 2 2(8) loops. The dimers are connected into [010] chains by C—H⋯O inter­actions. PMID:25309293

  20. Next-Generation Sequencing-Based RiboMethSeq  Protocol for Analysis of tRNA 2'-O-Methylation.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Virginie; Pichot, Florian; Thüring, Kathrin; Ayadi, Lilia; Freund, Isabel; Dalpke, Alexander; Helm, Mark; Motorin, Yuri

    2017-02-09

    Analysis of RNA modifications by traditional physico-chemical approaches is labor  intensive,  requires  substantial  amounts  of  input  material  and  only  allows  site-by-site  measurements.  The  recent  development  of  qualitative  and  quantitative  approaches  based  on   next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens new perspectives for the analysis of various cellular RNA  species.  The  Illumina  sequencing-based  RiboMethSeq  protocol  was  initially  developed  and  successfully applied for mapping of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) 2'-O-methylations. This method also  gives excellent results in the quantitative analysis of rRNA modifications in different species and  under varying growth conditions. However, until now, RiboMethSeq was only employed for rRNA,  and the whole sequencing and analysis pipeline was only adapted to this long and rather conserved  RNA species. A deep understanding of RNA modification functions requires large and global  analysis datasets for other important RNA species, namely for transfer RNAs (tRNAs), which are  well known to contain a great variety of functionally-important modified residues. Here, we  evaluated the application of the RiboMethSeq protocol for the analysis of tRNA 2'-O-methylation in  Escherichia coli and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After a careful optimization of the bioinformatic  pipeline, RiboMethSeq proved to be suitable for relative quantification of methylation rates for  known modified positions in different tRNA species.

  1. Crystal structure of 3-{[4-(2-meth­oxy­phen­yl)piperazin-1-yl]meth­yl}-5-(thio­phen-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxa­diazole-2(3H)-thione

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alshaikh, Monirah A.; Abuelizz, Hatem A.; El-Emam, Ali A.; Abdelbaky, Mohammed S. M.; Garcia-Granda, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, C18H20N4O2S2, is a new 1,3,4-oxa­diazole and a key pharmacophore of several biologically active agents. It is composed of a meth­yl(thio­phen-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxa­diazole-2(3H)-thione moiety linked to a 2-meth­oxy­phenyl unit via a piperazine ring that has a chair conformation. The thio­phene ring mean plane lies almost in the plane of the oxa­diazole ring, with a dihedral angle of 4.35 (9)°. The 2-meth­oxy­phenyl ring is almost normal to the oxa­diazole ring, with a dihedral angle of 84.17 (10)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by weak C—H⋯S hydrogen bonds and C—H⋯π inter­actions, forming layers parallel to the bc plane. The layers are linked via weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and slipped parallel π–π inter­actions [inter­centroid distance = 3.6729 (10) Å], forming a three-dimensional structure. The thio­phene ring has an approximate 180° rotational disorder about the bridging C—C bond. PMID:26958404

  2. Adolescents, sex and injecting drug use: risks for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Barnard, M; McKeganey, N

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we present data on the HIV-related risks for adolescents growing up in an area where injecting drug use is prevalent and HIV infection has been identified among local injecting drug users. We report on young peoples' knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of drug use and injectors; HIV and AIDS; sex, safer sex and condom use. These adolescents had an extensive and practically oriented knowledge of illicit drugs and drug injectors. The majority of adolescents contacted had an unsophisticated but approximate understanding of HIV transmission dynamics and how to guard against infection. Our data suggest that many adolescents find issues relating to sex awkward, embarrassing and difficult subjects for discussion. In a final section we consider some of the policy implications of our work focussing in particular on the prevention of injecting, the promotion of condom use, and the necessity of avoiding a focus upon risk groups.

  3. TAILSIM Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiltner, Dale W.

    2000-01-01

    The TAILSIM program uses a 4th order Runge-Kutta method to integrate the standard aircraft equations-of-motion (EOM). The EOM determine three translational and three rotational accelerations about the aircraft's body axis reference system. The forces and moments that drive the EOM are determined from aerodynamic coefficients, dynamic derivatives, and control inputs. Values for these terms are determined from linear interpolation of tables that are a function of parameters such as angle-of-attack and surface deflections. Buildup equations combine these terms and dimensionalize them to generate the driving total forces and moments. Features that make TAILSIM applicable to studies of tailplane stall include modeling of the reversible control System, modeling of the pilot performing a load factor and/or airspeed command task, and modeling of vertical gusts. The reversible control system dynamics can be described as two hinged masses connected by a spring. resulting in a fifth order system. The pilot model is a standard form of lead-lag with a time delay applied to an integrated pitch rate and/or airspeed error feedback. The time delay is implemented by a Pade approximation, while the commanded pitch rate is determined by a commanded load factor. Vertical gust inputs include a single 1-cosine gust and a continuous NASA Dryden gust model. These dynamic models. coupled with the use of a nonlinear database, allow the tailplane stall characteristics, elevator response, and resulting aircraft response, to be modeled. A useful output capability of the TAILSIM program is the ability to display multiple post-run plot pages to allow a quick assessment of the time history response. There are 16 plot pages currently available to the user. Each plot page displays 9 parameters. Each parameter can also be displayed individually. on a one plot-per-page format. For a more refined display of the results the program can also create files of tabulated data. which can then be used by other

  4. TMAP7 User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2006-09-01

    The TMAP Code was written at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory by Brad Merrill and James Jones in the late 1980s as a tool for safety analysis of systems involving tritium. Since then it has been upgraded to TMAP4 and has been used in numerous applications including experiments supporting fusion safety, predictions for advanced systems such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), and estimates involving tritium production technologies. Its further upgrade to TMAP2000 and now to TMAP7 was accomplished in response to several needs. TMAP and TMAP4 had the capacity to deal with only a single trap for diffusing gaseous species in solid structures. TMAP7 includes up to three separate traps and up to 10 diffusing species. The original code had difficulty dealing with heteronuclear molecule formation such as HD and DT. That has been removed. Under pre-specified boundary enclosure conditions and solution-law dependent diffusion boundary conditions, such as Sieverts' law, TMAP7 automatically generates heteronuclear molecular partial pressures when solubilities and partial pressures of the homonuclear molecular species are provided for law-dependent diffusion boundary conditions. A further sophistication is the addition of non-diffusing surface species. Atoms such as oxygen or nitrogen or formation and decay or combination of hydroxyl radicals on metal surfaces are sometimes important in reactions with diffusing hydrogen isotopes but do not themselves diffuse appreciably in the material. TMAP7 will accommodate up to 30 such surface species, allowing the user to specify relationships between those surface concentrations and partial pressures of gaseous species above the surfaces or to form them dynamically by combining diffusion species or other surface species. Additionally, TMAP7 allows the user to include a surface binding energy and an adsorption barrier energy. The code includes asymmetrical diffusion between the surface

  5. DIRAC: Secure web user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casajus Ramo, A.; Sapunov, M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally the interaction between users and the Grid is done with command line tools. However, these tools are difficult to use by non-expert users providing minimal help and generating outputs not always easy to understand especially in case of errors. Graphical User Interfaces are typically limited to providing access to the monitoring or accounting information and concentrate on some particular aspects failing to cover the full spectrum of grid control tasks. To make the Grid more user friendly more complete graphical interfaces are needed. Within the DIRAC project we have attempted to construct a Web based User Interface that provides means not only for monitoring the system behavior but also allows to steer the main user activities on the grid. Using DIRAC's web interface a user can easily track jobs and data. It provides access to job information and allows performing actions on jobs such as killing or deleting. Data managers can define and monitor file transfer activity as well as check requests set by jobs. Production managers can define and follow large data productions and react if necessary by stopping or starting them. The Web Portal is build following all the grid security standards and using modern Web 2.0 technologies which allow to achieve the user experience similar to the desktop applications. Details of the DIRAC Web Portal architecture and User Interface will be presented and discussed.

  6. Barriers and Facilitators to Adolescents' Use of Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Pritt, Nicole M; Norris, Alison H; Berlan, Elise D

    2017-02-01

    Most pregnancies among teenagers are unintended and many can be attributed to contraception misuse or nonuse. The etonogestrel implant and intrauterine devices, referred to as long-acting reversible contraceptives, or LARCs, are the most effective reversible contraceptive methods. These methods are safe for use by adolescents, yet the number of LARC users remains low among adolescents in the United States. In this review we examine recent literature about barriers and facilitators to LARC use among adolescent women. Factors that influence decision-making and provision are organized into 4 categories: (1) cost and clinical operations; (2) adolescent awareness and attitudes; (3) confidentiality, consent, and parental attitudes; and (4) health care provider knowledge, attitudes, and counseling. Knowledge deficits and misconceptions among adolescents and their health care providers are key barriers to adolescent LARC use.

  7. Graphical User Interfaces and Library Systems: End-User Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorn, Margaret; Marshall, Lucy

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study by Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research Library to determine user satisfaction with the graphical user interface-based (GUI) Dynix Marquis compared with the text-based Dynix Classic Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC). Results show that the GUI-based OPAC was preferred by endusers over the text-based OPAC. (eight references) (DGM)

  8. Echo™ User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Dustin Yewell

    2016-06-06

    Echo™ is a MATLAB-based software package designed for robust and scalable analysis of complex data workflows. An alternative to tedious, error-prone conventional processes, Echo is based on three transformative principles for data analysis: self-describing data, name-based indexing, and dynamic resource allocation. The software takes an object-oriented approach to data analysis, intimately connecting measurement data with associated metadata. Echo operations in an analysis workflow automatically track and merge metadata and computation parameters to provide a complete history of the process used to generate final results, while automated figure and report generation tools eliminate the potential to mislabel those results. History reporting and visualization methods provide straightforward auditability of analysis processes. Furthermore, name-based indexing on metadata greatly improves code readability for analyst collaboration and reduces opportunities for errors to occur. Echo efficiently manages large data sets using a framework that seamlessly allocates resources such that only the necessary computations to produce a given result are executed. Echo provides a versatile and extensible framework, allowing advanced users to add their own tools and data classes tailored to their own specific needs. Applying these transformative principles and powerful features, Echo greatly improves analyst efficiency and quality of results in many application areas.

  9. LCS Users Manual

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Redd; D.W. Ignat

    1998-02-01

    The Lower Hybrid Simulation Code (LSC) is a computational model of lower hybrid current drive in the presence of an electric field. Details of geometry, plasma profiles, and circuit equations are treated. Two-dimensional velocity space effects are approximated in a one-dimensional Fokker-Planck treatment. The LSC was originally written to be a module for lower hybrid current drive called by the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC), which is a numerical model of an axisymmetric tokamak plasma and the associated control systems. The TSC simulates the time evolution of a free boundary plasma by solving the MHD equations on a rectangular computational grid. The MHD equations are coupled to the external circuits (representing poloidal field coils) through the boundary conditions. The code includes provisions for modeling the control system, external heating, and fusion heating. The LSC module can also be called by the TRANSP code. TRANSP represents the plasma with an axisymmetric, fixed-boundary model and focuses on calculation of plasma transport to determine transport coefficients from data on power inputs and parameters reached. This manual covers the basic material needed to use the LSC. If run in conjunction with TSC, the "TSC Users Manual" should be consulted. If run in conjunction with TRANSP, on-line documentation will be helpful. A theoretical background of the governing equations and numerical methods is given. Information on obtaining, compiling, and running the code is also provided.

  10. Multisensor user authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombi, John M.; Krepp, D.; Rogers, Steven K.; Ruck, Dennis W.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1993-09-01

    User recognition is examined using neural and conventional techniques for processing speech and face images. This article for the first time attempts to overcome this significant problem of distortions inherently captured over multiple sessions (days). Speaker recognition uses both Linear Predictive Coding (LPC) cepstral and auditory neural model representations with speaker dependent codebook designs. For facial imagery, recognition is developed on a neural network that consists of a single hidden layer multilayer perceptron backpropagation network using either the raw data as inputs or principal components of the raw data computed using the Karhunen-Loeve Transform as inputs. The data consists of 10 subjects; each subject recorded utterances and had images collected for 10 days. The utterances collected were 400 rich phonetic sentences (4 sec), 200 subject name recordings (3 sec), and 100 imposter name recordings (3 sec). Face data consists of over 2000, 32 X 32 pixel, 8 bit gray scale images of the 10 subjects. Each subsystem attains over 90% verification accuracy individually using test data gathered on days following the training data.

  11. Multisensor user authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombi, John M.; Krepp, D.; Rogers, Steven K.; Ruck, Dennis W.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1993-08-01

    User recognition is examined using neural and conventional techniques for processing speech and face images. This article for the first time attempts to overcome this significant problem of distortions inherently captured over multiple sessions (days). Speaker recognition uses both Linear Predictive Coding (LPC) cepstral and auditory neural model representations with speaker dependent codebook designs. For facial imagery, recognition is developed on a neural network that consists of a single hidden layer multilayer perceptron backpropagation network using either the raw data as inputs or principal components of the raw data computed using the Karhunen-Loeve Transform as inputs. The data consists of 10 subjects; each subject recorded utterances and had images collected for 10 days. The utterances collected were 400 rich phonetic sentences (4 sec), 200 subject name recordings (3 sec), and 100 imposter name recordings (3 sec). Face data consists of over 2000, 32 X 32 pixel, 8 bit gray scale images of the 10 subjects. Each subsystem attains over 90% verification accuracy individually using test data gathered on day following the training data.

  12. PROFILE user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, L.; Saunders, D.

    1986-01-01

    User information for program PROFILE, an aerodynamics design utility for refining, plotting, and tabulating airfoil profiles is provided. The theory and implementation details for two of the more complex options are also presented. These are the REFINE option, for smoothing curvature in selected regions while retaining or seeking some specified thickness ratio, and the OPTIMIZE option, which seeks a specified curvature distribution. REFINE uses linear techniques to manipulate ordinates via the central difference approximation to second derivatives, while OPTIMIZE works directly with curvature using nonlinear least squares techniques. Use of programs QPLOT and BPLOT is also described, since all of the plots provided by PROFILE (airfoil coordinates, curvature distributions) are achieved via the general purpose QPLOT utility. BPLOT illustrates (again, via QPLOT) the shape functions used by two of PROFILE's options. The programs were designed and implemented for the Applied Aerodynamics Branch at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, and written in FORTRAN and run on a VAX-11/780 under VMS.

  13. Implications of marijuana legalization for adolescent substance use.

    PubMed

    Hopfer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana that is legally available for adults has multiple implications for adolescent substance use. One potential effect that legalization may have is an increase in adolescent use to due increased availability, greater social acceptance, and possibly lower prices. Legalization may also facilitate the introduction of new formulations of marijuana (edible, vaporized) and with potentially higher potencies. It is unknown what adolescent consumption patterns will be if marijuana is widely available and marketed in different forms, or what effects different patterns of adolescent use will have on cognition, the development of marijuana use disorders, school performance, and the development of psychotic illnesses. Also unclear is whether adolescent users will be experiencing higher levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) compared with previous generations of users due to higher potencies. Although previous studies of the effects of adolescent marijuana use provide some guidance for current policy and public health recommendations, many new studies will be needed that answer questions in the context of use within a legal adult environment. Claims that marijuana has medicinal benefits create additional challenges for adolescent prevention efforts, as they contrast with messages of its harmfulness. Prevention and treatment approaches will need to address perceptions of the safety of marijuana, claims of its medicinal use, and consider family-wide effects as older siblings and parents may increasingly openly consume and advocate for marijuana use. Guidance for primary care physicians will be needed regarded screening and counseling. Widespread legalization and acceptance of marijuana implies that as law enforcement approaches for marijuana control decline, public health, medical, and scientific efforts to understand and reduce negative consequences of adolescent marijuana use need to be substantially increased to levels commensurate with those efforts for tobacco and alcohol.

  14. Implications of Marijuana Legalization for Adolescent Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Hopfer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana that is legally available for adults has multiple implications for adolescent substance use. One potential effect that legalization may have is an increase in adolescent use to due increased availability, greater social acceptance, and possibly lower prices. Legalization may also facilitate the introduction of new formulations of marijuana (edible, vaporized) and with potentially higher potencies. It is unknown what adolescent consumption patterns will be if marijuana is widely available and marketed in different forms, or what effects different patterns of adolescent use will have on cognition, the development of marijuana use disorders, school performance, and the development of psychotic illnesses. Also unclear is whether adolescent users will be experiencing higher levels of THC compared with previous generations of users due to higher potencies. While previous studies of the effects of adolescent marijuana use provide some guidance for current policy and public health recommendations, many new studies will be needed that answer questions in the context of use within a legal adult environment. Claims that marijuana has medicinal benefits create additional challenges for adolescent prevention efforts as they contrast with messages of its harmfulness. Prevention and treatment approaches will need to address perceptions of the safety of marijuana, claims of its medicinal use, and consider family-wide effects as older siblings and parents may increasingly openly consume and advocate for marijuana use. Guidance for primary care physicians will be needed regarded screening and counseling. Widespread legalization and acceptance of marijuana implies that as law enforcement approaches for marijuana control decline, public health, medical, and scientific efforts to understand and reduce negative consequences of adolescent marijuana use need to be substantially increased to levels commensurate with those efforts for tobacco and alcohol. PMID:25127003

  15. Crystal structure of (E)-2-[(2-bromopyridin-3-yl)methyl­idene]-6-meth­oxy-3,4-di­hydro­naphthalen-1(2H)-one and 3-[(E)-(6-meth­oxy-1-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetra­hydro­naphthalen-2-ylidene)meth­yl]pyridin-2(1H)-one

    PubMed Central

    Zingales, Sarah K.; Moore, Morgan E.; Goetz, Andrew D.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2016-01-01

    The title compounds C17H14BrNO2, (I), and C17H15NO3, (II), were obtained from the reaction of 6-meth­oxy-3,4-di­hydro-2H-naphthalen-1-one and 2-bromo­nicotinaldehyde in ethanol. Compound (I) was the expected product and compound (II) was the oxidation product from air exposure. In the crystal structure of compound (I), there are no short contacts or hydrogen bonds. The structure does display π–π inter­actions between adjacent benzene rings and adjacent pyridyl rings. Compound (II) contains two independent mol­ecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit; both are non-planar, the dihedral angles between the meth­oxy­benzene and 1H-pyridin-2-one mean planes being 35.07 (9)° in A and 35.28 (9)°in B. In each mol­ecule, the 1H-pyridin-2-one unit participates in inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonding to another mol­ecule of the same type (A to A or B to B). The structure also displays π–π inter­actions between the pyridyl and the benzene rings of non-equivalent mol­ecules (viz., A to B and B to A). PMID:27555939

  16. [Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) in adolescent girls].

    PubMed

    Henry-suchet, J

    1987-04-01

    Contraception has been a factor in lowering the age at 1st sexual intercourse, which is now about 15 years in France. At that age, changes of partners are frequent, placing sexually active adolescents at high risk of sexually transmitted diseases. 2 risks predominate, those of condyloma following infection with the papilloma virus which exposes patients to risk of dysplasia and cervical cancer, and that of salpingitis with its risk of sterility. Condyloma has become more frequent in adolescents in France in the past 5 years. A comparative study showed that the average age at diagnosis of intraepithelial epithelioma related to condyloma declined by 5 years between 1960-80. The average age of condyloma diagnosis is about 18 years. Condyloma in adolescents should be treated prudently. If resected too soon after the primary infection before formation of antibodies, there is a risk of propagating the virus. Adolescent condyloma represents the major indication for laser treatment after colposcopy and microhysteroscopy have been used to determine the exact limits of the lesion. Patients should be warned of the possibility of return and the need for regular monitoring. Partners should also be treated. Apart from barrier methods, no contraceptive methods are known to affect development of condyloma. Chronic and acute salpingitis are 2 different entities, but both can cause sterility. Of the 100,000 French women diagnosed with salpingitis each year, 1/2 are under 25 and 1/5 are under 20. Salpingitis multiplies the risk of extrauterine pregnancy by 6 and carries a 15% risk of sterility, which doubles with each new episode. 75% of cases of salpingitis are caused by sexually transmitted diseases, with chlamydia trachomatis responsible for about 1/2. The risk of salpingitis in oral contraceptive (OC) users is .2-.9 in relation to women not using contraception. The seriousness of salpingitis is significantly less for OC than for IUD users. On the other hand , various studies have

  17. Health for Adolescents and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschamps, Jean-Pierre; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses the health of adolescents and youth in the tropics. The report is divided into five sections. The first section defines adolescence, youth, the duration of adolescence, the age group and its problems, and societies in adolescence. The second section discusses adolescence in relation to society and culture and focuses on the…

  18. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ott, Mary A; Sucato, Gina S

    2014-10-01

    A working knowledge of contraception will assist the pediatrician in both sexual health promotion as well as treatment of common adolescent gynecologic problems. Best practices in adolescent anticipatory guidance and screening include a sexual health history, screening for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, counseling, and if indicated, providing access to contraceptives. Pediatricians' long-term relationships with adolescents and families allow them to help promote healthy sexual decision-making, including abstinence and contraceptive use. Additionally, medical indications for contraception, such as acne, dysmenorrhea, and heavy menstrual bleeding, are frequently uncovered during adolescent visits. This technical report provides an evidence base for the accompanying policy statement and addresses key aspects of adolescent contraceptive use, including the following: (1) sexual history taking, confidentiality, and counseling; (2) adolescent data on the use and side effects of newer contraceptive methods; (3) new data on older contraceptive methods; and (4) evidence supporting the use of contraceptives in adolescent patients with complex medical conditions.

  19. Antitumor resistance induced by zinostatin stimalamer (ZSS), a polymer-conjugated neocarzinostatin (NCS) derivative. I. Meth A tumor eradication and tumor-neutralizing activity in mice pretreated with ZSS or NCS.

    PubMed

    Masuda, E; Maeda, H

    1995-05-01

    Zinostatin stimalamer (ZSS) is a new anticancer agent derived from neocarzinostatin (NCS), which is synthesized by conjugation of one molecule of NCS and two molecules of poly(styrene-co-maleic acid). ZSS exhibited potent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in preclinical experiments, and a clinical trial of the intra-arterial administration of ZSS with iodized oil on hepatocellular carcinoma showed potent antitumor activity. We investigated the effect of ZSS and NCS on antitumor resistance and found that pretreatment with either drug suppressed the growth of MethA tumors in Balb/c mice and induced tumor eradication when given separately by single administration at therapeutic doses between 1 day and 4 weeks before tumor transplantation. The findings that the cytocidal activity of these drugs was not detected in vivo at the time of tumor transplantation and that tumor regression was preceded by a period of transient growth suggested that tumor regression was due to host-mediated antitumor activity induced by these drugs. Pretreatment with ZSS or NCS also suppressed the growth of Colon 26 carcinoma and Sarcoma 180. The finding that NCS showed the same effect as ZSS suggests that poly(styrene-comaleic acid) is not essential for the induction of host-mediated antitumor activity. Furthermore, apo-ZSS, which lacks cytocidal activity, did not induce antitumor activity. From this, it is suggested that the cytocidal effect of ZSS involves the induction of host-mediated antitumor resistance. In athymic Balb/c nu/nu mice, pretreatment with ZSS or NCS did not induce tumor eradication, suggesting that mature T lymphocytes play an important role in tumor eradication. Challenging MethA was rejected without transient growth in mice that had been cured of MethA, but challenging Colon 26 was not, showing that anti-MethA resistance was augmented selectively in the MethA-eradicated mice. Splenocytes from MethA-bearing mice pretreated with the drug showed tumor

  20. WhiteStar user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, T.F.

    1990-08-01

    The WhiteStar project provides design engineers with needed part design data. WhiteStar encourages the use of preferred parts by providing a user-convenient parts database. This report shows selections the user makes in order to obtain information on a particular part. 15 figs.

  1. Overview of Graphical User Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulser, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of graphical user interfaces for online public access catalogs (OPACs) covers the history of OPACs; OPAC front-end design, including examples from Indiana University and the University of Illinois; and planning and implementation of a user interface. (10 references) (EA)

  2. User interfaces for voice applications.

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, C

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the aspects of task requirements, user expectations, and technological capabilities that influence the design of a voice interface and then identifies several components of user interfaces that are particularly critical in successful voice applications. Examples from several applications are provided to demonstrate how these components are used to produce effective voice interfaces. PMID:7479721

  3. User interfaces for voice applications.

    PubMed

    Kamm, C

    1995-10-24

    This paper discusses some of the aspects of task requirements, user expectations, and technological capabilities that influence the design of a voice interface and then identifies several components of user interfaces that are particularly critical in successful voice applications. Examples from several applications are provided to demonstrate how these components are used to produce effective voice interfaces.

  4. User Interfaces for Voice Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamm, Candace

    1995-10-01

    This paper discusses some of the aspects of task requirements, user expectations, and technological capabilities that influence the design of a voice interface and then identifies several components of user interfaces that are particularly critical in successful voice applications. Examples from several applications are provided to demonstrate how these components are used to produce effective voice interfaces.

  5. Microfiche 1969 -- A User Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooster, Harold

    An informal survey of microfiche users was conducted by correspondence, resulting in over 300 letters. Industrial libraries led all others in their acceptance of fiche, with a ratio of 2:1 in favor. Half of the individual users despised fiche; 25% liked it with some reservations and 25% were strongly in favor. Half of those who liked fiche had…

  6. Survey of User Authentication Mechanisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    security. It taxonomizes the existing inventory of user authentication mechanisms such as biometrics, challenge/response, password, smart card and token. The...It taxonomizes the existing inventory of user authentication mechanisms such as biometrics, challenge/response, password, smart card and token.

  7. Scientific customer needs - NASA user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Some requirements for scientific users of the Space Station are considered. The use of testbeds to evaluate design concepts for information systems, and for interfacing between designers and builders of systems is examined. The need for an information system that provides an effective interaction between ground-based users and their space-based equipment is discussed.

  8. A User- Dependent SDI System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Hilary D.

    1973-01-01

    A large-scale selective dissemination of information (SDI) system which is in operation at the Agricultural Research Service is described. The unique characteristic of this system is that the users develop and modify their own profiles. The implications of this user-dependent approach for information system planners are discussed. (2 references)…

  9. FAMIAS User Manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zima, Wolfgang

    2008-10-01

    The excitation of pulsation modes in Beta Cephei and Slowly Pulsating B stars is known to be very sensitive to opacity changes in the stellar interior where T ~ 2 x 10E5 K. In this region differences in opacity up to ~ 50% can be induced by the choice between OPAL and OP opacity tables, and between two different metal mixtures (Grevesse & Noels 1993 and Asplund et al. 2005). We have extended the non-adiabatic computations presented in Miglio et al. (2007) towards models of higher mass and pulsation modes of degree l = 3, and we present here the instability domains in the HR- and log P-log Teff diagrams resulting from different choices of opacity tables, and for three different metallicities. FAMIAS (Frequency Analysis and Mode Identification for AsteroSeismology) is a collection of state-of-the-art software tools for the analysis of photometric and spectroscopic time series data. It is one of the deliverables of the Work Package NA5: Asteroseismology of the European Coordination Action in Helio-and Asteroseismology (HELAS). Two main sets of tools are incorporated in FAMIAS. The first set allows to search for periodicities in the data using Fourier and non-linear least-squares fitting algorithms. The other set allows to carry out a mode identification for the detected pulsation frequencies to determine their pulsational quantum numbers, the harmonic degree, m. The types of stars to which famias is applicable are main-sequence pulsators hotter than the Sun. This includes the Gamma Dor stars, Delta Sct stars, the slowly pulsating B stars and the Beta Cep stars - basically all pulsating main-sequence stars, for which empirical mode identification is required to successfully carry out asteroseismology. This user manual describes how to use the different features of FAMIAS and provides two tutorials that demonstrate the usage of FAMIAS for spectroscopic and photometric mode identification.

  10. SVX4 User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Christofek, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hoff, J.; Kreiger, B.; Rapidis, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Utes, M.; Weber, M.; Yarema, R.; Zimmerman, T.; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    We present and describe the operation of the SVX4 chip. The SVX4 is a custom 128-channel analog to digital converter chip used by D0 and CDF in Run IIb to read out their respective silicon strip detectors. Each channel consists of an integrator (Front-End device, or FE) and a digitize/readout section (Back-End device, or BE). The input to each channel is sampled and temporarily stored in its own storage capacitor. Upon receiving a trigger signal, the relevant pipeline cell is reserved. Subsequent signals cause reserved cells to be digitized by a 128 parallel channel Wilkinson type 8-bit ADC, and then readout in byte-serial mode with optional zero suppression (sparsification). Salient features include (1) operation in either D0 mode or CDF mode (CDF mode features ''dead timeless operation'' or continued acquisition during digitization and readout) with an additional mixed mode of operation, (2) adjustable, loadable control parameters, including the integrator bandwidth and ADC polarity (only one input charge polarity will be used for Run IIb, but this feature remains for diagnostic purposes), (3) sparsified readout with nearest neighbor logic, (4) built-in charge injection with the ability for external voltage overriding for testing and calibration, and (5) a channel mask that is used for either charge injection or for masking of channels with excessive DC current input during chip operation. This document is meant to familiarize the user with the functionality of the SVX4 and goes on to include specifications, pin outs, timings and electrical information. Additional information on the SVX4 can be found in Ref [1].

  11. The TIMS Data User's Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Anne B. (Editor); Abbott, Elsa (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A workshop was held to bring together all users of data from NASA's airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS). The purpose was to allow users to compare results, data processing algorithms, and problems encountered; to update the users on the latest instrument changes and idiosyncracies, including distribution of the TIMS investigation guide; to inform the users of the wide range of problems that are currently being tackled by other TIMS investigators; to explore ways to expand the user community; to discuss current areas where more basic research is required; and to discuss the future directions of NASA's thermal infrared remote sensing programs. Also discussed were: geology, land use, archeology; and data processing and noise research.

  12. Crystal structures of two bis­(iodo­meth­yl)benzene derivatives: similarities and differences in the crystal packing

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, C. John; Hanton, Lyall R.; Moratti, Stephen C.; Simpson, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The isomeric derivatives 1,2-bis­(iodo­meth­yl)benzene, (I), and 1,3-bis­(iodo­meth­yl)benzene (II), both C8H8I2, were prepared by metathesis from their di­bromo analogues. The ortho-derivative, (I), lies about a crystallographic twofold axis that bis­ects the C—C bond between the two iodo­methyl substituents. The packing in (I) relies solely on C—H⋯I hydrogen bonds supported by weak parallel slipped π–π stacking inter­actions [inter-centroid distance = 4.0569 (11) Å, inter-planar distance = 3.3789 (8) Å and slippage = 2.245 Å]. While C—H⋯I hydrogen bonds are also found in the packing of (II), type II, I⋯I halogen bonds [I⋯I = 3.8662 (2) Å] and C—H⋯π contacts feature prominently in stabilizing the three-dimensional structure. PMID:26870415

  13. {μ-2-[(3-Amino-2,2-dimethyl-prop-yl)imino-meth-yl]-6-meth-oxy-phenolato-1:2κ(5)O(1),O(6):N,N',O(1)}{2-[(3-amino-2,2-dimethyl-prop-yl)imino-meth-yl]-6-meth-oxy-phenolato-1κ(3)N,N',O(1)}-μ-azido-1:2κ(2)N:N-azido-2κN-methanol-2κO-dinickel(II).

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, Akbar; Rayati, Saeed; Fayyazi, Kazem; Ng, Seik Weng; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2012-08-01

    Two distinct coordination geometries are found in the binuclear title complex, [Ni(2)(C(13)H(19)N(2)O(2))(2)(N(3))(2)(CH(3)OH)], as one Schiff base ligand is penta-dentate, coordinating via the anti-cipated oxide O, imine N and amine N atoms (as for the second, tridentate, ligand) but the oxide O is bridging and coordination also occurs through the meth-oxy O atom. The Ni(II) atoms are linked by a μ(2)-oxide atom and one end of a μ(2)-azide ligand, forming an Ni(2)ON core. The coordination geometry for the Ni(II) atom coordinated by the tridentate ligand is completed by the meth-oxy O atom derived from the penta-dentate ligand, with the resulting N(3)O(3) donor set defining a fac octa-hedron. The second Ni(II) atom has its cis-octa-hedral N(4)O(2) coordination geometry completed by the imine N and amine N atoms of the penta-dentate Schiff base ligand, a terminally coordinated azide N and a methanol O atom. The arrangement is stabilized by an intra-molecular hydrogen bond between the methanol H and the oxide O atom. Linear supra-molecular chains along the a axis are formed in the crystal packing whereby two amine H atoms from different amine atoms hydrogen bond to the terminal N atom of the monodentate azide ligand.

  14. Anti-tumor activity of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum BF-LP284 on Meth-A tumor cells in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoichi; Itoh, Yukie; Kataoka, Motoyuki; Iino-Miura, Shiori; Miura, Ryosuke; Mizutani, Takeo; Fujisawa, Tomohiko

    2016-09-01

    Probiotics exert numerous effects on human well-being. Here, heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum BF-LP284 (H-Lp) was isolated as a potent immuno-modulator among 15 strains of lactobacilli in terms of TNF-α induction ability in peritoneal macrophages. In vitro TNF-α and IFN-γ induction in Peyer's patch (PP) cells was higher when incubated with H-Lp than with live L. plantarum BF-LP284 (L-Lp). Suppression of syngeneic Meth-A tumors in a murine model by oral administration of H-Lp was also greater than that of L-Lp and of controls. H-Lp stimulated IFN-γ production in spleen cells, which displayed inhibited tumor growth in Winn assays when treated with H-Lp. Moreover, H-Lp increased the ratio of CD3(+ )cells among peripheral blood mononuclear cells in Meth-A tumor-bearing mice, suggesting an H-Lp-mediated anti-tumor mechanism whereby immune cells that are activated by H-Lp in PP and acquire anti-tumor activity in the spleen migrate to tumor sites through lymphocyte homing to inhibit tumor growth.

  15. Crystal structure of benzyl (E)-2-(3,4-di-meth-oxy-benzyl-idene)hydrazine-1-carbodi-thio-ate.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yew-Fung; Break, Mohammed Khaled Bin; Tahir, M Ibrahim M; Khoo, Teng-Jin

    2015-02-01

    The title compound, C17H18N2O2S2, synthesized via a condensation reaction between S-benzyl di-thio-carbazate and 3,4-di-meth-oxy-benzaldehyde, crystallized with two independent mol-ecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit. Both mol-ecules have an L-shape but differ in the orientation of the benzyl ring with respect to the 3,4-di-meth-oxy-benzyl-idine ring, this dihedral angle is 65.59 (8)° in mol-ecule A and 73.10 (8)° in mol-ecule B. In the crystal, the A and B mol-ecules are linked via pairs of N-H⋯S hydrogen bonds, forming dimers with an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. The dimers are linked via pairs of C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, giving inversion dimers of dimers. These units are linked by C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming ribbons propagating in the [100] direction.

  16. Size-Dependent Filling Behavior of UV-Curable Di(meth)acrylate Resins into Carbon-Coated Anodic Aluminum Oxide Pores of around 20 nm.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaru; Nakaya, Akifumi; Hoshikawa, Yasuto; Ito, Shunya; Hiroshiba, Nobuya; Kyotani, Takashi

    2016-11-09

    Ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprint lithography is a promising nanofabrication technology with cost efficiency and high throughput for sub-20 nm size semiconductor, data storage, and optical devices. To test formability of organic resist mask patterns, we investigated whether the type of polymerizable di(meth)acrylate monomer affected the fabrication of cured resin nanopillars by UV nanoimprinting using molds with pores of around 20 nm. We used carbon-coated, porous, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films prepared by electrochemical oxidation and thermal chemical vapor deposition as molds, because the pore diameter distribution in the range of 10-40 nm was suitable for combinatorial testing to investigate whether UV-curable resins comprising each monomer were filled into the mold recesses in UV nanoimprinting. Although the UV-curable resins, except for a bisphenol A-based one, detached from the molds without pull-out defects after radical photopolymerization under UV light, the number of cured resin nanopillars was independent of the viscosity of the monomer(s) in each resin. The number of resin nanopillars increased and their diameter decreased as the number of hydroxy groups in the aliphatic diacrylate monomers increased. It was concluded that the filling of the carbon-coated pores having diameters of around 20 nm with UV-curable resins was promoted by the presence of hydroxy groups in the aliphatic di(meth)acrylate monomers.

  17. (Z)-5-(3,4,5-Tri-meth-oxy-styr-yl)-2,3-di-hydro-thieno[3,4-b][1,4]dioxine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Tao; Chu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    In the title compound, C17H18O5S, an analogue of the potent anti-cancer agent combretastatin A-4, the alkene C=C bond has a cis conformation and the C-C=C-C torsion angle is 9.0 (3)°. The dihedral angle between the benzene and thio-phene rings is 54.07 (4)°. The dioxene ring adopts a half-chair conformation, with the C atoms of the methyl-ene groups displaced by -0.325 (2) and 0.341 (3) Å from the plane of the other atoms. The C atoms of the two meta-meth-oxy groups are close to being coplanar with their attached benzene ring [displacements = -0.025 (2) and -0.196 (2) Å], whereas the C atom of the para-meth-oxy group is significantly displaced [by -1.107 (2) Å]. In the crystal, C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol-ecules into [0-11] chains, which feature two different types of R 2 (2)(6) loops.

  18. Crystal structure of benzyl (E)-2-(3,4-di­meth­oxy­benzyl­idene)hydrazine-1-carbodi­thio­ate

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yew-Fung; Break, Mohammed Khaled bin; Tahir, M. Ibrahim M.; Khoo, Teng-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C17H18N2O2S2, synthesized via a condensation reaction between S-benzyl di­thio­carbazate and 3,4-di­meth­oxy­benzaldehyde, crystallized with two independent mol­ecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit. Both mol­ecules have an L-shape but differ in the orientation of the benzyl ring with respect to the 3,4-di­meth­oxy­benzyl­idine ring, this dihedral angle is 65.59 (8)° in mol­ecule A and 73.10 (8)° in mol­ecule B. In the crystal, the A and B mol­ecules are linked via pairs of N—H⋯S hydrogen bonds, forming dimers with an R 2 2(8) ring motif. The dimers are linked via pairs of C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, giving inversion dimers of dimers. These units are linked by C—H⋯π inter­actions, forming ribbons propagating in the [100] direction. PMID:25878829

  19. Crystal structure of bis­{μ-2-[(di­methyl­amino)­meth­yl]ferrocene­seleno­lato}bis[chlorido­palladium(II)

    PubMed Central

    Takaluoma, Esther M.; Oilunkaniemi, Raija; Laitinen, Risto S.

    2014-01-01

    The dinuclear title compound, [PdCl{Se[(C5H5)Fe(C5H3)2CH2N(CH3)2]}]2 was obtained by the reaction of [PdCl2(NCPh)2] with 2-[(N,N′-di­methyl­amino)­meth­yl]ferro­cene­seleno­late and the crystals for the structure determination were grown from a mixture of THF and n-hexane. Both PdII atoms are coordinated by the bridging Se atoms and by the amino N atoms of the bidentate 2-[(N,N′-di­methyl­amino)­meth­yl]ferrocene­seleno­late ligand, as well as by Cl atoms, and show a distorted square-planar coordination. The angle between the Pd—Se—Se planes of the two Pd atoms is 149.31 (3)°. Weak Cl⋯H hydrogen bonds link the binuclear complexes into a three-dimensional network. PMID:25484672

  20. Identifying online user reputation of user-object bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Jian-Guo; Yang, Kai; Guo, Qiang; Han, Jing-Ti

    2017-02-01

    Identifying online user reputation based on the rating information of the user-object bipartite networks is important for understanding online user collective behaviors. Based on the Bayesian analysis, we present a parameter-free algorithm for ranking online user reputation, where the user reputation is calculated based on the probability that their ratings are consistent with the main part of all user opinions. The experimental results show that the AUC values of the presented algorithm could reach 0.8929 and 0.8483 for the MovieLens and Netflix data sets, respectively, which is better than the results generated by the CR and IARR methods. Furthermore, the experimental results for different user groups indicate that the presented algorithm outperforms the iterative ranking methods in both ranking accuracy and computation complexity. Moreover, the results for the synthetic networks show that the computation complexity of the presented algorithm is a linear function of the network size, which suggests that the presented algorithm is very effective and efficient for the large scale dynamic online systems.

  1. User attitudes toward end-user literature searching.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, L; Mixter, J K; Emanuele, M A

    1988-01-01

    A survey to determine attitudes toward end-user searching was made at Loyola University's Medical Center Library using MEDIS, an online full-text and bibliographic medical retrieval system. One hundred forty-one completed questionnaires were analyzed for this report. Information was collected on user familiarity with computers, end-user training, system use, mechanics of searching, and attitudes toward future use. Computer familiarity was highest among the faculty users. Ninety percent of the respondents saw librarians as a crucial agent in training and in providing end-user assistance. Respondents identified five major reasons for using the system: helpfulness, convenience, time savings, rapid feedback, and presentation of needed information. Searching the MEDLINE database rather than the full-text database was the search method of choice. Continued use of both mediated and end-user searching was intended by most of the respondents. Survey results support a perceived need for end-user searching and confirmed recommendations of the Association of American Medical Colleges on medical information science skills. PMID:3285930

  2. Scoliosis brace design: influence of visual aesthetics on user acceptance and compliance.

    PubMed

    Law, Derry; Cheung, Mei-Chun; Yip, Joanne; Yick, Kit-Lun; Wong, Christina

    2016-09-06

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is a common condition found in adolescents. A rigid brace is often prescribed as the treatment for this spinal deformity, which negatively affects user compliance due to the discomfort caused by the brace, and the psychological distress resulting from its appearance. However, the latter, which is the impact of visual aesthetics, has not been thoroughly studied for scoliosis braces. Therefore, a qualitative study with in-depth interviews has been carried out with 10 participants who have a Cobb angle of 20°-30° to determine the impact of visual aesthetics on user acceptance and compliance towards the brace. It is found that co-designing with patients on the aesthetic aspects of the surface design of the brace increases the level of user compliance and induces positive user perception. Therefore, aesthetic preferences need to be taken into consideration in the design process of braces. Practitioner Summary: The impact of visual aesthetics on user acceptance and compliance towards a rigid brace for scoliosis is investigated. The findings indicate that an aesthetically pleasing brace and the involvement of patients in the design process of the brace are important for increasing user compliance and addressing psychological issues during treatment.

  3. Peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Christina; Lyke, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Maslow (1970) defined peak experiences as the most wonderful experiences of a person's life, which may include a sense of awe, well-being, or transcendence. Furthermore, recent research has suggested that psilocybin can produce experiences subjectively rated as uniquely meaningful and significant (Griffiths et al. 2006). It is therefore possible that psilocybin may facilitate or change the nature of peak experiences in users compared to non-users. This study was designed to compare the peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users, to evaluate the frequency of peak experiences while under the influence of psilocybin, and to assess the perceived degree of alteration of consciousness during these experiences. Participants were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling from undergraduate classes and at a musical event. Participants were divided into three groups, those who reported a peak experience while under the influence of psilocybin (psilocybin peak experience: PPE), participants who had used psilocybin but reported their peak experiences did not occur while they were under the influence of psilocybin (non-psilocybin peak experience: NPPE), and participants who had never used psilocybin (non-user: NU). A total of 101 participants were asked to think about their peak experiences and complete a measure evaluating the degree of alteration of consciousness during that experience. Results indicated that 47% of psilocybin users reported their peak experience occurred while using psilocybin. In addition, there were significant differences among the three groups on all dimensions of alteration of consciousness. Future research is necessary to identify factors that influence the peak experiences of psilocybin users in naturalistic settings and contribute to the different characteristics of peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users.

  4. NMG documentation, part 1: user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsch, F.N.; Dickinson, R.P. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    This is the first of a three-part report documenting NMG, the Numerical Mathematics Guide. Part I is aimed at the user of the system. It contains an introduction, with an outline of the complete report, and Chapter 1, User`s Point of View. Part II is aimed at the programmer and contains Chapter 2, How It Works. Part III is aimed at the maintainer of NMG and contains Chapter 3, Maintenance, and Chapter 4, Validation. Each chapter has its own page numbering and table of contents.

  5. Neurocognition in College-Aged Daily Marijuana Users

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Mary P.; Collins, Paul F.; Luciana, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Background Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit substance in the United States. Use, particularly when it occurs early, has been associated with cognitive impairments in executive functioning, learning, and memory. Methods This study comprehensively measured cognitive ability as well as comorbid psychopathology and substance use history to determine the neurocognitive profile associated with young adult marijuana use. College-aged marijuana users who initiated use prior to age 17 (n=35) were compared to demographically-matched controls (n=35). Results Marijuana users were high functioning, demonstrating comparable IQs to controls and relatively better processing speed. Marijuana users demonstrated relative cognitive impairments in verbal memory, spatial working memory, spatial planning, and motivated decision-making. Comorbid use of alcohol, which was heavier in marijuana users, was unexpectedly found to be associated with better performance in some of these areas. Conclusions This study provides additional evidence of neurocognitive impairment in the context of adolescent and young adult marijuana use. Findings are discussed in relation to marijuana’s effects on intrinsic motivation and discrete aspects of cognition. PMID:24620756

  6. STS pilot user development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdowell, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Full exploitation of the STS capabilities will be not only dependent on the extensive use of the STS for known space applications and research, but also on new, innovative ideas of use originating with both current and new users. In recognition of this, NASA has been engaged in a User Development Program for the STS. The program began with four small studies. Each study addressed a separate sector of potential new users to identify techniques and methodologies for user development. The collective results established that a user development function was not only feasible, but necessary for NASA to realize the full potential of the STS. This final report begins with a description of the overall pilot program plan, which involved five specific tasks defined in the contract Statement of Work. Each task is then discussed separately; but two subjects, the development of principal investigators and space processing users, are discussed separately for improved continuity of thought. These discussions are followed by a summary of the primary results and conclusions of the Pilot User Development Program. Specific recommendations of the study are given.

  7. CARE 3 user-friendly interface user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martensen, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    CARE 3 predicts the unreliability of highly reliable reconfigurable fault-tolerant systems that include redundant computers or computer systems. CARE3MENU is a user-friendly interface used to create an input for the CARE 3 program. The CARE3MENU interface has been designed to minimize user input errors. Although a CARE3MENU session may be successfully completed and all parameters may be within specified limits or ranges, the CARE 3 program is not guaranteed to produce meaningful results if the user incorrectly interprets the CARE 3 stochastic model. The CARE3MENU User Guide provides complete information on how to create a CARE 3 model with the interface. The CARE3MENU interface runs under the VAX/VMS operating system.

  8. Predictors of media multitasking in Chinese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohui; Zhu, Liqi

    2016-12-01

    We examined predictors of media multitasking in Chinese adolescents from 3 contexts: characteristics of the media user, types of media use and family media contexts. Three hundred and twenty adolescents, 11-18 years of age, completed questionnaires to measure media use, impulsivity, sensation seeking, time management disposition and family media environment. The results showed that media multitasking was positively correlated with age and total media use time. Participants with high levels of impulsivity and sensation seeking reported more multitasking behaviour. Multitasking was negatively correlated with time management. Children from media-oriented families often engage in more multitasking. What's more, social networking sites use and music use can mediate the effect of individual and family factors on media multitasking.

  9. User interfaces to expert systems

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Emrich, M.L.

    1988-10-01

    Expert Systems are becoming increasingly popular in environments where the user is not well versed in computers or the subject domain. They offer expert advice and can also explain their lines of reasoning. As these systems are applied to highly technical areas, they become complex and large. Therefore, User Systems Interfaces (USIs) become critical. This paper discusses recent technologies that can be applied to improved user communication. In particular, bar menus/graphics, mouse interfaces, touch screens, and voice links will be highlighted. Their applications in the context of SOFTMAN (The Software Manager Apprentice) a knowledge-based system are discussed. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  10. User clustering in smartphone applications.

    PubMed

    Schaefers, Klaus; Ribeiro, David

    2012-01-01

    In the context of mobile health applications usability is a crucial factor to achieve user acceptance. The successful user interface (UI) design requires a deep understanding of the needs and requirements of the targeted audience. This paper explores the application of the K-Means algorithm on smartphone usage data in order to offer Human Computer Interaction (HCI) specialists a better insight into their user group. Two different feature space representations are introduced and used to identify persona like stereotypes in a real world data set, which was obtained from a public available smartphone application.

  11. Adolescent childbearing.

    PubMed

    Vernon, M

    1991-05-01

    The concern for the consequences of adolescent pregnancy are discussed. Childbirth among unmarried teenagers results in a higher incidence of low birth weight babies, a higher infant mortality and morbidity rate, a higher percentage of childbirth complications, a decreased likelihood of completing school, a higher risk of unemployment and welfare dependency, limited vocational opportunities, larger families, and vulnerability to psychological problems and distress. In 1988, 66% of all births to teens occurred outside of marriage. Out of wedlock live births to teens 14 years rose from 80.8% in 1970 to 92.5% in 1986, and for teens 15-19 years, 29.5% to 60.8%. 70% have a repeat pregnancy within the 1st year following their 1st childbirth. 50% have a 2nd child within 3 years. Most 2nd pregnancies occur in teenagers who are not using effective contractive methods, and the pregnancy is frequently unplanned and unwanted. The factors affecting the rate of 2nd pregnancy are age, race, marital status, education, and economic status. Teenage mothers tend to come from disadvantaged backgrounds, and childbearing compounds the poverty. Aid to families with dependent children 50% of payments were to teen mothers for the birth of their 1st child. Teen fathers are usually low income providers. The public costs are high. Some teen fathers abandon their children after birth, but many are interested in supporting their child. Specific programs to help prepare fathers are needed. Teenage mothers are stressed by child care arrangements, living arrangements, employment, school, relationships with peers, relationships with parents, housework and errands, health, finances, job counseling, community services, and child care information. Parents play an important role in guiding sexual involvement and early childbearing, and need to understand why teens get pregnant and to keep channels of communication open. Teens are influenced by media, peer pressure, lack of self-esteem, unhappiness

  12. The pervasiveness, connectedness, and intrusiveness of social network site use among young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Guadalupe; Juvonen, Jaana

    2011-12-01

    Young adolescents are quickly becoming avid users of social networking sites (SNSs); however, little is known regarding how they use these sites. The goal of the present study was to examine the extent to which young adolescents use SNSs, with whom they connect via these sites, and whether SNS use disrupts daily functioning. Among 268 middle-school students surveyed, 63% reported having their own profile page on an SNS. On average, adolescents reported having 196 SNS contacts (friends), most of whom were known peers. Young adolescents with an SNS spent most of their time viewing and responding to comments written on their profile page. Among the SNS users, 39% reported getting behind on schoolwork and 37% reported losing sleep at least once because they were visiting an SNS. As SNS use becomes embedded in young teens' daily lives, it is important to better understand how such use affects their daily adaptive functioning.

  13. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Contraception is a pillar in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians develop a working knowledge of contraception to help adolescents reduce risks of and negative health consequences related to unintended pregnancy. Over the past 10 years, a number of new contraceptive methods have become available to adolescents, newer guidance has been issued on existing contraceptive methods, and the evidence base for contraception for special populations (adolescents who have disabilities, are obese, are recipients of solid organ transplants, or are HIV infected) has expanded. The Academy has addressed contraception since 1980, and this policy statement updates the 2007 statement on contraception and adolescents. It provides the pediatrician with a description and rationale for best practices in counseling and prescribing contraception for adolescents. It is supported by an accompanying technical report.

  14. Pregnancy in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda Y; Fleming, Nathalie A; Rome, Ellen S

    2012-04-01

    Adolescent pregnancy remains a public health issue with significant medical, emotional, and societal consequences for the adolescent mother, her child, and her family. Teenage pregnancies are at higher risk of many adverse outcomes, including preterm delivery, low birth weight, and neonatal and infant mortality. Teen pregnancy and motherhood may have detrimental effects on the teen mother and her child; antenatal and postpartum care need to be adapted to meet the special needs of pregnant adolescents because standard obstetrical environments may not do so. This comprehensive review of adolescent pregnancy will highlight global statistics, factors contributing to adolescent pregnancy, social implications of adolescent pregnancy, obstetrical and neonatal outcomes, and the importance of multidisciplinary antenatal and postnatal care.

  15. OpenEIS. Users Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woohyun; Lutes, Robert G.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Haack, Jereme N.; Carpenter, Brandon J.; Akyol, Bora A.; Monson, Kyle E.; Allwardt, Craig H.; Kang, Timothy; Sharma, Poorva

    2015-02-28

    This document is a users guide for OpenEIS, a software code designed to provide standard methods for authoring, sharing, testing, using and improving algorithms for operational building energy efficiency.

  16. The Exploitation of Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Shirley; Montagne, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drug users have been exploited in research studies and clinical practice. We explore ways in which exploitation has occurred and strategies to help patients, research subjects and communities to prevent or avoid exploitation.

  17. User profiling in WWW network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekez, Michal; Gluszek, Adam; Rudzinski, Filip

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we present application of several theoretical tools to a problem of generation of WWW user pofile. First, we present the idea of user profiling and the problem of classification using decision rules. The user profile consists of rules concerning time of day, amount of pages that were browsed and presumable time spent on browsing pages in one WWW host. This profile can be used for planning of advertisement on WWW sites. In the next section, we shortly describe selected tools for generation of decision rules that were used to create user profile. We have chosen two tools -- CART and C4.5 that are examples of decision tree algorithms. We also present the process of data mining. The following section of this paper presents the discussion of results.

  18. Soybean (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Stacey, Gary

    2016-07-12

    Gary Stacey, associate director of the National Center for Soybean Biotechnology at the University of Missouri, gives a talk simply titled "Soybean" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  19. Soybean (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, Gary

    2010-03-24

    Gary Stacey, associate director of the National Center for Soybean Biotechnology at the University of Missouri, gives a talk simply titled "Soybean" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  20. National Ignition Facility User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, C J

    2014-09-03

    This user manual is intended to provide sufficient information to allow researchers to become familiar with NIF and develop preliminary plans for NIF experiments. It also provides references to further detail that will allow detailed experiment planning.

  1. NASTRAN user's guide: Level 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The NASTRAN structural analysis system is presented. This user's guide is an essential addition to the original four NASTRAN manuals. Clear, brief descriptions of capabilities with example input are included, with references to the location of more complete information.

  2. Turkish adolescents' loneliness.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Aynur Bütün; Simşek, Sükran; Aral, Neriman; Baran, Gülen

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize loneliness among adolescents with respect to socioeconomic level, sex, and mothers' and fathers' education. General information about the 400 adolescents and their families were obtained. The UCLA Loneliness Scale was administered. Results of a hierarchical multiple regression showed that mothers' educational level explained a slight but statistically significant amount of variance in adolescents' loneliness scores while sex, socioeconomic level and fathers' educational level did not.

  3. Hydraulics Graphics Package. Users Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    Engineering Center, Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, as the origin of the program(s). IT, i HGP -3!OO Ju ’ ŕ Dlst! 3pbo.i:, HYDRAULICS GRAPHICS...Davis, California 95616 (916) 551-1748 (FTS) 460-1748 HGP Hydraulics Graphics Package Users Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Subject Page 1 Introduction...5 2.4 Use of Disk Files ........ ................ 6 3 HGP Free Format User Input 3.1 Command Language Syntax ...... ............. 8 3.2

  4. [User committees within health centres].

    PubMed

    Raymond, Régine; Borgia, Agnès; Ruelle, Yannick

    The legislative and regulatory arsenal has resulted in the gradual increase of the involvement of users of the health system within supervisory decision-making bodies and hospitals. In the field of primary care, this representation in the form of user committees is not regulated, but some historical examples exist. The advantage of implementing a health democracy in primary care structures is however real and must be developed.

  5. Internet use among Turkish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tahiroglu, Aysegul Yolga; Celik, Gonca G; Uzel, Mehtap; Ozcan, Neslihan; Avci, Ayse

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate Internet use habits and problematic Internet use (PIU) in Turkish adolescents. Participants were 3,975 undergraduate students, 7.6% of whom used the Internet for more than 12 hours weekly. The Online Cognition Scale (OCS) was used. The most common purpose for using the Internet was playing games, followed by general information search. Female users mostly preferred searching for general information; male users preferred playing games (p < 0.001, gamma = 995.205). The most preferred type of game was violent games. While preference for strategy and fantasy role-play (FRP) games increased with age, preference for other games decreased (p < 0.0001, gamma = 283.767). Participants who used the Internet mostly for general information searches and school-related searches had lower OCS scores (p < 0.0001). The highest OCS scores were related to violent games, followed by FRP, strategy, and sports and motor racing games. Computers and the Internet are useful, important inventions, but like other inventions, if used improperly, they may be harmful. Risk of harm raises concerns about who should use the Internet and computers, and where, when, and why the Internet and computers should be used.

  6. Nutrition in the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R

    1999-02-01

    This article reviews the nutritional requirements of puberty and the clinical assessment of nutritional status, and discusses the nutritional risks imposed by vegetarian diets, pregnancy, and athletic involvement. Energy (calories) and protein are essential in pubertal development. Adolescent females require approximately 2200 calories/day, whereas male adolescents require 2500-3000 calories/day. Additional intake requirements include fat, calcium, iron, zinc, vitamins, and fiber. The clinical assessment of nutritional status begins with obtaining a good diet history of the patient and this could be offered by the body mass index. Nutritional deficiencies and poor eating habits established during adolescence can have long-term consequences, including delayed sexual maturation, loss of final adult height, osteoporosis, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. As for vegetarian adolescents, nutritional risks include lack of iodine, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and some essential fatty acids. In addition, substances in some grains reduce gut absorption, thus increasing mineral deficiencies. Pregnancy may also be a risk factor for poor nutrition during adolescence. A pregnant adolescent has different nutritional needs because she is still growing. Among adolescent athletes many are turning to nutritional supplements in an attempt to improve athletic performance. A balanced, varied diet provides adequate calories and nutrition to meet the needs of most adolescents. They also have greater water needs than do adult athletes. Details on adolescent health concerns are further discussed in this article.

  7. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand.

  8. Suicide in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The recent trend in suicide mortality has made it the second-most-common cause of death in adolescence. The recognition of depressed adolescents, especially males, is made difficult by their low utilization of health services and by the variety of modes of presentation. The family physician's ability to play an effective role in helping the depressed adolescent and preventing the occurrence of suicide depends on the establishment of rapport, obtaining a detailed history, and being prepared to offer continuity of care. In most depressed adolescents there is limited need for hospitalization, medication or psychiatric treatment. PMID:21267225

  9. Adolescent pregnancy options.

    PubMed

    Resnick, M D

    1992-09-01

    The range of pregnancy options available to adolescents each have significant ramifications for future educational and economic achievement. The changing societal context of adolescent pregnancy decision-making are described, and the characteristics of adolescents who choose to terminate their pregnancy, parent their child, or place for adoption are examined. The role of significant others in decision-making and the implications of mandatory parental involvement in pregnancy decision-making is discussed, as well as the roles of schools in promoting the well-being and potential of adolescents considering pregnancy decisions.

  10. Aggression and body image concerns among anabolic androgenic steroid users, contemplators, and controls in Norway.

    PubMed

    Jenssen, Ida Heimly; Johannessen, Kim Berg

    2015-01-01

    AAS users and contemplators were investigated for differences in aggression and body image concern. Prevalence rates were sought as a secondary aim. 396 male adolescents at Norwegian high schools completed a questionnaire battery during school hours. Prevalence of AAS use showed 4.0%; AAS contemplation showed 5.1%. No significant differences between the AAS users and contemplators were found on levels of aggression and body image concern. AAS users and contemplators reported significantly higher levels of aggression and body image concern compared nonusing controls. AAS contemplators enhance understanding of AAS use by representing psychosocial factors contributing to increased aggression, and AAS use or risk thereof indicative of an aggressive personality profile. Body image concerns for AAS users and contemplators may indicate that AAS use does not diminish body image concern, and that body image concern is a risk factor for AAS use. This is supportive of previous research.

  11. Increasing the end user`s productivity through seamless integration of applications with the database

    SciTech Connect

    Parizadeh, K.

    1992-09-01

    End user`s productivity is a critical issue in modern day offices. The first section of this paper will present some guidelines and methods to improve end user`s productivity. The second section, presents an actual system.

  12. Adolescent's suicide attempts: populations at risk, vulnerability, and substance use.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, Monique; Plancherel, Bernard; Laget, Jacques; Halfon, Olivier

    2003-01-01

    Adolescence corresponds to a transition period that requires adaptation and change capacities and skills. Most young people succeed with this challenge, whereas a minority fail. In order to identify with the teenage culture, become autonomous, and differentiate from their parents, some adolescents choose to use drugs, beginning with the use of cigarettes, alcohol, cannabis, followed by other illicit drugs such as opiates and stimulants. A high proportion of these adolescents attempt suicide, which is the primary cause of death during adolescence in many European countries. Who are the "vulnerable" adolescents? What are the mechanisms that can explain the varieties of drug-use initiation or suicide attempts? Can "protective factors" be identified? What kind of strategies might be developed at a social and political level in order to prevent or to minimize drug abuse and suicide attempts, among other harmful behaviors? These issues will be discussed on the basis of the recent literature and in the light of a recent study carried out in the French-speaking part of Switzerland on large cohorts of adolescent drug users. Unresolved critical issues are noted and future needed research is suggested.

  13. High School Polydrug Users and Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Loyd S.

    1985-01-01

    Among 433 high school seniors, 12 percent were determined to be either polydrug users or abusers. Comparisons between nonpolydrug users and polydrug users on family violence, personality traits, psychological characteristics, and behavior are given. (Author/BL)

  14. Section 4 User Guide – Primary Support

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document presents the user guide for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) Section 4 application submission process. This document is the user guide for the Primary Support user of the Section 4 tool.

  15. Check out the Atmospheric Science User Forum

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-17

    article title:  Check out the Atmospheric Science User Forum     View larger image ... ASDC would like to bring your attention to the Atmospheric Science User Forum. The purpose of this forum is to improve user service, ...

  16. Adolescent Literature, Adolescent Reading and the English Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donelson, Ken, Ed.

    1972-01-01

    This issue of the Arizona English Bulletin contains articles discussing literature that adolescents read and literature that they might be encouraged to read. Thus there are discussions both of literature specifically written for adolescents and the literature adolescents choose to read. The term adolescent is understood to include young people in…

  17. Residual Neural Processing of Musical Sound Features in Adult Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Lydia; Vuust, Peter; Brattico, Elvira; Agrawal, Deepashri; Debener, Stefan; Büchner, Andreas; Dengler, Reinhard; Wittfoth, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Auditory processing in general and music perception in particular are hampered in adult cochlear implant (CI) users. To examine the residual music perception skills and their underlying neural correlates in CI users implanted in adolescence or adulthood, we conducted an electrophysiological and behavioral study comparing adult CI users with normal-hearing age-matched controls (NH controls). We used a newly developed musical multi-feature paradigm, which makes it possible to test automatic auditory discrimination of six different types of sound feature changes inserted within a musical enriched setting lasting only 20 min. The presentation of stimuli did not require the participants’ attention, allowing the study of the early automatic stage of feature processing in the auditory cortex. For the CI users, we obtained mismatch negativity (MMN) brain responses to five feature changes but not to changes of rhythm, whereas we obtained MMNs for all the feature changes in the NH controls. Furthermore, the MMNs to deviants of pitch of CI users were reduced in amplitude and later than those of NH controls for changes of pitch and guitar timber. No other group differences in MMN parameters were found to changes in intensity and saxophone timber. Furthermore, the MMNs in CI users reflected the behavioral scores from a respective discrimination task and were correlated with patients’ age and speech intelligibility. Our results suggest that even though CI users are not performing at the same level as NH controls in neural discrimination of pitch-based features, they do possess potential neural abilities for music processing. However, CI users showed a disrupted ability to automatically discriminate rhythmic changes compared with controls. The current behavioral and MMN findings highlight the residual neural skills for music processing even in CI users who have been implanted in adolescence or adulthood. Highlights: -Automatic brain responses to musical feature changes

  18. [Contraception in adolescents].

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    The proportion of women aged 15-19 in Colombia who are mothers declined from 14% in 1985 to 10% in 1990, but the actual number of cases increased due to population growth. Some 1,780,000 adolescents who have had children or are pregnant require family planning services. An additional, unknown number of adolescent pregnancies are terminated by abortion. It is estimated that 95% of adolescent pregnancies diagnosed or followed by PROFAMILIA's center for young people were unwanted. Reasons for making family planning services available to adolescents include the ever young age at initiation of sexual activity, the very low rates of contraceptive usage among sexually active adolescents, the lack of information of adolescents concerning reproduction and contraception, and their fear and guilt surrounding their sexual activity and contraceptive usage. Obstetrical services appear reluctant to furnish adolescent mothers with information on contraception, and the pharmacists and their employees who provide such information may not be aware of contraindications for this age group or whether adolescents are adequately instructed in use of the method. The rising age at marriage increases the span of time that adolescents are at risk of unwanted pregnancy. Adolescents who are well informed about sexuality and contraception and trained in decision making, self-esteem, and responsible parenthood are likely to postpone sexual activity. Information on contraception and family planning services needs to be made available to adolescents in a way that will actually motivate use. Information on sex and contraception should be made available at puberty and should include the form of use, contraindications, and advantages and disadvantages of all methods appropriate to adolescents. Orientation and assistance in selecting the best method should be individually tailored and should be provided in schools or other places accessible to young people, in a language they can understand. Rhythm and

  19. GXQ program user`s guide. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, B.E.

    1995-05-10

    This report documents the program user`s guide of a general purpose atmospheric dispersion code named GXQ. GXQ is an IBM Compatible microcomputer based program for calculating atmospheric dispersion coefficients using Hanford site specific joint frequency data. It uses the Gaussian straight line model to calculate either an atmospheric dispersion coefficient (X/Q{prime}) or a maximum normalized air concentration (X/Q). Several options are available to the user which alter the standard Gaussian model to allow for plume depletion, building wake, plume meander, sector averaging, gravitational settling and plume rise. Additional options control handling of the joint frequency data and output. Combinations of the above allow calculation of X/Q{prime} in accordance with Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.145.

  20. 2-(3,4-Di­meth­oxy­phen­yl)-1-pentyl-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazole

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Shaaban K.; Akkurt, Mehmet; Marzouk, Adel A.; Singh, Kuldip; Albayati, Mustafa R.

    2013-01-01

    The central imidazole ring in the title compound, C28H30N2O2, makes dihedral angles of 28.42 (13), 71.22 (15) and 29.50 (14)°, respectively, with the phenyl rings in the 4- and 5-positions and the 3,4-di­meth­oxy­phenyl group. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by C—H⋯O and C—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, weak π–π stacking inter­actions [centroid–centroid distance = 3.760 (2) Å] and C—H⋯π contacts, forming a three-dimensional network. PMID:24454255