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Sample records for adolescent mice exhibited

  1. Norepinephrine Transporter Heterozygous Knockout Mice Exhibit Altered Transport and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fentress, HM; Klar, R; Krueger, JK; Sabb, T; Redmon, SN; Wallace, NM; Shirey-Rice, JK; Hahn, MK

    2013-01-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically-driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET+/−), demonstrating that they display an ~50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity, assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET+/− mouse establishes an activated state of existing, surface NET proteins. NET+/− mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris Water Maze. These data suggest recovery of near basal activity in NET+/− mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET+/− mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders. PMID:24102798

  2. Norepinephrine transporter heterozygous knockout mice exhibit altered transport and behavior.

    PubMed

    Fentress, H M; Klar, R; Krueger, J J; Sabb, T; Redmon, S N; Wallace, N M; Shirey-Rice, J K; Hahn, M K

    2013-11-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET(+/-) ), demonstrating that they display an approximately 50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET(+/-) mouse establishes an activated state of existing surface NET proteins. The NET(+/-) mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris water maze. These data suggest that recovery of near basal activity in NET(+/-) mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET(+/-) mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders. PMID:24102798

  3. Autonomic Responses of Male Adolescents Exhibiting Refractory Behaviour in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, John G. V.; Maliphant, Rodney

    1971-01-01

    Adolescent boys, judged by the majority of their teachers to be refractory (unmanagable in behavior), were found to have significantly lower base heart-rates than their matched controls in three experimental situations. (Author/WY)

  4. Artificially reared mice exhibit anxiety-like behavior in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hidemi; Harauma, Akiko; Kato, Maki; Ootomo, Yuki; Hatanaka, Erisa; Moriguchi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    It is important to establish experimental animal techniques that are applicable to the newborn and infant phases for nutrition and pharmacological studies. Breeding technology using the artificial suckling method without breast milk is very effective for the study of newborn nutrition. Using this method, we separated newborn mice from dams within 48 h of birth and provided them with artificial milk. We evaluated mouse anxiety levels after early postnatal maternal separation. Artificially reared mice were subjected to elevated plus-maze tests to assess emotional behavior at 9 weeks of age. Artificially reared mice showed a significantly lower frequency of entries and dipping into the open arms of the maze compared with dam-reared mice. This result indicates that the anxiety level of artificially reared mice was higher than that of dam-reared mice. Moreover, the concentration of monoamines in the brain was determined after the behavioral experiment. The hippocampal norepinephrine, serotonin, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels in the artificially reared mice were significantly higher than those of the dam-reared mice. These results suggest that maternal-offspring interactions are extremely important for the emotional development of newborn infants during the lactation period. In future studies, it is necessary to consider the environmental factors and conditions that minimize the influence of artificial rearing on emotional behavior. PMID:26948536

  5. TRAIL-deficient mice exhibit delayed regression of retinal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Kristin E; Davies, Michael H; Stempel, Andrew J; Griffith, Thomas S; Powers, Michael R

    2009-12-01

    While it is well established that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in various cell types, the role of TRAIL in regulation of retinal neovascularization (NV) has not been described. Here we determined the role of TRAIL in retinal NV during oxygen-induced retinopathy using TRAIL deficient ((-/-)) mice. TRAIL and its receptor, DR5, were expressed in wild-type retinas at all time points evaluated (postnatal days 12, 17, 21, 24) during oxygen-induced retinopathy and in age-matched room air control animals. Localization of TRAIL(+) cells within the neovascular tufts of hyperoxia- exposed wild-type mice suggested TRAIL plays a role in oxygen-induced retinopathy. Retinal vascular development appeared normal in the TRAIL(-/-) mice, except for a small but significant difference in the capillary-free zone surrounding major arteries. A minimal difference in avascularity was observed at postnatal day 12 in the retinas of TRAIL(-/-) mice after hyperoxia-exposure compared with wild-type mice, suggesting that TRAIL does not play a major role in the vaso-obliterative phase of oxygen-induced retinopathy. However, at the peak of NV, TRAIL(-/-) mice had a significant increase in retinal neovascularization. In addition, when NV naturally regresses in wild-type mice, TRAIL(-/-) mice continued to display significantly high levels of NV. This was attributed to a significant decrease in neovascular tuft cells undergoing apoptosis in TRAIL(-/-) mice. Together, these data strongly suggest that TRAIL plays a role in the control of retinal NV. PMID:19893042

  6. Neuregulin 3 Knockout Mice Exhibit Behaviors Consistent with Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Lindsay N; Shevelkin, Alexey; Zeledon, Mariela; Steel, Gary; Chen, Pei-Lung; Obie, Cassandra; Pulver, Ann; Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Valle, David; Sawa, Akira; Pletnikov, Mikhail V

    2016-07-01

    Neuregulin 3 (NRG3) is a paralog of NRG1. Genetic studies in schizophrenia demonstrate that risk variants in NRG3 are associated with cognitive and psychotic symptom severity, and several intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms in NRG3 are associated with delusions in patients with schizophrenia. In order to gain insights into the biological function of the gene, we generated a novel Nrg3 knockout (KO) mouse model and tested for neurobehavioral phenotypes relevant to psychotic disorders. KO mice displayed novelty-induced hyperactivity, impaired prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response, and deficient fear conditioning. No gross cytoarchitectonic or layer abnormalities were noted in the brain of KO mice. Our findings suggest that deletion of the Nrg3 gene leads to alterations consistent with aspects of schizophrenia. We propose that KO mice will provide a valuable animal model to determine the role of the NRG3 in the molecular pathogenesis of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. PMID:27606322

  7. P2X6 Knockout Mice Exhibit Normal Electrolyte Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Viering, Daan H. H. M.; Bos, Caro; Bindels, René J. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-mediated signaling is an important regulator of electrolyte transport in the kidney. The purinergic cation channel P2X6 has been previously localized to the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), a nephron segment important for Mg2+ and Na+ reabsorption, but its role in ion transport remains unknown. In this study, P2x6 knockout (P2x6-/-) mice were generated to investigate the role of P2X6 in renal electrolyte transport. The P2x6-/- animals displayed a normal phenotype and did not differ physiologically from wild type mice. Differences in serum concentration and 24-hrs urine excretion of Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ were not detected between P2x6+/+, P2x6+/- and P2x6-/- mice. Quantitative PCR was applied to examine potential compensatory changes in renal expression levels of other P2x subunits and electrolyte transporters, including P2x1-5, P2x7, Trpm6, Ncc, Egf, Cldn16, Scnn1, Slc12a3, Slc41a1, Slc41a3, Cnnm2, Kcnj10 and Fxyd2. Additionally, protein levels of P2X2 and P2X4 were assessed in P2x6+/+ and P2x6-/- mouse kidneys. However, significant changes in expression were not detected. Furthermore, no compensatory changes in gene expression could be demonstrated in heart material isolated from P2x6-/- mice. Except for a significant (P<0.05) upregulation of P2x2 in the heart of P2x6-/- mice compared to the P2x6+/+ mice. Thus, our data suggests that purinergic signaling via P2X6 is not significantly involved in the regulation of renal electrolyte handling under normal physiological conditions. PMID:27254077

  8. Erythrocytes from ozone-exposed mice exhibit decreased deformability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.L.; Dorsey, A.F.; Menzel, D.B.

    1985-02-01

    Injury from short-term exposure to ozone (O/sub 3/) was detected by a simple test of red blood cell (RBC) filterability. This test measures changes in the ability of the RBC to deform--as occurs during passage through small capillaries. Male CD-1 mice were exposed to 1.0, 0.7, or 0.3 ppm O/sub 3/ for 4 hr, and blood samples were obtained by heart puncture. RBCs were suspended in Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.4, containing 10 mg/dl glucose. After incubation in air for up to 6 hr, the time required for 2 ml RBC suspension to pass through a 3-micron-pore-size polycarbonate filter was determined. A significant increase in the 6-hr filtration time for O/sub 3/-exposed (1.0 ppm) mice over unexposed mice and a lack of protection by vitamin E were shown. The increases in RBC filtration times for O/sub 3/-exposed mice appeared to be dose related. Ozone exposure (1.0 ppm) caused a significant increase in the hematocrit of both vitamin E-deficient and -supplemented mice. Vitamin E supplementation appeared to partially prevent this increase in hematocrit. Measurement of lipid peroxidation by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test revealed no detectable levels of TBA-reactive material in RBC from O/sub 3/-exposed mice. These results suggest that measurement of RBC filterability may be feasible as a clinical test for short-term injury from exposure to oxidant gases.

  9. Duck Tembusu virus exhibits neurovirulence in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Duck Tembusu virus is a member of the Ntaya group in the genus Flavivirus. The virus has been responsible for severe duck egg-drop syndrome in China since 2010. Its emergence and rapid spread have caused great economic loss for the poultry industry. The epidemiology of the virus infection and the potential threat to public health is of great concern because of the infective and zoonotic nature of flaviviruses. Results In this study, the pathogenicity of duck Tembusu virus in BALB/c mice was investigated. Infected mice developed clinical signs, including loss of appetite, ruffled hair, weight loss, disorientation, blindness and paralysis of hind limbs from six days post- infection following intracerebral inoculation. Morbidity was 100%, with mortality ranging from 20 to 80% in three- to eight-week-old mice. High virus titers were recovered from the brain, and the virus was distributed in several organs. Histologically, there was widespread non-suppurative encephalitis in the brain. Lymphocyte depletion in the spleen was observed, along with fatty degeneration in the liver and kidney. Conclusions Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that duck Tembusu virus is highly neurovirulent in BALB/c mice. The mouse model used in this work was able to produce Tembusu virus infection and could be useful for elucidating some of the aspects of the pathophysiology of other flavivirus infections. PMID:23941427

  10. Hypercholesterolemic Mice Exhibit Lymphatic Vessel Dysfunction and Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hwee Ying; Rutkowski, Joseph M.; Helft, Julie; Reddy, Sai T.; Swartz, Melody A.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Angeli, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels are essential for lipid absorption and transport. Despite increasing numbers of observations linking lymphatic vessels and lipids, little research has been devoted to address how dysregulation of lipid balance in the blood, ie, dyslipidemia, may affect the functional biology of lymphatic vessels. Here, we show that hypercholesterolemia occurring in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice is associated with tissue swelling, lymphatic leakiness, and decreased lymphatic transport of fluid and dendritic cells from tissue. Lymphatic dysfunction results in part from profound structural abnormalities in the lymphatic vasculature: namely, initial lymphatic vessels were greatly enlarged, and collecting vessels developed notably decreased smooth muscle cell coverage and changes in the distribution of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronic acid receptor-1 (LYVE-1). Our results provide evidence that hypercholesterolemia in adult apoE−/− mice is associated with a degeneration of lymphatic vessels that leads to decreased lymphatic drainage and provides an explanation for why dendritic cell migration and, thus, immune priming, are compromised in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:19679879

  11. Increased vulnerability to ethanol consumption in adolescent maternal separated mice.

    PubMed

    García-Gutiérrez, María S; Navarrete, Francisco; Aracil, Auxiliadora; Bartoll, Adrián; Martínez-Gras, Isabel; Lanciego, José L; Rubio, Gabriel; Manzanares, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of early life stress on the vulnerability to ethanol consumption in adolescence. To this aim, mice were separated from their mothers for 12 hours/day on postnatal days 8 and 12. Emotional behavior (light-dark box, elevated plus maze and tail suspension tests) and pre-attentional deficit (pre-pulse inhibition) were evaluated in adolescent maternal separated (MS) mice. Alterations of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), mu-opioid receptor (MOr), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neuronal nuclei (NeuN), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and neurofilament heavy (NF200)-immunoreactive fibers were studied in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc) or hippocampus (HIP). The effects of maternal separation (alone or in combination with additional stressful stimuli) on ethanol consumption during adolescence were evaluated using the oral ethanol self-administration paradigm. MS mice presented mood-related alterations and pre-attentional deficit. Increased CRF, MOr and TH, and reduced BDNF, NR3C1, NeuN, MAP2 and NF200-immunoreactive fibers were observed in the PVN, NAc and HIP of adolescent MS mice. In the oral ethanol self-administration test, adolescent MS mice presented higher ethanol consumption and motivation. Exposure to additional new stressful stimuli during adolescence significantly increased the vulnerability to ethanol consumption induced by maternal separation. These results clearly demonstrated that exposure to early life stress increased the vulnerability to ethanol consumption, potentiated the effects of stressful stimuli exposure during adolescence on ethanol consumption and modified the expression of key targets involved in the response to stress, ethanol reinforcing properties and cognitive processes. PMID:25988842

  12. Adolescent, but not adult, rats exhibit ethanol-mediated appetitive second-order conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Myers, Mallory; Spear, Linda Patia; Molina, Juan Carlos; Spear, Norman E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Adolescent rats are less sensitive to the sedative effects of ethanol than older animals. They also seem to perceive the reinforcing properties of ethanol. However, unlike neonates or infants, ethanol-mediated appetitive behavior has yet to be clearly shown in adolescents. Appetitive ethanol reinforcement was assessed in adolescent (postnatal day 33, P33) and adult rats (P71) through second-order conditioning (SOC). Methods On P32 or P70 animals were intragastrically administered ethanol (0.5 or 2.0 g/kg) paired with intraoral pulses of sucrose (CS1, first-order conditioning phase). CS1 delivery took place either 5-20 (Early pairing) or 30-45 (Late pairing) min following ethanol. CS1 exposure and ethanol administration were separated by 240 min in unpaired controls. On P33 or P71, animals were presented the CS1 (second-order conditioning phase) while in a distinctive chamber (CS2). Then, they were tested for CS2 preference. Results Early and late paired adolescents, but not adults, had greater preference for the CS2 than controls, a result indicative of ontogenetic variation in ethanol-mediated reinforcement. During the CS1 - CS2 associative phase, paired adolescents given 2.0 g/kg ethanol wall-climbed more than controls. Blood and brain ethanol levels associated with the 0.5 and 2.0 g/kg doses at the onset of each conditioning phase did not differ substantially across age, with mean BECs of 38 and 112 mg %. Conclusions These data indicate age-related differences between adolescent and adult rats in terms of sensitivity to ethanol’s motivational effects. Adolescents exhibit high sensitivity for ethanol’s appetitive effects. These animals also showed EtOH-mediated behavioral activation during the second-order conditioning phase. The SOC preparation provides a valuable conditioning model for assessing ethanol’s motivational effects across ontogeny. PMID:18782343

  13. GPRC6A Null Mice Exhibit Osteopenia, Feminization and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Min; Chen, Ling; Huang, Min-Zhao; Zhu, Wenyu; Ringhofer, Brian; Luo, Junming; Christenson, Lane; Li, Benyi; Zhang, Jianghong; Jackson, P. David; Faber, Pieter; Brunden, Kurt R.; Harrington, John J.; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2008-01-01

    Background GPRC6A is a widely expressed orphan G-protein coupled receptor that senses extracellular amino acids, osteocalcin and divalent cations in vitro. The physiological functions of GPRC6A are unknown. Methods/Principal Findings In this study, we created and characterized the phenotype of GPRC6A−/− mice. We observed complex metabolic abnormalities in GPRC6A−/− mice involving multiple organ systems that express GPRC6A, including bone, kidney, testes, and liver. GPRC6A−/− mice exhibited hepatic steatosis, hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. In addition, we observed high expression of GPRC6A in Leydig cells in the testis. Ablation of GPRC6A resulted in feminization of male GPRC6A−/− mice in association with decreased lean body mass, increased fat mass, increased circulating levels of estradiol, and reduced levels of testosterone. GPRC6A was also highly expressed in kidney proximal and distal tubules, and GPRC6A−/− mice exhibited increments in urine Ca/Cr and PO4/Cr ratios as well as low molecular weight proteinuria. Finally, GPRC6A−/− mice exhibited a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) in association with impaired mineralization of bone. Conclusions/Significance GPRC6A−/− mice have a metabolic syndrome characterized by defective osteoblast-mediated bone mineralization, abnormal renal handling of calcium and phosphorus, fatty liver, glucose intolerance and disordered steroidogenesis. These findings suggest the overall function of GPRC6A may be to coordinate the anabolic responses of multiple tissues through the sensing of extracellular amino acids, osteocalcin and divalent cations. PMID:19050760

  14. Steroid sulfatase-deficient mice exhibit endophenotypes relevant to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Simon; Dennehy, Alison; Richardson, Heather; Ojarikre, Obah A.; Burgoyne, Paul S.; Humby, Trevor; Davies, William

    2012-01-01

    Summary Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition characterised by inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity; it is frequently co-morbid with anxiety and conduct disorders, sleep perturbation and abnormal consummatory behaviours. Recent studies have implicated the neurosteroid-modulating enzyme steroid sulfatase (STS) as a modulator of ADHD-related endophenotypes. The effects of steroid sulfatase deficiency on homecage activity, feeding/drinking behaviours, anxiety-related behaviours (assayed in light-dark box and open field paradigms), social dominance and serum steroid hormone levels were determined by comparing 40,XY and 39,XY*O mice. Subsequently, mice administered the steroid sulfatase inhibitor COUMATE acutely were compared to vehicle-treated mice on behavioural tasks sensitive to enzyme deficiency to dissociate between its developmental and ongoing effects. 39,XY*O mice exhibited heightened reactivity to a novel environment, hyperactivity in the active phase, and increased water (but not food) consumption relative to 40,XY mice during a 24 h period; the former group also demonstrated evidence for heightened emotional reactivity. There was no difference in social dominance between the 40,XY and 39,XY*O mice. COUMATE administration had no effect on homecage activity, water consumption or anxiety measures in the open field. 39,XY*O mice exhibited significantly lower dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) serum levels than 40,XY mice, but equivalent corticosterone levels. Together with previous data, the present results suggest that steroid sulfatase may influence core and associated ADHD behavioural endophenotypes via both developmental and ongoing mechanisms, and that the 39,XY*O model may represent a useful tool for elucidating the neurobiological basis of these endophenotypes. PMID:21723668

  15. Mice with Dab1 or Vldlr insufficiency exhibit abnormal neonatal vocalization patterns.

    PubMed

    Fraley, E R; Burkett, Z D; Day, N F; Schwartz, B A; Phelps, P E; White, S A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic changes in components of the Reelin-signaling pathway (RELN, DAB1) are associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk. Social communication deficits are a key component of the ASD diagnostic criteria, but the underlying neurogenetic mechanisms remain unknown. Reln insufficient mice exhibit ASD-like behavioral phenotypes including altered neonatal vocalization patterns. Reelin affects multiple pathways including through the receptors, Very low-density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr), Apolipoprotein receptor 2 (Apoer2), and intracellular signaling molecule Disabled-1 (Dab1). As Vldlr was previously implicated in avian vocalization, here we investigate vocalizations of neonatal mice with a reduction or absence of these components of the Reelin-signaling pathway. Mice with low or no Dab1 expression exhibited reduced calling rates, altered call-type usage, and differential vocal development trajectories. Mice lacking Vldlr expression also had altered call repertoires, and this effect was exacerbated by deficiency in Apoer2. Together with previous findings, these observations 1) solidify a role for Reelin in vocal communication of multiple species, 2) point to the canonical Reelin-signaling pathway as critical for development of normal neonatal calling patterns in mice, and 3) suggest that mutants in this pathway could be used as murine models for Reelin-associated vocal deficits in humans. PMID:27184477

  16. Mice with Dab1 or Vldlr insufficiency exhibit abnormal neonatal vocalization patterns

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, E. R.; Burkett, Z. D.; Day, N. F.; Schwartz, B. A.; Phelps, P. E.; White, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic changes in components of the Reelin-signaling pathway (RELN, DAB1) are associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk. Social communication deficits are a key component of the ASD diagnostic criteria, but the underlying neurogenetic mechanisms remain unknown. Reln insufficient mice exhibit ASD-like behavioral phenotypes including altered neonatal vocalization patterns. Reelin affects multiple pathways including through the receptors, Very low-density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr), Apolipoprotein receptor 2 (Apoer2), and intracellular signaling molecule Disabled-1 (Dab1). As Vldlr was previously implicated in avian vocalization, here we investigate vocalizations of neonatal mice with a reduction or absence of these components of the Reelin-signaling pathway. Mice with low or no Dab1 expression exhibited reduced calling rates, altered call-type usage, and differential vocal development trajectories. Mice lacking Vldlr expression also had altered call repertoires, and this effect was exacerbated by deficiency in Apoer2. Together with previous findings, these observations 1) solidify a role for Reelin in vocal communication of multiple species, 2) point to the canonical Reelin-signaling pathway as critical for development of normal neonatal calling patterns in mice, and 3) suggest that mutants in this pathway could be used as murine models for Reelin-associated vocal deficits in humans. PMID:27184477

  17. Social defeat in adolescent mice increases vulnerability to alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Arias, Marta; Navarrete, Francisco; Blanco-Gandia, Maria Carmen; Arenas, Maria Carmen; Bartoll-Andrés, Adrián; Aguilar, Maria A; Rubio, Gabriel; Miñarro, José; Manzanares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This study employs an oral operant conditioning paradigm to evaluate the effects of repeated social defeat during adolescence on the reinforcing and motivational actions of ethanol in adult OF1 mice. Social interaction, emotional and cognitive behavioral aspects were also analyzed, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments were performed to study gene expression changes in the mesocorticolimbic and hypothalamus-hypophysis-adrenal (HHA) axis. Social defeat did not alter anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze or cognitive performance in the passive avoidance and Hebb-Williams tests. A social interaction test revealed depression-like symptoms and social subordination behavior in defeated OF1 mice. Interestingly, social defeat in adolescence significantly increased the number of effective responses, ethanol consumption values and motivation to drink. Finally, real-time PCR analyses revealed that social defeat significantly increased tyrosine hydroxylase and corticotropin-releasing hormone in the ventral tegmental area and paraventricular nucleus, respectively. In contrast, mu-opioid receptor gene expression was decreased in the nucleus accumbens of socially defeated mice. In summary, these findings suggest that exposure to social defeat during adolescence increases vulnerability to the rewarding effects of ethanol without affecting emotional or cognitive performance. The gene expression alterations we have observed in the mesocorticolimbic and HHA axis systems of defeated mice could be related with their increased ethanol consumption. These results endorse future research into pharmacological strategies that modulate these systems for the treatment of social stress-related alcohol consumption problems. PMID:25219790

  18. Selenoprotein K knockout mice exhibit deficient calcium flux in immune cells and impaired immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saguna; Hoffmann, FuKun W.; Kumar, Mukesh; Huang, Zhi; Roe, Kelsey; Nguyen-Wu, Elizabeth; Hashimoto, Ann S.; Hoffmann, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Selenoprotein K (Sel K) is a selenium-containing protein for which no function has been identified. We found that Sel K is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transmembrane protein expressed at relatively high levels in immune cells and is regulated by dietary selenium. Sel K−/− mice were generated and found to be similar to WT controls regarding growth and fertility. Immune system development was not affected by Sel K deletion, but specific immune cell defects were found in Sel K−/− mice. Receptor-mediated Ca2+ flux was decreased in T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages from Sel K−/− mice compare to controls. Ca2+-dependent functions including T cell proliferation, T cell and neutrophil migration, and Fcγ-receptor-mediated oxidative burst in macrophages were decreased in cells from Sel K−/− mice compared to controls. West Nile virus (WNV) infections were performed and Sel K−/− mice exhibited decreased viral clearance in the periphery and increased viral titers in brain. Furthermore, WNV-infected Sel K−/− mice demonstrated significantly lower survival (2/23; 8.7%) compared to WT controls (10/26; 38.5%). These results establish Sel K as an ER-membrane protein important for promoting effective Ca2+ flux during immune cell activation and provide insight into molecular mechanisms by which dietary selenium enhances immune responses. PMID:21220695

  19. Gomafu lncRNA knockout mice exhibit mild hyperactivity with enhanced responsiveness to the psychostimulant methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Joanna Y.; Sone, Masamitsu; Nashiki, Chieko; Pan, Qun; Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki; Yanaka, Kaori; Abe, Takaya; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The long noncoding RNA Gomafu/MIAT/Rncr2 is thought to function in retinal cell specification, stem cell differentiation and the control of alternative splicing. To further investigate physiological functions of Gomafu, we created mouse knockout (KO) model that completely lacks the Gomafu gene. The KO mice did not exhibit any developmental deficits. However, behavioral tests revealed that the KO mice are hyperactive. This hyperactive behavior was enhanced when the KO mice were treated with the psychostimulant methamphetamine, which was associated with an increase in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. RNA sequencing analyses identified a small number of genes affected by the deficiency of Gomafu, a subset of which are known to have important neurobiological functions. These observations suggest that Gomafu modifies mouse behavior thorough a mild modulation of gene expression and/or alternative splicing of target genes. PMID:27251103

  20. Gomafu lncRNA knockout mice exhibit mild hyperactivity with enhanced responsiveness to the psychostimulant methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ip, Joanna Y; Sone, Masamitsu; Nashiki, Chieko; Pan, Qun; Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki; Yanaka, Kaori; Abe, Takaya; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The long noncoding RNA Gomafu/MIAT/Rncr2 is thought to function in retinal cell specification, stem cell differentiation and the control of alternative splicing. To further investigate physiological functions of Gomafu, we created mouse knockout (KO) model that completely lacks the Gomafu gene. The KO mice did not exhibit any developmental deficits. However, behavioral tests revealed that the KO mice are hyperactive. This hyperactive behavior was enhanced when the KO mice were treated with the psychostimulant methamphetamine, which was associated with an increase in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. RNA sequencing analyses identified a small number of genes affected by the deficiency of Gomafu, a subset of which are known to have important neurobiological functions. These observations suggest that Gomafu modifies mouse behavior thorough a mild modulation of gene expression and/or alternative splicing of target genes. PMID:27251103

  1. GluN1 hypomorph mice exhibit wide-ranging behavioral alterations

    PubMed Central

    Barkus, C; Dawson, L A; Sharp, T; Bannerman, D M

    2012-01-01

    The psychotomimetic effects of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) antagonists such as ketamine and phencyclidine suggest a role for reduced NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission in schizophrenia. GluN1 ‘hypomorph’ (GluN1hypo) mice exhibit reduced NMDA receptor expression and have been suggested as a mouse model of schizophrenia. However, NMDA receptors are ubiquitous and are implicated in many physiological and pathological processes. The GluN1hypo mice have a global reduction of NMDA receptors and the consequences of such a global manipulation are likely to be wide-ranging. We therefore assessed GluN1hypo mice on a battery of behavioral tests, including tests of naturalistic behaviors, anxiety and cognition. GluN1hypo mice exhibited impairments on all tests of cognition that we employed, as well as reduced engagement in naturalistic behaviors, including nesting and burrowing. Behavioral deficits were present in both spatial and non-spatial domains, and included deficits on both short- and long-term memory tasks. Results from anxiety tests did not give a clear overall picture. This may be the result of confounds such as the profound hyperactivity seen in GluN1hypo mice, although hyperactivity cannot account for all of the results obtained. When viewed against this background of far-reaching behavioral abnormalities, the specificity of any one behavioral deficit is inevitably called into question. Indeed, the present data from GluN1hypo mice are indicative of a global impairment rather than any specific disease. The deficits seen go beyond what one would expect from a mouse model of schizophrenia, thus questioning their utility as a selective model of this disease. PMID:22300668

  2. Catechol-O-methyltransferase-deficient mice exhibit sexually dimorphic changes in catecholamine levels and behavior.

    PubMed

    Gogos, J A; Morgan, M; Luine, V; Santha, M; Ogawa, S; Pfaff, D; Karayiorgou, M

    1998-08-18

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is one of the major mammalian enzymes involved in the metabolic degradation of catecholamines and is considered a candidate for several psychiatric disorders and symptoms, including the psychopathology associated with the 22q11 microdeletion syndrome. By means of homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells, a strain of mice in which the gene encoding the COMT enzyme has been disrupted was produced. The basal concentrations of brain catecholamines were measured in the striatum, frontal cortex, and hypothalamus of adult male and female mutants. Locomotor activity, anxiety-like behaviors, sensorimotor gating, and aggressive behavior also were analyzed. Mutant mice demonstrated sexually dimorphic and region-specific changes of dopamine levels, notably in the frontal cortex. In addition, homozygous COMT-deficient female (but not male) mice displayed impairment in emotional reactivity in the dark/light exploratory model of anxiety. Furthermore, heterozygous COMT-deficient male mice exhibited increased aggressive behavior. Our results provide conclusive evidence for an important sex- and region-specific contribution of COMT in the maintenance of steady-state levels of catecholamines in the brain and suggest a role for COMT in some aspects of emotional and social behavior in mice. PMID:9707588

  3. Mice Deficient in Sfrp1 Exhibit Increased Adiposity, Dysregulated Glucose Metabolism, and Enhanced Macrophage Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Henchey, Elizabeth M.; Wyman, Josephine; Bentley, Brooke; Brown, Melissa; Shimono, Akihiko; Schneider, Sallie S.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the development of obesity and related complications remain unclear. Wnt signaling plays an important role in preadipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. The expression of a Wnt antagonist, secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1), is increased in response to initial weight gain, then levels are reduced under conditions of extreme obesity in both humans and animals. Here we report that loss of Sfrp1 exacerbates weight gain, glucose homeostasis and inflammation in mice in response to diet induced obesity (DIO). Sfrp1-/- mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) exhibited an increase in body mass accompanied by increases in body fat percentage, visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) mass, and adipocyte size. Moreover, Sfrp1 deficiency increases the mRNA levels of key de novo lipid synthesis genes (Fasn, Acaca, Acly, Elovl, Scd1) and the transcription factors that regulate their expression (Lxr-α, Srebp1, Chreb, and Nr1h3) in WAT. Fasting glucose levels are elevated, glucose clearance is impaired, hepatic gluconeogenesis regulators are aberrantly upregulated (G6pc and Pck1), and glucose transporters are repressed (Slc2a2 and Slc2a4) in Sfrp1-/- mice fed a HFD. Additionally, we observed increased steatosis in the livers of Sfrp1-/- mice. When there is an expansion of adipose tissue there is a sustained inflammatory response accompanied by adipokine dysregulation, which leads to chronic subclinical inflammation. Thus, we assessed the inflammatory state of different tissues and revealed that Sfrp1-/- mice fed a HFD exhibited increased macrophage infiltration and expression of pro-inflammatory markers including IL-6, Nmnat, Tgf-β2, and SerpinE1. Our findings demonstrate that the expression of Sfrp1 is a critical factor required for maintaining appropriate cellular signaling in response to the onset of obesity. PMID:24339864

  4. Mice lacking the Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein exhibit exaggerated hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Morecroft, I; Doyle, B; Nilsen, M; Kolch, W; Mair, K; MacLean, MR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Increased pulmonary vascular remodelling, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance characterize the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Activation of the Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 is thought to play an important role in PAH and Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), negatively regulates this pathway. This study investigated whether genetic deletion of RKIP (and hence ERK1/2 up-regulation) resulted in a pulmonary hypertensive phenotype in mice and investigated a role for RKIP in mitogen-regulated proliferative responses in lung fibroblasts. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Pulmonary vascular haemodynamics and remodelling were assessed in mice genetically deficient in RKIP (RKIP−/−) after 2 weeks of either normoxia or hypoxia. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry were used to examine phosphorylation of Raf-1, RKIP and ERK1/2 in mouse pulmonary arteries. In vitro, RKIP inhibition of mitogen signalling was analysed in CCL39 hamster lung fibroblasts. KEY RESULTS RKIP−/− mice demonstrated elevated indices of PAH and ERK1/2 phosphorylation compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Hypoxic RKIP−/− mice exhibited exaggerated PAH indices. Hypoxia increased phosphorylation of Raf-1, RKIP and ERK1/2 in WT mouse pulmonary arteries and Raf-1 phosphorylation in RKIP−/− mouse pulmonary arteries. In CCL39 cells, inhibition of RKIP potentiated mitogen-induced proliferation and phosphorylation of RKIP, and Raf-1. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The lack of RKIP protein resulted in a pulmonary hypertensive phenotype, exaggerated in hypoxia. Hypoxia induced phosphorylation of RKIP signalling elements in WT pulmonary arteries. RKIP inhibition potentiated mitogen-induced proliferation in lung fibroblasts. These results provide evidence for the involvement of RKIP in suppressing the development of hypoxia-induced PAH in mice. PMID:21385176

  5. Microbiota and bile acid profiles in retinoic acid-primed mice that exhibit accelerated liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui-Xin; Hu, Ying; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims All-trans Retinoic acid (RA) regulates hepatic lipid and bile acid homeostasis. Similar to bile acid (BA), RA accelerates partial hepatectomy (PHx)-induced liver regeneration. Because there is a bidirectional regulatory relationship between gut microbiota and BA synthesis, we examined the effect of RA in altering the gut microbial population and BA composition and established their relationship with hepatic biological processes during the active phases of liver regeneration. Methods C57BL/6 mice were treated with RA orally followed by 2/3 PHx. The roles of RA in shifting gut microbiota and BA profiles as well as hepatocyte metabolism and proliferation were studied. Results RA-primed mice exhibited accelerated hepatocyte proliferation revealed by higher numbers of Ki67-positive cells compared to untreated mice. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla dominated the gut microbial community (>85%) in both control and RA-primed mice after PHx. RA reduced the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, which was associated with a lean phenotype. Consistently, RA-primed mice lacked transient lipid accumulation normally found in regenerating livers. In addition, RA altered BA homeostasis and shifted BA profiles by increasing the ratio of hydrophilic to hydrophobic BAs in regenerating livers. Accordingly, metabolic regulators fibroblast growth factor 21, Sirtuin1, and their downstream targets AMPK and ERK1/2 were more robustly activated in RA-primed than unprimed regenerating livers. Conclusions Priming mice with RA resulted in a lean microbiota composition and hydrophilic BA profiles, which were associated with facilitated metabolism and enhanced cell proliferation. PMID:26701854

  6. Choline Kinase β Mutant Mice Exhibit Reduced Phosphocholine, Elevated Osteoclast Activity, and Low Bone Mass*

    PubMed Central

    Kular, Jasreen; Tickner, Jennifer C.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Viola, Helena M.; Abel, Tamara; Lim, Bay Sie; Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Honghui; Cook, Robert; Hool, Livia C.; Zheng, Ming Hao; Xu, Jiake

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of bone homeostasis requires tight coupling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. However, the precise molecular mechanism(s) underlying the differentiation and activities of these specialized cells are still largely unknown. Here, we identify choline kinase β (CHKB), a kinase involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, as a novel regulator of bone homeostasis. Choline kinase β mutant mice (flp/flp) exhibit a systemic low bone mass phenotype. Consistently, osteoclast numbers and activity are elevated in flp/flp mice. Interestingly, osteoclasts derived from flp/flp mice exhibit reduced sensitivity to excessive levels of extracellular calcium, which could account for the increased bone resorption. Conversely, supplementation of cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine in vivo and in vitro, a regimen that bypasses CHKB deficiency, restores osteoclast numbers to physiological levels. Finally, we demonstrate that, in addition to modulating osteoclast formation and function, loss of CHKB corresponds with a reduction in bone formation by osteoblasts. Taken together, these data posit CHKB as a new modulator of bone homeostasis. PMID:25451916

  7. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21-Null Mice Do Not Exhibit an Impaired Response to Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Antonellis, Patrick Joseph; Hayes, Meghan Patricia; Adams, Andrew Charles

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a pleotropic metabolic regulator, expression of which is elevated during fasting. To this end, the precise role played by FGF21 in the biology of fasting has been the subject of several recent studies, which have demonstrated contributions to the regulation of both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. In the present study, we compared wild-type (WT) and FGF21-null (FGF21KO) mice, demonstrating that, despite the significant induction of FGF21 during fasting in the WT animals, our strain of FGF21-null mice exhibits only limited impairments in their adaptation to nutrient deprivation. Specifically, fasted FGF21KO mice display a mild attenuation of gluconeogenic transcriptional induction in the liver accompanied by partially blunted glucose production in response to a pyruvate challenge. Furthermore, FGF21KO mice displayed only minor impairments in lipid metabolism in the fasted state, limited to accumulation of hepatic triglycerides and a reduction in expression of genes associated with fatty acid oxidation. To address the possibility of compensation to germline deletion of FGF21, we further interrogated the role of endogenous FGF21 via acute pharmacological blockade of FGF21 signaling. At the transcriptional level, we show that FGF21 signaling is required for full induction of gluconeogenic and oxidative genes in the liver. However, corroborating our findings in FGF21KO mice, pharmacological blockade of the FGF21 axis did not profoundly disrupt the physiological response to fasting. Taken as a whole, these data demonstrate that, while FGF21 is partially required for appropriate gene expression during the fed to fasted transition, its absence does not significantly impact the downstream physiology of the fasted state. PMID:27445980

  8. Behavioural and neurotoxic long-lasting effects of MDMA plus cocaine in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Daza-Losada, M; Rodríguez-Arias, M; Maldonado, C; Aguilar, M A; Miñarro, J

    2008-08-20

    The poly-drug pattern is the most common among MDMA users, with cocaine being a frequently associated drug. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the behavioural and neurotoxic long-term effects of exposure during adolescence to MDMA alone or plus cocaine. Mice of 28 to 30 days of age received a treatment of two daily injections of an identical dose of MDMA (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg), alone or plus cocaine (25 mg/kg), for 3 days (6 administrations). Three weeks after receiving MDMA, an increase in the time dedicated by the animals to social contacts with their conspecifics was observed, whilst their behaviour in the elevated plus maze showed no differences from that of non-treated mice. After being exposed to MDMA plus cocaine, mice spent more time in social contacts during the interaction test, as well as exhibiting an anxiolytic profile in the elevated plus maze, with an increase in the time and number of entries in the open arms. The activity of mice treated with cocaine alone or plus MDMA remained constant; the decrease observed among the rest of the animals after the second hour was absent in their case. The level of dopamine in the striatum was diminished in mice treated with 20 mg/kg of MDMA, but this neurotransmitter was not affected in animals exposed to the same dose plus cocaine. The present results highlight pronounced alterations in the behaviour of adult mice after exposure to MDMA and cocaine during adolescence, and demonstrate that these long-term effects can occur without the dopaminergic system becoming affected. PMID:18585379

  9. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator knockout mice exhibit aberrant gastrointestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Susan V; Goldfarb, Katherine C; Wild, Yvette K; Kong, Weidong; De Lisle, Robert C; Brodie, Eoin L

    2013-01-01

    The composition of the gastrointestinal microbiome is increasingly recognized as a crucial contributor to immune and metabolic homeostasis-deficiencies in which are characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The murine model (CFTR (-/-) , CF), has, in previous studies, demonstrated characteristic CF gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations including slowed transit and significant upregulation of genes associated with inflammation. To determine if characteristics of the microbiome are associated with these phenotypes we used a phylogenetic microarray to compare small intestine bacterial communities of wild type and congenic CF mice. Loss of functional CFTR is associated with significant decreases in GI bacterial community richness, evenness and diversity and reduced relative abundance of putative protective species such as Acinetobacter lwoffii and a multitude of Lactobacilliales members. CF mice exhibited significant enrichment of Mycobacteria species and Bacteroides fragilis, previously associated with GI infection and immunomodulation. Antibiotic administration to WT and CF animals resulted in convergence of their microbiome composition and significant increases in community diversity in CF mice. These communities were characterized by enrichment of members of the Lactobacillaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae and reduced abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridiaceae. These data suggest that Enterobacteria and Clostridia species, long associated with small intestinal overgrowth and inflammatory bowel disease, may suppress both ileal bacterial diversity and the particular species which maintain motility and immune homeostasis in this niche. Thus, these data provide the first indications that GI bacterial colonization is strongly impacted by the loss of functional CFTR and opens up avenues for alternative therapeutic approaches to improve CF disease management. PMID:23060053

  10. NRMT1 knockout mice exhibit phenotypes associated with impaired DNA repair and premature aging

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Tooley, John G.; Van Hoose, Patrick M.; Wang, Eugenia; Cheng, Alan; Cole, Marsha P.; Tooley, Christine E. Schaner

    2015-01-01

    Though defective genome maintenance and DNA repair have long been know to promote phenotypes of premature aging, the role protein methylation plays in these processes is only now emerging. We have recently identified the first N-terminal methyltransferase, NRMT1, which regulates protein-DNA interactions and is necessary for both accurate mitotic division and nucleotide excision repair. To demonstrate if complete loss of NRMT1 subsequently resulted in developmental or aging phenotypes, we constructed the first NRMT1 knockout (Nrmt1−/−) mouse. The majority of these mice die shortly after birth. However, the ones that survive exhibit decreased body size, female-specific infertility, kyphosis, decreased mitochondrial function, and early-onset liver degeneration; phenotypes characteristic of other mouse models deficient in DNA repair. The livers from Nrmt1−/− mice produce less reactive oxygen species (ROS) than wild type controls, and Nrmt1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts show a decreased capacity for handling oxidative damage. This indicates that decreased mitochondrial function may benefit Nrmt1−/− mice and protect them from excess internal ROS and subsequent DNA damage. These studies position the NRMT1 knockout mouse as a useful new system for studying the effects of genomic instability and defective DNA damage repair on organismal and tissue-specific aging. PMID:25843235

  11. GAL3 receptor KO mice exhibit an anxiety-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Susanne M.; Farzi, Aitak; Locker, Felix; Holub, Barbara S.; Drexel, Meinrad; Reichmann, Florian; Lang, Andreas A.; Mayr, Johannes A.; Vilches, Jorge J.; Navarro, Xavier; Lang, Roland; Sperk, Günther; Holzer, Peter; Kofler, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin (GAL) is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is a modulator of various physiological and pathological processes, and it mediates its effects via three G protein-coupled receptors (GAL1–3 receptors). A role for GAL as a modulator of mood and anxiety was suggested, because GAL and its receptors are highly expressed in limbic brain structures of rodents. In recent years, numerous studies of animal models have suggested an involvement of GAL and GAL1 and GAL2 receptors in anxiety- and depression-related behavior. However, to date, there is sparse literature implicating GAL3 receptors in behavioral functions. Therefore, we studied the behavior of GAL3 receptor-deficient (GAL3-KO) mice to elucidate whether GAL3 receptors are involved in mediating behavior-associated actions of GAL. The GAL3-KO mouse line exhibited normal breeding and physical development. In addition to behavioral tests, phenotypic characterization included analysis of hematology, amino acid profiles, metabolism, and sudomotor function. In contrast to WT littermates, male GAL3-KO mice exhibited an anxiety-like phenotype in the elevated plus maze, open field, and light/dark box tests, and they were less socially affiliated than WT animals to a stranger mouse in a social interaction test. In conclusion, our data suggest involvement of GAL3 receptors in GAL-mediated effects on mood, anxiety, and behavior, making it a possible target for alternative treatment strategies for mood disorders. PMID:24782539

  12. Lymphocytes from P2X7-deficient mice exhibit enhanced P2X7 responses

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Simon R. J.; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Sojka, Dorothy K.; Richardson, Jill C.; Sheardown, Steven A.; Harrison, Stephen M.; Pusey, Charles D.; Tam, Frederick W. K.; Elliott, James I.

    2009-01-01

    The purinergic receptor P2X7 is expressed on immune cells, and its stimulation results in the release of IL-1β from macrophages. Its absence, as evidenced from the analysis of two independent strains of P2X7-deficient mice, results in reduced susceptibility to inflammatory disease, and the molecule is an important, potential therapeutic target in autoimmunity. However, P2X7 has also been detected in several neuronal cell types, although its function and even its presence in these cells are highly contested, with anti-P2X7 antibodies staining brain tissue from both strains of P2X7−/− mice identically to wild-type mice. It has therefore been suggested that neurons express a distinct “P2X7-like” protein that has similar antibody recognition epitopes to P2X7 and some properties of the genuine receptor. In this study, we show that whereas P2X7 activity is absent from macrophages and dendritic cells in P2X7−/− animals, T cells from one gene-deficient strain unexpectedly exhibit higher levels of P2X7 activity than that found in cells from control, unmanipulated C57BL/6 mice. A potential mechanism for this tissue-specific P2X7 expression in P2X7−/− animals is discussed, as is the implication that the immune and indeed neuronal functions of P2X7 may have been underestimated. PMID:19276178

  13. Mice deficient of glutamatergic signaling from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells exhibit abnormal circadian photoentrainment.

    PubMed

    Purrier, Nicole; Engeland, William C; Kofuji, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Several aspects of behavior and physiology, such as sleep and wakefulness, blood pressure, body temperature, and hormone secretion exhibit daily oscillations known as circadian rhythms. These circadian rhythms are orchestrated by an intrinsic biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus which is adjusted to the daily environmental cycles of day and night by the process of photoentrainment. In mammals, the neuronal signal for photoentrainment arises from a small subset of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) that send a direct projection to the SCN. ipRGCs also mediate other non-image-forming (NIF) visual responses such as negative masking of locomotor activity by light, and the pupillary light reflex (PLR) via co-release of neurotransmitters glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) from their synaptic terminals. The relative contribution of each neurotransmitter system for the circadian photoentrainment and other NIF visual responses is still unresolved. We investigated the role of glutamatergic neurotransmission for circadian photoentrainment and NIF behaviors by selective ablation of ipRGC glutamatergic synaptic transmission in mice. Mutant mice displayed delayed re-entrainment to a 6 h phase shift (advance or delay) in the light cycle and incomplete photoentrainment in a symmetrical skeleton photoperiod regimen (1 h light pulses between 11 h dark periods). Circadian rhythmicity in constant darkness also was reduced in some mutant mice. Other NIF responses such as the PLR and negative masking responses to light were also partially attenuated. Overall, these results suggest that glutamate from ipRGCs drives circadian photoentrainment and negative masking responses to light. PMID:25357191

  14. Laminin γ2 knockout mice rescued with the human protein exhibit enamel maturation defects.

    PubMed

    Wazen, Rima M; Viegas-Costa, Luiz C; Fouillen, Aurélien; Moffatt, Pierre; Adair-Kirk, Tracy L; Senior, Robert M; Nanci, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial ameloblasts are separated from the maturing enamel by an atypical basement membrane (BM) that is enriched in laminin 332 (LM-332). This heterotrimeric protein (α3, ß3 and γ2 chains) provides structural integrity to BMs and influences various epithelial cell processes including cell adhesion and differentiation. Mouse models that lack expression of individual LM-332 chains die shortly after birth. The lethal phenotype of laminin γ2 knockout mice can be rescued by human laminin γ2 (LAMC2) expressed using a doxycycline-inducible (Tet-on) cytokeratin 14 promoter-rtTA. These otherwise normal-looking rescued mice exhibit white spot lesions on incisors. We therefore investigated the effect of rescue with human LAMC2 on enamel maturation and structuring of the atypical BM. The maturation stage enamel organ in transgenic mice was severely altered as compared to wild type controls, a structured BM was no longer discernible, dystrophic matrix appeared in the maturing enamel layer, and there was residual enamel matrix late into the maturation stage. Microtomographic scans revealed excessive wear of occlusal surfaces on molars, chipping of enamel on incisor tips, and hypomineralization of the enamel layer. No structural alterations were observed at other epithelial sites, such as skin, palate and tongue. These results indicate that while this humanized mouse model is capable of rescue in various epithelial tissues, it is unable to sustain structuring of a proper BM at the interface between ameloblasts and maturing enamel. This failure may be related to the atypical composition of the BM in the maturation stage and reaffirms that the atypical BM is essential for enamel maturation. PMID:26956061

  15. Alk7 Depleted Mice Exhibit Prolonged Cardiac Repolarization and Are Predisposed to Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Shaozhen; Cao, Hong; Hu, He; Wang, Xin; Tang, Yanhong; Huang, Congxin

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of activin receptor-like kinase (ALK7) in regulating cardiac electrophysiology. Here, we showed that Alk7-/- mice exhibited prolonged QT intervals in telemetry ECG recordings. Furthermore, Langendorff-perfused Alk7-/- hearts had significantly longer action potential duration (APD) and greater incidence of ventricular arrhythmia (AV) induced by burst pacing. Using whole-cell patch clamp, we found that the densities of repolarizing K+ currents Ito and IK1 were profoundly reduced in Alk7-/- ventricular cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, the expression of Kv4.2 (a major subunit of Ito carrying channel) and KCHIP2 (a key accessory subunit of Ito carrying channel), was markedly decreased in Alk7-/- hearts. These findings suggest that endogenous expression of ALK7 is necessary to maintain repolarizing K+ currents in ventricular cardiomyocytes, and finally prevent action potential prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:26882027

  16. DNA fragmentation factor 45 knockout mice exhibit longer memory retention in the novel object recognition task compared to wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Slane McQuade, Jill M; Vorhees, Charles V; Xu, Ming; Zhang, Jianhua

    2002-06-01

    Apoptosis is an important process in the development and function of the central nervous system (CNS). To study the role of DNA fragmentation factor 45 (DFF45/ICAD) in CNS function, we previously generated DFF45 knockout mice. We found that whereas they exhibit apparently normal CNS development, DFF45 knockout mice exhibit an increased number of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and enhanced spatial learning and memory compared to wild-type mice in a Morris water maze test. In this study, we examined the performance of the DFF45 knockout mice in a novel object recognition task to measure short-term nonspatial memory that is believed to depend on the hippocampal formation. Both wild-type and DFF45 knockout mice exhibited novel object recognition 1 h posttraining. However, whereas wild-type mice no longer did so, DFF45 knockout mice were still able to differentiate the novel versus the familiar object 3 h posttraining. The longer memory retention in DFF45 knockout mice did not last up to 24 h as neither wild-type nor DFF45 knockout mice demonstrated novel object recognition 24 h posttraining. These results suggest that a lack of DFF45 facilitates hippocampus-dependent nonspatial memory, as well as hippocampus-dependent spatial memory. PMID:12044605

  17. Predicting Early Sexual Activity with Behavior Problems Exhibited at School Entry and in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Hannah-Lise T.; Bierman, Karen L.; Heinrichs, Brenda; Nix, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Youth who initiate sexual intercourse in early adolescence (age 11-14) experience multiple risks, including concurrent adjustment problems and unsafe sexual practices. The current study tested two models describing the links between childhood precursors, early adolescent risk factors, and adolescent sexual activity: a cumulative model and a…

  18. Nav2 hypomorphic mutant mice are ataxic and exhibit abnormalities in cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Elizabeth M.; Klöckner-Bormann, Mariana; Roesler, Elizabeth C.; Talton, Lynn E.; Moechars, Dieder; Clagett-Dame, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Development of the cerebellum involves a coordinated program of neuronal process outgrowth and migration resulting in a foliated structure that plays a key role in motor function. Neuron navigator 2 (Nav2) is a cytoskeletal-interacting protein that functions in neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation. Herein we show that hypomorphic mutant mice lacking the full-length Nav2 transcript exhibit ataxia and defects in cerebellar development. At embryonic day (E)17.5, the mutant cerebellum is reduced in size and exhibits defects in vermal foliation. Reduction in cell proliferation at early times (E12.5 and E14.5) may contribute to this size reduction. The full-length Nav2 transcript is expressed in the premigratory zone of the external granule layer (EGL). Granule cells in the germinal zone of the EGL appear to proliferate normally, however, due to the reduction in cerebellar circumference there are fewer total BrdU-labeled granule cells in the mutants, and these fail to migrate normally toward the interior of the cerebellum. In Nav2 hypomorphs, fewer granule cells migrate out of cerebellar EGL explants and neurite outgrowth from both explants and isolated external granule cell cultures is reduced. This suggests the formation of parallel axon fibers and neuronal migration is disrupted in Nav2 mutants. This work supports an essential role for full-length Nav2 in cerebellar development, including axonal elongation and migration of the EGL neurons. PMID:21419114

  19. Hematopoietic stem cells from NOD mice exhibit autonomous behavior and a competitive advantage in allogeneic recipients.

    PubMed

    Chilton, Paula M; Rezzoug, Francine; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Fugier-Vivier, Isabelle; Ratajczak, Janina; Kucia, Magda; Huang, Yiming; Tanner, Michael K; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2005-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be cured by transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from disease-resistant donors. Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice have a number of features that distinguish them as bone marrow transplant recipients that must be understood prior to the clinical application of chimerism to induce tolerance. In the present studies, we characterized NOD HSCs, comparing their engraftment characteristics to HSCs from disease-resistant strains. Strikingly, NOD HSCs are significantly enhanced in engraftment potential compared with HSCs from disease-resistant donors. Unlike HSCs from disease-resistant strains, they do not require graft-facilitating cells to engraft in allogeneic recipients. Additionally, they exhibit a competitive advantage when coadministered with increasing numbers of syngeneic HSCs, produce significantly more spleen colony-forming units (CFU-Ss) in vivo in allogeneic recipients, and more granulocyte macrophage-colony-forming units (CFU-GMs) in vitro compared with HSCs from disease-resistant controls. NOD HSCs also exhibit significantly enhanced chemotaxis to a stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) gradient and adhere significantly better on primary stroma. This enhanced engraftment potential maps to the insulin-dependent diabetes locus 9 (Idd9) locus, and as such the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family as well as ski/sno genes may be involved in the mechanism underlying the autonomy of NOD HSCs. These findings may have important implications to understand the evolution of autoimmune disease and impact on potential strategies for cure. PMID:15522953

  20. Nav2 hypomorphic mutant mice are ataxic and exhibit abnormalities in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Elizabeth M; Klöckner-Bormann, Mariana; Roesler, Elizabeth C; Talton, Lynn E; Moechars, Dieder; Clagett-Dame, Margaret

    2011-05-15

    Development of the cerebellum involves a coordinated program of neuronal process outgrowth and migration resulting in a foliated structure that plays a key role in motor function. Neuron navigator 2 (Nav2) is a cytoskeletal-interacting protein that functions in neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation. Herein we show that hypomorphic mutant mice lacking the full-length Nav2 transcript exhibit ataxia and defects in cerebellar development. At embryonic day (E)17.5, the mutant cerebellum is reduced in size and exhibits defects in vermal foliation. Reduction in cell proliferation at early times (E12.5 and E14.5) may contribute to this size reduction. The full-length Nav2 transcript is expressed in the premigratory zone of the external granule layer (EGL). Granule cells in the germinal zone of the EGL appear to proliferate normally, however, due to the reduction in cerebellar circumference there are fewer total BrdU-labeled granule cells in the mutants, and these fail to migrate normally toward the interior of the cerebellum. In Nav2 hypomorphs, fewer granule cells migrate out of cerebellar EGL explants and neurite outgrowth from both explants and isolated external granule cell cultures is reduced. This suggests that the formation of parallel axon fibers and neuronal migration is disrupted in Nav2 mutants. This work supports an essential role for full-length Nav2 in cerebellar development, including axonal elongation and migration of the EGL neurons. PMID:21419114

  1. Endothelial cell-specific aryl hydrocarbon receptor knockout mice exhibit hypotension mediated, in part, by an attenuated angiotensin II responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Agbor, Larry N.; Elased, Khalid M.; Walker, Mary K.

    2011-01-01

    Hypotension in aryl hydrocarbon receptor knockout mice (ahr−/−) is mediated, in part, by a reduced contribution of angiotensin (Ang) II to basal blood pressure (BP). Since AHR is highly expressed in endothelial cells (EC), we hypothesized that EC-specific ahr−/− (ECahr−/−) mice would exhibit a similar phenotype. We generated ECahr−/− mice by crossing AHR floxed mice (ahrfx/fx) to mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by an EC-specific promoter. BP was assessed by radiotelemetry prior to and following an acute injection of Ang II or chronic treatment with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi). ECahr−/− mice were hypotensive (ECahr+/+: 116.1 ± 1.4; ECahr−/−: 107.4 ± 2.0 mmHg, n=11, p<0.05) and exhibited significantly different responses to Ang II and ACEi. While Ang II increased BP in both genotypes, the increase was sustained in ECahr+/+, whereas the increase in ECahr−/− mice steadily declined. Area under the curve analysis showed that Ang II-induced increase in diastolic BP (DBP) over 30 min was significantly lower in ECahr−/− mice (ECahr+/+ 1297 ± 223 mmHg/30 min; ECahr−/−AUC: 504 ± 138 mmHg/30 min, p<0.05). In contrast, while ACEi decreased BP in both genotypes, the subsequent rise in DBP after treatment was significantly delayed in the ECahr−/− mice. ECahr−/− mice also exhibited reduced vascular and adipose Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression, and reduced aortic Ang II-dependent vasoconstriction in the presence of vascular adipose. Taken together these data suggest that hypotension in ECahr−/− mice results from reduced vascular responsiveness to Ang II that is influenced by AT1R expression and adipose. PMID:21684261

  2. The marginating-pulmonary immune compartment in mice exhibits increased NK cytotoxicity and unique cellular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Benish, Marganit; Melamed, Rivka; Rosenne, Ella; Neeman, Elad; Sorski, Liat; Levi, Ben; Shaashua, Lee; Matzner, Pini; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2014-01-01

    To test whether marginating-pulmonary (MP) leukocytes in mice have a unique potential to identify and destroy aberrant circulating cells, we compared MP to circulating leukocytes with respect to natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity, proinflammatory characteristics, molecular determinants of activation, and response to IL-12 immunostimulation. Cytotoxicity was assessed employing the YAC-1, B16F10, and 3LL target lines. C57BL/6 mice were injected with either saline or murine IL-12 (0.1 or 0.5 µg/mouse), either once or three times 48-h apart. Twenty-four hours after last injection, cardiac blood was withdrawn and MP leukocytes were collected by forced lung perfusion. NK cytotoxicity, cellular composition, and surface molecular markers were studied. MP leukocytes exhibited greater NK cytotoxicity than circulating leukocytes against the syngeneic B16F10 and 3LL tumor lines, but not against the allogeneic YAC-1 line. NKG2D and IL-12 receptor expression predicted NK cytotoxicity in circulating leukocytes, but not in MP leukocytes. IFNγ-receptor, IL-12-receptor, CD69, CD11a, and CD11b showed different patterns of expression in the two leukocyte populations, suggesting pro-inflammatory characteristics of the MP compartment. IL-12 stimulation caused differential effects on these markers and also elevated cytotoxicity in both compartments, but in different effector: target ratio-dependent patterns. MP leukocytes may play a critical role in eliminating aberrant circulating cells due to their enhanced NK cytotoxicity and given their strategic location in the lungs vasculature, which forces physical interactions with all circulating aberrant cells. MP-NK cells are unique in their cytotoxic mechanisms against syngeneic targets and in their activation profile and response to immunostimulatory agents. PMID:24132552

  3. Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout mice exhibit placental P4 overproduction and delayed parturition.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Mie; Ono, Ryuichi; Irie, Masahito; Nakamura, Kenji; Furuse, Tamio; Hino, Toshiaki; Oda, Kanako; Kashimura, Misho; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2014-12-01

    Sirh7/Ldoc1 [sushi-ichi retrotransposon homolog 7/leucine zipper, downregulated in cancer 1, also called mammalian retrotransposon-derived 7 (Mart7)] is one of the newly acquired genes from LTR retrotransposons in eutherian mammals. Interestingly, Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal placental cell differentiation/maturation, leading to an overproduction of placental progesterone (P4) and placental lactogen 1 (PL1) from trophoblast giant cells (TGCs). The placenta is an organ that is essential for mammalian viviparity and plays a major endocrinological role during pregnancy in addition to providing nutrients and oxygen to the fetus. P4 is an essential hormone in the preparation and maintenance of pregnancy and the determination of the timing of parturition in mammals; however, the biological significance of placental P4 in rodents is not properly recognized. Here, we demonstrate that mouse placentas do produce P4 in mid-gestation, coincident with a temporal reduction in ovarian P4, suggesting that it plays a role in the protection of the conceptuses specifically in this period. Pregnant Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout females also displayed delayed parturition associated with a low pup weaning rate. All these results suggest that Sirh7/Ldoc1 has undergone positive selection during eutherian evolution as a eutherian-specific acquired gene because it impacts reproductive fitness via the regulation of placental endocrine function. PMID:25468940

  4. Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout mice exhibit placental P4 overproduction and delayed parturition

    PubMed Central

    Naruse, Mie; Ono, Ryuichi; Irie, Masahito; Nakamura, Kenji; Furuse, Tamio; Hino, Toshiaki; Oda, Kanako; Kashimura, Misho; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Sirh7/Ldoc1 [sushi-ichi retrotransposon homolog 7/leucine zipper, downregulated in cancer 1, also called mammalian retrotransposon-derived 7 (Mart7)] is one of the newly acquired genes from LTR retrotransposons in eutherian mammals. Interestingly, Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal placental cell differentiation/maturation, leading to an overproduction of placental progesterone (P4) and placental lactogen 1 (PL1) from trophoblast giant cells (TGCs). The placenta is an organ that is essential for mammalian viviparity and plays a major endocrinological role during pregnancy in addition to providing nutrients and oxygen to the fetus. P4 is an essential hormone in the preparation and maintenance of pregnancy and the determination of the timing of parturition in mammals; however, the biological significance of placental P4 in rodents is not properly recognized. Here, we demonstrate that mouse placentas do produce P4 in mid-gestation, coincident with a temporal reduction in ovarian P4, suggesting that it plays a role in the protection of the conceptuses specifically in this period. Pregnant Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout females also displayed delayed parturition associated with a low pup weaning rate. All these results suggest that Sirh7/Ldoc1 has undergone positive selection during eutherian evolution as a eutherian-specific acquired gene because it impacts reproductive fitness via the regulation of placental endocrine function. PMID:25468940

  5. Mice expressing a mutant form of fibrinogen that cannot support fibrin formation exhibit compromised antimicrobial host defense

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Joni M.; Gorkun, Oleg V.; Raghu, Harini; Thornton, Sherry; Mullins, Eric S.; Palumbo, Joseph S.; Ko, Ya-Ping; Höök, Magnus; David, Tovo; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Degen, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin(ogen) is central to hemostasis and thrombosis and also contributes to multiple physiologic and pathologic processes beyond coagulation. However, the precise contribution of soluble fibrinogen vs insoluble fibrin matrices to vascular integrity, tissue repair, inflammation, and disease has been undefined and unapproachable. To establish the means to distinguish fibrinogen- and fibrin-dependent processes in vivo, FibAEK mice were generated that carry normal levels of circulating fibrinogen but lack the capacity for fibrin polymer formation due to a germ-line mutation in the Aα chain thrombin cleavage site. Homozygous FibAEK mice developed to term and exhibited postnatal survival superior to that of fibrinogen-deficient mice. Unlike fibrinogen-deficient mice, platelet-rich plasma from FibAEK mice supported normal platelet aggregation in vitro, highlighting that fibrinogenAEK retains the functional capacity to support interactions with platelets. Thrombin failed to release fibrinopeptide-A from fibrinogenAEK and failed to induce polymer formation with FibAEK plasma or purified fibrinogenAEK in 37°C mixtures regardless of incubation time. FibAEK mice displayed both an absence of fibrin polymer formation following liver injury, as assessed by electron microscopy, and a failure to generate stable occlusive thrombi following FeCl3 injury of carotid arteries. FibAEK mice exhibited a profound impediment in Staphylococcus aureus clearance following intraperitoneal infection similar to fibrinogen-deficient mice, yet FibAEK mice displayed a significant infection dose-dependent survival advantage over fibrinogen-deficient mice following peritonitis challenge. Collectively, these findings establish for the first time that fibrin polymer is the molecular form critical for antimicrobial mechanisms while simultaneously highlighting biologically meaningful contributions and functions of the soluble molecule. PMID:26228483

  6. Mice expressing a mutant form of fibrinogen that cannot support fibrin formation exhibit compromised antimicrobial host defense.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Joni M; Gorkun, Oleg V; Raghu, Harini; Thornton, Sherry; Mullins, Eric S; Palumbo, Joseph S; Ko, Ya-Ping; Höök, Magnus; David, Tovo; Coughlin, Shaun R; Degen, Jay L; Flick, Matthew J

    2015-10-22

    Fibrin(ogen) is central to hemostasis and thrombosis and also contributes to multiple physiologic and pathologic processes beyond coagulation. However, the precise contribution of soluble fibrinogen vs insoluble fibrin matrices to vascular integrity, tissue repair, inflammation, and disease has been undefined and unapproachable. To establish the means to distinguish fibrinogen- and fibrin-dependent processes in vivo, Fib(AEK) mice were generated that carry normal levels of circulating fibrinogen but lack the capacity for fibrin polymer formation due to a germ-line mutation in the Aα chain thrombin cleavage site. Homozygous Fib(AEK) mice developed to term and exhibited postnatal survival superior to that of fibrinogen-deficient mice. Unlike fibrinogen-deficient mice, platelet-rich plasma from Fib(AEK) mice supported normal platelet aggregation in vitro, highlighting that fibrinogen(AEK) retains the functional capacity to support interactions with platelets. Thrombin failed to release fibrinopeptide-A from fibrinogen(AEK) and failed to induce polymer formation with Fib(AEK) plasma or purified fibrinogen(AEK) in 37°C mixtures regardless of incubation time. Fib(AEK) mice displayed both an absence of fibrin polymer formation following liver injury, as assessed by electron microscopy, and a failure to generate stable occlusive thrombi following FeCl3 injury of carotid arteries. Fib(AEK) mice exhibited a profound impediment in Staphylococcus aureus clearance following intraperitoneal infection similar to fibrinogen-deficient mice, yet Fib(AEK) mice displayed a significant infection dose-dependent survival advantage over fibrinogen-deficient mice following peritonitis challenge. Collectively, these findings establish for the first time that fibrin polymer is the molecular form critical for antimicrobial mechanisms while simultaneously highlighting biologically meaningful contributions and functions of the soluble molecule. PMID:26228483

  7. β3GnT2 null mice exhibit defective accessory olfactory bulb innervation.

    PubMed

    Henion, Timothy R; Madany, Pasil A; Faden, Ashley A; Schwarting, Gerald A

    2013-01-01

    Vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) extend axons to the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) where they form synaptic connections that relay pheromone signals to the brain. The projections of apical and basal VSNs segregate in the AOB into anterior (aAOB) and posterior (pAOB) compartments. Although some aspects of this organization exhibit fundamental similarities with the main olfactory system, the mechanisms that regulate mammalian vomeronasal targeting are not as well understood. In the olfactory epithelium (OE), the glycosyltransferase β3GnT2 maintains expression of axon guidance cues required for proper glomerular positioning and neuronal survival. We show here that β3GnT2 also regulates guidance and adhesion molecule expression in the vomeronasal system in ways that are partially distinct from the OE. In wildtype mice, ephrinA5(+) axons project to stereotypic subdomains in both the aAOB and pAOB compartments. This pattern is dramatically altered in β3GnT2(-/-) mice, where ephrinA5 is upregulated exclusively on aAOB axons. Despite this, apical and basal VSN projections remain strictly segregated in the null AOB, although some V2r1b axons that normally project to the pAOB inappropriately innervate the anterior compartment. These fibers appear to arise from ectopic expression of V2r1b receptors in a subset of apical VSNs. The homotypic adhesion molecules Kirrel2 and OCAM that facilitate axon segregation and glomerular compartmentalization in the main olfactory bulb are ablated in the β3GnT2(-/-) aAOB. This loss is accompanied by a two-fold increase in the total number of V2r1b glomeruli and a failure to form morphologically distinct glomeruli in the anterior compartment. These results identify a novel function for β3GnT2 glycosylation in maintaining expression of layer-specific vomeronasal receptors, as well as adhesion molecules required for proper AOB glomerular formation. PMID:23006775

  8. Differences between adolescents exhibiting moderate binging and non-binging eating behaviors.

    PubMed

    Cuzzocrea, Francesca; Costa, Sebastiano; Larcan, Rosalba; Toffle, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Much research has been conducted to study the association between personality and eating disorders using clinical samples. However, less research has been done on personality variables in non-clinical cases of adolescents prone to binge eating. The purpose of this study is to compare a group of 53 adolescents without binge eating with a group of 28 adolescents with moderate binging behaviors and to investigate the relationship between personality traits and eating behaviors. All participants completed BES, STAY, EPQ-R, IVE and EDI-2. The results demonstrated that the group with moderate binging presented higher scores in state and trait anxiety, psychoticism, neuroticism, and impulsivity than the adolescents without binge eating. The second hypothesis of this research was to analyze the relationship between personality characteristics and eating behaviors. In the group of adolescents without binge eating both neuroticism and psychoticism correlated with ED symptomatology. Similarly extraversion, impulsivity and venturesomeness correlated with ED symptomatology. In the group of adolescents with moderate binge eating, there was an association of trait anxiety, extraversion, venturesomeness and empathy with ED symptomatology in university samples. The results of this study represent a new stimulus to thoroughly investigate those aspects of personality that may be predictive of ED symptomatology and to develop preventative strategies. It is our opinion that it is necessary to focus attention not only on clinical or non-clinical samples, but also on adolescents who could be considered at risk. PMID:26543728

  9. Effect of intermittent exposure to ethanol and MDMA during adolescence on learning and memory in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Heavy binge drinking is increasingly frequent among adolescents, and consumption of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is often combined with ethanol (EtOH). The long-lasting effects of intermittent exposure to EtOH and MDMA during adolescence on learning and memory were evaluated in adult mice using the Hebb-Williams maze. Methods Adolescent OF1 mice were exposed to EtOH (1.25 g/kg) on two consecutive days at 48-h intervals over a 14-day period (from PD 29 to 42). MDMA (10 or 20 mg/kg) was injected twice daily at 4-h intervals over two consecutive days, and this schedule was repeated six days later (PD 33, 34, 41 and 42), resulting in a total of eight injections. Animals were initiated in the Hebb-Williams maze on PND 64. The concentration of brain monoamines in the striatum and hippocampus was then measured. Results At the doses employed, both EtOH and MDMA, administered alone or together, impaired learning in the Hebb-Williams maze, as treated animals required more time to reach the goal than their saline-treated counterparts. The groups treated during adolescence with EtOH, alone or plus MDMA, also presented longer latency scores and needed more trials to reach the acquisition criterion score. MDMA induced a decrease in striatal DA concentration, an effect that was augmented by the co-administration of EtOH. All the treatment groups displayed an imbalance in the interaction DA/serotonin. Conclusions The present findings indicate that the developing brain is highly vulnerable to the damaging effects of EtOH and/or MDMA, since mice receiving these drugs in a binge pattern during adolescence exhibit impaired learning and memory in adulthood. PMID:22716128

  10. Mice that lack the C-terminal region of Reelin exhibit behavioral abnormalities related to neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Kaori; Shoji, Hirotaka; Kohno, Takao; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Hattori, Mitsuharu

    2016-01-01

    The secreted glycoprotein Reelin is believed to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of several neuropsychiatric disorders. The highly basic C-terminal region (CTR) of Reelin is necessary for efficient activation of its downstream signaling, and the brain structure of knock-in mice that lack the CTR (ΔC-KI mice) is impaired. Here, we performed a comprehensive behavioral test battery on ΔC-KI mice, in order to evaluate the effects of partial loss-of-function of Reelin on brain functions. The ΔC-KI mice were hyperactive and exhibited reduced anxiety-like and social behaviors. The working memory in ΔC-KI mice was impaired in a T-maze test. There was little difference in spatial reference memory, depression-like behavior, prepulse inhibition, or fear memory between ΔC-KI and wild-type mice. These results suggest that CTR-dependent Reelin functions are required for some specific normal brain functions and that ΔC-KI mice recapitulate some aspects of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism spectrum disorder. PMID:27346785

  11. Mice that lack the C-terminal region of Reelin exhibit behavioral abnormalities related to neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kaori; Shoji, Hirotaka; Kohno, Takao; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Hattori, Mitsuharu

    2016-01-01

    The secreted glycoprotein Reelin is believed to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of several neuropsychiatric disorders. The highly basic C-terminal region (CTR) of Reelin is necessary for efficient activation of its downstream signaling, and the brain structure of knock-in mice that lack the CTR (ΔC-KI mice) is impaired. Here, we performed a comprehensive behavioral test battery on ΔC-KI mice, in order to evaluate the effects of partial loss-of-function of Reelin on brain functions. The ΔC-KI mice were hyperactive and exhibited reduced anxiety-like and social behaviors. The working memory in ΔC-KI mice was impaired in a T-maze test. There was little difference in spatial reference memory, depression-like behavior, prepulse inhibition, or fear memory between ΔC-KI and wild-type mice. These results suggest that CTR-dependent Reelin functions are required for some specific normal brain functions and that ΔC-KI mice recapitulate some aspects of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism spectrum disorder. PMID:27346785

  12. Pituitary tumor transforming gene-null male mice exhibit impaired pancreatic beta cell proliferation and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiyong; Moro, Enrico; Kovacs, Kalman; Yu, Run; Melmed, Shlomo

    2003-01-01

    The mammalian securin, pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG), regulates sister chromatid separation during mitosis. Mice or cell lines deficient in PTTG expression, however, are surprisingly viable. Here we show that PTTG disruption in mice (PTTG−/−) severely impairs glucose homeostasis leading to diabetes during late adulthood, especially in males associated with nonautoimmune insulinopenia and reversed alpha/beta cell ratio. Islet beta cell mass in PTTG−/− mice was already diminished before development of frank diabetes and only increased minimally during growth. BrdUrd incorporation of islet cells in PTTG-null mice was ≈65% lower (P < 0.005) than in the WT pancreas, whereas apoptosis rates were similar. PTTG−/− beta cells had pleiotropic nuclei, suggesting defects in cell division. The results indicated that securin is indispensable for normal pancreatic beta cell proliferation. PMID:12626748

  13. Duck Tembusu Virus Exhibits Pathogenicity to Kunming Mice by Intracerebral Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Ti, Jinfeng; Zhang, Min; Li, Zhijie; Li, Xiuli; Diao, Youxiang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Kunming mice were used as the animal models to study the pathogenicity of TMUV. Three groups of 3-week-old female Kunming mice (n = 15 mice per group) were infected with the SDSG strain of TMUV in 50 μL allantoic fluid (104.8 ELD50/0.2 ml) respectively by the intracerebral (i.c.), subcutaneous (s.c.) and intranasal (i.n.) routes. The control group (n = 15 mice) was inoculated with 50 μL sterile phosphate-buffered saline. Clinical signs, gross, and microscopic lesions, viral loads in different tissues, and serum antibody titers were examined and recorded. Kunming mice infected intracerebrally showed typical clinical symptoms, including severe hindlimb paralysis, weight loss and death. Only dead mice presented severe intestinal mucosal edema. No gross lesions were observed in mice sequentially euthanized. However, microscopic lesions in the brain, spleen, liver, kidney, and lung were very typical including varying degrees of viral encephalitis, lymphocytes depletion, liver cell necrosis and nephritis, etc. Viral loads in different tissues were detected by the SYBR Green I real-time PCR assay. Viral loads in the brain, liver, and spleen were first detected and maintained a longer time, which indicated that these organs may be the target organs of TMUV. The level of viral loads was consistent with the severity of clinical signs and microscopic lesions in different tissues. The neutralizing antibody began to seroconvert at 8 dpi. Clinical signs, microscopic lesions, viral loads and serum neutralizing antibodies weren’t observed in other groups. In summary, TMUV can cause systemic infections and death in Kunming mice by i.c., which provides some experimental basis for further study of the significance of TMUV in public health. PMID:26925054

  14. Duck Tembusu Virus Exhibits Pathogenicity to Kunming Mice by Intracerebral Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Ti, Jinfeng; Zhang, Min; Li, Zhijie; Li, Xiuli; Diao, Youxiang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Kunming mice were used as the animal models to study the pathogenicity of TMUV. Three groups of 3-week-old female Kunming mice (n = 15 mice per group) were infected with the SDSG strain of TMUV in 50 μL allantoic fluid (10(4.8) ELD50/0.2 ml) respectively by the intracerebral (i.c.), subcutaneous (s.c.) and intranasal (i.n.) routes. The control group (n = 15 mice) was inoculated with 50 μL sterile phosphate-buffered saline. Clinical signs, gross, and microscopic lesions, viral loads in different tissues, and serum antibody titers were examined and recorded. Kunming mice infected intracerebrally showed typical clinical symptoms, including severe hindlimb paralysis, weight loss and death. Only dead mice presented severe intestinal mucosal edema. No gross lesions were observed in mice sequentially euthanized. However, microscopic lesions in the brain, spleen, liver, kidney, and lung were very typical including varying degrees of viral encephalitis, lymphocytes depletion, liver cell necrosis and nephritis, etc. Viral loads in different tissues were detected by the SYBR Green I real-time PCR assay. Viral loads in the brain, liver, and spleen were first detected and maintained a longer time, which indicated that these organs may be the target organs of TMUV. The level of viral loads was consistent with the severity of clinical signs and microscopic lesions in different tissues. The neutralizing antibody began to seroconvert at 8 dpi. Clinical signs, microscopic lesions, viral loads and serum neutralizing antibodies weren't observed in other groups. In summary, TMUV can cause systemic infections and death in Kunming mice by i.c., which provides some experimental basis for further study of the significance of TMUV in public health. PMID:26925054

  15. Fgf8-Deficient Mice Compensate for Reduced GnRH Neuronal Population and Exhibit Normal Testicular Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Johnson, Joshua I.; Tsai, Pei-San

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is critical for the onset and maintenance of reproduction in vertebrates. The development of GnRH neurons is highly dependent on fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling. Mice with a hypomorphic Fgf8 allele (Fgf8 Het) exhibited a ~50% reduction in GnRH neuron number at birth. Female Fgf8 Het mice were fertile but showed significantly delayed puberty. However, it was unclear if these mice suffered additional loss of GnRH neurons after birth, and if male Fgf8 Het mice had normal pubertal transition and testicular function. In this study, we examined postnatal GnRH neuron number and hypothalamic GnRH content in Fgf8 Het mice from birth to 120 days of age. Further, we examined seminal vesicle and testicular growth, testicular histology, and circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) around and after pubertal transition. Our results showed that GnRH neuron numbers were significantly and consistently reduced in Fgf8 Het mice of both sexes in all ages examined, suggesting these animals were born with an inherently defective GnRH system, and no further postnatal loss of GnRH neurons had occurred. Despite an innately compromised GnRH system, male and female Fgf8 mice exhibited normal levels of immunoassayable hypothalamic GnRH peptide at all ages examined except on 60 days of age, suggesting increased GnRH synthesis or reduced turnover as a compensatory mechanism. Fgf8 Het males also had normal seminal vesicle and testicular mass/body mass ratios, testicular histology, and circulating LH. Overall, our data speak to the extraordinary ability of a GnRH system permanently compromised by developmental defect to overcome pre-existing deficiencies to ensure pubertal progression and reproduction. PMID:26441841

  16. Low-Income, African American Adolescent Mothers and Their Toddlers Exhibit Similar Dietary Variety Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papas, Mia A.; Hurley, Kristen M.; Quigg, Anna M.; Oberlander, Sarah E.; Black, Maureen M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between maternal and toddler dietary variety. Design: Longitudinal; maternal and toddler dietary data were collected at 13 months; anthropometry was collected at 13 and 24 months. Setting: Data were collected in homes. Participants: 109 primiparous, low-income, African American adolescent mothers and…

  17. Romk1 Knockout Mice Do Not Produce Bartter Phenotype but Exhibit Impaired K Excretion.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ke; Yan, Qingshang; Lu, Ming; Wan, Laxiang; Hu, Haiyan; Guo, Junhua; Boulpaep, Emile; Wang, WenHui; Giebisch, Gerhard; Hebert, Steven C; Wang, Tong

    2016-03-01

    Romk knock-out mice show a similar phenotype to Bartter syndrome of salt wasting and dehydration due to reduced Na-K-2Cl-cotransporter activity. At least three ROMK isoforms have been identified in the kidney; however, unique functions of any of the isoforms in nephron segments are still poorly understood. We have generated a mouse deficient only in Romk1 by selective deletion of the Romk1-specific first exon using an ES cell Cre-LoxP strategy and examined the renal phenotypes, ion transporter expression, ROMK channel activity, and localization under normal and high K intake. Unlike Romk(-/-) mice, there was no Bartter phenotype with reduced NKCC2 activity and increased NCC expression in Romk1(-/-) mice. The small conductance K channel (SK) activity showed no difference of channel properties or gating in the collecting tubule between Romk1(+/+) and Romk1(-/-) mice. High K intake increased SK channel number per patch and increased the ROMK channel intensity in the apical membrane of the collecting tubule in Romk1(+/+), but such regulation by high K intake was diminished with significant hyperkalemia in Romk1(-/-) mice. We conclude that 1) animal knockouts of ROMK1 do not produce Bartter phenotype. 2) There is no functional linking of ROMK1 and NKCC2 in the TAL. 3) ROMK1 is critical in response to high K intake-stimulated K(+) secretion in the collecting tubule. PMID:26728465

  18. Mice deficient for prion protein exhibit normal neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Lledo, P M; Tremblay, P; DeArmond, S J; Prusiner, S B; Nicoll, R A

    1996-01-01

    We recorded in the CA1 region from hippocampal slices of prion protein (PrP) gene knockout mice to investigate whether the loss of the normal form of prion protein (PrPC) affects neuronal excitability as well as synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. No deficit in synaptic inhibition was found using field potential recordings because (i) responses induced by stimulation in stratum radiatum consisted of a single population spike in PrP gene knockout mice similar to that recorded from control mice and (ii) the plot of field excitatory postsynaptic potential slope versus the population spike amplitude showed no difference between the two groups of mice. Intracellular recordings also failed to detect any difference in cell excitability and the reversal potential for inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. Analysis of the kinetics of inhibitory postsynaptic current revealed no modification. Finally, we examined whether synaptic plasticity was altered and found no difference in long-term potentiation between control and PrP gene knockout mice. On the basis of our findings, we propose that the loss of the normal form of prion protein does not alter the physiology of the CA1 region of the hippocampus. PMID:8637886

  19. Mice heterozygous for cathepsin D deficiency exhibit mania-related behavior and stress-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Lu, Yi; Han, Yong; Li, Xia; Lou, Huifang; Zhu, Liya; Zhen, Xuechu; Duan, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in cathepsin D (CTSD), an aspartic protease in the endosomal-lysosomal system, underlie congenital neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (cNCL, also known as CLN10), a devastating neurodegenerative disease. CLN10 patients die within the first few days of life, and in the few patients who live into adulthood psychopathological symptoms have not been reported. Extensive neuropathology and altered neurotransmission have been reported in CTSD-deficient mice; however signs of neuropsychiatric behavior in these mice are not well characterized due to the severe movement disorder and premature death of the animal. In the present study, we show that heterozygous CTSD-deficient (CTSD HET) mice display an overall behavioral profile that is similar to human mania, including hyperlocomotion, d-amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, sleep-disturbance, and reduced anxiety-like behavior. However, under stressful conditions CTSD HET mice manifest depressive-like behavior, including anhedonia, behavioral despair, and enhanced learned helplessness. Chronic administration of lithium chloride or valproic acid, two clinically effective mood stabilizers, reverses the majority of these behavioral abnormalities. In addition, CTSD HET mice display stress-induced hypersecretion of corticosterone. These findings suggest an important role for CTSD in the regulation of mood stabilization. PMID:26092248

  20. Mice Deficient for Prion Protein Exhibit Normal Neuronal Excitability and Synaptic Transmission in the Hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Tremblay, Patrick; Dearmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Nicoll, Roger A.

    1996-03-01

    We recorded in the CA1 region from hippocampal slices of prion protein (PrP) gene knockout mice to investigate whether the loss of the normal form of prion protein (PrPC) affects neuronal excitability as well as synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. No deficit in synaptic inhibition was found using field potential recordings because (i) responses induced by stimulation in stratum radiatum consisted of a single population spike in PrP gene knockout mice similar to that recorded from control mice and (ii) the plot of field excitatory postsynaptic potential slope versus the population spike amplitude showed no difference between the two groups of mice. Intracellular recordings also failed to detect any difference in cell excitability and the reversal potential for inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. Analysis of the kinetics of inhibitory postsynaptic current revealed no modification. Finally, we examined whether synaptic plasticity was altered and found no difference in long-term potentiation between control and PrP gene knockout mice. On the basis of our findings, we propose that the loss of the normal form of prion protein does not alter the physiology of the CA1 region of the hippocampus.

  1. Male Men1 heterozygous mice exhibit fasting hyperglycemia in the early stage of MEN1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhongxiuzi; Zhang, Li; Xie, Wenting; Wang, Siqi; Bao, Xiaorui; Guo, Yuli; Zhang, Houjian; Hu, Qingzhong; Chen, Yi; Wang, Zeen; Xue, Maoqiang; Jin, Guanghui

    2016-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant inherited syndrome characterized by multiple tumors in the parathyroid glands, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary. Recent clinical studies have revealed a strong association between MEN1 syndrome and the risk of developing diabetes mellitus; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, heterozygous Men1 knockout (Men1(+/-)) mice were used as MEN1 models to investigate MEN1-associated glucose metabolic phenotypes and mechanisms. Heterozygous deficiency of Men1 in 12-month-old male mice induced fasting hyperglycemia, along with increased serum insulin levels. However, male Men1(+/-) mice did not show insulin resistance, as evidenced by Akt activation in hepatic tissues and an insulin tolerance test. Increased glucose levels following pyruvate challenge and expression of key gluconeogenic genes suggested increased hepatic glucose output in the male Men1(+/-) mice. This effect could be partly due to higher basal serum glucagon levels, which resulted from pancreatic islet cell proliferation induced by heterozygous loss of Men1 Taken together, our results indicate that fasted male Men1(+/-) mice, in the early stage of development of MEN1, display glucose metabolic disorders. These disorders are caused not by direct induction of insulin resistance, but via increased glucagon secretion and the consequent stimulation of hepatic glucose production. PMID:27432891

  2. Early adolescent nicotine exposure affects later-life cocaine reward in mice.

    PubMed

    Alajaji, Mai; Lazenka, Matthew F; Kota, Dena; Wise, Laura E; Younis, Rabha M; Carroll, F Ivy; Levine, Amir; Selley, Dana E; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Damaj, M Imad

    2016-06-01

    Adolescence represents a unique developmental period associated with increased risk-taking behavior and experimentation with drugs of abuse, in particular nicotine. We hypothesized that exposure to nicotine during early adolescence might increase the risk for drug reward in adulthood. To test this hypothesis, male ICR mice were treated with a subchronic regimen of nicotine or saline during adolescence, and their preference for cocaine, morphine and amphetamine was examined using the conditioned place preference (CPP) test in adulthood. Long-term behavioral changes induced by nicotine suggested a possible role of altered gene transcription. Thus, immunoblot for ΔFosB, a member of the Fos family of transcription factors, was conducted in the nucleus accumbens of these mice. Mice treated with nicotine during early but not late adolescence showed an increase in CPP for cocaine, morphine and amphetamine later in adulthood. This effect was not seen in mice pretreated with a subchronic regimen of nicotine as adults, suggesting that exposure to nicotine specifically during early adolescence increases the rewarding effects of other drugs in adulthood. However, adolescent nicotine exposure did not alter highly palatable food conditioning in mice. The enhancement of cocaine CPP by nicotine was strain-dependent and was blocked by pretreatment with nicotinic antagonists. In addition, nicotine exposure during early adolescence induced ΔFosB expression to a greater extent than identical nicotine exposure in adulthood, and enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization later in adulthood. These results suggest that nicotine exposure during early adolescence increases drug-induced reward in adulthood through mechanisms that may involve the induction of ΔFosB. PMID:26808314

  3. Targeted Mybpc3 Knock-Out Mice with Cardiac Hypertrophy Exhibit Structural Mitral Valve Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Daniel P.; Neamatalla, Hany; Norris, Russell A.; Levine, Robert A.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Vignier, Nicolas; Kang, Kevin H.; Nguyen, Quangtung; Bruneval, Patrick; Perier, Marie-Cécile; Messas, Emmanuel; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; de Vlaming, Annemarieke; Markwald, Roger; Carrier, Lucie; Hagège, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    MYBPC3 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is frequently associated with mitral valve (MV) pathology. We reasoned that increased MV size is caused by localized growth factors with paracrine effects. We used high-resolution echocardiography to compare Mybpc3-null, heterozygous, and wild-type mice (n = 84, aged 3–6 months) and micro-CT for MV volume (n = 6, age 6 months). Mybpc3-null mice showed left ventricular hypertrophy, dilation, and systolic dysfunction compared to heterozygous and wild-type mice, but no systolic anterior motion of the MV or left ventricular outflow obstruction. Compared to wild-type mice, echocardiographic anterior leaflet length (adjusted for left ventricular size) was greatest in Mybpc3-null mice (1.92 ± 0.08 vs. 1.72 ± 0.08 mm, p < 0.001), as was combined leaflet thickness (0.23 ± 0.04 vs. 0.15 ± 0.02 mm, p < 0.001). Micro-CT analyses of Mybpc3-null mice demonstrated increased MV volume (0.47 ± 0.06 vs. 0.15 ± 0.06 mm3, p = 0.018) and thickness (0.35 ± 0.04 vs. 0.12 ± 0.04 mm, p = 0.002), coincident with increased markers of TGFβ activity compared to heterozygous and wild-type littermates. Similarly, excised MV from a patient with MYBPC3 mutation showed increased TGFβ activity. We conclude that MYBPC3 deficiency causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with increased MV leaflet length and thickness despite the absence of left ventricular outflow-tract obstruction, in parallel with increased TGFβ activity. MV changes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be due to paracrine effects, which represent targets for therapeutic studies. PMID:26819945

  4. Skeletal muscle-specific HMG-CoA reductase knockout mice exhibit rhabdomyolysis: A model for statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Miyahara, Shoko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Ishii, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sone, Hirohito; Ohashi, Ken; Ishibashi, Shun; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2015-10-23

    HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid (MVA); this is the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that synthesizes cholesterol. Statins, HMGCR inhibitors, are widely used as cholesterol-reducing drugs. However, statin-induced myopathy is the most adverse side effect of statins. To eludicate the mechanisms underlying statin the myotoxicity and HMGCR function in the skeletal muscle, we developed the skeletal muscle-specific HMGCR knockout mice. Knockout mice exhibited postnatal myopathy with elevated serum creatine kinase levels and necrosis. Myopathy in knockout mice was completely rescued by the oral administration of MVA. These results suggest that skeletal muscle toxicity caused by statins is dependent on the deficiencies of HMGCR enzyme activity and downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway in skeletal muscles rather than the liver or other organs. PMID:26381177

  5. Mice Lacking the ITIM-Containing Receptor G6b-B Exhibit Macrothrombocytopenia and Aberrant Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Jun; Bem, Danai; Finney, Brenda; Heising, Silke; Gissen, Paul; White, James G.; Berndt, Michael C.; Gardiner, Elizabeth E.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Douglas, Michael R.; Campbell, Robert D.; Watson, Steve P.; Senis, Yotis A.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are highly reactive cell fragments that adhere to exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) and prevent excessive blood loss by forming clots. Paradoxically, megakaryocytes, which produce platelets in the bone marrow, remain relatively refractory to the ECM-rich environment of the bone marrow despite having the same repertoire of receptors as platelets. These include the ITAM (immunoreceptor tyrosine–based activation motif)–containing collagen receptor complex, which consists of glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and the Fc receptor γ-chain, and the ITIM (immunoreceptor tyrosine–based inhibition motif)–containing receptor G6b-B. We showed that mice lacking G6b-B exhibited macrothrombocytopenia (reduced platelet numbers and the presence of enlarged platelets) and a susceptibility to bleeding as a result of aberrant platelet production and function. Platelet numbers were markedly reduced in G6b-B–deficient mice compared to those in wild-type mice because of increased platelet turnover. Furthermore, megakaryocytes in G6b-B–deficient mice showed enhanced metalloproteinase production, which led to increased shedding of cell-surface receptors, including GPVI and GPIba. In addition, G6b-B–deficient megakaryocytes exhibited reduced integrin-mediated functions and defective formation of proplatelets, the long filamentous projections from which platelets bud off. Together, these findings establish G6b-B as a major inhibitory receptor regulating megakaryocyte activation, function, and platelet production. PMID:23112346

  6. Mice lacking NCF1 exhibit reduced growth of implanted melanoma and carcinoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Kelkka, Tiina; Pizzolla, Angela; Laurila, Juha Petteri; Friman, Tomas; Gustafsson, Renata; Källberg, Eva; Olsson, Olof; Leanderson, Tomas; Rubin, Kristofer; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2013-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) complex is a professional producer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is mainly expressed in phagocytes. While the activity of the NOX2 complex is essential for immunity against pathogens and protection against autoimmunity, its role in the development of malignant tumors remains unclear. We compared wild type and Ncf1 (m1J) mutated mice, which lack functional NOX2 complex, in four different tumor models. Ncf1 (m1J) mutated mice developed significantly smaller tumors in two melanoma models in which B16 melanoma cells expressing a hematopoietic growth factor FLT3L or luciferase reporter were used. Ncf1 (m1J) mutated mice developed significantly fewer Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumors, but the tumors that did develop, grew at a pace that was similar to the wild type mice. In the spontaneously arising prostate carcinoma model (TRAMP), tumor growth was not affected. The lack of ROS-mediated protection against tumor growth was associated with increased production of immunity-associated cytokines. A significant increase in Th2 associated cytokines was observed in the LLC model. Our present data show that ROS regulate rejection of the antigenic B16-luc and LLC tumors, whereas the data do not support a role for ROS in growth of intrinsically generated tumors. PMID:24358335

  7. Adolescent Mice, Unlike Adults, Consume More Alcohol in the Presence of Peers than Alone

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Sheree; Chein, Jason; Gould, Thomas; Holliday, Erica; Steinberg, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    One hallmark of adolescent risk taking is that it typically occurs when adolescents are with peers. It has been hypothesized that the presence of peers primes a reward-sensitive motivational state that overwhelms adolescents’ immature capacity for inhibitory control. We examined this hypothesis using a rodent model. A sample of mice were raised in same-sex triads and were tested for alcohol consumption either as juveniles or as adults, with half in each age group tested alone and half tested with their cagemates. The presence of “peers” increased alcohol consumption among adolescent mice, but not adults. The peer effect on human adolescent reward-seeking may reflect a hard-wired, evolutionarily conserved process through which the presence of agemates increases individuals’ sensitivity to potential rewards in their immediate environment. PMID:24341974

  8. Mice deficient in Neu4 sialidase exhibit abnormal ganglioside catabolism and lysosomal storage.

    PubMed

    Seyrantepe, Volkan; Canuel, Maryssa; Carpentier, Stéphane; Landry, Karine; Durand, Stéphanie; Liang, Feng; Zeng, Jibin; Caqueret, Aurore; Gravel, Roy A; Marchesini, Sergio; Zwingmann, Claudia; Michaud, Jacques; Morales, Carlos R; Levade, Thierry; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2008-06-01

    Mammalian sialidase Neu4, ubiquitously expressed in human tissues, is located in the lysosomal and mitochondrial lumen and has broad substrate specificity against sialylated glycoconjugates. To investigate whether Neu4 is involved in ganglioside catabolism, we transfected beta-hexosaminidase-deficient neuroglia cells from a Tay-Sachs patient with a Neu4-expressing plasmid and demonstrated the correction of storage due to the clearance of accumulated GM2 ganglioside. To further clarify the biological role of Neu4, we have generated a stable loss-of-function phenotype in cultured HeLa cells and in mice with targeted disruption of the Neu4 gene. The silenced HeLa cells showed reduced activity against gangliosides and had large heterogeneous lysosomes containing lamellar structures. Neu4(-/-) mice were viable, fertile and lacked gross morphological abnormalities, but showed a marked vacuolization and lysosomal storage in lung and spleen cells. Lysosomal storage bodies were also present in cultured macrophages preloaded with gangliosides. Thin-layer chromatography showed increased relative level of GD1a ganglioside and a markedly decreased level of GM1 ganglioside in brain of Neu4(-/-) mice suggesting that Neu4 may be important for desialylation of brain gangliosides and consistent with the in situ hybridization data. Increased levels of cholesterol, ceramide and polyunsaturated fatty acids were also detected in the lungs and spleen of Neu4(-/-) mice by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Together, our data suggest that Neu4 is a functional component of the ganglioside-metabolizing system, contributing to the postnatal development of the brain and other vital organs. PMID:18270209

  9. Walnut extract exhibits anti-fatigue action via improvement of exercise tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Ik; Kim, Kil-Soo

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the anti-fatigue effect of walnut extract (WE) on forced swimming capacity in mice. Twenty-eight male ICR mice were randomly divided into four groups, a vehicle control (VC) or one of three WE administered groups (300, 600 and 900 mg/kg/day). WE was orally administered to mice once a day for 4 weeks, during which time a forced swimming test was conducted once a week. The vehicle control group was given a corresponding volume of sterile distilled water. After 4 weeks, the forced swimming capacity and levels of blood lactate, glucose, glutamine, ammonia and triacylglycerol, and liver glycogen were measured. In the WE administration group (600 and 900 mg/kg) the maximum swimming time increased significantly when compared with the vehicle control group. WE (600 and 900 mg/kg) significantly decreased the levels of lactate andammonia and increased the blood glutamine levels and liver glycogen content after forced swimming relative to the vehicle control group. The results of this study demonstrated the anti-fatigue effects of WE in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of WE at 600 and 900 mg/kg were similar. Overall, these results suggest that walnut has anti-fatigue activity and could elevate exercise tolerance. PMID:24396383

  10. Adult male mice conceived by in vitro fertilization exhibit increased glucocorticoid receptor expression in fat tissue.

    PubMed

    Simbulan, R K; Liu, X; Feuer, S K; Maltepe, E; Donjacour, A; Rinaudo, P

    2016-02-01

    Prenatal development is highly plastic and readily influenced by the environment. Adverse conditions have been shown to alter organ development and predispose offspring to chronic diseases, including diabetes and hypertension. Notably, it appears that the changes in glucocorticoid hormones or glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels in peripheral tissues could play a role in the development of chronic diseases. We have previously demonstrated that in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation embryo culture is associated with growth alterations and glucose intolerance in mice. However, it is unknown if GR signaling is affected in adult IVF offspring. Here we show that GR expression is increased in inbred (C57Bl6/J) and outbred (CF-1× B6D2F1/J) blastocysts following in vitro culture and elevated levels are also present in the adipose tissue of adult male mice. Importantly, genes involved in lipolysis and triglyceride synthesis and responsive to GR were also increased in adipose tissue, indicating that increased GR activates downstream gene pathways. The promoter region of GR, previously reported to be epigenetically modified by perinatal manipulation, showed no changes in DNA methylation status. Our findings demonstrate that IVF results in a long-term change in GR gene expression in a sex- and tissue-specific manner. These changes in adipose tissues may well contribute to the metabolic phenotype in mice conceived by IVF. PMID:26511158

  11. Permanent Suppression of Cortical Oscillations in Mice After Adolescent Exposure to Cannabinoids: Receptor Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Raver, Sylvina M.; Keller, Asaf

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana use in adolescence, but not adulthood, may permanently impair cognitive functioning and increase the risk of developing schizophrenia. Cortical oscillations are patterns of neural network activity implicated in cognitive processing, and are abnormal in patients with schizophrenia. We have recently reported that cortical oscillations are suppressed in adult mice that were treated, in adolescence but not adulthood, with the cannabinoids WIN55,212-2 (WIN) or Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). WIN and THC are cannabinoid types 1 and 2 receptor (CB1R & CB2R) agonists, and also have activity at non-cannabinoid receptor targets. However, as acute WIN and THC administration can suppress oscillations through CB1Rs, we hypothesize that a similar mechanism underlies the permanent suppression of oscillations by repeated cannabinoid exposure in adolescence. Here we test the prediction that cannabinoid exposure in adolescence permanently suppresses cortical oscillations by acting through CB1Rs, and that these suppressive effects can be antagonized by a CB1R antagonist. We treated adolescent mice with various cannabinoid compounds, and pharmacologically-evoked oscillations in vitro in adult mice. We find that WIN exposure for six days in early adolescence suppresses oscillations preferentially in adult medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) via CB1Rs, and that a similar CB1R mechanism accounts for the suppressive effects of long-term (20 day) adolescent THC in adult somatosensory cortex (SCx). Unexpectedly, we also find that CB2Rs may be involved in the suppression of oscillations in both mPFC and SCx by long-term adolescent cannabinoid exposure, and that non-cannabinoid receptors may also contribute to oscillation suppression in adult mPFC. These findings represent a novel attempt to antagonize the effects of adolescent cannabinoid exposure on neural network activity, and reveal the contribution of non-CB1R targets to the suppression of cortical oscillations. PMID:25036610

  12. Distinct types of tumors exhibit differential grade of inflammation and angiogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Viana, C T R; Campos, P P; Carvalho, L A; Cenedezi, J M; Lavall, L; Lopes, M T P; Ferreira, M A N D; Andrade, S P

    2013-03-01

    Inflammation, angiogenesis and cytokine production are common features of almost, if not all tumors. However, the extent of these processes induced by different types of tumors has not been evaluated. We investigated the growth pattern of the experimental metastatic tumors, B16F10 melanoma, CT26.WT colon and 4T1 mammary cells inoculated in the flank of syngeneic mice and determined the degree of inflammation, angiogenesis, and production level of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokines within the tumors. In addition, we have analyzed vascular changes in the interface between the tumors and the adjacent cutaneous tissue and levels of relevant pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokines systemically. The weight of tumors 15 days post-inoculation of 10(6) cells was markedly different. Melanomas were 2 and 10-fold heavier than colon and mammary tumors, respectively. Locally, CT26.WT tumor cells induced more vessels in cutaneous tissue adjacent to the tumors but systemically, the plasma levels of VEGF were higher (approximately 2-fold) in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice compared with the other two tumors. Mammary tumors presented the most prominent inflammatory content as assessed by a range of markers (inflammatory enzymes and cytokines). The vascular index, as determined by the intra-tumor amount of hemoglobin and number of vessels in hot spot areas, was also higher (approximately 2-fold) in melanomas compared with the other two tumors. These findings showing that distinct tumor types determine differential grade of inflammation, angiogenesis and host interaction in mice may provide new insights to tailor differential therapeutic approach based on the status of tumor biomarkers. PMID:23253264

  13. Hesr1 knockout mice exhibit behavioral alterations through the dopaminergic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fuke, Satoshi; Minami, Natsumi; Kokubo, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Ayumu; Yasumatsu, Hiroshi; Sasagawa, Noboru; Saga, Yumiko; Tsukahara, Toshifumi; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2006-11-15

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional factor Hesr1 gene (hairy and enhancer of split-related 1, also called Hey1/HRT1/CHF2/HERP2) has been identified and characterized as a member of the subfamily of hairy/Enhancer of split, and shown to be involved in cardiovascular and neural development. We report that HESR1 binds directly to a part of the 3' non-coding region of the human dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene and represses the endogenous DAT1 gene in HEK293 cells. To investigate functions of the HESR1 gene in the dopaminergic nervous system in vivo, we analyzed the expressions of dopamine-related genes in the postnatal day 0 whole brains of Hesr1 knockout mice by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Several dopamine-related genes, such as DAT, dopamine receptors D1, D2, D4, and D5, were significantly upregulated. Moreover, young adults of Hesr1 knockout mice showed a decrease in spontaneous locomotor activity and a reduction in exploratory behavior or behavioral responses to novelty in the open-field, and elevated plus-maze tests. These results indicate that the HESR1 gene is related to neuropsychiatric disorders and behavioral traits through the dopaminergic nervous system. PMID:16998899

  14. Nebulin-deficient mice exhibit shorter thin filament lengths and reduced contractile function in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Marie-Louise; Li, Xiaodong; Littlefield, Ryan; Bremner, Shannon; Thor, Andrea; Knowlton, Kirk U.; Lieber, Richard L.; Chen, Ju

    2006-01-01

    Nebulin is a giant modular sarcomeric protein that has been proposed to play critical roles in myofibrillogenesis, thin filament length regulation, and muscle contraction. To investigate the functional role of nebulin in vivo, we generated nebulin-deficient mice by using a Cre knock-in strategy. Lineage studies utilizing this mouse model demonstrated that nebulin is expressed uniformly in all skeletal muscles. Nebulin-deficient mice die within 8–11 d after birth, with symptoms including decreased milk intake and muscle weakness. Although myofibrillogenesis had occurred, skeletal muscle thin filament lengths were up to 25% shorter compared with wild type, and thin filaments were uniform in length both within and between muscle types. Ultrastructural studies also demonstrated a critical role for nebulin in the maintenance of sarcomeric structure in skeletal muscle. The functional importance of nebulin in skeletal muscle function was revealed by isometric contractility assays, which demonstrated a dramatic reduction in force production in nebulin-deficient skeletal muscle. PMID:16769824

  15. CPEB4 Knockout Mice Exhibit Normal Hippocampus-Related Synaptic Plasticity and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Jung; Liu, Ta-Jen; Lee, Ping-Tao; Huang, Wen-Hsuan; Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Huang, Yi-Shuian

    2013-01-01

    Regulated RNA translation is critical to provide proteins needed to maintain persistent modification of synaptic strength, which underlies the molecular basis of long-term memory (LTM). Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding proteins (CPEBs) are sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins and regulate translation in various tissues. All four CPEBs in vertebrates are expressed in the brain, including the hippocampal neurons, suggesting their potential roles in translation-dependent plasticity and memory. Although CPEB1 and CPEB3 have been shown to control specific kinds of hippocampus-related LTM, the role of CPEB2 and CPEB4 in learning and memory remains elusive. Thus, we generated CPEB4 knockout (KO) mice and analyzed them using several behavioral tests. No difference was found in the anxiety level, motor coordination, hippocampus-dependent learning and memory between the KO mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Electrophysiological recordings of multiple forms of synaptic plasticity in the Schaffer collateral pathway-CA1 neurons also showed normal responses in the KO hippocampal slices. Morphological analyses revealed that the CPEB4-lacking pyramidal neurons possessed slightly elongated dendritic spines. Unlike its related family members, CPEB1 and CPEB3, CPEB4 seems to be dispensable for hippocampus-dependent plasticity, learning and memory. PMID:24386439

  16. Mice with a deletion of the major central myelin protein exhibit hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimuli: involvement of central sensitization.

    PubMed

    Petit, Bérengère; Giraudet, Fabrice; Béchon, Céline; Bardin, Laurent; Avan, Paul; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Bégou, Mélina

    2014-05-01

    Null mutations in the gene encoding the major myelin protein of the central nervous system, proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1), cause an X-linked form of spastic paraplegia (SPG2) associated with axonal degeneration. While motor symptoms are the best known manifestations of this condition, its somatosensory disturbances have been described but poorly characterized. We carried out a longitudinal study in an animal model of SPG2 - mice carrying a deletion of the Plp1 gene (Plp-null mice). Plp-null mice exhibited severe early-onset thermal hyperalgesia, in the absence of thermal allodynia. We first performed an electrophysiological testing which showed an early decrease in peripheral and spinal conduction velocities in Plp null mice. Such as the abnormal sensitive behaviors, this slowing of nerve conduction was observed before the development of myelin abnormalities at the spinal level, from 3months of age, and without major morphological defects in the sciatic nerve. To understand the link between a decrease in nerve velocity and an increased response to thermal stimuli before the appearance of myelin abnormalities, we focused our attention on the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, the site of integration of somatosensory information. Immunohistochemical studies revealed an early-onset activation of astrocytes and microglia that worsened with age, associated later in age with perturbation of the expression of the sensory neuropeptides calcitonin-gene-related peptide and galanin. Taken together, these results represent complementary data supporting the hypothesis that Plp-null mice suffer from ganglionopathy associated with late onset central demyelination but with few peripheral nerve alterations, induced by the glial-cell-mediated sensitization of the spinal cord. The mechanism suggested here could underlie pain experiments in other leukodystrophies as well as in other non-genetic demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:24423646

  17. Permanent suppression of cortical oscillations in mice after adolescent exposure to cannabinoids: receptor mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Raver, Sylvina M; Keller, Asaf

    2014-11-01

    Marijuana use in adolescence, but not adulthood, may permanently impair cognitive functioning and increase the risk of developing schizophrenia. Cortical oscillations are patterns of neural network activity implicated in cognitive processing, and are abnormal in patients with schizophrenia. We have recently reported that cortical oscillations are suppressed in adult mice that were treated with the cannabinoids WIN55,212-2 (WIN) or Δ(9)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adolescence, but not adulthood. WIN and THC are cannabinoid-1 (CB1R) and CB2R agonists, and also have activity at non-cannabinoid receptor targets. However, as acute WIN and THC administration can suppress oscillations through CB1Rs, we hypothesize that a similar mechanism underlies the permanent suppression of oscillations by repeated cannabinoid exposure in adolescence. Here we test the prediction that cannabinoid exposure in adolescence permanently suppresses cortical oscillations by acting through CB1Rs, and that these suppressive effects can be antagonized by a CB1R antagonist. We treated adolescent mice with various cannabinoid compounds, and pharmacologically-evoked oscillations in local field potentials (LFPs) in vitro in adults. We find that WIN exposure for six days in early adolescence suppresses oscillations preferentially in adult medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) via CB1Rs, and that a similar CB1R mechanism accounts for the suppressive effects of long-term (20 day) adolescent THC in adult somatosensory cortex (SCx). Unexpectedly, we also find that CB2Rs may be involved in the suppression of oscillations in both mPFC and SCx by long-term adolescent cannabinoid exposure, and that non-cannabinoid receptors may also contribute to oscillation suppression in adult mPFC. These findings represent a novel attempt to antagonize the effects of adolescent cannabinoid exposure on neural network activity, and reveal the contribution of non-CB1R targets to the suppression of cortical oscillations. PMID

  18. Evaluation and Treatment of Swimming Pool Avoidance Exhibited by an Adolescent Girl with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, John T.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Hovanetz, Alyson N.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated and treated swimming pool avoidance that was exhibited by a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with autism. In part, treatment involved blocking for flopping (dropping to the ground) and elopement (running away from the pool) and access to food for movements toward a swimming pool. Treatment also involved reinforcement for exposure to various…

  19. Differential influence of social versus isolate housing on vicarious fear learning in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Panksepp, Jules B; Lahvis, Garet P

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory rodents can adopt the pain or fear of nearby conspecifics. This phenotype conceptually lies within the domain of empathy, a bio-psycho-social process through which individuals come to share each other's emotion. Using a model of cue-conditioned fear, we show here that the expression of vicarious fear varies with respect to whether mice are raised socially or in solitude during adolescence. The impact of the adolescent housing environment was selective: (a) vicarious fear was more influenced than directly acquired fear, (b) "long-term" (24-h postconditioning) vicarious fear memories were stronger than "short-term" (15-min postconditioning) memories in socially reared mice whereas the opposite was true for isolate mice, and (c) females were more fearful than males. Housing differences during adolescence did not alter the general mobility of mice or their vocal response to receiving the unconditioned stimulus. Previous work with this mouse model underscored a genetic influence on vicarious fear learning, and the present study complements these findings by elucidating an interaction between the adolescent social environment and vicarious experience. Collectively, these findings are relevant to developing models of empathy amenable to mechanistic exploitation in the laboratory. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26881314

  20. Differential influence of social versus isolate housing on vicarious fear learning in adolescent mice

    PubMed Central

    Panksepp, Jules B.; Lahvis, Garet P.

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory rodents can adopt the pain or fear of nearby conspecifics. This phenotype conceptually lies within the domain of empathy, a bio-psycho-social process through which individuals come to share each other’s emotion. Using a model of cue-conditioned fear, we show here that the expression of vicarious fear varies with respect to whether mice are raised socially or in solitude during adolescence. The impact of the adolescent housing environment was selective: i) vicarious fear was more influenced than directly acquired fear, ii) ‘Long-term’ (24-h post-conditioning) vicarious fear memories were stronger than ‘short-term’ (15-min post-conditioning) memories in socially reared mice whereas the opposite was true for isolate mice, and iii) Females were more fearful than males. Housing differences during adolescence did not alter the general mobility of mice or their vocal response to receiving the unconditioned stimulus. Previous work with this mouse model underscored a genetic influence on vicarious fear learning, and the present study complements these findings by elucidating an interaction between the adolescent social environment and vicarious experience. Collectively, these findings are relevant to developing models of empathy amenable to mechanistic exploitation in the laboratory. PMID:26881314

  1. HdhQ111 Mice Exhibit Tissue Specific Metabolite Profiles that Include Striatal Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Jeffrey B.; Deik, Amy; Fossale, Elisa; Weston, Rory M.; Guide, Jolene R.; Arjomand, Jamshid; Kwak, Seung; Clish, Clary B.; MacDonald, Marcy E.

    2015-01-01

    The HTT CAG expansion mutation causes Huntington’s Disease and is associated with a wide range of cellular consequences, including altered metabolism. The mutant allele is expressed widely, in all tissues, but the striatum and cortex are especially vulnerable to its effects. To more fully understand this tissue-specificity, early in the disease process, we asked whether the metabolic impact of the mutant CAG expanded allele in heterozygous B6.HdhQ111/+ mice would be common across tissues, or whether tissues would have tissue-specific responses and whether such changes may be affected by diet. Specifically, we cross-sectionally examined steady state metabolite concentrations from a range of tissues (plasma, brown adipose tissue, cerebellum, striatum, liver, white adipose tissue), using an established liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry pipeline, from cohorts of 8 month old mutant and wild-type littermate mice that were fed one of two different high-fat diets. The differential response to diet highlighted a proportion of metabolites in all tissues, ranging from 3% (7/219) in the striatum to 12% (25/212) in white adipose tissue. By contrast, the mutant CAG-expanded allele primarily affected brain metabolites, with 14% (30/219) of metabolites significantly altered, compared to wild-type, in striatum and 11% (25/224) in the cerebellum. In general, diet and the CAG-expanded allele both elicited metabolite changes that were predominantly tissue-specific and non-overlapping, with evidence for mutation-by-diet interaction in peripheral tissues most affected by diet. Machine-learning approaches highlighted the accumulation of diverse lipid species as the most genotype-predictive metabolite changes in the striatum. Validation experiments in cell culture demonstrated that lipid accumulation was also a defining feature of mutant HdhQ111 striatal progenitor cells. Thus, metabolite-level responses to the CAG expansion mutation in vivo were tissue specific and most evident

  2. Fucoidan Supplementation Improves Exercise Performance and Exhibits Anti-Fatigue Action in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ming; Tsai, Yi-Hsin; Tsai, Tsung-Yu; Chiu, Yen-Shuo; Wei, Li; Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Fucoidan (FCD) is a well-known bioactive constituent of seaweed extract that possess a wide spectrum of activities in biological systems, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammation and modulation of immune systems. However, evidence on the effects of FCD on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. Therefore, we investigated the potential beneficial effects of FCD on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR mice from three groups (n = 8 per group) were orally administered FCD for 21 days at 0, 310 and 620 mg/kg/day, which were, respectively, designated the vehicle, FCD-1X and FCD-2X groups. The results indicated that the FCD supplementations increased the grip strength (p = 0.0002) and endurance swimming time (p = 0.0195) in a dose-depend manner. FCD treatments also produced dose-dependent decreases in serum levels of lactate (p < 0.0001) and ammonia (p = 0.0025), and also an increase in glucose level (p < 0.0001) after the 15-min swimming test. In addition, FCD supplementation had few subchronic toxic effects. Therefore, we suggest that long-term supplementation with FCD can have a wide spectrum of bioactivities on health promotion, performance improvement and anti-fatigue. PMID:25558908

  3. Fucoidan supplementation improves exercise performance and exhibits anti-fatigue action in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ming; Tsai, Yi-Hsin; Tsai, Tsung-Yu; Chiu, Yen-Shuo; Wei, Li; Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidan (FCD) is a well-known bioactive constituent of seaweed extract that possess a wide spectrum of activities in biological systems, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammation and modulation of immune systems. However, evidence on the effects of FCD on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. Therefore, we investigated the potential beneficial effects of FCD on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR mice from three groups (n = 8 per group) were orally administered FCD for 21 days at 0, 310 and 620 mg/kg/day, which were, respectively, designated the vehicle, FCD-1X and FCD-2X groups. The results indicated that the FCD supplementations increased the grip strength (p = 0.0002) and endurance swimming time (p = 0.0195) in a dose-depend manner. FCD treatments also produced dose-dependent decreases in serum levels of lactate (p < 0.0001) and ammonia (p = 0.0025), and also an increase in glucose level (p < 0.0001) after the 15-min swimming test. In addition, FCD supplementation had few subchronic toxic effects. Therefore, we suggest that long-term supplementation with FCD can have a wide spectrum of bioactivities on health promotion, performance improvement and anti-fatigue. PMID:25558908

  4. Mice lacking TrkB in parvalbumin-positive cells exhibit sexually dimorphic behavioral phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Elizabeth K; Jegarl, Anita; Clem, Roger L

    2014-11-01

    Activity-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) is required for cued fear memory consolidation and extinction. Although BDNF is primarily secreted from glutamatergic neurons, TrkB is expressed by other genetically defined cells whose contributions to the behavioral effects of BDNF remain poorly understood. Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, which are highly enriched in TrkB, are emerging as key regulators of fear memory expression. We therefore hypothesized that activity-dependent BDNF signaling in PV-interneurons may modulate emotional learning. To test this hypothesis, we utilized the LoxP/Cre system for conditional deletion of TrkB in PV-positive cells to examine the impact of cell-autonomous BDNF signaling on Pavlovian fear conditioning and extinction. However, behavioral abnormalities indicative of vestibular dysfunction precluded the use of homozygous conditional knockouts in tests of higher cognitive functioning. While vestibular dysfunction was apparent in both sexes, female conditional knockouts exhibited an exacerbated phenotype, including extreme motor hyperactivity and circling behavior, compared to their male littermates. Heterozygous conditional knockouts were spared of vestibular dysfunction. While fear memory consolidation was unaffected in heterozygotes of both sexes, males exhibited impaired extinction consolidation compared to their littermate controls. Our findings complement evidence from human and rodent studies suggesting that BDNF signaling promotes consolidation of extinction and point to PV-positive neurons as a discrete population that mediates these effects in a sex-specific manner. PMID:25127683

  5. Cadmium Increases the Sensitivity of Adolescent Female Mice to Nicotine-Related Behavioral Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi, Philip Adeyemi; Olatunji, Babawale Peter; Ishola, Azeez Olakunle; Ajonijebu, Duyilemi Chris; Ogundele, Olalekan Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates spatial and nonspatial working memory, anxiety related behavior, and motor activities in cadmium and/or nicotine exposed female adolescent mice. P28 female adolescent mice (albino strain) were divided into four groups of five (n = 5) mice each. A set of mice (Nic) received subcutaneous nicotine (2.0 mg/kg) while a separate set (Cd) was treated with 2.0 mg/kg cadmium (subcutaneous). For the combined treatments of cadmium and nicotine, we administered 2.0 mg/kg Nicotine and 2.0 mg/kg of Cd. Subsequently, a separate group of animals (n = 5; control) received normal saline. The total duration of treatment for all groups was 28 days (P28–P56). At P56, the treatment was discontinued, after which the animals were examined in behavioural tests. Nicotine and cadmium increased the metabolism and food intake in the female adolescent mice. This also corresponded to an increase in weight when compared with the control. However, a combined nicotine-cadmium treatment induced a decline in weight of the animals versus the control. Also, nicotine administration increased the motor function, while cadmium and nicotine-cadmium treatment caused a decline in motor activity. Both nicotine and cadmium induced a reduction in memory index; however, nicotine-cadmium treatment induced the most significant decrease in nonspatial working memory. PMID:25477708

  6. Humanized Tau Mice with Regionalized Amyloid Exhibit Behavioral Deficits but No Pathological Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yetman, Michael J.; Fowler, Stephanie W.; Jankowsky, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) researchers have struggled for decades to draw a causal link between extracellular Aβ aggregation and intraneuronal accumulation of microtubule-associated protein tau. The amyloid cascade hypothesis posits that Aβ deposition promotes tau hyperphosphorylation, tangle formation, cell loss, vascular damage, and dementia. While the genetics of familial AD and the pathological staging of sporadic disease support this sequence of events, attempts to examine the molecular mechanism in transgenic animal models have largely relied on models of other inherited tauopathies as the basis for testing the interaction with Aβ. In an effort to more accurately model the relationship between Aβ and wild-type tau in AD, we intercrossed mice that overproduce human Aβ with a tau substitution model in which all 6 isoforms of the human protein are expressed in animals lacking murine tau. We selected an amyloid model in which pathology was biased towards the entorhinal region so that we could further examine whether the anticipated changes in tau phosphorylation occurred at the site of Aβ deposition or in synaptically connected regions. We found that Aβ and tau had independent effects on locomotion, learning, and memory, but found no behavioral evidence for an interaction between the two transgenes. Moreover, we saw no indication of amyloid-induced changes in the phosphorylation or aggregation of human tau either within the entorhinal area or elsewhere. These findings suggest that robust amyloid pathology within the medial temporal lobe has little effect on the metabolism of wild type human tau in this model. PMID:27070146

  7. Embryonic germ cells from mice and rats exhibit properties consistent with a generic pluripotent ground state

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Harry G.; Blair, Kate; Mansfield, William; Ayetey, Harold; Humphreys, Peter; Nichols, Jennifer; Surani, M. Azim; Smith, Austin

    2010-01-01

    Mouse and rat embryonic stem cells can be sustained in defined medium by dual inhibition (2i) of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (Erk1/2) cascade and of glycogen synthase kinase 3. The inhibitors suppress differentiation and enable self-renewal of pluripotent cells that are ex vivo counterparts of naïve epiblast cells in the mature blastocyst. Pluripotent stem cell lines can also be derived from unipotent primordial germ cells via a poorly understood process of epigenetic reprogramming. These are termed embryonic germ (EG) cells to denote their distinct origin. Here we investigate whether EG cell self-renewal and derivation are supported by 2i. We report that mouse EG cells can be established with high efficiency using 2i in combination with the cytokine leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Furthermore, addition of fibroblast growth factor or stem cell factor is unnecessary using 2i-LIF. The derived EG cells contribute extensively to healthy chimaeric mice, including to the germline. Using the same conditions, we describe the first derivations of EG cells from the rat. Rat EG cells express a similar marker profile to rat and mouse ES cells. They have a diploid karyotype, can be clonally expanded and genetically manipulated, and are competent for multilineage colonisation of chimaeras. These findings lend support to the postulate of a conserved molecular ground state in pluripotent rodent cells. Future research will determine the extent to which this is maintained in other mammals and whether, in some species, primordial germ cells might be a more tractable source than epiblast for the capture of naïve pluripotent stem cells. PMID:20519324

  8. 3xTg-AD Mice Exhibit an Activated Central Stress Axis during Early-Stage Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hebda-Bauer, Elaine K.; Simmons, Tracy A.; Sugg, Andrew; Ural, Eren; Stewart, James A.; Beals, James L.; Wei, Qiang; Watson, Stanley J.; Akil, Huda

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis occurs in response to the organism’s innate need for homeostasis. The glucocorticoids (GCs) that are released into the circulation upon acute activation of the HPA axis perform stress-adaptive functions and provide negative feedback to turn off the HPA axis, but can be detrimental when in excess. Long-term activation of the HPA axis (such as with chronic stress) enhances susceptibility to neuronal dysfunction and death, and increases vulnerability to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, little is known how components of the HPA axis, upstream of GCs, impact vulnerability to AD. This study examined basal gene expression of stress-related molecules in brains of 3xTg-AD mice during early-stage pathology. Basal glucocorticoid levels and mRNA expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and corticotropic releasing hormone (CRH) in several stress- and emotionality-related brain regions were measured in 3–4-month-old 3xTg-AD mice. Despite normal glucocorticoid levels, young 3xTg-AD mice exhibit an activated central HPA axis, with altered mRNA levels of MR and GR in the hippocampus, GR and CRH in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, GR and CRH in the central nucleus of the amygdala, and CRH in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This HPA axis activation is present during early-stage neuropathology when 3xTg-AD mice show mild behavioral changes, suggesting an ongoing neuroendocrine regulation that precedes the onset of severe AD-like pathology and behavioral deficits. PMID:22976078

  9. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei; Ouyang, Pin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  10. BDNF-Val66Met variant and adolescent stress interact to promote susceptibility to anorexic behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Madra, M; Zeltser, L M

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify therapeutic targets for anorexia nervosa (AN) because current medications do not impact eating behaviors that drive AN's high mortality rate. A major obstacle to developing new treatments is the lack of animal models that recapitulate the pattern of disease onset typically observed in human populations. Here we describe a translational mouse model to study interactions between genetic, psychological and biological risk factors that promote anorexic behavior. We combined several factors that are consistently associated with increased risk of AN-adolescent females, genetic predisposition to anxiety imposed by the BDNF-Val66Met gene variant, social isolation stress and caloric restriction (CR). Approximately 40% of the mice with all of these risk factors will exhibit severe self-imposed dietary restriction, sometimes to the point of death. We systematically varied the risk factors outlined above to explore how they interact to influence anorexic behavior. We found that the Val66Met genotype markedly increases the likelihood and severity of abnormal feeding behavior triggered by CR, but only when CR is imposed in the peri-pubertal period. Incidence of anorexic behavior in our model is dependent on juvenile exposure to social stress and can be extinguished by adolescent handling, but is discordant from anxiety-like behavior. Thus, this study characterized gene × environment interactions during adolescence that could be the underlying driver of abnormal eating behavior in certain AN patients, and represents a promising system to identify possible targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27045846

  11. BDNF-Val66Met variant and adolescent stress interact to promote susceptibility to anorexic behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Madra, M; Zeltser, L M

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify therapeutic targets for anorexia nervosa (AN) because current medications do not impact eating behaviors that drive AN's high mortality rate. A major obstacle to developing new treatments is the lack of animal models that recapitulate the pattern of disease onset typically observed in human populations. Here we describe a translational mouse model to study interactions between genetic, psychological and biological risk factors that promote anorexic behavior. We combined several factors that are consistently associated with increased risk of AN—adolescent females, genetic predisposition to anxiety imposed by the BDNF-Val66Met gene variant, social isolation stress and caloric restriction (CR). Approximately 40% of the mice with all of these risk factors will exhibit severe self-imposed dietary restriction, sometimes to the point of death. We systematically varied the risk factors outlined above to explore how they interact to influence anorexic behavior. We found that the Val66Met genotype markedly increases the likelihood and severity of abnormal feeding behavior triggered by CR, but only when CR is imposed in the peri-pubertal period. Incidence of anorexic behavior in our model is dependent on juvenile exposure to social stress and can be extinguished by adolescent handling, but is discordant from anxiety-like behavior. Thus, this study characterized gene × environment interactions during adolescence that could be the underlying driver of abnormal eating behavior in certain AN patients, and represents a promising system to identify possible targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27045846

  12. Mice Carrying a Hypomorphic Evi1 Allele Are Embryonic Viable but Exhibit Severe Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A.; Szumska, Dorota; Jacob, Bindya; Chua, Belinda Q. L.; Chatterjee, Gouri C.; Zhang, Yi; Ward, Jerrold M.; Urun, Fatma; Kinameri, Emi; Vincent, Stéphane D.; Ahmed, Sayadi; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Osato, Motomi; Perkins, Archibald S.; Moore, Adrian W.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    2014-01-01

    The ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Evi1) oncogenic transcription factor is one of a number of alternative transcripts encoded by the Mds1 and Evi1 complex locus (Mecom). Overexpression of Evi1 has been observed in a number of myeloid disorders and is associated with poor patient survival. It is also amplified and/or overexpressed in many epithelial cancers including nasopharyngeal carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, ependymomas, and lung and colorectal cancers. Two murine knockout models have also demonstrated Evi1's critical role in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell renewal with its absence resulting in the death of mutant embryos due to hematopoietic failure. Here we characterize a novel mouse model (designated Evi1fl3) in which Evi1 exon 3, which carries the ATG start, is flanked by loxP sites. Unexpectedly, we found that germline deletion of exon3 produces a hypomorphic allele due to the use of an alternative ATG start site located in exon 4, resulting in a minor Evi1 N-terminal truncation and a block in expression of the Mds1-Evi1 fusion transcript. Evi1δex3/δex3 mutant embryos showed only a mild non-lethal hematopoietic phenotype and bone marrow failure was only observed in adult Vav-iCre/+, Evi1fl3/fl3 mice in which exon 3 was specifically deleted in the hematopoietic system. Evi1δex3/δex3 knockout pups are born in normal numbers but die during the perinatal period from congenital heart defects. Database searches identified 143 genes with similar mutant heart phenotypes as those observed in Evi1δex3/δex3 mutant pups. Interestingly, 42 of these congenital heart defect genes contain known Evi1-binding sites, and expression of 18 of these genes are also effected by Evi1 siRNA knockdown. These results show a potential functional involvement of Evi1 target genes in heart development and indicate that Evi1 is part of a transcriptional program that regulates cardiac development in addition to the development of blood. PMID:24586749

  13. Adolescent mice are less sensitive to the effects of acute nicotine on context pre-exposure than adults.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Braak, David C; Tumolo, Jessica M; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Adolescence is a critical developmental period associated with both increased vulnerability to substance abuse and maturation of certain brain regions important for learning and memory such as the hippocampus. In this study, we employed a hippocampus-dependent learning context pre-exposure facilitation effect (CPFE) paradigm in order to test the effects of acute nicotine on contextual processing during adolescence (post-natal day (PND) 38) and adulthood (PND 53). In Experiment 1, adolescent or adult C57BL6/J mice received either saline or one of three nicotine doses (0.09, 0.18, and 0.36mg/kg) prior to contextual pre-exposure and testing. Our results demonstrated that both adolescent and adult mice showed CPFE in the saline groups. However, adolescent mice only showed acute nicotine enhancement of CPFE with the highest nicotine dose whereas adult mice showed the enhancing effects of acute nicotine with all three doses. In Experiment 2, to determine if the lack of nicotine's effects on CPFE shown by adolescent mice is specific to the age when they are tested, mice were either given contextual pre-exposure during adolescence or adulthood and received immediate shock and testing during adulthood after a 15day delay. We found that both adolescent and adult mice showed CPFE in the saline groups when tested during adulthood. However, like Experiment 1, mice that received contextual pre-exposure during adolescence did not show acute nicotine enhancement except at the highest dose (0.36mg/kg) whereas both low (0.09mg/kg) and high (0.36mg/kg) doses enhanced CPFE in adult mice. Finally, we showed that the enhanced freezing response found with 0.36mg/kg nicotine in the 15-day experiment may be a result of decreased locomotor activity as mice that received this dose of nicotine traveled shorter distances in an open field paradigm. Overall, our results indicate that while adolescent mice showed normal contextual processing when tested both during adolescence and adulthood, they

  14. Senescence marker protein-30/superoxide dismutase 1 double knockout mice exhibit increased oxidative stress and hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yoshitaka; Masutomi, Hirofumi; Noda, Yoshihiro; Ozawa, Yusuke; Takahashi, Keita; Handa, Setsuko; Maruyama, Naoki; Shimizu, Takahiko; Ishigami, Akihito

    2014-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is an antioxidant enzyme that converts superoxide anion radicals into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. The senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) is a gluconolactonase that functions as an antioxidant protein in mammals due to its involvement in ascorbic acid (AA) biosynthesis. SMP30 also participates in Ca(2+) efflux by activating the calmodulin-dependent Ca(2+)-pump. To reveal the role of oxidative stress in lipid metabolism defects occurring in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease pathogenesis, we generated SMP30/SOD1-double knockout (SMP30/SOD1-DKO) mice and investigated their survival curves, plasma and hepatic lipid profiles, amounts of hepatic oxidative stress, and hepatic protein levels expressed by genes related to lipid metabolism. While SMP30/SOD1-DKO pups had no growth retardation by 14 days of age, they did have low plasma and hepatic AA levels. Thereafter, 39% and 53% of male and female pups died by 15-24 and 89 days of age, respectively. Compared to wild type, SMP30-KO and SOD1-KO mice, by 14 days SMP30/SOD1-DKO mice exhibited: (1) higher plasma levels of triglyceride and aspartate aminotransferase; (2) severe accumulation of hepatic triglyceride and total cholesterol; (3) higher levels of superoxide anion radicals and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in livers; and (4) decreased mRNA and protein levels of Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) in livers - ApoB is an essential component of VLDL secretion. These results suggest that high levels of oxidative stress due to concomitant deficiency of SMP30 and/or AA, and SOD1 cause abnormal plasma lipid metabolism, hepatic lipid accumulation and premature death resulting from impaired VLDL secretion. PMID:25003023

  15. Recombinant Factor IX Fc Fusion Protein Maintains Full Procoagulant Properties and Exhibits Prolonged Efficacy in Hemophilia B Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toby, Garabet G.; Liu, Tongyao; Buyue, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Bitonti, Alan J.; Pierce, Glenn F.; Sommer, Jurg M.; Jiang, Haiyan; Peters, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia B is an inherited X chromosome–linked disorder characterized by impaired blood clotting owing to the absence of functional coagulation factor IX. Due to the relatively short half-life of factor IX, patients with hemophilia B require frequent factor IX infusions to maintain prophylaxis. We have developed a recombinant factor IX (rFIX) fused to the Fc region of IgG (rFIXFc) with an extended half-life in animals and humans. Materials and Methods Procoagulant properties of rFIXFc and rFIX (BENEFIX®) were compared to determine the effect of the Fc region on rFIXFc hemostatic function. Specifically, we assessed rFIXFc activation, intermolecular interactions within the Xase complex, inactivation by antithrombin III (AT) and thrombin generation potential compared with rFIX. We also assessed the acute and prophylactic efficacy profiles of rFIXFc and rFIX in vivo in hemophilia B mouse bleeding models. Results and Conclusions The activation by factor XIa or factor VIIa/tissue factor, inhibition by AT, interaction profiles with phospholipids, affinities for factor VIIIa within the context of the Xase complex, and thrombin generation profiles were similar for rFIXFc and rFIX. Xase complexes formed with either molecule exhibited similar kinetic profiles for factor Xa generation. In acute efficacy models, mice infused with rFIXFc or rFIX were equally protected from bleeding. However, in prophylactic efficacy models, protection from bleeding was maintained approximately three times longer in rFIXFc-dosed mice than in those given rFIX; this prolonged efficacy correlates with the previously observed half-life extension. We conclude that rFIXFc retains critical FIX procoagulant attributes and that the extension in rFIXFc half-life translates into prolonged efficacy in hemophilia B mice. PMID:26840952

  16. Chronic social stress during adolescence induces cognitive impairment in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Sterlemann, Vera; Rammes, Gerhard; Wolf, Miriam; Liebl, Claudia; Ganea, Karin; Müller, Marianne B; Schmidt, Mathias V

    2010-04-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is one of the major aspects that impede successful aging in humans. Environmental factors, such as chronic stress, can accelerate or aggravate cognitive deficits during aging. While there is abundant evidence that chronic stress directly affects cognitive performance, the lasting consequences of stress exposures during vulnerable developmental time windows are largely unknown. This is especially true for the adolescent period, which is critical in terms of physical, sexual, and behavioral maturation. Here we used chronic social stress during adolescence in male mice and investigated the consequences of this treatment on cognitive performance during aging. We observed a substantial impairment of spatial memory, but not other memory domains, 12 months after the end of the stress period. This hippocampus-dependent cognitive dysfunction was supported by concomitant impairment in LTP induction in CA1 neurons in 15-month-old animals. Further, we observed a decrease of hippocampal BDNF mRNA and synaptophysin immunoreactivity, suggesting plasticity and structural alterations in formerly stressed mice. Finally, we identified expression changes of specific neurotransmitter subunits critically involved in learning and memory, specifically the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B. Taken together, our results identify possible molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment during aging, demonstrating the detrimental impact of stress during adolescence on hippocampus-dependent cognitive function in aged mice. PMID:19489003

  17. Adolescent Social Defeat Induced Alterations in Social Behavior and Cognitive Flexibility in Adult Mice: Effects of Developmental Stage and Social Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Yuan, Sanna; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Negative social experiences during adolescence increase the risk of psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Using “resident-intruder” stress, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of adolescent social defeat on emotional and cognitive symptoms associated with psychiatric disorders during adulthood and the effects of the developmental stage and social condition on this process. In Experiment 1, animals were exposed to social defeat or manipulation for 10 days during early adolescence (EA, postnatal days [PND] 28–37), late adolescence (LA, PND 38–47), and adulthood (ADULT, PND 70–79) and then singly housed until the behavioral tests. Behaviors, including social avoidance of the defeat context and cortically mediated cognitive flexibility in an attentional set-shifting task (AST), were assessed during the week following stress or after 6 weeks during adulthood. We determined that social defeat induced significant and continuous social avoidance across age groups at both time points. The mice that experienced social defeat during adulthood exhibited short-term impairments in reversal learning (RL) on the AST that dissipated after 6 weeks. In contrast, social defeat during EA but not LA induced a delayed deficit in extra-dimensional set-shifting (EDS) in adulthood but not during adolescence. In Experiment 2, we further examined the effects of social condition (isolation or social housing after stress) on the alterations induced by social defeat during EA in adult mice. The adult mice that had experienced stress during EA exhibited social avoidance similar to the avoidance identified in Experiment 1 regardless of the isolation or social housing after the stress. However, social housing after the stress ameliorated the cognitive flexibility deficits induced by early adolescent social defeat in the adult mice, and the social condition had no effect on cognitive function. These findings suggest that the effects of social defeat on emotion and cognitive

  18. Organic anion transporter 3 (Oat3/Slc22a8) knockout mice exhibit altered clearance and distribution of penicillin G

    PubMed Central

    VanWert, Adam L.; Bailey, Rachel M.; Sweet, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of renal basolateral organic anion transporter 3 (Oat3) with commonly used pharmacotherapeutics (e.g., NSAIDs, β-lactams, and methotrexate) has been studied extensively in vitro. However, the in vivo role of Oat3 in drug disposition, in the context of other transporters, glomerular filtration, and metabolism, has not been established. Moreover, recent investigations have identified inactive human OAT3 polymorphisms. Therefore, this investigation was designed to elucidate the in vivo role of Oat3 in the disposition of penicillin G and prototypical substrates using an Oat3 knockout mouse model. Oat3 deletion resulted in a doubling of penicillin’s half-life (P < 0.05) and a reduced volume of distribution (P < 0.01), together yielding a plasma clearance that was one-half (P < 0.05, males) to one-third (P < 0.001, females) of that in wild-type mice. Inhibition of Oat3 abolished the differences in penicillin G elimination between genotypes. Hepatic accumulation of penicillin was 2.3 times higher in male knockouts (P < 0.05) and 3.7 times higher in female knockouts (P < 0.001). Female knockouts also exhibited impaired estrone-3-sulfate clearance. Oat3 deletion did not impact p-aminohippurate elimination, providing correlative evidence to studies in Oat1 knockout mice that suggest Oat1 governs tubular uptake of p-aminohippurate. Collectively, these findings are the first to indicate that functional Oat3 is necessary for proper elimination of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds in vivo. Thus Oat3 plays a distinct role in determining the efficacy and toxicity of drugs. Dysfunctional human OAT3 polymorphisms or instances of polypharmacy involving OAT3 substrates may result in altered systemic accumulation of β-lactams and other clinically relevant compounds. PMID:17686950

  19. Kharon1 Null Mutants of Leishmania mexicana Are Avirulent in Mice and Exhibit a Cytokinesis Defect within Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Marco A.; Valli, Jessica; Gluenz, Eva; Landfear, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    In a variety of eukaryotes, flagella play important roles both in motility and as sensory organelles that monitor the extracellular environment. In the parasitic protozoan Leishmania mexicana, one glucose transporter isoform, LmxGT1, is targeted selectively to the flagellar membrane where it appears to play a role in glucose sensing. Trafficking of LmxGT1 to the flagellar membrane is dependent upon interaction with the KHARON1 protein that is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme. Remarkably, while Δkharon1 null mutants are viable as insect stage promastigotes, they are unable to survive as amastigotes inside host macrophages. Although Δkharon1 promastigotes enter macrophages and transform into amastigotes, these intracellular parasites are unable to execute cytokinesis and form multinucleate cells before dying. Notably, extracellular axenic amastigotes of Δkharon1 mutants replicate and divide normally, indicating a defect in the mutants that is only exhibited in the intra-macrophage environment. Although the flagella of Δkharon1 amastigotes adhere to the phagolysomal membrane of host macrophages, the morphology of the mutant flagella is often distorted. Additionally, these null mutants are completely avirulent following injection into BALB/c mice, underscoring the critical role of the KHARON1 protein for viability of intracellular amastigotes and disease in the animal model of leishmaniasis. PMID:26266938

  20. Transgenic sickle cell trait mice do not exhibit abnormal thermoregulatory and stress responses to heat shock exposure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Islam, Aminul

    2016-07-01

    There remains controversy over whether individuals with sickle cell trait (SCT) are vulnerable to health risks during physical activity in high temperatures. We examined thermoregulatory and stress-related responses to heat exposure in SCT and wild-type (WT) mice. No significant differences in core temperature (Tc) were observed between SCT and WT mice during heat exposure. There was no correlation between peak Tc during heat exposure and levels of hemoglobin S in SCT mice. Basal levels of circulating inflammatory and stress-related markers were not significantly different between SCT and WT mice. Although heat exposure caused significant increases in plasma interleukins 1β and 6, and 8-isoprostane in SCT and WT mice, no differences were found between SCT and WT mice with similar thermal response profiles during heat exposure. SCT mice had significantly higher expression of heat shock protein 72 in heart, liver and gastrocnemius muscle than WT mice under control and post-heat conditions. In conclusion, there is neither thermoregulatory dysfunction nor abnormal stress-related response in SCT mice exposed to moderate heat. The hemoglobin variant in mice is associated with altered tissue stress protein homeostasis. PMID:27282581

  1. The recovery trajectory of adolescent social defeat stress-induced behavioral, (1)H-MRS metabolites and myelin changes in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Handi; Yan, Gen; Xu, Haiyun; Fang, Zeman; Zhang, Jinling; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Renhua; Kong, Jiming; Huang, Qingjun

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent exposure to social stress precipitates emotion-related disorders and affects the development and function of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). However, this adversity-induced behavioral and neurological changes remain not fully explored. Adolescent Balb/c mice were subjected to intermittent social defeat stress during postnatal days 28 to 42. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) measurements, behavioral tests and immunohistochemistry were performed one day or 3 weeks after the last stress episode. Defeated mice exhibited hypoactivity and social avoidance with the latter lasting into the early adulthood, while the anxiety level was unchanged. Social defeat experience lead to temporary decreases in the levels of total creatines (Cr + pCr) and Glx (Glu + Gln), but a delayed increase of N- acetylaspartate (NAA) levels. These alternations were accompanied with a persistent reduction of myelin basic protein expression although the number of mature oligodendrocyte did not change. These findings provide evidence that adolescent adverse social experience permanently impairs the emotion-related behavioral performance and induces biochemical and molecular changes in the brain which at least lasts into early adulthood, thus enhancing our understanding of the neurobiology of social defeat stress. Our finding also implicates that NAA signals on MRS may reflect myelin status. PMID:27283029

  2. The recovery trajectory of adolescent social defeat stress-induced behavioral, 1H-MRS metabolites and myelin changes in Balb/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Handi; Yan, Gen; Xu, Haiyun; Fang, Zeman; Zhang, Jinling; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Renhua; Kong, Jiming; Huang, Qingjun

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent exposure to social stress precipitates emotion-related disorders and affects the development and function of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). However, this adversity-induced behavioral and neurological changes remain not fully explored. Adolescent Balb/c mice were subjected to intermittent social defeat stress during postnatal days 28 to 42. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) measurements, behavioral tests and immunohistochemistry were performed one day or 3 weeks after the last stress episode. Defeated mice exhibited hypoactivity and social avoidance with the latter lasting into the early adulthood, while the anxiety level was unchanged. Social defeat experience lead to temporary decreases in the levels of total creatines (Cr + pCr) and Glx (Glu + Gln), but a delayed increase of N- acetylaspartate (NAA) levels. These alternations were accompanied with a persistent reduction of myelin basic protein expression although the number of mature oligodendrocyte did not change. These findings provide evidence that adolescent adverse social experience permanently impairs the emotion-related behavioral performance and induces biochemical and molecular changes in the brain which at least lasts into early adulthood, thus enhancing our understanding of the neurobiology of social defeat stress. Our finding also implicates that NAA signals on MRS may reflect myelin status. PMID:27283029

  3. Caspr3-Deficient Mice Exhibit Low Motor Learning during the Early Phase of the Accelerated Rotarod Task

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Haruna; Takahashi, Aki; Shimoda, Yasushi; Koide, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Caspr3 (Contactin-associated protein-like 3, Cntnap3) is a neural cell adhesion molecule belonging to the Caspr family. We have recently shown that Caspr3 is expressed abundantly between the first and second postnatal weeks in the mouse basal ganglia, including the striatum, external segment of the globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, and substantia nigra. However, its physiological role remains largely unknown. In this study, we conducted a series of behavioral analyses on Capsr3-knockout (KO) mice and equivalent wild-type (WT) mice to investigate the role of Caspr3 in brain function. No significant differences were observed in most behavioral traits between Caspr3-KO and WT mice, but we found that Caspr3-KO mice performed poorly during the early phase of the accelerated rotarod task in which latency to falling off a rod rotating with increasing velocity was examined. In the late phase, the performance of the Caspr3-KO mice caught up to the level of WT mice, suggesting that the deletion of Caspr3 caused a delay in motor learning. We then examined changes in neural activity after training on the accelerated rotarod by conducting immunohistochemistry using antibody to c-Fos, an indirect marker for neuronal activity. Experience of the accelerated rotarod task caused increases in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in the dorsal striatum, cerebellum, and motor cortex in both Caspr3-KO and WT mice, but the number of c-Fos-positive cells was significantly lower in the dorsal striatum of Caspr3-KO mice than in that of WT mice. The expression of c-Fos in the ventral striatum of Caspr3-KO and WT mice was not altered by the training. Our findings suggest that reduced activation of neural cells in the dorsal striatum in Caspr3-KO mice leads to a decline in motor learning in the accelerated rotarod task. PMID:26807827

  4. Caspr3-Deficient Mice Exhibit Low Motor Learning during the Early Phase of the Accelerated Rotarod Task.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Haruna; Takahashi, Aki; Shimoda, Yasushi; Koide, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Caspr3 (Contactin-associated protein-like 3, Cntnap3) is a neural cell adhesion molecule belonging to the Caspr family. We have recently shown that Caspr3 is expressed abundantly between the first and second postnatal weeks in the mouse basal ganglia, including the striatum, external segment of the globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, and substantia nigra. However, its physiological role remains largely unknown. In this study, we conducted a series of behavioral analyses on Capsr3-knockout (KO) mice and equivalent wild-type (WT) mice to investigate the role of Caspr3 in brain function. No significant differences were observed in most behavioral traits between Caspr3-KO and WT mice, but we found that Caspr3-KO mice performed poorly during the early phase of the accelerated rotarod task in which latency to falling off a rod rotating with increasing velocity was examined. In the late phase, the performance of the Caspr3-KO mice caught up to the level of WT mice, suggesting that the deletion of Caspr3 caused a delay in motor learning. We then examined changes in neural activity after training on the accelerated rotarod by conducting immunohistochemistry using antibody to c-Fos, an indirect marker for neuronal activity. Experience of the accelerated rotarod task caused increases in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in the dorsal striatum, cerebellum, and motor cortex in both Caspr3-KO and WT mice, but the number of c-Fos-positive cells was significantly lower in the dorsal striatum of Caspr3-KO mice than in that of WT mice. The expression of c-Fos in the ventral striatum of Caspr3-KO and WT mice was not altered by the training. Our findings suggest that reduced activation of neural cells in the dorsal striatum in Caspr3-KO mice leads to a decline in motor learning in the accelerated rotarod task. PMID:26807827

  5. Anxiolytic-like effects of restraint during the dark cycle in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Ota, Yuki; Ago, Yukio; Tanaka, Tatsunori; Hasebe, Shigeru; Toratani, Yui; Onaka, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2015-05-01

    Stress during developmental stage may cause psychological morbidities, and then the studies on stress are important in adolescent rodents. Restraint is used as a common stressor in rodents and the effects of restraint during the light cycle have been studied, but those of restraint during the dark cycle have not. The present study examined the effects of restraint during the light and dark cycles on anxiety behaviors in adolescent mice. Restraint for 3h during either the light or dark cycle impaired memory function in the fear conditioning test, but did not affect locomotor activity. In the elevated plus-maze test, restraint during the dark cycle reduced anxiety-like behaviors in mice. Repeated exposure to a 3-h period dark cycle restraint for 2 weeks had a similar anxiolytic-like effect. In contrast, restraint for 3h during the light cycle produced anxiety behavior in adolescent, but not adult, mice. The light cycle stress increased plasma corticosterone levels, and elevated c-Fos expression in the prefrontal cortex, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, basolateral amygdala and dentate gyrus, and enhanced serotonin turnover in the hippocampus and striatum, while the dark cycle stress did not. There was no difference in the stress-mediated reduction in pentobarbital-induced sleeping time between dark and light cycle restraint. These findings suggest that the anxiolytic effect of dark cycle restraint is mediated by corticosterone, serotonin or γ-aminobutyric acid-independent mechanisms, although the anxiogenic effect of light cycle restraint is associated with changes in plasma corticosterone levels and serotonin turnover in specific brain regions. PMID:25687845

  6. Integrin α1-null Mice Exhibit Improved Fatty Liver When Fed a High Fat Diet Despite Severe Hepatic Insulin Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ashley S.; Kang, Li; Zheng, Jenny; Grueter, Carrie; Bracy, Deanna P.; James, Freyja D.; Pozzi, Ambra; Wasserman, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic insulin resistance is associated with increased collagen. Integrin α1β1 is a collagen-binding receptor expressed on hepatocytes. Here, we show that expression of the α1 subunit is increased in hepatocytes isolated from high fat (HF)-fed mice. To determine whether the integrin α1 subunit protects against impairments in hepatic glucose metabolism, we analyzed glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in HF-fed integrin α1-null (itga1−/−) and wild-type (itga1+/+) littermates. Using the insulin clamp, we found that insulin-stimulated hepatic glucose production was suppressed by ∼50% in HF-fed itga1+/+ mice. In contrast, it was not suppressed in HF-fed itga1−/− mice, indicating severe hepatic insulin resistance. This was associated with decreased hepatic insulin signaling in HF-fed itga1−/− mice. Interestingly, hepatic triglyceride and diglyceride contents were normalized to chow-fed levels in HF-fed itga1−/− mice. This indicates that hepatic steatosis is dissociated from insulin resistance in HF-fed itga1−/− mice. The decrease in hepatic lipid accumulation in HF-fed itga1−/− mice was associated with altered free fatty acid metabolism. These studies establish a role for integrin signaling in facilitating hepatic insulin action while promoting lipid accumulation in mice challenged with a HF diet. PMID:25593319

  7. Bone-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from HIV transgenic mice exhibit altered proliferation, differentiation capacity and paracrine functions along with impaired therapeutic potential in kidney injury

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Kang; Rai, Partab; Lan, Xiqian; Plagov, Andrei; Malhotra, Ashwani; Gupta, Sanjeev; Singhal, Pravin C.

    2013-08-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete paracrine factors that could be cytoprotective and serve roles in immunoregulation during tissue injury. Although MSCs express HIV receptors, and co-receptors, and are susceptible to HIV infection, whether HIV-1 may affect biological properties of MSCs needs more study. We evaluated cellular proliferation, differentiation and paracrine functions of MSCs isolated from compact bones of healthy control mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice. The ability of MSCs to protect against cisplatin toxicity was studied in cultured renal tubular cells as well as in intact mice. We successfully isolated MSCs from healthy mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice and found the latter expressed viral Nef, Vpu, NL4-3 and Vif genes. The proliferation and differentiation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs was inferior to MSCs from healthy mice. Moreover, transplantation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs less effectively improved outcomes compared with healthy MSCs in mice with acute kidney injury. Also, Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs secreted multiple cytokines, but at significantly lower levels than healthy MSCs, which resulted in failure of conditioned medium from these MSCs to protect cultured renal tubular cells from cisplatin toxicity. Therefore, HIV-1 had adverse biological effects on MSCs extending to their proliferation, differentiation, function, and therapeutic potential. These findings will help in advancing mechanistical insight in renal injury and repair in the setting of HIV-1 infection. -- Highlights: •MSCs isolated from HIV mice displayed HIV genes. •MSCs isolated from HIV mice exhibited attenuated growth and paracrine functions. •AKI mice with transplanted HIV-MSC displayed poor outcome. •HIV-1 MSC secreted multiple cytokines but at a lower level.

  8. Mice expressing markedly reduced striatal dopamine transporters exhibit increased locomotor activity, dopamine uptake turnover rate, and cocaine responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Rao, Anjali; Sorkin, Alexander; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2013-10-01

    Variations in the expression levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT) can influence responsiveness to psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. To better understand this relationship, we studied a new DAT-low expresser (DAT-LE) mouse model and performed behavioral and biochemical studies with it. Immunoblotting and [(3) H]WIN 35,428 binding analyses revealed that these mice express ∼35% of wildtype (WT) mouse striatal DAT levels. Compared to WT mice, DAT-LE mice were hyperactive in a novel open-field environment. Despite their higher basal locomotor activity, cocaine (10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) induced greater locomotor activation in DAT-LE mice than in WT mice. The maximal velocity (Vmax ) of DAT-mediated [(3) H]DA uptake into striatal synaptosomes was reduced by 46% in DAT-LE mice, as compared to WT. Overall, considering the reduced number of DAT binding sites (Bmax ) along with the reduced Vmax in DAT-LE mice, a 2-fold increase in DA uptake turnover rate (Vmax /Bmax ) was found, relative to WT mice. This suggests that neuroadaptive changes have occurred in the DAT-LE mice that would help to compensate for their low DAT numbers. Interestingly, these changes do not include a reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase levels, as was previously reported in DAT knockout homozygous and heterozygous animals. Further, these changes are not sufficient to prevent elevated novelty- and cocaine-induced locomotor activity. Hence, these mice represent a unique model for studying changes of in vivo DAT function and regulation that result from markedly reduced levels of DAT expression. PMID:23564231

  9. Cardiac Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Exhibit High Differentiation Potential to Cardiovascular Cells in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Hiroki; Ii, Masaaki; Kohbayashi, Eiko; Hoshiga, Masaaki; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Asahi, Michio

    2016-02-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (AdSCs) have recently been shown to differentiate into cardiovascular lineage cells. However, little is known about the fat tissue origin-dependent differences in AdSC function and differentiation potential. AdSC-rich cells were isolated from subcutaneous, visceral, cardiac (CA), and subscapular adipose tissue from mice and their characteristics analyzed. After four different AdSC types were cultured with specific differentiation medium, immunocytochemical analysis was performed for the assessment of differentiation into cardiovascular cells. We then examined the in vitro differentiation capacity and therapeutic potential of AdSCs in ischemic myocardium using a mouse myocardial infarction model. The cell density and proliferation activity of CA-derived AdSCs were significantly increased compared with the other adipose tissue-derived AdSCs. Immunocytochemistry showed that CA-derived AdSCs had the highest appearance rates of markers for endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes among the AdSCs. Systemic transfusion of CA-derived AdSCs exhibited the highest cardiac functional recovery after myocardial infarction and the high frequency of the recruitment to ischemic myocardium. Moreover, long-term follow-up of the recruited CA-derived AdSCs frequently expressed cardiovascular cell markers compared with the other adipose tissue-derived AdSCs. Cardiac adipose tissue could be an ideal source for isolation of therapeutically effective AdSCs for cardiac regeneration in ischemic heart diseases. Significance: The present study found that cardiac adipose-derived stem cells have a high potential to differentiate into cardiovascular lineage cells (i.e., cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells) compared with stem cells derived from other adipose tissue such as subcutaneous, visceral, and subscapular adipose tissue. Notably, only a small number of supracardiac adipose-derived stem cells that were

  10. PEDF-Deficient Mice Exhibit an Enhanced Rate of Retinal Vascular Expansion and are More Sensitive to Hyperoxia-Mediated Vessel Obliteration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiong; Wang, Shoujian; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2008-01-01

    Pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) is an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis. However, its physiological role during vascular development and neovascularization remains elusive. Here we investigated the role of PEDF in normal postnatal vascularization of retina and retinal neovascularization during oxygen-induced ischemic retinopathy (OIR) using PEDF-deficient (PEDFminus;/minus;) mice. The β-galactosidase staining of eye sections from PEDFminus;/minus; mice confirmed the expression pattern of endogenous PEDF previously reported in mouse retina. However, strongest staining was observed in the retinal outer plexiform layer. Retinal trypsin digests indicated that the ratio of endothelial cells (EC) to pericytes (PC) was significantly higher in PEDFminus;/minus; mice compared to wild type (PEDF+/+) mice at postnatal day 21 (P21). This was mainly attributed to increased number of EC in the absence of PEDF. There was no significant difference in the number of PC. We observed increased rate of proliferation in retinal vasculature of PEDFminus;/minus; mice, which was somewhat compensated for by an increase in the rate of apoptosis. Staining of the retinal wholemounts and eye frozen sections indicated postnatal retinal vascularization expansion occurred at a faster rate in the absence of PEDF, and was more prominent at early time points (prior to P21). The retinal vascularization in PEDF+/+ mice reaches that of PEDFminus;/minus; mice such that no significant difference in vascular densities was observed by P42. Lack of PEDF had minimal effect on the regression of hyaloid vasculature and VEGF levels. PEDFminus;/minus; mice also exhibited enhanced sensitivity to hyperoxia-mediated vessel obliteration during OIR compared to PEDF+/+ mice despite higher levels of VEGF. However, there was no significant difference in the degree of retinal neovascularization. Our studies indicate that PEDF is an important modulator of early postnatal retinal vascularization and in its

  11. Mutant mice deficient in NOS-1 exhibit attenuated long-term facilitation and short-term potentiation in breathing

    PubMed Central

    Kline, David D; Overholt, Jeffery L; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to examine the potential role of nitric oxide (NO) in short-term potentiation (STP) and long-term facilitation (LTF) of breathing. Experiments were performed in wild-type (WT) and mutant mice deficient in nitric oxide synthase-1 (NOS-1), as well as in WT mice administered the NOS-1 inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI; 50 mg kg−1; i.p.). Respiratory responses following either single or recurrent episodes of hypoxia (7 % O2, balance N2) were analysed in unanaesthetised animals by body plethysmography along with rate of O2 consumption (V̇O2) and CO2 production (V̇CO2). After a single hypoxic challenge, respiration in WT mice remained elevated for 5 min, suggesting STP in ventilation. Following termination of three consecutive hypoxic challenges, respiration remained elevated during normoxia for as long as 30 min, indicating LTF in breathing under awake conditions. STP and LTF were significantly attenuated or absent in WT mice after 7-NI. A similar attenuation or absence of STP and LTF was also seen in NOS-1 mutant mice. Changes in V̇O2 and V̇CO2 were comparable among mice during the post-hypoxic period, suggesting that the absence of STP and LTF was not due to alterations in body metabolism. These results suggest endogenous NO is an important physiological modulator of ventilatory STP and LTF. PMID:11850522

  12. Effect of high-fat diets on mood and learning performance in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Danila; Morales, Lidia; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano; Del Olmo, Nuria

    2016-09-15

    Recent studies point to dietary factors as important effectors in the brain and epidemiological studies suggest a direct relationship between mood and anxiety disorders, cognitive impairment and obesity. Nevertheless the link between the consumption of high-fat diets (HFD) and emotional disorders still remains unclear. This issue is of particular interest during adolescence, which is an important period for shaping learning and memory acquisition that can be particularly sensitive to the detrimental effects of HFD. Otherwise, major depressive disorder and anxiety crisis often emerge in adolescence. In the current study we have characterized in adolescent mice i) the onset of HFD-induced memory impairment using the novel location recognition (NLR) paradigm, and ii) the effect of HFD on depression- and anxiety-related behaviors by using the forced swimming and the elevated plus maze tests, respectively. Here we report that memory impairments induced by HFD were already perceptible after 4-weeks HFD whereas HFD induced already antidepressant-like effects after 48-h, that remained after long-term treatment (8 weeks). No effects in anxiety were found. These data indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of HFD is independent of memory deficits as it was already present after 48-h HFD, while no effects in memory were still observed at this time. PMID:27212119

  13. Patterns of Reasoning Exhibited by Children and Adolescents in Response to Moral Dilemmas Involving Plants, Animals and Ecosystems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevers, Patricia; Gebhard, Ulrich; Billmann-Mahecha, Elfriede

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the attitudes and values that children and adolescents hold with respect to nature and the patterns of reasoning with which they are expressed. Outlines current positions in environmental ethics, discusses difficulties in applying contemporary theories of moral development to the problem, and summarizes preliminary results of the…

  14. Adolescent fluoxetine treatment decreases the effects of neonatal immune activation on anxiety-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Majidi-Zolbanin, Jafar; Azarfarin, Maryam; Samadi, Hanieh; Enayati, Mohsen; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2013-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown conflicting effects of neonatal infection on anxiety-like behaviors and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in adult rats. We investigated for the first time whether neonatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with increased levels of anxiety-like behaviors in mice. Moreover, there have been several studies showing that adolescent fluoxetine (FLX) treatment can influence HPA axis development and prevent occurrence of psychiatric disorders induced by common early-life insults. In the present study, we also investigated the effects of adolescent FLX exposure following neonatal immune activation on anxiety-like behavior in mice. Neonatal mice were treated to LPS (50μg/kg) or saline on postnatal days (PND) 3 and 5, then male and female mice of both neonatal intervention groups received oral administration of FLX (5 and 10mg/kg/day) or water via regular drinking bottles during the adolescent period (PNDs 35-65). The results showed that postnatal immune challenge increased anxiety-like behavior in the open field, elevated plus-maze and light-dark box in adult mice (PND 90). Furthermore, the adolescent FLX treatment inhibited the anxiety-like behavior induced by neonatal infection in both sexes. However, this study indicates the negative effects of the FLX on normal behavioral symptoms in male control mice. Taken together, the current data provide experimental evidence that neonatal infection increases anxiety levels in male and female mice in adulthood. Additionally, the findings of this study support the hypothesis that an early pharmacological intervention with FLX may be an effective treatment for reducing the behavioral abnormalities induced by common early-life insults. PMID:23669137

  15. ENU-mutagenesis mice with a non-synonymous mutation in Grin1 exhibit abnormal anxiety-like behaviors, impaired fear memory, and decreased acoustic startle response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Grin1 (glutamate receptor, ionotropic, NMDA1) gene expresses a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors that is considered to play an important role in excitatory neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and brain development. Grin1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In our previous study, we examined an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-generated mutant mouse strain (Grin1Rgsc174/Grin1+) that has a non-synonymous mutation in Grin1. These mutant mice showed hyperactivity, increased novelty-seeking to objects, and abnormal social interactions. Therefore, Grin1Rgsc174/Grin1+ mice may serve as a potential animal model of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, other behavioral characteristics related to these disorders, such as working memory function and sensorimotor gating, have not been fully explored in these mutant mice. In this study, to further investigate the behavioral phenotypes of Grin1Rgsc174/Grin1+ mice, we subjected them to a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. Results There was no significant difference in nociception between Grin1Rgsc174/Grin1+ and wild-type mice. The mutants did not display any abnormalities in the Porsolt forced swim and tail suspension tests. We confirmed the previous observations that the locomotor activity of these mutant mice increased in the open field and home cage activity tests. They displayed abnormal anxiety-like behaviors in the light/dark transition and the elevated plus maze tests. Both contextual and cued fear memory were severely deficient in the fear conditioning test. The mutant mice exhibited slightly impaired working memory in the eight-arm radial maze test. The startle amplitude was markedly decreased in Grin1Rgsc174/Grin1+ mice, whereas no significant differences between genotypes were detected in the prepulse inhibition (PPI) test. The mutant mice showed no obvious

  16. Tg-SwDI Transgenic Mice Exhibit Novel Alterations in AβPP Processing, Aβ Degradation, and Resilient Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Van Vickle, Gregory D.; Esh, Chera L.; Daugs, Ian D.; Kokjohn, Tyler A.; Kalback, Walter M.; Patton, R. Lyle; Luehrs, Dean C.; Walker, Douglas G.; Lue, Lih-Fen; Beach, Thomas G.; Davis, Judianne; Van Nostrand, William E.; Castaño, Eduardo M.; Roher, Alex E.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular insoluble amyloid, primarily derived from polymerized amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. We characterized the chemical composition of the Aβ peptides deposited in the brain parenchyma and cerebrovascular walls of triple transgenic Tg-SwDI mice that produce a rapid and profuse Aβ accumulation. The processing of the N- and C-terminal regions of mutant AβPP differs substantially from humans because the brain parenchyma accumulates numerous, diffuse, nonfibrillar plaques, whereas the thalamic microvessels harbor overwhelming amounts of compact, fibrillar, thioflavine-S- and apolipoprotein E-positive amyloid deposits. The abundant accretion of vascular amyloid, despite low AβPP transgene expression levels, suggests that inefficient Aβ proteolysis because of conformational changes and dimerization may be key pathogenic factors in this animal model. The disruption of amyloid plaque cores by immunotherapy is accompanied by increased perivascular deposition in both humans and transgenic mice. This analogous susceptibility and response to the disruption of amyloid deposits suggests that Tg-SwDI mice provide an excellent model in which to study the functional aftermath of immunotherapeutic interventions. These mice might also reveal new avenues to promote amyloidogenic AβPP processing and fundamental insights into the faulty degradation and clearance of Aβ in AD, pivotal issues in understanding AD pathophysiology and the assessment of new therapeutic agents. PMID:18599612

  17. Pseudouridine synthase 1 deficient mice, a model for Mitochondrial Myopathy with Sideroblastic Anemia, exhibit muscle morphology and physiology alterations

    PubMed Central

    Mangum, Joshua E.; Hardee, Justin P.; Fix, Dennis K.; Puppa, Melissa J.; Elkes, Johnathon; Altomare, Diego; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Campagna, Dean R.; Schmidt, Paul J.; Sendamarai, Anoop K.; Lidov, Hart G. W.; Barlow, Shayne C.; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Fleming, Mark D.; Carson, James A.; Patton, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy with lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) is an oxidative phosphorylation disorder, with primary clinical manifestations of myopathic exercise intolerance and a macrocytic sideroblastic anemia. One cause of MLASA is recessive mutations in PUS1, which encodes pseudouridine (Ψ) synthase 1 (Pus1p). Here we describe a mouse model of MLASA due to mutations in PUS1. As expected, certain Ψ modifications were missing in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs from Pus1−/− animals. Pus1−/− mice were born at the expected Mendelian frequency and were non-dysmorphic. At 14 weeks the mutants displayed reduced exercise capacity. Examination of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle morphology and histochemistry demonstrated an increase in the cross sectional area and proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIB and low succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) expressing myofibers, without a change in the size of MHC IIA positive or high SDH myofibers. Cytochrome c oxidase activity was significantly reduced in extracts from red gastrocnemius muscle from Pus1−/− mice. Transmission electron microscopy on red gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated that Pus1−/− mice also had lower intermyofibrillar mitochondrial density and smaller mitochondria. Collectively, these results suggest that alterations in muscle metabolism related to mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity may account for the reduced exercise capacity in Pus1−/− mice. PMID:27197761

  18. Pseudouridine synthase 1 deficient mice, a model for Mitochondrial Myopathy with Sideroblastic Anemia, exhibit muscle morphology and physiology alterations.

    PubMed

    Mangum, Joshua E; Hardee, Justin P; Fix, Dennis K; Puppa, Melissa J; Elkes, Johnathon; Altomare, Diego; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Campagna, Dean R; Schmidt, Paul J; Sendamarai, Anoop K; Lidov, Hart G W; Barlow, Shayne C; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Fleming, Mark D; Carson, James A; Patton, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy with lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) is an oxidative phosphorylation disorder, with primary clinical manifestations of myopathic exercise intolerance and a macrocytic sideroblastic anemia. One cause of MLASA is recessive mutations in PUS1, which encodes pseudouridine (Ψ) synthase 1 (Pus1p). Here we describe a mouse model of MLASA due to mutations in PUS1. As expected, certain Ψ modifications were missing in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs from Pus1(-/-) animals. Pus1(-/-) mice were born at the expected Mendelian frequency and were non-dysmorphic. At 14 weeks the mutants displayed reduced exercise capacity. Examination of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle morphology and histochemistry demonstrated an increase in the cross sectional area and proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIB and low succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) expressing myofibers, without a change in the size of MHC IIA positive or high SDH myofibers. Cytochrome c oxidase activity was significantly reduced in extracts from red gastrocnemius muscle from Pus1(-/-) mice. Transmission electron microscopy on red gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated that Pus1(-/-) mice also had lower intermyofibrillar mitochondrial density and smaller mitochondria. Collectively, these results suggest that alterations in muscle metabolism related to mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity may account for the reduced exercise capacity in Pus1(-/-) mice. PMID:27197761

  19. Oxytocin receptor and Mecp2 308/Y knockout mice exhibit altered expression of autism-related social behaviors.

    PubMed

    Pobbe, Roger L H; Pearson, Brandon L; Blanchard, D Caroline; Blanchard, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    The development of tasks measuring behaviors specific to the three major symptom categories for autism makes it possible to differentiate mouse models of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in terms of changes in these specific categories. Prior studies indicate that BTBR T+tf/J mice, the strain that has been evaluated most extensively, show autism-relevant changes in all three symptom categories; reciprocal social interactions; communication; and repetitive, ritualized behaviors. This report reviews the behaviors of oxytocin receptor (Oxtr) and Mecp2(308/Y) wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice, in a number of tests specifically designed to provide information on behaviors that may show functional parallels to the core symptoms of ASD. Oxtr KO mice show robust decreases in reciprocal social interactions, and reduced levels of communication, but no changes in repetitive, ritualized behaviors; whereas Mecp2(308/Y) KO mice show a slight but consistent enhancement of social behavior and communication, and no changes in repetitive, ritualized behaviors. This data base, although small, strongly indicates that mouse models can sort the diagnostic symptoms of autism, and suggests that biological and physiological analyses of these strains may be capable of providing differential information on the brain systems involved in particular symptoms of this disorder. Profiles of behavioral changes in other mouse models of ASD should provide additional specificity in the search for biomarkers associated with particular ASD symptoms and symptom clusters. PMID:22406388

  20. Female Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA Mice Exhibit Hyperactivity and a Reduced Sense of Danger in the Open Field Test

    PubMed Central

    Langford-Smith, Alex; Langford-Smith, Kia J.; Jones, Simon A.; Wynn, Robert F.; Wraith, J. E.; Wilkinson, Fiona L.; Bigger, Brian W.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable behavioural tests in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases allow us to study the natural history of disease and evaluate the efficacy of novel therapies. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA (MPS IIIA or Sanfilippo A), is a severe, neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency in the heparan sulphate catabolising enzyme, sulfamidase. Undegraded heparan sulphate accumulates, resulting in lysosomal enlargement and cellular dysfunction. Patients suffer a progressive loss of motor and cognitive function with severe behavioural manifestations and premature death. There is currently no treatment. A spontaneously occurring mouse model of the disease has been described, that has approximately 3% of normal enzyme activity levels. Behavioural phenotyping of the MPS IIIA mouse has been previously reported, but the results are conflicting and variable, even after full backcrossing to the C57BL/6 background. Therefore we have independently backcrossed the MPS IIIA model onto the C57BL/6J background and evaluated the behaviour of male and female MPS IIIA mice at 4, 6 and 8 months of age using the open field test, elevated plus maze, inverted screen and horizontal bar crossing at the same circadian time point. Using a 60 minute open field, we have demonstrated that female MPS IIIA mice are hyperactive, have a longer path length, display rapid exploratory behaviour and spend less time immobile than WT mice. Female MPS IIIA mice also display a reduced sense of danger and spend more time in the centre of the open field. There were no significant differences found between male WT and MPS IIIA mice and no differences in neuromuscular strength were seen with either sex. The altered natural history of behaviour that we observe in the MPS IIIA mouse will allow more accurate evaluation of novel therapeutics for MPS IIIA and potentially other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22028789

  1. Secretin receptor-knockout mice are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and exhibit impaired intestinal lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Revathi; Chow, Billy K C

    2014-08-01

    Secretin, a classical gastrointestinal hormone released from S cells in response to acid and dietary lipid, regulates pleiotropic physiological functions, such as exocrine pancreatic secretion and gastric motility. Subsequent to recently proposed revisit on secretin's metabolic effects, we have confirmed lipolytic actions of secretin during starvation and discovered a hormone-sensitive lipase-mediated mechanistic pathway behind. In this study, a 12 wk high-fat diet (HFD) feeding to secretin receptor-knockout (SCTR(-/-)) mice and their wild-type (SCTR(+/+)) littermates revealed that, despite similar food intake, SCTR(-/-) mice gained significantly less weight (SCTR(+/+): 49.6±0.9 g; SCTR(-/-): 44.7±1.4 g; P<0.05) and exhibited lower body fat content. These SCTR(-/-) mice have corresponding alleviated HFD-associated hyperleptinemia and improved glucose/insulin tolerance. Further analyses indicate that SCTR(-/-) have impaired intestinal fatty acid absorption while having similar energy expenditure and locomotor activity. Reduced fat absorption in the intestine is further supported by lowered postprandial triglyceride concentrations in circulation in SCTR(-/-) mice. In jejunal cells, transcript and protein levels of a key fat absorption regulator, cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36), was reduced in knockout mice, while transcript of Cd36 and fatty-acid uptake in isolated enterocytes was stimulated by secretin. Based on our findings, a novel positive feedback pathway involving secretin and CD36 to enhance intestinal lipid absorption is being proposed. PMID:24769669

  2. Comparison of the deleterious effects of binge drinking-like alcohol exposure in adolescent and adult mice.

    PubMed

    Lacaille, Hélène; Duterte-Boucher, Dominique; Liot, Donovan; Vaudry, Hubert; Naassila, Mickael; Vaudry, David

    2015-03-01

    A major cause of alcohol toxicity is the production of reactive oxygen species generated during ethanol metabolism. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of binge drinking-like alcohol exposure on a panel of genes implicated in oxidative mechanisms in adolescent and adult mice. In adolescent animals, alcohol decreased the expression of genes involved in the repair and protection of oxidative DNA damage such as atr, gpx7, or nudt15 and increased the expression of proapoptotic genes such as casp3. In contrast, in the adult brain, genes activated by alcohol were mainly associated with protective mechanisms that prevent cells from oxidative damage. Whatever the age, iterative binge-like episodes provoked the same deleterious effects as those observed after a single binge episode. In adolescent mice, multiple binge ethanol exposure substantially reduced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and impaired short-term memory in the novel object and passive avoidance tests. Taken together, our results indicate that alcohol causes deleterious effects in the adolescent brain which are distinct from those observed in adults. These data contribute to explain the greater sensitivity of the adolescent brain to alcohol toxicity. The effects of alcohol exposure were investigated on genes involved in oxidative mechanisms. In adolescent animals, alcohol decreased the expression of genes involved in DNA repair, a potential cause of the observed decrease of neurogenesis. In contrast, in the adult brain, alcohol increased the expression of genes associated with antioxidant mechanisms. Apoptosis was increase in all groups and converged with other biochemical alterations to enhance short-term memory impairment in the adolescent brain. These data contribute to explain the greater sensitivity of the adolescent brain to alcohol toxicity. PMID:25556946

  3. Mice deficient in LMAN1 exhibit FV and FVIII deficiencies and liver accumulation of α1-antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunlei; Zhu, Min; Tao, Jiayi; Vasievich, Matthew P.; Baines, Andrea; Kim, Jinoh; Schekman, Randy; Kaufman, Randal J.; Ginsburg, David

    2011-01-01

    The type 1-transmembrane protein LMAN1 (ERGIC-53) forms a complex with the soluble protein MCFD2 and cycles between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). Mutations in either LMAN1 or MCFD2 cause the combined deficiency of factor V (FV) and factor VIII (FVIII; F5F8D), suggesting an ER-to-Golgi cargo receptor function for the LMAN1-MCFD2 complex. Here we report the analysis of LMAN1-deficient mice. Levels of plasma FV and FVIII, and platelet FV, are all reduced to ∼ 50% of wild-type in Lman1−/− mice, compared with the 5%-30% levels typically observed in human F5F8D patients. Despite previous reports identifying cathepsin C, cathepsin Z, and α1-antitrypsin as additional potential cargoes for LMAN1, no differences were observed between wild-type and Lman1−/− mice in the levels of cathepsin C and cathepsin Z in liver lysates or α1-antitrypsin levels in plasma. LMAN1 deficiency had no apparent effect on COPII-coated vesicle formation in an in vitro assay. However, the ER in Lman1−/− hepatocytes is slightly distended, with significant accumulation of α1-antitrypsin and GRP78. An unexpected, partially penetrant, perinatal lethality was observed for Lman1−/− mice, dependent on the specific inbred strain genetic background, suggesting a potential role for other, as yet unidentified LMAN1-dependent cargo proteins. PMID:21795745

  4. Chronic Adolescent Exposure to Δ-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in COMT Mutant Mice: Impact on Psychosis-Related and Other Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    O'Tuathaigh, Colm MP; Hryniewiecka, Magdalena; Behan, Aine; Tighe, Orna; Coughlan, Catherine; Desbonnet, Lieve; Cannon, Mary; Karayiorgou, Maria; Gogos, Joseph A; Cotter, David R; Waddington, John L

    2010-01-01

    Cannabis use confers a two-fold increase in the risk for psychosis, with adolescent use conferring even greater risk. A high–low activity catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphism may modulate the effects of adolescent Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure on the risk for adult psychosis. Mice with knockout of the COMT gene were treated chronically with THC (4.0 and 8.0 mg/kg over 20 days) during either adolescence (postnatal days (PDs) 32–52) or adulthood (PDs 70–90). The effects of THC exposure were then assessed in adulthood across behavioral phenotypes relevant for psychosis: exploratory activity, spatial working memory (spontaneous and delayed alternation), object recognition memory, social interaction (sociability and social novelty preference), and anxiety (elevated plus maze). Adolescent THC administration induced a larger increase in exploratory activity, greater impairment in spatial working memory, and a stronger anti-anxiety effect in COMT knockouts than in wild types, primarily among males. No such effects of selective adolescent THC administration were evident for other behaviors. Both object recognition memory and social novelty preference were disrupted by either adolescent or adult THC administration, independent of genotype. The COMT genotype exerts specific modulation of responsivity to chronic THC administration during adolescence in terms of exploratory activity, spatial working memory, and anxiety. These findings illuminate the interaction between genes and adverse environmental exposures over a particular stage of development in the expression of the psychosis phenotype. PMID:20631688

  5. Chronic adolescent exposure to Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in COMT mutant mice: impact on psychosis-related and other phenotypes.

    PubMed

    O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Hryniewiecka, Magdalena; Behan, Aine; Tighe, Orna; Coughlan, Catherine; Desbonnet, Lieve; Cannon, Mary; Karayiorgou, Maria; Gogos, Joseph A; Cotter, David R; Waddington, John L

    2010-10-01

    Cannabis use confers a two-fold increase in the risk for psychosis, with adolescent use conferring even greater risk. A high-low activity catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphism may modulate the effects of adolescent Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure on the risk for adult psychosis. Mice with knockout of the COMT gene were treated chronically with THC (4.0 and 8.0 mg/kg over 20 days) during either adolescence (postnatal days (PDs) 32-52) or adulthood (PDs 70-90). The effects of THC exposure were then assessed in adulthood across behavioral phenotypes relevant for psychosis: exploratory activity, spatial working memory (spontaneous and delayed alternation), object recognition memory, social interaction (sociability and social novelty preference), and anxiety (elevated plus maze). Adolescent THC administration induced a larger increase in exploratory activity, greater impairment in spatial working memory, and a stronger anti-anxiety effect in COMT knockouts than in wild types, primarily among males. No such effects of selective adolescent THC administration were evident for other behaviors. Both object recognition memory and social novelty preference were disrupted by either adolescent or adult THC administration, independent of genotype. The COMT genotype exerts specific modulation of responsivity to chronic THC administration during adolescence in terms of exploratory activity, spatial working memory, and anxiety. These findings illuminate the interaction between genes and adverse environmental exposures over a particular stage of development in the expression of the psychosis phenotype. PMID:20631688

  6. Model mice for 15q11-13 duplication syndrome exhibit late-onset obesity and altered lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Rui; Tamada, Kota; Liu, Xiaoxi; Okubo, Hiroko; Ise, Satoko; Ohta, Hisashi; Ruf, Sandra; Nakatani, Jin; Kohno, Nobuoki; Spitz, François; Takumi, Toru

    2015-08-15

    Copy number variations on human chromosome 15q11-q13 have been implicated in several neurodevelopmental disorders. A paternal loss or duplication of the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region confers a risk of obesity, although the mechanism remains a mystery due to a lack of an animal model that accurately recreates the obesity phenotype. We performed detailed analyses of mice with duplication of PWS/AS locus (6 Mb) generated by chromosome engineering and found that animals with a paternal duplication of this region (patDp/+) show late-onset obesity, high sensitivity for high-fat diet, high levels of blood leptin and insulin without an increase in food intake. We show that prior to becoming obese, young patDp/+ mice already had enlarged white adipocytes. Transcriptome analysis of adipose tissue revealed an up-regulation of Secreted frizzled-related protein 5 (Sfrp5), known to promote adipogenesis. We additionally generated a new mouse model of paternal duplication focusing on a 3 Mb region (3 Mb patDp/+) within the PWS/AS locus. These mice recapitulate the obese phenotypes including expansion of visceral adipose tissue. Our results suggest paternally expressed genes in PWS/AS locus play a significant role for the obesity and identify new potential targets for future research and treatment of obesity. PMID:26002101

  7. Sphingosine kinase 2 deficient mice exhibit reduced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: Resistance to FTY720 but not ST-968 treatments.

    PubMed

    Imeri, Faik; Schwalm, Stephanie; Lyck, Ruth; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Stark, Holger; Engelhardt, Britta; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Huwiler, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The immunomodulatory drug FTY720 is presently approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. It is a prodrug that requires activation by sphingosine kinase 2 (SK-2) to induce T cell homing to secondary lymphoid tissue. In this study, we have investigated the role of SK-2 in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. We show that SK-2 deficiency reduced clinical symptoms of EAE. Furthermore, in SK-2-deficient mice, the protective effect of FTY720 on EAE was abolished, while the non-prodrug FTY720-derivative ST-968 was still fully active. Protection was paralleled by reduced numbers of T-lymphocytes in blood and a reduced blood-brain-barrier leakage. This correlated with reduced mRNA expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, but enhanced expression of PECAM-1. A similar regulation of permeability and of PECAM-1 was seen in primary cultures of isolated mouse brain vascular endothelial cells and in a human immortalized cell line upon SK-2 knockdown. In summary, these data demonstrated that deletion of SK-2 exerts a protective effect on the pathogenesis of EAE in C57BL/6 mice and that SK-2 is essential for the protective effect of FTY720 but not of ST-968. Thus, ST-968 is a promising novel immunomodulatory compound that may be a valuable alternative to FTY720 under conditions where SK-2 activity is limited. PMID:26808312

  8. Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Survive in Kupffer Cells and Exhibit High Virulence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Takuto; Miyazaki, Motoyasu; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Takata, Tohru; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki; Jimi, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is part of the normal body flora, heavy usage of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). MRSA can form biofilms and cause indwelling foreign body infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. Using an in vitro assay, we screened 173 clinical blood isolates of MRSA and selected 20 high-biofilm formers (H-BF) and low-biofilm formers (L-BF). These were intravenously administered to mice and the general condition of mice, the distribution of bacteria, and biofilm in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were investigated. MRSA count was the highest in the liver, especially within Kupffer cells, which were positive for acid polysaccharides that are associated with intracellular biofilm. After 24 h, the general condition of the mice worsened significantly in the H-BF group. In the liver, bacterial deposition and aggregation and the biofilm-forming spot number were all significantly greater for H-BF group than for L-BF. CFU analysis revealed that bacteria in the H-BF group survived for long periods in the liver. These results indicate that the biofilm-forming ability of MRSA is a crucial factor for intracellular persistence, which could lead to chronic infections. PMID:27376326

  9. Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Survive in Kupffer Cells and Exhibit High Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Takuto; Miyazaki, Motoyasu; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Takata, Tohru; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki; Jimi, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is part of the normal body flora, heavy usage of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). MRSA can form biofilms and cause indwelling foreign body infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. Using an in vitro assay, we screened 173 clinical blood isolates of MRSA and selected 20 high-biofilm formers (H-BF) and low-biofilm formers (L-BF). These were intravenously administered to mice and the general condition of mice, the distribution of bacteria, and biofilm in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were investigated. MRSA count was the highest in the liver, especially within Kupffer cells, which were positive for acid polysaccharides that are associated with intracellular biofilm. After 24 h, the general condition of the mice worsened significantly in the H-BF group. In the liver, bacterial deposition and aggregation and the biofilm-forming spot number were all significantly greater for H-BF group than for L-BF. CFU analysis revealed that bacteria in the H-BF group survived for long periods in the liver. These results indicate that the biofilm-forming ability of MRSA is a crucial factor for intracellular persistence, which could lead to chronic infections. PMID:27376326

  10. Metallothionein I,II deficient mice do not exhibit significantly worse long-term behavioral outcomes following neonatal hypoxia-ischemia: MT-I,II deficient mice have inherent behavioral impairments.

    PubMed

    McAuliffe, John J; Joseph, Bernadin; Hughes, Elizabeth; Miles, Lili; Vorhees, Charles V

    2008-01-23

    Metallothionein I and II are small metal binding proteins with a high affinity for zinc. They are found in the CNS and are thought to play a role in modulating the effects of free zinc. We hypothesized that MT-I,II deficient mice would have more neurological deficits both functionally and anatomically following a neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) insult than wild-type mice subjected to the same insult. Forty wild-type and 40 MT-I,II deficient C57 X 129T2 F1 P10 mice were randomized to either 45 min of HI or sham HI. Beginning on P50, the mice were given a series of behavioral tests including locomotor activity, novel object recognition, Morris water maze (cued, hidden platform, reduced platform), a 2-week-delayed probe trial and an apomorphine-induced rotation test. At the conclusion of testing, the brains were removed for histological analysis including staining with NeuN and GFAP to assess neuronal loss and reactive gliosis. There were no significant differences in functional or anatomic measures between the wild-type HI mice and the MT-I,II deficient HI mice. The MT-I,II deficient mice exhibited an impaired rate of learning in the spatially oriented mazes but once learned retained the information as well as the wild-type mice. The absence of functional MT-I,II proteins does not result in significantly worse injury following 45 min of HI on P10. The MT-I,II deficient mice have baseline impairments in spatial learning but not retention. PMID:18083145

  11. Long-term effects of methamphetamine exposure in adolescent mice on the future ovarian reserve in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Qu, Guoqiang; Dong, Xiyuan; Huang, Kai; Kumar, Molly; Ji, Licheng; Wang, Ya; Yao, Junning; Yang, Shulin; Wu, Ruxing; Zhang, Hanwang

    2016-02-01

    Currently, there is an increasing prevalence of adolescent exposure to methamphetamine (MA). However, there is a paucity of information concerning the long-term impact of early exposure to MA upon female fertility and ovarian reserve. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term MA exposure in adolescents on their ovarian reserve in adulthood. Adolescent mice received intraperitoneal injections of MA (5mg/kg, three times per week) or saline from the 21st postnatal day for an 8 week period. Morphological, histological, biochemical, hormonal and ethological parameters were evaluated. An impaired ovarian reserve and vitality was found in the group treated with MA, manifesting in morphological-apparent mitochondrial damage, an activated apoptosis pathway in the ovarian tissue, a downward expression of ovarian anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), a decreased number of primordial and growing follicles, an increased number of atretic follicles, and a depressed secretion of AMH, estradiol and progesterone from granulosa cells. However, no significant difference was noticed regarding the estrous cycle, the mating ability and the fertility outcome in the reproductive age of the mice after a period of non-medication. The present results confirmed that a long term exposure to methamphetamine in adolescent mice does have an adverse impact on their ovarian reserve, which indicates that such an early abuse of MA might influence the fertility lifespan of the female mouse. PMID:26657179

  12. Heregulin, but not ErbB2 or ErbB3, heterozygous mutant mice exhibit hyperactivity in multiple behavioral tasks.

    PubMed

    Gerlai, R; Pisacane, P; Erickson, S

    2000-05-01

    Genetic redundancy is a problem in gene targeting studies because functionally relevant sister proteins can compensate for the lack of protein product of a targeted gene. A molecular system is chosen in which it is hoped to demonstrate both the lack and presence of compensation after disruption of particular single genes. Mammals may not be able to compensate for the lack of heregulin, a single ligand for multiple ErbB receptors, however, compensation is expected when a single ErbB receptor is knocked out. To investigate this the heregulin-1, ErbB2, or ErbB3 locus was disrupted in a targeted manner and mice heterozygous for the mutation were analyzed. Heregulin and its receptors were shown to be involved in embryonic brain development and, more recently, in plastic changes associated with adult brain function in rodents. Although they have never been shown to play roles in mammalian behavior, it was decided to characterize the mice behaviorally using a battery of simple tests. Heregulin mutant mice exhibited elevated activity levels in the open field, showed improved rotorod performance, and finished T-maze spontaneous alternation task faster compared to control wild type littermates, findings that suggest a consistent hyperactivity across tests. ErbB2 and ErbB3 mutant mice, whose strain origin was identical to that of heregulin mutants, showed no sign of the behavioral alterations. It is suggested that the abnormalities seen in heregulin mutant mice are due to mutation at that locus and the lack of alterations seen in ErbB2 and ErbB3 mutant mice is the result of compensation by unaltered sister receptors. PMID:10762692

  13. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Amyloid Precursor Protein Exhibit Early Metabolic Deficits and a Pathologically Low Leptin State Associated with Hypothalamic Dysfunction in Arcuate Neuropeptide Y Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Makoto; Wang, Gang; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Dyke, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Weight loss is a prominent early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that often precedes the cognitive decline and clinical diagnosis. While the exact pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain is thought to lead to the neuronal dysfunction and death underlying the dementia. In this study, we examined whether transgenic mice overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP (Tg2576), recapitulating selected features of AD, have hypothalamic leptin signaling dysfunction leading to early body weight deficits. We found that 3-month-old Tg2576 mice, before amyloid plaque formation, exhibit decreased weight with markedly decreased adiposity, low plasma leptin levels, and increased energy expenditure without alterations in feeding behavior. The expression of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus to the low leptin state was abnormal at basal and fasting conditions. In addition, arcuate NPY neurons exhibited abnormal electrophysiological responses to leptin in Tg2576 hypothalamic slices or wild-type slices treated with Aβ. Finally, the metabolic deficits worsened as Tg2576 mice aged and amyloid burden increased in the brain. These results indicate that excess Aβ can potentially disrupt hypothalamic arcuate NPY neurons leading to weight loss and a pathologically low leptin state early in the disease process that progressively worsens as the amyloid burden increases. Collectively, these findings suggest that weight loss is an intrinsic pathological feature of Aβ accumulation and identify hypothalamic leptin signaling as a previously unrecognized pathogenic site of action for Aβ. PMID:24990930

  14. A history of chronic morphine exposure during adolescence increases despair-like behaviour and strain-dependently promotes sociability in abstinent adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, PE; Reiss, D; Ouagazzal, AM; Kieffer, BL

    2013-01-01

    A crucial issue in treating opiate addiction, a chronic relapsing disorder, is to maintain a drug-free abstinent state. Prolonged abstinence associates with mood disorders, strongly contributing to relapse. In particular, substance use disorders occurring during adolescence predispose to depression later in adulthood. Using our established mouse model of opiate abstinence, we characterized emotional consequences into adulthood of morphine exposure during adolescence. Our results indicate that morphine treatment in adolescent mice has no effect on anxiety-like behaviours in adult mice, after abstinence. In contrast, morphine treatment during adolescence increases behavioural despair in adult mice. We also show that morphine exposure strain-dependently enhances sociability in adult mice. Additional research will be required to understand where and how morphine acts during brain maturation to affect emotional and social behaviours into adulthood. PMID:23295400

  15. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate inhibits UVB-induced skin inflammation and oxidative stress in hairless mice and exhibits antioxidant activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Ana L M; Campanini, Marcela Z; Martinez, Renata M; Ferreira, Vitor S; Steffen, Vinicius S; Vicentini, Fabiana T M C; Vilela, Fernanda M P; Martins, Frederico S; Zarpelon, Ana C; Cunha, Thiago M; Fonseca, Maria J V; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Verri, Waldiceu A; Casagrande, Rúbia

    2014-09-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation may cause oxidative stress- and inflammation-dependent skin cancer and premature aging. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is an antioxidant and inhibits nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. In the present study, the mechanisms of PDTC were investigated in cell free oxidant/antioxidant assays, in vivo UVB irradiation in hairless mice and UVB-induced NFκB activation in keratinocytes. PDTC presented the ability to scavenge 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethyl benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl radical (DPPH) and hydroxyl radical (OH); and also efficiently inhibited iron-dependent and -independent lipid peroxidation as well as chelated iron. In vivo, PDTC treatment significantly decreased UVB-induced skin edema, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), increase of reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and antioxidant capacity of the skin tested by the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and ABTS assays. PDTC also reduced UVB-induced IκB degradation in keratinocytes. These results demonstrate that PDTC presents antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in vitro, which line up well with the PDTC inhibition of UVB irradiation-induced skin inflammation and oxidative stress in mice. These data suggest that treatment with PDTC may be a promising approach to reduce UVB irradiation-induced skin damages and merits further pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:24927233

  16. Adolescent female rats exhibiting activity-based anorexia express elevated levels of GABA(A) receptor α4 and δ subunits at the plasma membrane of hippocampal CA1 spines.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Chiye; Sabaliauskas, Nicole; Chowdhury, Tara; Min, Jung-Yun; Colacino, Anna Rita; Laurino, Kevin; Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C

    2012-05-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is an animal model for anorexia nervosa that has revealed genetic links to anxiety traits and neurochemical characteristics within the hypothalamus. However, few studies have used this animal model to investigate the biological basis for vulnerability of pubertal and adolescent females to ABA, even though the great majority of the anorexia nervosa cases are females exhibiting the first symptoms during puberty. GABAergic inhibition of the hippocampus strongly regulates anxiety as well as plasticity throughout life. We recently showed that the hippocampal CA1 of female mice undergo a dramatic change at puberty onset--from expressing virtually none of the nonsynaptic α4βδ GABA(A) receptors (GABARs) prepubertally to expressing these GABARs at ~7% of the CA1 dendritic spine membranes at puberty onset. Furthermore, we showed that this change underlies the enhanced modulation of anxiety, neuronal excitability, and NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus by the stress neurosteroid, THP (3α-OH-5α[β]-pregnan-20-one or [allo]pregnanolone). Here, we used quantitative electron microscopy to determine whether ABA induction in female rats during adolescence also elevates the expression of α4 and δ subunits of α4βδ GABARs, as was observed at puberty onset for mice. Our analysis revealed that rats also exhibit a rise of α4 and δ subunits of α4βδ GABARs at puberty onset, in that these subunits are detectable at ~6% of the dendritic spine membranes of CA1 pyramidal cells at puberty onset (postnatal day 32-36; P32-36) but this drops to about 2% by P40-P44. The levels of α4 and δ subunits at the CA1 spines remained low following exposure of females to either of the two environmental factors needed to generate ABA--food restriction and access to a running wheel for 4 days--from P40 to P44. This pattern contrasted greatly from those of ABA animals, for which the two environmental factors were combined. Within the

  17. Effects of adolescent nicotine exposure and withdrawal on intravenous cocaine self-administration during adulthood in male C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Price E; Miller, Mellessa M; Rogers, Tiffany D; Blaha, Charles D; Mittleman, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Studies of adolescent drug use show (1) a pattern in which the use of tobacco precedes the use of other drugs and (2) a positive relationship between adolescent tobacco use and later drug use. These observations have led to the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between early exposure to nicotine and the later use of hard drugs such as cocaine. Using male C57BL/6J mice, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine exposure in adolescence leads to increased intravenous self-administration (IVSA) of cocaine in adulthood. Using miniature osmotic pumps, we exposed mice and their littermate controls to nicotine (24 mg/kg/day) or vehicle, respectively, over the entire course of adolescence [postnatal days (P) 28-56]. Nicotine exposure was terminated on P56 and mice were not exposed to nicotine again during the experiment. On P73, mice were allowed to acquire cocaine IVSA (1.0 mg/kg/infusion) and a dose-response curve was generated (0.18, 0.32, 0.56, 1.0, 1.8 mg/kg/infusion). Lever pressing during extinction conditions was also evaluated. All mice rapidly learned to lever press for the combination of cocaine infusions and non-drug stimuli. Analysis of the dose-response curve revealed that adolescent nicotine-exposed mice self-administered significantly more (P < 0.05) cocaine than controls at all but the highest dose. No significant differences were observed between adolescent nicotine-exposed and control mice during the acquisition or extinction stages. These results indicate that adolescent nicotine exposure can increase cocaine IVSA in mice, which suggests the possibility of a causal link between adolescent tobacco use and later cocaine use in humans. PMID:22978678

  18. BAC Transgenic Mice Expressing a Truncated Mutant Parkin Exhibit Age-dependent Hypokinetic Motor Deficits, Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration, and Accumulation of Proteinase K-Resistant Alpha-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiao-Hong; Fleming, Sheila M.; Meurers, Bernhard; Ackerson, Larry C.; Mortazavi, Farzad; Lo, Victor; Hernandez, Daniela; Sulzer, David; Jackson, George R.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Chesselet, Marie-Francoise; Yang, X. William

    2009-01-01

    Summary Recessive mutations in parkin are the most common cause of familial early onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent studies suggest that certain parkin mutants may exert dominant toxic effects to cultured cells and such dominant toxicity can lead to progressive dopaminergic (DA) neuron degeneration in Drosophila. To explore whether mutant parkin could exert similar pathogenic effects to mammalian DA neurons in vivo, we developed a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse model expressing a C-terminal truncated human mutant parkin (Parkin-Q311X) in DA neurons driven by a dopamine transporter promoter. Parkin-Q311X mice exhibit multiple late-onset and progressive hypokinetic motor deficits. Stereological analyses reveal that the mutant mice develop age-dependent DA neuron degeneration in substantia nigra accompanied by a significant loss of DA neuron terminals in the striatum. Neurochemical analyses reveal a significant reduction of the striatal dopamine level in mutant mice, which is significantly correlated with their hypokinetic motor deficits. Finally, mutant Parkin-Q311X mice, but not wild-type controls, exhibit age-dependent accumulation of proteinase-K resistant endogenous α-synuclein in substantia nigra and co-localized with 3-nitrotyrosine, a marker for oxidative protein damage. Hence, our study provides the first mammalian genetic evidence that dominant toxicity of a parkin mutant is sufficient to elicit age-dependent hypokinetic motor deficits and DA neuron loss in vivo, and uncovers a causal relationship between dominant parkin toxicity and progressive α-synuclein accumulation in DA neurons. Our study underscores the need to further explore the putative link between parkin dominant toxicity and PD. PMID:19228951

  19. Mice with neuropathic pain exhibit morphine tolerance due to a decrease in the morphine concentration in the brain.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Wataru; Kaneta, Mitsumasa; Nagae, Marina; Yuzuhara, Ami; Li, Xin; Suzuki, Haruka; Hanagata, Mika; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Suto, Wataru; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Kon, Risako; Miyashita, Kazuhiko; Masukawa, Daiki; Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-20

    The chronic administration of morphine to patients with neuropathic pain results in the development of a gradual tolerance to morphine. Although the detailed mechanism of this effect has not yet been elucidated, one of the known causes is a decrease in μ-opioid receptor function with regard to the active metabolite of morphine, M-6-G(morphine-6-glucuronide), in the ventrotegmental area of the midbrain. In this study, the relationship between the concentration of morphine in the brain and its analgesic effect was examined after the administration of morphine in the presence of neuropathic pain. Morphine was orally administered to mice with neuropathic pain, and the relationship between morphine's analgesic effect and its concentration in the brain was analysed. In addition, the expression levels of the conjugation enzyme, UGT2B (uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase), which has morphine as its substrate, and P-gp, which is a transporter involved in morphine excretion, were examined. In mice with neuropathic pain, the concentration of morphine in the brain was significantly decreased, and a correlation was found between this decrease and the decrease in the analgesic effect. It was considered possible that this decrease in the brain morphine concentration may be due to an increase in the expression level of P-gp in the small intestine and to an increase in the expression level and binding activity of UGT2B in the liver. The results of this study suggest the possibility that a sufficient analgesic effect may not be obtained when morphine is administered in the presence of neuropathic pain due to a decrease in the total amount of morphine and M-6-G that reach the brain. PMID:27102159

  20. Anxiety is correlated with running in adolescent female mice undergoing activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Wable, Gauri S; Min, Jung-Yun; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-04-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a widely used animal model for identifying the biological basis of excessive exercise and starvation, 2 hallmarks of anorexia nervosa (AN). Anxiety is correlated with exercise in AN. Yet the anxiety level of animals in ABA has not been reported. We asked: Does food restriction as part of ABA induction change the anxiety level of animals? If so, is the degree of anxiety correlated with degree of hyperactivity? We used the open field test before food restriction and the elevated plus maze test (EPM) during food restriction to quantify anxiety among singly housed adolescent female mice and determined whether food restriction alone or combined with exercise (i.e., ABA induction) abates or increases anxiety. We show that food restriction, with or without exercise, reduced anxiety significantly, as measured by the proportion of entries into the open arms of EPM (35.73%, p = .04). Moreover, ABA-induced individuals varied in their open arm time measure of anxiety and this value was highly and negatively correlated to the individual's food restriction-evoked wheel activity during the 24 hr following the anxiety test (R = -.75, p = .004, N = 12). This correlation was absent among the exercise-only controls. In addition, mice with higher increase in anxiety ran more following food restriction. Our data suggest that food restriction-evoked wheel running hyperactivity can be used as a reliable and continuous measure of anxiety in ABA. The parallel relationship between anxiety level and activity in AN and ABA-induced female mice strengthens the animal model. PMID:25730124

  1. Anxiety is correlated with running in adolescent female mice undergoing activity-based anorexia

    PubMed Central

    Wable, Gauri S.; Min, Jung-Yun; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-01-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a widely used animal model for identifying the biological basis of excessive exercise and starvation, two hallmarks of anorexia nervosa (AN). Anxiety is correlated with exercise in AN. Yet the anxiety level of animals in ABA has not been reported. We asked: Does food restriction as part of ABA induction change the anxiety level of animals? If so, is the degree of anxiety correlated with degree of hyperactivity? We used the open field test before food restriction and the elevated plus maze test (EPM) during food restriction to quantify anxiety among singly housed adolescent female mice and determined whether food restriction alone or combined with exercise (i.e., ABA induction) abates or increases anxiety. We show that food restriction, with or without exercise, reduced anxiety significantly, as measured by the proportion of entries into the open arms of EPM (35.73 %, p= .04). Moreover, ABA-induced individuals varied in their open arm time measure of anxiety and this value was highly and negatively correlated to the individual’s food restriction-evoked wheel activity during the 24 hours following the anxiety test (R = − .75, p= .004, N = 12). This correlation was absent among the exercise-only controls. Additionally, mice with higher increase in anxiety ran more following food restriction. Our data suggest that food restriction-evoked wheel running hyperactivity can be used as a reliable and continuous measure of anxiety in ABA. The parallel relationship between anxiety level and activity in AN and ABA-induced female mice strengthens the animal model. PMID:25730124

  2. Temporal association of elevated cholecystokininergic tone and adolescent trauma is critical for posttraumatic stress disorder-like behavior in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Anu; Tang, Mingxi; Mamiya, Takayoshi; Chen, Qian; Yang, Ling-Ling; Jiao, Jianwei; Yu, Na; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent trauma (AT) is a common risk factor for adult-onset posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the vulnerability to AT among different individuals varies dramatically, indicating that other cofactors are important. Despite extensive studies, the identification of those cofactors has had little success. Here, we found that after subjected to traumatic stress at postnatal day 25 (P25), a stage that is comparable to the human adolescent period, inducible/reversible forebrain-specific cholecystokinin receptor-2 transgenic (IF-CCKR-2 tg) mice exhibited a significantly higher level of PTSD-like behavior at a later life (adult) stage compared with their wild-type littermates. Moreover, in these traumatized IF-CCKR-2 tg mice, both the glucocorticoid negative feedback inhibition and spatial learning and memory were impaired. Interestingly, if the CCKR-2 transgene was specifically suppressed during the time of AT exposure, these observations were largely diminished, indicating that a temporal association of the elevated CCKergic tone and AT is pathogenically critical. Treatment of traumatized IF-CCKR-2 tg mice with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, for a period of 4 wk significantly attenuated the PTSD-like behavior and the impaired glucocorticoid negative feedback inhibition, but not the memory deficit, implying that the memory deficit is an independent post-AT clinical entity and not a consequence of PTSD. Taken together, these results reveal a dynamic role of the CCKergic system in the development of post-AT psychopathologies and suggest that a timely antagonism of CCKR-2 activity during AT exposure is a potential preventive strategy for post-AT psychopathologies including PTSD and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:23576730

  3. Fucoidan from sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa exhibits anti-hyperglycemic effects in insulin resistant mice via activating the PI3K/PKB pathway and GLUT4.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiming; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhao, Yanlei; Hu, Shiwei; Shi, Di; Xue, Changhu

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-hyperglycemic properties and mechanisms of fucoidan, isolated from Cucumaria frondosa (Cf-FUC), in insulin resistant mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed regular diet or high-fat/high-sucrose diet for 19 weeks. Model animals were dietary administrated either rosiglitazone (RSG, 1 mg/kg·bw), fucoidan (Cf-FUC, 80 mg/kg·bw) or their combinations. Results showed that Cf-FUC significantly reduced fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, and enhanced glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance in insulin-resistant mice. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that Cf-FUC increased the mRNA expressions of insulin receptors (IR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (PKB), and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Western blot assays demonstrated that Cf-FUC showed no effect on total protein expression but nevertheless enhanced the phosphorylation of proteins listed above and increased translocation of GLUT4 to the cell membrane. Furthermore, Cf-FUC enhanced the effects of RSG. These results indicated that Cf-FUC exhibited significant anti-hyperglycemic effects via activating PI3K/PKB pathway and GLUT4 in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. PMID:26194305

  4. Morc3 mutant mice exhibit reduced cortical area and thickness, accompanied by altered haematopoietic stem cells niche and bone cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Gaurav; Teguh, Dian; Kenny, Jacob; Tickner, Jennifer; Xu, Jiake

    2016-01-01

    Morc3, a member of a highly conserved nuclear matrix protein super-family plays an important part in chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, epigenetic regulation and cellular senescence. However, its role in bone homeostasis is not known. In the present study, a phenotype-driven ENU mouse mutagenesis screen revealed that Morc3mut +/− mice exhibit reduced cortical area and thickness with increased cortical porosity. Morc3mut +/− mice displayed reduced osteoclast numbers and surface per bone surface as well as osteocyte numbers, concomitant with altered gene expressions such as Rankl/Opg and Sost in ex vivo long bones. In vitro experiments revealed a significant increase in the number of Sca-1+/c-kit+ haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and a significant reduction in senescence associated β-galactosidase activity in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). In addition, we observed a decrease in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption accompanied by upregulation of STAT1 expression in osteoclast lineage cells. Strikingly, Morc3 protein localization within the nuclear membrane was shifted to the cytoplasm in Morc3mut +/− osteoclasts. Further, Morc3mut +/− mice displayed increased osteoblast differentiation and altered gene expression. Collectively, our data show that Morc3 is a previously unreported regulator of cortical bone homeostasis and haematopoietic stem cells niche, accompanied by altered bone cell differentiation. PMID:27188231

  5. Flaxseed extract exhibits mucosal protective effect in acetic acid induced colitis in mice by modulating cytokines, antioxidant and antiinflammatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Palla, Amber Hanif; Iqbal, Najeeha Talat; Minhas, Khurram; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2016-09-01

    New treatments for inflammatory bowel disease are of interest due to high rate of remission failure. Natural products have been effective in IBD therapeutics as they have multiple constituents. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Flaxseed extract (Fs.Cr) on ulcerative colitis and identify the possible mechanisms involved. Colitis was induced by intrarectal administration of 6% AA in BALB/c mice. Colonic mucosal damage was assessed after 24h by calculating disease activity index (DAI), macroscopic and histological damage scores, biochemical measurement of myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), and total glutathione activities. Since cytokines are involved in exacerbating inflammatory cascade with emerging role of innate immune cytokines in IBD therapeutics, we hence assessed the effect on the levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17, at 6, 12 and 24h by ELISA. Fs.Cr ameliorated the severity of AA colitis as evident by improved DAI, macroscopic damage and the histopathological scores along with restoration of goblet cells. Fs.Cr decreased MDA and MPO activities and enhanced antioxidant activity compared to the AA group. Finally, Fs.Cr in doses (300 and 500mg/kg) decreased TNF-α and IFN-γ levels at all time points with simultaneous increase in IL-17 levels at 24h as compared to the AA group. These results suggest that Fs.Cr ameliorates the severity of AA colitis by reducing goblet cell depletion, scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, reduce neutrophil infiltration that may be attributed due to decreasing IFN-γ and TNF-α and increasing IL-17 levels. PMID:27280586

  6. Effects of chronic social defeat stress on behaviour, endoplasmic reticulum proteins and choline acetyltransferase in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guang-Biao; Zhao, Tong; Muna, Sushma Shrestha; Bagalkot, Tarique Rajasaheb; Jin, Hong-Mei; Chae, Han-Jung; Chung, Young-Chul

    2013-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of social defeat stress on the behaviours and expressions of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (Grp78), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) and choline acetyltransferase (Chat) in the brains of adolescent mice. Adolescent male C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups (susceptible and unsusceptible) after 10 d social defeat stress. In expt 1, behavioural tests were conducted and brains were processed for Western blotting on day 21 after stress. In expt 2, social avoidance tests were conducted and brains were subsequently processed for Western blotting on day 12 after stress. Chronic social defeat stress produced more pronounced depression-like behaviours such as decreased locomotion and social interaction, increased anxiety-like behaviours and immobility, and impaired memory performance in susceptible mice. Moreover, susceptible mice showed greater expression of Grp78 and CHOP in the amygdala (Amyg) on days 12 and 21 compared with the other groups. Susceptible and unsusceptible groups showed significant increases in Grp78 and CHOP expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (Hipp) on day 12 compared with the control group; this persisted until day 21. The levels of Chat measured on days 12 and 21 were significantly lower in the PFC, Amyg and Hipp of all defeated mice compared with controls. The findings of the behavioural tests indicate that chronic social defeat in adolescents produces anxiety-like behaviours, social withdrawal, despair-like behaviours and cognitive impairment. The Grp78, CHOP and Chat results suggest that the selective response of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins in the Amyg plays an important role in the vulnerability-stress model of depression. PMID:23442729

  7. Exposure to nicotine increases nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density in the reward pathway and binge ethanol consumption in C57BL/6J adolescent female mice.

    PubMed

    Locker, Alicia R; Marks, Michael J; Kamens, Helen M; Klein, Laura Cousino

    2016-05-01

    Nearly 80% of adult smokers begin smoking during adolescence. Binge alcohol consumption is also common during adolescence. Past studies report that nicotine and ethanol activate dopamine neurons in the reward pathway and may increase synaptic levels of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens through nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) stimulation. Activation of the reward pathway during adolescence through drug use may produce neural alterations affecting subsequent drug consumption. Consequently, the effect of nicotine exposure on binge alcohol consumption was examined along with an assessment of the neurobiological underpinnings that drive adolescent use of these drugs. Adolescent C57BL/6J mice (postnatal days 35-44) were exposed to either water or nicotine (200μg/ml) for ten days. On the final four days, ethanol intake was examined using the drinking-in-the-dark paradigm. Nicotine-exposed mice consumed significantly more ethanol and displayed higher blood ethanol concentrations than did control mice. Autoradiographic analysis of nAChR density revealed higher epibatidine binding in frontal cortical regions in mice exposed to nicotine and ethanol compared to mice exposed to ethanol only. These data show that nicotine exposure during adolescence increases subsequent binge ethanol consumption, and may affect the number of nAChRs in regions of the brain reward pathway, specifically the frontal cortex. PMID:26428091

  8. Social influences on morphine sensitization in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Hofford, Rebecca S; Roberts, Kris W; Wellman, Paul J; Eitan, Shoshana

    2010-08-01

    We recently observed that social interactions influence morphine responsiveness in adolescent males. Given sex-related differences in both social interactions and responses to morphine, the present study examines social influences on morphine sensitization in adolescent female mice. Four experimental groups were examined: (1) morphine-treated mice (twice daily, 10-40 mg/kg, s.c.) housed physically and visually separated from saline-treated mice ('morphine only'), (2) morphine-treated mice housed together with saline-treated mice ('morphine cage-mates (of saline)'), (3) saline-treated mice housed together with morphine-treated mice ('saline cage-mates (of morphine)'), and (4) saline-treated mice housed physically and visually separated from morphine-treated mice ('saline only'). Following the treatment period, mice were tested individually for their locomotor response to 20 mg/kg morphine (s.c.). There were no significant differences in morphine-induced hyper-locomotion between saline only and saline cage-mates (of morphine) female adolescent mice. Notably, morphine only mice exhibited significantly greater morphine sensitization as compared to morphine cage-mates (of saline). Thus, this study demonstrates social influences on morphine sensitization in adolescent females. Drug use during early adolescence is a key predictor of later drug abuse and dependence during adulthood. Thus, understanding the specific vulnerabilities to drug use in this age group may represent a first step in helping develop more effective treatment programs. PMID:20456874

  9. Chronic cocaine exposure in adolescence: Effects on spatial discrimination reversal, delay discounting, and performance on fixed-ratio schedules in mice.

    PubMed

    Pope, Derek A; Boomhower, Steven R; Hutsell, Blake A; Teixeira, Kathryn M; Newland, M Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Adolescence is marked by the continued development of the neural pathways that support choice and decision-making, particularly those involving dopamine signaling. Cocaine exposure during adolescence may interfere with this development and manifest as increased perseveration and delay discounting in adulthood, behavioral processes that are related to drug addiction. Adolescent mice were exposed to 30mg/kg/day of cocaine (n=11) or saline vehicle (n=10) for 14days and behavior was assessed in adulthood. In Experiment 1, performance on a spatial-discrimination-reversal procedure was evaluated. In the first two sessions following the first reversal, cocaine-exposed mice produced more preservative errors relative to controls. In Experiment 2, cocaine-exposed mice displayed steeper delay discounting than saline-exposed mice, effects that were reversed by acute cocaine administration. Experiment 3 examined responding maintained by a range of fixed-ratio schedules of reinforcement. An analysis based on a theoretical framework called Mathematical Principles of Reinforcement (MPR) was applied to response-rate functions of individual mice. According to MPR, differences in response-rate functions in adulthood were due to a steepening of the delay-of-reinforcement gradient, disrupted motoric capacity (lower maximum response rates), and enhanced reinforcer efficacy for the adolescent cocaine- compared with saline-exposed mice. Overall, these experiments suggest that chronic exposure to cocaine during adolescence may impair different features of 'executive functions' in adulthood, and these may be related to distortions in the impact of reinforcing events. PMID:26868477

  10. Combined use of vitamin D3and metformin exhibits synergistic chemopreventive effects on colorectal neoplasia in rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wan; Wang, Qi-Long; Liu, Xia; Dong, Shu-Hong; Li, Hong-Xia; Li, Chun-Yang; Guo, Li-Shu; Gao, Jing-Miao; Berger, Nathan A.; Li, Li; Ma, Lan; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D3 and metformin are widely used in humans for regulating mineral metabolism and as an anti-diabetic drug respectively; and both of them have been shown to have chemopreventive effects against various tumors. This study was designed to investigate the potential synergistic chemopreventive effects of vitamin D3 and metformin against the development of early colon neoplasia in two models. The first model was a 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) induced colon cancer rat model and the second, a DMH-dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis-associated colon neoplasia mouse model. Compared to either vitamin D3 or metformin alone, combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin showed more pronounced effect in reducing the numbers of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and tumor in the colon. The most prominent inhibitory effects were observed in the vitamin D3 medium dose (100 IU/kg/day) and metformin medium dose (120 mg/kg/day) combination group. Furthermore, our results showed that enhancement of metformin’s chemopreventive effects by vitamin D3 was associated with down-regulation of S6P expression, via the AMPK (IGF-1)/mTOR pathway. In addition, and enhancement of vitamin D3’s chemopreventive effects by metformin was associated with inhibition of the protein expressions of c-Myc and Cyclin D1, via the vitamin D receptor/β-catenin pathway. These findings show that combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin exhibits synergistic effects against the development of early colon neoplasia. They suggest that the combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin may represent a novel strategy for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:25416412

  11. Developmental Trajectories of Auditory Cortex Synaptic Structures and Gap-Prepulse Inhibition of Acoustic Startle Between Early Adolescence and Young Adulthood in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Caitlin E; Erickson, Susan L; Fish, Kenneth N; Thiels, Edda; Penzes, Peter; Sweet, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Cortical excitatory and inhibitory synapses are disrupted in schizophrenia, the symptoms of which often emerge during adolescence, when cortical excitatory synapses undergo pruning. In auditory cortex, a brain region implicated in schizophrenia, little is known about the development of excitatory and inhibitory synapses between early adolescence and young adulthood, and how these changes impact auditory cortex function. We used immunohistochemistry and quantitative fluorescence microscopy to quantify dendritic spines and GAD65-expressing inhibitory boutons in auditory cortex of early adolescent, late adolescent, and young adult mice. Numbers of spines decreased between early adolescence and young adulthood, during which time responses increased in an auditory cortex-dependent sensory task, silent gap-prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (gap-PPI). Within-bouton GAD65 protein and GAD65-expressing bouton numbers decreased between late adolescence and young adulthood, a delay in onset relative to spine and gap-PPI changes. In mice lacking the spine protein kalirin, there were no significant changes in spine number, within-bouton GAD65 protein, or gap-PPI between adolescence and young adulthood. These results illustrate developmental changes in auditory cortex spines, inhibitory boutons, and auditory cortex function between adolescence and young adulthood, and provide insights into how disrupted adolescent neurodevelopment could contribute to auditory cortex synapse pathology and auditory impairments. PMID:25759333

  12. A ten fold reduction of nicotine yield in tobacco smoke does not spare the central cholinergic system in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Abreu-Villaça, Yael; Correa-Santos, Monique; Dutra-Tavares, Ana C; Paes-Branco, Danielle; Nunes-Freitas, Andre; Manhães, Alex C; Filgueiras, Cláudio C; Ribeiro-Carvalho, Anderson

    2016-08-01

    The tobacco industry has gradually decreased nicotine content in cigarette smoke but the impact of this reduction on health is still controversial. Since the central cholinergic system is the primary site of action of nicotine, here, we investigated the effects of exposure of adolescent mice to tobacco smoke containing either high or low levels of nicotine on the central cholinergic system and the effects associated with cessation of exposure. From postnatal day (PN) 30 to 45, male and female Swiss mice were exposed to tobacco smoke (whole body exposure, 8h/day, 7 days/week) generated from 2R1F (HighNic group: 1.74mg nicotine/cigarette) or 4A1 (LowNic group: 0.14mg nicotine/cigarette) research cigarettes, whereas control mice were exposed to ambient air. Cholinergic biomarkers were assessed in the cerebral cortex and midbrain by the end of exposure (PN45), at short- (PN50) and long-term (PN75) deprivation. In the cortex, nicotinic cholinergic receptor upregulation was observed with either type of cigarette. In the midbrain, upregulation was detected only in HighNic mice and remained significant in females at short-term deprivation. The high-affinity choline transporter was reduced in the cortex: of HighNic mice by the end of exposure; of both HighNic and LowNic females at short-term deprivation; of LowNic mice at long-term deprivation. These decrements were separable from effects on choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities, suggesting cholinergic synaptic impairment. Here, we demonstrated central cholinergic alterations in an animal model of tobacco smoke exposure during adolescence. This system was sensitive even to tobacco smoke with very low nicotine content. PMID:27287270

  13. The Burkholderia pseudomallei Δasd Mutant Exhibits Attenuated Intracellular Infectivity and Imparts Protection against Acute Inhalation Melioidosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Michael H.; Propst, Katie L.; Kang, Yun; Dow, Steven W.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Hoang, Tung T.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the cause of serious and life-threatening diseases in humans, is of national biodefense concern because of its potential use as a bioterrorism agent. This microbe is listed as a select agent by the CDC; therefore, development of vaccines is of significant importance. Here, we further investigated the growth characteristics of a recently created B. pseudomallei 1026b Δasd mutant in vitro, in a cell model, and in an animal model of infection. The mutant was typified by an inability to grow in the absence of exogenous diaminopimelate (DAP); upon single-copy complementation with a wild-type copy of the asd gene, growth was restored to wild-type levels. Further characterization of the B. pseudomallei Δasd mutant revealed a marked decrease in RAW264.7 murine macrophage cytotoxicity compared to the wild type and the complemented Δasd mutant. RAW264.7 cells infected by the Δasd mutant did not exhibit signs of cytopathology or multinucleated giant cell (MNGC) formation, which were observed in wild-type B. pseudomallei cell infections. The Δasd mutant was found to be avirulent in BALB/c mice, and mice vaccinated with the mutant were protected against acute inhalation melioidosis. Thus, the B. pseudomallei Δasd mutant may be a promising live attenuated vaccine strain and a biosafe strain for consideration of exclusion from the select agent list. PMID:21807903

  14. Cinnamic Acid Bornyl Ester Derivatives from Valeriana wallichii Exhibit Antileishmanial In Vivo Activity in Leishmania major-Infected BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Masic, Anita; Valencia Hernandez, Ana Maria; Hazra, Sudipta; Glaser, Jan; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Hazra, Banasri; Schurigt, Uta

    2015-01-01

    Human leishmaniasis covers a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from self-healing cutaneous leishmaniasis to severe and lethal visceral leishmaniasis caused among other species by Leishmania major or Leishmania donovani, respectively. Some drug candidates are in clinical trials to substitute current therapies, which are facing emerging drug-resistance accompanied with serious side effects. Here, two cinnamic acid bornyl ester derivatives (1 and 2) were assessed for their antileishmanial activity. Good selectivity and antileishmanial activity of bornyl 3-phenylpropanoate (2) in vitro prompted the antileishmanial assessment in vivo. For this purpose, BALB/c mice were infected with Leishmania major promastigotes and treated with three doses of 50 mg/kg/day of compound 2. The treatment prevented the characteristic swelling at the site of infection and correlated with reduced parasite burden. Transmitted light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of Leishmania major promastigotes revealed that compounds 1 and 2 induce mitochondrial swelling. Subsequent studies on Leishmania major promastigotes showed the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) as a putative mode of action. As the cinnamic acid bornyl ester derivatives 1 and 2 had exhibited antileishmanial activity in vitro, and compound 2 in Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice in vivo, they can be regarded as possible lead structures for the development of new antileishmanial therapeutic approaches. PMID:26554591

  15. Cinnamic Acid Bornyl Ester Derivatives from Valeriana wallichii Exhibit Antileishmanial In Vivo Activity in Leishmania major-Infected BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Sudipta; Glaser, Jan; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Hazra, Banasri; Schurigt, Uta

    2015-01-01

    Human leishmaniasis covers a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from self-healing cutaneous leishmaniasis to severe and lethal visceral leishmaniasis caused among other species by Leishmania major or Leishmania donovani, respectively. Some drug candidates are in clinical trials to substitute current therapies, which are facing emerging drug-resistance accompanied with serious side effects. Here, two cinnamic acid bornyl ester derivatives (1 and 2) were assessed for their antileishmanial activity. Good selectivity and antileishmanial activity of bornyl 3-phenylpropanoate (2) in vitro prompted the antileishmanial assessment in vivo. For this purpose, BALB/c mice were infected with Leishmania major promastigotes and treated with three doses of 50 mg/kg/day of compound 2. The treatment prevented the characteristic swelling at the site of infection and correlated with reduced parasite burden. Transmitted light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of Leishmania major promastigotes revealed that compounds 1 and 2 induce mitochondrial swelling. Subsequent studies on Leishmania major promastigotes showed the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) as a putative mode of action. As the cinnamic acid bornyl ester derivatives 1 and 2 had exhibited antileishmanial activity in vitro, and compound 2 in Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice in vivo, they can be regarded as possible lead structures for the development of new antileishmanial therapeutic approaches. PMID:26554591

  16. In vivo expression of the Arf6 Guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1 in mice exhibits enhanced myelin thickness in nerves.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Onami, Naoko; Tsumura, Hideki; Nemoto, Noriko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Kato, Minoru; Kotera, Jun; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2013-10-01

    The myelin sheath consists of a unique multiple layer structure that acts as an insulator between neuronal axons to enhance the propagation of the action potential. In neuropathies such as demyelinating or dismyelinating diseases, chronic demyelination and defective remyelination occur repeatedly, leading to more severe neuropathy. As yet, little is known about the possibility of drug target-specific medicine for such diseases. In the developing peripheral nervous system (PNS), myelin sheaths form as Schwann cells wrap individual axons. It is thought that the development of a drug promoting myelination by Schwann cells would provide effective therapy against peripheral nerve disorders: to test such treatment, genetically modified mice overexpressing the drug target molecules are needed. We previously identified an Arf6 activator, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1, as the signaling molecule controlling myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells; yet, the important issue of whether cytohesin-1 itself promotes myelin thickness in vivo has remained unclear. Herein, we show that, in mouse PNS nerves, Schwann cell-specific expression of wild-type cytohesin-1 exhibits enhanced myelin thickness. Downstream activation of Arf6 is also seen in these transgenic mice, revealing the involvement of the cytohesin-1 and Arf6 signaling unit in promoting myelination. These results suggest that cytohesin-1 may be a candidate for the basis of a therapy for peripheral neuropathies through its enhancement of myelin thickness. PMID:23636892

  17. Chronic social stress during adolescence in mice alters fat distribution in late life: prevention by antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M V; Czisch, M; Sterlemann, V; Reinel, C; Sämann, P; Müller, M B

    2009-01-01

    Obesity and visceral fat accumulation are key features of the metabolic syndrome that represents one of the main health problems in western societies due to its neurovascular and cardiovascular complications. Epidemiological studies have identified chronic stress exposure as an important risk factor for the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome, but also psychiatric diseases, especially affective disorders. However, it is still unclear if chronic stress has merely transient or potentially lasting effects on body composition. Here, we investigated the effects of chronic social stress during the adolescent period on body fat composition in mice one year after the cessation of the stressor. We found that stress exposure during the adolescent period decreases subcutaneous fat content, without change in visceral fat, and consequently increases the visceral fat/subcutaneous fat ratio in adulthood. Further, we demonstrated that treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (paroxetine) during stress exposure prevented later effects on body fat distribution. These results from a recently validated chronic stress paradigm in mice provide evidence that stressful experiences during adolescence can alter body fat distribution in adulthood, thereby possibly contributing to an increased risk for metabolic diseases. Antidepressant treatment disrupted this effect underlining the link between the stress hormone system, metabolic homeostasis and affective disorders. PMID:18951248

  18. Mainstream cigarette smoke accelerates the progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by modulating Kupffer cell-mediated hepatocellular apoptosis in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Surim; Kim, Jong Won; Yun, Hyejin; Choi, Seong-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hyub; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lim, Chae Woong; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Bumseok

    2016-08-10

    Cigarette smoking in adolescents is considered to be a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of mainstream cigarette smoke (MSCS) on the progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in adolescents. Three-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed either a methionine and choline-deficient plus high fat (MCDHF) diet for 6 weeks. Each group was exposed to MSCS (300, 600 ug/L) or fresh air for 2h per day during the first 3 weeks of MCDHF diet feeding. MSCS increased MCDHF diet-induced NASH by increasing serum ALT/AST levels, steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Furthermore, MSCS was associated with the degree of oxidative stress and hepatocellular apoptosis in NASH mice, but not prominent in controls. In vitro, cigarette smoke extract (CSE) activated Kupffer cells (KCs) to release inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress, which induced hepatocellular apoptosis. In conclusion, MSCS exposure accelerates the progression and severity of NASH by modulating KC-mediated hepatocellular apoptosis. Our results support the regulation of CS in adolescents with steatohepatitis. PMID:27180087

  19. Effects of Cannabinoid Exposure during Adolescence on the Conditioned Rewarding Effects of WIN 55212-2 and Cocaine in Mice: Influence of the Novelty-Seeking Trait

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Arias, M.; Roger-Sánchez, C.; Vilanova, I.; Revert, N.; Manzanedo, C.; Miñarro, J.; Aguilar, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent exposure to cannabinoids enhances the behavioural effects of cocaine, and high novelty-seeking trait predicts greater sensitivity to the conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by this drug. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of novelty-seeking on the effects of adolescent cannabinoid exposure. Adolescent male mice were classified as high or low novelty seekers (HNS and LNS) in the hole-board test. First, we evaluated the CPP induced by the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2 (0.05 and 0.075 mg/kg, i.p.) in HNS and LNS mice. Then, HNS and LNS mice were pretreated i.p. with vehicle, WIN 55212-2 (0.1 mg/kg), or cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg) and were subsequently conditioned with WIN 55212-2 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) or cocaine (1 or 6 mg/kg, i.p.). Only HNS mice conditioned with the 0.075 mg/kg dose acquired CPP with WIN 55212-2. Adolescent exposure to this cannabinoid agonist increased the rewarding effects of 1 mg/kg of cocaine in both HNS and LNS mice, and in HNS mice it also increased the reinstating effect of a low dose of cocaine. Our results endorse a role for individual differences such as a higher propensity for sensation-seeking in the development of addiction. PMID:26881125

  20. Intermittent (every-other-day) drinking induces rapid escalation of ethanol intake and preference in adolescent and adult C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, Roberto I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Using adult C57BL/6J (B6) mice, we previously developed a procedure that causes a progressive increase in ethanol intake and preference (i.e., alcohol escalation effect) following weekly (intermittent) access to ethanol (Melendez et al. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 30, 2006). A limitation of this procedure is that it requires many weeks of testing, which limits its use to study ethanol escalation (i.e., binge-like drinking) during adolescence. Previous studies have shown that intermittent every-other-day (EOD) access to ethanol is sufficient to induce ethanol escalation in rats. The objective of this study was to verify if EOD access is sufficient to induce escalated levels of ethanol intake and preference in adult and adolescent B6 mice. Methods Male B6 mice received free-choice 24 hr access to 15% ethanol and water on an EOD or daily basis for 2 weeks. Food and water was available at all times. Using adult mice, Experiment 1 characterized the induction of ethanol escalation following EOD access at 6 (i.e., drinking in the dark) and 24 hr intervals, whereas Experiment 2 determined if daily drinking reverses escalation induced by EOD drinking. Experiment 3 compared ethanol-drinking capacity following daily versus EOD drinking in adolescent (P30–45) and adult (P70–85) mice. Results Experiment 1 revealed that EOD drinking leads to a significant (nearly two-fold) increase in ethanol intake and preference over mice given daily access. Experiment 2 demonstrated that EOD-elicited escalation is blocked and subsequently reversed following daily drinking. Experiment 3 revealed that ethanol drinking was greater in adolescent mice compared to adults following daily drinking and EOD (escalated) drinking. Although the escalated levels of ethanol intake were greater in adolescent mice, the rate or onset of escalation was comparable between both age groups. Conclusions This study is the first to demonstrate that EOD drinking leads to escalation of ethanol intake and

  1. cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II Knockout Mice Exhibit Working Memory Impairments, Decreased Repetitive Behavior, and Increased Anxiety-like Traits

    PubMed Central

    Wincott, Charlotte M.; Abera, Sinedu; Vunck, Sarah A.; Choi, Yoon; Titcombe, Roseann F.; Antoine, Shannon O.; Tukey, David S.; DeVito, Loren M.; Hofmann, Franz; Hoeffer, Charles A.; Ziff, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates AMPA receptor trafficking, a process that mediates changes in synaptic strength, a key component of learning and memory. This form of plasticity may be induced by stimulation of the NMDA receptor which, among its activities, increases cyclic guanosine monophosphate through the nitric oxide synthase pathway. cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII) is ultimately activated via this mechanism and AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is phosphorylated at serine 845. This phosphorylation contributes to the delivery of GluA1 to the synapse, a step that increases synaptic strength. Previous studies have shown that cGKII-deficient mice display striking spatial learning deficits in the Morris Water Maze compared to wild-type littermates as well as lowered GluA1 phosphorylation in the postsynaptic density of the prefrontal cortex (Serulle, Zhang, Ninan, Puzzo, McCarthy, Khatri, Arancio, and Ziff, 2007; Wincott, Kim, Titcombe, Tukey, Girma, Pick, Devito, Hofmann, Hoeffer, and Ziff, 2013). In the current study, we show that cGKII knockout mice exhibit impaired working memory as determined using the prefrontal cortex-dependent Radial Arm Maze (RAM). Additionally, we report reduced repetitive behavior in the Marble Burying task (MB), and heightened anxiety-like traits in the Novelty Suppressed Feeding Test (NSFT). These data suggest that cGKII may play a role in the integration of information that conveys both anxiety-provoking stimuli as well as the spatial and environmental cues that facilitate functional memory processes and appropriate behavioral response. PMID:24752151

  2. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor inhibition blunts adolescent-typical increased binge alcohol and sucrose consumption in male C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Agoglia, Abigail E.; Holstein, Sarah E.; Eastman, Vallari R.; Hodge, Clyde W.

    2016-01-01

    Increased binge alcohol consumption has been reported among adolescents as compared to adults in both humans and rodent models, and has been associated with serious long-term health consequences. However, the neurochemical mechanism for age differences in binge drinking between adolescents and adults has not been established. The present study was designed to evaluate the mechanistic role of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in adolescent and adult binge drinking. Binge consumption was established in adolescent and adult male C57BL/6J mice by providing access to 20% alcohol or 1% sucrose for 4 h every other day. Pretreatment with the CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM-251 (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) in a Latin square design dose-dependently reduced adolescent alcohol consumption to adult levels without altering adult intake. AM-251 (3 mg/kg) also reduced adolescent but not adult sucrose consumption. Adolescent reductions in alcohol and sucrose were not associated with alterations in open-field locomotor activity or thigmotaxis. These findings point to age differences in CB1 receptor activity as a functional mediator of adolescent-typical increased binge drinking as compared to adults. Developmental alterations in endocannabinoid signaling in the adolescent brain may therefore be responsible for the drinking phenotype seen in this age group. PMID:26800788

  3. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor inhibition blunts adolescent-typical increased binge alcohol and sucrose consumption in male C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Agoglia, Abigail E; Holstein, Sarah E; Eastman, Vallari R; Hodge, Clyde W

    2016-04-01

    Increased binge alcohol consumption has been reported among adolescents as compared to adults in both humans and rodent models, and has been associated with serious long-term health consequences. However, the neurochemical mechanism for age differences in binge drinking between adolescents and adults has not been established. The present study was designed to evaluate the mechanistic role of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in adolescent and adult binge drinking. Binge consumption was established in adolescent and adult male C57BL/6J mice by providing access to 20% alcohol or 1% sucrose for 4h every other day. Pretreatment with the CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM-251 (0, 1, 3, and 10mg/kg) in a Latin square design dose-dependently reduced adolescent alcohol consumption to adult levels without altering adult intake. AM-251 (3mg/kg) also reduced adolescent but not adult sucrose consumption. Adolescent reductions in alcohol and sucrose were not associated with alterations in open-field locomotor activity or thigmotaxis. These findings point to age differences in CB1 receptor activity as a functional mediator of adolescent-typical increased binge drinking as compared to adults. Developmental alterations in endocannabinoid signaling in the adolescent brain may therefore be responsible for the drinking phenotype seen in this age group. PMID:26800788

  4. A Novel Bufalin Derivative Exhibited Stronger Apoptosis-Inducing Effect than Bufalin in A549 Lung Cancer Cells and Lower Acute Toxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Feng, Li-Xing; Sun, Peng; Liu, Wang; Wu, Wan-Ying; Jiang, Bao-Hong; Yang, Min; Hu, Li-Hong; Guo, De-An; Liu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    BF211 is a synthetic molecule derived from bufalin (BF). The apoptosis-inducing effect of BF211 was stronger than that of BF while the acute toxicity of BF211 was much lower than that of BF. BF211 exhibited promising concentration-dependent anti-cancer effects in nude mice inoculated with A549 cells in vivo. The growth of A549 tumor xenografts was almost totally blocked by treatment with BF211 at 6 mg/kg. Notably, BF and BF211 exhibited differences in their binding affinity and kinetics to recombinant proteins of the α subunits of Na+/K+-ATPase. Furthermore, there was a difference in the effects of BF or BF211 on inhibiting the activity of porcine cortex Na+/K+-ATPase and in their time-dependent effects on intracellular Ca2+ levels in A549 cells. The time-dependent effects of BF or BF211 on the activation of Src, which was mediated by the Na+/K+-ATPase signalosome, in A549 cells were also different. Both BF and BF211 could induce apoptosis-related cascades, such as activation of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) in A549 cells, in a concentration-dependent manner; however, the effects of BF211 on apoptosis-related cascades was stronger than that of BF. The results of the present study supported the importance of binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase α subunits in the mechanism of cardiac steroids and also suggested the possibility of developing new cardiac steroids with a stronger anti-cancer activity and lower toxicity as new anti-cancer agents. PMID:27459387

  5. Delay discounting in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice: adolescent-limited and life-persistent patterns of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; Lamb, R J

    2011-04-01

    Impulsivity is a defining characteristic of adolescence. Compared to adults, for example, adolescents engage in higher rates of drug and alcohol experimentation, risky sexual practices, and criminal activity. Such behavior may reflect reduced sensitivity to long-term consequences of behavior during adolescence. Recently, our lab has attempted to refine mouse procedures to study developmental trends in decision making in the laboratory. In the present experiment, we examined sensitivity to delayed rewards in C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2) mice during adolescence and adulthood using an adaptation of a 2-week delay discounting procedure developed by Adriani and Laviola (2003). During training, mice could choose between a 20- or 100-μl drop of milk delivered after a 1-s delay. During testing, the delay to the large drop of milk was increased from 1 to 100 seconds. As the delay to the larger volume increased, preference shifted to the smaller, more immediate option. In adolescence, both strains showed similar shifts in preference. In contrast, adult B6 mice were less sensitive to increasing delays than were adult D2 mice, who continued to perform much as their adolescent counterparts. A subsequent resistance-to-extinction test ruled out the possibility that the slower change in the adult B6 mice was due to perseverative responding. The present findings suggest that B6 and D2 strains may be differentially suited to uncovering the biological mechanism of short-term and long-term patterns of impulsive behavior. PMID:21463022

  6. Blocking glucocorticoid receptors at adolescent age prevents enhanced freezing between repeated cue-exposures after conditioned fear in adult mice raised under chronic early life stress.

    PubMed

    Arp, J Marit; Ter Horst, Judith P; Loi, Manila; den Blaauwen, Jan; Bangert, Eline; Fernández, Guillén; Joëls, Marian; Oitzl, Melly S; Krugers, Harm J

    2016-09-01

    Early life adversity can have long-lasting impact on learning and memory processes and increase the risk to develop stress-related psychopathologies later in life. In this study we investigated (i) how chronic early life stress (ELS) - elicited by limited nesting and bedding material from postnatal day 2 to 9 - affects conditioned fear in adult mice and (ii) whether these effects can be prevented by blocking glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) at adolescent age. In adult male and female mice, ELS did not affect freezing behavior to the first tone 24h after training in an auditory fear-conditioning paradigm. Exposure to repeated tones 24h after training also resulted in comparable freezing behavior in ELS and control mice, both in males and females. However, male (but not female) ELS compared to control mice showed significantly more freezing behavior between the tone-exposures, i.e. during the cue-off periods. Intraperitoneal administration of the GR antagonist RU38486 during adolescence (on postnatal days 28-30) fully prevented enhanced freezing behavior during the cue-off period in adult ELS males. Western blot analysis revealed no effects of ELS on hippocampal expression of glucocorticoid receptors, neither at postnatal day 28 nor at adult age, when mice were behaviorally tested. We conclude that ELS enhances freezing behavior in adult mice in a potentially safe context after cue-exposure, which can be normalized by brief blockade of glucocorticoid receptors during the critical developmental window of adolescence. PMID:27246249

  7. Vulnerability to nicotine self-administration in adolescent mice correlates with age-specific expression of α4* nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Renda, Anthony; Penty, Nora; Komal, Pragya; Nashmi, Raad

    2016-09-01

    The majority of smokers begin during adolescence, a developmental period with a high susceptibility to substance abuse. Adolescents are affected differently by nicotine compared to adults, with adolescents being more vulnerable to nicotine's rewarding properties. It is unknown if the age-dependent molecular composition of a younger brain contributes to a heightened susceptibility to nicotine addiction. Nicotine, the principle pharmacological component of tobacco, binds and activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. The most prevalent is the widely expressed α4-containing (α4*) subtype which mediates reward and is strongly implicated in nicotine dependence. Exposing different age groups of mice, postnatal day (P) 44-86 days old, to a two bottle-choice oral nicotine self-administration paradigm for five days yielded age-specific consumption levels. Nicotine self-administration was elevated in the P44 group, peaked at P54-60 and was drastically lower in the P66 through P86 groups. We also quantified α4* nAChR expression via spectral confocal imaging of brain slices from α4YFP knock-in mice, in which the α4 nAChR subunit is tagged with a yellow fluorescent protein. Quantitative fluorescence revealed age-specific α4* nAChR expression in dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area. Receptor expression showed a strong positive correlation with daily nicotine dose, suggesting that α4* nAChR expression levels are age-specific and may contribute to the propensity to self-administer nicotine. PMID:27102349

  8. Altered gene expression and spine density in nucleus accumbens of adolescent and adult male mice exposed to emotional and physical stress

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Brandon L; Sial, Omar K.; Alcantara, Lyonna F.; Greenwood, Maria A.; Brewer, Jacob S.; Rozofsky, John P.; Parise, Eric M.; Bolaños-Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Stressful early life experiences are implicated in lifelong health. However, little is known about the consequences of emotional or physical stress on neurobiology. Therefore, the following set of experiments was designed to assess changes in transcription and translation of key proteins within the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Male adolescent (postnatal day [PD] 35) or adult (eight-week old) mice were exposed to emotional (ES) or physical stress (PS) using a vicarious social defeat paradigm. Twenty-four hours after the last stress session, we measured levels of specific mRNAs and proteins within the NAc. Spine density was also assessed in separate groups of mice. Exposure to ES or PS disrupted ERK2, reduced transcription of ΔFosB, and had no effect on CREB mRNA. Western blots revealed that exposure to ES or PS decreased ERK2 phosphorylation in adolescents, whereas the same stress regimen increased ERK2 phosphorylation in adults. Exposure to ES or PS had no effect on ΔFosB or CREB phosphorylation. ES and PS increased spine density in the NAc of adolescent-exposed mice, but only exposure to PS increased spine density in adults. Together, these findings demonstrate that exposure to ES or PS is a potent stressor in adolescent and adult mice, and can disturb the integrity of the NAc by altering transcription and translation of important signaling molecules in an age-dependent manner. Furthermore, exposure to ES and PS induces substantial synaptic plasticity of the NAc. PMID:24943326

  9. Impact of social isolation and enriched environment during adolescence on voluntary ethanol intake and anxiety in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Marcelo F; Laber, Kathy

    2015-09-01

    This study was designed to determine the impact of an enriched environment in a previously established stress model of isolation during early development that induces high alcohol (ethanol) self-administration. The study was conducted with male and female C57BL/6J mice housed in isolation or in groups that were either provided or withheld enrichment during adolescence. The impact of these housing conditions was assessed during adulthood by measuring weight gain, quantifying voluntary ethanol intake, measuring plasma corticosterone levels, and assessing anxiety-like behavior. Results showed that, regardless of sex, mice that were single-housed during adolescence showed a significant increase in voluntary ethanol intake, which was not observed in isolated mice that were provided with nesting material during adolescence (compared to group-housed non-enriched control group). Basal corticosterone was not affected by housing, enrichment conditions, or sex. Corticosterone levels did not relate to levels of voluntary ethanol intake. However, corticosterone levels were higher after three weeks of ethanol intake. Surprisingly, mice that were group-housed during adolescence showed higher levels of anxiety-like behavior in the light/dark test. Overall, these results indicate that housing conditions during a critical developmental period can significantly modulate voluntary ethanol intake later in life. PMID:25446196

  10. Murine mesenchymal stem cells transplanted to the central nervous system of neonatal versus adult mice exhibit distinct engraftment kinetics and express receptors that guide neuronal cell migration.

    PubMed

    Phinney, Donald G; Baddoo, Melody; Dutreil, Maria; Gaupp, Dina; Lai, Wen Tzu; Isakova, Iryna A

    2006-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have demonstrated efficacy as cellular vectors for treating a variety of nervous system disorders. Nevertheless, few studies have quantified MSC engraftment levels or explored the mechanisms that promote their survival and migration in nervous tissue. In this study, we compared the engraftment kinetics and anatomical distribution of murine, male MSCs injected intracranially into neonatal versus adult female mice using a real-time PCR assay that targets the mouse SRY gene. These analyses revealed that MSCs exhibited low but equivalent engraftment levels in the central nervous system (CNS) of neonatal and adult transplant recipients at 12 days post-injection. However, MSC engraftment levels were significantly greater at 60 and 150 days post-transplantation in neonates as compared to adults. Despite these differences, engrafted MSCs were widely distributed along the neuraxis of the CNS in both transplant groups. Collectively, these data indicate that proliferation, but not engraftment and migration, of MSCs in brain are regulated by the host microenvironment. Using a genomics approach, we also identified MSC subpopulations that express neural adhesion proteins and receptors that regulate neuronal cell migration in brain, including cadherin 2, neurexin 1, ninjurin 1, neogenin 1, neuropilin 2, and roundabout homolog 1 and 4. Functional studies indicate these proteins confer cell adhesion and migration of MSCs in response to the appropriate chemoattractant. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the unique molecular composition of MSC subpopulations imparts to them an inherent capacity to engraft and migrate in brain. These subpopulations may represent more potent cellular vectors for treating CNS disorders. PMID:16846379

  11. Adolescent intake of caffeinated energy drinks does not affect adult alcohol consumption in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Robins, Meridith T; DeFriel, Julia N; van Rijn, Richard M

    2016-08-01

    The rise in marketing and mass consumption of energy drink products by adolescents poses a largely unknown risk on adolescent development and drug reward. Yet, with increasing reports of acute health issues present in young adults who ingest large quantities of energy drinks alone or in combination with alcohol, the need to elucidate these potential risks is pressing. Energy drinks contain high levels of caffeine and sucrose; therefore, exposure to energy drinks may lead to changes in drug-related behaviors since caffeine and sucrose consumption activates similar brain pathways engaged by substances of abuse. With a recent study observing that adolescent caffeine consumption increased cocaine sensitivity, we sought to investigate how prolonged energy drink exposure in adolescence alters alcohol use and preference in adulthood. To do so, we utilized three different energy drink exposure paradigms and two strains of male mice (C57BL/6 and BALB/c) to monitor the effect of caffeine exposure via energy drinks in adolescence on adult alcohol intake. These paradigms included two models of volitional consumption of energy drinks or energy drink-like substances and one model of forced consumption of sucrose solutions with different caffeine concentrations. Following adolescent exposure to these solutions, alcohol intake was monitored in a limited-access, two-bottle choice between water and increasing concentrations of alcohol during adulthood. In none of the three models or two strains of mice did we observe that adolescent 'energy drink' consumption or exposure was correlated with changes in adult alcohol intake or preference. While our current preclinical results suggest that exposure to large amounts of caffeine does not alter future alcohol intake, differences in caffeine metabolism between mice and humans need to be considered before translating these results to humans. PMID:27565749

  12. The nuclear receptor Tlx regulates motor, cognitive and anxiety-related behaviours during adolescence and adulthood.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, James D; Kozareva, Danka A; Hueston, Cara M; O'Leary, Olivia F; Cryan, John F; Nolan, Yvonne M

    2016-06-01

    The nuclear receptor Tlx is a key regulator of embryonic and adult hippocampal neurogenesis and has been genetically linked to bipolar disorder. Mice lacking Tlx (Nr2e1(-/-)) display deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and behavioural abnormalities. However, whether Tlx regulates behaviour during adolescence or in a sex-dependent manner remains unexplored. Therefore, we investigated the role of Tlx in a series of behavioural tasks in adolescent male and female mice with a spontaneous deletion of Tlx (Nr2e1(-/-) mice). Testing commenced at adolescence (postnatal day 28) and continued until adulthood (postnatal day 67). Adolescent male and female Nr2e1(-/-) mice were hyperactive in an open field, an effect that persisted in adulthood. Male but not female Nr2e1(-/-) mice exhibited reduced thigmotaxis during adolescence and adulthood. Impairments in rotarod motor performance developed in male and female Nr2e1(-/-) mice at the onset of adulthood. Spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze, a hippocampus-dependent task, was impaired in adolescent but not adult male and female Nr2e1(-/-) mice. Contextual fear conditioning was impaired in adolescent male Nr2e1(-/-) mice only, but both male and female adolescent Nr2e1(-/-) mice showed impaired cued fear conditioning, a hippocampal-amygdala dependent cognitive process. These deficits persisted into adulthood in males but not females. In conclusion, deletion of Tlx impairs motor, cognitive and anxiety-related behaviours during adolescence and adulthood in male and female mice with most effects occurring during adolescence rather than adulthood, independent of housing conditions. This suggests that Tlx has functions beyond regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and may be an important target in understanding neurobiological disorders. PMID:26970576

  13. Effects of one- and three-day binge alcohol exposure in neonatal C57BL/6 mice on spatial learning and memory in adolescence and adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jennifer L.; Zhou, Feng C.; Goodlett, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Binge-like alcohol exposure during the early postnatal period in rats and mice causes deficits in spatial learning and memory that persist into adulthood. Wozniak et al. (2004) reported that heavy binge alcohol exposure on postnatal day 7 (PD 7) in C57BL/6 (B6) mice produced profound spatial learning deficits in the Morris water maze when tested in adolescence (P30–39); when tested in adulthood, however, the deficits were greatly attenuated. Using a similar PD 7 binge alcohol exposure paradigm in B6 mice, we tested whether a single-day (PD 7 only) alcohol treatment produced place learning deficits in both adolescence and in adulthood, and further tested whether a more extended (3-day, PD 7–9) alcohol exposure would induce more severe and enduring deficits. B6 mice were given either 2 subcutaneous injections of alcohol (2.5 g/kg each) 2 h apart on PD 7 or on PD 7–9, and compared with controls that received saline vehicle injections and controls that received no injections. The alcohol injections on PD 7 produced average peak blood alcohol concentrations of 472 mg/dL and evoked typical patterns of activated caspase-3-positive neurons in the cortex, hippocampal formation, and striatum 6 h after the last injection. Mice were given standard place training or random location training in the Morris water maze either as adolescents (PD 30–39) or adults (PD 70–79). The adolescents acquired the place learning more slowly than adults, and the alcohol treatments produced only modest place acquisition deficits. In contrast, both the PD7 and the PD 7–9 alcohol treatments resulted in large and significant spatial learning impairments in adults. In contrast to the previous findings of Wozniak et al. (2004), these results indicate that binge alcohol exposure in the 3rd trimester equivalent produces significant and enduring deficits in spatial learning in B6 mice. PMID:24507877

  14. Mice expressing the A53T mutant form of human alpha-synuclein exhibit hyperactivity and reduced anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Graham, Dianca R; Sidhu, Anita

    2010-06-01

    Genetic mutations associated with alpha-synuclein (alpha-Syn) are implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is primarily a movement disorder, but patients are known to experience anxiety and other mood disorders. In this study, we examined the effect of the hA53T mutation during development by analyzing the protein expression of norepinephrine (NET), serotonin (SERT), and dopamine (DAT) transporters in addition to assessing locomotor and anxiety-like behavior. We observed significant decreases in DAT expression at 8 months in transgenic animals compared with normal and younger mice. We used the elevated plus maze, open-field test, and rotarod apparatus to evaluate wild-type and hA53T hemizygous mice at 2, 8, and 12 months of age. Our results showed that 12-month-old transgenic mice spend more time in the open arms and display a greater number of open entries of the elevated plus maze compared with wild-type controls and younger mice. Open-field test results showed that 12-month-old mice travel a greater distance overall and travel more in the inner zone than either wild-type or younger mice. Rotarod testing showed that 8- and 12-month-old transgenic mice perform better than either wild-type controls or younger mice. Overall, 8-12-month-old transgenic mice showed a trend toward reduced anxiety-like behavior and increased hyperactivity. These results indicate a possible role of the A53T alpha-Syn mutation in anxiety-like and hyperactive behaviors in a PD mouse model, suggesting that these behaviors might be comorbid with this disease. PMID:20077428

  15. Orally active opioid μ/δ dual agonist MGM-16, a derivative of the indole alkaloid mitragynine, exhibits potent antiallodynic effect on neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Narita, Minoru; Muramatsu, Naotaka; Nakayama, Terumi; Misawa, Kaori; Kitajima, Mariko; Tashima, Kimihito; Devi, Lakshmi A; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Horie, Syunji

    2014-03-01

    (E)-Methyl 2-((2S,3S,7aS,12bS)-3-ethyl-7a-hydroxy-8-methoxy-1,2,3,4,6,7,7a,12b-octahydroindolo[2,3-a]quinolizin-2-yl)-3-methoxyacrylate (7-hydroxymitragynine), a main active constituent of the traditional herbal medicine Mitragyna speciosa, is an indole alkaloid that is structurally different from morphine. 7-Hydroxymitragynine induces a potent antinociceptive effect on mouse acute pain through μ-opioid receptors. In this study, we developed dual-acting μ- and δ-opioid agonists MGM-15 and MGM-16 from 7-hydroxymitragynine for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. MGM-16 showed a higher potency than that of 7-hydroxymitragynine and MGM-15 in in vitro and in vivo assays. MGM-16 exhibited a high affinity for μ- and δ-opioid receptors, with K(i) values of 2.1 and 7.0 nM, respectively. MGM-16 showed μ- and δ-opioid full agonistic effects in a guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thiotriphosphate) binding assay and in a functional test using electrically elicited guinea pig ileum and mouse vas deferens contractions. Systemic administration of MGM-16 produced antinociceptive effects in a mouse acute pain model and antiallodynic effects in a chronic pain model. The antinociceptive effect of MGM-16 was approximately 240 times more potent than that of morphine in a mouse tail-flick test, and its antiallodynic effect was approximately 100 times more potent than that of gabapentin in partial sciatic nerve-ligated mice, especially with oral administration. The antinociceptive effect of MGM-16 was completely and partially blocked by the μ-selective antagonist β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride (β-FNA) and by the δ-selective antagonist naltrindole, respectively, in a tail-flick test. The antiallodynic effect of MGM-16 was completely blocked by β-FNA and naltrindole in a neuropathic pain model. These findings suggest that MGM-16 could become a class of a compound with potential therapeutic utility for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:24345467

  16. Phasic dopamine neuron activity elicits unique mesofrontal plasticity in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mastwal, Surjeet; Ye, Yizhou; Ren, Ming; Jimenez, Dennisse V; Martinowich, Keri; Gerfen, Charles R; Wang, Kuan Hong

    2014-07-16

    The mesofrontal dopaminergic circuit, which connects the midbrain motivation center to the cortical executive center, is engaged in control of motivated behaviors. In addition, deficiencies in this circuit are associated with adolescent-onset psychiatric disorders in humans. Developmental studies suggest that the mesofrontal circuit exhibits a protracted maturation through adolescence. However, whether the structure and function of this circuit are modifiable by activity in dopaminergic neurons during adolescence remains unknown. Using optogenetic stimulation and in vivo two-photon imaging in adolescent mice, we found that phasic, but not tonic, dopamine neuron activity induces the formation of mesofrontal axonal boutons. In contrast, in adult mice, the effect of phasic activity diminishes. Furthermore, our results showed that dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission regulate this axonal plasticity in adolescence and inhibition of dopamine D2-type receptors restores this plasticity in adulthood. Finally, we found that phasic activation of dopamine neurons also induces greater changes in mesofrontal circuit activity and psychomotor response in adolescent mice than in adult mice. Together, our findings demonstrate that the structure and function of the mesofrontal circuit are modifiable by phasic activity in dopaminergic neurons during adolescence and suggest that the greater plasticity in adolescence may facilitate activity-dependent strengthening of dopaminergic input and improvement in behavioral control. PMID:25031392

  17. Unique Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects Induced by Repeated Adolescent Consumption of Caffeine-Mixed Alcohol in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Robins, Meridith T; Lu, Julie; van Rijn, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    The number of highly caffeinated products has increased dramatically in the past few years. Among these products, highly caffeinated energy drinks are the most heavily advertised and purchased, which has resulted in increased incidences of co-consumption of energy drinks with alcohol. Despite the growing number of adolescents and young adults reporting caffeine-mixed alcohol use, knowledge of the potential consequences associated with co-consumption has been limited to survey-based results and in-laboratory human behavioral testing. Here, we investigate the effect of repeated adolescent (post-natal days P35-61) exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol in C57BL/6 mice on common drug-related behaviors such as locomotor sensitivity, drug reward and cross-sensitivity, and natural reward. To determine changes in neurological activity resulting from adolescent exposure, we monitored changes in expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the dopaminergic reward pathway as a sign of long-term increases in neuronal activity. Repeated adolescent exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure induced significant locomotor sensitization, desensitized cocaine conditioned place preference, decreased cocaine locomotor cross-sensitivity, and increased natural reward consumption. We also observed increased accumulation of ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens following repeated adolescent caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure compared to alcohol or caffeine alone. Using our exposure model, we found that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence causes unique behavioral and neurochemical effects not observed in mice exposed to caffeine or alcohol alone. Based on similar findings for different substances of abuse, it is possible that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence could potentially alter or escalate future substance abuse as means to compensate for these behavioral and neurochemical alterations. PMID:27380261

  18. Unique Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects Induced by Repeated Adolescent Consumption of Caffeine-Mixed Alcohol in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Robins, Meridith T.; Lu, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The number of highly caffeinated products has increased dramatically in the past few years. Among these products, highly caffeinated energy drinks are the most heavily advertised and purchased, which has resulted in increased incidences of co-consumption of energy drinks with alcohol. Despite the growing number of adolescents and young adults reporting caffeine-mixed alcohol use, knowledge of the potential consequences associated with co-consumption has been limited to survey-based results and in-laboratory human behavioral testing. Here, we investigate the effect of repeated adolescent (post-natal days P35-61) exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol in C57BL/6 mice on common drug-related behaviors such as locomotor sensitivity, drug reward and cross-sensitivity, and natural reward. To determine changes in neurological activity resulting from adolescent exposure, we monitored changes in expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the dopaminergic reward pathway as a sign of long-term increases in neuronal activity. Repeated adolescent exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure induced significant locomotor sensitization, desensitized cocaine conditioned place preference, decreased cocaine locomotor cross-sensitivity, and increased natural reward consumption. We also observed increased accumulation of ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens following repeated adolescent caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure compared to alcohol or caffeine alone. Using our exposure model, we found that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence causes unique behavioral and neurochemical effects not observed in mice exposed to caffeine or alcohol alone. Based on similar findings for different substances of abuse, it is possible that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence could potentially alter or escalate future substance abuse as means to compensate for these behavioral and neurochemical alterations. PMID:27380261

  19. Mice with Genetic Deletion of Group VIA Phospholipase A2β Exhibit Impaired Macrophage Function and Increased Parasite Load in Trypanosoma cruzi-Induced Myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Janhavi; Blase, Jennifer R; Hoft, Daniel F; Marentette, John O; Turk, John; McHowat, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection, which is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is associated with intense inflammation during the acute and chronic phases. The pathological progression of Chagas disease is influenced by the infiltration and transmigration of inflammatory cells across the endothelium to infected tissues, which are carefully regulated processes involving several molecular mediators, including adhesion molecules and platelet-activating factor (PAF). We have shown that PAF production is dependent upon calcium-independent group VIA phospholipase A2β (iPLA2β) following infection of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) with T. cruzi, suggesting that the absence of iPLA2β may decrease the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the heart to manage parasite accumulation. Cardiac endothelial cells isolated from iPLA2β-knockout (iPLA2β-KO) mice infected withT. cruzi demonstrated decreased PAF production compared to that by cells isolated from wild-type (WT) mice but demonstrated increases in adhesion molecule expression similar to those seen in WT mice. Myocardial inflammation in iPLA2β-KO mice infected with T. cruzi was similar in severity to that in WT mice, but the iPLA2β-KO mouse myocardium contained more parasite pseudocysts. Upon activation, macrophages from iPLA2β-KO mice produced significantly less nitric oxide (NO) and caused lessT. cruzi inhibition than macrophages from wild-type mice. Thus, the absence of iPLA2β activity does not influence myocardial inflammation, but iPLA2β is essential forT. cruzi clearance. PMID:26857573

  20. Exposure of Adolescent Mice to Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Long-Lasting Modulation of Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines in Hypothalamus and Hippocampus Similar to that Observed for Peripheral Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Sarah; Franchi, Silvia; Castelli, Mara; Amodeo, Giada; Somaini, Lorenzo; Panerai, Alberto; Sacerdote, Paola

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis use is frequent among adolescents. Its main component, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), affects the immune system. We recently demonstrated that chronic exposure of adolescent mice to THC suppressed immunity immediately after treatment but that after a washout period THC induced a long-lasting opposite modulation towards a proinflammatory and T-helper-1 phenotype in adulthood. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether the same effect was also present in brain regions such as the hypothalamus and hippocampus. Thirty-three-day-old adolescent and 80-day-old adult male mice were used. Acute THC administration induced a similar reduction of macrophage proinflammatory cytokines and an IL-10 increase in adult and adolescent mice. THC did not affect brain cytokines in adult mice, but a proinflammatory cytokine decrease was evident in the adolescent brain. A similar effect was present in the hypothalamus and hippocampus after 10 days' THC administration. In contrast, when brain cytokines were measured 47 days after the final THC administration, we observed an inverted effect in adult mice treated as adolescents, i.e., IL-1β and TNF-α increased and IL-10 decreased, indicating a shift toward neuroinflammation. These data suggest that THC exposure in adolescence has long-lasting effects on brain cytokines that parallel those present in the periphery. This modulation may affect vulnerability to immune and behavioural diseases in adulthood. PMID:25875136

  1. Blockade of NMDA receptors reverses the depressant, but not anxiogenic effect of adolescence social isolation in mice.

    PubMed

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Amiri, Shayan; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Marzban, Hassan; Aminzadeh, Azadeh; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei

    2015-03-01

    Early life social isolation stress (SIS), a well-known chronic stress paradigm, is contributed to a number of pathophysiological and neurochemical changes including depression and anxiety. The underlying mechanisms for these disorders in socially isolated animals have not been fully cleared. Previous studies have shown that N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor function is changed by social isolation condition. It is now well recognized that NMDA receptor blockade can exhibit antidepressant and anxiolytic actions. In our study, postnatal day 21-25 mice were randomly housed for 4 weeks under either social condition (SC) or isolated condition (IC). Then, animals were subjected to different behavioral experiments to investigate whether blockade of NMDA receptor resulted in behavioral alterations in animals. Social isolation stress induced depressive and anxiety-like behaviors in IC animals in comparison with SC mice. Also, we applied subeffective doses of antagonists including ketamine (1mg/kg), MK-801 (0.05mg/kg), and magnesium sulfate (10mg/kg) to both SC and IC mice prior to behavioral experiments. Administration of a single dose of all mentioned drugs did not affect the SC mice but modulated the depressant effects of SIS on IC mice. Administration of NMDA receptor antagonists decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test as well as an increase in grooming behavior in splash test. However, anxiety-like behaviors in IC animals remained unchanged in hole-board test and open field test after blockade of NMDA receptors. Taken together, our results showed the possible involvement of the NMDA receptors in the depressive, but not anxiety-like behaviors induced by SIS. PMID:25592321

  2. Young APOE[subscript 4] Targeted Replacement Mice Exhibit Poor Spatial Learning and Memory, with Reduced Dendritic Spine Density in the Medial Entorhinal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Gustavo A.; Burns, Mark P.; Weeber, Edwin J.; Rebeck, G. William

    2013-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E4 ("APOE-[epsilon]4") allele is the strongest genetic risk factor for developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease, and may predispose individuals to Alzheimer's-related cognitive decline by affecting normal brain function early in life. To investigate the impact of human APOE alleles on cognitive performance in mice, we trained…

  3. Transgenic Mice Expressing a Truncated Form of CREB-Binding Protein (CBP) Exhibit Deficits in Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Storage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Marcelo A.; Kaplan, Michael P.; Park, Alice; Blanchard, Edward J.; Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Lombardi, Thomas L.; Abel, Ted

    2005-01-01

    Deletions, translocations, or point mutations in the CREB-binding protein (CBP) gene have been associated with Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome; a human developmental disorder characterized by retarded growth and reduced mental function. To examine the role of CBP in memory, transgenic mice were generated in which the CaMKII[alpha] promoter drives…

  4. Altered gene expression and spine density in nucleus accumbens of adolescent and adult male mice exposed to emotional and physical stress.

    PubMed

    Warren, Brandon L; Sial, Omar K; Alcantara, Lyonna F; Greenwood, Maria A; Brewer, Jacob S; Rozofsky, John P; Parise, Eric M; Bolaños-Guzmán, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    Stressful early life experiences are implicated in lifelong health. However, little is known about the consequences of emotional stress (ES) or physical stress (PS) on neurobiology. Therefore, the following set of experiments was designed to assess changes in transcription and translation of key proteins within the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Male adolescent (postnatal day 35) or adult (8-week-old) mice were exposed to ES or PS using a witness social defeat paradigm. Then, 24 h after the last stress session, we measured levels of specific mRNAs and proteins within the NAc. Spine density was also assessed in separate groups of mice. Exposure to ES or PS disrupted extracellular signal-related kinase 2 (ERK2), reduced transcription of ΔFosB and had no effect on cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) mRNA. Western blots revealed that exposure to ES or PS decreased ERK2 phosphorylation in adolescents, whereas the same stress regimen increased ERK2 phosphorylation in adults. Exposure to ES or PS had no effect on ΔFosB or CREB phosphorylation. ES and PS increased spine density in the NAc of adolescent exposed mice, but only exposure to PS increased spine density in adults. Together, these findings demonstrate that exposure to ES or PS is a potent stressor in adolescent and adult mice and can disturb the integrity of the NAc by altering transcription and translation of important signaling molecules in an age-dependent manner. Furthermore, exposure to ES and PS induces substantial synaptic plasticity of the NAc. PMID:24943326

  5. Atp13a2-deficient mice exhibit neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, limited α-synuclein accumulation and age-dependent sensorimotor deficits

    PubMed Central

    Schultheis, Patrick J.; Fleming, Sheila M.; Clippinger, Amy K.; Lewis, Jada; Tsunemi, Taiji; Giasson, Benoit; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mazzulli, Joseph R.; Bardgett, Mark E.; Haik, Kristi L.; Ekhator, Osunde; Chava, Anil Kumar; Howard, John; Gannon, Matt; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Chen, Yinhuai; Prasad, Vikram; Linn, Stephen C.; Tamargo, Rafael J.; Westbroek, Wendy; Sidransky, Ellen; Krainc, Dimitri; Shull, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in ATP13A2 (PARK9), encoding a lysosomal P-type ATPase, are associated with both Kufor–Rakeb syndrome (KRS) and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). KRS has recently been classified as a rare genetic form of Parkinson's disease (PD), whereas NCL is a lysosomal storage disorder. Although the transport activity of ATP13A2 has not been defined, in vitro studies show that its loss compromises lysosomal function, which in turn is thought to cause neuronal degeneration. To understand the role of ATP13A2 dysfunction in disease, we disrupted its gene in mice. Atp13a2−/− and Atp13a2+/+ mice were tested behaviorally to assess sensorimotor and cognitive function at multiple ages. In the brain, lipofuscin accumulation, α-synuclein aggregation and dopaminergic pathology were measured. Behaviorally, Atp13a2−/− mice displayed late-onset sensorimotor deficits. Accelerated deposition of autofluorescent storage material (lipofuscin) was observed in the cerebellum and in neurons of the hippocampus and the cortex of Atp13a2−/− mice. Immunoblot analysis showed increased insoluble α-synuclein in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex or cerebellum. There was no change in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra or in striatal dopamine levels in aged Atp13a2−/− mice. These results show that the loss of Atp13a2 causes sensorimotor impairments, α-synuclein accumulation as occurs in PD and related synucleinopathies, and accumulation of lipofuscin deposits characteristic of NCL, thus providing the first direct demonstration that null mutations in Atp13a2 can cause pathological features of both diseases in the same organism. PMID:23393156

  6. Platycarya strobilacea S. et Z. Extract Has a High Antioxidant Capacity and Exhibits Hair Growth-promoting Effects in Male C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jin; Choi, Joo Yeon; Park, Byung Cheol; Lee, Bog-Hieu

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Platycarya strobilacea S. et Z. (PSE) extract on mouse hair growth and to determine the mechanism of action of PSE. PSE was purchased and its antioxidant activities, such as electron donating ability, total polyphenol content, and flavonoid content were tested. Toxicity during topical treatment was determined by the CCK-8 assay, a cell viability test. Fifteen 4-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were assigned to receive one of three treatments: dimethyl sulfoxide (negative control), minoxidil (positive control) or PSE. Test materials were topically applied to the shaved dorsal skin of each mouse daily for 3 weeks. After 21 days, we observed skin tissue hair follicle morphology and length, mast cell number, and stem cell factor (SCF) expression using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), toluidine blue, and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of cytokines involved in hair growth [i.e., insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1] was determined by PCR. PSE was found to have very high antioxidant activity. The cell viability rate of PSE-treated mice was markedly higher than that of mice in the control group. We also observed an increase in hair follicle length, strong SCF staining, and a decrease in mast cell number in the PSE group. In addition, PSE-treated mice had higher IGF-1 and KGF expression and lower TGF-β1 expression than mice in the minoxidil-treated group. These results suggest that topical application of PSE promotes hair growth by intensifying SCF, suppressing mast cell production, and increasing hair growth-promoting cytokine expression. PMID:25320710

  7. Outdoor Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) at the John C. Stennis Space Center has exhibits located in front of the Visitors Center. These boat-shaped buoys are moored in areas of the ocean that experience hostile environmental conditions. The instruments installed gather information and relay it to the National Weather Service by satellite. Nomad buoys are 20 feet long and weigh 13,900 pounds. They provide information on wind speed and direction, humidity levels, air and sea surface temperature and air pressure. U.S. Coast Guard ships transport buoys to their mooring sites.

  8. De novo inbred heterozygous Zeb2/Sip1 mutant mice uniquely generated by germ-line conditional knockout exhibit craniofacial, callosal and behavioral defects associated with Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Tsuyoshi; Nishizaki, Yuriko; Matsui, Fumiko; Wakamatsu, Nobuaki; Higashi, Yujiro

    2015-11-15

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MOWS) is caused by de novo heterozygous mutation at ZEB2 (SIP1, ZFHX1B) gene, and exhibit moderate to severe intellectual disability (ID), a characteristic facial appearance, epilepsy and other congenital anomalies. Establishing a murine MOWS model is important, not only for investigating the pathogenesis of this disease, but also for identifying compounds that may improve the symptoms. However, because the heterozygous Zeb2 knockout mouse could not be maintained as a mouse line with the inbred C57BL/6 background, it was difficult to use those mice for the study of MOWS. Here, we systematically generated de novo Zeb2 Δex7/+ mice by inducing the Zeb2 mutation in the germ cells using conditional recombination system. The de novo Zeb2 Δex7/+ mice with C57BL/6 background developed multiple defects relevant to MOWS, including craniofacial abnormalities, defective corpus callosum formation and the decreased number of parvalbumin interneurons in the cortex. In behavioral analyses, these mice showed reduced motor activity, increased anxiety and impaired sociability. Notably, during the Barnes maze test, immobile Zeb2 mutant mice were observed over repeated trials. In contrast, neither the mouse line nor the de novo Zeb2 Δex7/+ mice with the closed colony ICR background showed cranial abnormalities or reduced motor activities. These results demonstrate the advantages of using de novo Zeb2 Δex7/+ mice with the C57BL/6 background as the MOWS model. To our knowledge, this is the first time an inducible de novo mutation system has been applied to murine germline cells to produce an animal model of a human congenital disease. PMID:26319231

  9. Adolescent mice show anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior and the reduction of long-term potentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 synapses after neonatal maternal separation.

    PubMed

    Shin, S Y; Han, S H; Woo, R-S; Jang, S H; Min, S S

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to maternal separation (MS) during early life is an identified risk factor for emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression later in life. This study investigated the effects of neonatal MS on the behavior and long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as basic synaptic transmission at hippocampal CA3-CA1 and mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 synapses in adolescent mice for 19days. When mice were adolescents, we measured depression, learning, memory, anxious and aggressive behavior using the forced swimming test (FST), Y-maze, Morris water maze (MWM), elevated plus maze (EPM), three consecutive days of the open field test, the social interaction test, the tube-dominance test and the resident-intruder test. The results showed that there was no difference in FST, Y-maze, and MWM performance. However, MS mice showed more anxiety-like behavior in the EPM test and aggressive-like behavior in the tube-dominance and resident-intruder tests. In addition, the magnitude of LTP and release probability in the MF-CA3 synapses was reduced in the MS group but not in the CA3-CA1 synapse. Our results indicate that early life stress due to MS may induce anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior during adolescence, and these effects are associated with synaptic plasticity at the hippocampal MF-CA3 synapses. PMID:26733385

  10. Acute alcohol exposure during neurulation: Behavioral and brain structural consequences in adolescent C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Fish, E W; Holloway, H T; Rumple, A; Baker, L K; Wieczorek, L A; Moy, S S; Paniagua, B; Parnell, S E

    2016-09-15

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) can induce physical malformations and behavioral abnormalities that depend in part on thedevelopmental timing of alcohol exposure. The current studies employed a mouse FASD model to characterize the long-term behavioral and brain structural consequences of a binge-like alcohol exposure during neurulation; a first-trimester stage when women are typically unaware that they are pregnant. Time-mated C57BL/6J female mice were administered two alcohol doses (2.8g/kg, four hours apart) or vehicle starting at gestational day 8.0. Male and female adolescent offspring (postnatal day 28-45) were then examined for motor activity (open field and elevated plus maze), coordination (rotarod), spatial learning and memory (Morris water maze), sensory motor gating (acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition), sociability (three-chambered social test), and nociceptive responses (hot plate). Regional brain volumes and shapes were determined using magnetic resonance imaging. In males, PAE increased activity on the elevated plus maze and reduced social novelty preference, while in females PAE increased exploratory behavior in the open field and transiently impaired rotarod performance. In both males and females, PAE modestly impaired Morris water maze performance and decreased the latency to respond on the hot plate. There were no brain volume differences; however, significant shape differences were found in the cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, and corpus callosum. These results demonstrate that alcohol exposure during neurulation can have functional consequences into adolescence, even in the absence of significant brain regional volumetric changes. However, PAE-induced regional shape changes provide evidence for persistent brain alterations and suggest alternative clinical diagnostic markers. PMID:27185739

  11. Synthesized Peptides from Yam Dioscorin Hydrolysis in Silico Exhibit Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitory Activities and Oral Glucose Tolerance Improvements in Normal Mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yin-Shiou; Han, Chuan-Hsiao; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Hou, Wen-Chi

    2016-08-24

    RRDY, RL, and DPF were the top 3 of 21 peptides for inhibitions against dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) from the pepsin hydrolysis of yam dioscorin in silico and were further investigated in a proof-of-concept study in normal ICR mice for regulating glucose metabolism by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The sample or sitagliptin (positive control) was orally administered by a feeding gauge; 30 min later, the glucose loads (2.5 g/kg) were performed. RRDY, yam dioscorin, or sitagliptin preload, but not DPF, lowered the area under the curve (AUC0-120) of blood glucose and DPP-IV activity and elevated the AUC0-120 of blood insulin, which showed significant differences compared to control (P < 0.05 or 0.001). These results suggested that RRDY and yam dioscorin might be beneficial in glycemic control in normal mice and need further investigations in diabetic animal models. PMID:27499387

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing Rift Valley fever virus antigens: Mice exhibit systemic immune responses as the result of oral administration of the transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Kalbina, Irina; Lagerqvist, Nina; Moiane, Bélisario; Ahlm, Clas; Andersson, Sören; Strid, Åke; Falk, Kerstin I

    2016-11-01

    The zoonotic Rift Valley fever virus affects livestock and humans in Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula. The economic impact of this pathogen due to livestock losses, as well as its relevance to public health, underscores the importance of developing effective and easily distributed vaccines. Vaccines that can be delivered orally are of particular interest. Here, we report the expression in transformed plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) of Rift Valley fever virus antigens. The antigens used in this study were the N protein and a deletion mutant of the Gn glycoprotein. Transformed lines were analysed for specific mRNA and protein content by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Furthermore, the plant-expressed antigens were evaluated for their immunogenicity in mice fed the transgenic plants. After oral intake of fresh transgenic plant material, a proportion of the mice elicited specific IgG antibody responses, as compared to the control animals that were fed wild-type plants and of which none sero-converted. Thus, we show that transgenic plants can be readily used to express and produce Rift Valley Fever virus proteins, and that the plants are immunogenic when given orally to mice. These are promising findings and provide a basis for further studies on edible plant vaccines against the Rift Valley fever virus. PMID:27402440

  13. Adolescent and adult responsiveness to the incentive value of cocaine reward in mice: role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) gene.

    PubMed

    Balda, Mara A; Anderson, Karen L; Itzhak, Yossef

    2006-08-01

    A major concern in adolescent psychostimulant abuse is the long-term consequence of this practice, because early drug exposure may cause long-term adaptations, which render the organism more susceptible to drug abuse later in life. The incentive value of drug and natural reward in rodents is commonly assessed by the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm, which involves Pavlovian learning. The aims of the present study were to investigate: a) the acquisition, expression, maintenance and reinstatement of cocaine CPP from periadolescence (PD24-45) through adulthood (PD70); b) potential sexual dimorphism in adolescence and adulthood in response to cocaine-induced CPP; and c) the role of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) gene in long-term neural plasticity underlying responsiveness to cocaine and cocaine-associated cues. Adolescent wild type (WT) mice acquired significant cocaine (20 mg/kg) CPP that was maintained from PD24 through PD43. Upon extinction, CPP was reinstated in adulthood (PD70) following a priming injection of cocaine (5 mg/kg). In contrast, cocaine CPP acquired between PD26 and PD31 in adolescent nNOS knockout (KO) mice, was neither maintained nor reinstated by cocaine. There was no sexual dimorphism in adolescent WT and KO mice. Genotype differences and sexual dimorphism were observed in adult mice. Cocaine CPP in adult WT males (PD89-94) was maintained for 4 weeks post training, and subsequently reinstated by cocaine priming; the magnitude of CPP in adult WT males was lower than in female counterparts. CPP in adult KO males (PD88-93) was neither maintained nor reinstated by cocaine priming; in contrast, CPP in adult KO females was not significantly different from adult WT females. Results suggest that the nNOS gene is essential during adolescence of both sexes for the development of long-term neural plasticity underlying responsiveness to the incentive value of cocaine reward. Sexual dimorphism in response to cocaine CPP emerges in

  14. Beta 2-microglobulin-, CD8+ T-cell-deficient mice survive inoculation with high doses of vaccinia virus and exhibit altered IgG responses.

    PubMed Central

    Spriggs, M K; Koller, B H; Sato, T; Morrissey, P J; Fanslow, W C; Smithies, O; Voice, R F; Widmer, M B; Maliszewski, C R

    1992-01-01

    Transgenic mice lacking an intact beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) gene fail to express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I proteins on the cell surface and, as a result, are virtually devoid of CD4- CD8+ lymphocytes. These animals provide a unique model system for directly assessing the role of CD8+ lymphocytes in the modulation of viral infection in vivo. beta 2m- CD8- mice and their normal littermates were inoculated at the base of the tail with the WR strain of vaccinia virus and monitored for serum antibody and lesion formation. Both groups developed similar lesions in response to a broad virus dose range, and all animals had completely recovered by day 28 after inoculation. Isotype-specific immunoglobulin levels were determined for each animal on day 7 and day 14 after primary inoculation, and again 7 days after a virus challenge. The virus-specific IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b levels were significantly different in the beta 2m-/- group (20-, 9-, and 30-fold lower, respectively, on day 7 after challenge) compared with the beta 2m+/- group. Virus-specific serum IgM levels for both groups remained similar throughout the experiment. In a separate experiment, beta 2m-/- mice were immunized with a nonviral antigen, 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl-conjugated keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and both total and antigen-specific isotype-specific immunoglobulin titers were determined. Total IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 tended to be lower overall in the beta 2m-/- mice compared with beta 2m+/- littermates. In contrast, total and antigen-specific IgE titers were similar in the two groups. These data indicate that CD8+ lymphocytes are not required to clear high doses of vaccinia virus, and they suggest that beta 2m-/- mice are less efficient at antigen-specific IgG production than their beta 2m+/- littermates. PMID:1631092

  15. Developmental exposure to chlorpyrifos alters reactivity to environmental and social cues in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Ricceri, Laura; Markina, Nadja; Valanzano, Angela; Fortuna, Stefano; Cometa, Maria Francesca; Meneguz, Annarita; Calamandrei, Gemma

    2003-09-15

    Neonatal mice were treated daily on postnatal days (pnds) 1 through 4 or 11 through 14 with the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF), at doses (1 or 3 mg/kg) that do not evoke systemic toxicity. Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was evaluated within 24 h from termination of treatments. Pups treated on pnds 1-4 underwent ultrasonic vocalization tests (pnds 5, 8, and 11) and a homing test (orientation to home nest material, pnd 10). Pups in both treatment schedules were then assessed for locomotor activity (pnd 25), novelty-seeking response (pnd 35), social interactions with an unfamiliar conspecific (pnd 45), and passive avoidance learning (pnd 60). AChE activity was reduced by 25% after CPF 1-4 but not after CPF 11-14 treatment. CPF selectively affected only the G(4) (tetramer) molecular isoform of AChE. Behavioral analysis showed that early CPF treatment failed to affect neonatal behaviors. Locomotor activity on pnd 25 was increased in 11-14 CPF-treated mice at both doses, and CPF-treated animals in both treatment schedules were more active when exposed to environmental novelty in the novelty-seeking test. All CPF-treated mice displayed more agonistic responses, and such effect was more marked in male mice exposed to the low CPF dose on pnds 11-14. Passive avoidance learning was not affected by CPF. These data indicate that developmental exposure to CPF induces long-term behavioral alterations in the mouse species and support the involvement of neural systems in addition to the cholinergic system in the delayed behavioral toxicity of CPF. PMID:13678652

  16. Environmental enrichment during adolescence regulates gene expression in the striatum of mice.

    PubMed

    Thiriet, Nathalie; Amar, Lahouari; Toussay, Xavier; Lardeux, Virginie; Ladenheim, Bruce; Becker, Kevin G; Cadet, Jean Lud; Solinas, Marcello; Jaber, Mohamed

    2008-07-30

    We have previously shown that environmental enrichment decreases the activating and rewarding effects of the psychostimulant cocaine and increases resistance to the neurotoxic effect of the Parkinson-inducing drug MPTP. These effects were accompanied by an increase in the striatal expression of the neurotrophin BDNF, an increase in the striatal levels of delta-Fos B and by a decrease in striatal levels of the dopamine transporter, the main molecular target for cocaine and MPTP. Here, we used cDNA arrays to investigate the effects of rearing mice in enriched environments from weaning to adulthood on the profile of expression of genes in the striatum focusing on genes involved in intracellular signalling and functioning. We found that mice reared in an enriched environment show several alterations in the levels of mRNA coding for proteins involved in cell proliferation, cell differentiation, signal transduction, transcription and translation, cell structure and metabolism. Several of these findings were further confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and, in the case of protein kinase C lambda, also by western blot. These findings are the first description of alterations in striatal gene expression by an enriched environment. The striatal gene expression regulation by environment that we report here may play a role in the resistance to the effects of drugs of abuse and dopaminergic neurotoxins previously reported. PMID:18585688

  17. Mice with conditional deletion of Cx26 exhibit no vestibular phenotype despite secondary loss of Cx30 in the vestibular end organs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Young; Takada, Tomoko; Takada, Yohei; Kappy, Michelle D; Beyer, Lisa A; Swiderski, Donald L; Godin, Ashley L; Brewer, Shannon; King, W Michael; Raphael, Yehoash

    2015-10-01

    Connexins are components of gap junctions which facilitate transfer of small molecules between cells. One member of the connexin family, Connexin 26 (Cx26), is prevalent in gap junctions in sensory epithelia of the inner ear. Mutations of GJB2, the gene encoding Cx26, cause significant hearing loss in humans. The vestibular system, however, does not usually show significant functional deficits in humans with this mutation. Mouse models for loss of Cx26 function demonstrate hearing loss and cochlear pathology but the extent of vestibular dysfunction and organ pathology are less well characterized. To understand the vestibular effects of Cx26 mutations, we evaluated vestibular function and histology of the vestibular sensory epithelia in a conditional knockout (CKO) mouse with Cx26 loss of function. Transgenic C57BL/6 mice, in which cre-Sox10 drives excision of the Cx26 gene from non-sensory cells flanking the sensory epithelium of the inner ear (Gjb2-CKO), were compared to age-matched wild types. Animals were sacrificed at ages between 4 and 40 weeks and their cochlear and vestibular sensory organs harvested for histological examination. Cx26 immunoreactivity was prominent in the peripheral vestibular system and the cochlea of wild type mice, but absent in the Gjb2-CKO specimens. The hair cell population in the cochleae of the Gjb2-CKO mice was severely depleted but in the vestibular organs it was intact, despite absence of Cx26 expression. The vestibular organs appeared normal at the latest time point examined, 40 weeks. To determine whether compensation by another connexin explains survival of the normal vestibular sensory epithelium, we evaluated the presence of Cx30 in the Gjb2-CKO mouse. We found that Cx30 labeling was normal in the cochlea, but it was decreased or absent in the vestibular system. The vestibular phenotype of the mutants was not different from wild-types as determined by time on the rotarod, head stability tests and physiological responses to

  18. Contemporary Pharyngeal and Invasive emm1 and Invasive emm12 Group A Streptococcus Isolates Exhibit Similar In Vivo Selection for CovRS Mutants in Mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenchao; Liu, Mengyao; Chen, Daniel G; Yiu, Rossana; Fang, Ferric C; Lei, Benfang

    2016-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes diverse infections ranging from common pharyngitis to rare severe invasive infections. Invasive GAS isolates can have natural mutations in the virulence regulator CovRS, which result in enhanced expression of multiple virulence genes, suppressed the expression of the protease SpeB, and increased virulence. It is believed that CovRS mutations arise during human infections with GAS carrying wild-type CovRS and are not transmissible. CovRS mutants of invasive GAS of the emm1 genotype arise readily during experimental infection in mice. It is possible that invasive GAS arises from pharyngeal GAS through rare genetic mutations that confer the capacity of mutated GAS to acquire covRS mutations during infection. The objective of this study was to determine whether contemporary pharyngeal emm1 GAS isolates have a reduced propensity to acquire CovRS mutations in vivo compared with invasive emm1 GAS and whether emm3, emm12, and emm28 GAS acquire CovRS mutants in mouse infection. The propensity of invasive and pharyngeal emm1 and invasive emm3, emm12, and emm28 SpeBA+ isolates to acquire variants with the SpeBA- phenotype was determined during subcutaneous infection of mice. The majority of both invasive and pharyngeal emm1 SpeBA+ isolates and two of three emm12 isolates, but not emm3 and emm28 isolates, were found to acquire SpeBA- variants during skin infection in mice. All analyzed SpeBA- variants of emm1 and emm12 GAS from the mouse infection acquired covRS mutations and produced more platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase SsE. Thus, contemporary invasive and pharyngeal emm1 GAS isolates and emm12 GAS have a similar capacity to acquire covRS mutations in vivo. The rarity of severe invasive infections caused by GAS does not appear to be attributable to a reduced ability of pharyngeal isolates to acquire CovRS mutations. PMID:27611332

  19. Zinc-Oxide Nanoparticles Exhibit Genotoxic, Clastogenic, Cytotoxic and Actin Depolymerization Effects by Inducing Oxidative Stress Responses in Macrophages and Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Pati, Rashmirekha; Das, Ishani; Mehta, Ranjit Kumar; Sahu, Rojalin; Sonawane, Avinash

    2016-04-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) have wide biological applications, which have raised serious concerns about their impact on the health and environment. Although, various studies have shown ZnO-NP toxicity on different cells underin vitroconditions, sufficient information is lacking regarding toxicity and underlying mechanisms underin vivoconditions. In this work, we investigated genotoxic, clastogenic, and cytotoxic effects of ZnO-NPs on macrophages and in adult mice. ZnO-NP-treated mice showed signs of toxicity such as loss in body weight, passive behavior and reduced survival. Further mechanistic studies revealed that administration of higher dose caused severe DNA damage in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells as evident by the formation of COMET tail, micronuclei, chromosomal fragmentation, and phosphorylation of H2A histone family member X. Moreover, ZnO-NPs inhibited DNA repair mechanism by downregulating the expression offen-1andpolBproteins. Histopathological examinations showed severe inflammation and damage to liver, lungs, and kidneys. Cell viability and wound healing assays revealed that ZnO-NPs killed macrophages in a dose-dependent manner, caused severe wounds and inhibited cellular migration by irreversible actin depolymerization and degradation. Reduction in the viability of macrophages was due to the arrest of the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, inhibition of superoxide dismutase and catalase and eventually reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, treatment with an antioxidant drug N-acetyl cysteine significantly reduced the ZnO-NP induced genotoxicity bothin vitroandin vivo Altogether, this study gives detailed pathological insights of ZnO-NP that impair cellular functions, thus will enable to arbitrate their biological applications. PMID:26794139

  20. X-linked Angelman-like syndrome caused by Slc9a6 knockout in mice exhibits evidence of endosomal-lysosomal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Strømme, Petter; Dobrenis, Kostantin; Sillitoe, Roy V; Gulinello, Maria; Ali, Nafeeza F; Davidson, Cristin; Micsenyi, Matthew C; Stephney, Gloria; Ellevog, Linda; Klungland, Arne; Walkley, Steven U

    2011-11-01

    Mutations in solute carrier family 9 isoform 6 on chromosome Xq26.3 encoding sodium-hydrogen exchanger 6, a protein mainly expressed in early and recycling endosomes are known to cause a complex and slowly progressive degenerative human neurological disease. Three resulting phenotypes have so far been reported: an X-linked Angelman syndrome-like condition, Christianson syndrome and corticobasal degeneration with tau deposition, with each characterized by severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, autistic behaviour and ataxia. Hypothesizing that a sodium-hydrogen exchanger 6 deficiency would most likely disrupt the endosomal-lysosomal system of neurons, we examined Slc9a6 knockout mice with tissue staining and related techniques commonly used to study lysosomal storage disorders. As a result, we found that sodium-hydrogen exchanger 6 depletion leads to abnormal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside and unesterified cholesterol within late endosomes and lysosomes of neurons in selective brain regions, most notably the basolateral nuclei of the amygdala, the CA3 and CA4 regions and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and some areas of cerebral cortex. In these select neuronal populations, histochemical staining for β-hexosaminidase activity, a lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of GM2 ganglioside, was undetectable. Neuroaxonal dystrophy similar to that observed in lysosomal disease was observed in the cerebellum and was accompanied by a marked and progressive loss of Purkinje cells, particularly in those lacking the expression of Zebrin II. On behavioural testing, Slc9a6 knockout mice displayed a discrete clinical phenotype attributable to motor hyperactivity and cerebellar dysfunction. Importantly, these findings show that sodium-hydrogen exchanger 6 loss of function in the Slc9a6-targeted mouse model leads to compromise of endosomal-lysosomal function similar to lysosomal disease and to conspicuous neuronal abnormalities in specific brain regions, which in concert

  1. FT-Raman study of deferoxamine and deferiprone exhibits potent amelioration of structural changes in the liver tissues of mice due to aluminum exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, S.; Khatiwada, Chandra Prasad; Sivasubramanian, J.; Raja, B.

    2014-01-01

    The present study inform the alterations on major biochemical constituents such as lipids, proteins, nucleic acids and glycogen along with phosphodiester linkages, tryptophan bands, tyrosine doublet, disulfide bridge conformations, aliphatic hydrophobic residue, and salt bridges in liver tissues of mice using Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. In amide I, amide II and amide III, the area value significant decrease due structural alteration in the protein, glycogen and triglycerides levels but chelating agents DFP and DFO upturned it. Morphology changes by aluminium induced alterations and recovery by chelating agents within liver tissues known by histopathological examination. Concentrations of trace elements were found by ICP-OES. FT-Raman study was revealed to be in agreement with biochemical studies and demonstrate that it can successfully specify the molecular alteration in liver tissues. The tyrosyl doublet ratio I899/I831 decreases more in aluminum intoxicated tissues but treatment with DFP and DFO + DFP brings back to nearer control value. This indicates more variation in the hydrogen bonding of the phenolic hydroxyl group due to aluminum poisoning. The decreased Raman intensity ratio (I3220/I3400) observed in the aluminum induced tissues suggests a decreased water domain size, which could be interpreted in terms of weaker hydrogen-bonded molecular species of water in the aluminum intoxicated liver tissues. Finally, FT-Raman spectroscopy might be a useful tool for obtained successfully to indicate the molecular level changes.

  2. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Brown, Christine E; Ostberg, Julie R; Priceman, Saul J; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Lin, Paul; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Jensen, Michael C; Forman, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM) were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R), which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:26761817

  3. Adolescent Attitudes about Rape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershner, Ruth

    1996-01-01

    A very significant problem in society is adolescent rape victimization and the growing number of adolescent perpetrators. This paper examines adolescent attitudes about rape in order to develop curricular materials. It is found that adolescents exhibit conservative attitudes about gender roles, general rape myths, and victim issues. (Author)

  4. Self-recognition specificity expressed by T cells from nude mice. Absence of detectable Ia-restricted T cells in nude mice that do exhibit self-K/D-restricted T cell responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kruisbeek, A.M.; Davis, M.L.; Matis, L.A.; Longo, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    The presence in athymic nude mice of precursor T cells with self-recognition specificity for either H-2 K/D or H-2 I region determinants was investigated. Chimeras were constructed of lethally irradiated parental mice receiving a mixture of F1 nude mouse (6-8 wk old) spleen and bone marrow cells. The donor inoculum was deliberately not subjected to any T cell depletion procedure, so that any potential major histocompatibility complex-committed precursor T cells were allowed to differentiate and expand in the normal parental recipients. 3 mo after reconstitution, the chimeras were immunized with several protein antigens in complete Freund's adjuvant in the footpads and their purified draining lymph node T cells tested 10 d later for ability to recognize antigen on antigen-presenting cells of either parental haplotype. Also, their spleen and lymph node cells were tested for ability to generate a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. It was demonstrated that T cell proliferative responses of these F1(nude)----parent chimeras were restricted solely to recognizing parental host I region determinants as self and expressed the Ir gene phenotype of the host. In contrast, CTL responses could be generated (in the presence of interleukin 2) to TNP-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. Thus these results indicate that nude mice which do have CTL with self-specificity for K/D region determinants lack proliferating T cells with self-specificity for I region determinants. These results provide evidence for the concepts that development of the I region-restricted T cell repertoire is strictly an intrathymically determined event and that young nude mice lack the unique thymic elements responsible for edu

  5. Affinity-Tuned ErbB2 or EGFR Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Exhibit an Increased Therapeutic Index against Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Jiang, Shuguang; Fang, Chongyun; Yang, Shiyu; Olalere, Devvora; Pequignot, Edward C; Cogdill, Alexandria P; Li, Na; Ramones, Melissa; Granda, Brian; Zhou, Li; Loew, Andreas; Young, Regina M; June, Carl H; Zhao, Yangbing

    2015-09-01

    Target-mediated toxicity is a major limitation in the development of chimeric antigen T-cell receptors (CAR) for adoptive cell therapy of solid tumors. In this study, we developed a strategy to adjust the affinities of the scFv component of CAR to discriminate tumors overexpressing the target from normal tissues that express it at physiologic levels. A CAR-expressing T-cell panel was generated with target antigen affinities varying over three orders of magnitude. High-affinity cells recognized target expressed at any level, including at levels in normal cells that were undetectable by flow cytometry. Affinity-tuned cells exhibited robust antitumor efficacy similar to high-affinity cells, but spared normal cells expressing physiologic target levels. The use of affinity-tuned scFvs offers a strategy to empower wider use of CAR T cells against validated targets widely overexpressed on solid tumors, including those considered undruggable by this approach. PMID:26330166

  6. Affinity-tuned ErbB2 or EGFR chimeric antigen receptor T cells exhibit an increased therapeutic index against tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojun; Jiang, Shuguang; Fang, Chongyun; Yang, Shiyu; Olalere, Devvora; Pequignot, Edward C.; Cogdill, Alexandria P.; Li, Na; Ramones, Melissa; Granda, Brian; Zhou, Li; Loew, Andreas; Young, Regina M.; June, Carl H.; Zhao, Yangbing

    2015-01-01

    Target-mediated toxicity is a major limitation in the development of chimeric antigen T cell receptors (CAR) for adoptive cell therapy of solid tumors. In this study, we developed a strategy to adjust the affinities of the scFv component of CAR to discriminate tumors overexpressing the target from normal tissues which express it at physiologic levels. A CAR-expressing T cell panel was generated with target antigen affinities varying over three orders of magnitude. High-affinity cells recognized target expressed at any level, including at levels in normal cells that were undetectable by flow cytometry. Affinity-tuned cells exhibited robust antitumor efficacy similar to high-affinity cells, but spared normal cells expressing physiologic target levels. The use of affinity-tuned scFvs offers a strategy to empower wider use of CAR T cells against validated targets widely overexpressed on solid tumors, including those considered undruggable by this approach. PMID:26330166

  7. Effects of repeated adolescent stress and serotonin transporter gene partial knockout in mice on behaviors and brain structures relevant to major depression

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Simona; Müller, Tanja; Friedel, Miriam; Sigrist, Hannes; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Henkelman, Mark; Rudin, Markus; Seifritz, Erich; Pryce, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    In humans, exposure to stress during development is associated with structural and functional alterations of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala (AMY), and hippocampus (HC) and their circuits of connectivity, and with an increased risk for developing major depressive disorder particularly in carriers of the short (s) variant of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR). Although changes in these regions are found in carriers of the s allele and/or in depressed patients, evidence for a specific genotype × developmental stress effect on brain structure and function is limited. Here, we investigated the effect of repeated stress exposure during adolescence in mice with partial knockout of the 5-HTT gene (HET) vs. wildtype (WT) on early-adulthood behavioral measures and brain structure [using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] relevant to human major depression. Behaviorally, adolescent stress (AS) increased anxiety and decreased activity and did so to a similar degree in HET and WT. In a probabilistic reversal learning task, HET-AS mice achieved fewer reversals than did HET-No-AS mice. 5-HTT genotype and AS were without effect on corticosterone stress response. In terms of structural brain differences, AS reduced the volume of two long-range white matter tracts, the optic tract (OT) and the cerebral peduncle (CP), in WT mice specifically. In a region-of-interest analysis, AS was associated with increased HC volume and HET genotype with a decreased frontal lobe volume. In conclusion, we found that 5-HTT and AS genotype exerted long-term effects on behavior and development of brain regions relevant to human depression. PMID:24427124

  8. Co-occurrence of anxiety and depressive-like behaviors following adolescent social isolation in male mice; possible role of nitrergic system.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Razmi, Ali; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Shirzadian, Armin; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Sianati, Hamed; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-06-01

    Approximately more than 50% of patients with depression have the co-occurrence of anxiety, which complicates the treatment of disease. Recently, social isolation stress (SIS) paradigm has been suggested as an animal model to investigate the underlying mechanism involved in depression-anxiety co-occurrence. In this study, applying six weeks of SIS to adolescent mice, we tested whether nitrergic system plays a role in co-occurrence of depression and anxiety. In this study, comparisons between socially and isolated conditioned (SC and IC) animals showed that SIS induces behaviors relevant to depression and anxiety in IC mice and in addition, nitrergic system is involved in mediating the negative outcomes of SIS. Administration of subeffective doses of aminoguanidine (a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor or iNOS, 50mg/kg) and L-NAME (non-specific inhibitor of NOS, 10mg/kg) significantly reversed the negative effects of SIS on behavioral profile as well as nitrite levels in the cortex of IC mice, Although administration of subeffective dose of 7-nitroindazole (a specific neuronal NOS inhibitor, 25mg/kg) decreased the nitrite levels in the hippocampus, but had no effect on depressant and anxiogenic effects of SIS. Results of this study confirmed that SIS is an appropriate animal model to investigate the potential mechanisms in depression-anxiety co-occurrence. We also showed that nitrergic system has contributed to co-occurrence of depression and anxiety in IC mice as an underlying mechanism. PMID:25817356

  9. Desensitization of leptin receptors is coincident with the upregulation of dopamine-related genes in the prefrontal cortex of adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Danila; Del Olmo, Nuria; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated in adolescent mice the effect of subchronic leptin on (i) leptin receptor expression and functionality, and (ii) dopamine-related gene expression (tyrosine hydroxylase, Th; dopamine type-1 receptor, Drd1; dopamine type-2 receptor, Drd2) within the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which is involved in sensory perception of food and reward sensitivity, and the hippocampus, a brain area sensitive to food composition and pivotal in learning and memory processes related to feeding behaviour. Here, we show that leptin treatment triggered leptin resistance both in the hippocampus and in the PFC. In contrast, leptin induced the upregulation of dopamine-related genes in the PFC, whereas it failed to modify the expression of these genes in the hippocampus. The effect of leptin was similar irrespective of the time elapsed since the last leptin administration (either 2 or 14 h), indicating that the effect detected was not associated with leptin withdrawal. Our data show that leptin receptor desensitization is coincident with the upregulation of dopamine-related genes in the PFC of adolescent mice undergoing hyperleptinaemia triggered by exogenous leptin. PMID:27031872

  10. Lithium attenuates the proconvulsant effect of adolescent social isolation stress via involvement of the nitrergic system.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Shirzadian, Armin; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Razmi, Ali; Bergen, Hugo; Rastegar, Mojgan; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Ejtemai-Mehr, Shahram; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we tested whether acute administration of lithium mitigates the deleterious effect of adolescent social isolation stress (SIS) on seizure susceptibility. In comparison with socially conditioned (SC) mice, isolated conditioned (IC) mice exhibited an increase in seizure susceptibility to pentylenetetrazole. Acute administration of lithium (10mg/kg) reversed the proconvulsant effect of SIS in IC mice, but this effect was not observed in SC mice. Coadministration of subthreshold doses of lithium (3mg/kg) with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors reversed the effect of SIS on seizure susceptibility and decreased hippocampal nitrite levels in IC animals. In addition, a subthreshold dose of a nitric oxide precursor reduced the protective effect of lithium on seizure susceptibility and increased nitrite levels in the hippocampus of IC mice. These results suggest that lithium exerts a protective influence against the proconvulsant effect of adolescent SIS via a nitrergic system that includes activation of neuronal NOS in the hippocampus. PMID:27232376

  11. Isolation Rearing Reduces Neuronal Excitability in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells of Adolescent C57BL/6J Mice: Role of GABAergic Tonic Currents and Neurosteroids.

    PubMed

    Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Francesca; Licheri, Valentina; Locci, Valentina; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Early-life exposure to stress, by impacting on a brain still under development, is considered a critical factor for the increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders and abuse of psychotropic substances during adulthood. As previously reported, rearing C57BL/6J weanling mice in social isolation (SI) from their peers for several weeks, a model of prolonged stress, is associated with a decreased plasma and brain levels of neuroactive steroids such as 3α,5α-THP, with a parallel up-regulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAAR) in dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells compared to group-housed (GH) mice. In the present study, together with the SI-induced decrease in plasma concentration of both progesterone and 3α,5α-THP, and an increase in THIP-stimulated GABAergic tonic currents, patch-clamp analysis of DG granule cells revealed a significant decrease in membrane input resistance and action potential (AP) firing rate, in SI compared to GH mice, suggesting that SI exerts an inhibitory action on neuronal excitability of these neurons. Voltage-clamp recordings of glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) revealed a SI-associated decrease in frequency as well as a shift from paired-pulse (PP) depression to PP facilitation (PPF) of evoked EPSCs, indicative of a reduced probability of glutamate release. Daily administration of progesterone during isolation reverted the changes in plasma 3α,5α-THP as well as in GABAergic tonic currents and neuronal excitability caused by SI, but it had only a limited effect on the changes in the probability of presynaptic glutamate release. Overall, the results obtained in this work, together with those previously published, indicate that exposure of mice to SI during adolescence reduces neuronal excitability of DG granule cells, an effect that may be linked to the increased GABAergic tonic currents as a consequence of the sustained decrease in plasma and hippocampal levels of neurosteroids. All these

  12. Isolation Rearing Reduces Neuronal Excitability in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells of Adolescent C57BL/6J Mice: Role of GABAergic Tonic Currents and Neurosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Francesca; Licheri, Valentina; Locci, Valentina; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Early-life exposure to stress, by impacting on a brain still under development, is considered a critical factor for the increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders and abuse of psychotropic substances during adulthood. As previously reported, rearing C57BL/6J weanling mice in social isolation (SI) from their peers for several weeks, a model of prolonged stress, is associated with a decreased plasma and brain levels of neuroactive steroids such as 3α,5α-THP, with a parallel up-regulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAAR) in dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells compared to group-housed (GH) mice. In the present study, together with the SI-induced decrease in plasma concentration of both progesterone and 3α,5α-THP, and an increase in THIP-stimulated GABAergic tonic currents, patch-clamp analysis of DG granule cells revealed a significant decrease in membrane input resistance and action potential (AP) firing rate, in SI compared to GH mice, suggesting that SI exerts an inhibitory action on neuronal excitability of these neurons. Voltage-clamp recordings of glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) revealed a SI-associated decrease in frequency as well as a shift from paired-pulse (PP) depression to PP facilitation (PPF) of evoked EPSCs, indicative of a reduced probability of glutamate release. Daily administration of progesterone during isolation reverted the changes in plasma 3α,5α-THP as well as in GABAergic tonic currents and neuronal excitability caused by SI, but it had only a limited effect on the changes in the probability of presynaptic glutamate release. Overall, the results obtained in this work, together with those previously published, indicate that exposure of mice to SI during adolescence reduces neuronal excitability of DG granule cells, an effect that may be linked to the increased GABAergic tonic currents as a consequence of the sustained decrease in plasma and hippocampal levels of neurosteroids. All these

  13. The combination of ethanol with mephedrone increases the signs of neurotoxicity and impairs neurogenesis and learning in adolescent CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Ciudad-Roberts, Andrés; Duart-Castells, Leticia; Camarasa, Jorge; Pubill, David; Escubedo, Elena

    2016-02-15

    A new family of psychostimulants, under the name of cathinones, has broken into the market in the last decade. In light of the fact that around 95% of cathinone consumers have been reported to combine them with alcoholic drinks, we sought to study the consequences of the concomitant administration of ethanol on mephedrone -induced neurotoxicity. Adolescent male Swiss-CD1 mice were administered four times in one day, every 2h, with saline, mephedrone (25mg/kg), ethanol (2; 1.5; 1.5; 1g/kg) and their combination at a room temperature of 26±2°C. The combination with ethanol impaired mephedrone-induced decreases in dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase in the frontal cortex; and in serotonin transporter and tryptophan hydroxylase in the hippocampus by approximately 2-fold, 7days post-treatment. Furthermore, these decreases correlated with a 2-fold increase in lipid peroxidation, measured as concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), 24h post-treatment, and were accompanied by changes in oxidative stress-related enzymes. Ethanol also notably potentiated mephedrone-induced negative effects on learning and memory, as well as hippocampal neurogenesis, measured through the Morris water maze (MWM) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine staining, respectively. These results are of special significance, since alcohol is widely co-abused with amphetamine derivatives such as mephedrone, especially during adolescence, a crucial stage in brain maturation. Given that the hippocampus is greatly involved in learning and memory processes, normal brain development in young adults could be affected with permanent behavioral consequences after this type of drug co-abuse. PMID:26747301

  14. Exogenous progesterone exacerbates running response of adolescent female mice to repeated food restriction stress by changing α4-GABAA receptor activity of hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Wable, G S; Chen, Y-W; Rashid, S; Aoki, C

    2015-12-01

    Adolescent females are particularly vulnerable to mental illnesses with co-morbidity of anxiety, such as anorexia nervosa (AN). We used an animal model of AN, called activity-based anorexia (ABA), to investigate the neurobiological basis of vulnerability to repeated, food restriction (FR) stress-evoked anxiety. Twenty-one of 23 adolescent female mice responded to the 1st FR with increased wheel-running activity (WRA), even during the limited period of food access, thereby capturing AN's symptoms of voluntary FR and over-exercise. Baseline WRA was an excellent predictor of FR-elicited WRA (severity of ABA, SOA), with high baseline runners responding to FR with minimal SOA (i.e., negative correlation). Nine gained resistance to ABA following the 1st FR. Even though allopregnanolone (3α-OH-5α-pregnan-20-one, THP), the metabolite of progesterone (P4), is a well-recognized anxiolytic agent, subcutaneous P4 to these ABA-resistant animals during the 2nd FR was exacerbative, evoking greater WRA than the counterpart resistant group that received oil vehicle, only. Moreover, P4 had no WRA-reducing effect on animals that remained ABA-vulnerable. To explain the sensitizing effect of P4 upon the resistant mice, we examined the relationship between P4 treatment and levels of the α4 subunit of GABAARs at spines of pyramidal cells of the hippocampal CA1, a parameter previously shown to correlate with resistance to ABA. α4 levels at spine membrane correlated strongly and negatively with SOA during the 1st ABA (prior to P4 injection), confirming previous findings. α4 levels were greater among P4-treated animals that had gained resistance than of vehicle-treated resistant animals or of the vulnerable animals with or without P4. We propose that α4-GABAARs play a protective role by counterbalancing the ABA-induced increase in excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, and although exogenous P4's metabolite, THP, enhances α4 expression, especially among those that can gain resistance

  15. Ethics on Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethical questions raised by an exhibition of work by an artist with a history of mental illness and the exhibition's relevance to art therapy and “outsider art” discourse on the subject. Considerations for how such an exhibit could be handled had the circumstances included an art therapist and art therapy client are…

  16. An Exhibit for Touching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Susan

    1979-01-01

    An exhibit designed for visually handicapped persons presented by the Kalamazoo (Michigan) Institute of Art included bronze sculptures and oil paintings from the institute's permanent collection. (CL)

  17. Octaphlorethol A, a marine algae product, exhibits antidiabetic effects in type 2 diabetic mice by activating AMP-activated protein kinase and upregulating the expression of glucose transporter 4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hong; Ko, Seok-Chun; Kang, Min-Cheol; Lee, Dae Ho; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-05-01

    Octaphlorethol A (OPA), a type of phlorotannin isolated from Ishige foliacea has been shown to have antidiabetic activities. However, the mechanism of action of OPA in type 2 diabetes has not been investigated extensively. Here, we investigated the antidiabetic effects and mechanism of OPA in C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice, a model of type 2 diabetes. Levels of postprandial blood glucose were significantly lower in OPAtreated db/db mice than in control db/db mice. In addition, the OPA supplements significantly improved fasting blood glucose level and impaired glucose tolerance compared to control db/db mice. OPA also significantly decreased the level of serum insulin, augmented the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and increased the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein in skeletal muscle. In addition, it significantly suppressed the increases in hepatic mRNA expression level of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), gluconeogenesis-related enzymes. Therefore, the mechanisms of OPA may involve suppression of gluconeogenesis by inhibiting PEPCK and G6Pase activity in the liver and affecting GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle through activation of AMPK. These findings provide a new insight into the antidiabetic clinical applications of OPA and demonstrate the potential of OPA as a new drug candidate for type 2 diabetes. PMID:26939912

  18. San Rafael Schools Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Rafael City Schools, CA.

    The San Rafael City Schools' exhibit which was displayed at the 1983 Marin County Fair (California) is described. The exhibit, entitled "Education - A Real Winner," consisted of 12 display panels illustrating the following aspects of the school system: (1) early history from 1861; (2) present board and administration; (3) present schools and…

  19. A Teaching Aids Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahanja, Salah

    1985-01-01

    Describes an exhibition for the benefit of teachers of English in Arab Primary Schools, which was prepared by third-year students at the Teachers College for Arab Teachers. The exhibition included games, songs, audiovisual aids, crossword puzzles, vocabulary, spelling booklets, preposition aids, and worksheet and lesson planning aids. (SED)

  20. Visitors Center Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A child enjoys building his own LEGO model at a play table which was included in the exhibit 'Travel in Space' World Show. The exhibit consisted of 21 displays designed to teach children about flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles.

  1. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; Harold, J.; Morrow, C.

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. There are many ways for scientists to help develop science exhibitions. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). Two of its exhibitions, Space Weather Center and MarsQuest, are currently on tour. Another exhibition, Alien Earths, is in development. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot traveling exhibition. The exhibit's second 3-year tour began this January at the Detroit Science Center. It is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. The 3,000 square-foot traveling exhibition, called Alien Earths, will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. Alien Earths has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Besides the exhibits, SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous

  2. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  3. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, Paul

    2005-04-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. Science exhibitions also provide a marvelous opportunity for scientists to become engaged in the exhibit development process. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on two of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (on tour for four years) and Alien Earths (its tour began early in 2005). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, Planet Quest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous potential for informal education and inquiry-based investigations. This talk will focus on the role informal science projects play in effectively communicating science to a broad, public audience.

  4. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  5. Adolescent development

    MedlinePlus

    Development - adolescent; Growth and development - adolescent ... During adolescence, children develop the ability to: Understand abstract ideas. These include grasping higher math concepts, and developing moral ...

  6. Adolescent development

    MedlinePlus

    Development - adolescent; Growth and development - adolescent ... rights and privileges. Establish and maintain satisfying relationships. Adolescents will learn to share intimacy without feeling worried ...

  7. Social isolation-induced increase in NMDA receptors in the hippocampus exacerbates emotional dysregulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hua; Hsiao, Ya-Hsin; Chen, Yu-Wen; Yu, Yang-Jung; Gean, Po-Wu

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that early life adverse events have long-term effects on the susceptibility to subsequent stress exposure in adolescence, but the precise mechanism is unclear. In the present study, mice on postnatal day 21-28 were randomly assigned to either a group or isolated cages for 8 weeks. The socially isolated (SI) mice exhibited a higher level of spontaneous locomotor activity, a longer duration of immobility in the forced swimming test (FST), significantly less prepulse inhibition (PPI) and an increase in aggressive (but not attack) behavior. However, acute stress markedly exacerbated the attack counts of the SI mice but did not affect the group housing (GH) mice. SI mice exhibited higher synaptosomal NR2A and NR2B levels in the hippocampus as compared to the GH mice. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of CA1 neurons in hippocampal slices showed that the SI mice exhibited a higher input-output relationship of NMDAR-EPSCs as compared to the GH mice. Application of the NR2B -specific antagonist ifenprodil produced a greater attenuating effect on NMDAR-EPSCs in slices from the SI mice. NMDAR EPSCs recorded from the SI mice had a slower deactivation kinetic. MK-801, CPP and ifenprodil, the NMDA antagonists, reversed acute stress-induced exaggeration of aggressive and depressive behaviors. Furthermore, acute stress-induced exacerbation of attack behavior in the SI mice was abolished after the knockdown of NR2B expression. These results suggest that social isolation-induced increased expression of NMDA receptors in the hippocampus involves stress exacerbation of aggressive behaviors. Amelioration of aggressive behaviors by NMDA antagonists may open a new avenue for the treatment of psychopathologies that involve outbursts of emotional aggression in neglected children. PMID:25348768

  8. Swamp to Space exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The menacing-looking alligator is really harmless. It is one of the realistic props to help convince visitors that the feel of the swamp is real in StenniSphere's Swamp to Space exhibit at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss. The historical section of the Swamp to Space exhibit tells the story of why and how Stennis Space Center came to be. It also pays tribute to the families who moved their homes to make way for the space age in Mississippi.

  9. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  10. Exhibitions in Sight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    During this past year a vast number of art shows have been exhibited across the United States. Their most striking features were their range and diversity. Here are some comments on Ben Shahn's paintings and photography focusing on social realism, some works by the Polish Constructivists, interested in redefining form in relation to space, the…

  11. Adolescent exposure to MDMA induces dopaminergic toxicity in substantia nigra and potentiates the amyloid plaque deposition in the striatum of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice.

    PubMed

    Abad, Sonia; Ramon, Carla; Pubill, David; Camarasa, Jorge; Camins, Antonio; Escubedo, Elena

    2016-09-01

    MDMA is one of the most used drugs by adolescents and its consumption has been associated with many psychobiological problems, among them psychomotor problems. Moreover, some authors described that early exposure to MDMA may render the dopaminergic neurons more vulnerable to the effects of future neurotoxic insults. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the main cause of dementia in the elderly and a percentage of the patients have predisposition to suffer nigrostriatal alterations, developing extrapyramidal signs. Nigrostriatal dysfunction in the brain of aged APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1), a mouse model of familiar AD (FAD), has also been described. The aim of the present study was to investigate the consequences of adolescent exposure to MDMA in APP/PS1 mice, on nigrostriatal function on early adulthood. We used a MDMA schedule simulating weekend binge abuse of this substance. Our MDMA schedule produced a genotype-independent decrease in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that remained at least 3months. Shortly after the injury, wild-type animals showed a decrease in the locomotor activity and apparent DA depletion in striatum, however in the APP/PS1 mice neither the locomotor activity nor the DA levels were modified, but a reduction in dopamine transporter (DAT) expression and a higher levels of oxidative stress were observed. We found that these disturbances are age-related characteristics that this APP/PS1 mice develops spontaneously much later. Therefore, MDMA administration seems to anticipate the striatal dopaminergic dysfunction in this FAD model. The most important outcome lies in a potentiation, by MDMA, of the amyloid beta deposition in the striatum. PMID:27344237

  12. Skylab Exhibit Ribbon Cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A metal strap became tangled over one of the folded solar array panels when Skylab lost its micro meteoroid shield during its launch. Cutters like the ones used to free the solar array were used to cut the ribbon opening to the public a new full-scale Skylab cluster exhibit at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Wielding the cutters are (left to right): Alabama Senator James B. Allen; Marshall Space Flight Center director, Dr. William R. Lucas, Huntsville Mayor, Joe Davis; Madison County Commission Chairman, James Record (standing behind Mayor Davis); and chairman of the Alabama Space Science Exhibit Commission, Jack Giles. Astronauts Conrad and Kerwin used the same type of tool in Earth orbit to cut the aluminum strap which jammed the Skylab solar array.

  13. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows Justin Varnadore, son of a Marshall TV employee, at the controls of one of the many displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  14. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting the complexity of geosciences to the public via the Internet poses a number of challenges. For example, utilizing various - and sometimes redundant - Web 2.0 tools can quickly devour limited time. Do you tweet? Do you write press releases? Do you create an exhibit or concept map? The presentation will provide participants with a context for utilizing Web 2.0 tools by briefly highlighting methods of online scientific communication across several dimensions. It will address issues of: * breadth and depth (e.g. from narrow topics to well-rounded views), * presentation methods (e.g. from text to multimedia, from momentary to enduring), * sources and audiences (e.g. for experts or for the public, content developed by producers to that developed by users), * content display (e.g. from linear to non-linear, from instructive to entertaining), * barriers to entry (e.g. from an incumbent advantage to neophyte accessible, from amateur to professional), * cost and reach (e.g. from cheap to expensive), and * impact (e.g. the amount learned, from anonymity to brand awareness). Against this backdrop, the presentation will provide an overview of two methods of online information dissemination, exhibits and concept maps, using the WebExhibits online museum (www.webexhibits.org) and SpicyNodes information visualization tool (www.spicynodes.org) as examples, with tips on how geoscientists can use either to communicate their science. Richly interactive online exhibits can serve to engage a large audience, appeal to visitors with multiple learning styles, prompt exploration and discovery, and present a topic’s breadth and depth. WebExhibits, which was among the first online museums, delivers interactive information, virtual experiments, and hands-on activities to the public. While large, multidisciplinary exhibits on topics like “Color Vision and Art” or “Calendars Through the Ages” require teams of scholars, user interface experts, professional writers and editors

  15. Space Shuttle Cockpit exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  16. Establishment of mesenchymal stem cell lines derived from the bone marrow of green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice exhibiting a diversity in intracellular transforming growth factor-β and bone morphogenetic protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Shunsuke; Chosa, Naoyuki; Takizawa, Naoki; Yokota, Jun; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Tomoda, Koichi; Kondo, Hisatomo; Yaegashi, Takashi; Ishisaki, Akira

    2016-03-01

    Cytokines and their intercellular signals regulate the multipotency of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The present study established the MSC lines SG‑2, ‑3, and ‑5 from the bone marrow of green fluorescent protein (GFP)‑transgenic mice. These cell lines clearly expressed mouse MSC markers Sca‑1 and CD44, and SG‑2 and ‑5 cells retained the potential for osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation in the absence of members of the transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β superfamily. By contrast, SG‑3 cells only retained adipogenic differentiation potential. Analysis of cytokine and cytokine receptor expression in these SG cell lines showed that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor 1B was most highly expressed in the SG‑3 cells, which underwent osteogenesis in response to BMP, while TGF‑β receptor II was most highly expressed in SG‑3 and ‑5 cells. However, it was unexpectedly noted that phosphorylation of Smad 2, a major transcription factor, was induced by TGF‑β1 in SG‑2 cells but not in SG‑3 or ‑5 cells. Furthermore, TGF‑β1 clearly induced the expression of Smad‑interacting transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein‑β in SG‑2 but not in SG‑3 or ‑5 cells. These results demonstrated the establishment of TGF‑β‑responsive SG‑2 MSCs, BMP‑responsive SG‑3 MSCs and TGF‑β/BMP‑unresponsive SG‑5 MSCs, each of which was able to be traced by GFP fluorescence after transplantation into in vivo experimental models. In conclusion, the present study suggested that these cell lines may be used to explore how the TGF‑β superfamily affects the proliferation and differentiation status of MSCs in vivo. PMID:26781600

  17. Cystamine preparations exhibit anticoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Maria M; Holle, Lori A; Stember, Katherine G; Devette, Christa I; Monroe, Dougald M; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2015-01-01

    Transglutaminases are a superfamily of isoenzymes found in cells and plasma. These enzymes catalyze the formation of ε-N-(γ-glutamyl)-lysyl crosslinks between proteins. Cystamine blocks transglutaminase activity and is used in vitro in human samples and in vivo in mice and rats in studies of coagulation, immune dysfunction, and inflammatory disease. These studies have suggested cystamine blocks fibrin crosslinking and has anti-inflammatory effects, implicating transglutaminase activity in the pathogenesis of several diseases. We measured the effects of cystamine on fibrin crosslinking, tissue factor-triggered plasma clot formation and thrombin generation, and coagulation factor enzymatic activity. At concentrations that blocked fibrin crosslinking, cystamine also inhibited plasma clot formation and reduced thrombin generation. Cystamine inhibited the amidolytic activity of coagulation factor XI and thrombin towards chromogenic substrates. These findings demonstrate that cystamine exhibits anticoagulant activity during coagulation. Given the close relationship between coagulation and inflammation, these findings suggest prior studies that used cystamine to implicate transglutaminase activity in disease pathogenesis warrant re-examination. PMID:25915545

  18. Cystamine Preparations Exhibit Anticoagulant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Maria M.; Holle, Lori A.; Stember, Katherine G.; Devette, Christa I.; Monroe, Dougald M.; Wolberg, Alisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Transglutaminases are a superfamily of isoenzymes found in cells and plasma. These enzymes catalyze the formation of ε-N-(γ-glutamyl)-lysyl crosslinks between proteins. Cystamine blocks transglutaminase activity and is used in vitro in human samples and in vivo in mice and rats in studies of coagulation, immune dysfunction, and inflammatory disease. These studies have suggested cystamine blocks fibrin crosslinking and has anti-inflammatory effects, implicating transglutaminase activity in the pathogenesis of several diseases. We measured the effects of cystamine on fibrin crosslinking, tissue factor-triggered plasma clot formation and thrombin generation, and coagulation factor enzymatic activity. At concentrations that blocked fibrin crosslinking, cystamine also inhibited plasma clot formation and reduced thrombin generation. Cystamine inhibited the amidolytic activity of coagulation factor XI and thrombin towards chromogenic substrates. These findings demonstrate that cystamine exhibits anticoagulant activity during coagulation. Given the close relationship between coagulation and inflammation, these findings suggest prior studies that used cystamine to implicate transglutaminase activity in disease pathogenesis warrant re-examination. PMID:25915545

  19. Parental resolution and the adolescent's health and adjustment: The case of adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Alon; Wiseman, Hadas

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the association between parents' resolution of their adolescent child's diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and the health and mental adjustment of the adolescents themselves. Parents of 75 adolescents with type 1 diabetes were interviewed using the Reaction to Diagnosis Interview. Parents and adolescents completed questionnaires regarding the child's physical health, self-management of the disease, and behavioral and emotional problems. Physicians reported adolescents' HbA1c levels. Results showed that adolescents whose fathers were resolved with the diagnosis exhibited better diabetes self-management and adolescents whose mothers were resolved with the diagnosis exhibited fewer internalizing and externalizing problems. The findings highlight the different role of mothers and fathers in the treatment of adolescents with diabetes and provide a basis for clinical intervention that focuses not only on adolescent health, but also on parental state of mind regarding the resolution with the disease. PMID:26684497

  20. 18F9 (4-(3,6-bis (ethoxycarbonyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrothieno (2,3-c) pyridin-2-ylamino)-4-oxobutanoic acid) enhances insulin-mediated glucose uptake in vitro and exhibits antidiabetic activity in vivo in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Anandharajan, Rathinasabapathy; Sayyed, Sufyan G; Doshi, Lalit S; Dixit, Pooja; Chandak, Prakash G; Dixit, Amol V; Brahma, Manoja K; Deshmukh, Nitin J; Gupte, Ravindra; Damre, Anagha; Suthar, Jaspreet; Padigaru, Muralidhara; Sharma, Somesh D; Nemmani, Kumar V S

    2009-10-01

    Insulin resistance is central to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Previous studies have demonstrated that compounds that cause adipogenesis and improve glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 cells are potential insulin sensitizers. Therefore, we evaluated one such compound, 18F9, for (1) adipogenesis in human subcutaneous preadipocyte (SQ) cells, (2) glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle myotubes and SQ cells, and (3) antidiabetic activity in db/db mice. We also investigated its effect on ex vivo glucose uptake in soleus muscle isolated from continuously treated db/db mice. Gene expression profiling in soleus muscle and epididymal fat of db/db mice was performed to understand its effect on glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and thermogenesis. 18F9 enhanced adipogenesis in SQ cells and increased glucose uptake in SQ and human skeletal muscle myotubes cells. In db/db mice, 18F9 exhibited dose-dependent reduction in plasma glucose and insulin level. Interestingly, 18F9 was as efficacious as rosiglitazone but did not cause body weight gain and hepatic adverse effects. In addition, 18F9 demonstrated no change in plasma volume in Wistar rats. Furthermore, it enhanced ex vivo glucose uptake in soleus muscles in these mice, which substantiates our in vitro findings. Human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma transactivation assay revealed a weak peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma transactivation potential (44% of rosiglitazone at 10 mumol/L) of 18F9. Gene expression profiling indicated that 18F9 increased insulin sensitivity mainly through a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent mechanism. 18F9 also up-regulated genes involved in lipid transport and synthesis at par with rosiglitazone. Unlike rosiglitazone, 18F9 elevated the expression of Pdk4. In addition, 18F9 elevated the expression of glycogen synthase and adiponectin significantly higher than rosiglitazone. Taken together, these observations suggest that 18F9 is a safer and potent insulin

  1. Delayed emergence of behavioral and electrophysiological effects following juvenile ketamine exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Nagy, L R; Featherstone, R E; Hahn, C G; Siegel, S J

    2015-01-01

    Frequent ketamine abuse in adulthood correlates with increased risk of psychosis, as well as cognitive deficits, including disruption of higher-order executive function and memory formation. Although the primary abusers of ketamine are adolescents and young adults, few studies have evaluated its effects on juvenile cognition. Therefore, the current study analyzes the effect of adolescent ketamine exposure on cognitive development. Juvenile mice (4 weeks of age) were exposed to chronic ketamine (20 mg kg(-1), i.p. daily) for 14 days. Mice were tested immediately after exposure in the juvenile period (7 weeks of age) and again as adults (12 weeks of age). Measures included electroencephalography (EEG) in response to auditory stimulation, the social choice test, and a 6-arm radial water maze task. Outcome measures include low-frequency EEG responses, event-related potential (ERP) amplitudes, indices of social behavior and indices of spatial working memory. Juvenile exposure to ketamine was associated with electrophysiological abnormalities in adulthood, particularly in induced theta power and the P80 ERP. The social choice test revealed that ketamine-exposed mice failed to exhibit the same age-related decrease in social interaction time as controls. Ketamine-exposed mice outperformed control mice as juveniles on the radial water maze task, but did not show the same age-related improvement as adult controls. These data support the hypothesis that juvenile exposure to ketamine produces long-lasting changes in brain function that are characterized by a failure to progress along normal developmental trajectories. PMID:26371763

  2. [Physiological adolescence, pathological adolescence].

    PubMed

    Olié, Jean-Pierre; Gourion, David; Canceil, Olivier; Lôo, Henri

    2006-11-01

    The uncertainties of looming adulthood, nostalgia for childhood, and a general malaise explain the crisis of adolescence. Rebellion, conflict, occasional failure at school or in society, and at-risk behaviors are not always signs of future psychiatric illness. In contrast, the physician must be in a position to identify tell-tale signs such as dysmorphophobia, existential anxiety, a feeling of emptiness, and school or social breakdown. Most psychiatric disorders that begin in adolescence are only diagnosed several years after onset. Yet early diagnosis is of utmost importance, as treatment becomes less effective and the long-term prognosis worsens with time. Suicide is the second cause of death during adolescence. All signs of suicidal behavior require hospitalization and evaluation in a psychiatric unit. Antidepressants may be necessary in adolescence. The recent controversy concerning a possible increase in the suicidal risk during antidepressant treatment should not mask the fact that the real public health issue is depression, and not antidepressants. Eating disorders are especially frequent among adolescent girls; it is important to identify psychiatric comorbidities such as schizophrenia, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorders, and to assess the vital risk. Illicit drug and alcohol consumption are frequent during adolescence; for example, close to half of all French adolescents have tried cannabis at least once. Once again, it is important to detect psychiatric comorbidities in substance-abusing adolescents. Phobia is an underdiagnosed anxiety disorder among adolescents; it may become chronic if proper treatment is not implemented, leading to suffering and disability. Finally, two major psychiatric disorders--schizophrenia and bipolar disorder--generally begin in adolescence. Treatment efficacy and the long-term prognosis both depend on early diagnosis. Treatment must be tailored to the individual patient. "Borderline" states are over

  3. Homozygous mutation of VPS16 gene is responsible for an autosomal recessive adolescent-onset primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiaodong; Chen, Xin; Wu, Song; Liu, Wenlan; Zhang, Xiejun; Zhang, Doudou; He, Sijie; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Mali; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zongyang; Luo, Kun; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder that is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Herein, we report the identification a novel homozygous missense mutation, c.156 C > A in VPS16, co-segregating with disease status in a Chinese consanguineous family with adolescent-onset primary dystonia by whole exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping. To assess the biological role of c.156 C > A homozygous mutation of VPS16, we generated mice with targeted mutation site of Vps16 through CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing approach. Vps16 c.156 C > A homozygous mutant mice exhibited significantly impaired motor function, suggesting that VPS16 is a new causative gene for adolescent-onset primary dystonia. PMID:27174565

  4. Drebrin A regulates hippocampal LTP and hippocampus-dependent fear learning in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kojima, N; Yasuda, H; Hanamura, K; Ishizuka, Y; Sekino, Y; Shirao, T

    2016-06-01

    Structural plasticity of dendritic spines, which underlies higher brain functions including learning and memory, is dynamically regulated by the actin cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Drebrin A is an F-actin-binding protein preferentially expressed in the brain and localized in the dendritic spines of mature neurons. Isoform conversion from drebrin E to drebrin A and accumulation of the latter in dendritic spines occurs during synapse maturation. We have previously demonstrated that drebrin A plays a pivotal role in spine morphogenesis and plasticity. However, it is unclear whether drebrin A plays a specific role in processes required for structural plasticity, and whether drebrin E can substitute in this role. To answer these questions, we analyzed mutant mice (named DAKO mice), in which isoform conversion from drebrin E to drebrin A is disrupted. In DAKO mouse brain, drebrin E continues to be expressed throughout life instead of drebrin A. Electrophysiological studies using hippocampal slices revealed that long-term potentiation of CA1 synapses was impaired in adult DAKO mice, but not in adolescents. In parallel with this age-dependent impairment, DAKO mice exhibited impaired hippocampus-dependent fear learning in an age-dependent manner; the impairment was evident in adult mice, but not in adolescents. In addition, histological investigation revealed that the spine length of the apical dendrite of CA1 pyramidal cells was significantly longer in adult DAKO mice than in wild-type mice. Our data indicate that the roles of drebrin E and drebrin A in brain function are different from each other, that the isoform conversion of drebrin is critical, and that drebrin A is indispensable for normal synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent fear memory in the adult brain. PMID:26970584

  5. The risks for late adolescence of early adolescent marijuana use.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, J S; Balka, E B; Whiteman, M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the relation of early adolescent marijuana use to late adolescent problem behaviors, drug-related attitudes, drug problems, and sibling and peer problem behavior. METHODS: African American (n = 627) and Puerto Rican (n = 555) youths completed questionnaires in their classrooms initially and were individually interviewed 5 years later. Logistic regression analysis estimated increases in the risk of behaviors or attitudes in late adolescence associated with more frequent marijuana use in early adolescence. RESULTS: Early adolescent marijuana use increased the risk in late adolescence of not graduating from high school; delinquency; having multiple sexual partners; not always using condoms; perceiving drugs as not harmful; having problems with cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana; and having more friends who exhibit deviant behavior. These relations were maintained with controls for age, sex, ethnicity, and, when available, earlier psychosocial measures. CONCLUSIONS: Early adolescent marijuana use is related to later adolescent problems that limit the acquisition of skills necessary for employment and heighten the risks of contracting HIV and abusing legal and illegal substances. Hence, assessments of and treatments for adolescent marijuana use need to be incorporated in clinical practice. PMID:10511838

  6. Traveling Exhibitions: translating current science into effective science exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; Morrow, C.; Harold, J.

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called the Space Weather Center and MarsQuest. It is currently planning to develop two other exhibitions called Cosmic Origins and InterActive Earth. Museum exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of earth and space outreach programs. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The focus of the presentation will be on the Institute's MarsQuest exhibition. This project is a 5000 square-foot, 2.5M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's 3-year tour is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient host museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents). The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibitions interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. SSI is also developing an interactive web site called MarsQuest On-line. The linkage between the web site, education program and exhibit will be discussed. MarsQuest and SSI's other exhibitions are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education.

  7. Exhibitions: Facing Outward, Pointing Inward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    The Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) Exhibitions Project of the early 1990s produced a range of work that continues to inform the practice of using exhibitions as a "360 degree" method of transforming teaching and learning, community connections, school design, and assessment. Among that work was this paper coupling the origins of exhibitions…

  8. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    MedlinePlus

    ... the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson NIH Director Dr. Elias ... addresses visitors to the opening of the exhibition. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson Brothers Niko and Theo ...

  9. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Against the Odds Exhibition Opens Past Issues / Spring 2008 ... Research in Bethesda. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson "Against the Odds" is a remarkable story of achievement ...

  10. Disruption of the ErbB signaling in adolescence increases striatal dopamine levels and affects learning and hedonic-like behavior in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Golani, Idit; Tadmor, Hagar; Buonanno, Andres; Kremer, Ilana; Shamir, Alon

    2014-11-01

    The ErbB signaling pathway has been genetically and functionally implicated in schizophrenia. Numerous findings support the dysregulation of Neuregulin (NRG) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in schizophrenia. However, it is unclear whether alterations of these pathways in the adult brain or during development are involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Herein we characterized the behavioral profile and molecular changes resulting from pharmacologically blocking the ErbB signaling pathway during a critical period in the development of decision making, planning, judgments, emotions, social cognition and cognitive skills, namely adolescence. We demonstrate that chronic administration of the pan-ErbB kinase inhibitor JNJ-28871063 (JNJ) to adolescent mice elevated striatal dopamine levels and reduced preference for sucrose without affecting locomotor activity and exploratory behavior. In adulthood, adolescent JNJ-treated mice continue to consume less sucrose and needed significantly more correct-response trials to reach the learning criterion during the discrimination phase of the T-maze reversal learning task than their saline-injected controls. In addition, JNJ mice exhibited deficit in reference memory but not in working memory as measured in the radial arm maze. Inhibition of the pathway during adolescence did not affect exploratory behavior and locomotor activity in the open field, social interaction, social memory, and reversal learning in adult mice. Our data suggest that alteration of ErbB signaling during adolescence resulted in changes in the dopaminergic systems that emerge in pathological learning and hedonic behavior in adulthood, and pinpoints the possible role of the pathway in the development of cognitive skills and motivated behavior. PMID:25451700

  11. Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

    1992-09-01

    The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change.

  12. Early postnatal nicotine exposure causes hippocampus-dependent memory impairments in adolescent mice: association with altered nicotinic cholinergic modulation of LTP, but not impaired LTP

    PubMed Central

    Nakauchi, Sakura; Malvaez, Melissa; Su, Hailing; Kleeman, Elise; Dang, Richard; Wood, Marcelo A.; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2014-01-01

    Fetal nicotine exposure from smoking during pregnancy causes long-lasting cognitive impairments in offspring, yet little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this effect. Here we demonstrate that early postnatal exposure of mouse pups to nicotine via maternal milk impairs long-term, but not short-term, hippocampus-dependent memory during adolescence. At the Schaffer collateral (SC) pathway, the most widely studied synapses for a cellular correlate of hippocampus-dependent memory, the induction of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent transient long-term potentiation (LTP) and protein synthesis-dependent long-lasting LTP are not diminished by nicotine exposure, but rather unexpectedly the threshold for LTP induction becomes lower after nicotine treatment. Using voltage sensitive dye to visualize hippocampal activity, we found that early postnatal nicotine exposure also results in enhanced CA1 depolarization and hyperpolarization after SC stimulation. Furthermore, we show that postnatal nicotine exposure induces pervasive changes to the nicotinic modulation of CA1 activity: activation of nicotinic receptors no longer increases CA1 network depolarization, acute nicotine inhibits rather than facilitates the induction of LTP at the SC pathway by recruiting an additional nicotinic receptor subtype, and acute nicotine no longer blocks LTP induction at the temporoammonic pathway. These findings reflect the pervasive impact of nicotine exposure during hippocampal development, and demonstrate an association of hippocampal memory impairments with altered nicotinic cholinergic modulation of LTP, but not impaired LTP. The implication of our results is that nicotinic cholinergic-dependent plasticity is required for long-term memory formation and that postnatal nicotine exposure disrupts this form of plasticity. PMID:25545599

  13. Earlier onset of motor deficits in mice with double mutations in Dyt1 and Sgce

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Fumiaki; Yang, Guang; Li, JinDong; DeAndrade, Mark P.; Zhou, Tong; Li, Yuqing

    2010-01-01

    DYT1 early-onset generalized torsion dystonia is an inherited movement disorder caused by mutations in DYT1 coding for torsinA with ∼30% penetrance. Most of the DYT1 dystonia patients exhibit symptoms during childhood and adolescence. On the other hand, DYT1 mutation carriers without symptoms during these periods mostly do not exhibit symptoms later in their life. Little is known about what controls the timing of the onset, a critical issue for DYT1 mutation carriers. DYT11 myoclonus-dystonia is caused by mutations in SGCE coding for ε-sarcoglycan. Two dystonia patients from a single family with double mutations in DYT1 and SGCE exhibited more severe symptoms. A recent study suggested that torsinA contributes to the quality control of ε-sarcoglycan. Here, we derived mice carrying mutations in both Dyt1 and Sgce and found that these double mutant mice showed earlier onset of motor deficits in beam-walking test. A novel monoclonal antibody against mouse ε-sarcoglycan was developed by using Sgce knock-out mice to avoid the immune tolerance. Western blot analysis suggested that functional deficits of torsinA and ε-sarcoglycan may independently cause motor deficits. Examining additional mutations in other dystonia genes may be beneficial to predict the onset in DYT1 mutation carriers. PMID:20627944

  14. Considering High-Tech Exhibits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Routman, Emily

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a variety of high-tech exhibit media used in The Living World, an educational facility operated by The Saint Louis Zoo. Considers the strengths and weaknesses of holograms, video, animatronics, video-equipped microscopes, and computer interactives. Computer interactives are treated with special attention. (LZ)

  15. Piper betle extracts exhibit antitumor activity by augmenting antioxidant potential

    PubMed Central

    ALAM, BADRUL; MAJUMDER, RAJIB; AKTER, SHAHINA; LEE, SANG-HAN

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves (MPBL) and its organic fractions with regard to antitumor activity against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in Swiss albino mice and to confirm their antioxidant activities. At 24 h post-intraperitoneal inoculation of tumor cells into mice, extracts were administered at 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight for nine consecutive days. The antitumor effects of the extracts were then assessed according to tumor volume, packed cell count, viable and non-viable tumor cell count, median survival time and increase in life span of EAC-bearing mice. Next, hematological profiles and serum biochemical parameters were calculated, and antioxidant properties were assessed by estimating lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) levels. MPBL and the ethylacetate fraction (EPBL) at a dose of 100 mg/kg induced a significant decrease in tumor volume, packed cell volume and viable cell count and increased the life span of the EAC-bearing mice (P<0.05). Hematological and serum biochemical profiles were restored to normal levels in the extract-treated mice compared with the EAC control mice. MPBL and EPBL treatment significantly decreased lipid peroxidation (P<0.05) and restored GSH, SOD and CAT levels towards normal compared with the EAC control. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrated that Piper betle extracts exhibit significant antitumor activity, which may be attributed to the augmentation of endogenous antioxidant potential. PMID:25624910

  16. [Adolescent pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Fatichi, B

    1991-10-01

    This exploration of adolescent pregnancy focuses on adolescents whose pregnancies are undesired. The physical and psychic transformations of puberty and adolescence may be experienced differently in different social contexts. The prolongation of school attendance in Western societies means that most adolescents remain financially dependent on their parents. But greater sexual freedom in the society at large has been reflected in an increase in early sexual activity among adolescents. Wider use of contraception has not completely eliminated prenatal pregnancy among adolescents. Adolescent pregnancies have actually declined in France as a proportion of all pregnancies carried to term, from 4% to 1.5-2% in the past 10 or 15 years. But in 1986, 42.5% of all induced abortions were performed on adolescents. Among causes of unwanted pregnancy in adolescents are their frequent inability to believe that they may be at risk of pregnancy, or that pregnancy can result from the 1st sexual intercourse. The episodic nature of sexual relations, the lack of ready availability of contraception, and specific shortcomings of different methods are factors in the frequent failure of adolescents to protect themselves against undesired pregnancy. Adolescents may become pregnant out of loneliness or to prove that they are women, or as a result of incest or prostitution. Adolescents who seek abortions are those who have discovered and acknowledged their pregnancies before the 12th week and had the courage to inform their parents and obtain legal permission for the abortion. Pregnancy terminations are more frequent in more advantaged societal sectors with more structured family life. The moral shock and sense of failure associated with abortion are often deeply felt by adolescents. Their experience is greatly influenced by the attitudes of those around them. Adolescents who carry their pregnancies to term are those who have not sought abortion in the 1st 12 weeks. Often they refuse to admit

  17. Counseling adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yamuna, Srinivasan

    2013-11-01

    Skills for counseling adolescents are acquired over a period of time by all practitioners of adolescent health. Though the principles of counseling remain the same the process of counseling an adolescent differs considerably from that of a child or an adult. Adolescents are in their transition between childhood and adulthood with physical, emotional and social challenges to face. The maturity level of each adolescent differs and that decides the pace and contents of each session. The counselor sets the context in a non judgmental manner so that the adolescent feels the ease and eagerness to self disclose. Privacy and confidentiality are two key issues that have to be taken care of during counseling. PMID:23888379

  18. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit extensive developmental and phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Prabhat K.; Sassi, Slim; Lan, Lan; Au, Patrick; Halvorsen, Stefan C.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.; Seed, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of embryonic fibroblasts from GFP reporter mice indicates that the fibroblast cell type harbors a large collection of developmentally and phenotypically heterogeneous subtypes. Some of these cells exhibit multipotency, whereas others do not. Multiparameter flow cytometry analysis shows that a large number of distinct populations of fibroblast-like cells can be found in cultures initiated from different embryonic organs, and cells sorted according to their surface phenotype typically retain their characteristics on continued propagation in culture. Similarly, surface phenotypes of individual cloned fibroblast-like cells exhibit significant variation. The fibroblast cell class appears to contain a very large number of denumerable subtypes. PMID:26699463

  19. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit extensive developmental and phenotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Prabhat K; Sassi, Slim; Lan, Lan; Au, Patrick; Halvorsen, Stefan C; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Seed, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of embryonic fibroblasts from GFP reporter mice indicates that the fibroblast cell type harbors a large collection of developmentally and phenotypically heterogeneous subtypes. Some of these cells exhibit multipotency, whereas others do not. Multiparameter flow cytometry analysis shows that a large number of distinct populations of fibroblast-like cells can be found in cultures initiated from different embryonic organs, and cells sorted according to their surface phenotype typically retain their characteristics on continued propagation in culture. Similarly, surface phenotypes of individual cloned fibroblast-like cells exhibit significant variation. The fibroblast cell class appears to contain a very large number of denumerable subtypes. PMID:26699463

  20. Longwall - USA: International exhibition & conference

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The Longwall-USA International Exhibition and Conference was held June 4-6, 1996 in Pittsburgh, PA. Seventeen papers are included in the proceedings that covered such topics as health and safety, development of gate roads, telemetry monitoring systems, fires, longwall miners, roof support technologies, dust control, moving car bunker systems, reducing longwall noise, vibration of longwall equipment, and the USBM`s strategic structures testing laboratory. A separate abstract with indexing was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. Mother-Adolescent Language Proficiency and Adolescent Academic and Emotional Adjustment among Chinese American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Lisa L.; Benner, Aprile D.; Lau, Anna S.; Kim, Su Yeong

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the role of adolescents' and mothers' self-reports of English and heritage language proficiency in youth's academic and emotional adjustment among 444 Chinese American families. Adolescents who were proficient in English tended to exhibit higher reading achievement scores, math achievement scores, and overall GPA. Mothers who…

  2. Kibbutz Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazor, Aviva, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This special issue on adolescence in the Israeli kibbutz contains a series of seven papers that seek to advance thought and research regarding the relationship between a communal way of life and individual developmental processes in adolescence and early adulthood. The articles represent a transitional era as the kibbutz evolves. (SLD)

  3. Adolescent Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ippolito, Jacy, Ed.; Steele, Jennifer L., Ed.; Samson, Jennifer F., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Adolescent Literacy" initially appeared as a special issue of the "Harvard Educational Review". It explores key issues and debates in the adolescent literacy crisis, the popular use of cognitive strategies, and disciplinary and content-area literacy. Also examined are alternative forms of literacy, afterschool interventions, new instruction…

  4. Adolescent Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Linda Patia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to outline notable alterations occurring in the adolescent brain, and consider potential ramifications of these developmental transformations for public policy and programs involving adolescents. Methods Developmental changes in the adolescent brain obtained from human imaging work are reviewed, along with results of basic science studies. Results Adolescent brain transformations include both progressive and regressive changes that are regionally specific and serve to refine brain functional connectivity. Along with still maturing inhibitory control systems that can be overcome under emotional circumstances, the adolescent brain is associated with sometimes elevated activation of reward-relevant brain regions, whereas sensitivity to aversive stimuli may be attenuated. At this time, the developmental shift from greater brain plasticity early in life to the relative stability of the mature brain is still tilted more towards plasticity than seen in adulthood, perhaps providing an opportunity for some experience-influenced sculpting of the adolescent brain. Conclusions Normal developmental transformations in brain reward/aversive systems, areas critical for inhibitory control, and regions activated by emotional, exciting and stressful stimuli may promote some normative degree of adolescent risk-taking. These findings have a number of potential implications for public policies and programs focused on adolescent health and well-being. PMID:23332574

  5. Collaborative virtual environments art exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinsky, Margaret; Anstey, Josephine; Pape, Dave E.; Aguilera, Julieta C.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole; Tsoupikova, Daria

    2005-03-01

    This panel presentation will exhibit artwork developed in CAVEs and discuss how art methodologies enhance the science of VR through collaboration, interaction and aesthetics. Artists and scientists work alongside one another to expand scientific research and artistic expression and are motivated by exhibiting collaborative virtual environments. Looking towards the arts, such as painting and sculpture, computer graphics captures a visual tradition. Virtual reality expands this tradition to not only what we face, but to what surrounds us and even what responds to our body and its gestures. Art making that once was isolated to the static frame and an optimal point of view is now out and about, in fully immersive mode within CAVEs. Art knowledge is a guide to how the aesthetics of 2D and 3D worlds affect, transform, and influence the social, intellectual and physical condition of the human body through attention to psychology, spiritual thinking, education, and cognition. The psychological interacts with the physical in the virtual in such a way that each facilitates, enhances and extends the other, culminating in a "go together" world. Attention to sharing art experience across high-speed networks introduces a dimension of liveliness and aliveness when we "become virtual" in real time with others.

  6. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. PMID:25532894

  7. Adolescent suicide.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    In the introduction to this report our committee, with its focus on adolescent development, expressed its concern that adolescent suicidal behavior represented a grave crisis in the adolescent, a crisis not only in the development of the adolescent but one that endangers the existence of the adolescent. The possibility of a fatal outcome is abhorrent to us as physicians and psychiatrists, as it is to all those entrusted with the care and development of our fellow human beings. Consequently, we explored the ways in which developmental and other forces lead to adolescent suicide and the measures that can be taken to prevent it. We first considered the historical and cross-cultural aspects of suicidal behaviors. Societal and cultural stresses arise from parental attitudes, beliefs, expectations, and childrearing practices that evolve from the social and economic needs in each culture. If unbalanced by growth-sustaining supports, they may compromise or constrict the existential adaptive ability of the developing adolescent and place the adolescent at risk for suicide. Research into vulnerability in adolescence has revealed gender, ethnic, and geographic differences in the dimension of the problem and has indicated the social, psychological, and biological conditions that increase the likelihood that adolescents will resort to suicidal behaviors. Research is still needed to distinguish those adolescents who commit suicide from those adolescents with similar conditions who do not. Research has only begun to explore the ways in which the interaction of specific individual dynamics, precipitating events, and personal characteristics result in an adolescent's attempt of suicide. We discussed the strengths that adolescents acquire, but we emphasized the weaknesses that ensue as adolescents are faced with the impact of the thrust of their own biological, psychological, and social development with the forces inherent in their cultures. Adolescents progress through this period

  8. Stages of Adolescence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Stages of Adolescence Page Content Article Body Adolescence, these years from puberty to adulthood, may be roughly divided into three stages: early adolescence, generally ages eleven to fourteen; middle adolescence, ages ...

  9. Trace metals and otolith defects in mocha mice.

    PubMed

    Rolfsen, R M; Erway, L C

    1984-01-01

    Mocha mice with pigment anomalies of the coat, eyes, and inner ears also have congenital otolith defects, and they exhibit progressive cochlear degeneration. Mocha mice were first reported to exhibit otolith defects comparable to those of pallid mice. Since manganese supplementation is effective in preventing the otolith defects in pallid mice and in pastel mink, we sought to establish whether or not manganese also might be effective in mocha mice. The otolith defects of mocha mice were prevented or reduced by supplementing the pregnant dams with manganese and/or zinc. The mocha mice also exhibited high perinatal mortality that was not reduced by the supplementary metals. Surviving mocha mice have behavioral anomalies associated with their inner ear defects. Preliminary observations of auditory-evoked brainstem responses and of cochlear degeneration in the mocha mice are discussed. PMID:6736600

  10. Stability and Change in Adjustment Profiles Among Chinese American Adolescents: The Role of Parenting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Yeong; Wang, Yijie; Shen, Yishan; Hou, Yang

    2015-09-01

    Asian American adolescents are often depicted as academically successful but psychologically distressed, a pattern known as the achievement/adjustment paradox. In a sample of 444 Chinese American adolescents (54 % females), we identified three distinct patterns of adjustment in early adolescence, middle adolescence, and emerging adulthood: the well-adjusted group, which was the largest, exhibited high achievement and low psychological distress; the poorly-adjusted group exhibited poor achievement and moderate distress; and the paradox group exhibited relatively high achievement and high distress. More than half of the adolescents remained in the same profile over time. Adolescents with supportive parents were more likely to stay well-adjusted, and those with "tiger" parents were more likely to stay in the paradox group over time. The present study focused on the critical role of parenting in early adolescence, highlighting variations in Chinese American adolescents' adjustment in multiple domains over time. PMID:26022414

  11. Impairment of Oligodendroglia Maturation Leads to Aberrantly Increased Cortical Glutamate and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in Juvenile Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianjun; Zhang, Weiguo; Li, Tao; Guo, Yu; Tian, Yanping; Wang, Fei; Liu, Shubao; Shen, Hai-Ying; Feng, Yue; Xiao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is the critical time for developing proper oligodendrocyte (OL)-neuron interaction and the peak of onset for many cognitive diseases, among which anxiety disorders display the highest prevalence. However, whether impairment of de novo OL development causes neuronal abnormalities and contributes to the early onset of anxiety phenotype in childhood still remains unexplored. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that defects in OL maturation manifests cortical neuron function and leads to anxiety-like behaviors in juvenile mice. We report here that conditional knockout of the Olig2 gene (Olig2 cKO) specifically in differentiating OLs in the mouse brain preferentially impaired OL maturation in the gray matter of cerebral cortex. Interestingly, localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that Olig2 cKO mice displayed abnormally elevated cortical glutamate levels. In addition, transmission electron microscopy demonstrated increased vesicle density in excitatory glutamatergic synapses in the cortex of the Olig2 cKO mice. Moreover, juvenile Olig2 cKO mice exhibited anxiety-like behaviors and impairment in behavioral inhibition. Taken together, our results suggest that impaired OL development affects glutamatergic neuron function in the cortex and causes anxiety-related behaviors in juvenile mice. These discoveries raise an intriguing possibility that OL defects may be a contributing mechanism for the onset of anxiety in childhood. PMID:26696827

  12. Wanting to See People Like Me? Racial and Gender Diversity in Popular Adolescent Television.

    PubMed

    Ellithorpe, Morgan E; Bleakley, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Media are one source for adolescent identity development and social identity gratifications. Nielsen viewing data across the 2014-2015 television season for adolescents ages 14-17 was used to examine racial and gender diversity in adolescent television exposure. Compared to US Census data, mainstream shows under represent women, but the proportion of Black characters is roughly representative. Black adolescents watch more television than non-Black adolescents and, after taking this into account, shows popular with Black adolescents are more likely than shows popular with non-Black adolescents to exhibit racial diversity. In addition, shows popular with female adolescents are more likely than shows popular with males to exhibit gender diversity. These results support the idea that adolescents seek out media messages with characters that are members of their identity groups, possibly because the characters serve as tools for identity development and social identity gratifications. PMID:26759131

  13. Enlargement of Axo-Somatic Contacts Formed by GAD-Immunoreactive Axon Terminals onto Layer V Pyramidal Neurons in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Adolescent Female Mice Is Associated with Suppression of Food Restriction-Evoked Hyperactivity and Resilience to Activity-Based Anorexia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wable, Gauri Satish; Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Aoki, Chiye

    2016-06-01

    Many, but not all, adolescent female mice that are exposed to a running wheel while food restricted (FR) become excessive wheel runners, choosing to run even during the hours of food availability, to the point of death. This phenomenon is called activity-based anorexia (ABA). We used electron microscopic immunocytochemistry to ask whether individual differences in ABA resilience may correlate with the lengths of axo-somatic contacts made by GABAergic axon terminals onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5P) in the prefrontal cortex. Contact lengths were, on average, 40% greater for the ABA-induced mice, relative to controls. Correspondingly, the proportion of L5P perikaryal plasma membrane contacted by GABAergic terminals was 45% greater for the ABA mice. Contact lengths in the anterior cingulate cortex correlated negatively and strongly with the overall wheel activity after FR (R = -0.87, P < 0.01), whereas those in the prelimbic cortex correlated negatively with wheel running specifically during the hours of food availability of the FR days (R = -0.84, P < 0.05). These negative correlations support the idea that increases in the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) terminal contact lengths onto L5P contribute toward ABA resilience through suppression of wheel running, a behavior that is intrinsically rewarding and helpful for foraging but maladaptive within a cage. PMID:25979087

  14. Adolescent Prostitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Bernie; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1984-01-01

    Explores the conditions which lead to teenagers' becoming prostitutes, including alienation, abuse, lack of education and employment, and family problems. Discusses the role of the justice system and institutions and the need for improving adolescents' self-image. (JAC)

  15. Adolescent Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpe, Thomasina H.

    2003-01-01

    This article offers a medical and psychosocial perspective of adolescent sexual development. Sub-types of sexual development are discussed as well as treatment implications for allied health providers. (Contains 38 references.) (Author)

  16. Short and long term measures of anxiety exhibit opposite results.

    PubMed

    Fonio, Ehud; Benjamini, Yoav; Golani, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases of the central nervous system, generalized anxiety disorder included, are essential for the study of the brain-behavior interface and obligatory for drug development; yet, these models fail to yield new insights and efficacious drugs. By increasing testing duration hundredfold and arena size tenfold, and comparing the behavior of the common animal model to that of wild mice, we raise concerns that chronic anxiety might have been measured at the wrong time, for the wrong duration, and in the wrong animal. Furthermore, the mice start the experimental session with a short period of transient adaptation to the novel environment (habituation period) and a long period reflecting the respective trait of the mice. Using common measures of anxiety reveals that mice exhibit opposite results during these periods suggesting that chronic anxiety should be measured during the post-habituation period. We recommend tools for measuring the transient period, and provide suggestions for characterizing the post habituation period. PMID:23119008

  17. Early life stress dampens stress responsiveness in adolescence: Evaluation of neuroendocrine reactivity and coping behavior.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Young-Ming; Tsai, Tsung-Chih; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chen, Chien-Chung; Huang, Chiung-Chun; Hsu, Kuei-Sen

    2016-05-01

    Stressful experiences during early life (ELS) can affect brain development, thereby exerting a profound and long-lasting influence on mental development and psychological health. The stress inoculation hypothesis presupposes that individuals who have early experienced an attenuated form of stressors may gain immunity to its more virulent forms later in life. Increasing evidence demonstrates that ELS may promote the development of subsequent stress resistance, but the mechanisms underlying such adaptive changes are not fully understood. The present study evaluated the impact of fragmented dam-pup interactions by limiting the bedding and nesting material in the cage during postnatal days 2-9, a naturalistic animal model of chronic ELS, on the physiological and behavioral responses to different stressors in adolescent mice and characterized the possible underlying mechanisms. We found that ELS mice showed less social interaction deficits after chronic social defeat stress and acute restraint-tailshock stress-induced impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and enhanced long-term depression (LTD) in hippocampal CA1 region compared with control mice. The effects of ELS on LTP and LTD were rescued by adrenalectomy. While ELS did not cause alterations in basal emotional behaviors, it significantly enhanced stress coping behaviors in both the tail suspension and the forced swimming tests. ELS mice exhibited a significant decrease in corticosterone response and trafficking of glucocorticoid receptors to the nucleus in response to acute restraint stress. Altogether, our data support the hypothesis that stress inoculation training, via early exposure to manageable stress, may enhance resistance to other unrelated extreme stressors in adolescence. PMID:26881834

  18. [Adolescence: viewpoints from adolescent psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Bürgin, D; von Klitzing, K

    1994-05-01

    Adolescence is a phase of human development which is marked by a high vulnerability due to the ongoing psycho-physiological transformations. The regulation of the self-esteem is especially in danger in youngsters who went into adolescence with a marked burden of conflicts or who lived in families with disturbed intrafamilial dynamics. To be present as a partner and not to find the solutions for the adolescents' conflicts, to accept their questioning of what is established and to recognize their movements of reconciliation are the quite complex demands put on to the world of the adults. Adolescents urge us to a review of our own adolescence, to a balancing of hate and love, openness and rigidity, and to dialectic movements between disintegration and reintegration as well as between the generations. Any help, be it on the physical, the social or the psychic level, should be directed toward a restitution of the intrapsychic, intrafamilial or intergenerational balance; sociocultural factors have also always to be respected. The helpers--especially in a culture with rapid change--are often confronted with their own adolescence, which took place a generation before and mostly under totally different conditions. PMID:8016759

  19. A unique amyloidogenic apolipoprotein serum amyloid A (apoSAA) isoform expressed by the amyloid resistant CE/J mouse strain exhibits higher affinity for macrophages than apoSAA1 and apoSAA2 expressed by amyloid susceptible CBA/J mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, J; Elliott-Bryant, R; Hajri, T; Sipe, J D; Cathcart, E S

    1998-10-01

    CBA/J and other inbred strains of mice that express the amyloidogenic apolipoprotein serum amyloid A (apoSAA) apoSAA2, together with apoSAA1, are susceptible to amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, whereas CE/J mice that express a single unique isoform, apoSAACEJ, are resistant. Studies indicate that CBA/JxCE/J hybrid mice that express apoSAA2 in the presence of apoSAACEJ are protected from amyloidogenesis. To define a mechanism by which expression of apoSAACEJ may protect from AA formation in the presence of apoSAA2, binding of recombinant apoSAA (r-apoSAA) isoforms, validated by N-terminal sequencing, to a murine macrophage cell line was investigated. Maximal specific binding occurred after incubation of radiolabeled apoSAA with IC-21 macrophages (1x105 cells/ml) for 30 min at 4 degreesC. The binding of 125I-r-apoSAA1, 125I-r-apoSAA2 and 125I-r-apoSAACEJ was specific and saturable, with an affinity (Kd) of about 2.8, 3.2 and 1.3 nM, respectively, and approximately 2-4x106 sites per cell. Competitive binding experiments indicate apoSAACEJ binds with higher affinity to macrophages than does either apoSAA1 or apoSAA2. We suggest that greater cellular affinity of apoSAACEJ compared to apoSAA2 may contribute to protection from AA amyloid in certain CBA/JxCE/J hybrid mice by interfering with interaction of apoSAA2 by macrophages and hence either membrane associated or intracellular degradation. PMID:9767146

  20. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition... proceeding. (f) Request for custody of physical exhibit. Any person may on motion to the Executive...

  1. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition... proceeding. (f) Request for custody of physical exhibit. Any person may on motion to the Executive...

  2. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition... proceeding. (f) Request for custody of physical exhibit. Any person may on motion to the Executive...

  3. Exhibits Enhanced by Stand-Alone Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rennes, Eve C.

    Both the development and evaluation of one of a set of computer programs designed for use by visitors as adjuncts to museum exhibits are described. Museum displays used were (1) a static, behind-glass exhibit on evolution; (2) a hands-on primitive stone age tools exhibit; and (3) a Foucault pendulum. A computer placed next to each exhibit served…

  4. Sporadic Fatal Insomnia in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Blase, Jennifer L.; Cracco, Laura; Schonberger, Lawrence B.; Maddox, Ryan A.; Cohen, Yvonne; Cali, Ignazio

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of sporadic prion disease among adolescents is extremely rare. A prion disease was confirmed in an adolescent with disease onset at 13 years of age. Genetic, neuropathologic, and biochemical analyses of the patient’s autopsy brain tissue were consistent with sporadic fatal insomnia, a type of sporadic prion disease. There was no evidence of an environmental source of infection, and this patient represents the youngest documented case of sporadic prion disease. Although rare, a prion disease diagnosis should not be discounted in adolescents exhibiting neurologic signs. Brain tissue testing is necessary for disease confirmation and is particularly beneficial in cases with an unusual clinical presentation. PMID:24488737

  5. Evaluating the Link between Self-Esteem and Temperament in Mexican Origin Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Richard W.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Widaman, Keith F.; Conger, Rand D.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the relation between self-esteem and temperament in a sample of 646 Mexican-American early adolescents (mean age = 10.4). Findings show that (a) early adolescents with high self-esteem exhibit higher levels of Effortful Control but, contrary to findings in adult samples, do not differ from low self-esteem adolescents in…

  6. Sex Differences in the Forms of Aggression among Adolescent Students in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amedahe, Francis K.; Owusu-Banahene, Nana Opoku

    2007-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated sex differences in the forms of aggression exhibited by adolescent students, particularly in the Western world. No such study has been done among sub-Saharan Africa students. The aim was to examine the sex differences in forms of aggression among adolescent students in Ghana. A total of 800 adolescent students…

  7. Sexual Abuse History and Problems in Adolescence: Exploring the Effects of Moderating Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luster, Tom; Small, Stephen A.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the relationship between sexual abuse and two problem outcomes in adolescents (N=42,568): binge drinking and suicidal ideation. Focused on factors related to problem behaviors among adolescents reporting sexual abuse. Results indicate that adolescents who endured sexual and physical abuse exhibited more problems than those experiencing…

  8. Autonomy and Relatedness in Inner-City Families of Substance Abusing Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuolis, Jessica; Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah; Liddle, Howard A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined parent-adolescent autonomous-relatedness functioning in inner-city, ethnic minority families of adolescents exhibiting drug abuse and related problem behaviors. Seventy-four parent-adolescent dyads completed a structured interaction task prior to the start of treatment that was coded using an established autonomous-relatedness…

  9. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Experiencing Parents' Marital Disruption during Late Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Yongmin; Li, Yuanzhang

    2007-01-01

    Using panel data from 9,252 adolescents in the National Education Longitudinal Study, this study finds that among children who experience parents' marital disruption during late adolescence, European, Asian, and African American adolescents exhibit wider and greater maladjustment both before and after the disruption than their Hispanic American…

  10. Early Childhood Television Viewing and Adolescent Behavior: The Recontact Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daniel R.; Huston, Aletha C.; Schmitt, Kelly L.; Linebarger, Deborah L.; Wright, John C.

    2001-01-01

    Followed up on 570 adolescents studied as preschoolers. Found that preschoolers' viewing of educational television programs was associated with achieving higher grades, reading more books, placing more value on achievement, exhibiting greater creativity, and behaving less aggressively as adolescents more consistently for boys than girls. Found…

  11. An Astrobiology Microbes Exhibit and Education Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Allen, J. S.; Mortillaro, C.; Ducceschi, C.; Rawlings, P.; Stocco, K.; Tobola, K.; Olendzenski, L.; Angermiller, L.

    2001-03-01

    A JSC-SCH team has produced an astrobiology exhibit and education module to augment the 'Microbes!' traveling exhibit. The astrobiology section focuses on life in extreme environments and considers the possibility of extraterrestrrial life.

  12. Learning by Doing, Creating a Museum Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Sarah; Kallquist, Dierdre

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exhibit called Kid's Kitchen, built within a major exhibit called Biodiversity: Life Supporting Life, in order to discuss environmental prompts hidden within the kitchen designed to surprise students and get them thinking. (ASK)

  13. Treating Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children and Adolescents Go Back Treating Children and Adolescents Email Print + Share For the most part, the ... tailored, based upon the child's weight. Children and adolescents are moving through a period of physical and ...

  14. 49 CFR 1114.7 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... practical the sheets of each exhibit and the lines of each sheet should be numbered. If the exhibit consists of five or more sheets, the first sheet or title-page should be confined to a brief statement of what the exhibit purports to show with reference by sheet and line to illustrative or typical...

  15. 49 CFR 1114.7 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... practical the sheets of each exhibit and the lines of each sheet should be numbered. If the exhibit consists of five or more sheets, the first sheet or title-page should be confined to a brief statement of what the exhibit purports to show with reference by sheet and line to illustrative or typical...

  16. 49 CFR 1114.7 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... practical the sheets of each exhibit and the lines of each sheet should be numbered. If the exhibit consists of five or more sheets, the first sheet or title-page should be confined to a brief statement of what the exhibit purports to show with reference by sheet and line to illustrative or typical...

  17. 49 CFR 1114.7 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... practical the sheets of each exhibit and the lines of each sheet should be numbered. If the exhibit consists of five or more sheets, the first sheet or title-page should be confined to a brief statement of what the exhibit purports to show with reference by sheet and line to illustrative or typical...

  18. 49 CFR 1114.7 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... practical the sheets of each exhibit and the lines of each sheet should be numbered. If the exhibit consists of five or more sheets, the first sheet or title-page should be confined to a brief statement of what the exhibit purports to show with reference by sheet and line to illustrative or typical...

  19. Variability in empathic fear response among 11 inbred strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Keum, S; Park, J; Kim, A; Park, J; Kim, K K; Jeong, J; Shin, H-S

    2016-02-01

    Empathy is an important emotional process that involves the ability to recognize and share emotions with others. We have previously developed an observational fear learning (OFL) behavioral assay to measure empathic fear in mice. In the OFL task, a mouse is conditioned for context-dependent fear when it observes a conspecific demonstrator receiving aversive stimuli. In the present study, by comparing 11 different inbred mouse strains that are commonly used in the laboratory, we found that empathic fear response was highly variable between different strains. Five strains--C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NTac, 129S1/SvImJ, 129S4/SvJae and BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf) /J--showed observational fear (OF) responses, whereas AKR/J, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeJ, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ and NOD/ShiLtJ mice exhibited low empathic fear response. Importantly, day 2 OF memory was significantly correlated with contextual memory in the classical fear conditioning among the 11 strains. Innate differences in anxiety, locomotor activity, sociability and preference for social novelty were not significantly correlated with OFL. Interestingly, early adolescent C57BL/6J mice exhibited an increase in acquisition of OF. The level of OFL in C57BL/6J strain was not affected by sex or strains of the demonstrator. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that there are naturally occurring OFL-specific genetic variations modulating empathic fear behaviors in mice. The identification of causal genes may uncover novel genetic pathways and underlying neural mechanisms that modulate empathic fear and, ultimately, provide new targets for therapeutic intervention in human mental disorders associated with impaired empathy. PMID:26690560

  20. [Adolescent sexuality].

    PubMed

    Calero, Juan del Rey

    2010-01-01

    The social Adolescent features are insecurity, narcissism, eroticism, more impetuosity than reason. 1/3 of adolescents have risk behaviour for health. The pregnancy rate in adolescent are 9/1,000 (11,720, the abort about 50 %). The total abort (2009) were 114,480. Increase the rate of 8,4 (1990) to 14,6/ 1,000 (2009). The sexual education fails. The consulting about contraceptives get pregnancy of the OR 3,2, condom OR 2,7. The adolescent are influenced in his matter: oeer have 70-75 % of influence, mother 30-40 %, father 15 %, for yhe environment and education Cyberspace access to information: 33 % exposed to unwanted sexual materials, 1 in 7 solicited sexual online. The argument have 4 central topic: Morality and Responsibility, Desire (responsibility vs gratification), Danger (fear related to pregnancy and STD/VIH), and Victimization. The prevention of STD: so called safe sex, delayed, and abstinence, Prevention HPV vaccine. The information is not enough, are necessary personal integral formation in values as self control, abstinence, mutual respect, responsibility, reasonable decisions. PMID:21877398

  1. Adolescent Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Lynda Y.; Johnson, Norbert

    1983-01-01

    Explores the causes and symptoms of adolescent suicide including depression, loss of parent, alienation from family, and a mystical concept of death. Treatment procedures with unsuccessful suicide attempters and their parents are described and prevention strategies are discussed which involve teachers and counselors as well as parents. (JAC)

  2. Unmotivated Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jill; Diller, Howard

    This book examines the characteristics and educational needs of unmotivated adolescents. It suggests that many of these students suffer from low self-esteem and are learning disabled and/or have an attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity. It offers a definition of learning disabilities that emphasizes the presence of significant differences…

  3. Behavioral Disorder amongst Adolescents Attending Secondary School in Southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chinawa, J. M.; Manyike, P. C.; Obu, H. A.; Odetunde, O. I.; Aniwada, E. C.; Ndu, I. K.; Chinawa, A. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Adolescents are prone to various forms of behavioral problems. These behavioral issues in adolescents can have serious consequences for the adolescents. Objectives. The objectives of the study are to determine the causative factors of adolescent problems and specific manifestations. Methods. Behavioral problems were investigated using a random sampling of adolescents from secondary schools in southeast Nigeria from February to April, 2014. A self-administered questionnaire was developed from Health Kids Colorado Questionnaire. Results. A total of 763 subjects completed the questionnaire. Adolescents who reported to have used tobacco 3 to 5 and 6 to 9 times during the last 30 days are just 3.14% and 3.4%, respectively. Nineteen (2.49%) adolescents claimed that they have had sex before but not in the last 3 months. Adolescents who attempted suicide are from 15 years and peaked at 18. Eighty-three (11%) adolescents who are 15 years old attempted suicide in a year; this peaks at 17 years where 235 (30.8%) committed suicide. Majority of adolescents with behavioral disorder are from the upper class family. Conclusion. This study revealed that adolescents exhibit several forms of behavioral problems. PMID:25276048

  4. Parental emotion socialization in clinically depressed adolescents: Enhancing, and dampening positive affect

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Shortt, Joann Wu; Allen, Nicholas B.; Davis, Betsy; Hunter, Erin; Leve, Craig; Sheeber, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This study compared parental socialization of adolescent positive affect in families of depressed and healthy adolescents. Participants were 107 adolescents (42 boys) aged 14 - 18 years and their parents. Half of the participants met criteria for major depressive disorder and the others were demographically matched adolescents without emotional or behavioral disorders. Results based on multi-source questionnaire and interview data indicated that mothers and fathers of depressed adolescents were less accepting of adolescents’ positive affect and more likely to use strategies that dampen adolescents’ positive affect than were parents of healthy adolescents. Additionally, fathers of depressed adolescents exhibited fewer responses likely to enhance the adolescents’ positive affect than were fathers of healthy adolescents. These findings build on those of previous work in examining parental responses to adolescent emotions, focusing on positive emotions and including both mothers and fathers. PMID:23942826

  5. Adolescent gynecology.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, Joseph S; Lara-Torre, Eduardo

    2009-04-01

    Given new developments in the field of adolescent reproductive health, this review focuses on highlighting new guidelines and practice patterns in evaluation and management of adolescent gynecologic problems. First, understanding the proper techniques for the initial examination is key to establishing a long-term relationship with this age group. Reservations about the first gynecologic examination are common, and the practitioner's goal is foremost to make the patient as comfortable as possible. Preventive health in this patient population is key, and practitioners should become comfortable with providing education about topics as diverse as sexuality, eating disorders, and dating violence. Furthermore, the frequency with which teenagers report sexual activity and the high unintended pregnancy rate in this age group makes counseling regarding effective contraception essential. Additionally, practitioners are encouraged to take the opportunity to discuss the availability of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine with adolescents. In 2007, adolescents were designated as a special population, given the frequency with which they acquire and clear mild HPV-related cervical dysplasia. More conservative treatment in this population is generally favored. During their transition through puberty, disorders of menstruation become the most common complaint requiring the attention of the gynecologist. Most commonly, anovulation serves as the cause behind such abnormal bleeding. Polycystic ovarian syndrome can develop in early puberty and carry its consequences into adulthood. Infertility, diabetes, and hirsutism mark the most important components of the syndrome and require age-appropriate management. Finally, the consequences of endometriosis on the future fertility of adolescents have brought early intervention to light. Recognition and prompt treatment are advocated to prevent the future implications of this disease. PMID:19305342

  6. Preventing suicide in adolescents with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Nita J; Sher, Leo

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent suicide is an escalating crisis that needs to be addressed by clinicians and researchers. Alcohol use has consistently been implicated in adolescent suicide and it is generally assumed that alcohol use leads to an increased risk in suicidality, suicide attempts and completed suicides. It can lead to adolescent suicidality through alcohol myopia, disinhibition, and impaired judgment. Multiple genetically related intermediate phenotypes might contribute to the risk of alcohol misuse and suicidal behavior in adolescents. Genetic variations that enhance the risk for mood and anxiety symptoms or susceptibility to stress might increase risk through different mechanisms. Comorbid disorders such as depression are frequently exhibited in adolescents who misuse alcohol, therefore any adolescent who appears to be at risk for alcoholism or depression should always be screened for all other psychiatric disorders and for suicidality; some signs suicidal adolescents may exhibit include withdrawal, personality change, and a loss of interest in pleasurable activities. While assessment is important, prevention is crucial in any attempt to decrease the incidence of adolescent suicide. The US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has established a set of seven guidelines that can be implemented from kindergarten through high school in order to establish alcohol prevention efforts in schools. Through beginning prevention efforts at a young age, it is hopeful that both alcohol misuse and adolescent suicide can be reduced. PMID:17458324

  7. Superconductive microstrip exhibiting negative differential resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Huebener, R.P.; Gallus, D.E.

    1975-10-28

    A device capable of exhibiting negative differential electrical resistivity over a range of values of current and voltage is formed by vapor- depositing a thin layer of a material capable of exhibiting superconductivity on an insulating substrate, establishing electrical connections at opposite ends of the deposited strip, and cooling the alloy into its superconducting range. The device will exhibit negative differential resistivity when biased in the current- induced resistive state.

  8. EEG theta and beta power spectra in adolescents with ADHD versus adolescents with ASD + ADHD.

    PubMed

    Bink, M; van Boxtel, G J M; Popma, A; Bongers, I L; Denissen, A J M; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch

    2015-08-01

    Attention problems are common in youngsters with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as well as in adolescents with combined autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and ADHD. However, it is unknown whether there is psychophysiological overlap and/or a difference in electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectra between ADHD and comorbid ASD and ADHD (ASD + ADHD), on and off stimulant medication. To explore potential differences and overlap, measures of theta and beta power in adolescents diagnosed with ADHD (n = 33) versus adolescents with combined ASD + ADHD (n = 20), categorized by stimulant medication use (57 % of the total sample), were compared. EEG measures were acquired in three conditions: (1) resting state, eyes closed (2) resting state, eyes open and (3) during an oddball task. In addition, performance on the d2 attention test was analyzed. Adolescents with ADHD displayed more absolute theta activity than adolescents with ASD + ADHD during the eyes open and task conditions, independent of stimulant medication use. In addition, only the adolescents with ADHD showed an association between diminished attention test performance and increased theta in the eyes open condition. Results of the current study suggest that although there is behavioral overlap between ADHD characteristics in adolescents with ADHD and adolescents with combined ASD + ADHD, the underlying psychophysiological mechanisms may be different. Adolescents with ASD + ADHD exhibited fewer of the EEG physiological signs usually associated with ADHD, although there was an overlap in attentional problems between the groups. This may indicate that treatments developed for ADHD work differently in some adolescents with ASD + ADHD and adolescents with ADHD only. PMID:25374034

  9. Counsellors' Perceptions of Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Moshe

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the perceptions Israeli secondary-school counselors have of adolescence. Results reveal that, in general, counselors have a favorable view of adolescents and do not perceive adolescence as a "difficult stage." Counselors also believe that they are perceived positively by their adolescent students. Identifies five types of adolescents…

  10. Encountering Nanotechnology in an Interactive Exhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murriello, Sandra E.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This article offers findings from a learning sciences-informed evaluation of a nanoscience and nanotechnology exhibition called Nano-Aventura (NanoAdventure), based on four interactive-collaborative games and two narrated videos. This traveling exhibition was developed in Brazil by the Museu Exploratorio de Ciencias for children and teenagers…

  11. Science Fiction Exhibits as STEM Gateways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robie, Samantha

    Women continue to hold less than a quarter of all STEM jobs in the United States, prompting many museums to develop programs and exhibits with the express goal of interesting young girls in scientific fields. At the same time, a number of recent museum exhibits have harnessed the popularity of pop culture and science fiction in order to interest general audiences in STEM subject matter, as well as using the exhibits as springboards to expand or shift mission goals and focus. Because science fiction appears to be successful at raising interest in STEM fields, it may be an effective way to garner the interest of young girls in STEM in particular. This research seeks to describe the ways in which museums are currently using science fiction exhibits to interest young girls in STEM fields and careers. Research focused on four institutions across the country hosting three separate exhibits, and included staff interviews and content analysis of exhibit descriptions, promotional materials, a summative evaluation and supplementary exhibit productions. In some ways, science fiction exhibits do serve young girls, primarily through the inclusion of female role models, staff awareness, and prototype testing to ensure interactives are attractive to girls as well as to boys. However, STEM appears to be underutilized, which may be partly due to a concern within the field that the outcome of targeting a specific gender could be construed as "stereotyping".

  12. Strategies for Determining Exhibit Effectiveness. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shettel, Harris H.; And Others

    This project was designed to develop research strategies and hypotheses for evaluating the effectiveness of exhibits. An exhibit on the role of the Federal Government in science and technology was used as the subject matter. Two basic groups of viewers were used, casual viewers and paid experimental viewers. Both were tested on knowledge gained…

  13. An Attention Model for Museum Exhibits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightner, John W.

    A qualitative study determined which factors in the museum exhibit environment or within the museum visitor may influence the visitor to attend an exhibit. Observations and interviews were conducted of 14 groups that visited a Chesapeake & Ohio steam locomotive at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. An inductive or grounded theory…

  14. Learning4Life on the Exhibit Floor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The exhibit floor is a wealth of knowledge. One can read, view, and listen to information presented in many formats. Somewhere on the exhibit floor there are experts on every topic, ready and waiting for one's questions. But like any research topic, frequently a structured search is required to find the best answers. This article discusses how to…

  15. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (respondent) necessary for the rendition of service requested by the applicant. (6) Exhibit G—Flow diagram showing daily design capacity and reflecting operation with proposed transmission facilities. A flow...—Flow diagram reflecting maximum capabilities. If Exhibit G does not reflect the maximum deliveries...

  16. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (respondent) necessary for the rendition of service requested by the applicant. (6) Exhibit G—Flow diagram showing daily design capacity and reflecting operation with proposed transmission facilities. A flow...—Flow diagram reflecting maximum capabilities. If Exhibit G does not reflect the maximum deliveries...

  17. NORMAL PSYCHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN ADOLESCENCE

    PubMed Central

    Teicher, Joseph D.

    1956-01-01

    It behooves physicians to be aware that adolescents are different people, that they have a vast capacity for change, that they often exhibit the sickest kind of behavior, which may be very frightening to us and to them. Physicians have to be able to wait and not become panicked by the turbulences, confusions, and contradictions that mark the adolescent's behavior; to keep in mind at all times that much of what is going on is relatively normal behavior in the drive toward maturation and adulthood; that the adolescent has to cope with his sexual drive which is continually frustrated, that he has to cope with the problems of emancipation from parental authority, that he has to cope with an aggressive drive to achieve and to dominate. Parents, too, have to be understanding and ready to render unselfish support, for they continue to be the source of strength and security, and even the source of healthy restrictions. Adults must be aware that the adolescent struggles with his conscience and its dictates, and we should look upon cliques, groups and clubs as a healthy assistance in the preservation of standards, ethics, and mores. PMID:13356179

  18. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not...

  19. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not...

  20. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not...

  1. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not...

  2. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not...

  3. Mice Drawer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cancedda, Ranieri

    2008-01-01

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) facility which is able to support mice onboard the International Space Station during long-duration exploration missions (from 100 to 150-days) by living space, food, water, ventilation and lighting. Mice can be accommodated either individually (maximum 6) or in groups (4 pairs). MDS is integrated in the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation (uploading and downloading) to the ISS and in an EXPRESS Rack in Destiny, the US Laboratory during experiment execution. Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton. This bone loss experienced by astronauts is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population. MDS will help investigate the effects of unloading on transgenic (foreign gene that has been inserted into its genome to exhibit a particular trait) mice with the Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1, OSF-1, a growth and differentiation factor, and to study the genetic mechanisms underlying the bone mass pathophysiology. MDS will test the hypothesis that mice with an increased bone density are likely to be more protected from osteoporosis, when the increased bone mass is a direct effect of a gene involved in skeletogenesis (skeleton formation). Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton, a loss that is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population on Earth. Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1 (OSF-1), also known as pleiotrophin (PTN) or Heparin-Binding Growth- Associated Molecule (HB-GAM) belongs to a family of secreted heparin binding proteins..OSF-1 is an extracellular matrix-associated growth and

  4. Mainstream Television, Adolescent Homosexuality, and Significant Silence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kielwasser, Alfred P.; Wolf, Michelle A.

    1992-01-01

    Argues that the symbolic annihilation of gay and lesbian youth exhibited by network television contributes to a dysfunctional isolation supported by the mutually reinforcing invisibility of homosexual adolescents on television and in the real world. Suggests that the spiral of silence also partially accounts for the inefficacy of oppositional…

  5. Museum Exhibitions: Optimizing Development Using Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.

    2002-12-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado, has recently developed two museum exhibits called the Space Weather Center and MarsQuest. It is currently planning to develop a third exhibit called InterActive Earth. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The development of these exhibitions included a comprehensive evaluation plan. I will report on the important role evaluation plays in exhibit design and development using MarsQuest and InterActive Earth as models. The centerpiece of SSI's Mars Education Program is the 5,000-square-foot traveling exhibition, MarsQuest: Exploring the Red Planet, which was developed with support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, and several corporate donors. The MarsQuest exhibit is nearing the end of a highly successful, fully-booked three-year tour. The Institute plans to send an enhanced and updated MarsQuest on a second three-year tour and is also developing Destination: Mars, a mini-version of MarsQuest designed for smaller venues. They are designed to inspire and empower participants to extend the excitement and science content of the exhibitions into classrooms and museum-based education programs in an ongoing fashion. The centerpiece of the InterActive Earth project is a traveling exhibit that will cover about 4,000 square feet. The major goal of the proposed exhibit is to introduce students and the public to the complexity of the interconnections in the Earth system, and thereby, to inspire them to better understand planet Earth. Evaluation must be an integral part of the exhibition development process. For MarsQuest, a 3-phase evaluation (front end, formative and summative) was conducted by Randi Korn and Associates in close association with the development team. Sampling procedures for all three evaluation phases ensured the participation of all audiences, including family groups, students, and adults. Each phase of

  6. Astronomy's New Messengers: A traveling exhibit on gravitational-wave physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaglià, Marco; Hendry, Martin; Márka, Szabolcs; Reitze, David H.; Riles, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory exhibit Astronomy's New Messengers: Listening to the Universe with Gravitational Waves is traveling to colleges, universities, museums and other public institutions throughout the United States. Astronomy's New Messengers primarily communicates with an adolescent and young adult audience, potentially inspiring them into the field of science. Acknowledging that this audience is traditionally a difficult one to attract, the exhibit publicly announces itself in a charismatic fashion to reach its principal goals of broadening the community of people interested in science and encouraging interest in science among young people.

  7. Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) exhibits striking sexual dichotomy impacting on autistic and Alzheimer's pathologies.

    PubMed

    Malishkevich, A; Amram, N; Hacohen-Kleiman, G; Magen, I; Giladi, E; Gozes, I

    2015-01-01

    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is a most frequent autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-associated gene and the only protein significantly decreasing in the serum of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Is ADNP associated with ASD being more prevalent in boys and AD more prevalent in women? Our results revealed sex-related learning/memory differences in mice, reflecting hippocampal expression changes in ADNP and ADNP-controlled AD/ASD risk genes. Hippocampal ADNP transcript content was doubled in male vs female mice, with females showing equal expression to ADNP haploinsufficient (ADNP(+/)(-)) males and no significant genotype-associated reduction. Increased male ADNP expression was replicated in human postmortem hippocampal samples. The hippocampal transcript for apolipoprotein E (the major risk gene for AD) was doubled in female mice compared with males, and further doubled in the ADNP(+/-) females, contrasting a decrease in ADNP(+/-) males. Previously, overexpression of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) led to ASD-like phenotype in mice. Here, we identified binding sites on ADNP for eIF4E and co-immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, hippocampal eIF4E expression was specifically increased in young ADNP(+/-) male mice. Behaviorally, ADNP(+/-) male mice exhibited deficiencies in object recognition and social memory compared with ADNP(+/+) mice, while ADNP(+/-) females were partially spared. Contrasting males, which preferred novel over familiar mice, ADNP(+/+) females showed no preference to novel mice and ADNP(+/-) females did not prefer mice over object. ADNP expression, positioned as a master regulator of key ASD and AD risk genes, introduces a novel concept of hippocampal gene-regulated sexual dimorphism and an ADNP(+/-) animal model for translational psychiatry. PMID:25646590

  8. Enhanced Generalization of Auditory Conditioned Fear in Juvenile Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Wataru; Pan, Bing-Xing; Yang, Chao; Thakur, Siddarth; Morozov, Alexei

    2009-01-01

    Increased emotionality is a characteristic of human adolescence, but its animal models are limited. Here we report that generalization of auditory conditioned fear between a conditional stimulus (CS+) and a novel auditory stimulus is stronger in 4-5-wk-old mice (juveniles) than in their 9-10-wk-old counterparts (adults), whereas nonassociative…

  9. The Making of a Museum Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleecker, Samuel E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the preparation of the Reptile and Amphibian exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History. Various steps involved in developing the ten showcases in a six-year period are presented. (SA)

  10. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of operating such facilities. Exhibit B. A general or key map on a scale not greater than 20 miles to... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the...

  11. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tractor-trailer transportation should be forwarded prior to November 15th previous to the year desired. A... time for which an exhibit is authorized will be determined by the nature of the event and the type...

  12. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tractor-trailer transportation should be forwarded prior to November 15th previous to the year desired. A... time for which an exhibit is authorized will be determined by the nature of the event and the type...

  13. Exhibit of School Architecture, 1996. Special Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Architect, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Presents selected winners of the Texas 1996 Exhibit of School Architecture Design Competition. The Caudill and honor award-winning projects are listed along with facility photos, brief descriptions, project credits, and the names of the construction companies used. (GR)

  14. Exhibit of School Architecture, 1997. Special Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Architect, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents selected winners of the Texas 1997 Exhibit of School Architecture Design Competition. The Caudill and honor award winning projects are listed along with facility photos, brief descriptions, project credits, and the names of the construction companies used. (GR)

  15. When Do Children Exhibit a "Yes" Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as "preference-object" and "knowledge-object" questions pertaining to…

  16. Reaching the Public through Traveling Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-11-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called Alien Earths and MarsQuest. It has just started to develop another exhibit called Giant Planets. These exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of these major outreach programs. Alien Earths was developed in partnership with various research missions. The focus of the presentation will be on MarsQuest and Giant Planets. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot, \\$3M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's second 3-year tour will enable millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents) and workshops for master educators near host museums and science centers. The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibition's interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. These exhibit programs are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education. The presentation will also discuss how Giant Planets, a proposed 3500 square-foot traveling exhibition on the mysteries and discoveries of the outer planets, will be able to take advantage of the connections and resources that have been developed by the MarsQuest project.

  17. An Astrobiology Microbes Exhibit and Education Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Allen, Jaclyn S.; Stocco, Karen; Tobola, Kay; Olendzenski, Lorraine

    2001-01-01

    Telling the story of NASA-sponsored scientific research to the public in exhibits is best done by partnerships of scientists and museum professionals. Likewise, preparing classroom activities and training teachers to use them should be done by teams of teachers and scientists. Here we describe how we used such partnerships to develop a new astrobiology augmentation to the Microbes! traveling exhibit and a companion education module. "Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract."

  18. Short communication: Flourishing among adolescents with epilepsy: Correlates and comparison to peers.

    PubMed

    Odar Stough, Cathleen; Nabors, Laura; Merianos, Ashley; Zhang, Jiaqi

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to examine if adolescents with a seizure disorder/epilepsy display less flourishing (thriving) than peers without seizures using data from the National Survey of Children's Health 2011-2012. Adolescent demographics, symptom severity, and parents' anger toward their child were explored as possible predictors of flourishing. Adolescents with seizures exhibited lower flourishing than peers, and flourishing among adolescents with seizures was predicted by symptom severity, age, race/ethnicity, sex, and parental anger. Study results suggest adolescents with a seizure disorder/epilepsy should be targeted for interventions that promote flourishing. PMID:26313714

  19. Sex differences in science museum exhibit attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arámbula Greenfield, Teresa

    This study examines the relative attraction of hands-on, interactive science museum exhibits for females and males. Studies have demonstrated that such exhibits can be effective learning experiences for children, with both academic and affective benefits. Other studies have shown that girls and boys do not always experience the same science-related educational opportunities and that, even when they do, they do not necessarily receive the same benefits from them. These early differences can lead to more serious educational and professional disparities later in life. As interactive museum exhibits represent a science experience that is-readily available to both girls and boys, the question arose as to whether they were being used similarly by the two groups as well as by adult women and men. It was found that both girls and boys used all types of exhibits, but that girls were more likely than boys to use puzzles and exhibits focusing on the human body; boys were more likely than girls to use computers and exhibits illustrating physical science principles. However, this was less true of children accompanied by adults (parents) than it was of unaccompanied children on school field trips who roamed the museum more freely.Received: 16 February 1994; Revised: 3 February 1995;

  20. Using Comparative Planetology in Exhibit Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on three of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (currently on tour), Alien Earths (in fabrication), and Giant Planets (in development). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in "habitable zones" around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Giant Planets: Exploring the Outer Solar System will take advantage of the excitement generated by the Cassini mission and bring planetary and origins research and discoveries to students and the public. It will be organized around four thematic areas: Our Solar System; Colossal Worlds; Moons, Rings, and Fields; and Make Space for Kids. Giant Planets will open in 2007. This talk will focus on the importance of making Earth comparisons in the conceptual design of each exhibit and will show several examples of how these comparisons were manifested in

  1. Halofuginone alleviates acute viral myocarditis in suckling BALB/c mice by inhibiting TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Hua; Fu, Jia; Sun, Da-Qing

    2016-04-29

    Viral myocarditis (VMC) is an inflammation of heart muscle in infants and young adolescents. This study explored the function of halofuginone (HF) in Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) -treated suckling mice. HF-treated animal exhibited higher survival rate, lower heart/body weight, and more decreased blood sugar concentration than CVB3 group. HF also reduced the expressions of interleukin(IL)-17 and IL-23 and the numbers of Th17 cells. Moreover, HF downregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine levels. The expressions of transforming growth factor(TGF-β1) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B (NF-κB) p65/ tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) proteins were decreased by HF as well. Finally, the overexpression of TGF-β1 counteracted the protection effect of HF in CVB3-treated suckling mice. In summary, our study suggests HF increases the survival of CVB3 suckling mice, reduces the Th17 cells and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, and may through downregulation of the TGF-β1-mediated expression of NF-κB p65/TNF-α pathway proteins. These results offer a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of VMC. PMID:27021682

  2. A window of vulnerability: impaired fear extinction in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kathryn D; Den, Miriam L; Graham, Bronwyn M; Richardson, Rick

    2014-09-01

    There have been significant advances made towards understanding the processes mediating extinction of learned fear. However, despite being of clear theoretical and clinical significance, very few studies have examined fear extinction in adolescence, which is often described as a developmental window of vulnerability to psychological disorders. This paper reviews the relatively small body of research examining fear extinction in adolescence. A prominent finding of this work is that adolescents, both humans and rodents, exhibit a marked impairment in extinction relative to both younger (e.g., juvenile) and older (e.g., adult) groups. We then review some potential mechanisms that could produce the striking extinction deficit observed in adolescence. For example, one neurobiological candidate mechanism for impaired extinction in adolescence involves changes in the functional connectivity within the fear extinction circuit, particularly between prefrontal cortical regions and the amygdala. In addition, we review research on emotion regulation and attention processes that suggests that developmental changes in attention bias to threatening cues may be a cognitive mechanism that mediates age-related differences in extinction learning. We also examine how a differential reaction to chronic stress in adolescence impacts upon extinction retention during adolescence as well as in later life. Finally, we consider the findings of several studies illustrating promising approaches that overcome the typically-observed extinction impairments in adolescent rodents and that could be translated to human adolescents. PMID:24513634

  3. Palmoplantar Keratoderma in Slurp2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Allan, Christopher M; Procaccia, Shiri; Tran, Deanna; Tu, Yiping; Barnes, Richard H; Larsson, Mikael; Allan, Bernard B; Young, Lorraine C; Hong, Cynthia; Tontonoz, Peter; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G; Beigneux, Anne P

    2016-02-01

    SLURP1, a member of the lymphocyte antigen 6 protein family, is secreted by suprabasal keratinocytes. Mutations in SLURP1 cause a palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) known as mal de Meleda. SLURP2, another secreted lymphocyte antigen 6 protein, is encoded by a gene located ?20 kb downstream from SLURP1. SLURP2 is produced by suprabasal keratinocytes. To investigate the importance of SLURP2, we first examined Slurp2 knockout mice in which exon 2-3 sequences had been replaced with lacZ and neo cassettes. Slurp2(-/-) mice exhibited hyperkeratosis on the volar surface of the paws (i.e., palmoplantar keratoderma), increased keratinocyte proliferation, and an accumulation of lipid droplets in the stratum corneum. They also exhibited reduced body weight and hind limb clasping. These phenotypes are similar to those of Slurp1(-/-) mice. To solidify a link between Slurp2 deficiency and palmoplantar keratoderma and to be confident that the disease phenotypes in Slurp2(-/-) mice were not secondary to the effects of the lacZ and neo cassettes on Slurp1 expression, we created a new line of Slurp2 knockout mice (Slurp2X(-/-)) in which Slurp2 was inactivated with a simple nonsense mutation. Slurp2X(-/-) mice exhibited the same disease phenotypes. Thus, Slurp2 deficiency and Slurp1 deficiencies cause the same disease phenotypes. PMID:26967477

  4. Palmoplantar keratoderma in Slurp2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Christopher M.; Procaccia, Shiri; Tran, Deanna; Tu, Yiping; Barnes, Richard H.; Larsson, Mikael; Allan, Bernard B.; Young, Lorraine C.; Hong, Cynthia; Tontonoz, Peter; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Beigneux, Anne P.

    2015-01-01

    SLURP1, a member of the Ly6 protein family, is secreted by suprabasal keratinocytes. Mutations in SLURP1 cause a palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) known as mal de Meleda. Another secreted Ly6 protein, SLURP2, is encoded by a gene located ~20 kb downstream from SLURP1. SLURP2 is produced by suprabasal keratinocytes. To investigate the importance of SLURP2, we first examined Slurp2 knockout mice in which exon 2–3 sequences had been replaced with lacZ and neo cassettes. Slurp2−/− mice exhibited hyperkeratosis on the volar surface of the paws (i.e., PPK), increased keratinocyte proliferation, and an accumulation of lipid droplets in the stratum corneum. They also exhibited reduced body weight and hind limb clasping. These phenotypes are very similar to those of Slurp1−/− mice. To solidify a link between Slurp2 deficiency and PPK and to be confident that the disease phenotypes in Slurp2−/− mice were not secondary to the effects of the lacZ and neo cassettes on Slurp1 expression, we created a new line of Slurp2 knockout mice (Slurp2X−/−) in which Slurp2 was inactivated with a simple nonsense mutation. Slurp2X−/− mice exhibited the same disease phenotypes. Thus, Slurp2 deficiency and Slurp1 deficiencies cause the same disease phenotypes. PMID:26967477

  5. [Adaptation and mental-hygienic characteristics of internally displaced adolescents].

    PubMed

    Maksimović, Milos; Kocijancić, Radojka; Backović, Dusan; Ille, Tatjana; Paunović, Katarina

    2005-01-01

    The change in socio-economic status, drastic decrease in living standards, war, and the introduction of sanctions to our country were complicated in addition by a large number of internally displaced people from Kosovo, which culminated with the 1999 NATO bombing. The aim of this investigation was to estimate the influence of internal displacement on the adaptation and mental health of adolescents. The investigation was conducted on 238 adolescents, comprising a control group of 206 adolescents from Belgrade and 32 internally displaced adolescents from Kosovo. A specific questionnaire regarding habits, behaviour, and psychosomatic state was used, as well as the Cornell Medical Index and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Internally displaced adolescents from Kosovo exhibited greater difficulties in adapting and had worse school records than adolescents from Belgrade, one year after the change in their location. Immediately after the NATO bombing, both groups reacted in the same way: they often talked about the events they had survived, they were afraid of the sounds of alarm sirens and of aeroplanes, and in addition had similar dreams (no statistical variation between the groups). Emotional disturbances, one year after the bombing, were not observed in 40.6% of adolescents from Kosovo, compared to the figure of 74.8% for adolescents from Belgrade. Adolescents from Belgrade consumed alcohol significantly more often: 75.7% compared to 56.3% for adolescents from Kosovo. In addition, 20.4% of adolescents from Belgrade consumed psychoactive substances compared to 6.3% of adolescents from Kosovo. There was no significant difference between the examined groups in the total scores on the scale for neuroticism. All in all, the girls from both examined groups displayed neurotic tendencies more frequently than the boys. PMID:16392285

  6. Adolescent attraction to cults.

    PubMed

    Hunter, E

    1998-01-01

    This article details the reasons behind adolescents' attraction to cults. It is recommended that parents, teachers, and counselors familiarize themselves with the warning signs. Suggestions are offered on how to make adolescents less vulnerable to cult overtures. PMID:9831888

  7. Post-Adolescent Issues

    MedlinePlus

    Search COPING & HEALING CARING FOR A CHILD: POST-ADOLESCENT ISSUES As your child reaches adulthood, there will ... intake. New issues that you and your post adolescent child may want to discus together with his/ ...

  8. Adolescent and School Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Adolescent and School Health Note: Javascript is disabled or ... behaviors now JAMA Viewpoint: Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adolescents New MMWR Article Learn What State and Local ...

  9. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... engineering design data in explanation and support of the diagrams and the proposed project, setting forth: (i... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exhibits. 156.5 Section 156.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  10. 10 CFR 205.303 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... pertinent Federal and State laws. (c) Exhibit C. A general map showing the applicant's overall electric system and a detailed map highlighting the location of the facilities or the proposed facilities to be used for the generation and transmission of the electric energy to be exported. The detailed map...

  11. 10 CFR 205.303 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pertinent Federal and State laws. (c) Exhibit C. A general map showing the applicant's overall electric system and a detailed map highlighting the location of the facilities or the proposed facilities to be used for the generation and transmission of the electric energy to be exported. The detailed map...

  12. 18 CFR 34.4 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... stockholders has been obtained. (c) Exhibit C. The Balance Sheet and attached notes for the most recent 12... computation of interest coverage Actual for the year ended mm-dd-yy OMB control No. 1902-0043, pro forma for the year ended mm-dd-yy Net income Add: Interest on Long-Term Debt, Interest on Short-Term Debt,...

  13. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exhibits. 156.5 Section 156.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF... outlet connections at each compressor station. (iv) Pressures and volumes of gas at each intake...

  14. After Terror Charges, Artist Exhibits Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Steven Kurtz, a professor of visual studies at the State University of New York, has been working with various bacteria as part of his counterculture exhibit artworks for nearly 20 years. Four years ago, federal agents raided his home in a bioterrorism investigation. The federal agents had been called to the house by local police officers…

  15. Do Online Students Exhibit Different Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausler, Joel; Sanders, John W.; Young, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relationship between learning styles and student type. This research seeks to examine if online students exhibit different learning styles from onsite students; and, if so, what accommodations relating to learning style differences may be made for online students? Students (N = 80) were asked to complete an online survey in order…

  16. The medial prefrontal cortex exhibits money illusion

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernd; Rangel, Antonio; Wibral, Matthias; Falk, Armin

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral economists have proposed that money illusion, which is a deviation from rationality in which individuals engage in nominal evaluation, can explain a wide range of important economic and social phenomena. This proposition stands in sharp contrast to the standard economic assumption of rationality that requires individuals to judge the value of money only on the basis of the bundle of goods that it can buy—its real value—and not on the basis of the actual amount of currency—its nominal value. We used fMRI to investigate whether the brain's reward circuitry exhibits money illusion. Subjects received prizes in 2 different experimental conditions that were identical in real economic terms, but differed in nominal terms. Thus, in the absence of money illusion there should be no differences in activation in reward-related brain areas. In contrast, we found that areas of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which have been previously associated with the processing of anticipatory and experienced rewards, and the valuation of goods, exhibited money illusion. We also found that the amount of money illusion exhibited by the vmPFC was correlated with the amount of money illusion exhibited in the evaluation of economic transactions. PMID:19307555

  17. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... (8) As Exhibit 8, a copy of applicant's most recent year-end general balance sheet certified by... general balance sheet as of a date no less recent than the end of the third month preceding the date of the filing of the application. The unaudited balance sheet shall be presented in account form...

  18. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... (8) As Exhibit 8, a copy of applicant's most recent year-end general balance sheet certified by... general balance sheet as of a date no less recent than the end of the third month preceding the date of the filing of the application. The unaudited balance sheet shall be presented in account form...

  19. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS TO SITE INTERSTATE ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION FACILITIES §...

  20. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... favorably only when not in conflict with recruiting requirements. (i) Requests for exhibits must be... among the Armed Forces, or with other agencies of the Federal Government. (i) All Navy activities will... concerned, via the chain of command. (3) The official OASD(PA) Request Form for Armed Forces...

  1. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS TO SITE...

  2. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS TO SITE...

  3. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS TO SITE...

  4. 18 CFR 153.8 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... facilities in the United States and Canada or Mexico; (5) Exhibit E. If the proposal is to import or export... Seismic Risk Map of the United States, or where there is a risk of surface faulting or ground liquefaction... the Seismic Review of LNG Facilities,” NBSIR 84-2833. This document may be obtained from the...

  5. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... such enterprises or operations, a detailed explanation of each such relationship, including the... relationship. (5) Exhibit F—Location of facilities. A geographical map of suitable scale and detail showing all...—Construction, operation, and management. A concise statement setting forth arrangements for...

  6. 18 CFR 157.14 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... explanation of each such relationship, including the percentage of voting strength represented by such... detailed explanation of each such relationship. (5) Exhibit E—Other pending applications and filings. A... abandoned. This map, or an additional map, shall clearly show the relationship of the new facilities to...

  7. 10 CFR 205.303 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; Applications; Administrative Procedures and Sanctions Application for Authorization to Transmit Electric Energy... used for the generation and transmission of the electric energy to be exported. The detailed map shall... or fixing of rates for the purchase, sale or transmission of electric energy. (f) Exhibit F....

  8. 24 CFR 180.645 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exhibits. 180.645 Section 180.645... OPPORTUNITY CONSOLIDATED HUD HEARING PROCEDURES FOR CIVIL RIGHTS MATTERS Procedures at Hearing § 180.645... evidence could not reasonably be anticipated at that time. (c) Authenticity. The authenticity of...

  9. 18 CFR 157.14 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Act (42 U.S.C. 7101-7352); E.O. 12009, 3 CFR 142) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 157.14, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the...) Exhibit G—Flow diagrams showing daily design capacity and reflecting operation with and without...

  10. 18 CFR 157.14 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Act (42 U.S.C. 7101-7352); E.O. 12009, 3 CFR 142) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 157.14, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the...) Exhibit G—Flow diagrams showing daily design capacity and reflecting operation with and without...

  11. 18 CFR 157.14 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Act (42 U.S.C. 7101-7352); E.O. 12009, 3 CFR 142) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 157.14, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the...) Exhibit G—Flow diagrams showing daily design capacity and reflecting operation with and without...

  12. MarsQuest: A National Traveling Exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. W.; Dusenbery, P. B.

    1998-09-01

    With the successful landing of Mars Pathfinder and the arrival of Mars Global Surveyor, a new decade of Mars exploration has commenced. MarsQuest, a 5000 square foot traveling exhibition, is being developed to further bring the excitement and discoveries of this "Decade of Mars Exploration" to the public. MarsQuest is partially funded by the Informal Science Education Program of the National Science Foundation and NASA's Office of Space Science. The Space Science Institute (SSI) in Boulder, CO, is leading the project. Scientific and educational advisors from many different universities and government laboratories, most of whom are directly involved in the active and planned Mars missions, will ensure the scientific accuracy, timeliness, and relevance of the key concepts presented in the exhibition and accompanying programs. The traveling exhibit is the primary element of the MarsQuest project. The exhibition experience, carefully keyed to current events in Mars exploration, will transport visitors to the surface of the Red Planet via large murals, dioramas, and numerous interactive displays. There they will have the opportunity to share in the spirit and thrill of exploration, and come to appreciate the similarities and differences between Earth and Mars. A planetarium show, geared to the goals of the MarsQuest project, will be an important sensory addition to the traveling exhibit. The planetarium/star-theater venue presents a unique environment where audience members can literally be surrounded by Mars images. Education and outreach programs comprise the remainder of the MarsQuest project. The goal of these is to make scientific concepts and scientific and engineering processes understandable to students via Mars-inspired curricula. MarsQuest will open in late-1999, traveling to about nine sites throughout the United States and reaching an estimated two to three million children and adults during its planned three-year tour. Mars - coming soon to a museum near

  13. Binge ethanol intoxication heightens subsequent ethanol intake in adolescent, but not adult, rats.

    PubMed

    Fabio, María Carolina; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Spear, Norman E; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2014-04-01

    A question still to be answered is whether ethanol initiation has a greater effect on ethanol consumption if it occurs during adolescence than in adulthood. This study assessed the effect of ethanol initiation during adolescence or adulthood on voluntary ethanol consumption when animals were still within the same age range. Adolescent or adult rats were given 5, 2, or 0 ethanol exposures. The animals were tested for ethanol consumption through two-bottle choice tests, before undergoing a 1-week deprivation. A two-bottle assessment was conducted after the deprivation. Adolescents, but not adults, given two ethanol administrations during initiation exhibited significantly higher ethanol intake during the pre-deprivation period. These adolescents also exhibited a threefold increase in ethanol intake after 7 days of drug withdrawal, when compared with controls. These findings suggest that very brief experience with binge ethanol intoxication in adolescence, but not in adulthood, impacts later predisposition to drink. PMID:23341340

  14. Adolescence and Mythology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasopoulos, Dimitris; Soumaki, Eugenia; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    The article begins with a brief exploration of the various aspects of adolescent's psychic qualities as these are described in Greek mythology. It is argued that myths are an integral part of the way that adolescence is perceived and myths play an important role in adolescents' psychic and external world, as well as in their mythological thinking.…

  15. Preventing Adolescent Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capuzzi, David

    The adolescent at risk for suicidal preoccupation and behavior has become an increasing concern for schools and communities. This paper presents some of the causes of teen suicide, things adults should know about adolescent suicide prevention, and what can be done to help such youth. The transition to adolescence is a complex time when many values…

  16. Life Satisfaction of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torgoff, Irving; And Others

    The feelings and perceptions of adolescents, apart from objective indices, warrent attention from those who are concerned with adolescent development and psychological stress. There is a need for a reliable baseline measure of adolescent subjective well-being, as manifested by self-reports of life satisfaction, to which future measurements can be…

  17. Adolescent Attachment and Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Diana S.; Horowitz, Harvey A.

    1996-01-01

    In relationships among attachment classification, psychopathology, and personality, traits were examined in a group of 60 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. Attachment was examined in 27 adolescent-mother pairs. Both adolescent and maternal attachment status were overwhelmingly insecure and were highly concordant. Results support a model of…

  18. Demystifying the Adolescent Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the nature of brain development in adolescence helps explain why adolescents can vacillate so often between mature and immature behavior. Early and middle adolescence, in particular, are times of heightened vulnerability to risky and reckless behavior because the brain's reward center is easily aroused, but the systems that control…

  19. Adolescents and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasburgber, Victor C., Ed.; Comstock, George A., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    In the 1990s, the media represent the single most easily modifiable influence on children and adolescents. This series of articles offers medically oriented practitioners a review of current research on the influence of the media on children and adolescents. The 13 articles are: (1) "Children, Adolescents, and the Media: Five Crucial Issues"…

  20. The Adolescent Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, William A., Jr.

    Written to orient the physician and paramedical personnel to the adolescent patient, the book provides information concerning the changes of adolescence, and age-related problems and illnesses. Part 1 discusses the essence of adolescence by describing physical, mental, and emotional growth and development. Part 2, the major section, consists of 21…

  1. Update on Adolescent Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Rebecca; Halady, Tasia; Bishop, Nina; Chatterjee, Archana

    2016-02-01

    Timely and complete adolescent vaccination remains an elusive public health goal. Three infections for which routine adolescent vaccination is recommended in the U.S. are pertussis, meningococcal disease and human papillomavirus (HPV). These infections and the Tdap, meningococcal and HPV vaccines recommended for adolescents are reviewed in this article. PMID:26999915

  2. 2007 Maryland Adolescent Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Periodically, Maryland's sixth, eighth, tenth, and twelfth graders are surveyed to determine the nature, extent, and trend of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use among adolescents. The "2007 Maryland Adolescent Survey (MAS)" presents the latest findings regarding ATOD use by Maryland's adolescents and compares State and local findings with…

  3. Astronomy's New Messengers: A traveling exhibit to reach out to a young adult audience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaglià, Marco; Hendry, Martin; Márka, Szabolcs; Reitze, David H.; Riles, Keith

    2010-05-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory exhibit Astronomy's New Messengers: Listening to the Universe with Gravitational Waves is traveling to colleges, universities, museums and other public institutions throughout the United States. In 2010, an extended version of this exhibit will appear in a New York City venue that is accessible to a large and diverse cross section of the general public. Astronomy's New Messengers primarily communicates with an adolescent and young adult audience, potentially inspiring them into the field of science. Acknowledging that this audience is traditionally a difficult one to attract, the exhibit publicly announces itself in a charismatic fashion to reach its principal goals of broadening the community of people interested in science and encouraging interest in science among young people.

  4. Developmental differences in children's and adolescents' post-disaster reactions.

    PubMed

    Dogan-Ates, Aysun

    2010-07-01

    Disaster literature suggests that children's and adolescents' post-disaster reactions vary according to their developmental levels. Preschool children show less psychological problems as compared to older children and adolescents, but they have a higher incidence of trauma-specific fears and behavioral problems (e.g., dependency, clinging). School-age children's disaster responses include sleep and eating disturbances, behavioral problems, and poor school performance. Adolescents tend to exhibit symptoms such as posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, belligerence, and pessimistic views about the future (Korol, Green, & Gleser, 1999 ). PMID:20521917

  5. Parent-Adolescent Conflict in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Barbara N.; Schultz, Jerelyn B.

    2004-01-01

    This study explored parent-adolescent conflict during the early years of adolescence (ages 11 to 14). The responses of 357 youths in Grades 6, 7, and 8 to the Issues Checklist (Prinz, Foster, Kent, & O'Leary, 1979) revealed frequent conflicts with parents over a sizable number of issues during this period, peaking in Grade 7 between parents and…

  6. Multimodal audio guide for museums and exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbensleben, Sandra; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus

    2006-02-01

    In our paper we introduce a new Audio Guide concept for exploring buildings, realms and exhibitions. Actual proposed solutions work in most cases with pre-defined devices, which users have to buy or borrow. These systems often go along with complex technical installations and require a great degree of user training for device handling. Furthermore, the activation of audio commentary related to the exhibition objects is typically based on additional components like infrared, radio frequency or GPS technology. Beside the necessity of installation of specific devices for user location, these approaches often only support automatic activation with no or limited user interaction. Therefore, elaboration of alternative concepts appears worthwhile. Motivated by these aspects, we introduce a new concept based on usage of the visitor's own mobile smart phone. The advantages in our approach are twofold: firstly the Audio Guide can be used in various places without any purchase and extensive installation of additional components in or around the exhibition object. Secondly, the visitors can experience the exhibition on individual tours only by uploading the Audio Guide at a single point of entry, the Audio Guide Service Counter, and keeping it on her or his personal device. Furthermore, since the user usually is quite familiar with the interface of her or his phone and can thus interact with the application device easily. Our technical concept makes use of two general ideas for location detection and activation. Firstly, we suggest an enhanced interactive number based activation by exploiting the visual capabilities of modern smart phones and secondly we outline an active digital audio watermarking approach, where information about objects are transmitted via an analog audio channel.

  7. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit entrance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    StenniSphere at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., invites visitors to discover why America comes to Stennis Space Center before going into space. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center.

  8. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  9. The E = mc{sup 2} exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, D.; Peshkin, M.

    1995-08-01

    The goal of this DOE-supported exhibition is to demystify Einstein`s formula E = mc{sup 2} by illustrating the interchangeability of matter (m) and energy (E), c{sup 2} being the exchange rate. The exhibition has two major parts, {open_quotes}matter into energy{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}energy into matter{close_quotes}, plus a video to connect them. {open_quotes}Matter into energy{close_quotes} has now been completed and has been placed on the museum floor. Positrons from a {sup 22}Na source are annihilated to produce gamma rays that are caught in NaI detectors. The viewer can alter the alignment of the detectors and observe the consequences for the rates of single and coincident counts. The viewer can also observe the effects of placing absorbers in front of the counters. Prototype explanatory graphics were placed around the exhibit and those will probably be changed after we have some experience with their effectiveness. The connecting video is in the process of being produced in collaboration with Fermilab. A cloud chamber for {open_quotes}energy into matter{close_quotes}, where gamma rays from a small Th source will produce observable pairs, was purchased and work to make the pairs visible has commenced.

  10. Art exhibit focuses on African astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-07-01

    Connections between Africans and astronomy are the focus of a new exhibition in the National Museum of African Art in Washington, D. C. "African Cosmos: Stellar Arts," which includes artwork, cultural items, and scientific displays from ancient to contemporary times, is the first major exhibit "that brings together arts and science focused on Africa's contribution to keen observations of the heavens over time," curator Christine Mullen Kreamer said at a 20 June news briefing. Among the exhibit's nearly 100 objects are an ancient Egyptian mummy board that includes a representation of the sky goddess Nut, sculptures by the Dogon people of Mali depicting figures in relation to the cosmos, a video that uses data from two square degrees of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Evolution Survey, and a nearly floor-to-ceiling "Rainbow Serpent" constructed of plastic containers by Benin artist Hazoume. An untitled acrylic painting (Figure 1) by South African Gavin Jantjes evokes a myth of the Khoi San people of southern Africa, as it portrays a girl throwing evening fire embers into the night sky, where they remained as the Milky Way.

  11. Bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Nicholas R. T.; Song, Jeremy; Nieh, James C.

    2009-10-01

    Associative learning is key to how bees recognize and return to rewarding floral resources. It thus plays a major role in pollinator floral constancy and plant gene flow. Honeybees are the primary model for pollinator associative learning, but bumblebees play an important ecological role in a wider range of habitats, and their associative learning abilities are less well understood. We assayed learning with the proboscis extension reflex (PER), using a novel method for restraining bees (capsules) designed to improve bumblebee learning. We present the first results demonstrating that bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect. They improve their associative learning of odor and nectar reward by exhibiting increased memory acquisition, a component of long-term memory formation, when the time interval between rewarding trials is increased. Bombus impatiens forager memory acquisition (average discrimination index values) improved by 129% and 65% at inter-trial intervals (ITI) of 5 and 3 min, respectively, as compared to an ITI of 1 min. Memory acquisition rate also increased with increasing ITI. Encapsulation significantly increases olfactory memory acquisition. Ten times more foragers exhibited at least one PER response during training in capsules as compared to traditional PER harnesses. Thus, a novel conditioning assay, encapsulation, enabled us to improve bumblebee-learning acquisition and demonstrate that spaced learning results in better memory consolidation. Such spaced learning likely plays a role in forming long-term memories of rewarding floral resources.

  12. ALTERED METHIONINE METABOLISM IN LONG LIVING AMES DWARF MICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ames dwarf mice (df/df) are deficient in growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their normal siblings. In the current study, we found that the hormone deficiencies affect methionine metabolism. We previously reported that the dwarf mice exhibit ...

  13. Health for Adolescents and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschamps, Jean-Pierre; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses the health of adolescents and youth in the tropics. The report is divided into five sections. The first section defines adolescence, youth, the duration of adolescence, the age group and its problems, and societies in adolescence. The second section discusses adolescence in relation to society and culture and focuses on the…

  14. Age associations with neural processing of reward anticipation in adolescents with bipolar disorders

    PubMed Central

    Urošević, Snežana; Luciana, Monica; Jensen, Jonathan B.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Thomas, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Reward/behavioral approach system hypersensitivity is implicated in bipolar disorders (BD) and in normative development during adolescence. Pediatric onset of BD is associated with a more severe illness course. However, little is known about neural processing of rewards in adolescents with BD or developmental (i.e., age) associations with activation of these neural systems. The present study aims to address this knowledge gap. The present sample included 21 adolescents with BD and 26 healthy adolescents, ages 13 to 19. Participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol using the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID) task. Behavioral performance was similar between groups. Group differences in BOLD activation during target anticipation and feedback anticipation periods of the task were examined using whole-brain analyses, as were group differences in age effects. During both target anticipation and feedback anticipation, adolescents with BD, compared to adolescents without psychopathology, exhibited decreased engagement of frontal regions involved in cognitive control (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). Healthy adolescents exhibited age-related decreases, while adolescents with BD exhibited age-related increases, in activity of other cognitive control frontal areas (i.e., right inferior frontal gyrus), suggesting altered development in the BD group. Longitudinal research is needed to examine potentially abnormal development of cognitive control during reward pursuit in adolescent BD and whether early therapeutic interventions can prevent these potential deviations from normative development. PMID:27114896

  15. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ott, Mary A; Sucato, Gina S

    2014-10-01

    A working knowledge of contraception will assist the pediatrician in both sexual health promotion as well as treatment of common adolescent gynecologic problems. Best practices in adolescent anticipatory guidance and screening include a sexual health history, screening for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, counseling, and if indicated, providing access to contraceptives. Pediatricians' long-term relationships with adolescents and families allow them to help promote healthy sexual decision-making, including abstinence and contraceptive use. Additionally, medical indications for contraception, such as acne, dysmenorrhea, and heavy menstrual bleeding, are frequently uncovered during adolescent visits. This technical report provides an evidence base for the accompanying policy statement and addresses key aspects of adolescent contraceptive use, including the following: (1) sexual history taking, confidentiality, and counseling; (2) adolescent data on the use and side effects of newer contraceptive methods; (3) new data on older contraceptive methods; and (4) evidence supporting the use of contraceptives in adolescent patients with complex medical conditions. PMID:25266435

  16. Ethnic identity and gender as moderators of the association between discrimination and academic adjustment among Mexican-origin adolescents.

    PubMed

    Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Wong, Jessie J; Gonzales, Nancy A; Dumka, Larry E

    2012-08-01

    Existing work has identified perceived discrimination as a risk factor that may contribute to the relatively poorer academic outcomes exhibited by Mexican-origin adolescents in the U.S. The current study examined the longitudinal associations among perceived discrimination and three indices of adolescent adjustment in the school setting (i.e., grade point average, teacher reports of externalizing, adolescents' deviant peer associations) among 178 Mexican-origin adolescents (53% female). Ethnic identity affirmation was examined as a protective factor expected to reduce the negative effects of discrimination on adolescents' adjustment, and gender was examined as a potential moderator of the associations of interest. Findings indicated that the deleterious effects of discrimination on adolescents' adjustment in school were particularly salient for Mexican-origin male adolescents. Importantly, ethnic identity affirmation emerged as a protective factor for Mexican-origin male adolescents by buffering the negative effects of discrimination on their externalizing behaviors in school. PMID:22152761

  17. Measuring Anhedonia in Adolescents: A Psychometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Unger, Jennifer B; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Sussman, Steve; Volk, Heather E; Strong, David R

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia-the reduced capacity to experience pleasure-is a trait implicated in mental and physical health. Yet, psychometric data on anhedonia measures in adolescents are absent. We conducted an in-depth psychometric analysis of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS; Snaith et al., 1995 )-a self-report measure of anticipated pleasure response to 14 pleasant experiences-in adolescents. Adolescents (N = 585, M age = 14.5) completed the SHAPS and other paper-and-pencil surveys. Item response theory models were used to evaluate the psychometric performance of each SHAPS item. Correlations of the SHAPS with other personality and psychopathology measures were calculated to evaluate construct validity. Results showed that (a) certain items (e.g., reported pleasure from basic experiences like "seeing smiling faces" or "smelling flowers") provided more information about latent anhedonia than others; and (b) SHAPS scales exhibited construct-consistent convergent and discriminant validity (i.e., stronger correlations with low positive affect constructs, weaker correlations with negative affect). Reporting diminished pleasure from basic pleasant experiences accurately indicates adolescent anhedonia, which is important for future scale development and understanding the phenomenology of anhedonia in teens. These data support using the SHAPS for assessing anhedonia in epidemiological research and school-based universal prevention programming in general adolescent populations. PMID:25893676

  18. Measuring Anhedonia in Adolescents: A Psychometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Sussman, Steve; Volk, Healther E.; Strong, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia—the reduced capacity to experience pleasure—is a trait implicated in mental and physical health. Yet, psychometric data on anhedonia measures in adolescents are absent. We conducted an in-depth psychometric analysis of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS; Snaith et al., 1995)—a self-report measure of anticipated pleasure response to 14 pleasant experiences—in adolescents. Adolescents (N=585; M age=14.5) completed the SHAPS and other paper-and-pencil surveys. Item response theory models were used to evaluate the psychometric performance of each SHAPS item. Correlations of the SHAPS with other personality and psychopathology measures were calculated to evaluate construct validity. Results showed that: (1) certain items (e.g., reported pleasure from basic experiences like “seeing smiling faces” or “smelling flowers”) provided more information about latent anhedonia than others; and (2) SHAPS scales exhibited construct-consistent convergent and discriminant validity (i.e., stronger correlations with low positive affect constructs; weaker correlations with negative affect). Reporting diminished pleasure from basic pleasant experiences accurately indicates adolescent anhedonia, which is important for future scale development and understanding the phenomenology of anhedonia in teens. These data support using the SHAPS for assessing anhedonia in epidemiological research and school-based universal prevention programming in general adolescent populations. PMID:25893676

  19. Self-Concept and Coping Skills of Female Early Adolescents in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Kyung Mi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the coping strategies and self-concept of Korean female early adolescents. These adolescents (n = 351) were enrolled in a middle school in Seoul. The subjects completed the Multidimensional Self-Concept Scale and Coping Responses Inventory questionnaires. The subjects exhibited the greatest…

  20. Adaptive Skills and Maladaptive Behavior of Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders Attending Special Schools in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Kenneth K.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the profile of and relationships between adaptive skills and the maladaptive behaviors exhibited by adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) attending special schools in Singapore. Parents of 20 adolescents with ASD attending special schools completed the Development Behavior Checklist (DBC; Einfeld & Tonge, 1995;…

  1. Styles of Parent-Child Interaction and Moral Reasoning in Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyes, Michael C.; Allen, Sandra G.

    1993-01-01

    Examined whether adolescents of authoritative parents exhibit a greater preference for postconventional moral reasoning than do adolescents of permissive or authoritarian parents. Subjects (75 high school and 67 undergraduate students) completed Rest's Defining Issues Test and Schaefer's Child Report of Parental Behavior Inventory. Results…

  2. Parental Emotion Socialization in Adolescence: Differences in Sex, Age and Problem Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Brand, Ann E.; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn; Usher, Barbara; Hastings, Paul D.; Kendziora, Kimberly; Garside, Rula B.

    2007-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on how mothers and fathers socialize emotion in their adolescent sons and daughters. This study was based on 220 adolescents (range 11- to 16-years-old) who exhibit a range of emotional and behavioral problems and their parents. Parental responses to their children's displays of sadness, anger and fear were assessed.…

  3. Memory Retrieval before or after Extinction Reduces Recovery of Fear in Adolescent Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Kathryn D.; McNally, Gavan P.; Richardson, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent rats exhibit impaired extinction retention compared to pre-adolescent and adult rats. A single nonreinforced exposure to the conditioned stimulus (CS; a retrieval trial) given shortly before extinction has been shown in some circumstances to reduce the recovery of fear after extinction in adult animals. This study investigated whether a…

  4. Progression of Amygdala Volumetric Abnormalities in Adolescents after Their First Manic Episode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Samantha M.; Mills, Neil P.; Adler, Caleb M.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Although previous neuroimaging studies suggest that adolescents with bipolar disorder exhibit smaller amygdala volumes compared with healthy adolescents, whether these abnormalities are present at illness onset or instead develop over time remains unclear. The aim of this study was to conduct a prospective longitudinal investigation…

  5. School Transitions among Military Adolescents: A Qualitative Study of Stress and Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Sudhinaraset, May; Mmari, Kristin; Blum, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    The research on highly mobile military adolescents has produced mixed findings. Whereas early descriptive studies reported that adolescents experiencing multiple residential moves exhibited symptoms of what was termed "military family syndrome", more recent quantitative studies have found few negative effects after controlling for prior status.…

  6. Representations of Attachment to Parents in Adolescent Sibling Pairs: Concordant or Discordant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiang, Lisa; Furman, Wyndol

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of adolescents have at least one sibling, and most are raised by the same parent or parents. What then might researchers expect two adolescent siblings' representations of attachment to parents to be like? Are both siblings likely to exhibit similarly secure or insecure representations, or is it just as likely that one sibling…

  7. Adolescent Egocentrism, Risk Perceptions, and Sensation Seeking among Smoking and Nonsmoking Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenberger, Kristina D.

    2004-01-01

    A survey compared adolescents (ages 14 to 18) who have never tried smoking, smoke infrequently, or smoke regularly on three characteristics: adolescent egocentrism, risk perceptions, and sensation seeking. Sensation seeking exhibited the expected result by increasing with smoking experience. Contrary to past research findings, perceptions of…

  8. Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome Can Use a Mindfulness-Based Strategy to Control Their Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Angela D. A.; Winton, Alan S. W.; Singh, Ashvind N. A.; Singh, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome occasionally exhibit aggressive behavior against peers and parents. In a multiple baseline design across subjects, three adolescents with Asperger syndrome were taught to use a mindfulness-based procedure called "Meditation on the Soles of the Feet" to control their physical aggression in the family…

  9. Subregion-Specific p300 Conditional Knock-Out Mice Exhibit Long-Term Memory Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Estevez, Marcel A.; Hawk, Joshua D.; Grimes, Shannon; Brindle, Paul K.; Abel, Ted

    2011-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays a critical role during long-term memory formation. Several studies have demonstrated that the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) CBP is required during long-term memory formation, but the involvement of other HAT proteins has not been extensively investigated. The HATs CBP and p300 have at least 400 described interacting…

  10. "Gadd45b" Knockout Mice Exhibit Selective Deficits in Hippocampus-Dependent Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, Prescott T.; Poplawski, Shane G.; Kenney, Justin W.; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A.; Abel, Ted; Gould, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible [beta] ("Gadd45b") has been shown to be involved in DNA demethylation and may be important for cognitive processes. "Gadd45b" is abnormally expressed in subjects with autism and psychosis, two disorders associated with cognitive deficits. Furthermore, several high-throughput screens have identified "Gadd45b"…

  11. Transgenic Mice Expressing an Inhibitory Truncated Form of p300 Exhibit Long-Term Memory Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Wood, Marcelo A.; McDonough, Conor B.; Abel, Ted

    2007-01-01

    The formation of many forms of long-term memory requires several molecular mechanisms including regulation of gene expression. The mechanisms directing transcription require not only activation of individual transcription factors but also recruitment of transcriptional coactivators. CBP and p300 are transcriptional coactivators that interact with…

  12. Mammalian meiotic silencing exhibits sexually dimorphic features.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, J M; Mahadevaiah, S K; ElInati, E; Tóth, A; Turner, James

    2016-06-01

    During mammalian meiotic prophase I, surveillance mechanisms exist to ensure that germ cells with defective synapsis or recombination are eliminated, thereby preventing the generation of aneuploid gametes and embryos. Meiosis in females is more error-prone than in males, and this is in part because the prophase I surveillance mechanisms are less efficient in females. A mechanistic understanding of this sexual dimorphism is currently lacking. In both sexes, asynapsed chromosomes are transcriptionally inactivated by ATR-dependent phosphorylation of histone H2AFX. This process, termed meiotic silencing, has been proposed to perform an important prophase I surveillance role. While the transcriptional effects of meiotic silencing at individual genes are well described in the male germ line, analogous studies in the female germ line have not been performed. Here we apply single- and multigene RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (RNA FISH) to oocytes from chromosomally abnormal mouse models to uncover potential sex differences in the silencing response. Notably, we find that meiotic silencing in females is less efficient than in males. Within individual oocytes, genes located on the same asynapsed chromosome are silenced to differing extents, thereby generating mosaicism in gene expression profiles across oocyte populations. Analysis of sex-reversed XY female mice reveals that the sexual dimorphism in silencing is determined by gonadal sex rather than sex chromosome constitution. We propose that sex differences in meiotic silencing impact on the sexually dimorphic prophase I response to asynapsis. PMID:26712235

  13. A metafluid exhibiting strong optical magnetism.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Sassan N; Alaeian, Hadiseh; Koh, Ai Leen; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2013-09-11

    Advances in the field of metamaterials have enabled unprecedented control of light-matter interactions. Metamaterial constituents support high-frequency electric and magnetic dipoles, which can be used as building blocks for new materials capable of negative refraction, electromagnetic cloaking, strong visible-frequency circular dichroism, and enhancing magnetic or chiral transitions in ions and molecules. While all metamaterials to date have existed in the solid-state, considerable interest has emerged in designing a colloidal metamaterial or "metafluid". Such metafluids would combine the advantages of solution-based processing with facile integration into conventional optical components. Here we demonstrate the colloidal synthesis of an isotropic metafluid that exhibits a strong magnetic response at visible frequencies. Protein-antibody interactions are used to direct the solution-phase self-assembly of discrete metamolecules comprised of silver nanoparticles tightly packed around a single dielectric core. The electric and magnetic response of individual metamolecules and the bulk metamaterial solution are directly probed with optical scattering and spectroscopy. Effective medium calculations indicate that the bulk metamaterial exhibits a negative effective permeability and a negative refractive index at modest fill factors. This metafluid can be synthesized in large-quantity and high-quality and may accelerate development of advanced nanophotonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:23919764

  14. Nematic liquid crystals exhibiting high birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingujam, Kiranmala; Bhattacharjee, Ayon; Choudhury, Basana; Dabrowski, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Two fluorinated isothiocyanato nematic liquid crystalline compounds, 4'-butylcyclohexyl-3, 5-difluoro-4-isothiocyanatobiphenyl and 4'-pentylcyclohexyl-3, 5-difluoro-4-isothiocynatobiphenyl are studied in detail to obtain their different physical parameters. Optical polarizing microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, density and dielectric studies have been carried out for the two samples. Both the samples were found to have high clearing temperature (>100 °C) and exhibit small enthalpy of transition. The two samples exhibit high optical birefringence (Δ n > 0.2). The values of order parameters for the two samples were obtained using different approaches, namely, Vuks', Neugebauer's, modified Vuks' and direct extrapolation method from birefringence data. Experimentally obtained values of order parameters have also been compared with theoretical Maier-Saupe values. The parallel and perpendicular components of dielectric permittivity values of the two compounds were also calculated and their anisotropy values were found to be small. The effect of temperature on the molecular dipole moment μ and the angle of inclination β of the dipole axis with the director have also been investigated in this work.

  15. Dysfunctional dopaminergic neurotransmission in asocial BTBR mice

    PubMed Central

    Squillace, M; Dodero, L; Federici, M; Migliarini, S; Errico, F; Napolitano, F; Krashia, P; Di Maio, A; Galbusera, A; Bifone, A; Scattoni, M L; Pasqualetti, M; Mercuri, N B; Usiello, A; Gozzi, A

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by pronounced social and communication deficits and stereotyped behaviours. Recent psychosocial and neuroimaging studies have highlighted reward-processing deficits and reduced dopamine (DA) mesolimbic circuit reactivity in ASD patients. However, the neurobiological and molecular determinants of these deficits remain undetermined. Mouse models recapitulating ASD-like phenotypes could help generate hypotheses about the origin and neurophysiological underpinnings of clinically relevant traits. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), behavioural and molecular readouts to probe dopamine neurotransmission responsivity in BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J mice (BTBR), an inbred mouse line widely used to model ASD-like symptoms owing to its robust social and communication deficits, and high level of repetitive stereotyped behaviours. C57BL/6J (B6) mice were used as normosocial reference comparators. DA reuptake inhibition with GBR 12909 produced significant striatal DA release in both strains, but failed to elicit fMRI activation in widespread forebrain areas of BTBR mice, including mesolimbic reward and striatal terminals. In addition, BTBR mice exhibited no appreciable motor responses to GBR 12909. DA D1 receptor-dependent behavioural and signalling responses were found to be unaltered in BTBR mice, whereas dramatic reductions in pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 and adenosine A2A receptor function was observed in these animals. Overall these results document profoundly compromised DA D2-mediated neurotransmission in BTBR mice, a finding that is likely to have a role in the distinctive social and behavioural deficits exhibited by these mice. Our results call for a deeper investigation of the role of dopaminergic dysfunction in mouse lines exhibiting ASD-like phenotypes, and possibly in ASD patient populations. PMID:25136890

  16. Enhanced brain susceptibility to negative stimuli in adolescents: ERP evidences

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jiajin; Ju, Enxia; Meng, Xianxin; Chen, Xuhai; Zhu, Siyu; Yang, Jiemin; Li, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies investigated neural substrates of emotional face processing in adolescents and its comparison with adults. As emotional faces elicit more of emotional expression recognition rather than direct emotional responding, it remains undetermined how adolescents are different from adults in brain susceptibility to emotionally stressful stimuli. Methods: Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded for highly negative (HN), moderately negative (MN), and neutral pictures in 20 adolescents and 20 adults while subjects performed a standard/deviant distinction task by pressing different keys, irrespective of the emotionality of deviant stimuli. Results: Adolescents exhibited more negative amplitudes for HN vs. neutral pictures in N1 (100–150 ms), P2 (130–190 ms), N2 (210–290 ms), and P3 (360–440 ms) components. In addition, adolescents showed more negative amplitudes for MN compared to neutral pictures in N1, P2, and N2 components. By contrast, adults exhibited significant emotion effects for HN stimuli in N2 and P3 amplitudes but not in N1 and P2 amplitudes, and they did not exhibit a significant emotion effect for MN stimuli at all these components. In the 210–290 ms time interval, the emotion effect for HN stimuli was significant across frontal and central regions in adolescents, while this emotion effect was noticeable only in the central region for adults. Conclusions: Adolescents are more emotionally sensitive to negative stimuli compared to adults, regardless of the emotional intensity of the stimuli, possibly due to the immature prefrontal control system over the limbic emotional inputs during adolescence. PMID:25972790

  17. Dexrazoxane Diminishes Doxorubicin-Induced Acute Ovarian Damage and Preserves Ovarian Function and Fecundity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ringelstetter, Ashley; Khatib, Hasan; Abbott, David H.; Salih, Sana M.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in cancer treatment utilizing multiple chemotherapies have dramatically increased cancer survivorship. Female cancer survivors treated with doxorubicin (DXR) chemotherapy often suffer from an acute impairment of ovarian function, which can persist as long-term, permanent ovarian insufficiency. Dexrazoxane (Dexra) pretreatment reduces DXR-induced insult in the heart, and protects in vitro cultured murine and non-human primate ovaries, demonstrating a drug-based shield to prevent DXR insult. The present study tested the ability of Dexra pretreatment to mitigate acute DXR chemotherapy ovarian toxicity in mice through the first 24 hours post-treatment, and improve subsequent long-term fertility throughout the reproductive lifespan. Adolescent CD-1 mice were treated with Dexra 1 hour prior to DXR treatment in a 1:1 mg or 10:1 mg Dexra:DXR ratio. During the acute injury period (2–24 hours post-injection), Dexra pretreatment at a 1:1 mg ratio decreased the extent of double strand DNA breaks, diminished γH2FAX activation, and reduced subsequent follicular cellular demise caused by DXR. In fertility and fecundity studies, dams pretreated with either Dexra:DXR dose ratio exhibited litter sizes larger than DXR-treated dams, and mice treated with a 1:1 mg Dexra:DXR ratio delivered pups with birth weights greater than DXR-treated females. While DXR significantly increased the “infertility index” (quantifying the percentage of dams failing to achieve pregnancy) through 6 gestations following treatment, Dexra pretreatment significantly reduced the infertility index following DXR treatment, improving fecundity. Low dose Dexra not only protected the ovaries, but also bestowed a considerable survival advantage following exposure to DXR chemotherapy. Mouse survivorship increased from 25% post-DXR treatment to over 80% with Dexra pretreatment. These data demonstrate that Dexra provides acute ovarian protection from DXR toxicity, improving reproductive health in a mouse

  18. Personality and Parenting Processes Associated with Problem Behaviors: A Study of Adolescents in Santiago, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Bares, Cristina B.; Andrade, Fernando; Delva, Jorge; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Considerable research in the U.S. has established that adolescent antisocial, aggressive, and attention problems have a negative influence on adolescents' ability to become productive members of society. However, although these behaviors appear in other cultures, little is known about the development of these problems among adolescents in countries other than the U.S.. This study contributes to our understanding of personality and parenting factors associated with adolescent problem behaviors using an international sample. Data are from a NIDA-funded study of 884 community-dwelling adolescents in Santiago, Chile (Mean age=14, SD=1.4, 48% females) of mid-to-low socioeconomic status. Results revealed that rule-breaking and aggressive behaviors were both associated with greater levels of adolescent drive but lower levels of parental monitoring and positive parenting by both parents. Adolescents who reported more attention problems were more likely to exhibit driven behavior, more behavioral inhibition, to report lower levels of parental monitoring, and positive parenting by mother and father. Results of interactions revealed that the influences of positive parenting and parental monitoring on adolescent aggressive behaviors varied as a function of the gender of the adolescent. Helping parents build on their parenting skills may result in important reductions in adolescent problem behaviors among U.S. and international adolescents. PMID:23100999

  19. Bone growth and turnover in progesterone receptor knockout mice.

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jaime C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-05-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and mCT analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 weeks of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain and tibia longitudinal bone growth was normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total and cortical bone mass were increased in long bones of post-pubertal (12 and 26-week-old) PRKO mice, whereas cancellous bone mass was normal in the tibia but increased in the humerus. The striking 57% decrease in cancellous bone from the proximal tibia metaphysis which occurred between 6 and 26 weeks in WT mice was abolished in PRKO mice. The improved bone balance in aging PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice attenuates the accumulation of cortical bone mass during adolescence and is required for early age-related loss of cancellous bone.

  20. Bone Growth and Turnover in Progesterone Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jamie C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O’Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-01-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and microcomputed tomography analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 wk of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain, and tibia longitudinal bone growth were normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total, cancellous, and cortical bone mass were increased in the humerus of 12-wk-old PRKO mice, whereas cortical and cancellous bone mass in the tibia was normal. At 26 wk of age, cancellous bone area in the proximal tibia metaphysis of PRKO mice was 153% greater than age matched wild-type mice. The improved cancellous bone balance in 6-month-old PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice is not essential for bone growth and turnover. However, at some skeletal sites, PR signaling attenuates the accumulation of cortical and cancellous bone mass during adolescence. PMID:18276762

  1. Assessment and treatment of multiple behavior problems exhibited by a profoundly retarded adolescent.

    PubMed

    Slifer, K J; Ivancic, M T; Parrish, J M; Page, T J; Burgio, L D

    1986-09-01

    The severe aggression and noncompliance of a profoundly retarded blind male were subjected to extensive behavioral assessment in order to identify controlling variables. The assessment, conducted across settings and therapists, suggested that these inappropriate behaviors functioned to avoid or terminate nonpreferred activities. Intervention consisted of manual guidance when there was noncompliance with instructions and edible reinforcement upon compliance; there were no direct contingencies for the inappropriate behaviors. Treatment procedures were implemented in a multiple baseline design across therapists and settings. Results show that the intervention consistently increased compliance, with concurrent decreases in inappropriate behaviors. Edible reinforcement and neuroleptic medication were withdrawn systematically with no loss of therapeutic gains. Family members and school personnel were trained to use the intervention procedures. Results are discussed in terms of functional assessment, response covariation, compliance training, parent and staff training, and behavioral assessment of the effects of neuroleptic medication. PMID:2876010

  2. Proteolytic regulation of synaptic plasticity in the mouse primary visual cortex: analysis of matrix metalloproteinase 9 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Emily A.; Russo, Amanda S.; Jackson, Cory D.; Lamantia, Cassandra E.; Majewska, Ania K.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to play important roles in regulating neuronal recovery from injury. The ECM can also impact physiological synaptic plasticity, although this process is less well understood. To understand the impact of the ECM on synaptic function and remodeling in vivo, we examined ECM composition and proteolysis in a well-established model of experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. We describe a rapid change in ECM protein composition during Ocular Dominance Plasticity (ODP) in adolescent mice, and a loss of ECM remodeling in mice that lack the extracellular protease, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9). Loss of MMP9 also attenuated functional ODP following monocular deprivation (MD) and reduced excitatory synapse density and spine density in sensory cortex. While we observed no change in the morphology of existing dendritic spines, spine dynamics were altered, and MMP9 knock-out (KO) mice showed increased turnover of dendritic spines over a period of 2 days. We also analyzed the effects of MMP9 loss on microglia, as these cells are involved in extracellular remodeling and have been recently shown to be important for synaptic plasticity. MMP9 KO mice exhibited very limited changes in microglial morphology. Ultrastructural analysis, however, showed that the extracellular space surrounding microglia was increased, with concomitant increases in microglial inclusions, suggesting possible changes in microglial function in the absence of MMP9. Taken together, our results show that MMP9 contributes to ECM degradation, synaptic dynamics and sensory-evoked plasticity in the mouse visual cortex. PMID:26441540

  3. Shape-Memory PVDF Exhibiting Switchable Piezoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Hoeher, Robin; Raidt, Thomas; Novak, Nikola; Katzenberg, Frank; Tiller, Joerg C

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a material is designed which combines the properties of shape-memory and electroactive polymers. This is achieved by covalent cross-linking of polyvinylidene fluoride. The resulting polymer network exhibits excellent shape-memory properties with a storable strain of 200%, and fixity as well as recovery values of 100%. Programming upon rolling induces the transformation from the nonelectroactive α-phase to the piezoelectric β-phase. The highest β-phase content is found to be 83% for a programming strain of 200% affording a d33 value of -30 pm V(-1). This is in good accordance with literature known values for piezoelectric properties. Thermal triggering this material does not only result in a shape change but also renders the material nonelectroactive. PMID:26332996

  4. Supercomputing meets seismology in earthquake exhibit

    ScienceCinema

    Blackwell, Matt; Rodger, Arthur; Kennedy, Tom

    2014-07-22

    When the California Academy of Sciences created the "Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet" exhibit, they called on Lawrence Livermore to help combine seismic research with the latest data-driven visualization techniques. The outcome is a series of striking visualizations of earthquakes, tsunamis and tectonic plate evolution. Seismic-wave research is a core competency at Livermore. While most often associated with earthquakes, the research has many other applications of national interest, such as nuclear explosion monitoring, explosion forensics, energy exploration, and seismic acoustics. For the Academy effort, Livermore researchers simulated the San Andreas and Hayward fault events at high resolutions. Such calculations require significant computational resources. To simulate the 1906 earthquake, for instance, visualizing 125 seconds of ground motion required over 1 billion grid points, 10,000 time steps, and 7.5 hours of processor time on 2,048 cores of Livermore's Sierra machine.

  5. Nanoporous frameworks exhibiting multiple stimuli responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Pintu K.; Olsen, Gregory L.; Kiss, Vladimir; Klajn, Rafal

    2014-04-01

    Nanoporous frameworks are polymeric materials built from rigid molecules, which give rise to their nanoporous structures with applications in gas sorption and storage, catalysis and others. Conceptually new applications could emerge, should these beneficial properties be manipulated by external stimuli in a reversible manner. One approach to render nanoporous frameworks responsive to external signals would be to immobilize molecular switches within their nanopores. Although the majority of molecular switches require conformational freedom to isomerize, and switching in the solid state is prohibited, the nanopores may provide enough room for the switches to efficiently isomerize. Here we describe two families of nanoporous materials incorporating the spiropyran molecular switch. These materials exhibit a variety of interesting properties, including reversible photochromism and acidochromism under solvent-free conditions, light-controlled capture and release of metal ions, as well reversible chromism induced by solvation/desolvation.

  6. New Monolayered Materials Exhibiting Unusual Electronic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Martin, Ivar; Littlewood, Peter B.

    Computationally based approaches are allowing to progress in the discovery and design of nano-scaled materials. Here we propose a series of new mono-layered compounds with exotic properties. By means of density functional theory calculations we demonstrate that the pentagonal arrangement of SiC2 yields an inverted distribution of the p-bands which leads to an unusual electronic behaviour of the material under strain [J. Phys. Chem. C, 2015, 119 (33), pp 19469]. A different pentagonal arrangement of C atoms enables the formation of Dirac cones which, unlike graphene, exhibit a strain-mediated tunable band gap. This work is supported by DOE-BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Supercomputing meets seismology in earthquake exhibit

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, Matt; Rodger, Arthur; Kennedy, Tom

    2013-10-03

    When the California Academy of Sciences created the "Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet" exhibit, they called on Lawrence Livermore to help combine seismic research with the latest data-driven visualization techniques. The outcome is a series of striking visualizations of earthquakes, tsunamis and tectonic plate evolution. Seismic-wave research is a core competency at Livermore. While most often associated with earthquakes, the research has many other applications of national interest, such as nuclear explosion monitoring, explosion forensics, energy exploration, and seismic acoustics. For the Academy effort, Livermore researchers simulated the San Andreas and Hayward fault events at high resolutions. Such calculations require significant computational resources. To simulate the 1906 earthquake, for instance, visualizing 125 seconds of ground motion required over 1 billion grid points, 10,000 time steps, and 7.5 hours of processor time on 2,048 cores of Livermore's Sierra machine.

  8. Application of an imaging system to a museum exhibition for developing interactive exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kimiyoshi; Inoue, Yuka; Takiguchi, Takahiro; Tsumura, Norimichi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Miyake, Yoichi

    2009-10-01

    In the National Museum of Japanese History, 215,759 artifacts are stored and used for research and exhibitions. In museums, due to the limitation of space in the galleries, a guidance system is required to satisfy visitors' needs and to enhance their understanding of the artifacts. We introduce one exhibition using imaging technology to improve visitors' understanding of a kimono (traditional Japanese clothing) exhibition. In the imaging technology introduced, one data projector, one display with touch panel interface, and magnifiers were used as exhibition tools together with a real kimono. The validity of this exhibition method was confirmed by results from a visitors' interview survey. Second, to further develop the interactive guidance system, an augmented reality system that consisted of cooperation between the projector and a digital video camera was also examined. A white paper board in the observer's hand was used as a projection screen and also as an interface to control the images projected on the board. The basic performance of the proposed system was confirmed; however continuous development was necessary for applying the system to actual exhibitions.

  9. A Traveling Exhibit of Cassini Image Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Hedman, M. M.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Ebel, D.; Mac Low, M.; Lovett, L. E.; Burns, J. K.; Schaff, N.; Bilson, E. M.

    2007-10-01

    An exhibit of Cassini's images will open at NYC's American Museum of Natural History in March 2008 and then visit the Johnson Art Museum (Cornell) throughout fall 2008, including during next year's DPS. It is under consideration by several other venues in the States and overseas. The exhibit will feature 40-50 images, ranging from letter size to large posters, taken by remote-sensing instruments aboard Cassini and Huygens. Photos will be organized into a half-dozen thematic clusters (e.g., organized by celestial target or by physical process); a panel will introduce each grouping with individual images identified briefly. The Saturn system is a perfect vehicle to educate citizens about planetary science and origins. The images’ beauty should capture the public's attention, allowing us to then engage their curiosity about the relevant science. Among the Saturn system's broad suite of objects are Enceladus and Titan, two satellites of astrobiological interest; moreover, the rings display many processes active in other astrophysical disks. Several auxiliary ideas will be implemented. In Ithaca, we will project images at night against the museum's sand-colored exterior walls. A 10-12 minute musical composition has been commissioned from Roberto Sierra to open the show. We will encourage school children to participate in a human orrery circling the museum and will seek volunteers to participate in several Saturnalia. At Cornell we will involve the university and local communities, by taping their reactions to the images’ exquisite beauty as well as to their scientific content. Cassini will be the E/PO focus of next year's DPS meeting; those materials will be employed throughout the fall at New York schools and be available to travel with the show. We intend to work with NYC partners to offer teacher credits for associated weekend courses. We will produce classroom materials, including a DVD, for teacher use.

  10. Extract from Ceratonia siliqua Exhibits Depigmentation Properties.

    PubMed

    Lall, Namrita; Kishore, Navneet; Momtaz, Saeideh; Hussein, Ahmed; Naidoo, Sanushka; Nqephe, Mabatho; Crampton, Bridget

    2015-11-01

    Skin hyper-pigmentation is a condition initiated by the overproduction of melanin existing in the melanocytes. Melanin pigment is responsible for the colour of skin in humans. It is formed through a series of oxidative reactions involving the amino acid tyrosine in the presence of the key enzyme tyrosinase. In continuation with our efforts to identify tyrosinase inhibitors from plants sources, the methanol extract from leaf, bark and fruit of Ceratonia siliqua were screened for tyrosinase inhibition and diphenolase activity. The bark extract exhibited significant inhibition on mushroom tyrosinase using L-tyrosine as a substrate and showed diphenolase activity. The extract further significantly lowered tyrosinase mRNA levels in B16-F10 mouse melanocytes. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of six compounds. Compounds (-)-epicatechin-3-O-gallate, 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-ß-D-glucose and gallocatechin-3-O-gallate showed tyrosinase inhibitions with the IC50 values of 27.52, 83.30 and 28.30 µg/mL, respectively. These compounds also exhibited L-DOPA activities with IC50 values of >200, 150 and 200 µg/mL, respectively. A clinical study was conducted using 20 volunteers in a patch testing trial for irritancy potential and skin depigmentation. The clinical results showed the sample to be non-irritant with irritancy potential of -34.21 and depigmentation trial showed an improvement in the even skin tone of UV induced pigmentation at 3% after 28 days of application. PMID:26201055

  11. Quiescent Fibroblasts Exhibit High Metabolic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemons, Johanna M. S.; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Bennett, Bryson D.; Legesse-Miller, Aster; Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Raitman, Irene; Pollina, Elizabeth A.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Coller, Hilary A.

    2010-01-01

    Many cells in mammals exist in the state of quiescence, which is characterized by reversible exit from the cell cycle. Quiescent cells are widely reported to exhibit reduced size, nucleotide synthesis, and metabolic activity. Much lower glycolytic rates have been reported in quiescent compared with proliferating lymphocytes. In contrast, we show here that primary human fibroblasts continue to exhibit high metabolic rates when induced into quiescence via contact inhibition. By monitoring isotope labeling through metabolic pathways and quantitatively identifying fluxes from the data, we show that contact-inhibited fibroblasts utilize glucose in all branches of central carbon metabolism at rates similar to those of proliferating cells, with greater overflow flux from the pentose phosphate pathway back to glycolysis. Inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway resulted in apoptosis preferentially in quiescent fibroblasts. By feeding the cells labeled glutamine, we also detected a “backwards” flux in the tricarboxylic acid cycle from α-ketoglutarate to citrate that was enhanced in contact-inhibited fibroblasts; this flux likely contributes to shuttling of NADPH from the mitochondrion to cytosol for redox defense or fatty acid synthesis. The high metabolic activity of the fibroblasts was directed in part toward breakdown and resynthesis of protein and lipid, and in part toward excretion of extracellular matrix proteins. Thus, reduced metabolic activity is not a hallmark of the quiescent state. Quiescent fibroblasts, relieved of the biosynthetic requirements associated with generating progeny, direct their metabolic activity to preservation of self integrity and alternative functions beneficial to the organism as a whole. PMID:21049082

  12. An examination of psychopathology and daily impairment in adolescents with social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Mesa, Franklin; Beidel, Deborah C; Bunnell, Brian E

    2014-01-01

    Although social anxiety disorder (SAD) is most often diagnosed during adolescence, few investigations have examined the clinical presentation and daily functional impairment of this disorder exclusively in adolescents. Prior studies have demonstrated that some clinical features of SAD in adolescents are unique relative to younger children with the condition. Furthermore, quality of sleep, a robust predictor of anxiety problems and daily stress, has not been examined in socially anxious adolescents. In this investigation, social behavior and sleep were closely examined in adolescents with SAD (n = 16) and normal control adolescents (NC; n = 14). Participants completed a self-report measure and an actigraphy assessment of sleep. Social functioning was assessed via a brief speech and a social interaction task, during which heart rate and skin conductance were measured. Additionally, participants completed a daily social activity journal for 1 week. No differences were observed in objective or subjective quality of sleep. Adolescents with SAD reported greater distress during the analogue social tasks relative to NC adolescents. During the speech task, adolescents with SAD exhibited a trend toward greater speech latency and spoke significantly less than NC adolescents. Additionally, SAD participants manifested greater skin conductance during the speech task. During the social interaction, adolescents with SAD required significantly more confederate prompts to stimulate interaction. Finally, adolescents with SAD reported more frequent anxiety-provoking situations in their daily lives, including answering questions in class, assertive communication, and interacting with a group. The findings suggest that, although adolescents with SAD may not exhibit daily impaired sleep, the group does experience specific behavioral and physiological difficulties in social contexts regularly. Social skills training may be a critical component in therapeutic approaches for this group

  13. Exposure of Neonatal Mice to Tobacco Smoke Disturbs Synaptic Proteins and Spatial Learning and Memory from Late Infancy to Early Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Torres, Larissa Helena; Garcia, Raphael C T; Blois, Anne M M; Dati, Lívia M M; Durão, Ana Carolina; Alves, Adilson Silva; Pacheco-Neto, Maurílio; Mauad, Thais; Britto, Luiz R G; Xavier, Gilberto Fernando; Camarini, Rosana; Marcourakis, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the early postnatal period has been associated with several diseases; however, little is known about the brain effects of ETS exposure during this critical developmental period or the long-term consequences of this exposure. This study investigated the effects of the early postnatal ETS exposure on both reference and working memory, synaptic proteins and BDNF from late infancy to early adulthood (P3-P73). BALB/c mice were exposed to ETS generated from 3R4F reference research cigarettes (0.73 mg of nicotine/cigarette) from P3 to P14. Spatial reference and working memory were evaluated in the Morris water maze during infancy (P20-P29), adolescence (P37-P42) and adulthood (P67-P72). Synapsin, synaptophysin, PSD95 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were assessed at P15, P35 and P65 by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Mice that were exposed to ETS during the early postnatal period showed poorer performance in the spatial reference memory task. Specifically, the ETS-exposed mice exhibited a significantly reduced time and distance traveled in the target quadrant and in the platform location area than the controls at all ages evaluated. In the spatial working memory task, ETS disrupted the maintenance but not the acquisition of the critical spatial information in both infancy and adolescence. ETS also induced changes in synaptic components, including decreases in synapsin, synaptophysin, PSD95 and BDNF levels in the hippocampus. Exposure to ETS in the early postnatal period disrupts both spatial reference and working memory; these results may be related to changes in synaptogenesis in the hippocampus. Importantly, most of these effects were not reversed even after a long exposure-free period. PMID:26305213

  14. Exposure of Neonatal Mice to Tobacco Smoke Disturbs Synaptic Proteins and Spatial Learning and Memory from Late Infancy to Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Larissa Helena; Garcia, Raphael C. T.; Blois, Anne M. M.; Dati, Lívia M. M.; Durão, Ana Carolina; Alves, Adilson Silva; Pacheco-Neto, Maurílio; Mauad, Thais; Britto, Luiz R. G.; Xavier, Gilberto Fernando; Camarini, Rosana; Marcourakis, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the early postnatal period has been associated with several diseases; however, little is known about the brain effects of ETS exposure during this critical developmental period or the long-term consequences of this exposure. This study investigated the effects of the early postnatal ETS exposure on both reference and working memory, synaptic proteins and BDNF from late infancy to early adulthood (P3-P73). BALB/c mice were exposed to ETS generated from 3R4F reference research cigarettes (0.73 mg of nicotine/cigarette) from P3 to P14. Spatial reference and working memory were evaluated in the Morris water maze during infancy (P20-P29), adolescence (P37-P42) and adulthood (P67-P72). Synapsin, synaptophysin, PSD95 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were assessed at P15, P35 and P65 by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Mice that were exposed to ETS during the early postnatal period showed poorer performance in the spatial reference memory task. Specifically, the ETS-exposed mice exhibited a significantly reduced time and distance traveled in the target quadrant and in the platform location area than the controls at all ages evaluated. In the spatial working memory task, ETS disrupted the maintenance but not the acquisition of the critical spatial information in both infancy and adolescence. ETS also induced changes in synaptic components, including decreases in synapsin, synaptophysin, PSD95 and BDNF levels in the hippocampus. Exposure to ETS in the early postnatal period disrupts both spatial reference and working memory; these results may be related to changes in synaptogenesis in the hippocampus. Importantly, most of these effects were not reversed even after a long exposure-free period. PMID:26305213

  15. Victimization of obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sabrina

    2006-08-01

    Peer victimization of obese adolescents has been associated with low self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, social isolation, marginalization, poor psychosocial adjustment, depression, eating disorders, and suicidal ideation and attempts, not to mention poor academic performance. Weight-based peer victimization is defined as unsolicited bullying and teasing as a result of being overweight or obese. The victimization may be overt or relational. Obese adolescents are at risk of victimization, because their peers view them as different and undesirable. Although peer victimization occurs commonly among adolescents, obese adolescents are more susceptible than their average-weight peers. Because school nurses are often the first line of defense for obese adolescents, they are in an excellent position to identify forms of peer victimization and be prepared to intervene with the victims. School nurses can potentially preserve the psychosocial integrity of obese adolescents by promoting healthy peer interactions and experiences. PMID:16856773

  16. Adolescents with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Joav; Kandel, Isack; Vardi, Gideon

    2004-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of transition that can create stress for both adolescents and parents. Adolescents with Down syndrome (DS) go through the same stages as other adolescents, but due to lack of cognitive and behavioral factors they and their parents may find this period particularly challenging. This paper reviews several studies, especially from the United Kingdom, of groups of adolescents with Down syndrome and their controls followed from childhood, through adolescence into adulthood. There are special medical problems for this population that require annual medical examinations and surveillance, but the focus has shifted from health problems to social maturation, developing independence, and transition from school to employment or work activity. Medical transition from a pediatric to family physician provider is mentioned with recommendations as to how that transition can be made as smooth as possible. PMID:15148854

  17. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Contraception is a pillar in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians develop a working knowledge of contraception to help adolescents reduce risks of and negative health consequences related to unintended pregnancy. Over the past 10 years, a number of new contraceptive methods have become available to adolescents, newer guidance has been issued on existing contraceptive methods, and the evidence base for contraception for special populations (adolescents who have disabilities, are obese, are recipients of solid organ transplants, or are HIV infected) has expanded. The Academy has addressed contraception since 1980, and this policy statement updates the 2007 statement on contraception and adolescents. It provides the pediatrician with a description and rationale for best practices in counseling and prescribing contraception for adolescents. It is supported by an accompanying technical report. PMID:25266430

  18. Adolescent childbearing.

    PubMed

    Vernon, M

    1991-05-01

    The concern for the consequences of adolescent pregnancy are discussed. Childbirth among unmarried teenagers results in a higher incidence of low birth weight babies, a higher infant mortality and morbidity rate, a higher percentage of childbirth complications, a decreased likelihood of completing school, a higher risk of unemployment and welfare dependency, limited vocational opportunities, larger families, and vulnerability to psychological problems and distress. In 1988, 66% of all births to teens occurred outside of marriage. Out of wedlock live births to teens 14 years rose from 80.8% in 1970 to 92.5% in 1986, and for teens 15-19 years, 29.5% to 60.8%. 70% have a repeat pregnancy within the 1st year following their 1st childbirth. 50% have a 2nd child within 3 years. Most 2nd pregnancies occur in teenagers who are not using effective contractive methods, and the pregnancy is frequently unplanned and unwanted. The factors affecting the rate of 2nd pregnancy are age, race, marital status, education, and economic status. Teenage mothers tend to come from disadvantaged backgrounds, and childbearing compounds the poverty. Aid to families with dependent children 50% of payments were to teen mothers for the birth of their 1st child. Teen fathers are usually low income providers. The public costs are high. Some teen fathers abandon their children after birth, but many are interested in supporting their child. Specific programs to help prepare fathers are needed. Teenage mothers are stressed by child care arrangements, living arrangements, employment, school, relationships with peers, relationships with parents, housework and errands, health, finances, job counseling, community services, and child care information. Parents play an important role in guiding sexual involvement and early childbearing, and need to understand why teens get pregnant and to keep channels of communication open. Teens are influenced by media, peer pressure, lack of self-esteem, unhappiness

  19. Cochlear function in mice following inhalation of brevetoxin-3

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Janet M.; Stagner, Barden B.; Martin, Glen K.; Friedman, Melissa; Durr, Sarah E.; Gomez, Andrea; McDonald, Jacob; Fleming, Lora E.; Backer, Lorraine C.; Baden, Daniel G.; Bourdelais, Andrea; Naar, Jerome; Lonsbury-Martin, Brenda L.

    2009-01-01

    Brevetoxin-3 was shown previously to adversely affect central auditory function in goldfish. The present study evaluated the effects of exposure to this agent on cochlear function in mice using the 2f1-f2 distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE). Towards this end, inbred CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to a relatively high concentration of brevetoxin-3 (∼400 μg/m3) by nose-only inhalation for a 2-h period. Further, a subset of these mice received a second exposure a day later that lasted for an additional 4 h. Mice exposed only once for 2 h did not exhibit any notable cochlear effects. Similarly, mice exposed two times, for a cumulative dose of 6 h, exhibited essentially no change in DPOAE levels. PMID:15902474

  20. Hepatic immunophenotyping for streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Jeong, Jong-Min; Seo, Wonhyo; Byun, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Won-Il; Yi, Hyon-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence revealed that diabetes induces abnormal immune responses that result in serious complications in organs. However, the effect of hyperglycemia on hepatic immunity remains obscure. We evaluated the population and function of hepatic immune cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemic mice. CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)-knockout mice and mice with a depletion of regulatory T cells (DEREG) were used to investigate the migration and role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in hyperglycemic mice. The inflammatory cytokines and hepatic transaminase levels were significantly increased in the hyperglycemic mice. The population and number of infiltrating monocytes, granulocytes, and Tregs were enhanced in the livers of the hyperglycemic mice. Hepatic monocytes other than macrophages showed the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the hyperglycemic mice. The CCR2 knockout and DEREG chimeric mice exhibited increased populations of activated T cells and neutrophils compared to the WT chimeric mice, which promoted hepatic inflammation in the hyperglycemic mice. The migration of CCR2 knockout Tregs into the liver was significantly reduced compared to the WT Tregs. We demonstrated that hyperglycemia contributes to increase in infiltrating monocytes and Tregs, which are associated with hepatic immune dysfunction in mice. CCR2-mediated migration of Tregs regulates hyperglycemia-induced hepatic inflammation. PMID:27464894

  1. Tempol intake improves inflammatory status in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamato, Mayumi; Ishimatsu, Ayumi; Yamanaka, Yuuki; Mine, Takara; Yamada, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with both healthy aging and age-related disease states. In connection with oxidative stress, immunity is also a major component as a result of the chronic, low-grade inflammation associated with the development of tissue aging. Here we show that long-term treatment with the antioxidant tempol extends life-span in mice. Tempol-treated mice exhibited a reduction in mortality at 20 months. Tempol drinking did not have any effect on body weight, amount of visceral adipose tissue, or plasma biochemical parameters in aged mice. Body temperature of aged control mice (which drank only water) was significantly lower than young mice, but this reduction of body temperature was partially restored in aged mice which drank tempol. Plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and C-reactive protein were significantly increased in the control aged mice compared with young mice, but levels of both were normalized by tempol drinking. One of the endogenous antioxidants, ascorbic acid, was significantly increased in the plasma of mice which consumed tempol. The proportion of CD4 lymphocytes in the blood of aged tempol-treated mice was partially increased in comparison to aged control mice. These results suggest that the reduction of mortality by tempol is due to amelioration of chronic inflammation and improved function of the immune system through antioxidant effects. PMID:25120275

  2. Hepatic immunophenotyping for streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sun; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Jeong, Jong-Min; Seo, Wonhyo; Byun, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Won-Il; Yi, Hyon-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence revealed that diabetes induces abnormal immune responses that result in serious complications in organs. However, the effect of hyperglycemia on hepatic immunity remains obscure. We evaluated the population and function of hepatic immune cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemic mice. CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)-knockout mice and mice with a depletion of regulatory T cells (DEREG) were used to investigate the migration and role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in hyperglycemic mice. The inflammatory cytokines and hepatic transaminase levels were significantly increased in the hyperglycemic mice. The population and number of infiltrating monocytes, granulocytes, and Tregs were enhanced in the livers of the hyperglycemic mice. Hepatic monocytes other than macrophages showed the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the hyperglycemic mice. The CCR2 knockout and DEREG chimeric mice exhibited increased populations of activated T cells and neutrophils compared to the WT chimeric mice, which promoted hepatic inflammation in the hyperglycemic mice. The migration of CCR2 knockout Tregs into the liver was significantly reduced compared to the WT Tregs. We demonstrated that hyperglycemia contributes to increase in infiltrating monocytes and Tregs, which are associated with hepatic immune dysfunction in mice. CCR2-mediated migration of Tregs regulates hyperglycemia-induced hepatic inflammation. PMID:27464894

  3. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  4. Adolescent pregnancy options.

    PubMed

    Resnick, M D

    1992-09-01

    The range of pregnancy options available to adolescents each have significant ramifications for future educational and economic achievement. The changing societal context of adolescent pregnancy decision-making are described, and the characteristics of adolescents who choose to terminate their pregnancy, parent their child, or place for adoption are examined. The role of significant others in decision-making and the implications of mandatory parental involvement in pregnancy decision-making is discussed, as well as the roles of schools in promoting the well-being and potential of adolescents considering pregnancy decisions. PMID:1434557

  5. Nutrition in the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R

    1999-02-01

    This article reviews the nutritional requirements of puberty and the clinical assessment of nutritional status, and discusses the nutritional risks imposed by vegetarian diets, pregnancy, and athletic involvement. Energy (calories) and protein are essential in pubertal development. Adolescent females require approximately 2200 calories/day, whereas male adolescents require 2500-3000 calories/day. Additional intake requirements include fat, calcium, iron, zinc, vitamins, and fiber. The clinical assessment of nutritional status begins with obtaining a good diet history of the patient and this could be offered by the body mass index. Nutritional deficiencies and poor eating habits established during adolescence can have long-term consequences, including delayed sexual maturation, loss of final adult height, osteoporosis, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. As for vegetarian adolescents, nutritional risks include lack of iodine, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and some essential fatty acids. In addition, substances in some grains reduce gut absorption, thus increasing mineral deficiencies. Pregnancy may also be a risk factor for poor nutrition during adolescence. A pregnant adolescent has different nutritional needs because she is still growing. Among adolescent athletes many are turning to nutritional supplements in an attempt to improve athletic performance. A balanced, varied diet provides adequate calories and nutrition to meet the needs of most adolescents. They also have greater water needs than do adult athletes. Details on adolescent health concerns are further discussed in this article. PMID:10036686

  6. [Childhood and adolescent depression].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Katsunaka; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2007-09-01

    Depression is a common, chronic and recurrent disorder in children and adolescents. This article reviewed the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, natural course and treatment (pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment) of major depressive disorder (MDD) in children and adolescents. Several randomized controlled trials have shown that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), in particular fluoxetine, and psychotherapeutic treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy are efficacious in children and adolescents with MDD. However, in Japan only three SSRIs (fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline) are currently available, and few clinicians are trained to deliver psychotherapeutic treatment. Further clinical researches on the treatment to children and adolescents with MDD are needed in Japan. PMID:17876994

  7. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand. PMID:26598305

  8. Representations of Self and Parents, and Relationship Themes, in Adolescents with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

    PubMed

    Shafran, Naama; Shahar, Golan; Berant, Ety; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Negative perceptions of self and others have lately become one of the criteria for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among adults and adolescents. Drawing from theories of mental representations in psychopathology, this study examined self-reported negative cognitions, self and parental representations, and relationship themes among adolescents with and without PTSD. Thirty one adolescents with PTSD (11 boys, mean age = 14.06, SD = 2.24) were matched with 29 adolescents who had no psychiatric diagnosis (11 boys, mean age = 14.96, SD = 1.78). Adolescents completed self-report measures, wrote a description of self, mother and father, and were interviewed about positive and negative relationship episodes with mother, father, and peers. Adolescents with PTSD reported more self-criticism and performance evaluation than did controls. Their self-representation exhibited a lower sense of agency, which was related to structural variables (i.e., less integrative description). Although parental representations of adolescents with PTSD were not generally less benevolent or more punitive than those of controls, their relationship themes revealed a higher proportion of the wish to be distant from others. Adolescents with PTSD exhibited more passive responses and perceived more dominant or controlling responses from their parents. Findings point out to a serious impairment in representations of self and relationship patterns in adolescent PTSD. PMID:26582181

  9. Virtual Exhibition and Fruition of Archaeological Finds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manferdini, A. M.; Garagnani, S.

    2011-09-01

    During the last two decades, since digital technologies have become more sophisticated in acquiring real data and building faithful copies of them, their improvements have suggested interesting applications in the field of valorisation of Historical, Cultural and Artistic Heritage, with significant consequences in the share and widespread of knowledge. But although several technologies and methodologies for 3d digitization have recently been developed and improved, the lack of a standard procedure and the costs connected to their use still doesn't encourage the systematic digital acquisition of wide collections and heritage. The aim of this paper is to show the state of the art of a project whose aim is to provide a methodology and a procedure to create digital reproductions of artefacts for Institutions called to preserve, manage and enhance the fruition of archaeological finds inside museums or through digital exhibitions. Our project's aim is to find the most suitable procedure to digitally acquire archaeo logical artefacts that usually have small dimensions and have very complex and detailed surfaces. Within our methodology, particular attention has been paid to the use of widely shared and open-source visualization systems that enhance the involvement of the user by emphasizing three-dimensional characteristics of artefacts through virtual reality.

  10. Osteonecrosis of the Jaw Developed in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sil; Kanayama, Keiichi; Kaur, Kawaljit; Tseng, Han-Ching Helen; Banankhah, Sina; Quje, Davood Talebi; Sayre, James W.; Jewett, Anahid; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), an uncommon co-morbidity in patients treated with bisphosphonates (BP), occurs in the segment of jawbone interfacing oral mucosa. This study aimed to investigate a role of oral mucosal barrier γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of ONJ. Female C57Bl/6J (B6) mice received a bolus zoledronate intravenous injection (ZOL, 540 μg/kg), and their maxillary left first molars were extracted 1 week later. ZOL-treated mice (WT ZOL) delayed oral wound healing with patent open wounds 4 weeks after tooth extraction with characteristic oral epithelial hyperplasia. γδ T cells appeared within the tooth extraction site and hyperplastic epithelium in WT ZOL mice. In ZOL-treated γδ T cell null (Tcrd−/− ZOL) mice, the tooth extraction open wound progressively closed; however, histological ONJ-like lesions were identified in 75 and 60% of WT ZOL and Tcrd−/− ZOL mice, respectively. Although the bone exposure phenotype of ONJ was predominantly observed in WT ZOL mice, Tcrd−/− ZOL mice developed the pustule/fistula disease phenotype. We further addressed the role of γδ T cells from human peripheral blood (h-γδ T cells). When co-cultured with ZOL-pretreated human osteoclasts in vitro, h-γδ T cells exhibited rapid expansion and robust IFN-γ secretion. When h-γδ T cells were injected into ZOL-treated immunodeficient (Rag2−/− ZOL) mice, the oral epithelial hyperplasia developed. However, Rag2−/− ZOL mice did not develop osteonecrosis. The results indicate that γδ T cells are unlikely to influence the core osteonecrosis mechanism; however, they may serve as a critical modifier contributing to the different oral mucosal disease variations of ONJ. PMID:26013832

  11. Sleep and risk-taking behavior in adolescents.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Erin M; Mindell, Jodi A

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between adolescents' sleep-wake patterns and risk-taking behavior. A second goal was to replicate the results obtained by Wolfson and Carskadon (1998) regarding adolescents' sleep habits. Three hundred eighty-eight adolescents (217 males, 171 females) completed the Sleep Habits Survey and the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. The results indicated that adolescents who reported longer weekend delay and higher levels of sleep problems also reported significantly higher levels of risk-taking behaviors, and students' weekend delay was also related to their academic performance in this sample. As in the sample studied by Wolfson and Carskadon (1998), the adolescents in this study exhibited changes in both weekday and weekend sleep habits across grade/age. However in the present study, only school-night total sleep time and weekend delay were related to adolescents' daytime functioning, with no significant relationships being found between weekend oversleep and daytime functioning. This provides partial support for the findings of Wolfson and Carskadon (1998). Overall, sleep-wake patterns were found to relate to risk-taking behavior during adolescence in this study. PMID:15984914

  12. 14 CFR Appendix to Subpart A of... - Listing of Exhibits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Exhibit A—Budget Summary Exhibit B—Standard Grant and Cooperative Agreement Cover Page Exhibit C... Cooperative Agreements between NASA and the Commercial Space Centers Exhibit F—NASA 1674 Letter of Delegation... Reports Note: Exhibits are available at NASA Headquarters, Code HC, Washington, D.C. 20546....

  13. 14 CFR Appendix to Subpart A of... - Listing of Exhibits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...—Budget Summary Exhibit B—Standard Grant and Cooperative Agreement Cover Page Exhibit C—Provisions Exhibit... Cooperative Agreements between NASA and the Commercial Space Centers Exhibit F—NASA 1674 Letter of Delegation... Reports Note: Exhibits are available at NASA Headquarters, Code HC, Washington, D.C. 20546....

  14. 14 CFR Appendix to Subpart A of... - Listing of Exhibits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Exhibit A—Budget Summary Exhibit B—Standard Grant and Cooperative Agreement Cover Page Exhibit C... Cooperative Agreements between NASA and the Commercial Space Centers Exhibit F—NASA 1674 Letter of Delegation... Reports Note: Exhibits are available at NASA Headquarters, Code HC, Washington, D.C. 20546....

  15. 14 CFR Appendix to Subpart A of... - Listing of Exhibits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Exhibit A—Budget Summary Exhibit B—Standard Grant and Cooperative Agreement Cover Page Exhibit C... Cooperative Agreements between NASA and the Commercial Space Centers Exhibit F—NASA 1674 Letter of Delegation... Reports Note: Exhibits are available at NASA Headquarters, Code HC, Washington, D.C. 20546....

  16. 14 CFR Appendix to Subpart A of... - Listing of Exhibits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Exhibit A—Budget Summary Exhibit B—Standard Grant and Cooperative Agreement Cover Page Exhibit C... Cooperative Agreements between NASA and the Commercial Space Centers Exhibit F—NASA 1674 Letter of Delegation... Reports Note: Exhibits are available at NASA Headquarters, Code HC, Washington, D.C. 20546....

  17. Postpartum estrogen withdrawal impairs hippocampal neurogenesis and causes depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuan; Hong, Juan; Zhang, Suyun; Zhang, Tingting; Sha, Sha; Yang, Rong; Qian, Yanning; Chen, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Postpartum estrogen withdrawal is known to be a particularly vulnerable time for depressive symptoms. Ovariectomized adult mice (OVX-mice) treated with hormone-simulated pregnancy (HSP mice) followed by a subsequent estradiol benzoate (EB) withdrawal (EW mice) exhibited depression- and anxiety-like behaviors, as assessed by forced swim, tail suspension and elevated plus-maze, while HSP mice, OVX mice or EB-treated OVX mice (OVX/EB mice) did not. The survival and neurite growth of newborn neurons in hippocampal dentate gyrus were examined on day 5 after EW. Compared with controls, the numbers of 28-day-old BrdU(+) and BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) cells were increased in HSP mice but significantly decreased in EW mice; the numbers of 10-day-old BrdU(+) cells were increased in HSP mice and OVX/EB mice; and the density of DCX(+) fibers was reduced in EW mice and OVX mice. The phosphorylation of hippocampal NMDA receptor (NMDAr) NR2B subunit or Src was increased in HSP mice but decreased in EW mice. NMDAr agonist NMDA prevented the loss of 28-day-old BrdU(+) cells and the depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in EW mice. NR2B inhibitor Ro25-6981 or Src inhibitor dasatinib caused depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in HSP mice with the reduction of 28-day-old BrdU(+) cells. The hippocampal BDNF levels were reduced in EW mice and OVX mice. TrkB receptor inhibitor K252a reduced the density of DCX(+) fibers in HSP mice without the reduction of 28-day-old BrdU(+) cells, or the production of affective disorder. Collectively, these results indicate that postpartum estrogen withdrawal impairs hippocampal neurogenesis in mice that show depression- and anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:26803529

  18. Conflict Resolution in Parent-Adolescent Relationships and Adolescent Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Doorn, Muriel D.; Branje, Susan J. T.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the relation between conflict resolution styles in parent-adolescent relationships and adolescent delinquency. Questionnaires about conflict resolution styles were completed by 284 early adolescents (mean age 13.3) and their parents. Adolescents also completed a questionnaire on delinquency. Hierarchical regression analyses…

  19. Understanding overweight adolescents' beliefs using the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Debra R; Kridli, Suha Al-Oballi; Penprase, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    This qualitative inquiry examined adolescents' experiences surrounding their beliefs towards being overweight. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand behavioural, normative and control beliefs of overweight adolescents regarding losing weight, exercising and eating healthy. Purposive sampling was used to obtain 10 overweight adolescents between the ages of 13 and 19. The theory of planned behaviour was used as a theoretical framework for this study. An interview guide based on the Theory of Planned was used to conduct individual semistructured interviews. Content analysis showed that overweight adolescents exhibited positive attitudes in dealing with their weight status and valued their family's support and guidance in helping control their weight. Although friends were important to facilitate regular exercise, families, particularly mothers, were crucial in addressing healthy eating habits. Understanding the subtleties and complexities of living with childhood overweight might assist health professionals in creating more effective and developmentally sensitive interventions. PMID:22103822

  20. [Contraception in adolescents].

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    The proportion of women aged 15-19 in Colombia who are mothers declined from 14% in 1985 to 10% in 1990, but the actual number of cases increased due to population growth. Some 1,780,000 adolescents who have had children or are pregnant require family planning services. An additional, unknown number of adolescent pregnancies are terminated by abortion. It is estimated that 95% of adolescent pregnancies diagnosed or followed by PROFAMILIA's center for young people were unwanted. Reasons for making family planning services available to adolescents include the ever young age at initiation of sexual activity, the very low rates of contraceptive usage among sexually active adolescents, the lack of information of adolescents concerning reproduction and contraception, and their fear and guilt surrounding their sexual activity and contraceptive usage. Obstetrical services appear reluctant to furnish adolescent mothers with information on contraception, and the pharmacists and their employees who provide such information may not be aware of contraindications for this age group or whether adolescents are adequately instructed in use of the method. The rising age at marriage increases the span of time that adolescents are at risk of unwanted pregnancy. Adolescents who are well informed about sexuality and contraception and trained in decision making, self-esteem, and responsible parenthood are likely to postpone sexual activity. Information on contraception and family planning services needs to be made available to adolescents in a way that will actually motivate use. Information on sex and contraception should be made available at puberty and should include the form of use, contraindications, and advantages and disadvantages of all methods appropriate to adolescents. Orientation and assistance in selecting the best method should be individually tailored and should be provided in schools or other places accessible to young people, in a language they can understand. Rhythm and

  1. Marine bacteria exhibit a bipolar distribution.

    PubMed

    Sul, Woo Jun; Oliver, Thomas A; Ducklow, Hugh W; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2013-02-01

    The microbial cosmopolitan dispersion hypothesis often invoked to explain distribution patterns driven by high connectivity of oceanographic water masses and widespread dispersal ability has never been rigorously tested. By using a global marine bacterial dataset and iterative matrix randomization simulation, we show that marine bacteria exhibit a significantly greater dispersal limitation than predicted by our null model using the "everything is everywhere" tenet with no dispersal limitation scenario. Specifically, marine bacteria displayed bipolar distributions (i.e., species occurring exclusively at both poles and nowhere else) significantly less often than in the null model. Furthermore, we observed fewer taxa present in both hemispheres but more taxa present only in a single hemisphere than expected under the null model. Each of these trends diverged further from the null expectation as the compared habitats became more geographically distant but more environmentally similar. Our meta-analysis supported a latitudinal gradient in bacterial diversity with higher richness at lower latitudes, but decreased richness toward the poles. Bacteria in the tropics also demonstrated narrower latitudinal ranges at lower latitudes and relatively larger ranges in higher latitudes, conforming to the controversial macroecological pattern of the "Rapoport rule." Collectively, our findings suggest that bacteria follow biogeographic patterns more typical of macroscopic organisms, and that dispersal limitation, not just environmental selection, likely plays an important role. Distributions of microbes that deliver critical ecosystem services, particularly those in polar regions, may be vulnerable to the same impacts that environmental stressors, climate warming, and degradation in habitat quality are having on biodiversity in animal and plant species. PMID:23324742

  2. Waves in geomaterials exhibiting negative stiffness behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, Maxim; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Negative stiffness denotes the type of material behaviour when the force applied to the body decreases the body's deformation increases. Some geomaterials, for instance, rocks, demonstrate behaviour of this type at certain loads: during the compression tests the loading curves exhibit descending branch (post-peak softening). One of the possible mechanisms of the negative stiffness appearance in geomaterials is rotation of non-spherical grains. It is important to emphasize that in this case the descending branch may be reversible given that the testing machine is stiff enough (in general case it means an importance of boundary conditions). Existence of geomaterials with a negative modulus associated with rotations may have significant importance. In particular, important is understanding of the wave propagation in such materials. We study the stability of geomaterials with negative stiffness inclusions and wave propagation in it using two approaches: Cosserat continuum and discrete mass-spring models. In both cases we consider the rotational degrees of freedom in addition to the conventional translational ones. We show that despite non positiveness of the energy the materials with negative stiffness elements can be stable if certain conditions are met. In the case of Cosserat continuum the Cosserat shear modulus (the modulus relating the non-symmetrical part of shear stress and internal rotations) is allowed to assume negative values as long as its value does not exceed the value of the standard (positive) shear modulus. In the case of discrete mass-spring systems (with translational and rotational springs) the concentration of negative stiffness springs and the absolute values of negative spring stiffness are limited. The critical concentration when the system loses stability and the amplitude of the oscillations tends to infinity is equal to 1/2 and 3/5 for two- and three-dimensional cases respectively.

  3. Rats exhibit reference-dependent choice behavior.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Mehwish; Jang, Hyeran; Kralik, Jerald D; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2014-07-01

    Human preferences depend on whether a chosen outcome appears to be a loss or a gain compared with what had been expected, i.e., in comparison to a reference point. Because reference dependence has such a strong influence on human decision-making, it is important to uncover its origins, which will in turn help delineate the underlying mechanisms. It remains unknown whether rats use reference points in decision-making, and yet, the study of rats could help address the question of whether reference dependence is evolutionarily conserved among mammals and could provide a nonhuman animal model to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying this important cognitive process. The aim of the current study was to determine whether rats show reference-dependent choice behavior. We developed a novel paradigm by modifying the "T" maze by installing "pockets" to the left and right of the "T" stem that held reward pellets so rats would potentially develop reference values for each option prior to choice. We found that the rats were indeed sensitive to the way alternatives were presented. That is, they exhibited reference-dependent choice behavior by avoiding the choice option framed as a loss (e.g., having four reward pellets in the pocket, but receiving only one), at least under conditions with certain outcomes and clear differences between the reference and outcome quantities. Despite the small number of rats in this study, this species-level capacity suggests that reference dependence in general and loss aversion in particular may be conserved traits that evolved at or before the emergence of mammals. PMID:24657593

  4. Knockout of Foxp2 disrupts vocal development in mice.

    PubMed

    Castellucci, Gregg A; McGinley, Matthew J; McCormick, David A

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP2 gene is important for the development of proper speech motor control in humans. However, the role of the gene in general vocal behavior in other mammals, including mice, is unclear. Here, we track the vocal development of Foxp2 heterozygous knockout (Foxp2+/-) mice and their wildtype (WT) littermates from juvenile to adult ages, and observe severe abnormalities in the courtship song of Foxp2+/- mice. In comparison to their WT littermates, Foxp2+/- mice vocalized less, produced shorter syllable sequences, and possessed an abnormal syllable inventory. In addition, Foxp2+/- song also exhibited irregular rhythmic structure, and its development did not follow the consistent trajectories observed in WT vocalizations. These results demonstrate that the Foxp2 gene is critical for normal vocal behavior in juvenile and adult mice, and that Foxp2 mutant mice may provide a tractable model system for the study of the gene's role in general vocal motor control. PMID:26980647

  5. Bex1 knock out mice show altered skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Jae Hyung Smiley, Mark A.; Lovering, Richard M.; Margolis, Frank L.

    2007-11-16

    Bex1 and Calmodulin (CaM) are upregulated during skeletal muscle regeneration. We confirm this finding and demonstrate the novel finding that they interact in a calcium-dependent manner. To study the role of Bex1 and its interaction with CaM in skeletal muscle regeneration, we generated Bex1 knock out (Bex1-KO) mice. These mice appeared to develop normally and are fertile, but displayed a functional deficit in exercise performance compared to wild type (WT) mice. After intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin, which causes extensive and reproducible myotrauma followed by recovery, regenerating muscles of Bex1-KO mice exhibited elevated and prolonged cell proliferation, as well as delayed cell differentiation, compared to WT mice. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that Bex1-KO mice show altered muscle regeneration, and allow us to propose that the interaction of Bex1 with Ca{sup 2+}/CaM may be involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  6. The Majority of Resorptions in Old Mice Are Euploid

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yong; Liu, X. Johné

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormality is a leading cause of aging-related infertility, spontaneous abortion and congenital birth defects in humans. Karyotype analyses of spontaneously aborted human fetuses reveal high proportions (~50%) being chromosomal abnormal with the majority being trisomies of various chromosomes. As a model organism, mice are widely used for studies of reproduction and reproductive aging. Like older women, older mice exhibit high incidences of early embryo death. However, it is not known if aneuploidy is prevalent amongst resorptions in older mice. We have karyotyped 65 retarded/resorbed fetuses in 10-month-old C57BL/6 mice, and found that 55 (84.6%±8.8%, with 95% confidence) were euploid. Similarly, of 40 such fetuses from 17 month-old C57BL/6 mice, we found 38 (95±7%, with 95% confidence 95%) being euploid. Therefore, aneuploidy is not a leading cause of embryo death in older mice. PMID:26636341

  7. Chronic Stress During Adolescence Impairs and Improves Learning and Memory in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Chaby, Lauren E.; Cavigelli, Sonia A.; Hirrlinger, Amy M.; Lim, James; Warg, Kendall M.; Braithwaite, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS This study tested the effects of adolescent-stress on adult learning and memory.Adolescent-stressed rats had enhanced reversal learning compared to unstressed rats.Adolescent-stress exposure made working memory more vulnerable to disturbance.Adolescent-stress did not affect adult associative learning or reference memory. Exposure to acute stress can cause a myriad of cognitive impairments, but whether negative experiences continue to hinder individual as they age is not as well understood. We determined how chronic unpredictable stress during adolescence affects multiple learning and memory processes in adulthood. Using male Sprague Dawley rats, we measured learning (both associative and reversal) and memory (both reference and working) starting 110 days after completion of an adolescent-stress treatment. We found that adolescent-stress affected adult cognitive abilities in a context-dependent way. Compared to rats reared without stress, adolescent-stressed rats exhibited enhanced reversal learning, an indicator of behavioral flexibility, but showed no change in associative learning and reference memory abilities. Working memory, which in humans is thought to underpin reasoning, mathematical skills, and reading comprehension, may be enhanced by exposure to adolescent-stress. However, when adolescent-stressed animals were tested after a novel disturbance, they exhibited a 5-fold decrease in working memory performance while unstressed rats continued to exhibit a linear learning curve. These results emphasize the capacity for stress during adolescence to transform the cognitive abilities of adult animals, even after stress exposure has ceased and animals have resided in safe environments for the majority of their lifespans. PMID:26696849

  8. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  9. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  10. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  11. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  12. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  13. Sexual Health for America's Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haffner, Debra W.

    1996-01-01

    The National Commission on Adolescent Sexual Health developed a professional consensus statement about adolescent sexual health. Its report for policymakers recommends that adults face the facts about adolescent sexuality and that public policies on adolescent sexual health be based on appropriate knowledge, accurate data, current theory, ongoing…

  14. Adolescent exposure to cocaine, amphetamine, and methylphenidate cross-sensitizes adults to methamphetamine with drug- and sex-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Ryan A; Ross, Jordan M; Doyle, Hillary H; Helton, Amanda K; Picou, Brittany N; Schulz, Jordyn; Tavares, Chris; Bryant, Sarah; Dawson, Bryan L; Lloyd, Steven A

    2015-03-15

    The increasing availability, over-prescription, and misuse and abuse of ADHD psychostimulant medications in adolescent populations necessitates studies investigating the long-term effects of these drugs persisting into adulthood. Male and female C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to amphetamine (AMPH) (1.0 and 10 mg/kg), methylphenidate (MPD) (1.0 and 10 mg/kg), or cocaine (COC) (5.0 mg/kg) from postnatal day 22 to 31, which represents an early adolescent period. After an extended period of drug abstinence, adult mice were challenged with a subacute methamphetamine (METH) dose (0.5 mg/kg), to test the long-term effects of adolescent drug exposures on behavioral cross-sensitization using an open field chamber. There were no sex- or dose-specific effects on motor activity in adolescent, saline-treated controls. However, AMPH, MPD, and COC adolescent exposures induced cross-sensitization to a subacute METH dose in adulthood, which is a hallmark of addiction and a marker of long-lasting plastic changes in the brain. Of additional clinical importance, AMPH-exposed male mice demonstrated increased cross-sensitization to METH in contrast to the female-specific response observed in MPD-treated animals. There were no sex-specific effects after adolescent COC exposures. This study demonstrates differential drug, dose, and sex-specific alterations induced by early adolescent psychostimulant exposure, which leads to behavioral alterations that persist into adulthood. PMID:25496784

  15. [Kinematics of Stair Ascent in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder].

    PubMed

    Malyar, N L; Maximova, E V; Talis, V L

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed kinematics of stair ascent and descent in autistic children and adolescents in comparison with age-matched healthy children and adolescents. Eight healthy adolescents, 6 autistic adolescents, 7 healthy children and 6 autistic children participated in the study. We found that autistic subjects of both groups showed significantly more fluctuations of hip joint angular velocity than age-matched control subjects while preparing for stair ascent. During preparation for stair descent these velocity fluctuations appeared mainly in autistic adolescents, moreover, autistic children exhibited less velocity fluctuations than children in control group while preparing for stair descent. The kinematics of the movement itself demonstrated significantly less hip abduction in both autistic children and adolescents than in age-matched controls during stair ascent, and less ankle joint plantar extension in autistic adolescents than in healthy adolescents during stair descent. We suppose that age-related changes in kinematics of leg motion during stair ascent and descent in autistic patients indicate aggravated motor coordination in autistic adolescents as compared with both healthy adolescents and autistic children. PMID:27263276

  16. Classifying Adolescent Perfectionists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Ashby, Jeffrey S.; Gilman, Rich

    2011-01-01

    A large school-based sample of 9th-grade adolescents (N = 875) completed the Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (APS-R; Slaney, Mobley, Trippi, Ashby, & Johnson, 1996). Decision rules and cut-scores were developed and replicated that classify adolescents as one of two kinds of perfectionists (adaptive or maladaptive) or as nonperfectionists. A…

  17. Adolescent Steroid Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    The study focused on non-medical steroid use by adolescents according to data obtained from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, professional literature, 30 key informants knowledgeable in steroid issues, and 72 current or former steroid users. The findings indicated: (1) over 250,000 adolescents, primarily males, used or have used steroids, and…

  18. Diagnosing ADHD in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Margaret H.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Garefino, Allison C.; Kuriyan, Aparajita B.; Babinski, Dara E.; Karch, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines adolescent-specific practical problems associated with current practice parameters for diagnosing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to inform recommendations for the diagnosis of ADHD in adolescents. Specifically, issues surrounding the use of self- versus informant ratings, diagnostic threshold, and…

  19. Gender and Adolescent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, David G.; Pauletti, Rachel E.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes and critiques recent trends in research and theory on the role of gender in adolescent development. First, gender differences in key areas of adolescent functioning are reviewed. Second, research on 3 constructs that are especially relevant to the investigation of within-gender individual differences in gender…

  20. Key Data on Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, John

    In order to counteract widespread stereotyping of adolescents and to provide a historical perspective on the lives of youth in Great Britain, this report compiles statistical data in six areas regarding adolescents and youth. Chapter 1, "Population, Families and Households," presents information on the population of the United Kingdom including…

  1. Cigars, Cigarettes, and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Ashley; Larkin, Elizabeth M. Gaier; Kishore, Sonal; Frank, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine public health implications of adolescent use of cigars only, cigarettes only, and both cigarettes and cigars. Methods: A cross-sectional health risk survey was administered to a random sample of 4486 high school students in a Midwestern county. Results: More adolescents reported using both cigarettes and cigars (10.6%) than…

  2. Preventing Adolescent Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capuzzi, Dave; Golden, Larry

    This book deals with the realities of adolescent suicide. It consists of 15 chapters organized under 5 major headings: The Problem of Adolescent Suicide (chapters 1 and 2); A Profile of the Attempter (chapters 3-6); Assessing Lethality (chapters 7 and 8); Prevention and Intervention (chapters 9-14); and Legal Issues (chapter 15). Individual…

  3. Motivating Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wormeli, Rick

    2014-01-01

    This author acknowledges that teachers agree that "adolescents aren't always interested in the topics adults consider important for them to learn." It is easy for adults who have forgotten the wonder and uncertainty of the adolescent years to declare that students today are more uninterested in school and undisciplined in life than…

  4. The Adolescent Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, B. J.; Getz, Sarah; Galvan, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period characterized by suboptimal decisions and actions that give rise to an increased incidence of unintentional injuries and violence, alcohol and drug abuse, unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. Traditional neurobiological and cognitive explanations for adolescent behavior have failed to…

  5. Advances in Adolescent Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Violato, Claudio; Travis, Leroy

    Adolescence is a multiplicity of events, experiences, behavior, people, and cultural meanings. This book attempts to provide detailed and in-depth analysis of the central issues related to adolescent psychology, while taking this multiplicity into account. A comprehensive representation of the topic is provided through integration of historical,…

  6. Responding to Adolescent Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation, Bloomington, IN.

    This publication is designed to help educators deal with the problems that arise after an adolescent's suicide. It recommends that teachers should be able to detect differences in students' responses to emotional problems. Following a preface and a brief review of the extent of the problem, the first chapter discusses which adolescents are…

  7. The Changing Adolescent Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Aaron M.

    2005-01-01

    Adolescence is the transition from childhood to adulthood, a period during which an individual acquires the skills necessary to survive on his or her own, away from parents or other caregivers. Adolescence can be a very confusing time. They experience changes in sleep, diet, mood, weight and attitude and a decreased pleasure from daily activities.…

  8. Early Adolescent Ego Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Michael A.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are the theoretical characteristics of social identity in early adolescence (ages 10 to 15). It is suggested that no longer is identity thought to begin with adolescence, but may have its beginnings in the preteen years. The article draws heavily on Eriksonian concepts. (Editor/KC)

  9. Adolescent Attraction to Cults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Eagan

    1998-01-01

    Details the reasons behind adolescents' attraction to cults. and distinguishes functions of cults and the term "cult." Identifies various cults, and describes the process of involvement. Notes that in the absence of authentic, stabilizing standards, some youth are especially vulnerable. Provides recommendations for adults working with adolescents.…

  10. [Adolescent sexuality in Peru].

    PubMed

    Loli, A; Aramburu, C; Paxman, J M

    1987-01-01

    22% of the population of Peru, or 4.25 million individuals, is between the ages of 11 and 19 years. A survey was performed on a sample of 6,000 adolescents living in Lima, Cajamarca, Huarez, and Supe. Surveys were performed in a variety of locations, including school classrooms, maternity wards, schools, and work places. The questionnaire was constructed based on a format that had been tested in Nigeria; questions dealt with socioeconomic background, sex behavior, contraceptive behavior, pregnancy history, and health practices and knowledge. 60% of the adolescents were women and 40% were men. 41% had had at least 1 sexual experience; among 18-year-olds, this % rose to 55. Only 10% were in stable union. Married adolescents tended to have begun sexual relations sooner in life. Early sexual relations were more common among men than among women, and more common among non-religious adolescents than among Catholics. Fewer than 12% of the adolescents had at 1 time used contraceptives. Contraceptive use was more prevalent among adolescents from wealthier socioeconomic groups, and more prevalent in Lima than in other regions surveyed. Of adolescents using contraceptives, 38% used condoms, 24% used oral contraceptives, and 15% used rhythm methods. Most adolescents who did not use contraceptives failed to do so because of lack of knowledge. Almost 1/4 of the young women had had a pregnancy. 18.5 of these had abortions, usually in a hospital. The importance of supporting educational prevention programs is underlined. PMID:12269059

  11. Hispanic Adolescent Fertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darabi, Katherine F.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses fertility of Hispanic adolescents in the United States. Summarizes what is known about sexuality, contraception, pregnancy, and childbearing among male and female Hispanics of various countries of origin. Indicates Hispanic adolescent birthrates fall between those of non-Hispanic Whites and Blacks, but there is considerable within-group…

  12. Wellness Factors among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleet, David A.; Dane, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Content for wellness-learning games aimed at youth was derived from the professional judgment of an advisory panel composed of experts in preventive medicine, health education, and adolescent development using a Delphi-like series of structured inquiries. Thirty-nine attributes considered important in the development of healthy adolescents were…

  13. Adolescence and Body Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinshenker, Naomi

    2002-01-01

    Discusses body image among adolescents, explaining that today's adolescents are more prone to body image distortions and dissatisfaction than ever and examining the historical context; how self-image develops; normative discontent; body image distortions; body dysmorphic disorder (BDD); vulnerability of boys (muscle dysmorphia); who is at risk;…

  14. Adolescence Education Newsletter, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villanueva, Carmelita L., Ed.; Padilla, Teresita M., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document comprises the two 2000 issues of a UNESCO newsletter addressing topics related to adolescent well-being in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly reproductive and sexual health. Each issue contains news from the region on various initiatives related to adolescent health and education, as well as Web links and publications on the…

  15. Adolescence Education Newsletter, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villanueva, Carmelita L., Ed.; Espada-Carlos, Lichelle Dara, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document consists of the two 2002 issues of a UNESCO newsletter addressing topics related to adolescent well-being in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly reproductive and sexual health. Each issue includes news from the region on various initiatives related to adolescent health and education, as well as Web links and publications on the…

  16. Adolescence Education Newsletter, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villanueva, Carmelita L., Ed.; Espada-Carlos, Lichelle Dara, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document comprises the two 2001 issues of a UNESCO newsletter addressing topics related to adolescent well-being in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly reproductive and sexual health. Each issue contains news from the region on various initiatives related to adolescent health and education, as well as Web links and publications on the…

  17. Adolescence Education Newsletter, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villanueva, Carmelita L., Ed.; Padilla, Teresita M., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document comprises the two 1999 issues of a UNESCO newsletter addressing topics related to adolescent well-being in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly reproductive and sexual health. Each issue contains news from the region on various initiatives related to adolescent heath and education, as well as Web links and publications on the…

  18. Inside the Adolescent Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Stacy S.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Jay Giedd says that the main alterations in the adolescent brain are the inverted U-shaped developmental trajectories with late childhood/early teen peaks for gray matter volume among others. Giedd adds that the adolescent brain is vulnerable to substances that artificially modulate dopamine levels since its reward system is in a state of flux.

  19. Smoking and adolescent health.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hee

    2011-10-01

    With the Westernization and opening of our society, adolescents' smoking is increasing and being popularized. Many adolescents start smoking at an early age out of curiosity and venturesomeness, and earlier start of smoking makes it more difficult to quit smoking. Adolescents' habitual smoking not only becomes a gateway to all kinds of substance abuse but also causes various health problems including upper respiratory infection, immature lung development, reduced maximum vital capacity, and lung cancer. Therefore, it is quite important to prevent adolescents from smoking. The lowering of adolescents' smoking rate cannot be achieved only through social restrictions such as stereotyped education on the harms of smoking and ID checking. In order to lower adolescents' smoking rate substantially, each area of society should develop standardized programs and make related efforts. As adolescents' smoking is highly influenced by home environment or school life, it is necessary to make efforts in effective education and social reinforcement in school, to establish related norms, and to execute preventive education using peer groups. When these efforts are spread throughout society in cooperation with homes and communities, they will be helpful to protect adolescents' health and improve their quality of life. PMID:22232621

  20. School Phobia in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Charles

    1977-01-01

    The symptoms of school phobia were found to be student withdrawal, unwillingness of the student to leave the mother, being either the oldest child of the family or the last one left at home, and having an impulsive, violent, sadistic philandering father. Five adolescents are examined in detail and a proposal is made that adolescence is a time…