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Sample records for adolescent oncology patients

  1. Body Image and the Female Adolescent Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Burg, Alison Joy

    2016-01-01

    Female adolescent oncology patients undergo many physical changes throughout treatment that have challenging psychological, emotional, and social implications. Body image for this population is a subject that tends to be overlooked in the midst of the cancer experience. This article will examine the complex concept of body image and discuss why female adolescent patients are at such high risk for negative body image. Assessment and care strategies are needed to foster a positive body image, resiliency, and overall well-being. Although survivorship studies may offer insightful information about the effects of the cancer journey on long-term body image, focus should be on prevention and holistic care as part of the treatment itself. The health care team, especially nursing professionals, should acknowledge, recognize, and address this vital issue as a critical part of oncology care.

  2. Body Image and the Female Adolescent Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Burg, Alison Joy

    2016-01-01

    Female adolescent oncology patients undergo many physical changes throughout treatment that have challenging psychological, emotional, and social implications. Body image for this population is a subject that tends to be overlooked in the midst of the cancer experience. This article will examine the complex concept of body image and discuss why female adolescent patients are at such high risk for negative body image. Assessment and care strategies are needed to foster a positive body image, resiliency, and overall well-being. Although survivorship studies may offer insightful information about the effects of the cancer journey on long-term body image, focus should be on prevention and holistic care as part of the treatment itself. The health care team, especially nursing professionals, should acknowledge, recognize, and address this vital issue as a critical part of oncology care. PMID:25643971

  3. The fifth vital sign: chronic pain assessment of the adolescent oncology patient.

    PubMed

    Neale, Kelly Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Adolescent oncology patients with chronic pain require holistic management using interdisciplinary care, multimodal therapies, and family-centered treatment. Adolescents are at a crucial stage of development and require unique assessment that incorporates seeking their input, valuing their opinion, and establishing a developmentally appropriate treatment plan to give them a sense of control. This article discusses the essential elements of assessment that pediatric nurse practitioners should use when evaluating chronic pain in this unique patient population. A comprehensive assessment should determine the biological, psychosocial, and developmental functioning of the patient through objective and subjective measurements. The purpose of this literature review is to outline the mainstays of evaluating pain in a vulnerable population. Ascertaining the barriers that lead to underreporting and undertreating this symptom may lead to more effective management. This article assembles concepts established in research conducted on adolescents with nonmalignant chronic pain and studies on pain in the general pediatric oncology population to assist in evaluating adolescent oncology patients with chronic pain.

  4. Reproductive health in the adolescent and young adult cancer patient: an innovative training program for oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Hutchins, Nicole M; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2013-03-01

    In 2008, approximately 69,200 adolescents and young adults (AYAs) were diagnosed with cancer, second only to heart disease for males in this age group. Despite recent guidelines from professional organizations and clinical research that AYA oncology patients want information about reproductive health topics and physician support for nurses to address these issues with patients, existing research finds few oncology nurses discuss this topic with patients due to barriers such as lack of training. This article describes an innovative eLearning training program, entitled Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare. The threefold purpose of this article is to: (1) highlight major reproductive health concerns relevant to cancer patients, (2) describe the current status of reproductive health and oncology communication and the target audience for the training, and (3) present a systematic approach to curriculum development, including the content analysis and design stages as well as the utilization of feedback from a panel of experts. The resulting 10-week curriculum contains a broad-based approach to reproductive health communication aimed at creating individual- and practice-level change. PMID:23225072

  5. Reproductive Health in the Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Patient: An Innovative Training Program for Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Hutchins, Nicole M.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, approximately 69,200 AYAs were diagnosed with cancer, second only to heart disease for males in this age group. Despite recent guidelines from professional organizations and clinical research that AYA oncology patients want information about reproductive health topics and physician support for nurses to address these issues with patients, existing research finds few oncology nurses discuss this topic with patients due to barriers such as lack of training. This article describes an innovative eLearning training program, entitled Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare (ENRICH). The threefold purpose of this article is to: (1) highlight major reproductive health concerns relevant to cancer patients, (2) describe the current status of reproductive health and oncology communication and the target audience for the training, and (3) present a systematic approach to curriculum development, including the content analysis and design stages as well as the utilization of feedback from a panel of experts. The resulting 10-week curriculum contains a broad-based approach to reproductive health communication aimed at creating individual- and practice-level change. PMID:23225072

  6. Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Oncology in the United States: A Specialty in Its Late Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Peter H; Reed, Damon R; Yeager, Nicholas; Zebrack, Bradley; Castellino, Sharon M; Bleyer, Archie

    2015-04-01

    Over the last 30 years, it has become apparent that oncology patients ages 15 to 39 have not reaped the same rewards of improved survival that we have seen in younger and older patients. As a result, in 2006 the Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Oncology Progress Review Group convened and examined the factors that impact the care of the 70,000 new cases per year (approximately 7% of all new cases) in the United States and published their findings. The reasons for inferior survival gains are of course multiple and include the settings in which patients are cared for, clinical trial enrollment, insurance coverage, varied treatment of sarcomas, varied treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the psychosocial impact of cancer and cancer survivorship. A new area of a yet-to-be completely defined subspecialty was born out of this meeting: AYA oncology. As a medical community we realized that these patients do not fit neatly into the pediatric nor adult world and, therefore, require a unique approach which many individuals, oncology centers, advocacy groups, and cooperative trial groups have started to address. This group of dedicated providers and advocates has made strides but there is still much work to be done on the local, national, and international level to make up for shortcomings in the medical system and improve outcomes. We review key components of AYA cancer care in 2015 that all providers should be aware of, how far we have come, where this movement is headed, and the obstacles that continue to stand in the way of better cure rates and quality of life after cure for this unique group of patients. Like an adolescent maturing into adulthood, this movement has learned from the past and is focused on moving into the future to achieve its goals.

  7. Risk factors for opioid misuse in adolescents and young adults with focus on oncology setting.

    PubMed

    Peck, Kelly R; Ehrentraut, Jennifer Harman; Anghelescu, Doralina L

    2016-01-01

    Prescription opioid use has increased in recent decades. Although opioids provide effective pain control, their use may be associated with the risk of misuse. Opioid misuse (OM) is prevalent among adolescents and young adults (AYAs). Opioids are necessary to treat cancer-related pain; however, oncology patients are not immune to medication misuse. Research examining OM among AYAs with cancer is scarce. This article examines the risk factors described in the general adult and adolescent medication abuse literature and aims to provide recommendations for practice in the AYA oncology population. The following risk factors should be examined in AYA oncology patients to determine their relevance: age, sex, behavioral and academic problems, psychological conditions, and a history of illicit drug use/abuse. To maintain the delicate balance of providing adequate pain relief while protecting patients from the risk of OM, clinicians must consider potential risk factors, motivating factors, and individual behaviors. Placing these challenges in perspective, this review provides clinical considerations, recommendations, and intervention strategies for OM prevention in AYA oncology patients. PMID:27435441

  8. [Geriatric intervention in oncology for elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Saint-Jean, O; LeGuen, J

    2015-10-01

    Half of all cancers occur in patients older than 70 years. National cancer plans in France promote the emergence of geriatric oncology, whose aim is that every elder cancer patient receives a pertinent treatment, according to his frailty. Geriatric intervention has been evaluated in various conditions or patients since 30 years. Meta-analysis has shown the benefits on autonomy and mortality. But benefits are related to the organization of geriatric care, especially when integrated care is provided. Literature on geriatric oncology is relatively poor. But it is certain that a geriatric comprehensive assessment provided a lot of important information for the care of cancer patients, leading to a modification of cancer treatment in many cases. Randomized trials will soon begin to evaluate the benefits of geriatric integrated care for elder cancer patients, in terms of mortality and quality of life. Actually, in oncogeriatic coordination units, pilot organizations are developed for the satisfaction of patients and professionals.

  9. Plastic Surgery for the Oncological Patient

    PubMed Central

    Daigeler, Adrien; Harati, Kamran; Kapalschinski, Nicolai; Goertz, Ole; Hirsch, Tobias; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Kolbenschlag, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The therapy of oncological patients has seen tremendous progress in the last decades. For most entities, it has been possible to improve the survival as well as the quality of life of the affected patients. To supply optimal cancer care, a multidisciplinary approach is vital. Together with oncologists, radiotherapists and other physicians, plastic surgeons can contribute to providing such care in all stages of treatment. From biopsies to the resection of advanced tumors, the coverage of the resulting defects and even palliative care, plastic surgery techniques can help to improve survival and quality of life as well as mitigate negative effects of radiation or the problems arising from exulcerating tumors in a palliative setting. This article aims to present the mentioned possibilities by illustrating selected cases and reviewing the literature. Especially in oncological patients, restoring their quality of life with the highest patient safety possible is of utmost importance. PMID:25593966

  10. Improving patient safety in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Hendee, William R.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-15

    Beginning in the 1990s, and emphasized in 2000 with the release of an Institute of Medicine report, healthcare providers and institutions have dedicated time and resources to reducing errors that impact the safety and well-being of patients. But in January 2010 the first of a series of articles appeared in the New York Times that described errors in radiation oncology that grievously impacted patients. In response, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American Society of Radiation Oncology sponsored a working meeting entitled ''Safety in Radiation Therapy: A Call to Action''. The meeting attracted 400 attendees, including medical physicists, radiation oncologists, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, hospital administrators, regulators, and representatives of equipment manufacturers. The meeting was cohosted by 14 organizations in the United States and Canada. The meeting yielded 20 recommendations that provide a pathway to reducing errors and improving patient safety in radiation therapy facilities everywhere.

  11. Adolescents with Cancer in Italy: Improving Access to National Cooperative Pediatric Oncology Group (AIEOP) Centers.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Andrea; Rondelli, Roberto; Pession, Andrea; Mascarin, Maurizio; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Mosso, Maria Luisa; Maule, Milena; Barisone, Elena; Bertolotti, Marina; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Jankovic, Momcilo; Fagioli, Franca; Biondi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    This analysis compared the numbers of patients treated at Italian pediatric oncology group (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica [AIEOP]) centers with the numbers of cases predicted according to the population-based registry. It considered 32,431 patients registered in the AIEOP database (1989-2012). The ratio of observed (O) to expected (E) cases was 0.79 for children (0-14 years old) and 0.15 for adolescents (15-19 years old). The proportion of adolescents increased significantly over the years, however, from 0.05 in the earliest period to 0.10, 0.18, and then 0.28 in the latest period of observation, suggesting a greater efficacy of local/national programs dedicated to adolescents.

  12. [The current situation of adolescents with cancer in pediatric hematology-oncology units in Spain. Results of a national survey].

    PubMed

    Lassaletta, A; Andión, M; Garrido-Colino, C; Gutierrez-Carrasco, I; Echebarria-Barona, A; Almazán, F; López-Ibor, B; Ortega-Acosta, M J

    2013-04-01

    Little attention was paid to adolescents with Cancer in Spain up to 2010. In 2011 an "Adolescents with Cancer Committee" was established by the Spanish Society of Pediatric Hemato-Oncology (SEHOP) to care for the needs of these patients. The aim of this national survey was to outline the present situation of adolescents with cancer in Spanish Pediatric Hemato-Oncology units. A web based survey assessed institutional management of adolescents with cancer. The survey was personally sent to one member of the staff of each Pediatric Hemato-Oncology unit in Spain. It included questions about epidemiology, management, psycho-social coverage, specific facilities, and follow up of these patients. A total of 40 institutions out of 41 responded to the survey (overall response rate 98%). Fifty-six percent of the institutions had patients over 14, but only 36% of the institutions treated patients up to 18 years old. Only 25.6% of the units have more than 40 new pediatric cases every year. The percentage of patients between 14 and 18 years of age is below 10% in most of the units (77%). In 30.8% and 48.7% of the institutions, pediatric hemato-oncologists treat adolescents with hematological and solid tumors, respectively. The rest of the patients are seen by adult oncologists. There is only one institution that has a physician specifically dedicated to adolescent patients, and only two units have a "teenager's room". Only 2 units have a psychologist specifically trained to treat adolescents with cancer. The survey shows that most adolescents with cancer in Spain between 14 and 18 years of age are treated by adult oncologists. Most pediatric institutions still do not have specific facilities and psychosocial support for adolescents. The SEHOP is working hard in order to improve the quality of cancer care, and the quality of survival of this population.

  13. The oncological patient in the palliative situation.

    PubMed

    Eychmueller, Steffen; Zwahlen, Diana; Fliedner, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care approaches the patient and his or her suffering with a biopsychosocial-spiritual model. Thus, it is the strength of palliative care to complement the diagnosis driven approach of medical cancer care by a problem and resources-based assessment, participatory care plan, and patient-directed interventions. Interventions need to reflect timely prognosis, target population (the patient, the family carer, the professional), and level of trust and remaining energy. In palliative care the relevance of psycho-oncological aspects in the care of the terminally ill is considerable in the understanding of the overall suffering of patients approaching death and their loved ones and in their care and support. There is little evidence to date in terms of clinical benefit of specific psycho-oncological interventions in the last months or weeks of life, but there is evidence on effects of stress reduction and reduced anxiety if locus of control can stay within the patient as long as possible. One major difficulty in psychosocial research at the end-of-life, however, is defining patient relevant outcomes. PMID:24305769

  14. Protecting pediatric oncology patients from influenza.

    PubMed

    Kersun, Leslie S; Reilly, Anne F; Coffin, Susan E; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is a common respiratory pathogen. Its severity can be unpredictable, but people with chronic illness are at increased risk of severe infection, complications, and death from influenza. This review examines evidence to support various strategies to protect pediatric oncology patients from influenza-related morbidity. Influenza vaccination should be considered standard. Additional evidence-supported measures include antiviral treatment, antiviral prophylaxis, cohorting of patients, and hospital infection control measures. Data from other high-risk populations support the vaccination of family members, double-dose or high-dose vaccination, and the use of barrier methods. These measures have the potential to optimize patient outcomes because there will be fewer treatment interruptions for acute illness. These strategies can also protect patients from prolonged hospitalizations and morbidity related to influenza.

  15. Cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Can; Kantar, Mehmet; Tuna, Arzu; Ertam, Ilgen; Aksoylar, Serap; Günaydın, Aslı; Çetingül, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric oncology patients can present with various skin lesions related to both primary disease and immunosuppressive treatments. This study aimed to evaluate the cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients. Sixty-five pediatric oncology patients who were scheduled to undergo chemotherapy from May 2011 to May 2013 were included in the study. Three patients were excluded from the results, as 2 patients died during treatment and 1 patient withdrew from the study; therefore, a total of 62 patients were evaluated for mucocutaneous findings. Patients were grouped according to their oncological diagnoses and a statistical analysis was performed. There was no statistical significance in the incidence of cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy among the different diagnostic groups. Awareness among dermatologists of the possible cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric patients and their causes can promote early diagnosis and treatment in this patient population.

  16. Thyroid Disorders in the Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease and cancer diagnoses are common conditions likely to coexist. Optimal management requires appropriate diagnostic testing and consideration of a number of factors, including overall health status and prognosis. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can lead to a number of symptoms that may affect not only quality of life but can interfere with the patient's ability to tolerate cancer treatment. Imaging studies performed for cancer staging can identify incidental structural abnormalities in the thyroid, which should be assessed with dedicated neck ultrasonography and possibly fine-needle aspiration. Incidental thyroid cancer is most often less urgent than the patient's presenting malignancy and can be addressed surgically when appropriate in the context of other treatments (i.e., chemotherapy). Providers working in an oncology setting, as well as primary care providers, should be aware of medications that are associated with hormonal abnormalities. Any patient with a history of neck or brain radiation therapy is at risk of developing hypothyroidism and possibly other endocrinopathies. Complex or very ill patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that utilizes the experience of a knowledgeable endocrinologist. PMID:26649243

  17. Thyroid Disorders in the Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease and cancer diagnoses are common conditions likely to coexist. Optimal management requires appropriate diagnostic testing and consideration of a number of factors, including overall health status and prognosis. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can lead to a number of symptoms that may affect not only quality of life but can interfere with the patient’s ability to tolerate cancer treatment. Imaging studies performed for cancer staging can identify incidental structural abnormalities in the thyroid, which should be assessed with dedicated neck ultrasonography and possibly fine-needle aspiration. Incidental thyroid cancer is most often less urgent than the patient’s presenting malignancy and can be addressed surgically when appropriate in the context of other treatments (i.e., chemotherapy). Providers working in an oncology setting, as well as primary care providers, should be aware of medications that are associated with hormonal abnormalities. Any patient with a history of neck or brain radiation therapy is at risk of developing hypothyroidism and possibly other endocrinopathies. Complex or very ill patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that utilizes the experience of a knowledgeable endocrinologist. PMID:26649243

  18. The Adolescent Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, William A., Jr.

    Written to orient the physician and paramedical personnel to the adolescent patient, the book provides information concerning the changes of adolescence, and age-related problems and illnesses. Part 1 discusses the essence of adolescence by describing physical, mental, and emotional growth and development. Part 2, the major section, consists of 21…

  19. [Strategies for improving care of oncologic patients: SHARE Project results].

    PubMed

    Reñones Crego, María de la Concepción; Fernández Pérez, Dolores; Vena Fernández, Carmen; Zamudio Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is a major burden for the patient and its family that requires an individualized management by healthcare professionals. Nurses are in charge of coordinating care and are the closest healthcare professionals to patient and family; however, in Spain, there are not standard protocols yet for the management of oncology patients. The Spanish Oncology Nursing Society developed between 2012 and 2014 the SHARE project, with the aim of establishing strategies to improve quality of life and nursing care in oncology patients. It was developed in 3 phases. First, a literature search and review was performed to identify nursing strategies, interventions and tools to improve cancer patients' care. At the second stage, these interventions were agreed within a group of oncology nursing experts; and at the third phase, a different group of experts in oncology care categorized the interventions to identify the ones with highest priority and most feasible to be implemented. As a result, 3 strategic actions were identified to improve nursing care during cancer treatment: To provide a named nurse to carry out the follow up process by attending to the clinic or telephonic consultation, develop therapeutic education with adapted protocols for each tumor type and treatment and ensure specific training for nurses on the management of the cancer patients. Strategic actions proposed in this paper aim to improve cancer patients' healthcare and quality of life through the development of advanced nursing roles based on a higher level of autonomy, situating nurses as care coordinators to assure an holistic care in oncology patients.

  20. Sport and oxidative stress in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Knop, K; Schwan, R; Bongartz, M; Bloch, W; Brixius, K; Baumann, F

    2011-12-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be an important factor in the onset, progression and recurrence of cancer. In order to investigate how it is influenced by physical activity, we measured oxidative stress and antioxidative capacity (aoC) in 12 women with breast cancer and 6 men with prostate cancer, before and after long hiking trips. Before the hike, the men had a ROS-concentration of 1.8±0.6 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 0.7±0.6 mM Trolox-equivalent (Tro), while the women had a ROS-concentration of 3.1±0.7 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 1.2±0.2 mM Tro. After the hike, women showed no significant change in ROS and a significant increase in aoC (1.3±0.2 mM Tro), while the ROS concentration in men increased significantly (2.1±0.3 mM H2O2) and their aoC decreased (0.25±0.1 mM Tro). After a regenerative phase, the ROS concentration of the men decreased to 1.7±0.4 mM H2O2 and their aoC recovered significantly (1.2±0.4 mM Tro), while the women presented no significant change in the concentration of H2O2 but showed an ulterior increase in antioxidant capacity (2.05±0.43 mM Tro). From this data we conclude that physical training programs as for example long distance hiking trips can improve the aoC in the blood of oncological patients.

  1. Creating a unique, multi-stakeholder Paediatric Oncology Platform to improve drug development for children and adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Vassal, Gilles; Rousseau, Raphaël; Blanc, Patricia; Moreno, Lucas; Bode, Gerlind; Schwoch, Stefan; Schrappe, Martin; Skolnik, Jeffrey; Bergman, Lothar; Bradley-Garelik, Mary Brigid; Saha, Vaskar; Pearson, Andy; Zwierzina, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Seven years after the launch of the European Paediatric Medicine Regulation, limited progress in paediatric oncology drug development remains a major concern amongst stakeholders - academics, industry, regulatory authorities, parents, patients and caregivers. Restricted increases in early phase paediatric oncology trials, legal requirements and regulatory pressure to propose early Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs), missed opportunities to explore new drugs potentially relevant for paediatric malignancies, lack of innovative trial designs and no new incentives to develop drugs against specific paediatric targets are some unmet needs. Better access to new anti-cancer drugs for paediatric clinical studies and improved collaboration between stakeholders are essential. The Cancer Drug Development Forum (CDDF), previously Biotherapy Development Association (BDA), with Innovative Therapy for Children with Cancer Consortium (ITCC), European Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOPE) and European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) has created a unique Paediatric Oncology Platform, involving multiple stakeholders and the European Union (EU) Commission, with an urgent remit to improve paediatric oncology drug development. The Paediatric Oncology Platform proposes to recommend immediate changes in the implementation of the Regulation and set the framework for its 2017 revision; initiatives to incentivise drug development against specific paediatric oncology targets, and repositioning of drugs not developed in adults. Underpinning these changes is a strategy for mechanism of action and biology driven selection and prioritisation of potential paediatric indications rather than the current process based on adult cancer indications. Pre-competitive research and drug prioritisation, early portfolio evaluation, cross-industry cooperation and multi-compound/sponsor trials are being explored, from which guidance for innovative trial designs will be

  2. Exploratory survey of patients' needs and perceptions of psychosocial oncology.

    PubMed

    Preyde, Michele; Macdonald, Janice; Seegmiller, Merle

    2014-03-01

    Cancer is a major disease that affects a significant proportion of the population worldwide. With a decrease in mortality due to advancements in oncology treatment, there is an expanding role for psychosocial oncology. A satellite clinic for medical treatment (only chemotherapy) of cancer is available at the Guelph General Hospital (GGH). Patients accessing the chemotherapy clinic at GGH have minimal access to psychosocial or supportive care and it is not known if the existing services are addressing the psychosocial symptoms of cancer patients. Participants were asked to complete an anonymous survey which included self-report measures of depression, symptom severity, quality of life, and social support while receiving treatment at this facility. There was a great deal of variability in the patients' emotional symptoms at this satellite clinic, though many patients reported emotional difficulties. Greater social work presence may lead to better identification of patients who would benefit from psychosocial oncology services. PMID:24193219

  3. [Strategies for improving care of oncologic patients: SHARE Project results].

    PubMed

    Reñones Crego, María de la Concepción; Fernández Pérez, Dolores; Vena Fernández, Carmen; Zamudio Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is a major burden for the patient and its family that requires an individualized management by healthcare professionals. Nurses are in charge of coordinating care and are the closest healthcare professionals to patient and family; however, in Spain, there are not standard protocols yet for the management of oncology patients. The Spanish Oncology Nursing Society developed between 2012 and 2014 the SHARE project, with the aim of establishing strategies to improve quality of life and nursing care in oncology patients. It was developed in 3 phases. First, a literature search and review was performed to identify nursing strategies, interventions and tools to improve cancer patients' care. At the second stage, these interventions were agreed within a group of oncology nursing experts; and at the third phase, a different group of experts in oncology care categorized the interventions to identify the ones with highest priority and most feasible to be implemented. As a result, 3 strategic actions were identified to improve nursing care during cancer treatment: To provide a named nurse to carry out the follow up process by attending to the clinic or telephonic consultation, develop therapeutic education with adapted protocols for each tumor type and treatment and ensure specific training for nurses on the management of the cancer patients. Strategic actions proposed in this paper aim to improve cancer patients' healthcare and quality of life through the development of advanced nursing roles based on a higher level of autonomy, situating nurses as care coordinators to assure an holistic care in oncology patients. PMID:27237729

  4. Understanding the Differences Between Oncology Patients and Oncology Health Professionals Concerning Spirituality/Religiosity

    PubMed Central

    de Camargos, Mayara Goulart; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated whether spirituality/religiosity (S/R) plays an important role in the lives of cancer patients and in the work of health professionals who provide care for these patients. The correlations between spiritual quality of life (QOL) and the other QOL domain scores of patients and health professionals were also assessed. Moreover, QOL domain scores were compared between patients and health professionals. In this cross-sectional study, 1050 participants (525 oncology patients and 525 health professionals) were interviewed. Quality of life was assessed with the World Health Organization quality of life spiritual, religious, and personal beliefs (WHOQOL-SRPB). To compare the groups with respect to the instruments’ domains, a quantile regression and an analysis of covariance model were used. The WHOQOL-Bref and WHOQOL-SRPB domains were correlated by performing Pearson and partial correlation tests. It was demonstrated that 94.1% of patients considered it important that health professionals addressed their spiritual beliefs, and 99.2% of patients relied on S/R to face cancer. Approximately, 99.6% of the patients reported that S/R support is necessary during cancer treatment; 98.3% of health professionals agreed that spiritual and religious support was necessary for oncology patients. Positive correlations between spiritual QOL and the other QOL domains were observed. When compared among themselves, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of spiritual QOL. In conclusion, S/R was an important construct in the minds of cancer patients and health professionals. Both groups often use S/R resources in their daily lives, which seems to positively affect their perceptions of QOL. Further studies are needed to determine how health professionals effectively address S/R during oncology practice. PMID:26632743

  5. The importance of pharmacist providing patient education in oncology.

    PubMed

    Avery, Mia; Williams, Felecia

    2015-02-01

    The world's increasing diversity requires health care professionals to adjust delivery methods of teaching to accommodate different cultural values and beliefs. The ability to communicate effectively across languages and various cultural practices directly affects patient education outcomes. Pharmacist should be aware of varying modalities and considerations when counseling a patient diagnosed with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy. In more recent years, the medical profession has seen an increase in patient outcomes due to using the multidisciplinary team approach and has benefited by implementing Medication Therapy Management (MTM) programs at various institutions. For the clinical pharmacist, this would mean documentation for these services should be precise and accurate based on the specific patients needs. There are several factors involved in the care and therapy of the patient with cancer. Clinical oncology pharmacist should be aware of the ever-changing role in oncology and be able to implement new practices at their facility for better patient outcomes.

  6. A nurse practitioner patient care team: implications for pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Golden, Julia Rose

    2014-01-01

    The role of the pediatric advanced practice registered nurse continues to evolve within the ever-changing field of health care. In response to increased demand for health care services and because of a variety of changes in the health care delivery system, nurse practitioner patient care teams are an emerging trend in acute care settings. Care provided by nurse practitioner teams has been shown to be effective, efficient, and comprehensive. In addition to shorter hospital stays and reduced costs, nurse practitioner teams offer increased quality and continuity of care, and improved patient satisfaction. Nurse practitioner patient care teams are well suited to the field of pediatric oncology, as patients would benefit from care provided by specialized clinicians with a holistic focus. This article provides health care professionals with information about the use of nurse practitioner patient care teams and implications for use in pediatric oncology.

  7. Patient Appreciation Day in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Dianne

    2014-08-01

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy struggle with many physical and emotional stressors. Many ways to help patients cope with stressors and improve the treatment experience are found in the literature, including humor, art, entertainment, and hospitality. At H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, the radiation therapy nurses and staff members use entertainment in an annual patient appreciation day event as one way to give back to the patients.

  8. Proximal femoral reconstruction with a constrained acetabulum in oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Muhammad Umar; Brien, Earl W

    2014-02-01

    Metallic endoprostheses are used for oncological reconstruction around the proximal femur and hip joint. Common modes of failure with hemiarthroplasty or standard hip arthroplasty after proximal femoral replacement include dislocation, late hip pain, and infection. The authors reviewed hospital records to identify patients undergoing constrained tripolar hip arthroplasty for oncological reasons between 2002 and 2012. Inclusion criterion was at least 12-cm proximal femoral resection, including patients with total femur reconstruction. A total of 33 patients were reviewed. Information regarding demographics, length of follow-up, treatment characteristics, and patient outcomes was extracted. Average follow-up for all patients was 912.33 days (30.4 months). Average follow-up was 1396.1 days for living patients and 428.6 days for deceased patients. Average estimated blood loss was 462.12 cc: an average of 1080 cc for patients undergoing total femoral resection and replacement and 315.8 cc for patients undergoing proximal femoral resection and replacement. Average operative time was 137.7 minutes: an average of 205 minutes for patients undergoing total femoral resection and replacement and 119.1 minutes for patients undergoing proximal femoral resection and replacement. Average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score was 21.7. There were no dislocations in the cohort. A constrained tripolar device can be safely used for oncological proximal femoral reconstructions while minimizing the risk of dislocation. Positioning of the acetabular implant in neutral anatomic version in conjunction with a neutral-placed femoral component provides the greatest range of motion, reduction of liner impingement, and improved hip stability.

  9. Doctor–patient relationship in oncologic radiology

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, L; Leclère, J; Dolbeault, S; Neuenschwander, S

    2005-01-01

    Progress in medicine and changes in our society have led to an increasing number of patients with cancer and a change in the doctor–patient relationship. Patients rights are now defined in several countries by laws. The course of cancer involves numerous imaging examinations in which the radiologist is primarily involved. It is often the radiologist who discovers abnormalities and who must break the news to the patient. This task is made all the more difficult by the radiologist’s lack of specific training in the management of difficult situations such as announcing bad news. There is a high risk of inappropriate responses that can have a seriously damaging effect on the patient’s state of mind. Even with the best intentions, it can be very profitable to review and improve our relational modalities and to more effectively meet the patient’s increasing demand for information. The radiologist’s technical know-how is not sufficient, as he must also be able to give just the right amount of information based on his clinical competence, and his relationship with patients while respecting their wishes and their rights. PMID:16361141

  10. Electronic patient-reported outcome systems in oncology clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Antonia V; Jensen, Roxanne E; Basch, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires assess topics a patient can report about his or her own health. This includes symptoms (eg, nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, pain, or frequent urination), physical functioning (eg, difficulty climbing stairs or difficulty fastening buttons), and mental health (eg, anxiety, fear, or worry). Electronic PRO (ePRO) systems are used in oncology clinical care because of 1) their ability to enhance clinical care by flagging important symptoms and saving clinicians time; 2) the availability of standardized methods for creating and implementing PROs in clinics; and 3) the existence of user-friendly platforms for patient self-reporting like tablet computers and automated telephone surveys. Many ePRO systems can provide actionable links to clinical care such as summary reports in a patient's electronic medical record and real-time e-mail alerts to providers when patients report acute needs. This review presents 5 examples of ePRO systems currently in use in oncology practice. These systems support multiple clinical activities, including assessment of symptoms and toxicities related to chemotherapy and radiation, postoperative surveillance, and symptom management during palliative care and hospice. Patient self-reporting is possible both at clinical visits and between visits over the Internet or by telephone. The implementation of an ePRO system requires significant resources and expertise, as well as user training. ePRO systems enable regular monitoring of patient symptoms, function, and needs, and can enhance the efficiency and quality of care as well as communication with patients.

  11. Oncology nurse honors pediatric caregivers and patients.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, Lauren

    2016-07-01

    Dunbar, a registered nurse at Presbyterian Hospital in Albuquerque, N.M., knows firsthand the struggles patients and their families endure during cancer treatment. Her son underwent a bone marrow transplant at age 22. In 2011, Dunbar organized an annual race to raise funds for families who have children with cancer. PMID:27526505

  12. Nutritional support of the pediatric oncology patient.

    PubMed

    Andrassy, R J; Chwals, W J

    1998-01-01

    The child with a malignancy frequently will have associated cachexia with significant weight loss and malnutrition. The reasons for this are multifactorial and may be related directly to the tumor, such as increased metabolic rate, circulating peptides leading to anorexia, and decreased intake due to poor appetite or gut involvement. There appears to be other reasons involved, including increased whole body protein breakdown, increased lipolysis, and increased gluconeogenesis. Release of certain cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and others may increase the cancer cachexia. Malnutrition in these children leads to intolerance of chemotherapy and radiotherapy as well as increased local and systemic infections. For many years, oncologists were hesitant to provide nutrition support to cancer patients for fear that tumor growth would be enhanced. Pediatric oncologists learned early that starvation plays no positive role in cancer therapy. Adjunctive nutritional support, either enterally or parenterally, supports the patient during therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. Many studies have now shown that the nutritionally replete patient tolerates therapy better and in some pediatric malignancies may enhance survival.

  13. Dermatological Findings in Turkish Paediatric Haematology-Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Uksal, Umit; Ozturk, Pinar; Colgecen, Emine; Taslidere, Nazan; Patiroglu, Turkan; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Torun, Yasemin Altuner; Borlu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diagnoses of skin, mucosae, hair and nail manifestations in malignant diseases are often challenging because of life-threatening drug reactions, opportunistic infections or skin involvement of primary processes. Description of morphology, configuration and distribution of lesions is important in order to differentiate the self-healing eruptions from serious side effects of chemotherapy. There are case reports from Turkey including dermatological manifestations of malignancies and case series in adult patients but there are no published large group studies assessing all manifestations in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological features of dermatological findings in children with haemato-oncological diseases. Materials and Methods: The study was performed at the Erciyes University, Faculty of Medicine Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Clinic, Turkey. Three dermatologists daily consulted all patients admitted to the clinic during a one-year period. Results: The study group comprised of 157 children (79 female/78 male) aged 1–16 years (mean 7.19±4.63). Detailed dermatological examinations were performed, including oral-genital mucosae, hair and nails. Thorough skin examination revealed that 70% of the patients exhibited at least one dermatological finding. Generalized xerosis and hyperpigmentation were the most common findings among patients undergoing chemotherapy (24.19%). Multiple nevi on at least 10 covered areas were very frequent among patients undergoing long-term chemotherapy (18.47%). Three were identified as dysplastic nevus, but malignant transformation was not observed during the one-year study period. Conclusion: Regular dermatological consultation may help resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic problems in paediatric haemato-oncology clinics. PMID:27551173

  14. [Measuring quality of life in every oncological patient].

    PubMed

    Aaronson, Neil K; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2011-01-01

    There are indications that in cancer patients quality of life is a better predictor of survival than clinical measures such as tumour response and stage of disease. In addition, health care professionals' expectations about the effect of a particular treatment on quality of life often do not correspond with the experience of the patient. These are all reasons for every oncological patient to complete a short questionnaire on quality of life. Using this questionnaire can improve communication between care provider and patient, and also give the care provider insight into the problems that are important to the patient at that time. This insight could subsequently lead to counseling tailored to the patient, and, if necessary, modification of treatment or referral for supportive care. A second aim is to link information on quality of life to clinical pathways and treatment guidelines.

  15. The Challenge of Access to Care for Adolescents with Cancer in Italy: National and Local Pediatric Oncology Programs. International Perspectives on AYAO, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    This paper, summarizing the March 2012 presentation at the second international workshop of the Canadian Task Force on Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer, describes the situation in Italy concerning the inadequate access to optimal cancer services for adolescents, and the need to improve the quality of care for these patients while investing in more research on the diseases that afflict them. National actions to bridge the gap in care and implement specific programs tailored to these patients arose from the pediatric oncology community. These actions include creation of the national Committee on Adolescents of the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP), founded with the mission of ensuring that Italian adolescents with cancer have prompt, adequate, and equitable access to the best care to optimize their treatment outcome and quality of life. Also developed was the Youth Project of the pediatric oncology unit at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, which is currently dedicated to adolescents aged 15-19 years old and may eventually serve young adults up to the age of 25 that are affected by pediatric-type tumors.

  16. Central Line Maintenance Bundles and CLABSIs in Ambulatory Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bundy, David G.; Chen, Allen R.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Pehar, Miriana; Herpst, Cynthia; Fratino, Lisa; Miller, Marlene R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pediatric oncology patients are frequently managed with central lines as outpatients, and these lines confer significant morbidity in this immune-compromised population. We aimed to investigate whether a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle reduces central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and bacteremias in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients. METHODS: We conducted an interrupted time-series study of a maintenance bundle concerning all areas of central line care. Each of 3 target groups (clinic staff, homecare agency nurses, and patient families) (1) received training on the bundle and its importance, (2) had their practice audited, and (3) were shown CLABSI rates through graphs, in-service training, and bulletin boards. CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates were collected for 23 months before and 24 months after beginning the intervention and were compared by using a Poisson regression model. RESULTS: The mean CLABSI rate decreased by 48% from 0.63 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.32 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P = .005). The mean bacteremia rate decreased by 54% from 1.27 bacteremias per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.59 bacteremias per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle significantly reduced CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients with central lines. Further research is needed to determine if maintenance care bundles reduce ambulatory CLABSIs and bacteremia in other adult and pediatric populations. PMID:24101764

  17. The Rehabilitation of Oncological Patients Presenting Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MICU, ELENA CLAUDIA; IRSAY, LASZLO

    2014-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP 2011) defines neuropathic pain as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the somatosensory portion of the nervous system”. The central neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the central somatosensory central nervous system”, whereas the peripheral neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the peripheral somatosensory nervous system” [1]. The peripheral neuropathy describes any affection of the peripheral nervous system. The etiology is vast, there being a number of over 100 possible causes, which causes the global morbidity rate to reach approximately 2.4%. The chronic nature of the pain superposes the everyday routine and leads to the high intake of medication for pain alleviation. The number of cases of neuroplasia has always increased today. This disturbing diagnosis which can potentiate the signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy as well as reduce and limit the treatment options associated with neuropathies. The treatment presupposes a multidisciplinary approach, while the solution to prevent complications involves the control of risk factors and pathophysiological treatment. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CPIN) is a significant disabling symptom that is tightly connected to the administration of neurotoxic cytostatic agents used for the treatment of neoplasia. CPIN compromises the quality of life and produces pain or discomfort [2]. I have sought to produce a presentation of the medicated and physical-kinetic treatment options that have proved their effectiveness during clinical studies or random trials and can be applied to cancer patients presenting with symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy, namely with neuropathic pain, and support it with arguments. PMID:26528000

  18. Oncological outcome after lung metastasis in patients presenting with localized chondrosarcoma at extremities: Tokai Musculoskeletal Oncology Consortium study

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomoki; Matsumine, Akihiko; Yamada, Satoshi; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Ohno, Takatoshi; Katagiri, Hirohisa; Sugiura, Hideshi; Yamada, Kenji; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Sudo, Akihiro; Nishida, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The oncological outcome after lung metastasis in patients with chondrosarcoma of the extremities has not been reported. Between June 2000 and June 2013, 179 patients with chondrosarcoma in the extremities were treated at eleven hospitals. Twenty consecutive patients (11.2%) developed lung metastases after initial treatment of primary chondrosarcoma in the extremities. We investigated the oncological outcome of 20 chondrosarcoma patients with lung metastasis. There were 14 males and six females with a mean age of 49 years. The mean duration between primary surgery and appearance of lung metastases was 34 months. The mean follow-up period was 48 months. We excluded patients with lung metastasis at the time of presentation from this study. At the final follow-up, four of 20 patients had no evidence of disease, four were alive with disease, and twelve had died of disease. The 3- and 5-year survival rates after lung metastasis were 51.5% and 45.7%, respectively. Tumor grade, extrapulmonary metastasis, and treatment for lung metastases including metastasectomy and radiofrequency ablation were identified by univariate analysis to be significant prognostic factors for oncological analysis. In conclusion, this study evaluated the oncological outcome in patients with chondrosarcoma of the extremities with lung metastasis. Although a large-scale study might be required to confirm the results of this study, we suggest that metastasectomy and/or radiofrequency ablation should be considered to improve postmetastatic survival. PMID:27536136

  19. Outcome of the Gynecologic Oncology Patients Surveillance Network Program.

    PubMed

    Suprasert, Prapaporn; Suwansirikul, Songkiat; Charoenkwan, Kittipat; Cheewakriangkrai, Chalong; Suwansirikul, Songkiat

    2015-01-01

    The gynecologic oncology patients surveillance network program was conducted with the collaboration of 5 provincial hospitals located in the north of Thailand (Chiang Rai, Lamphun Nan, Phayao and Phrae). The aim was to identify ways of reducing the burden and the cost to the gynecologic cancer patients who needed to travel to the tertiary care hospital for follow up. The clinical data of each patient was transferred to the provincial hospital by the internet via the website www.gogcmu.or.th. All the general gynecologists who participated in this project attended the training course set up for the program. From January 2011 to February 2014, 854 patients who were willing to have their next follow-up at the network hospitals close to their home were enrolled this project. Almost of them were residents in Chiang Rai province and the most common disease was cervical cancer. After the project had been running for 1 year, 604 of the enrolled patients and 21 health-care personnel who had participated in this project were interviewed to assess its success. Some 85.3% of the patients and 100% of the health-care personnel were satisfied with this project. However, 60 patients had withdrawn, the most common reason being the lack of confidence in the follow up at the local provincial hospital. In conclusion, it is possible to initiate a gynecologic oncology patients' surveillance network program and the initiation could reduce the problems associated with and the cost the patients incurred as they journeyed to the tertiary care hospital. PMID:26163612

  20. Physicians' evaluations of patients' decisions to refuse oncological treatment

    PubMed Central

    van Kleffens, T; van Leeuwen, E

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To gain insight into the standards of rationality that physicians use when evaluating patients' treatment refusals. Design of the study: Qualitative design with indepth interviews. Participants: The study sample included 30 patients with cancer and 16 physicians (oncologists and general practitioners). All patients had refused a recommended oncological treatment. Results: Patients base their treatment refusals mainly on personal values and/or experience. Physicians mainly emphasise the medical perspective when evaluating patients' treatment refusals. From a medical perspective, a patient's treatment refusal based on personal values and experience is generally evaluated as irrational and difficult to accept, especially when it concerns a curative treatment. Physicians have a different attitude towards non-curative treatments and have less difficulty accepting a patient's refusal of these treatments. Thus, an important factor in the physician's evaluation of a treatment refusal is whether the treatment refused is curative or non-curative. Conclusion: Physicians mainly use goal oriented and patients mainly value oriented rationality, but in the case of non-curative treatment refusal, physicians give more emphasis to value oriented rationality. A consensus between the value oriented approaches of patient and physician may then emerge, leading to the patient's decision being understood and accepted by the physician. The physician's acceptance is crucial to his or her attitude towards the patient. It contributes to the patient's feeling free to decide, and being understood and respected, and thus to a better physician–patient relationship. PMID:15738431

  1. The Doctor-Patient Relationship in the Adolescent Cancer Setting: A Developmentally Focused Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Siembida, Elizabeth J; Bellizzi, Keith M

    2015-09-01

    Several national reports and many individuals in the clinical oncology community have defined the adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer population as individuals diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 39. However, neuroscience and developmental research have identified important decision-making skills (e.g., information processing, reasoning, emotion regulation) that are not fully developed during adolescence, making general, AYA-focused doctor-patient interaction guidelines potentially questionable for the adolescent cancer population. Most studies include adolescents in samples of pediatric cancer patients or include adolescents in samples of young adult cancer patients, but studies rarely consider adolescent cancer patients as a distinct, developmentally unique group. A systematic literature review was undertaken in October 2014 to begin to understand what is known about the doctor-patient relationship and communication preferences within adolescent oncology. From the 25 included studies, three important conclusions emerged: (1) discrepancies among adolescent patients, parents, and providers about the desired extent of involvement in treatment-related decisions; (2) patient desire for developmentally and culturally appropriate information provision; and (3) the desire and preference for how information is delivered, with recognition that these preferences may change with age. There was some variation in themes by study design, with studies directly observing medical consultations reporting less adolescent involvement in discussions than studies that surveyed doctors. The results of this review support the need for developmentally focused research and clinical guidelines that emphasize the experience of adolescent cancer patients separate from their older and younger counterparts.

  2. Evaluation and Management of the Geriatric Urologic Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    McKibben, Maxim J.; Smith, Angela B.

    2014-01-01

    The geriatric population presents a unique set of challenges in urologic oncology. In addition to the known natural history of disease, providers must also consider patient factors such as functional and nutritional status, comorbidities and social support when determining the treatment plan. The development of frailty measures and biomarkers to estimate surgical risk shows promise, with several assessment tools predictive of surgical complications. Decreased dependence on chronologic age is important when assessing surgical fitness, as age cutoffs prevent appropriate treatment of many elderly patients who would benefit from surgery. Within bladder, kidney and prostate cancers, continued refinement of surgical techniques offers a broader array of options for the geriatric patient than previously available. PMID:25678987

  3. Enhancing Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Research Within the National Clinical Trials Network: Rationale, Progress, and Emerging Strategies.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Aaron R; Nichols, Craig R; Freyer, David R

    2015-10-01

    Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (AYAO, including patients 15-39 years of age) is an emerging discipline in the field of cancer treatment and research. Poorer survival outcomes for this population and characteristic age-related challenges in care have called attention to the need for increased AYAO research. This chapter outlines pressing questions and reviews recent progress in AYAO research within the current organizational structure of the federal clinical trials enterprise, emphasizing how the United States National Cancer Institute's National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) has created novel opportunities for collaborative AYAO research among the pediatric and adult NCTN groups. Potential strategies for expanding AYAO research, both within the NCTN and with other partners in the federal and advocacy domains are identified. PMID:26433555

  4. Daily Bathing with Chlorhexidine and Its Effects on Nosocomial Infection Rates in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Raulji, Chittalsinh M; Clay, Kristin; Velasco, Cruz; Yu, Lolie C

    2015-01-01

    Infections remain a serious complication in pediatric oncology patients. To determine if daily bathing with Chlorhexidine gluconate can decrease the rate of nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients, we reviewed rates of infections in pediatric oncology patients over a 14-month span. Intervention group received daily bath with Chlorhexidine, while the control group did not receive daily bath. The results showed that daily bath with antiseptic chlorhexidine as daily prophylactic antiseptic topical wash leads to decreased infection density amongst the pediatric oncology patients, especially in patients older than 12 years of age. Furthermore, daily chlorhexidine bathing significantly reduced the rate of hospital acquired infection in patients older than 12 years of age. The findings of this study suggest that daily bathing with chlorhexidine may be an effective measure of reducing nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients.

  5. Daily Bathing with Chlorhexidine and Its Effects on Nosocomial Infection Rates in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Raulji, Chittalsinh M; Clay, Kristin; Velasco, Cruz; Yu, Lolie C

    2015-01-01

    Infections remain a serious complication in pediatric oncology patients. To determine if daily bathing with Chlorhexidine gluconate can decrease the rate of nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients, we reviewed rates of infections in pediatric oncology patients over a 14-month span. Intervention group received daily bath with Chlorhexidine, while the control group did not receive daily bath. The results showed that daily bath with antiseptic chlorhexidine as daily prophylactic antiseptic topical wash leads to decreased infection density amongst the pediatric oncology patients, especially in patients older than 12 years of age. Furthermore, daily chlorhexidine bathing significantly reduced the rate of hospital acquired infection in patients older than 12 years of age. The findings of this study suggest that daily bathing with chlorhexidine may be an effective measure of reducing nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients. PMID:25918820

  6. Caregivers' perception of drug administration safety for pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Harris, Nariman; Badr, Lina Kurdahi; Saab, Raya; Khalidi, Aziza

    2014-01-01

    Medication errors (MEs) are reported to be between 1.5% and 90% depending on many factors, such as type of the institution where data were collected and the method to identify the errors. More significantly, the risk for errors with potential for harm is 3 times higher for children, especially those receiving chemotherapy. Few studies have been published on averting such errors with children and none on how caregivers perceive their role in preventing such errors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pediatric oncology patient's caregivers' perception of drug administration safety and their willingness to be involved in averting such errors. A cross-sectional design was used to study a nonrandomized sample of 100 caregivers of pediatric oncology patients. Ninety-six of the caregivers surveyed were well informed about the medications their children receive and were ready to participate in error prevention strategies. However, an underestimation of potential errors uncovered a high level of "trust" for the staff. Caregivers echoed their apprehension for being responsible for potential errors. Caregivers are a valuable resource to intercept medication errors. However, caregivers may be hesitant to actively communicate their fears with health professionals. Interventions that aim at encouraging caregivers to engage in the safety of their children are recommended.

  7. Supracricoid laryngectomies: oncological and functional results for 152 patients.

    PubMed

    Leone, C A; Capasso, P; Russo, G; D'Errico, P; Cutillo, P; Orabona, P

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the oncological and functional outcomes in patients who underwent supracricoid laryngectomies with a crico-hyoidopexy (SCL-CHP) or a crico-hyoido-epiglottopexy (SCL-CHEP) for the treatment of primary and reccurent laryngeal cancer. A retrospective study was conducted on 152 consecutive patients seen from January 1996 to December 2006. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and were compared according to the type of surgery and clinical stage of the tumour. The mean period before decannulation, nasogastric tube (NGT) removal and recovery of a normal diet and speech were evaluated, and statistical analyses were performed regarding the association with the type of surgery and arytenoidectomy. The median follow-up period was 49.9 months (range: 10-110 months). The 3- and 5-year OS were 87.5 and 83.5%, respectively, and 3- and 5-year DFS were 78.3 and 73.7%, respectively. For patients with early stages tumours, the 5-year OS and DFS were 92.3 and 84.6% respectively, whereas for patients with locally advanced stage tumours, the OS and DFS were 74.3 and 62.2%, respectively. Significant differences in OS and DFS for patients who had early or locally advanced cancers were found (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.0032, respectively). The rate of overall local control was 92.1%, while the mean period until decannulation or NGT removal was 25.1 and 16.6 days, respectively. The mean period until NGT removal was significantly different according to the type of surgery (p = 0.0001) and whether arytenoidectomy was performed (p = 0.0001). The reliable oncological and functional results of SCL for early and locally advanced laryngeal cancers are confirmed by our series of patients.

  8. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Adolescent Patients Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Basics Overview Eosinophilic esophagitis also known as ( ... children may have vomiting and abdominal pain, and adolescents may complain of the feeling of food getting ...

  9. Quality of sleep in postoperative surgical oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Elizabeth; Sawada, Namie Okino; Sonobe, Helena Megumi; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate surgical-oncologic patients' quality of sleep through the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire. It is an exploratory study with transversal-observational design, in 46 postoperative head & neck and urology cancer patients. The PSQI questionnaire was used to evaluate the subjective quality of sleep and the occurrence of sleep disorders. Six PSQI components were statistically significant and 78.3% of the interviewees had impaired subjective quality of sleep. Among factors leading to sleep disorders we point out: taking too long to fall asleep; waking up in the middle of the night; getting up to go to the bathroom and napping during the day. This study is expected to sensitize the nursing team regarding the need to investigate quality of sleep and causes of its disorders in cancer survivors for an effective course of action. PMID:19820854

  10. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  11. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc.), to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc.), and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.). These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS) has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person's job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information. PMID:19052391

  12. Illness perception differences between Russian- and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Popov, Nadia; Heruti, Irit; Levy, Sigal; Lulav-Grinwald, Doron; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2014-03-01

    Illness perception influences health and illness behaviors. This study was designed to estimate illness perception differences between Russian-speaking and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients. Changes in illness perception associated with time spent in Israel among Russian-speaking patients were also evaluated. Additionally, we evaluated differences in illness perception of patients exposed to Chernobyl's consequences. A total of 144 oncology patients (77 Hebrew-speaking, 67 Russian-speaking) completed personal data questionnaires and The illness perception questionnaire revised, translated into Russian for this study. Significantly more Russian-speaking oncology patients perceived their illness as chronic and having negative consequences on life (p < .01). Russian-speaking oncology patients tend to have a more negative perception of cancer compared to Hebrew-speaking patients. Time spent in Israel may create more positive perceptions of cancer among these patients. No illness perception differences were found concerning Chernobyl consequences.

  13. Understanding the Differences Between Oncology Patients and Oncology Health Professionals Concerning Spirituality/Religiosity: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Camargos, Mayara Goulart de; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated whether spirituality/religiosity (S/R) plays an important role in the lives of cancer patients and in the work of health professionals who provide care for these patients. The correlations between spiritual quality of life (QOL) and the other QOL domain scores of patients and health professionals were also assessed. Moreover, QOL domain scores were compared between patients and health professionals. In this cross-sectional study, 1050 participants (525 oncology patients and 525 health professionals) were interviewed. Quality of life was assessed with the World Health Organization quality of life spiritual, religious, and personal beliefs (WHOQOL-SRPB). To compare the groups with respect to the instruments' domains, a quantile regression and an analysis of covariance model were used. The WHOQOL-Bref and WHOQOL-SRPB domains were correlated by performing Pearson and partial correlation tests. It was demonstrated that 94.1% of patients considered it important that health professionals addressed their spiritual beliefs, and 99.2% of patients relied on S/R to face cancer. Approximately, 99.6% of the patients reported that S/R support is necessary during cancer treatment; 98.3% of health professionals agreed that spiritual and religious support was necessary for oncology patients. Positive correlations between spiritual QOL and the other QOL domains were observed. When compared among themselves, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of spiritual QOL. In conclusion, S/R was an important construct in the minds of cancer patients and health professionals. Both groups often use S/R resources in their daily lives, which seems to positively affect their perceptions of QOL. Further studies are needed to determine how health professionals effectively address S/R during oncology practice. PMID:26632743

  14. Male reproductive health after childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancers: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Lisa B; Cohen, Laurie E; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Metzger, Monika L; Lockart, Barbara; Hijiya, Nobuko; Duffey-Lind, Eileen; Constine, Louis; Green, Daniel; Meacham, Lillian

    2012-09-20

    The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer will become long-term survivors. Although cancer therapy is associated with many adverse effects, one of the primary concerns of young male cancer survivors is reproductive health. Future fertility is often the focus of concern; however, it must be recognized that all aspects of male health, including pubertal development, testosterone production, and sexual function, can be impaired by cancer therapy. Although pretreatment strategies to preserve reproductive health have been beneficial to some male patients, many survivors remain at risk for long-term reproductive complications. Understanding risk factors and monitoring the reproductive health of young male survivors are important aspects of follow-up care. The Children's Oncology Group Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancer (COG-LTFU Guidelines) were created by the COG to provide recommendations for follow-up care of survivors at risk for long-term complications. The male health task force of the COG-LTFU Guidelines, composed of pediatric oncologists, endocrinologists, nurse practitioners, a urologist, and a radiation oncologist, is responsible for updating the COG-LTFU Guidelines every 2 years based on literature review and expert consensus. This review summarizes current task force recommendations for the assessment and management of male reproductive complications after treatment for childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancers. Issues related to male health that are being investigated, but currently not included in the COG-LTFU Guidelines, are also discussed. Ongoing investigation will inform future COG-LTFU Guideline recommendations for follow-up care to improve health and quality of life for male survivors.

  15. Oral Health Status of Patients Undergoing Treatment for Head and Neck Oncology in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran; Killough, Simon; Markey, Neill; Winning, Lewis; McKenna, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to collect data on the oral health status of patients undergoing treatment for head and neck oncology across Northern Ireland. Data were collected on all patients referred to the Northern Ireland Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Oncology Team for discussion and treatment planning. Each patient underwent pre-treatment dental assessment in the Centre for Dentistry, Queen's University Belfast, between June 2013 and November 2014. Data were collected from clinical oral examinations supplemented with intra-oral radiographs. During the course of the study 96 patients were assessed and the levels of dental disease observed in this cohort were high. On clinical examination 43% were diagnosed with caries and 46% with periodontal disease. Ten patients were completely edentate. The disease profile of this patient group presents significant challenges to dental services tasked with rendering patients dentally fit prior to undergoing oncology treatment. PMID:27424336

  16. A survey of emotional difficulties of nurses who care for oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Oflaz, Fahriye; Arslan, Filiz; Uzun, Senay; Ustunsoz, Ayfer; Yilmazkol, Elif; Unlü, Emine

    2010-02-01

    Nurses who care for dying patients are under pressure emotionally because of their beliefs and values about death as well as the emotions and reactions of the patients and their families. This study examines the emotional difficulties of nurses caring for oncology patients in Turkey. The study used a descriptive survey design. The participants were 157 nurses from three medical oncology units in Ankara. Results showed that nurses had difficulty in talking to oncology patients about end-of-life issues and found that caring for dying patients affected their personal lives. This study also showed that the length of nurses' work experience had no effect on their feelings and perceptions toward terminally ill patients. However, the nurses who had more work experience were more likely to report difficulty in talking to patients. Most of the nurses expressed feelings of inadequacy and hopelessness about pain management and treatments.

  17. Rehabilitation of Oncology Patients with Hard Palate Defects Part 2: Principles of Obturator Design.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rahat; Altaie, Asmaa; Nattress, Brian

    2015-06-01

    The first part of this series on the conventional rehabilitation of oncology patients with hard palate defects discussed the dental challenges posed by oncology patients and the surgical/restorative planning interface for conventional dental rehabilitation. This article will describe Aramany's classification of hard palate defects, Brown's classification of palatal defects and focus on the basic principles of obturator design which need to be appreciated when prosthetically rehabilitating a patient with a hard palate defect. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A good understanding of basic removable prosthodontic theory relating to denture design, dental materials science and head and neck anatomy is a prerequisite when designing an obturator for a patient. PMID:26964444

  18. The Use of Art in the Medical Decision-Making Process of Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of written informed consent in the 1970s created expectations of shared decision making between doctors and patients that has led to decisional conflict for some patients. This study utilized a collaborative, intrinsic case study approach to the decision-making process of oncology patients who participated in an open art therapy…

  19. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  20. Perioperative preparation of the adolescent surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Busen, N H

    2001-02-01

    The perioperative preparation of adolescents for surgery provides a challenge to nurses and other health care providers because of the wide diversity in adolescents' age, physical maturation, and cognitive and psychosocial development. Perioperative issues, informed consent, and assent differ considerably depending on the age and developmental level of each adolescent. This article provides information about adolescent growth and development and approaches to managing adolescent surgical patients.

  1. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hemato-oncological patients: A case control study in 144 patients

    PubMed Central

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Koni, Danjel; Gleiss, Andreas; Kundi, Michael; Makristathis, Athanasios; Zielinski, Christoph; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hemato-oncologic patients is conflicting. We studied risk factors for CDI in a large, well-characterized cohort of hemato-oncological patients. 144 hemato-oncological patients were identified in this retrospective, single center study with a microbiologically confirmed CDI-associated diarrhea. Patients were compared with 144 age and sex matched hemato-oncologic patients with CDI negative diarrhea. Risk factors such as prior antimicrobial therapy, type of disease, chemotherapy and survival were evaluated. CDI-positive patients received more frequently any antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial combination therapy than CDI-negative patients (79% vs. 67%; OR = 2.26, p = 0.038 and OR = 2.62, p = 0.003, respectively). CDI positive patients were treated more frequently with antimicrobial agents active against C. difficile than CDI negative ones (25% vs. 13%; OR = 2.2, p = 0.039). The interval between last chemotherapy and onset of diarrhea was significantly shorter in patients without CDI (median, 17 days vs 36 days; p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that chemotherapy is not a significant risk factor for CDI but for early onset CDI negative diarrhea. The predominant modifiable risk factor for CDI is in hemato-oncological patients antimicrobial treatment. These findings should be taken into account in the daily clinical practice to avoid CDI associated complications and excess health care costs. PMID:27510591

  2. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hemato-oncological patients: A case control study in 144 patients.

    PubMed

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Koni, Danjel; Gleiss, Andreas; Kundi, Michael; Makristathis, Athanasios; Zielinski, Christoph; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hemato-oncologic patients is conflicting. We studied risk factors for CDI in a large, well-characterized cohort of hemato-oncological patients. 144 hemato-oncological patients were identified in this retrospective, single center study with a microbiologically confirmed CDI-associated diarrhea. Patients were compared with 144 age and sex matched hemato-oncologic patients with CDI negative diarrhea. Risk factors such as prior antimicrobial therapy, type of disease, chemotherapy and survival were evaluated. CDI-positive patients received more frequently any antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial combination therapy than CDI-negative patients (79% vs. 67%; OR = 2.26, p = 0.038 and OR = 2.62, p = 0.003, respectively). CDI positive patients were treated more frequently with antimicrobial agents active against C. difficile than CDI negative ones (25% vs. 13%; OR = 2.2, p = 0.039). The interval between last chemotherapy and onset of diarrhea was significantly shorter in patients without CDI (median, 17 days vs 36 days; p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that chemotherapy is not a significant risk factor for CDI but for early onset CDI negative diarrhea. The predominant modifiable risk factor for CDI is in hemato-oncological patients antimicrobial treatment. These findings should be taken into account in the daily clinical practice to avoid CDI associated complications and excess health care costs. PMID:27510591

  3. Integrative Therapy Use for Management of Side Effects and Toxicities Experienced by Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Shana S

    2014-01-01

    Integrative Therapies (IT), otherwise known as Complementary and Alternative Medicine, are widely used among pediatric oncology patients, despite a paucity of available evidence. This review summarizes surveys that describe the prevalence of IT use by pediatric oncology patients, both during therapy and in survivorship, as well as the modalities being used. Additionally, the evidence that exists for specific treatments that appear to be efficacious in controlling specific symptoms is described. Finally, there are recommendations for practitioners on how to best counsel patients about IT use. PMID:27417488

  4. Oncology nurses' communication challenges with patients and families: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Smita C; Manna, Ruth; Coyle, Nessa; Shen, Megan Johnson; Pehrson, Cassandra; Zaider, Talia; Hammonds, Stacey; Krueger, Carol A; Parker, Patricia A; Bylund, Carma L

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of effective communication in an oncology setting are multifold and include the overall well-being of patients and health professionals, adherence to treatment regimens, psychological functioning, and improvements in quality of life. Nevertheless, there are substantial barriers and communication challenges reported by oncology nurses. This study was conducted to present a summary of communication challenges faced by oncology nurses. From November 2012 to March 2014, 121 inpatient nurses working in the oncology setting participated in an online pre-training qualitative survey that asked nurses to describe common communication challenges in communicating empathy and discussing death, dying, and end-of-life (EOL) goals of care. The results revealed six themes that describe the challenges in communicating empathically: dialectic tensions, burden of carrying bad news, lack of skills for providing empathy, perceived institutional barriers, challenging situations, and perceived dissimilarities between the nurse and the patient. The results for challenges in discussing death, dying and EOL goals of care revealed five themes: dialectic tensions, discussing specific topics related to EOL, lack of skills for providing empathy, patient/family characteristics, and perceived institutional barriers. This study emphasizes the need for institutions to provide communication skills training to their oncology nurses for navigating through challenging patient interactions.

  5. Group Therapy with Patients in the Waiting Room of an Oncology Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnowitz, Edward; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a therapy group for cancer patients, conducted by cotherapists in an oncology waiting room. Group members provided mutual support and shared concerns and coping methods. Medical staff members became more involved and were more able to address the affective needs of the patients and their families. (JAC)

  6. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B and C among Oncology Patients in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Sukran; Olmezoglu, Ali; Gozaydin, Ayhan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the public-health issues worldwide. Approximately two billion people are infected with HBV, and about 350 million people are chronic carriers globally. About 3% of the world population is infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Oncology patients receiving packed red blood cell suspensions and other blood products usually are in the high-risk group for infections due to these viruses. The aim of the study was to detect the seroprevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C among chemotherapy patients at the Oncology Department of the Tepecik Education and Research Hospital. HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBcIgM, anti-HBc total and anti-HCV assays were studied by enzyme immunoassay method (Diasorin, Italy) in serum samples of patients (n=448) referred to the Department of Oncology of the Tepecik Education and Research Hospital during 1 June 2006–1 January 2007. Of the 448 patients, 19 (4.2%) were HBsAg-positive, and three (0.7%) had anti-HCV positivity. In this study, the seroprevalence of HBV was similar to previous data in Turkey. This could be due to widespread vaccination programmes. The seroprevalence of low anti-HCV may be because of controlled blood transfusion. Oncology patients should be monitored for their protective antibody levels against HBV, and they must be included in the vaccination programme. Their anti-HCV status should also be checked as well. PMID:22283040

  7. Exercise and Fatigue in Adolescent and Young Adult Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Hooke, Mary C; Friedman, Debra L; Campbell, Kristin; Withycombe, Janice; Schwartz, Cindy L; Kelly, Kara; Meza, Jane

    2015-09-01

    Fatigue is a significant problem for adolescent and young adult (AYA) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. The relationship between exercise and fatigue is complex. This study explored the trajectory of and the relationship between exercise and fatigue over 36 months post-therapy in a cohort of 103 AYA-aged HL survivors treated on Children's Oncology Group (COG) study AHOD0031. Descriptive statistics and generalized estimating equations were used in this secondary data analysis. Exercise and fatigue improved over time but were unrelated; amount of exercise at end of therapy predicted amount of exercise at 12 (p = 0.02) and 36 (p = 0.0008) months post-therapy.

  8. [The experience of the "oncologic patient": (re)conceptualizing the informative act].

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Carlos António

    2007-01-01

    The adaptation of the patient to the conditions of chronic illness makes the information given to the patient one of the most powerful strategies, capable of contributing to a change in the social representation of the patient, from that of a mere clinical case to that of a holistic being. The objective of this study was to investigate the scientific work published in periodicals indexed by the Medline and Lilacs databases between 1990 and 2006 as to the informative act and the different forms in which information is provided to oncology patients. This analysis of the literature led to the conclusion that there has been an increase in the volume of publications, underlining the role of the oncology patient as a catalyst for new strategies for psychosocial adjustment and revealing her key role through her status as a 'professional patient'.

  9. [The experience of the "oncologic patient": (re)conceptualizing the informative act].

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Carlos António

    2007-01-01

    The adaptation of the patient to the conditions of chronic illness makes the information given to the patient one of the most powerful strategies, capable of contributing to a change in the social representation of the patient, from that of a mere clinical case to that of a holistic being. The objective of this study was to investigate the scientific work published in periodicals indexed by the Medline and Lilacs databases between 1990 and 2006 as to the informative act and the different forms in which information is provided to oncology patients. This analysis of the literature led to the conclusion that there has been an increase in the volume of publications, underlining the role of the oncology patient as a catalyst for new strategies for psychosocial adjustment and revealing her key role through her status as a 'professional patient'. PMID:18472547

  10. Use of Psychosocial Services Increases after a Social Worker-Mediated Intervention in Gynecology Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Yuko; Shah, Nina R.; Ward, Kristy K.; McHale, Michael T.; Alvarez, Edwin A.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of psychosocial services to gynecologic oncology outpatients by a social worker increases service use. During the initial six weeks (phase I), patients were referred for psychosocial services by clinic staff. During the second six weeks (phase II), a nurse introduced available…

  11. From Patient-Specific Mathematical Neuro-Oncology to Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, A. L.; Rockne, R. C.; Boone, A. D.; Neal, M. L.; Hawkins-Daarud, A.; Corwin, D. M.; Bridge, C. A.; Guyman, L. A.; Trister, A. D.; Mrugala, M. M.; Rockhill, J. K.; Swanson, K. R.

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are notoriously aggressive, malignant brain tumors that have variable response to treatment. These patients often have poor prognosis, informed primarily by histopathology. Mathematical neuro-oncology (MNO) is a young and burgeoning field that leverages mathematical models to predict and quantify response to therapies. These mathematical models can form the basis of modern “precision medicine” approaches to tailor therapy in a patient-specific manner. Patient-specific models (PSMs) can be used to overcome imaging limitations, improve prognostic predictions, stratify patients, and assess treatment response in silico. The information gleaned from such models can aid in the construction and efficacy of clinical trials and treatment protocols, accelerating the pace of clinical research in the war on cancer. This review focuses on the growing translation of PSM to clinical neuro-oncology. It will also provide a forward-looking view on a new era of patient-specific MNO. PMID:23565501

  12. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: Results of online focus groups

    PubMed Central

    Zwaanswijk, Marieke; Tates, Kiek; van Dulmen, Sandra; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Kamps, Willem A; Bensing, Jozien M

    2007-01-01

    Background Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated communication preferences of childhood cancer patients, parents, and survivors of childhood cancer. Methods Communication preferences were examined by means of online focus groups. Seven patients (aged 8–17), 11 parents, and 18 survivors (aged 8–17 at diagnosis) participated. Recruitment took place by consecutive inclusion in two Dutch university oncological wards. Questions concerned preferences regarding interpersonal relationships, information exchange and participation in decision making. Results Participants expressed detailed and multi-faceted views regarding their needs and preferences in communication in paediatric oncology. They agreed on the importance of several interpersonal and informational aspects of communication, such as honesty, support, and the need to be fully informed. Participants generally preferred a collaborative role in medical decision making. Differences in views were found regarding the desirability of the patient's presence during consultations. Patients differed in their satisfaction with their parents' role as managers of the communication. Conclusion Young patients' preferences mainly concur with current guidelines of providing them with medical information and enabling their participation in medical decision making. Still, some variation in preferences was found, which faces health care providers with the task of balancing between the sometimes conflicting preferences of young cancer patients and their parents. PMID:17996108

  13. Endoscopic laser therapy of erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of patients in oncological hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Oleg N.; Kuvshinov, Yu. P.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kartasheva, E. O.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Ponomarev, Igor V.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The results of laser therapy present in 374 patients with erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of respiratory organs and of gastro-intestinal tract after oncological operations. Two types of laser namely endoscopic laser on the basis of He-Ne and Cu laser were used as sources of radiation. It was shown high therapeutic effectiveness of laser therapy. This method may be recommended for the above-mentioned category of the patients.

  14. Complications and oncologic outcomes of pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Somintara, Ongart; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Kongdan, Youwanush; Supsamutchai, Chairat; Sukpanich, Rupporn

    2016-01-01

    Background There are several techniques for harvesting the pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap after mastectomy in breast cancer patients. We examined the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique and determined factors associated with its complications and oncological outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the results of 168 TRAM flaps performed between January 2003 and December 2010, focusing on complications and oncologic outcomes. Results Among the 168 pedicled TRAM flap procedures in 158 patients, flap complications occurred in 34%. Most of the flap complications included some degree of fat necrosis. There was no total flap loss. Flap complications were associated with elderly patients and the presence of major donor site complications. Abdominal bulging and hernia occurred in 12% of patients. The bi-pedicled TRAM flap and higher body mass index (BMI) were significant factors associated with increased donor site complications. Seven patients (4%) developed loco-regional recurrence. Within a median follow-up of 27 months, distant metastasis and death occurred in 6% and 4% of patients, respectively. Conclusions The pedicled TRAM flap using the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique in the present study is consistent with the results from previous studies in flap complication rates and oncological outcomes. PMID:27563562

  15. Fears, Uncertainties, and Hopes: Patient-Initiated Actions and Doctors' Responses During Oncology Interviews.

    PubMed

    Beach, Wayne A; Dozier, David M

    2015-01-01

    New cancer patients frequently raise concerns about fears, uncertainties, and hopes during oncology interviews. This study sought to understand when and how patients raise their concerns, how doctors responded to these patient-initiated actions, and implications for communication satisfaction. A subsampling of video recorded and transcribed encounters was investigated involving 44 new patients and 14 oncologists. Patients completed pre/post self-report measures about fears, uncertainties, and hopes as well as postevaluations of interview satisfaction. Conversation analysis was used to initially identify pairs of patient-initiated and doctor-responsive actions. A coding scheme was subsequently developed, and two independent coding teams, comprised of two coders each, reliably identified patient-initiated and doctor-responsive social actions. Interactional findings reveal that new cancer patients initiate actions much more frequently than previous research had identified, concerns are usually raised indirectly, and with minimal emotion. Doctors tend to respond to these concerns immediately, but with even less affect, and rarely partner with patients. From pre/post results, it was determined that the higher patients' reported fears, the higher their postvisit fears and lower their satisfaction. Patients with high uncertainty were highly proactive (e.g., asked more questions), yet reported even greater uncertainties after encounters. Hopeful patients also exited interviews with high hopes. Overall, new patients were very satisfied: oncology interviews significantly decreased patients' fears and uncertainties, while increasing hopes. Discussion raises key issues for improving communication and managing quality cancer care. PMID:26134261

  16. Patient-centered care in cancer treatment programs: the future of integrative oncology through psychoeducation.

    PubMed

    Garchinski, Christina M; DiBiase, Ann-Marie; Wong, Raimond K; Sagar, Stephen M

    2014-12-01

    The reciprocal relationship between the mind and body has been a neglected process for improving the psychosocial care of cancer patients. Emotions form an important link between the mind and body. They play a fundamental role in the cognitive functions of decision-making and symptom control. Recognizing this relationship is important for integrative oncology. We define psychoeducation as the teaching of self-evaluation and self-regulation of the mind-body process. A gap exists between research evidence and implementation into clinical practice. The patients' search for self-empowerment through the pursuit of complementary therapies may be a surrogate for inadequate psychoeducation. Integrative oncology programs should implement psychoeducation that helps patients to improve both emotional and cognitive intelligence, enabling them to better negotiate cancer treatment systems. PMID:25531048

  17. Integrated multimedia timeline of medical images and data for thoracic oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Aberle, D R; Dionisio, J D; McNitt-Gray, M F; Taira, R K; Cárdenas, A F; Goldin, J G; Brown, K; Figlin, R A; Chu, W W

    1996-05-01

    A prototype multimedia medical database has been developed to provide image and textual data for thoracic oncology patients undergoing treatment of advanced malignancies. The database integrates image data from the hospital picture archiving and communication system with textual reports from the radiology information system, alphanumeric data contained in the hospital information system, and other electronic medical data. The database presents information in a timeline format and also contains visualization programs that permit the user to view and annotate radiographic measurements in tabular or graphic form. The database provides an efficient and intuitive display of the changing status of oncology patients. The ability to integrate, manage, and access relevant multimedia information may substantially enhance communication among distributed multidisciplinary health care providers and may ensure greater consistency and completeness of patient-related data.

  18. Frequency of and predictors for withholding patient safety concerns among oncology staff: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Schwappach, D L B; Gehring, K

    2015-05-01

    Speaking up about patient safety is vital to avoid errors reaching the patient and to improve a culture of safety. This study investigated the prevalence of non-speaking up despite concerns for safety and aimed to identify predictors for withholding voice among healthcare professionals (HCPs) in oncology. A self-administered questionnaire assessed safety concerns, speaking up beliefs and behaviours among nurses and doctors from nine oncology departments. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify predictors for withholding safety concerns. A total of 1013 HCPs returned the completed survey (response rate 65%). Safety concerns were common among responders. Fifty-four per cent reported to recognise their colleagues making potentially harmful errors at least sometimes. A majority of responders reported at least some episodes of withholding concerns about patient safety. Thirty-seven per cent said they remained silent at least once when they had information that might have helped prevent an incident. Respondents believed that a high level of interpersonal, communication and coping skills are necessary to speak up about patient safety issues at their workplace. Higher levels of perceived advocacy for patient safety and psychological safety significantly decreased the frequency of withholding voice. Remaining silent about safety concerns is a common phenomenon in oncology. Improved strategies are needed to support staff in effective communication and make cancer care safer. PMID:25287114

  19. Patient participation in the medical decision-making process in haemato-oncology--a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ernst, J; Berger, S; Weißflog, G; Schröder, C; Körner, A; Niederwieser, D; Brähler, E; Singer, S

    2013-09-01

    Cancer patients are showing increased interest in shared decision-making. Patients with haematological illnesses, however, express considerably less desire for shared decision-making as compared with other oncological patient groups. The goal of the current project was to identify the reasons for the lower desire for shared decision-making among patients with haematological illness. We conducted qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 11 haematological patients (39-70 years old) after the beginning of therapy concerning the course and evaluation of medical shared decision-making. The patients were often overwhelmed by the complexity of the illness and the therapy and did not want to assume any responsibility in medical decision-making. They reported a great deal of distress and very traditional paternalistic role expectations with regards to their health care providers, which limited the patients' ability to partake in the decision-making process. In contrast to the socio-cultural support for many other oncological diseases, haematological diseases are not as well supported, e.g. there is a lack of self-help materials, systematic provision of information and support groups for patients, which may be related to a lower empowerment of this patient population. Results show the limits of patient participation in the context of highly complicated medical conditions. In addition to already researched preferences of the physicians and patients for shared decision-making, future research should pay greater attention to the process and other variables relevant to this aspect of the doctor-patient relationship.

  20. From one side to the other: what is essential? Perception of oncology patients and their caregivers in the beginning of oncology treatment and in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Munhoz, Bruna Antenussi; Paiva, Henrique Soares; Abdalla, Beatrice Martinez Zugaib; Zaremba, Guilherme; Rodrigues, Andressa Macedo Paiva; Carretti, Mayra Ribeiro; Monteiro, Camila Ribeiro de Arruda; Zara, Aline; Silva, Jussara Oliveira; Assis, Widner Baptista; Auresco, Luciana Campi; Pereira, Leonardo Lopes; del Giglio, Adriana Braz; Lepori, Ana Claudia de Oliveira; Trufelli, Damila Cristina; del Giglio, Auro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the perception of oncology patients and their caregivers upon diagnosis and beginning of the therapy and during palliative care. Methods A cross-sectional study at the oncology and palliative care outpatients clinics of the Faculdade de Medicina do ABC . Clinical and demographic data from patients and their caregivers were collected and questionnaires regarding the elements considered important in relation to the treatment were applied. Results We enrolled 32 patients and 23 caregivers that were initiating treatment at the oncology outpatient clinic, as well as 20 patients and 20 caregivers at the palliative care clinic. Regarding the patients treated at the oncology clinic, the issues considered most important were a physician available to discuss the disease and answer questions (84%), trust in the physician (81%), and a physician with accessible language (81%). For their caregivers, the following issues were considered extremely important: trust in the medical team that treats the patients (96%), and the same medical team taking care of their relatives (87%). As to patients treated at the palliative care clinic, trust in the physician (83%), to be with people considered important to them (78%), and to be treated preserving their dignity (72%) were considered extremely important. For their caregivers, to receive adequate information about the disease and the treatment’s risks and benefits (84%), and sincere communication of information about the disease (79%) were considered extremely relevant. Conclusion Confidence through good communication and consistency in care were fundamental values to achieve satisfaction among caregivers and patients with cancer during all the course of disease development. PMID:25628202

  1. The patient-centered medical home in oncology: from concept to reality.

    PubMed

    Page, Ray D; Newcomer, Lee N; Sprandio, John D; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the cost of providing quality cancer care has been subject to an epic escalation causing concerns on the verge of a health care crisis. Innovative patient-management models in oncology based on patient-centered medical home (PCMH) principles, coupled with alternative payments to traditional fee for service (FFS), such as bundled and episodes payment are now showing evidence of effectiveness. These efforts have the potential to bend the cost curve while also improving quality of care and patient satisfaction. However, going forward with FFS alternatives, there are several performance-based payment options with an array of financial risks and rewards. Most novel payment options convey a greater financial risk and accountability on the provider. Therefore, the oncology medical home (OMH) can be a way to mitigate some financial risks by sharing savings with the payer through better global care of the patient, proactively preventing complications, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations. However, much of the medical home infrastructure that is required to reduced total costs of cancer care comes as an added expense to the provider. As best-of-practice quality standards are being elucidated and refined, we are now at a juncture where payers, providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders should work in concert to expand and implement the OMH framework into the variety of oncology practice environments to better equip them to assimilate into the new payment reform configurations of the future. PMID:25993243

  2. Risk of Infectious Complications in Hemato-Oncological Patients Treated with Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Reinwald, Mark; Boch, Tobias; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Buchheidt, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hemato-oncological diseases. Although disease-related immunosuppression represents one factor, aggressive treatment regimens, such as chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or antibody treatment, account for a large proportion of infectious side effects. With the advent of targeted therapies affecting specific kinases in malignant diseases, the outcome of patients has further improved. Nonetheless, dependent on the specific pathway targeted or off-target activity of the kinase inhibitor, therapy-associated infectious complications may occur. We review the most common and approved kinase inhibitors targeting a variety of hemato-oncological malignancies for their immunosuppressive potential and evaluate their risk of infectious side effects based on preclinical evidence and clinical data in order to raise awareness of the potential risks involved. PMID:27127405

  3. Oral-dental concerns of the pediatric oncology patient

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, K.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main concerns of all disciplines in health care today is maintaining the patient's quality of life and comfort during cancer therapy. Oral complications resulting from radiation or chemotherapy can be expected in a large percentage of patients. Conducting a dental evaluation and performing treatment before therapy can help prevent or lessen potential complications. With preventive care and fewer infections, the patient will be able to communicate with friends and family, and optimum care and comfort can be provided.

  4. Smoking behavior and patient education practices of oncology nurses in six countries.

    PubMed

    Lally, Robin M; Chalmers, Karen I; Johnson, Judith; Kojima, Misako; Endo, Emiko; Suzuki, Shizue; Lai, Yeur-Hur; Yang, Young-Hee; Degner, Lesley; Anderson, Elsie; Molassiotis, Alexander

    2008-09-01

    Worldwide, tobacco is the leading cause of preventable death, resulting in approximately 5 million deaths annually. Nurses are keenly positioned to work toward reducing tobacco-related illness and deaths. Therefore, guided by the health belief model, the purpose of this study was to explore the smoking behavior, beliefs, smoking cessation education practices, and existing smoking policies at the institutions of a sample of practicing oncology nurses in Canada, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, United Kingdom, and the United States. A 27-item structured survey, designed for this study in English and translated and reverse translated by the Asian countries, was distributed to a convenience sample of nurses attending oncology meetings in each country. Totally 759 surveys were completed and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Principle findings indicate that 4.5% of these nurses currently smoke, although 23.3% reported smoking previously. While many nurses (74%) reported frequently assessing the smoking status of patients, only 50% reported discussing cessation with their patients that smoke. Although the majority (80%) reported feeling comfortable with asking their patients about smoking, only 23% felt it was the nurse's role. The findings indicate that while internationally oncology nurses recognize the importance of smoking cessation, significant room for improvement exists in translating this into practice.

  5. Exercise and Fatigue in Adolescent and Young Adult Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Hooke, Mary C.; Friedman, Debra L.; Campbell, Kristin; Withycombe, Janice; Schwartz, Cindy L.; Kelly, Kara; Meza, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is a significant problem for adolescent and young adult (AYA) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. The relationship between exercise and fatigue is complex. This study explored the trajectory of and the relationship between exercise and fatigue over 36 months post-therapy in a cohort of 103 AYA-aged HL survivors treated on Children's Oncology Group (COG) study AHOD0031. Descriptive statistics and generalized estimating equations were used in this secondary data analysis. Exercise and fatigue improved over time but were unrelated; amount of exercise at end of therapy predicted amount of exercise at 12 (p = 0.02) and 36 (p = 0.0008) months post-therapy. PMID:26421221

  6. Informal Financial Assistance for Patients With a Hematological Malignancy: Implications for Oncology Social Work Practice.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam

    2015-01-01

    The article presents original research findings on informal financial assistance for hematological patients; that is, the gifts from family, friends, and communities that help patients cope with the financial hardship associated with cancer. The qualitative study involved interviews with 45 hematology patients that were audio-recorded, transcribed, coded, and then thematically analyzed. The findings examine the differing perspectives that individuals and families bring to the notion of informal financial aid, provide examples of individuals who require and receive informal financial assistance, and conclude with descriptions of those who require informal financial assistance but it is not available. The implications of the findings for oncology social work practice are explored.

  7. Patient navigation in oncology nursing: an innovative blended learning model.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Joanne; Brudnoy, Liat; Soong, Tracy; Graham, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Nurses are ideally suited to assume professional patient navigation roles in cancer care. Continuing education and staff development are essential for nurses to implement their roles to the fullest potential. This article describes an innovative patient navigation course that was developed to meet the educational needs of nurses who work with patients who have been diagnosed with cancer or are undergoing evaluation for cancer. Adult learning principles and interactive teaching strategies facilitated learning that was relevant and applicable to all nurses. Of the 200 participants, 77.5% completed questionnaires before and after the course. The questionnaire administered after the course showed a statistically significant increase in average total confidence scores on knowledge and skills in the seven domains examined (p < .00 to .03). This change reflected improvements in overall confidence in key principles and role functions of patient navigation. The course provided an opportunity for nurses to enhance their individual practice in patient navigation in the following areas: meeting patient needs for emotional and supportive care; providing information and education; and facilitating coordination and continuity of care.

  8. Oncology patients' and professional nurses' perceptions of important nurse caring behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Caring is the essence of nursing. Caring to be meaningful needs to be based on mutual agreement between nurses and patients as to what constitutes nurse caring behaviors. As a result, healthcare professional can enhance patients' satisfaction of care by providing appropriate caring behavior. However, previous research that combined multiple types of patients, nurses and institutions demonstrated disagreement in prioritizing important behaviors. This paper reports a study that aimed at determining the caring behaviors which oncology patients and oncology nurses perceive to be the most important. Methods This study is a comparative descriptive design that was conducted in an Iranian oncology centre. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 200 patients and 40 nurses to take part in the study. Data were collected over a period of 4 months in 2009 using the Caring Assessment Questionnaire, developed by Larson. Caring behaviors (n = 57) were ranked on a 5-point Likert-type scale and ordered in six subscales: "Being accessible", "Explains and facilitates", "Comforts", "Anticipates", "Trusting relationship", "Monitors and follows through". The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 13.0. The overall mean was calculated for each subscale to determine the rank distribution of the subscales. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test analysis of variables was used to compare patients' and nurses' scores on subscales. Results The results demonstrate that both groups considered the same order of importance of caring, the high ranking of "Monitors and Follows through and "Being Accessible" and the low ranking of "Comforts" and "Trusting Relationships". Also, Patients only ranked "Being accessible" (p = 0.04) and "Explains and facilitates" (p = 0.03) higher than nurses. Conclusions The oncology patients and nurses perceived highly physical aspects of caring and the results provide for nurses to be aware of the need, during their interactions with patients, to

  9. Digital Audio Recording of Initial Patient Visits to an Ocular Oncology Clinic: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Seider, Michael I; Damato, Bertil E

    2015-05-01

    It is challenging for patients to receive a new diagnosis of a life-threatening ocular tumor when visiting an ocular oncology clinic for the first time. Audio recording of patient-physician interactions has been shown to be an effective memory aid and stress-reducing technique for patients with various types of nonophthalmic cancer. This study evaluated a protocol for digitally recording the initial conversation between the ocular oncologist and the patient. Twenty patients were enrolled in the study, and 13 patients (65%) returned the survey. All of the patients who returned the survey reported being "very satisfied" with the audio recording, indicating that patients with a newly diagnosed ocular tumor were highly satisfied with the audio recording of their conversations with the ocular oncologist. Although larger studies are needed to confirm this conclusion, the initial results are encouraging. PMID:26057768

  10. Oncologic outcomes following metastasectomy in colorectal cancer patients developing distant metastases after initial treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Yoon; Suh, Kwang Wook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We performed a comparative analysis of the clinicopathologic features and oncologic outcomes of colorectal cancer patients with metachronous versus synchronous metastasis, according to the prognostic factors. Methods Ninety-three patients who underwent curative resection for distant metastatic colorectal cancer were included in the study between December 2001 and December 2011. We assessed recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with distant metastasis who underwent curative surgery. Results The most common site of distant metastasis was lung alone (n = 19, 51.4%) in patients with metachronous metastasis, while liver alone was most common in those with synchronous metastasis (n = 40, 71.4%). Overall survival rate was significantly different between patients with synchronous metastasis and metachronous metastasis (34.0% vs. 53.7%; P = 0.013). Incomplete resection of the metastatic lesion was significantly related to poor overall survival in both, patients with synchronous metastasis, and metachronous metastasis. Conclusion Our study indicates that patients developing distant metastasis after initial treatment show a different metastatic pattern and better oncologic outcomes, as compared to those presenting with distant metastasis. Resection with tumor free margins significantly improves survival in patients with metachronous as well as synchronous metastasis. PMID:25960988

  11. Empowering Preadolescent and Adolescent Leukemia Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Kathy

    1988-01-01

    Describes effects of leukemia diagnosis and treatment for preadolescents and adolescents. Discusses strategies for social workers to assist these cancer patients in participating actively in the day-to-day management of their own care. (ABL)

  12. Moving CLABSI Prevention Beyond the ICU: Risk Factors in Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Matthew; Conway, Margaret; Wirth, Kathleen; Potter-Bynoe, Gail; Billett, Amy L.; Sandora, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) frequently complicate the use of central venous catheters (CVCs) among pediatric patients with cancer. Our objectives were to describe the microbiology and identify risk factors for hospital-onset CLABSI in this patient population. Design Retrospective case-control study. Setting Oncology and stem cell transplant units of a freestanding, 396-bed quaternary care pediatric hospital. Participants Case subjects (N=54) were patients with a diagnosis of malignancy and/or stem cell transplant recipients with CLABSI occurring during admission. Controls (N=108) were identified using risk set sampling of hospitalizations among patients with a CVC, matched on date of admission. Methods Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of CLABSI. Results The majority of CLABSI isolates were Gram-positive bacteria (58%). The most frequently isolated organism was Enterococcus faecium, and 6 of 9 isolates were resistant to vancomycin. In multivariate analyses, independent risk factors for CLABSI included platelet transfusion within the prior week (odds ratio [OR], 10.90 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.02–39.38], P<0.001) and CVC placement within the previous month (<1 week vs. ≥1 month: OR, 11.71 [95% CI, 1.98–69.20], P=0.02; ≥1 week and <1 month vs. ≥1 month: OR, 7.37 [95% CI, 1.85–29.36], P=0.004). Conclusions Adjunctive measures to prevent CLABSI among pediatric oncology patients may be most beneficial in the month following CVC insertion and in patients requiring frequent platelet transfusions. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci may be an emerging cause of CLABSI in hospitalized pediatric oncology patients and are unlikely to be treated by typical empiric antimicrobial regimens. PMID:22011534

  13. Patient-Reported Outcomes Are Changing the Landscape in Oncology Care: Challenges and Opportunities for Payers

    PubMed Central

    Zagadailov, Erin; Fine, Michael; Shields, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background A patient-reported outcome (PRO) is a subjective report that comes from a patient without interpretation by a clinician. Because of the increasingly significant role of PROs in the development and evaluation of new medicines, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a formal guidance to describe how PRO instruments will be reviewed and evaluated with respect to claims in approved medical product labeling. Meanwhile, PROs continue to appear in oncology clinical trials more frequently; however, it is unclear how payers and policymakers can use PRO data in the context of decision-making for cancer treatments. Objective The objective of this article is to discuss the challenges and opportunities of incorporating oncology-related PRO data into payer decision-making. Discussion Payer concerns with PRO instruments are often related to issues regarding measurement, relevance, quality, and interpretability of PROs. Payers may dismiss PROs that do not independently predict improved outcomes. The FDA guidance released in 2009 demonstrates, as evidenced by the case of ruxolitinib, how PRO questionnaires can be generated in a relevant, trustworthy, and meaningful way, which provides an opportunity for payers and policy decision makers to focus on how to use PRO data in their decision-making. This is particularly relevant in oncology, where a recent and sizable number of clinical trials include PRO measures. Conclusion As an increasing number of oncology medications enter the market with product labeling claims that contain PRO data, payers will need to better familiarize themselves with the opportunities associated with PRO questionnaires when making coverage decisions. PRO measures will continue to provide valuable information regarding the risk–benefit profile of novel agents. As such, PRO measures may provide evidence that should be considered in payers' decisions and discussions; however, the formal role of PROs and the pertinence of PROs in decision

  14. Helping patients to reduce tobacco consumption in oncology: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Lucchiari, Claudio; Masiero, Marianna; Botturi, Andrea; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The present overview focuses on evidence of smoking cessation approaches in oncology settings with the aim to provide health personnel a critical perspective on how to help their patients. This narrative review is structured in two main sections: the first one describes the psycho-cognitive variables involved in the decision to continue smoking after a cancer diagnosis and during the treatment; the second section relates methods and tools may be recommended, being evidence-based, to support smoking cessation in oncology settings. Active smoking increases not only susceptibility to common cancers in the general population, but also increases disease severity and comorbidities in cancer patients. Nowadays, scientific evidence has identified many strategies to give up smoking, but a lack of knowledge exists for treatment of nicotine dependence in the cancer population. Health personnel is often ambiguous when approaching the problem, while their contribution is essential in guiding patients towards healthier choices. We argue that smoking treatments for cancer patients deserve more attention and that clinical features, individual characteristics and needs of the patient should be assessed in order to increase the attempts success rate. Health personnel that daily work and interact with cancer patients and their caregivers have a fundamental role in the promotion of the health changing. For this reason, it is important that they have adequate knowledge and resources in order to support cancer patients to stop tobacco cigarette smoking and promoting and healthier lifestyle. PMID:27504234

  15. Wait Times Experienced by Lung Cancer Patients in the BC Southern Interior to Obtain Oncologic Care: Exploration of the Intervals from First Abnormal Imaging to Oncologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rezwan; Boyce, Andrew; Halperin, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is associated with rapid disease progression, which can significantly progress over a duration of four to eight weeks. This study examines the time interval lung cancer patients from the interior of British Columbia (BC) experience while undergoing diagnostic evaluation, biopsy, staging, and preparation for treatment. Methods: A chart review of lung cancer patients (n=231) referred to the BC Cancer Agency Centre for the Southern Interior between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 was performed. Time zero was defined as the date of the first abnormal chest imaging. Time intervals, expressed as median averages, to specialist consult, biopsy, oncologic referral, initial oncology consultation, and commencement of oncologic treatment were obtained. Results: The median time interval from first abnormal chest imaging to a specialist consultation was 18 days (interquartile range, IQR, 7-36). An additional nine days elapsed prior to biopsy in the form of bronchoscopy, CT-guided biopsy, or sputum cytology (median; IQR, 3-21); if lobectomy was required, 18 days elapsed (median; IQR, 9-28). Eight days were required for pathologic diagnosis and subsequent referral to the cancer centre (median; IQR, 3-16.5). Once referral was received, 10 days elapsed prior to consultation with either a medical or radiation oncologist (median, IQR 5-18). Finally, eight days was required for initiation of radiation and/or chemotherapy (median; IQR, 1-15). The median wait time from detection of lung cancer on imaging to oncologic treatment in the form of radiation and/or chemotherapy was 65.5 days (IQR, 41.5-104.3).  Interpretation: Patients in the BC Southern Interior experience considerable delays in accessing lung cancer care. During this time, the disease has the potential to significantly progress and it is possible that a subset of patients may lose their opportunity for curative intent treatment. PMID:26543688

  16. Guiding Oncology Patients Through the Maze of Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Giuse, Nunzia Bettinsoli; Kusnoor, Sheila V; Koonce, Taneya Y; Naylor, Helen M; Chen, Sheau-Chiann; Blasingame, Mallory N; Anderson, Ingrid A; Micheel, Christine M; Levy, Mia A; Ye, Fei; Lovly, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    As the role of genomics in health care grows, patients increasingly require adequate genetic literacy to fully engage in their care. This study investigated a model for delivering consumer-friendly genetic information to improve understanding of precision medicine using health literacy and learning style principles. My Cancer Genome (MCG), a freely available cancer decision support tool, was used as a testbed. MCG content on a melanoma tumor mutation, BRAF V600E, was translated to a 6th-grade reading level, incorporating multiple learning modalities. A total of 90 patients and caregivers were recruited from a melanoma clinic at an academic medical center and randomized to 3 groups. Group A (control) received an exact copy of text from MCG. Group B was given the same content with hyperlinks to videos explaining key genetic concepts, identified and labeled by the team as knowledge pearls. Group C received the translated content with the knowledge pearls embedded. Changes in knowledge were measured through pre and post questionnaires. Group C showed the greatest improvement in knowledge. The study results demonstrate that providing information based on health literacy and learning style principles can improve patients' understanding of genetic concepts, thus increasing their likelihood of taking an active role in any decision making concerning their health. PMID:27043753

  17. “Il Corpo Ritrovato”: Dermocosmetological Skin Care Project for the Oncologic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, G.; Romano, M. C.; Cameli, N.; Mariano, M.; Pastore, F.; Annunziata, M. C.; Mazzella, C.; De Vita, Valerio; Mauriello, Maria Chiara; Monfrecola, G.

    2011-01-01

    Neoplastic disease and its therapeutic options have a huge impact on the patient's quality of life from both the emotional and the working point of view. The project “Il Corpo Ritrovato” aims at creating an interdisciplinary network of physicians to improve the quality of life of the oncologic patient, focusing on such important aspects as dermocosmetological skin care but also on the evaluation of new therapeutic and diagnostic algorithms in order to make further progress in the field of prevention. PMID:22084736

  18. Information and communication technology (ICT) in oncology. Patients' and relatives' experiences and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Norum, Jan; Grev, Anne; Moen, Mari-Ann; Balteskard, Lise; Holthe, Kari

    2003-05-01

    Cancer patients and relatives worldwide are turning more and more to the internet to obtain health information. The goal of this survey was to clarify their experiences and suggestions on the implementation of information and communication technology (ICT) in oncology. A total of 127 patients and 60 relatives visiting the outpatient clinic at the Department of Oncology, University of North Norway (UNN), the regional office of the Norwegian Cancer Union (NCU) and the Montebello Centre were included in a questionnaire-based study. Participants were recruited during the period September 2001 to February 2002. There were 92 women and 95 men. We revealed that hospital doctors, followed by nurses and friends, were the most important informants. Two-thirds of patients and relatives had access to the internet, but fewer than one-third had searched the internet for medical information and only one-fifth had discussed information accessed with their doctor. Only one-tenth had visited a hospital website. Internet access was correlated with young age. Almost two-thirds suggested that e-mail and/or WAP (wireless application protocol) communication should be included in hospital-patient communication. Concerning hospital websites, waiting time, treatment offer and addresses were considered the top three topics of interest. In conclusion, the majority of cancer patients and relatives have access to the internet. They recommend ICT employed in patient-hospital communication and suggest waiting time, treatment offers and addresses the three most important topics on hospital websites.

  19. Treatment of colorectal cancer in older patients: International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) consensus recommendations 2013.

    PubMed

    Papamichael, D; Audisio, R A; Glimelius, B; de Gramont, A; Glynne-Jones, R; Haller, D; Köhne, C-H; Rostoft, S; Lemmens, V; Mitry, E; Rutten, H; Sargent, D; Sastre, J; Seymour, M; Starling, N; Van Cutsem, E; Aapro, M

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in Europe and worldwide, with the peak incidence in patients >70 years of age. However, as the treatment algorithms for the treatment of patients with CRC become ever more complex, it is clear that a significant percentage of older CRC patients (>70 years) are being less than optimally treated. This document provides a summary of an International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) task force meeting convened in Paris in 2013 to update the existing expert recommendations for the treatment of older (geriatric) CRC patients published in 2009 and includes overviews of the recent data on epidemiology, geriatric assessment as it relates to surgery and oncology, and the ability of older CRC patients to tolerate surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, treatment of their metastatic disease including palliative chemotherapy with and without the use of the biologics, and finally the use of adjuvant and palliative radiotherapy in the treatment of older rectal cancer patients. An overview of each area was presented by one of the task force experts and comments invited from other task force members.

  20. The Cardio-oncology Program: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Care of Cancer Patients With Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Parent, Sarah; Pituskin, Edith; Paterson, D Ian

    2016-07-01

    Improved cancer survivorship has resulted in a growing number of Canadians affected by cancer and cardiovascular disease. As a consequence, cardio-oncology programs are rapidly emerging to treat cancer patients with de novo and preexisting cardiovascular disease. The primary goal of a cardio-oncology program is to preserve cardiovascular health to allow the timely delivery of cancer therapy and achieve disease-free remission. Multidisciplinary programs in oncology and cardiology have been associated with enhanced patient well-being and improved clinical outcomes. Because of the complex needs of these multisystem patients, a similar model of care is gaining acceptance. The optimal composition of the cardio-oncology team will typically involve support from cardiology, oncology, and nursing. Depending on the clinical scenario, additional consultation from dietetics, pharmacy, and social services might be required. Timely access to consultation and testing is another prerequisite for cardio-oncology programs because delays in treating cardiac complications and nonadherence to prescribed cancer therapy are each associated with poor outcomes. Recommended reasons for referral to cardio-oncology programs include primary prevention for those at high risk for cardiotoxicity and the secondary treatment of new or worsening cardiovascular disease in cancer patients and survivors. Management is multifaceted and can involve lifestyle education, pharmacotherapy, enhanced cardiovascular surveillance, and support services, such as exercise training. The lack of evidence to guide clinical decisions and recommendations in cardio-oncology is a major challenge and opportunity for health care professionals. Large multicentre prospective registries are needed to adequately power risk model calculations and generate hypotheses for novel interventions.

  1. TRAJECTORIES OF ANXIETY IN ONCOLOGY PATIENTS AND FAMILY CAREGIVERS DURING AND AFTER RADIATION THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Laura B.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Dodd, Marylin; Lee, Kathryn; West, Claudia; Paul, Steven M.; Wara, William; Swift, Patrick; Miaskowski, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Anxiety is common in patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) and in their family caregivers (FCs). Little is known about individual differences in anxiety trajectories during and after RT. This study aimed to identify distinct latent classes of oncology patients and their FCs based on self-reported anxiety symptoms from the beginning to four months after the completion of RT. Method Using growth mixture modeling (GMM), longitudinal changes in Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) scores among 167 oncology outpatients with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer and 85 FCs were evaluated to determine distinct anxiety symptom profiles. STAI-S scores were assessed just prior to, throughout the course of, and for four months following RT (total of 7 assessments). Baseline trait anxiety and depressive symptoms (during and after RT) were also assessed. Results The GMM analysis identified three latent classes of oncology patients and FCs with distinct trajectories of state anxiety: Low Stable (n=93, 36.9%), Intermediate Decelerating (n=82, 32.5%), and High (n=77, 30.6%) classes. Younger participants, women, ethnic minorities, and those with children at home were more likely to be classified in the High anxiety class. Higher levels of trait anxiety and depressive symptoms, at the initiation of RT, were associated with being in the High anxiety class. Conclusions Subgroups of patients and FCs with high, intermediate, and low mean levels of anxiety during and after RT were identified with GMM. Additional research is needed to better understand the heterogeneity of symptom experiences as well as comorbid symptoms in patients and FCs. PMID:21324418

  2. Integrative oncology for breast cancer patients: introduction of an expert-based model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant breast neoplasms are among the most frequent forms of cancer in the Western world. Conventional treatment of breast cancer may include surgery, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, radiation and/or immunotherapy, all of which are often accompanied by severe side effects. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been shown to be effective in alleviating those symptoms. Furthermore, with patient survival rates increasing, oncologists, psychologists and other therapists have to become more sensitive to the needs of cancer survivors that go beyond than the mere alleviation of symptoms. Many CAM methods are geared to treat the patient in a holistic manner and thus are also concerned with the patient’s psychological and spiritual needs. Discussion The use of certain CAM methods may become problematic when, as frequently occurs, patients use them indiscriminately and without informing their oncologists. Herbal medicines and dietary supplements, especially, may interfere with primary cancer treatments or have other detrimental effects. Thus, expertise in this highly specialized field of integrative medicine should be available to patients so that they can be advised about the benefits and negative effects of such preparations and practices. Being a beneficial combination of conventional and CAM care, integrative oncology makes possible the holistic approach to cancer care. The concept of integrative oncology for breast cancer is jointly practiced by the Department of Internal and Integrative Medicine, Kliniken Essen-Mitte, academic teaching hospital of the University of Duisburg-Essen, and the Breast Center at Kliniken Essen-Mitte in Germany. This model is introduced here; its scope is reviewed, and its possible implications for the practice of integrative medicine are discussed. Summary Evidence-based integrative care is crucial to the field of oncology in establishing state-of-the-art care for breast cancer patients. PMID:23170989

  3. Assessing the spiritual needs and practices of oncology patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dedeli, Ozden; Yildiz, Emel; Yuksel, Safak

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the oncology patients' spiritual needs and activities. Besides, the study was to provide clinical evaluation of the feasibility and usefulness of the Patients Spiritual Needs Assessment Scale. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was performed by using a demographic and spiritual practices questionnaire, the Turkish version of the Patients Spiritual Needs Assessment Scale. The results of our study demonstrated that the most common spiritual needs of patients with cancer were "to address issues before death and dying" (100%), "feel a sense of peace and contentment" (94.8%), and "for companionship" (93.5%). Spiritually assessing a patient with cancer requires knowledge of how spiritual needs may manifest and how to talk with a client about his or her spiritual needs. These findings can help nurses to begin this process of providing spiritual care for patients with cancer. PMID:25658933

  4. Robotic surgery in urological oncology: patient care or market share?

    PubMed

    Kaye, Deborah R; Mullins, Jeffrey K; Carter, H Ballentine; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2015-01-01

    Surgical robotic use has grown exponentially in spite of limited or uncertain benefits and large costs. In certain situations, adoption of robotic technology provides value to patients and society. In other cases, however, the robot provides little or no increase in surgical quality, with increased expense, and, therefore, does not add value to health care. The surgical robot is expensive to purchase, maintain and operate, and can contribute to increased consumerism in relation to surgical procedures, and increased reliance on the technology, thus driving future increases in health-care expenditure. Given the current need for budget constraints, the cost-effectiveness of specific procedures must be evaluated. The surgical robot should be used when cost-effective, but traditional open and laparoscopic techniques also need to be continually fostered. PMID:25535000

  5. Delivering care to oncology patients in the community: an innovative integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Hanan, Terry; Mullen, Louise; Laffoy, Marie; O'Toole, Eve; Richmond, Janice; Wynne, Mary

    2014-08-01

    A community oncology nursing programme was developed in Ireland between the hospital and community health services for patients receiving systemic cancer therapy, in response to a service need. A robust evaluation of the pilot programme was undertaken, which found that defined clinical procedures traditionally undertaken in hospitals were safely undertaken in the patient's home with no adverse effects. There was a dramatic decrease in hospital attendances for these defined clinical procedures, and hospital capacity was consequently freed up. Patients valued having aspects of their care delivered at home and reported that it improved their quality of life, including reduced hospital visits and travel time. Community nurses expanded their scope of practice and became partners with oncology day-ward nurses in caring for these patients. Community nurses developed the competence and confidence to safely deliver cancer care in the community. This initiative shows that defined elements of acute cancer care can be safely delivered in the community so long as the training and support are provided. The findings and recommendations of the evaluation resulted in university accreditation and approval for national roll-out of the programme. Integration of services between primary and secondary care is a key priority. This innovative programme is a good example of shared integrated care that benefits both patients and health-care providers. PMID:25089749

  6. Is the clinical use of cannabis by oncology patients advisable?

    PubMed

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Avisar, Adva; Batash, Ron; Schaffer, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    The use of the cannabis plant for various medical indications by cancer patients has been rising significantly in the past few years in several European countries, the US and Israel. The increase in use comes from public demand for the most part, and not due to a scientific basis. Cannabis chemistry is complex, and the isolation and extraction of the active ingredient remain difficult. The active agent in cannabis is unique among psychoactive plant materials, as it contains no nitrogen and, thus, is not an alkaloid. Alongside inconclusive evidence of increased risks of lung and head and neck cancers from prolonged smoking of the plant produce, laboratory evidence of the anti-cancer effects of plant components exists, but with no clinical research in this direction. The beneficial effects of treatment with the plant, or treatment with medicine produced from its components, are related to symptoms of the disease: pain, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight loss. The clinical evidence of the efficacy of cannabis for these indications is only partial. However, recent scientific data from studies with THC and cannabidiol combinations report the first clinical indication of cancer-related pain relief. The difficulties of performing research into products that are not medicinal, such as cannabis, have not allowed a true study of the cannabis plant extract although, from the public point of view, such studies are greatly desirable. PMID:24606496

  7. Acuity-based nurse assignment and patient scheduling in oncology clinics.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bohui; Turkcan, Ayten

    2016-09-01

    The oncology clinics use different nursing care delivery models to provide chemotherapy treatment to cancer patients. Functional and primary care delivery models are the most commonly used methods in the clinics. In functional care delivery model, patients are scheduled for a chemotherapy appointment without considering availabilities of individual nurses, and nurses are assigned to patients according to patient acuities, nursing skill, and patient mix on a given day after the appointment schedule is determined. Patients might be treated by different nurses on different days of their treatment. In primary care delivery model, each patient is assigned to a primary nurse, and the patients are scheduled to be seen by the same nurse every time they come to the clinic for treatment. However, these clinics might experience high variability in daily nurse workload due to treatment protocols that should be followed strictly. In that case, part-time nurses can be utilized to share the excess workload of the primary nurses. The aim of this study is to develop optimization methods to reduce the time spent for nurse assignment and patient scheduling in oncology clinics that use different nursing care delivery models. For the functional delivery model, a multiobjective optimization model with the objectives of minimizing patient waiting times and nurse overtime is proposed to solve the nurse assignment problem. For the primary care delivery model, another multiobjective optimization model with the objectives of minimizing total overtime and total excess workload is proposed to solve the patient scheduling problem. Spreadsheet-based optimization tools are developed for easy implementation. Computational results show that the proposed models provide multiple nondominated solutions, which can be used to determine the optimal staffing levels.

  8. Physical Activity Participation and Preferences: Developmental and Oncology-Related Transitions in Adolescents Treated for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe motor function and participation in, barriers to, and preferences for physical activity (PA) in adolescents during and after treatment of cancer and to discuss PA promotion in the context of developmental and cancer transitions. Method: A cross-sectional survey study used the Transfer and Basic Mobility and Sports/Physical Functioning self-report and parent-report scales of the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) and questions about PA participation and preferences to collect information from 80 adolescents and 63 parents. Results: PODCI scores for adolescents receiving treatment were more variable and significantly lower than those of adolescents who had been off treatment for more than 2 years. Fatigue, pain, general health, and doctor's orders were frequently identified as barriers to PA for adolescents receiving treatment. Many did not achieve recommended levels of PA. The adolescents expressed preferences for being active with friends and family, at home or in school, in the afternoon or evening, and through daily recreational and sports activities typical of teenagers. Conclusions: Physical abilities and participation in and barriers to PA vary across the cancer journey. Interventions should be sensitive to variability and acknowledge individual preferences and environments throughout the trajectories and transitions of cancer treatment and youth development to achieve lifelong healthy lifestyles. PMID:26839461

  9. Assessing Interpersonal and Communication Skills in Radiation Oncology Residents: A Pilot Standardized Patient Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Melody; Berman, Abigail T.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; LaMarra, Denise; Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita; Vapiwala, Neha

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Methods and Materials: Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of “bad news” to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Results: Overall resident performance ratings were “good” to “excellent,” with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. Conclusions: The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills.

  10. Precision oncology for patients with advanced cancer: the challenges of malignant snowflakes

    PubMed Central

    Kurzrock, Razelle; Giles, Francis J

    2015-01-01

    Precision oncology implies customizing treatment to the unique molecular and biologic characteristics of each individual and their cancer. Its implementation is being facilitated by remarkable technological advances in genomic sequencing, as well as the increasing availability of targeted and immunotherapeutic drugs. Yet, next generation sequencing may be a disruptive technology in that its results suggest that classic paradigms for clinical research and practice are a poor fit with the complex reality encountered in metastatic malignancies. Indeed, it is evident that advanced tumors have heterogeneous molecular landscapes that mostly differ between patients. Traditional modes of clinical research/practice are drug centered, with a strategy of finding commonalities between patients so that they can be grouped together and treated similarly. However, if each patient with metastatic cancer has a unique molecular portfolio, a new patient-centered, N-of-one approach that utilizes individually tailored treatment is needed. PMID:26030337

  11. Patient-reported outcomes and the evolution of adverse event reporting in oncology.

    PubMed

    Trotti, Andy; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Setser, Ann; Basch, Ethan

    2007-11-10

    Adverse event (AE) reporting in oncology has evolved from informal descriptions to a highly systematized process. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is the predominant system for describing the severity of AEs commonly encountered in oncology clinical trials. CTCAE clinical descriptors have been developed empirically during more than 30 years of use. The method of data collection is clinician based. Limitations of the CTC system include potential for incomplete reporting and limited guidance on data analysis and presentation methods. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) is a comprehensive medical terminology system used for regulatory reporting and drug labeling. MedDRA does not provide for severity ranking of AEs. CTC-based data presentations are the primary method of AE data reporting used in scientific journals and oncology meetings. Patient-reported outcome instruments (PROs) cover the subjective domain of AEs. Exploratory work suggests PROs can be used with a high degree of patient engagement and compliance. Additional studies are needed to determine how PROs can be used to complement current AE reporting systems. Potential models for integrating PROs into AE reporting are described in this review. AE reporting methods will continue to evolve in response to changing therapies and growing interest in measuring the impact of cancer treatment on health status. Although integration of PROs into AE reporting may ultimately improve the comprehensiveness and quality of collected data, it may also increase the administrative burden and cost of conducting trials. Therefore, care must be used when developing health outcomes and safety data collection plans. PMID:17991931

  12. Provider practice models in ambulatory oncology practice: analysis of productivity, revenue, and provider and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Buswell, Lori A; Ponte, Patricia Reid; Shulman, Lawrence N

    2009-07-01

    Physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants often work in teams to deliver cancer care in ambulatory oncology practices. This is likely to become more prevalent as the demand for oncology services rises, and the number of providers increases only slightly.

  13. Psychosocial support for patients in pediatric oncology: the influences of parents, schools, peers, and technology.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Lalita K; Kato, Pamela M

    2003-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of pediatric cancer can be associated with profound psychosocial changes in the life of young patients. Although nurses, physicians, and other health care professionals are important sources of support, psychosocial support is also available through parents, schools, and peers. This article presents a review of the literature on how parents, schools, and peers affect the coping and adjustment of young patients with cancer and critically reviews interventions directed at improving functioning in these areas. Special attention is paid to recent interventions that exploit technology such as video games, CD-ROMs, and the Internet to provide creative new forms of support for patients in pediatric oncology. Existing research on both technological and interpersonal forms of intervention and support shows promising results, and suggestions for further study are provided.

  14. Tools for improving the characterization and visualization of changes in neuro-oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Hsu, William; Taira, Ricky K

    2010-11-13

    Capturing how a patient's medical problems change over time is important for understanding the progression of a disease, its effects, and response to treatment. We describe two prototype tools that are being developed as part of a data processing pipeline for standardizing, structuring, and visualizing problems and findings documented in clinical reports associated with neuro-oncology patients. Given a list of problems and findings identified using a natural language processing (NLP) system, we have created a mapping tool that assigns an observation of a problem to one of nine classes that describe change. The second tool utilizes iconic representations of the nine classes to generate a timeline interface, enabling users to pan, zoom, and filter the data. The result of this preliminary work is an automated approach for understanding and summarizing the evolution of a problem within the patient electronic medical record.

  15. [Brief interdisciplinary oncology: a model for ambulatory, multimodal treatment of tumor patients].

    PubMed

    Liersch, T; Wörmann, B; Rauschecker, H F; Kaufmann, C C; Hiddemann, W; Becker, H; Gatzemeier, W

    1997-01-01

    Since 10/1994 the Interdisziplinäre Kurzzeit-Onkologie (IKO) is an outpatient department for the treatment of patients with cancer used by the departments of hematology/oncology and surgery. Between 09/1995 and 02/1997, 818 patients received 2024 cytotoxic therapies with neoadjuvant (15%), adjuvant (65%) or palliative (20%) intention-mostly within multicenter clinical studies. Ambulatory operations like removal of lymph nodes for diagnosis or the implantation of venous catheter systems prepared the way for specialized modalities of cancer therapy. The high compliance and consent of patients, combined with better understanding of cancer therapy, resulted in an enhanced quality of life and optimized therapy. Standardization in diagnostics and fast realisation of interdisciplinary treatment schedules lead to reduction of costs and to enhancement of quality and security in cancer therapy.

  16. Readability of American Online Patient Education Materials in Urologic Oncology: a Need for Simple Communication

    PubMed Central

    Pruthi, Amanda; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Raynor, Mathew C.; Woods, Michael E.; Wallen, Eric M.; Smith, Angela B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine readability levels of reputable cancer and urologic websites addressing bladder, prostate, kidney and testicular cancers. Methods Online patient education materials (PEMs) for bladder, prostate, kidney and testicular malignancies were evaluated from the American Cancer Society, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Urology Care Foundation (AUA-UCF), Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN), Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), Kidney Cancer Association (KCA), and Testicular Cancer Resource Center (TCRC). Grade level was determined using several readability indices, and analyses were performed based on cancer type, website, and content area (general, causes, risk factors and prevention, diagnosis and staging, treatment, and post-treatment). Results Estimated grade level of online PEMs ranged from 9.2 to 14.2 with an overall mean of 11.7. Websites for kidney cancer had the least difficult readability (11.3) and prostate cancer had the most difficult readability (12.1). Among specific websites, the most difficult readability levels were noted for the AUA-UCF website for bladder and prostate cancer and the KCA and TCRC for kidney and testes cancer. Readability levels within content areas varied based on disease and website. Conclusion Online PEMs in urologic oncology are written at a level above the average American reader. Simplification of these resources are necessary to improve patient understanding of urologic malignancy. PMID:25623686

  17. Palliative care in pediatric hematological oncology patients: experience of a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Maria Thereza Macedo; Mota, Joaquim Antônio César; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the approach to palliative care for hematological oncology patients in the pediatric ward of a tertiary hospital. Methods This was a retrospective, descriptive study of 29 hematological oncology patients who died between 2009 and 2011. Data regarding the approach and prevalence of pain, prevalence of other symptoms, multidisciplinary team participation, communication between staff and family and limited invasive therapy were collected from the medical records. Results Twenty-seven (93.1%) patients displayed disease progression unresponsive to curative treatment. The median age at death was ten years old. Pain was the most prevalent symptom with all patients who reported pain receiving analgesic medications. The majority took weak (55.2%) and/or strong (65.5%) opioids. The patients were followed by pediatricians and a pediatric hematologist/oncologist. Participation of other professionals was also documented: 86.2% were followed by social services and 69% by psychologists, among others. There were explicit descriptions of limitation of invasive therapy in the medical records of 26 patients who died with disease progression. All these decisions were shared with the families. Conclusion Although the hospital where this study was conducted does not have a specialized team in pediatric palliative care, it meets all the requirements for developing a specific program. The importance of approaching pain and other prevalent symptoms in children with cancer involving a comprehensive multidisciplinary team is evident. Discussions were had with most of the families on limiting invasive therapy, but no record of a well-defined and coordinated treatment plan for palliative care was found. PMID:25453649

  18. A tele-oncology model replacing face-to-face specialist cancer care: perspectives of patients in North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Sabe; Kelly, Jenny; Evans, Rebecca; Larkins, Sarah

    2014-03-18

    We explored the experiences of patients using the Townsville Tele-oncology clinic, where most patients are no longer seen face-to-face. All medical oncology patients who received services via telehealth at the Townsville Cancer Centre in 2012 were invited to participate in an interview. None refused. Thirty two patients were interviewed by telephone and three via videoconference at their local health service facility. Data analysis identified five major themes (quality of the consultation; communication and relationships; familiarity with technology and initial fears; local services and support; and lack of coordination of services between the local rural hospital and the major regional hospital) and each major theme included a number of sub-themes. Most patients interviewed (69%) had not seen their oncology specialist face-to-face, but 86% of them found the video-consultation to be of high quality and were extremely satisfied with the interaction. The acceptance of teleconsultation appeared to be linked to the patients' trust with their local health system and staff. Overall, the tele-oncology model that replaced face-to-face care in North Queensland was accepted and welcomed by patients. PMID:24643950

  19. Implementation of a Central Line Maintenance Care Bundle in Hospitalized Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Allen R.; Bundy, David G.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Fratino, Lisa; Drucis, Kim M.; Panton, Stephanie Y.; Kokoszka, Michelle; Budd, Alicia P.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Miller, Marlene R.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a multidisciplinary, best-practice central line maintenance care bundle reduces central line-associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) rates in hospitalized pediatric oncology patients and to further delineate the epidemiology of CLABSIs in this population. METHODS: We performed a prospective, interrupted time series study of a best-practice bundle addressing all areas of central line care: reduction of entries, aseptic entries, and aseptic procedures when changing components. Based on a continuous quality improvement model, targeted interventions were instituted to improve compliance with each of the bundle elements. CLABSI rates and epidemiological data were collected for 10 months before and 24 months after implementation of the bundle and compared in a Poisson regression model. RESULTS: CLABSI rates decreased from 2.25 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days at baseline to 1.79 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (incidence rate ratio [IRR]: 0.80, P = .58). Secondary analyses indicated CLABSI rates were reduced to 0.81 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days in the second 12 months of the intervention (IRR: 0.36, P = .091). Fifty-nine percent of infections resulted from Gram-positive pathogens, 37% of patients with a CLABSI required central line removal, and patients with Hickman catheters were more likely to have a CLABSI than patients with Infusaports (IRR: 4.62, P = .02). CONCLUSIONS: A best-practice central line maintenance care bundle can be implemented in hospitalized pediatric oncology patients, although long ramp-up times may be necessary to reap maximal benefits. Further research is needed to determine if this CLABSI rate reduction can be sustained and spread. PMID:22945408

  20. Bacterial bloodstream infections and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in pediatric hematology/oncology patients after anticancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mulla, Naima A; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; El Shafie, Sittana; Janahi, Mohammed; Al-Nasser, Abdullah A; Chandra, Prem

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology and oncology represent a major problem worldwide, but this has not been studied in Qatar. In this study, we investigated the burden of infection and the resistance pattern in the bacterial etiology, in the only tertiary pediatric hematology and oncology center in Qatar. Methods All pediatric cancer patients (n=185) were evaluated retrospectively during the period 2004–2011; a total of 70 (38%) patients were diagnosed with bloodstream infections. Bacterial etiology was determined, along with their susceptibility patterns. Neutropenia, duration of neutropenia, fever, duration of fever, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated throughout the study. Results A total of 70 patients (38%) were diagnosed with acute leukemias, lymphomas, solid tumors, or brain tumors; those patients experienced 111 episodes of bacteremia. The most common Gram-positive (n=64 [55%]) isolates were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=26), Staphylococcus hominis (n=9), and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=7), and the common Gram-negative (n=52 [45%]) isolates were Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=14), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=10), and Escherichia coli (n=7). There was a significant association observed between fever with positive blood culture and different types of cancer (P=0.035). The majority of bacteremia (n=68 [61.3%]) occurred in nonneutropenic episodes. Elevated values of CRP (≥5 mg/L) were detected in 82 (95.3%) episodes and were negatively correlated with absolute neutrophil count (ANC) (r=−0.18; P=0.248) among all cases. However, the infection-related fatality rate was 2.2% (n=4), with three caused by Gram-negative pathogens. Multidrug resistant organisms were implicated in 33 (28.4%) cases and caused three of the mortality cases. Conclusion Multidrug resistant organisms cause mortality in pediatric cancer patients. Investigation of antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms may guide successful antimicrobial therapy and improve

  1. Merging Children’s Oncology Group Data with an External Administrative Database Using Indirect Patient Identifiers: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yimei; Hall, Matt; Fisher, Brian T.; Seif, Alix E.; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Bagatell, Rochelle; Getz, Kelly D.; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gerbing, Robert B.; Sung, Lillian; Adamson, Peter C.; Gamis, Alan; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials data from National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative oncology group trials could be enhanced by merging with external data sources. Merging without direct patient identifiers would provide additional patient privacy protections. We sought to develop and validate a matching algorithm that uses only indirect patient identifiers. Methods We merged the data from two Phase III Children’s Oncology Group (COG) trials for de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS). We developed a stepwise matching algorithm that used indirect identifiers including treatment site, gender, birth year, birth month, enrollment year and enrollment month. Results from the stepwise algorithm were compared against the direct merge method that used date of birth, treatment site, and gender. The indirect merge algorithm was developed on AAML0531 and validated on AAML1031. Results Of 415 patients enrolled on the AAML0531 trial at PHIS centers, we successfully matched 378 (91.1%) patients using the indirect stepwise algorithm. Comparison to the direct merge result suggested that 362 (95.7%) matches identified by the indirect merge algorithm were concordant with the direct merge result. When validating the indirect stepwise algorithm using the AAML1031 trial, we successfully matched 157 out of 165 patients (95.2%) and 150 (95.5%) of the indirectly merged matches were concordant with the directly merged matches. Conclusions These data demonstrate that patients enrolled on COG clinical trials can be successfully merged with PHIS administrative data using a stepwise algorithm based on indirect patient identifiers. The merged data sets can be used as a platform for comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness studies. PMID:26606521

  2. Split-Bolus Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography Technique for Characterization of Focal Liver Lesions in Oncologic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scialpi, Michele; Pierotti, Luisa; Gravante, Sabrina; Rebonato, Alberto; Piscioli, Irene; D’Andrea, Alfredo; Schiavone, Raffaele; Palumbo, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background In oncologic patients, the liver is the most common target for metastases. An accurate detection and characterization of focal liver lesions in patients with known primary extrahepatic malignancy are essential to define management and prognosis. Objectives To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the split-bolus multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) protocol in the characterization of focal liver lesions in oncologic patients. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the follow-up split-bolus 64-detector row CT protocol in 36 oncologic patients to characterize focal liver lesions. The split-bolus MDCT protocol by intravenous injection of two boluses of contrast medium combines the hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and hepatic enhancement during the portal venous phase (PVP) in a single-pass. Results The split-bolus MDCT protocol detected 208 lesions and characterized 186 (89.4%) of them: typical hemangiomas (n = 9), atypical hemangiomas (n = 3), cysts (n = 78), hypovascular (n = 93) and hypervascular (n = 3) metastases. Twenty two (10.6%) hypodense lesions were categorized as indeterminate (≤5 mm). The mean radiation dose was 24.5±6.5 millisieverts (mSv). Conclusion The designed split-bolus MDCT technique can be proposed alternatively to triphasic MDCT and in a single-pass to PVP in the initial staging and in the follow-up respectively in oncologic patients.

  3. Impact of Referral Protocols on the Dental Management of Patients Undergoing Treatment for Head and Neck Oncology in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran; Killough, Simon; Markey, Neill; McLister, Conor; McKenna, Gerald

    2016-03-01

    Management of head and neck oncology necessitates an extensive multidisciplinary approach. Throughout Northern Ireland all oral care for Head and Neck Oncology patients is overseen within the Centre for Dentistry, Queens University Belfast via referral from the Head and Neck Multidisciplinary Team. The aim of this study was to develop and introduce a referral pro-forma to improve communication between members of the multidisciplinary team and ultimately expedite provision of oral care prior to patients undergoing treatment for Head and Neck Oncology. The study period ran from June 2013 until November 2014. All patients undergoing treatment for Head and Neck Oncology in Northern Ireland were included in the study. A referral pro-forma was introduced in June 2014 in an attempt to streamline the referral process. Data was gathered on patient waiting times, extraction protocols with comparisons made between the period before and after introduction of the pro-forma. In total 137 patients were included in the study: 96 patients were referred to the service using referral letters, confidential emails and via telephone; 41 patients were referred using the pro-forma. The introduction of the referral pro-forma resulted in a significant decrease in the mean number of days from referral to assessment (12 to 7 days) (p < 0.05) and significantly increased mean interval time between extractions and patients beginning radiotherapy (13 to 17 days) (p < 0.05). Significant improvements have been made with the introduction of the referral pro-forma where patients are waiting significantly less time for dental assessment and having extractions completed in a more timely manner therefore expediting the commencement of their oncology treatment. PMID:27039474

  4. Pediatric oncology nurses' attitudes related to discussing fertility preservation with pediatric cancer patients and their families.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Clayton, Heather; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; King, Lindsey M; Nieder, Michael; Wilson, Crystal

    2007-01-01

    This study explores nurses' attitudes toward the discussion of fertility preservation (FP) with pediatric cancer patients and their families. A cross-sectional survey was administered to attendees of a pediatric oncology conference. Of the 115 nurses who responded and comprised the study sample, most reported discussing risks of infertility or FP patients' families, that boys younger than 18 years should not be given erotic materials during semen collection, and difficulty locating FP facilities. The 3 patient factors most likely to encourage the discussion of FP are the patient being recently married or engaged, the patient asking about FP, and availability of patient education materials. While the results indicate that nurses do not regularly discuss FP with their patients, nurses perceive such discussion as being within their scope of practice. Therefore, with appropriate intervention, nurses may play a key role in facilitating discussions regarding FP with patients and families. PMID:17827491

  5. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: what every provider of gynecologic oncology care should know.

    PubMed

    Duska, Linda R; Engelhard, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2010. While initial implementation of the law began shortly thereafter, the full implementation will take place over the next few years. With respect to cancer care, the act was intended to make care more accessible, affordable, and comprehensive across different parts of the country. For our cancer patients and our practices, the ACA has implications that are both positive and negative. The Medicaid expansion and access to insurance exchanges are intended to increase the number of insured patients and thus improve access to care, but many states have decided to opt out of the Medicaid program and in these states access problems will persist. Screening programs will be put in place for insured patients but may supplant federally funded programs that are currently in place for uninsured patients and may not follow current screening guidelines. Both hospice and home health providers will be asked to provide more services with less funding, and quality measures, including readmission rates, will factor into reimbursement. Insured patients will have access to all phases of clinical trial research. There is a need for us as providers of Gynecologic Oncology care to be active in the implementation of the ACA in order to ensure that our patients and our practices can survive and benefit from the changes in health care reimbursement, with the ultimate goals of improving access to care and quality while reducing unsustainable costs. PMID:23500090

  6. Outcomes of gynecologic oncology patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic procedures in a university setting.

    PubMed

    Walters Haygood, Christen L; Fauci, Janelle M; Huddleston-Colburn, Mary Katherine; Huh, Warner K; Straughn, J Michael

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated intraoperative complications and postoperative outcomes of gynecologic oncology patients undergoing robotic-assisted (RA) laparoscopic procedures in a university setting. A retrospective chart review evaluated all gynecologic oncology patients at the University of Alabama at Birmingham who underwent attempted RA procedures between August 2006 and October 2011. Patient demographics, medical/surgical history, intraoperative complications, postoperative outcomes, conversion rates, readmission rates, and length of stay were examined. Total complication rates were assessed over time for each surgeon. 681 patients underwent planned RA procedures by seven gynecologic oncologists. The mean body mass index was 33.5 kg/m(2) (range 16.6-71.0 kg/m(2)). 61.4 % were diagnosed with malignancy. The most common procedure was RA hysterectomy with unilateral/bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (37.2 %). Robotic staging was performed in 291 patients (45.1 %). Mean estimated blood loss was 75 ml (range 5-700 ml). 36 patients (5.3 %) were converted to laparotomy. The most common reason for conversion was adhesions (30.1 %), followed by uterine size (22.2 %). In 107 cases, a surgical modification was required for specimen removal including mini-laparotomy (24), extension of accessory port (36), morcellation (9), and difficult vaginal delivery (38). 3.7 % had intraoperative complications; 6 patients had a cystotomy and 5 had a vascular injury. Postoperatively, 20 patients had a febrile episode, 9 had wound complications, and 3 had a vaginal cuff dehiscence. 27 (4.2 %) patients were readmitted within 30 days. Complication rates and conversion rates were similar per surgeon. Total complication rates for evaluable surgeons were similar between the first 10 cases and subsequent 50 cases. Although patients undergoing RA procedures in a university setting are high risk, the conversion rate to laparotomy is low and intraoperative and postoperative complications are

  7. Cytokine Gene Variation is Associated with Depressive Symptom Trajectories in Oncology Patients and Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Laura B.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Langford, Dale J.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Dhruva, Anand; Cataldo, Janine K.; Baggott, Christina R.; Merriman, John D.; Dodd, Marylin; West, Claudia; Paul, Steven M.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Depressive symptoms are common in cancer patients and their family caregivers (FCs). While these symptoms are characterized by substantial interindividual variability, the factors that predict this variability remain largely unknown. This study sought to confirm latent classes of oncology patients and FCs with distinct depressive symptom trajectories and to examine differences in phenotypic and genotypic characteristics among these classes. Method Among 167 oncology outpatients with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer and 85 of their FCs, growth mixture modeling (GMM) was used to identify latent classes of individuals based on Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scores obtained prior to, during, and for four months following completion of radiation therapy. One hundred four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes in 15 candidate cytokine genes were interrogated for differences between the two largest latent classes. Multivariate logistic regression analyses assessed effects of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics on class membership. Results Four latent classes were confirmed: Resilient (56.3%), Subsyndromal (32.5%), Delayed (5.2%), and Peak (6.0%). Participants who were younger, female, non-white, and who reported higher baseline trait and state anxiety were more likely to be in the Subsyndromal, Delayed, or Peak groups. Variation in three cytokine genes (i.e., interleukin 1 receptor 2 [IL1R2], IL10, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFA]), age,and performance status predicted membership in the Resilient versus Subsyndromal classes. Conclusions Findings confirm the four latent classes of depressive symptom trajectories previously identified in a sample of breast cancer patients. Variations in cytokine genes may influence variability in depressive symptom trajectories. PMID:23187335

  8. Providing Children and Adolescents Opportunities for Social Interaction as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Heather L; Bingen, Kristin; Hoag, Jennifer A; Karst, Jeffrey S; Velázquez-Martin, Blanca; Barakat, Lamia P

    2015-12-01

    Experiences with peers constitute an important aspect of socialization, and children and adolescents with cancer may experience reduced social interaction due to treatment. A literature review was conducted to investigate the evidence to support a standard of care evaluating these experiences. Sixty-four articles were reviewed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Moderate quality of evidence suggest that social interaction can be beneficial to increase knowledge, decrease isolation, and improve adjustment and constitute an important, unmet need. The evidence supports a strong recommendation for youth with cancer to be provided opportunities for social interaction following a careful assessment of their unique characteristics and preferences.

  9. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Jin; Fishman, Jessica; Vapiwala, Neha; Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali; Xie, Sharon X.; Mao, Jun J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  10. The meaning of DNR status: oncology nurses' experiences with patients and families.

    PubMed

    Jezewski, M A; Finnell, D S

    1998-06-01

    Patients, providers, and families are increasingly involved in end-of-life decisions (advance directives, health care proxy, do-not-resuscitate [DNR] status consents). These decisions can be complex processes whereby the participants in the process must come to terms with often painful and difficult decisions. The role perception of the nurse in end-of-life decision making is not well delineated. This chapter explores the results of a study that addresses the question, "What are the experiences of oncology nurses as they interact with patients and/or family members during the process of patients/families signing DNR consents. The grounded theory method of data collection and analysis was used to explore this question. The results of the study indicate that central to the process of consenting to DNR status is the degree of shared understanding about the meaning of DNR status among participants and the conflict that can occur when meanings are not shared. A model is presented that illustrates the connections between the meanings of DNR (patient, family, and provider) and congruence and conflict in the DNR consent process. Strategies are discussed that facilitate prevention or resolution of conflict in the DNR status decision-making process. Strategies used by the nurse to facilitate decision making by patient and families include communicating with, caring for, educating, advocating for, and collaborating with patients, families, and other providers. PMID:9615512

  11. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  12. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection in Patients at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, A; Farhangi, H; Badiee, Z; Banihashem, A; Mosaddegh, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections in critical care unit are high, and they are serious hospital problems. Infections acquired during the hospital stay are generally called nosocomial infections, initially known as infections arising after 48 h of hospital admission. The mostfrequent nosocomial infections (urinary, respiratory, gastroenteritis and blood stream infection) were common in patients at hospital.The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection among hospitalized children at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods Data were collected from 200 patient's records presented with symptoms of nosocomial infection at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital from March 2014 to September 2014. Descriptive statistics using percentage was calculated. Results Incidence of nosocomial infections inpatients athematology-oncology ward was 31% (62/200). Of which 69.35% (43/62) blood stream infection being the most frequent; followed by 30.64% (19/62) was urinary tract infection (UTI), and the most common blood culture isolate was been Staphylococcus epidermidis 18 (41.86%), andour study showed that large numbers ofnosocomial UTIs causing by Gram‑negative bacteria. Conclusion This study showed blood stream infection and UTI are the common nosocomial infections among patients athematology-oncology ward. Early recognition of infections and short term use of invasive devices along with proper infection control procedures can significantly decrease the incidence of nosocomial infections in patients. PMID:26985350

  13. Effects of Video Games on the Adverse Corollaries of Chemotherapy in Pediatric Oncology Patients: A Single-Case Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolko, David J.; Rickard-Figueroa, Jorge L.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed effects of video games on adverse corollaries of chemotherapy in three pediatric oncology patients. Results indicated that access to video games resulted in reduction in the number of anticipatory symptoms experienced and observed, as well as a diminution in the aversiveness of chemotherapy side effects. (Author/NRB)

  14. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care: Survey of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Patra, Lipika; Usha Rani, MR; Lohitashva, SO; Rao, Raghavendra; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Vallath, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Palliative care is usually delivered late in the course of illness trajectory. This precludes patients on active disease modifying treatment from receiving the benefit of palliative care intervention. A survey was conducted to know the opinion of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients about the role of early specialist palliative care in cancer. Methods: A nonrandomized descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary cancer care center in India. Thirty oncologists, sixty oncology nurses, and sixty patients were surveyed. Results: Improvement in symptom control was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to pain (Z = −4.10, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.84, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.20, P = 0.001); nausea and vomiting (Z = −3.75, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.3, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.1, P = 0.001); constipation (Z = −3.29, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.96, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.49, P = 0.001); breathlessness (Z = −3.57, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.03, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.99, P = 0.001); and restlessness (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.23, P = 0.001), (Z = −3.22, P = 0.001). Improvement in end-of-life care management was appreciated by oncologists and oncology nurses with respect to communication of prognosis (Z = −4.04, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.20, P = 0.001); discussion on limitation of life-sustaining treatment (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.53, P = 0.001); end-of-life symptom management (Z = −4.17, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.59, P = 0.001); perimortem care (Z = −3.86, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.80, P = 0.001); and bereavement support (Z = −3-80, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.95, P = 0.001). Improvement in health-related communication was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to communicating health related information in a sensitive manner (Z = −3.74, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.47, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.12, P = 0.001); conducting family meeting (Z = −3.12, P = 0.002), (Z = −4.60, P = 0

  15. [Patient guidelines in oncology: objectives, procedures and first experiences with this format].

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Corinna; Zowalla, Richard; Wiesner, Martin; Siegert, Svenja; Bothe, Lydia; Follmann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    For several years patient versions of guidelines have become mandatory in the German Guidelines Program in Oncology (GGPO). Based on the methodology that has been developed for the German National Disease Management Guidelines Program, patient versions of guidelines translate the recommendations of clinical practice guideline into plain language and provide information about the harms and benefits of the interventions being addressed in the guideline. They are developed by a group of guideline authors (experts as well as patients), they are consensus-based and aim to create transparency in recommendations for physicians and their rationales. An automated analysis of readability shows that patient versions of guidelines are specific to the target group of educated lay people. Moreover, the responses to a reader feedback questionnaire indicate that comprehensibility, level of detail and depth of information are considered highly relevant and positive by users. Thus, patient versions of guidelines meet the needs of a specific target group. Nevertheless, the development of other formats for readers with low levels of health literacy or cognitive competencies is desirable. Currently it remains unclear if these simplified formats are able to reflect the complexity of high quality clinical practice guidelines. PMID:26474649

  16. [Patient guidelines in oncology: objectives, procedures and first experiences with this format].

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Corinna; Zowalla, Richard; Wiesner, Martin; Siegert, Svenja; Bothe, Lydia; Follmann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    For several years patient versions of guidelines have become mandatory in the German Guidelines Program in Oncology (GGPO). Based on the methodology that has been developed for the German National Disease Management Guidelines Program, patient versions of guidelines translate the recommendations of clinical practice guideline into plain language and provide information about the harms and benefits of the interventions being addressed in the guideline. They are developed by a group of guideline authors (experts as well as patients), they are consensus-based and aim to create transparency in recommendations for physicians and their rationales. An automated analysis of readability shows that patient versions of guidelines are specific to the target group of educated lay people. Moreover, the responses to a reader feedback questionnaire indicate that comprehensibility, level of detail and depth of information are considered highly relevant and positive by users. Thus, patient versions of guidelines meet the needs of a specific target group. Nevertheless, the development of other formats for readers with low levels of health literacy or cognitive competencies is desirable. Currently it remains unclear if these simplified formats are able to reflect the complexity of high quality clinical practice guidelines.

  17. An exploratory, interview study of oncology patients' and health-care staff experiences of discussing resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Karen; Wilson, E; Jones, L; Fyfe, D

    2007-11-01

    There is little research about how patients and their families would like discussions surrounding resuscitation to take place. The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the experience of a discussion of resuscitation from the perspective of the participants. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 21 patients, of whom nine were interviewed together with a relative and 14 staff in an oncology setting. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method and coded using NVIVO qualitative data analysis software. Patients appeared to be accepting resuscitation discussions as necessary and important. A minority felt that the timing of the discussion could have been better, particularly if they were newly diagnosed or had recently commenced treatment. Relatives generally found the discussions more difficult and felt that discussions should take place much closer to death. Patients identified that they needed time and privacy during the discussion. Staff identified a need to present a sensitive and individualised discussion which took into account the key elements of timing, place, space, manner and pace. Patients acknowledged that the resuscitation discussion enabled them to begin to address issues relating to dying and end of life. For staff on-going communication skills training and support in this area were seen as important but often overlooked parts of the process.

  18. Radical cystectomy for bladder cancer: oncologic outcome in 271 Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Dong, Pei; Li, Yong-Hong; Liu, Zhuo-Wei; Yao, Kai; Han, Hui; Qin, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Fang-Jian

    2014-03-01

    Few large scale studies have reported the oncologic outcome of radical cystectomy for treating bladder cancer in China; hence, we lack long-term prognostic information. The aim of the current study was to determine the survival rate and prognostic factors of patients who underwent radical cystectomy for bladder cancer in a Chinese medical center. We retrospectively analyzed clinicopathologic data from 271 bladder cancer patients who underwent radical cystectomy between 2000 and 2011. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify independent prognostic predictors for this cohort. Median follow-up was 31.7 months (range, 0.2-139.1 months). Thirty-day mortality was (1.4%). The 5-year recurrence-free survival, cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival rates were 61.6%, 72.9%, and 68.0%, respectively. The 5-year CSS rates of patients with T1-T4 disease were 90.7%, 85.0%, 51.0%, and 18.0%, respectively. Patients with organ-confined disease had a higher 5-year CSS rate than those with extravesical disease (81.4% vs. 34.9%, P < 0.001). For the 38 patients (14%) with lymph node involvement, the 5-year CSS rate was 27.7%-significantly lower than that of patients without lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). The 5-year CSS rate was much higher in patients with low grade tumor than in those with high grade tumor (98.1% vs. 68.1%, P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression showed that patient age (hazard ratio, 2.045; P = 0.013) and T category (hazard ratio, 2.213; P < 0.001) were independent predictors for CSS. These results suggest that radical cystectomy is a safe and effective method for treating bladder cancer in Chinese patients. Old age and high T category were associated with poor prognosis in bladder cancer patients who underwent radical cystectomy.

  19. RECQ1 A159C Polymorphism Is Associated With Overall Survival of Patients With Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Replication Study in NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui; Moughan, Jennifer; Crane, Christopher; Hoffman, John P.; Regine, William F.; Abrams, Ross A.; Safran, Howard; Liu, Chang; Chang, Ping; Freedman, Gary M.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Guha, Chandan; Abbruzzese, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To confirm whether a previously observed association between RECQ1 A159C variant and clinical outcome of resectable pancreatic cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation is reproducible in another patient population prospectively treated with postoperative chemoradiation. Methods and Materials Patients were selected, according to tissue availability, from eligible patients with resected pancreatic cancer who were enrolled on the NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704 trial of 5-fluorouacil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation preceded and followed by 5-FU or gemcitabine. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue sections, and genotype was determined using the Taqman method. The correlation between genotype and overall survival was analyzed using a Kaplan-Meier plot, log-rank test, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results In the 154 of the study’s 451 eligible patients with evaluable tissue, genotype distribution followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (ie, 37% had genotype AA, 43% AC, and 20% CC). The RECQ1 variant AC/CC genotype carriers were associated with being node positive compared with the AA carrier (P = .03). The median survival times (95% confidence interval [CI]) for AA, AC, and CC carriers were 20.6 (16.3–26.1), 18.8 (14.2–21.6), and 14.2 (10.3–21.0) months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, patients with the AC/CC genotypes were associated with worse survival than patients with the AA genotype (hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.07–2.23, P =.022). This result seemed slightly stronger for patients on the 5-FU arm (n = 82) (HR 1.64, 95% CI 0.99–2.70, P =.055) than for patients on the gemcitabine arm (n = 72, HR 1.46, 95% CI 0.81–2.63, P =.21). Conclusions Results of this study suggest that the RECQ1 A159C genotype may be a prognostic or predictive factor for resectable pancreatic cancer patients who are treated with adjuvant 5-FU before and after 5-FU-based chemoradiation

  20. Shared decision making in dermato-oncology: preference for involvement of melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Karoline J; Nashan, Dorothée; Meiss, Frank; Bengel, Jürgen; Reuter, Katrin

    2014-02-01

    Increasing importance is being conferred to the implementation of shared decision making (SDM) in clinical practice for medical, ethical, and sociological reasons. In Germany, SDM has recently been adopted as an explicit goal in the S3-melanoma treatment guideline. The aim of this study is to present data on how melanoma patients want to be involved in treatment decisions and second on the dynamic of these preferences for involvement. This was investigated in consecutively recruited melanoma patients (stages I-III) in two German Skin Cancer Centers as part of a longitudinal questionnaire study. The Control Preference Scale assessed patients' preferences at baseline (n=405) and was readministered 1 year later (n=314) to detect potential changes. In addition, the perceived realization of SDM in the adjuvant interferon-α treatment decision was investigated in a subgroup of patients (n=108) using the nine-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9). More than 80% of the patients want to play an active role (autonomous or collaborative) in treatment decisions and only 17% want to delegate their decision to the doctor. We found a significant preference shift within a year in 43% of the patients, predominantly toward more active involvement. The results of the SDM-Q-9 indicate a moderate degree of perceived participation, with differing perceived implementation of the individual the SDM process steps. With the majority of melanoma patients preferring an active role in treatment decisions and improvable implementation of the SDM process steps in clinical practice, our findings support the relevance of SDM in dermato-oncology.

  1. Escalation of Oncologic Services at the End of Life Among Patients With Gynecologic Cancer at an Urban, Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Eijean; Rogers, Anna; Ji, Lingyun; Sposto, Richard; Church, Terry; Roman, Lynda; Tripathy, Debu; Lin, Yvonne G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Use of oncology-related services is increasingly scrutinized, yet precisely which services are actually rendered to patients, particularly at the end of life, is unknown. This study characterizes the end-of-life use of medical services by patients with gynecologic cancer at a safety-net hospital. Methods: Oncologic history and metrics of medical use (eg, hospitalizations, chemotherapy infusions, procedures) for patients with gynecologic oncology who died between December 2006 and February 2012 were evaluated. Mixed-effect regression models were used to test time effects and construct usage summaries. Results: Among 116 subjects, cervical cancer accounted for the most deaths (42%). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years; 63% were Hispanic, and 65% had advanced disease. Only 34% died in hospice care. The median times from do not resuscitate/do not intubate documentation and from last therapeutic intervention to death were 9 days and 55 days, respectively. Significant time effects for all services (eg, hospitalizations, diagnostics, procedures, treatments, clinic appointments) were detected during the patient's final year (P < .001), with the most dramatic changes occurring during the last 2 months. Patients with longer duration of continuity of care used significantly fewer resources toward the end of life. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report enumerating medical services obtained by patients with gynecologic cancer in a large, public hospital during the end of life. Marked changes in interventions in the patient's final 2 months highlight the need for cost-effective, evidence-based metrics for delivering cancer care. Our data emphasize continuity of care as a significant determinant of oncologic resource use during this critical period. PMID:25604595

  2. A multiplex cytokine score for the prediction of disease severity in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Yong-Min; Song, Hua; Yang, Shi-Long; Xu, Wei-Qun; Shi, Shu-Wen; Zhao, Ning; Liao, Chan

    2013-11-01

    Although many inflammatory cytokines are prognostic in sepsis, the utility of cytokines in evaluating disease severity in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock was rarely studied. On the other hand, a single particular cytokine is far from ideal in guiding therapeutic intervention, but combination of multiple biomarkers improves the accuracy. In this prospective observational study, 111 episodes of septic shock in pediatric hematology/oncology patients were enrolled from 2006 through 2012. Blood samples were taken for inflammatory cytokine measurement by cytometric bead array (CBA) technology at the initial onset of septic shock. Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 were significantly elevated in majority of patients, while tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were markedly increased in patients with high pediatric index of mortality 2 (PIM2) score and non-survivors. All the four cytokines paralleled the PIM2 score and differentially correlated with hemodynamic disorder and fatal outcomes. The pediatric multiplex cytokine score (PMCS), which integrated the four cytokines into one score system, was related to hemodynamic disorder and mortality as well, but showed more powerful prediction ability than each of the four cytokines. PMCS was an independent predictive factor for fatal outcome, presenting similar discriminative power with PIM2, with accuracy of 0.83 (95% CI, 0.71-0.94). In conclusion, this study develops a cytokine scoring system based on CBA technique, which performs well in disease severity and fatality prediction in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock. PMID:24051223

  3. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Oncology Drug Labeling in the United States: A Framework for Navigating Early Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Alan L.; Hao, Yanni; Krohe, Meaghan; Yaworsky, Andrew; Mazar, Iyar; Foley, Catherine; Mehmed, Faisal; Globe, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite an increased use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in oncology clinical trials, integrating the patient perspective into drug approval decisions and documentation has been challenging. Objectives To review important regulatory and measurement terminology, and to provide oncology outcomes researchers and those involved with building oncology programs with tools to plan PRO data collection, particularly in relation to drug efficacy claims for drug labeling in the United States. Discussion When contemplating a PRO measurement strategy for oncology clinical trials, outcomes researchers are challenged in several ways. First, given multiple stakeholders, researchers must communicate with their scientific, commercial, and regulatory colleagues using often misunderstood terms, such as “label,” “claim,” “end point,” “outcome,” and “concept.” Second, because stakeholders do not always have access to data from early-stage clinical trials and do not contribute to the target drug's profile in early development, researchers are often unable to address the most important question in building a measurement strategy: What do we want to say about our drug? To overcome these challenges, researchers can systematically develop an end point model to facilitate communication among drug development stakeholders using a common language and to link the building blocks of a PRO measurement strategy, including claims, concepts, questionnaires, and end points. We developed a model that characterizes a disease by its proximal signs and/or symptoms and increasingly distal health outcomes to provide researchers potential measurement concepts that can be instrumental in selecting PRO questionnaires for use in studies. Conclusion PRO data collected in clinical trials should be used in drug development to evaluate the drug's efficacy; it is encouraging that US regulators are willing to work with drug sponsors to overcome the challenges associated with the

  4. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Oncology Drug Labeling in the United States: A Framework for Navigating Early Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Alan L.; Hao, Yanni; Krohe, Meaghan; Yaworsky, Andrew; Mazar, Iyar; Foley, Catherine; Mehmed, Faisal; Globe, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite an increased use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in oncology clinical trials, integrating the patient perspective into drug approval decisions and documentation has been challenging. Objectives To review important regulatory and measurement terminology, and to provide oncology outcomes researchers and those involved with building oncology programs with tools to plan PRO data collection, particularly in relation to drug efficacy claims for drug labeling in the United States. Discussion When contemplating a PRO measurement strategy for oncology clinical trials, outcomes researchers are challenged in several ways. First, given multiple stakeholders, researchers must communicate with their scientific, commercial, and regulatory colleagues using often misunderstood terms, such as “label,” “claim,” “end point,” “outcome,” and “concept.” Second, because stakeholders do not always have access to data from early-stage clinical trials and do not contribute to the target drug's profile in early development, researchers are often unable to address the most important question in building a measurement strategy: What do we want to say about our drug? To overcome these challenges, researchers can systematically develop an end point model to facilitate communication among drug development stakeholders using a common language and to link the building blocks of a PRO measurement strategy, including claims, concepts, questionnaires, and end points. We developed a model that characterizes a disease by its proximal signs and/or symptoms and increasingly distal health outcomes to provide researchers potential measurement concepts that can be instrumental in selecting PRO questionnaires for use in studies. Conclusion PRO data collected in clinical trials should be used in drug development to evaluate the drug's efficacy; it is encouraging that US regulators are willing to work with drug sponsors to overcome the challenges associated with the

  5. Patient-reported outcomes for US oncology labeling: review and discussion of score interpretation and analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Shields, Alan; Coon, Cheryl; Hao, Yanni; Krohe, Meaghan; Yaworsky, Andrew; Mazar, Iyar; Foley, Catherine; Globe, Denise

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes ways to approach the conceptual and practical challenges associated with interpreting the clinical meaning of scores produced by patient reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires, particularly when used to inform efficacy decisions for regulatory approval for oncology products. Score interpretation estimates are not inherent to PRO questionnaires per se, instead, vary dependent upon sample and study design characteristics. Scores from PRO measures can be interpreted at the individual and group level, and each carries its own set of statistics for evaluating differences. Oncology researchers have a variety of methods and data analytic strategies available to support their score interpretation needs, which should be considered in the context of their a priori knowledge of the target patient population, the hypothesized effects of treatment, the study design and assessment schedule, and the inferences and decisions to be made from the PRO data. PMID:26594897

  6. Oncologic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis.

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine use in pediatric oncology patients in eastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gözüm, Sebahat; Arikan, Duygu; Büyükavci, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) among children with cancer is becoming increasingly popular. Therefore, it is important to gain insight into the prevalence and factors related to the use of CAM. This study presents findings from a study of parents of 88 children with cancer who were receiving or had received conventional therapy for treatment of childhood cancer at a pediatric oncology unit in eastern Turkey. The findings indicated that 48.9% of the respondents reported the use of 1 or more CAM therapies. The most commonly used modality was herbal products such as herbal tea and herbal meal, mostly stinging nettle (Urtica dioica). The findings of this study indicate that CAM users were children who were an average of 3 years older than nonuser children and that CAM use was more prevalent among the children who had been diagnosed with cancer for a longer time than nonusers. There were no significant difference between users and nonusers regarding sociodemographic characteristics (such as age education level, economic status), hopelessness score of parents, gender of child, and treatment status. Healthcare providers should remain informed about the benefits and adverse effects of complementary and alternative therapies to discuss treatment options with patients and their families and to monitor treatment efficacy.

  8. Analysis of non-clonal chromosome abnormalities observed in hematologic malignancies among Southwest Oncology Group patients

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, T.S.; Dobin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    From 1987-1994, the Southwest Oncology Group Cytogenetics Committee reviewed 1571 studies in 590 adult patient cases with ALL, AML, CML or CLL. These were analyzed for the presence of clinically important non-clonal abnormalities (NCA). Abnormalities were defined as non-clonal if one metaphase had a structural abnormality or an extra chromosome. Chromosome loss was not analyzed due to the possibility of random loss. In 72 cases (12%) comprising 136 studies, at least one NCA was observed. In 21 of these cases (29%), NCAs consisted of obvious clonal evolution or instability, and thus were not included in the analysis. At least one structural NCA was observed in which the abnormality differed from the mainline in 36 (50%) patients. Seventeen of the 36 cases had a normal mode. Nineteen of the 36 patients had an abnormal or normal/abnormal mode. At least one numerical NCA was found in 15 cases (21%). Fifteen cases (21%) contained at least one marker chromosome. Several cases involved NCA in more than one of the above divisions. NCAs could be classified into several categories: (1){open_quotes}the clone to come{close_quotes}, (2) evolving clones which then disappeared, (3) NCAs with putative clinical importance that never became clonal, (4) NCAs during remission identical to the preceding clonal abnormality, (5) NCAs which indicated clonal evolution or instability. Examples include one metaphase with t(9;22) or del(20q) or inv(16) or +8 which either preceded or followed clonal findings of the same aberration. Such findings should be communicated to the clinician.

  9. Report on the international colloquium on cardio-oncology (rome, 12-14 march 2014).

    PubMed

    Ewer, Michael; Gianni, Luca; Pane, Fabrizio; Sandri, Maria Teresa; Steiner, Rudolf K; Wojnowski, Leszek; Yeh, Edward T; Carver, Joseph R; Lipshultz, Steven E; Minotti, Giorgio; Armstrong, Gregory T; Cardinale, Daniela; Colan, Steven D; Darby, Sarah C; Force, Thomas L; Kremer, Leontien Cm; Lenihan, Daniel J; Sallan, Stephen E; Sawyer, Douglas B; Suter, Thomas M; Swain, Sandra M; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2014-01-01

    Cardio-oncology is a relatively new discipline that focuses on the cardiovascular sequelae of anti-tumour drugs. As any other young adolescent discipline, cardio-oncology struggles to define its scientific boundaries and to identify best standards of care for cancer patients or survivors at risk of cardiovascular events. The International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology was held in Rome, Italy, 12-14 March 2014, with the aim of illuminating controversial issues and unmet needs in modern cardio-oncology. This colloquium embraced contributions from different kind of disciplines (oncology and cardiology but also paediatrics, geriatrics, genetics, and translational research); in fact, cardio-oncology goes way beyond the merging of cardiology with oncology. Moreover, the colloquium programme did not review cardiovascular toxicity from one drug or the other, rather it looked at patients as we see them in their fight against cancer and eventually returning to everyday life. This represents the melting pot in which anti-cancer therapies, genetic backgrounds, and risk factors conspire in producing cardiovascular sequelae, and this calls for screening programmes and well-designed platforms of collaboration between one key professional figure and another. The International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology was promoted by the Menarini International Foundation and co-chaired by Giorgio Minotti (Rome), Joseph R Carver (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States), and Steven E Lipshultz (Detroit, Michigan, United States). The programme was split into five sessions of broad investigational and clinical relevance (what is cardiotoxicity?, cardiotoxicity in children, adolescents, and young adults, cardiotoxicity in adults, cardiotoxicity in special populations, and the future of cardio-oncology). Here, the colloquium chairs and all the session chairs briefly summarised what was said at the colloquium. Topics and controversies were reported on behalf of all members of the working group of

  10. Patient perspectives: Kundalini yoga meditation techniques for psycho-oncology and as potential therapies for cancer.

    PubMed

    Shannahoff-Khalsa, David S

    2005-03-01

    The ancient system of Kundalini Yoga (KY) includes a vast array of meditation techniques. Some were discovered to be specific for treating psychiatric disorders and others are supposedly beneficial for treating cancers. To date, 2 clinical trials have been conducted for treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The first was an open uncontrolled trial and the second a single-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing a KY protocol against the Relaxation Response and Mindfulness Meditation (RRMM) techniques combined. Both trials showed efficacy on all psychological scales using the KY protocol; however, the RCT showed no efficacy on any scale with the RRMM control group. The KY protocol employed an OCD-specific meditation technique combined with other techniques that are individually specific for anxiety, low energy, fear, anger, meeting mental challenges, and turning negative thoughts into positive thoughts. In addition to OCD symptoms, other symptoms, including anxiety and depression, were also significantly reduced. Elements of the KY protocol other than the OCD-specific technique also may have applications for psycho-oncology patients and are described here. Two depression-specific KY techniques are described that also help combat mental fatigue and low energy. A 7-part protocol is described that would be used in KY practice to affect the full spectrum of emotions and distress that complicate a cancer diagnosis. In addition, there are KY techniques that practitioners have used in treating cancer. These techniques have not yet been subjected to formal clinical trials but are described here as potential adjunctive therapies. A case history demonstrating rapid onset of acute relief of intense fear in a terminal breast cancer patient using a KY technique specific for fear is presented. A second case history is reported for a surviving male diagnosed in 1988 with terminal prostate cancer who has used KY therapy long term as part of a self

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine use by gynecologic oncology patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Nazik, Evşen; Nazik, Hakan; Api, Murat; Kale, Ahmet; Aksu, Meltem

    2012-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) among women with gynecologic cancer is becoming increasingly popular. Therefore, it is important to gain insight into the prevalence and factors related to the use of CAM. The aim of this study was to assess the use of CAM in women with gynecologic cancer. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from 67 gynecological cancer patients at gynecologic oncology clinic of a hospital in Turkey between October 2009 to December 2010 using a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The instrument included questions on socio-demographic information, disease specifics and complementary and alternative medicine usage. On the basis of women's responses, all participants were divided into 2 groups: CAM users and nonusers. The findings indicated that 61.2% of the women reported the use of 1 or more CAM therapies. There were no significant differences in the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics between CAM users and nonusers (P <0.05). The most frequently used CAM method was herbal therapy (90.2%) and the second was prayer (41.5%). The main sources of information about CAM were informal (friends/ family members). A considerable proportion (56.1%) of CAM users had discussed their CAM use with their physicians or nurses. Turkish women with gynecologic cancer frequently use CAM in addition to standard medical therapy. Nurses/ oncologists caring for women with gynecologic cancer should initiate a dialogue about usage of CAM, discussing the potential adverse effects of CAM and the patient's therapeutic goals.

  12. Building Bridges From Hospital to Home: Understanding the Transition Experience for the Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Branowicki, Patricia A; Vessey, Judith A; Temple, Kendal L Jackson; Lulloff, Amanda J

    2016-09-01

    Caregivers of pediatric oncology patients are expected to understand and adhere to a complex medical plan of care while at home; yet little is known about how to assess and evaluate the caregivers' abilities to adequately meet these demands. The purpose of this study was to describe the issues and daily challenges faced by caregivers as they transition from hospital to home after their child's cancer diagnosis. Patients and caregivers received a home visit by an expert pediatric oncology nurse within 72 hours postdischarge after initial diagnosis. The nursing narrative notes from these visits were analyzed using content analysis. Four explanatory themes emerged: (1) "We're doing okay," (2) "This isn't going so well," (3) "I could use a little help with this," and (4) "An RN in the house makes you feel safe and know what is correct." These analyses revealed many caregivers achieved mastery of caring for the child at home; however, an overwhelming majority of caregivers expressed questions or concerns to the nurse during the home visit, even those achieving mastery of care. A home visit by an expert pediatric oncology nurse assisted the caregiver in transitioning to caring for the child at home. Such programs should be considered when planning transition programs from hospital to home. PMID:26668212

  13. Using baldrige performance excellence program approaches in the pursuit of radiation oncology quality care, patient satisfaction, and workforce commitment.

    PubMed

    Sternick, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies. PMID:22655229

  14. Identifying oncological emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guddati, Achuta K; Kumar, Nilay; Segon, Ankur; Joy, Parijat S; Marak, Creticus P; Kumar, Gagan

    2013-01-01

    Prompt identification and treatment of life-threatening oncological conditions is of utmost importance and should always be included in the differential diagnosis. Oncological emergencies can have a myriad of presentations ranging from mechanical obstruction due to tumor growth to metabolic conditions due to abnormal secretions from the tumor. Notably, hematologic and infectious conditions may complicate the presentation of oncological emergencies. Advanced testing and imaging is generally required to recognize these serious presentations of common malignancies. Early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions can significantly affect the patient's clinical outcome. PMID:23873016

  15. Bringing Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Home: Catheter Maintenance Practices and Beliefs of Pediatric Oncology Patients and Families

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, Michael L.; Chen, Allen R.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Hebert, Lindsay C.; Bundy, David G.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Fratino, Lisa; Herpst, Cynthia; Kokoszka, Michelle; Miller, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to investigate (1) the extent to which best-practice central line maintenance practices were employed in the homes of pediatric oncology patients and by whom, (2) caregiver beliefs about central line care and central line–associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) risk, (3) barriers to optimal central line care by families, and (4) educational experiences and preferences regarding central line care. Methods Researchers administered a survey to patients and families in a tertiary care pediatric oncology clinic that engaged in rigorous ambulatory and inpatient CLABSI prevention efforts. Results Of 110 invited patients and caregivers, 105 participated (95% response rate) in the survey (March–May 2012). Of the 50 respondents reporting that they or another caregiver change central line dressings, 48% changed a dressing whenever it was soiled as per protocol (many who did not change dressings per protocol also never personally changed dressings); 67% reported the oncology clinic primarily cares for their child’s central line, while 29% reported that an adult caregiver or the patient primarily cares for the central line. Eight patients performed their own line care “always” or “most of the time.” Some 13% of respondents believed that it was “slightly likely” or “not at all likely” that their child will get an infection if caregivers do not perform line care practices perfectly every time. Dressing change practices were the most difficult to comply with at home. Some 18% of respondents wished they learned more about line care, and 12% received contradictory training. Respondents cited a variety of preferences regarding line care teaching, although the majority looked to clinic nurses for modeling line care. Conclusions Interventions aimed at reducing ambulatory CLABSIs should target appropriate educational experiences for adult caregivers and patients and identify ways to improve compliance with best-practice care

  16. Impact of proton beam availability on patient treatment schedule in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric D; Derenchuk, Vladimir; Das, Indra J; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2012-11-08

    Proton beam therapy offers unique physical properties with potential for reduced toxicity and better patient care. There is an increased interest in radiation oncology centers to acquire proton therapy capabilities. The operation of a proton treatment center is quite different than a photon-based clinic because of the more complex technology involved, as well as the single proton beam source serving multiple treatment rooms with no backup source available. There is limited published data which investigates metrics that can be used to determine the performance of a proton facility. The purpose of this study is to evaluate performance metrics of Indiana University Cyclotron Operations (IUCO), including availability, mean time between failures, and mean time to repair, and to determine how changes in these metrics impact patient treatments. We utilized a computerized maintenance management system to log all downtime occurrences and servicing operations for the facility. These data were then used to calculate the availability as well as the mean time between failures and mean time to repair. Impact on patient treatments was determined by analyzing delayed and missed treatments, which were recorded in an electronic medical record and database maintained by the therapists. The availability of the IUCO proton beam has been increasing since beginning of operation in 2003 and averaged 96.9% for 2009 through 2011. The mean time between failures and mean time to repair were also determined and correlated with improvements in the maintenance and operating procedures of the facility, as well as environmental factors. It was found that events less than 15 minutes in duration have minimal impact on treatment delays, while events lasting longer than one hour may result in missed treatments. The availability of the proton beam was more closely correlated with delayed than with missed treatments, demonstrating the utility and limitations of the availability metric. In conclusion, we

  17. Reversible Valproate Induced Pisa Syndrome and Parkinsonism in a Neuro-Oncology Patient with Depression and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Botturi, Andrea; Silvani, Antonio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Paoli, Riccardo Augusto; Lucchiari, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric conditions frequently overlap in neuro-oncology. This overlapping negatively affects patients’ quality of life and decreases the ability of providers to manage specific symptoms by therapy modulation, especially when psychopharmacotherapy needs to be prescribed. We describe here a patient with recurrent brain tumor, symptomatic epilepsy and depression who developed Pisa syndrome and parkinsonism after several months of valproic acid use. An accurate recognition of symptoms and treatment side effect allowed an appropriate clinical approach so as to rapidly improve both movement disorder and depression without increasing the risk of developing seizure. This has improved the autonomy and quality of life in a patient with poor prognosis. PMID:27462241

  18. Differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics and quality of life outcomes among oncology patients with different types of pain.

    PubMed

    Posternak, Victoria; Dunn, Laura B; Dhruva, Anand; Paul, Steven M; Luce, Judith; Mastick, Judy; Levine, Jon D; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Hammer, Marylin; Wright, Fay; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study, in oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy (n = 926), were to: describe the occurrence of different types of pain (ie, no pain, only noncancer pain [NCP], only cancer pain [CP], or both CP and NCP) and evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics, and quality of life (QOL) among the 4 groups. Patients completed self-report questionnaires on demographic and symptom characteristics and QOL. Patients who had pain were asked to indicate if it was or was not related to their cancer or its treatment. Medical records were reviewed for information on cancer and its treatments. In this study, 72.5% of the patients reported pain. Of the 671 who reported pain, 21.5% reported only NCP, 37.0% only CP, and 41.5% both CP and NCP. Across the 3 pain groups, worst pain scores were in the moderate to severe range. Compared with the no pain group, patients with both CP and NCP were significantly younger, more likely to be female, have a higher level of comorbidity, and a poorer functional status. In addition, these patients reported: higher levels of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbance; lower levels of energy and attentional function; and poorer QOL. Patients with only NCP were significantly older than the other 3 groups. The most common comorbidities in the NCP group were back pain, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and depression. Unrelieved CP and NCP continue to be significant problems. Oncology outpatients need to be assessed for both CP and NCP conditions.

  19. INvolvement of breast CAncer patients during oncological consultations: a multicentre randomised controlled trial—the INCA study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Claudia; Ghilardi, Alberto; Deledda, Giuseppe; Buizza, Chiara; Bottacini, Alessandro; Del Piccolo, Lidia; Rimondini, Michela; Chiodera, Federica; Mazzi, Maria Angela; Ballarin, Mario; Bighelli, Irene; Strepparava, Maria Grazia; Molino, Annamaria; Fiorio, Elena; Nortilli, Rolando; Caliolo, Chiara; Zuliani, Serena; Auriemma, Alessandra; Maspero, Federica; Simoncini, Edda Lucia; Ragni, Fulvio; Brown, Richard; Zimmermann, Christa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Studies on patient involvement show that physicians make few attempts to involve their patients who ask few questions if not facilitated. On the other hand, the patients who participate in the decision-making process show greater treatment adherence and have better health outcomes. Different methods to encourage the active participation during oncological consultation have been described; however, similar studies in Italy are lacking. The aims of the present study are to (1) assess the effects of a preconsultation intervention to increase the involvement of breast cancer patients during the consultation, and (2) explore the role of the attending companions in the information exchange during consultation. Methods and analysis All female patients with breast cancer who attend the Oncology Out-patient Services for the first time will provide an informed consent to participate in the study. They are randomly assigned to the intervention or to the control group. The intervention consists of the presentation of a list of relevant illness-related questions, called a question prompt sheet. The primary outcome measure of the efficacy of the intervention is the number of questions asked by patients during the consultation. Secondary outcomes are the involvement of the patient by the oncologist; the patient's perceived achievement of her information needs; the patient's satisfaction and ability to cope; the quality of the doctor–patient relationship in terms of patient-centeredness; and the number of questions asked by the patient's companions and their involvement during the consultation. All outcome measures are supposed to significantly increase in the intervention group. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the local Ethics Committee of the Hospital Trust of Verona. Study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01510964 PMID:23645911

  20. SU-F-18C-06: Prospective Patient Evaluation of Iterative Reconstruction in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R; Vance, S; Cattaneo, R; Schultz, L; Elshaikh, M; Chetty, I; Glide-Hurst, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work incorporates iterative reconstruction (IR) into a dose reduction study to characterize image quality metrics, delineation, and dosimetric assessment, with the goal of reducing imaging dose in Radiation Oncology. Methods: Three-dimensional noise power spectrum (NPS) analysis characterized noise magnitude/texture (120 kVp, 50–200 mAs, IR levels 1–6 yielding noise reduction of 0.89–0.55 compared to filtered backprojection (FBP)). Task-specific Modulation Transfer Functions (MTFtask) were characterized across varied subject contrasts. A prospective dose reduction study (500 to 150 mAs) was conducted for 12 patients (43 inter-fraction CTs) for high-dose rate brachytherapy. Three physicians performed qualitative image assessment between full-dose FBP (FD-FBP, 500 mAs), low-dose FBP (LD-FBP, 150–250 mAs), and low-dose IRL5-6 (LD-IR) scans for image noise, cuff/bladder interface detectability, spatial resolution, texture, and segmentation confidence. Comparisons between LD-FBP and LD-IR were conducted for the following metrics: delineation (bladder and rectum evaluated via overlap indices (OI) and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC)), noise, boundary changes, dose calculation, and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Results: NPS showed ∼50% reduction in noise magnitude and ∼0.1 1/mm spatial frequency shift with IRL6. The largest MTFtask decrease between FBP and IR was 0.08 A.U. Qualitative patient image evaluation revealed LD-IR was equivalent or slightly worse than FD-FBP, and superior to LD-FBP for all metrics except low contrast interface and texture. The largest CT number discrepancy from FBP occurred at a bone/tissue interface using IRL6 (−1.2 ± 4.9 HU (range: −17.6 – 12.5 HU)). No significant contour differences (OIs and DSCs = 0.85 – 0.95) and dose calculation discrepancy (<0.02%) were observed. DRRs preserved anatomical detail and demonstrated <2% difference in intensity between LD-FBP and LD-IRL6. Conclusion: While

  1. Factors Affecting Communication Patterns between Oncology Staff and Family Members of Deceased Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Tal; Gordon, Noa; Perry, Shlomit; Rizel, Shulamith; Stemmer, Salomon M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Perceptions of the role of oncology medical staff in supporting bereaved families have evolved with the transition to interdisciplinary cancer care. We investigated the interactions between oncology professionals and bereaved families. Methods This cross-sectional study involved all oncology medical staff at the Davidoff Center. Participants were given a questionnaire relating to bereavement follow-up. Responses were measured using a 5-point Likert scale. Results Of 155 staff members, 107 filled questionnaires with <20% missing data and were included in the analysis (α = 0.799; corrected, α = 0.821). Respondents included physicians (35%), nurses (46%), social workers (7%), psychologists (4%), or unspecified (8%); 85% were Jewish, and 60% had ≥10 years of oncology experience. Most respondents thought that contacting bereaved families was important (73%), and that it provided closure for staff (79%); 41% indicated that they contacted >50% of the families of their deceased patients. Contacting bereaved families was considered the responsibility of the physicians (90%), nurses (84%), or social workers (89%). The main barriers to contacting bereaved families were emotional overload (68%) and lack of time (63%); 60% indicated a need for additional communication tools for bereavement follow-up. In a multivariate analysis, profession (physician vs. nurse), primary workplace (outpatient setting vs. other), and self-defined religion were significant variables with respect to the perceived importance of contacting bereaved families and to actually contacting them. Other factors (e.g., age, gender) were non-significant. Conclusions Perspectives regarding bereavement actions differ significantly across medical professions, work settings, and self-defined religions. Additional guidance and education regarding bereavement actions is warranted. PMID:27683075

  2. The Prevalence of HIV in Cancer Patients at the Surgical Oncology Unit of Donka University Hospital of Conakry (Guinea)

    PubMed Central

    Traore, Bangaly; Bah, Thierno Souleymane; Traore, Fode Amara; Sow, Mamadou Saliou; Diane, Solomana; Keita, Mamady; Cisse, Mohamed; Koulibaly, Moussa; Camara, Naby Daouda

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To determine the prevalence of HIV infection among patients seen at the surgical oncology unit of Donka (Conakry, Guinea). Method. We conducted a retrospective and descriptive study of HIV infection in cancer patients from May 2007 to December 2012. Social characteristics (age, gender, marital status, and education) and immune status (HIV type, CD4 count) were reviewed. Results. Out of 2598 cancer patients, 54 (2.1%) tested positive for HIV. There were 11 (20.4%) defining AIDS and 43 (79.6%) nondefining AIDS cancers. The most frequent cancers were breast (14) (26.0%), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (6) (11.1%), liver (6) (11.1%), eye and annexes (6) (11.1%), and cervical cancer (5) (9.3%). These patients were female in 34 (63.0%) and had a median age of 39 years and body mass index was 20,3 Kg/m2. They were unschooled in 40 (74.1%) and married in 35 (64.8%). CD4 count showed a median of 317 cells/mL. Antiretroviral treatment was performed in 40 (74.1%). Conclusion. HIV prevalence is higher in patients in our unit of surgical oncology. Breast cancer was the most common in this association. A national survey of a large sample is needed to determine the true prevalence and impact of HIV on cancer prognosis. PMID:26770197

  3. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Charles B. Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  4. Management of prostate cancer in older patients: updated recommendations of a working group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Droz, Jean-Pierre; Aapro, Matti; Balducci, Lodovico; Boyle, Helen; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Cathcart, Paul; Dickinson, Louise; Efstathiou, Eleni; Emberton, Mark; Fitzpatrick, John M; Heidenreich, Axel; Hughes, Simon; Joniau, Steven; Kattan, Michael; Mottet, Nicolas; Oudard, Stéphane; Payne, Heather; Saad, Fred; Sugihara, Toru

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) developed treatment guidelines for men with prostate cancer who are older than 70 years old. In 2013, a new multidisciplinary SIOG working group was formed to update these recommendations. The consensus of the task force is that older men with prostate cancer should be managed according to their individual health status, not according to age. On the basis of a validated rapid health status screening instrument and simple assessment, the task force recommends that patients are classed into three groups for treatment: healthy or fit patients who should have the same treatment options as younger patients; vulnerable patients with reversible impairment who should receive standard treatment after medical intervention; and frail patients with non-reversible impairment who should receive adapted treatment.

  5. Principles of psychopharmacology for the adolescent patient.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Alya

    2013-08-01

    Physicians are presented with great challenges when attempting to integrate information from multiple sources, often with conflicting recommendations, to meet the present and future needs of adolescents and the expectations of their families and caregivers. For this reason, this article attempts to outline a general strategy in assessment and use of information. General history of presenting symptoms, results of examination details, and additional history from family or other contexts lead to the development of a reasoned hypothesis. The working hypothesis is the basis for subsequent treatment. Revisiting the ongoing data, including response to therapeutic intervention, leads to revised hypotheses that provide the basis for the new treatment formulation. Patients and their families become informed self-advocates and partners in achieving improved outcomes.

  6. Phase 2 Trial of Pemetrexed in Children and Adolescents with Refractory Solid Tumors: a Children’s Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Anne B.; Malempati, Suman; Krailo, Mark; Melemed, Allen; Gorlick, Richard; Ames, Matthew M.; Safgren, Stephanie L.; Adamson, Peter C.; Blaney, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pemetrexed is a multi-targeted antifolate that inhibits key enzymes involved in nucleotide biosynthesis. We performed a phase 2 trial of pemetrexed in children with refractory or recurrent solid tumors, including CNS tumors, to estimate the response rate and further define its toxicity profile. Procedure Pemetrexed, at a dose of 1910 mg/m2, was administered as a 10-minute intravenous infusion every 21 days. Patients also received vitamin B12, daily multivitamin supplementation, and dexamethasone. A two-stage design (10 + 10) was employed in each of the following disease strata: osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, ependymoma, medulloblastoma/supratentorial PNET, and non-brainstem high-grade glioma. Results Seventy-two eligible subjects (39 males) were enrolled. Median age was 11 years (range 3–23). Sixty-eight were evaluable for response. The median number of cycles administered was 2 (range 1–13). No complete or partial responses were observed. Stable disease, for a median of 5 (range 4–13) cycles, was observed in 5 patients (ependymoma, Ewing sarcoma, medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma; n=1 each). Neutropenia (44%), anemia (35%), and elevated alanine transaminase (35%) attributable to pemetrexed were the most commonly recurring toxicities observed in patients receiving multiple cycles. Other toxicities attributed to pemetrexed occurring in ≥10% of cycles included thrombocytopenia (30%), fatigue (18%), nausea (14), hyperglycemia (13%), rash (11%), vomiting (13%), and hypophosphatemia (11%). Conclusions Pemetrexed, administered as an intravenous infusion every 21 days, was tolerable in children and adolescents with refractory solid tumors, including CNS tumors, but did not show evidence of objective anti-tumor activity in the childhood tumors studied. PMID:22745043

  7. Habitual Response to Stress in Recovering Adolescent Anorexic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Samantha P.; Erickson, Sarah J.; Branom, Christina; Steiner, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Although previous research has investigated the stress response in acutely anorexic patients, there is currently little research addressing this response in recovering adolescent anorexic girls. Therefore, this study investigated partially and fully weight-restored anorexic adolescent girls' psychological and physiological response to a…

  8. Physicians' perceptions of cancer care for elderly patients: a qualitative sociological study based on a pilot geriatric oncology program.

    PubMed

    Sifer-Rivière, Lynda; Girre, Véronique; Gisselbrecht, Mathilde; Saint-Jean, Olivier

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to document physicians' perceptions of cancer care for elderly patients within an oncogeriatric coordination pilot unit (UPCOG) created in Paris, France. We focused on how physicians apply new cancer care practices, how they establish new teamwork, and their experience of oncogeriatrics in everyday practice. Qualitative methods were used, including a literature review, observation of working sessions in the oncogeriatric pilot unit, and semi-structured interviews with 28 physicians. The results show how physicians' differing perceptions of geriatric oncology can hinder routine collaboration.

  9. Palliative Care as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Meaghann S; Heinze, Katherine E; Kelly, Katherine P; Wiener, Lori; Casey, Robert L; Bell, Cynthia J; Wolfe, Joanne; Garee, Amy M; Watson, Anne; Hinds, Pamela S

    2015-12-01

    The study team conducted a systematic review of pediatric and adolescent palliative cancer care literature from 1995 to 2015 using four databases to inform development of a palliative care psychosocial standard. A total of 209 papers were reviewed with inclusion of 73 papers for final synthesis. Revealed topics of urgent consideration include the following: symptom assessment and intervention, direct patient report, effective communication, and shared decision-making. Standardization of palliative care assessments and interventions in pediatric oncology has the potential to foster improved quality of care across the cancer trajectory for children and adolescents with cancer and their family members.

  10. Psychosocial interventions for adolescents and young adult cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Diana; Koehler, Michael; Friedrich, Michael; Hilgendorf, Inken; Mehnert, Anja; Weißflog, Gregor

    2015-09-01

    Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients experience unique psychosocial needs and developmental challenges. A cancer diagnosis can stress this development and disrupt AYAs in their normal life. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the impact of psychosocial interventions on mental health in AYAs. A literature research was conducted, which resulted in twelve eligible studies. The standardized mean difference between intervention and control conditions was 0.13 (95% CI: -0.16 to 0.42) for quality of life, 0.27 (95% CI: -0.22 to 0.76) for cancer-related knowledge and -0.16 (95% CI: -0.73 to 0.42) on psychological distress indicating, small and non-significant effects for interventions improving mental health. This work strengthens the need for age-appropriated interventions in psycho-oncology. Future research should develop interventions more graduated by age. Randomized intervention studies with larger samples and focusing psychosocial outcomes are needed to establish evidence-based psycho-oncological interventions for AYAs.

  11. Results of high-risk neutropenia therapy of hematology–oncology patients in a university hospital in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Boada Burutaran, Matilde; Guadagna, Regina; Grille, Sofia; Stevenazzi, Mariana; Guillermo, Cecilia; Diaz, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Background Febrile neutropenia is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in hematology–oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. The management of febrile neutropenia is typically algorithm-driven. The aim of this study was to assess the results of a standardized protocol for the treatment of febrile neutropenia. Methods A retrospective cohort study (2011–2012) was conducted of patients with high-risk neutropenia in a hematology–oncology service. Results Forty-four episodes of 17 patients with a median age of 48 years (range: 18–78 years) were included. The incidence of febrile neutropenia was 61.4%. The presence of febrile neutropenia was associated with both the duration and severity of neutropenia. Microbiological agents were isolated from different sources in 59.3% of the episodes with bacteremia isolated from blood being the most prevalent (81.3%). Multiple drug-resistant gram-negative bacilli were isolated in 62.5% of all microbiologically documented infections. Treatment of 63% of the episodes in which the initial treatment was piperacillin/tazobactam needed to be escalated to meropenem. The mortality rate due to febrile neutropenia episodes was 18.5%. Conclusion The high rate of gram-negative bacilli resistant to piperacillin/tazobactam (front-line antibiotics in our protocol) and the early need to escalate to carbapenems raises the question as to whether it is necessary to change the current protocol. PMID:25638764

  12. Financial Quality Control of In-Patient Chemotherapy in Germany: Are Additional Payments Cost-Covering for Pharmaco-Oncological Expenses?

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Volker R.; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Cost-covering in-patient care is increasingly important for hospital providers in Germany, especially with regard to expensive oncological pharmaceuticals. Additional payments (Zusatzentgelte; ZE) on top of flat rate diagnose-related group (DRG) reimbursement can be claimed by hospitals for in-patient use of selected medications. To verify cost coverage of in-patient chemotherapies, the costs of medication were compared to their revenues. Method From January to June 2010, a retrospective cost-revenue study was performed at a German obstetrics/gynecology university clinic. The hospital's pharmacy list of inpatient oncological therapies for breast and gynecological cancer was checked for accuracy and compared with the documented ZEs and the costs and revenues for each oncological application. Results N = 45 in-patient oncological therapies were identified in n = 18 patients, as well as n = 7 bisphosphonate applications; n = 11 ZEs were documented. Costs for oncological medication were € 33,752. The corresponding ZE revenues amounted to only € 13,980, resulting in a loss of € 19,772. All in-patient oncological therapies performed were not cost-covering. Data discrepancy, incorrect documentation and cost attribution, and process aborts were identified. Conclusions Routine financial quality control at the medicine-pharmacy administration interface is implemented, with monthly comparison of costs and revenues, as well as admission status. Non-cost-covering therapies for in-patients should be converted to out-patient therapies. Necessary adjustments of clinic processes are made according to these results, to avoid future losses. PMID:21673822

  13. Adolescent and young adult patients with cancer: a milieu of unique features.

    PubMed

    Sender, Leonard; Zabokrtsky, Keri B

    2015-08-01

    Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer are a unique category of patients who, depending on age at time of diagnosis, might receive treatment from oncologists specializing either in the treatment of children or adults. In the USA, AYA oncology generally encompasses patients 15-39 years of age. AYA patients with cancer typically present with diseases that span the spectrum from 'paediatric' cancers (such as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia [ALL] and brain tumours) to 'adult' tumours (such as breast cancer and melanoma), as well as cancers that are largely unique to their age group (such as testicular cancer and bone tumours). Research indicates that outcomes of AYA patients with cancer are influenced not only by the treatment provided, but also by factors related to 'host' biology. In addition to the potential biological and cancer-specific differences between AYAs and other patients with cancer, AYA patients also often have disparate access to clinical trials and suffer from a lack of age-appropriate psychosocial support services and health services, which might influence survival as well as overall quality of life. In this Review, these issues are discussed, with a focus on two types of AYA cancer--ALL and melanoma--highlighting findings arising from the use of emerging technologies, such as whole-genome sequencing. PMID:26011488

  14. [Microbial analysis of clinical material taken from patients at the Oncology Center, Maria Skłodowkda-Curie Institute in Warsaw in 1997].

    PubMed

    Fuksiewicz, A; Połowniak-Pracka, H; Ochman, E; Podsiadło, B

    1999-01-01

    An analysis was carried out of the microbiological investigations of clinical material samples obtained from the patients of two oncology centres belonging to the Warsaw Oncology Centre. Microorganisms cultured from urine, blood, catheters, smears of wounds and other materials were analysed. From 4839 clinical material samples from the Ursynów centre 1755 bacterial strains were isolated. From 423 samples from the centre in Wawelska Street 171 strains were obtained. In infections of patients from the centres the number of Gram-positive cocci was twice that of Gram-negative rods. In the investigated clinical material S. aureus was the most frequently isolated Gram-positive coccus, while E. coli was the most frequent species among Gram-negative bacteria. In the infections of oncological patients a considerable frequency was noted of yeast-like fungi, especially C. albicans. Particularly disquieting was the increasing number of isolates of C. glabrata and C. krusei strains resistant to fluconazole.

  15. Oncology legislative update.

    PubMed

    Holmes, H

    2000-11-01

    This article reviews current legislative and regulatory issues of importance to the oncology community. Topics include patient protection, Medicare support of clinical trials, research data protection, the Medical Innovation Tax Credit, National Cancer Institute appropriations, and medical record privacy issues. Other topics discussed included funding for stem-cell research, genetic therapy oversight, and coverage for uninsured patients.

  16. Inhalant Use, Abuse, and Dependence among Adolescent Patients: Commonly Comorbid Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakai, Joseph T.; Hall, Shannon K.; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about adolescents with DSM-IV-defined inhalant abuse and dependence. The aim of this study was to compare comorbidity among (1) adolescents with inhalant use disorders, (2) adolescents who reported using inhalants without inhalant use disorder, and (3) other adolescent patients drawn from an adolescent drug and alcohol…

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma in central Sydney: a 10 year review of patients seen in a medical oncology department

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Desmond; Findlay, Michael; Boyer, Michael; Tattersall, Martin H.

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To report a single Australian oncology unit’s experience with the management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in the context of a literature review of the current management issues. METHODS: Retrospective case record review of 76 patients with diagnosis of HCC referred to the unit between 1984 and 1995. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients had adequate records for analysis. Thirty-six (56%) were migrants with half from Southeast Asia. Twenty-four p atients had a documented viral aetiology. Nine (14%) of 51 patients with pathological confirmation of HCC had normal alpha-fetoprotein levels. Median survival of the 20 patients managed palliatively was 5 weeks compared to 16 weeks for the cohort overall. Surgery in 16 patients rendered all initially disease free with a median survival of 88 weeks. Chemoembolisation induced tumor responses in 5 of the 11 patients so treated. Systemic chemotherapy and tamoxifen treatment caused tumor response in two of 12 and one of 25 respectively. CONCLUSION: Prolonged survival of patients with HCC depends on early detection of small tumors suitable for surgical resection. Other active t reatments are palliative in intent and have limited success. In addition to tumor response and survival duration, the toxicities of therapies and the overall quality of life of patients need to be considered as important outcomes. Viral hepatitis prevention and screening of individuals at risk are strategies that are important for HCC management in communities where the disease is endemic. PMID:11819496

  18. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76). Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers. PMID:25243153

  19. Case management in oncology rehabilitation (CAMON): The effect of case management on the quality of life in patients with cancer after one year of ambulant rehabilitation. A study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial in oncology rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer diseases and their therapies have negative effects on the quality of life. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of case management in a sample of oncological outpatients with the intent of rehabilitation after cancer treatment. Case management wants to support the complex information needs of the patients in addition to the segmented structure of the health care system. Emphasis is put on support for self-management in order to enhance health - conscious behaviour, learning to deal with the burden of the illness and providing the opportunity for regular contacts with care providers. We present a study protocol to investigate the efficacy of a case management in patients following oncology rehabilitation after cancer treatment. Methods The trial is a multicentre, two-arm randomised controlled study. Patients are randomised parallel in either 'usual care' plus case management or 'usual care' alone. Patients with all types of cancer can be included in the study, if they have completed the therapy with chemo- and/or radiotherapy/surgery with curative intention and are expected to have a survival time >1 year. To determine the health-related quality of life the general questionnaire FACT G is used. The direct correlation between self-management and perceived self-efficacy is measured with the Jerusalem & Schwarzer questionnaire. Patients satisfaction with the care received is measured using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care 5 As (PACIC-5A). Data are collected at the beginning of the trial and after 3, 6 and 12 months. The power analysis revealed a sample size of 102 patients. The recruitment of the centres began in 2009. The inclusion of patients began in May 2010. Discussion Case management has proved to be effective regarding quality of life of patients with chronic diseases. When it comes to oncology, case management is mainly used in cancer treatment, but it is not yet common in the rehabilitation of cancer patients

  20. Use of Disinfection Cap to Reduce Central-Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection and Blood Culture Contamination Among Hematology–Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kamboj, Mini; Blair, Rachel; Bell, Natalie; Son, Crystal; Huang, Yao-Ting; Dowling, Mary; Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Eagan, Janet; Sepkowitz, Kent

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study, we examined the impact of routine use of a passive disinfection cap for catheter hub decontamination in hematology–oncology patients. SETTING A tertiary care cancer center in New York City METHODS In this multiphase prospective study, we used 2 preintervention phases (P1 and P2) to establish surveillance and baseline rates followed by sequential introduction of disinfection caps on high-risk units (HRUs: hematologic malignancy wards, hematopoietic stem cell transplant units and intensive care units) (P3) and general oncology units (P4). Unit-specific and hospital-wide hospital-acquired central-line–associated bloodstream infection (HA-CLABSI) rates and blood culture contamination (BCC) with coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS) were measured. RESULTS Implementation of a passive disinfection cap resulted in a 34% decrease in hospital-wide HA-CLABSI rates (combined P1 and P2 baseline rate of 2.66–1.75 per 1,000 catheter days at the end of the study period). This reduction occurred only among high-risk patients and not among general oncology patients. In addition, the use of the passive disinfection cap resulted in decreases of 63% (HRUs) and 51% (general oncology units) in blood culture contamination, with an estimated reduction of 242 BCCs with CONS. The reductions in HA-CLABSI and BCC correspond to an estimated annual savings of $3.2 million in direct medical costs. CONCLUSION Routine use of disinfection caps is associated with decreased HA-CLABSI rates among high-risk hematology oncology patients and a reduction in blood culture contamination among all oncology patients. PMID:26394849

  1. Patient-Reported Outcome Coordinator Did Not Improve Quality of Life Assessment Response Rates: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donna; Gerbing, Robert; Alonzo, Todd; Aplenc, Richard; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Schulte, Fiona; Cullen, Patricia; Sung, Lillian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Health related quality of life (HRQL) assessments during therapy for pediatric cancer provide valuable information to better understand the patient experience. Our objective was to determine the impact of a patient-reported outcome (PRO) coordinator on HRQL questionnaire completion rates during a pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) trial. Methods AAML1031 is a multicenter Children’s Oncology Group therapeutic trial for de novo AML with a secondary aim to assess HRQL of children and adolescents treated with chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Parents/guardians are the primary respondents and four questionnaires are administered at eight time points. The questionnaires are the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales, PedsQL 3.0 Acute Cancer Module, PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale, and the Pediatric Inventory for Parents. To improve response rates, a central PRO coordinator was instituted and reminded sites about upcoming and delinquent questionnaires. The proportion of HRQL questionnaires completed were compared prior to, and following institution of the PRO coordinator. This analysis evaluated the first five assessment time points. Results There were231 families who consented to participate in the HRQL aim. Overall response rates for all questionnaires were 73–83%. At time point 1, within 14 days of chemotherapy initiation, post-PRO coordinator completion rates were significantly higher for three of four questionnaires. However, the effect was not sustained and at time point 4, one month following last chemotherapy or HSCT, completion rates were significantly lower post-PRO coordinator for all four questionnaires. Conclusion Addition of a central PRO coordinator did not result in sustained improvement in HRQL questionnaire completion rates. Efforts to improve response rates must consider other strategies. PMID:25915772

  2. DISPARITIES IN PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGY PATIENT EDUCATION AND LINGUISTIC RESOURCES: RESULTS OF A NATIONAL SURVEY OF PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGISTS

    PubMed Central

    Slone, Jeremy S; Self, Elizabeth; Friedman, Debra; Heiman, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Background Extensive patient and family education is required at the time of a new diagnosis of pediatric cancer yet ittle data exist regarding the availability and linguistic competency of new cancer diagnosis education provided by pediatric oncology institutions. Procedure Using the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) membership list, a web-based survey was conducted among a cohort of pediatric oncologists to determine pediatric oncologists’ assessment of institutional resources for new cancer diagnosis education and the availability of linguistically appropriate education. Results Of 1,294 ASPHO members sent email survey invitations, 573 (44.3%) responded with 429 meeting eligibility criteria. Oncologists at academic institutions reported their institutions had more availability of resources for new diagnosis education compared with those from non-academic institutions (Mean 78.6 vs. 74.3; 0 [not at all] – 100 [well equipped]; p=0.05). The mean score increased with volume of new cancer diagnoses/year: small (<75) = 73.4; medium (75 – 149) = 76.7; large (≥ 150) = 84.5 (p <0.001). Oncologists at large volume institutions reported more availability of an established patient education protocol (50.8% vs. 38.1%, p <0.001) and increased use of dedicated non-physician staff (79.9% vs. 66.1%, p=0.02), but less use of websites for patient education (17.2% vs. 33.3%, p=0.001). Availability of linguistically appropriate education improved with increasing institution size: small (76.4), medium (82.3) and large (84.0) patient volume (p <0.011). Conclusion According to pediatric oncologists, a disparity in educational and linguistic resources for new pediatric cancer diagnosis education exists depending on institution type and size. PMID:24167088

  3. Patterns of Care in Elderly Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Oncology Patients: A Single-Center Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Lockwood, Gina; Bayley, Andrew; Kim, John; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura A.; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John; Witterick, Ian; Chen, Eric X.; Ringash, Jolie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the patterns of care for elderly head-and-neck cancer patients with those of younger patients. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of all new mucosal head-and-neck cancer referrals to radiation oncology between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, treatment pattern, tolerance, and outcomes were compared between the elderly (aged {>=}75 years) and younger (aged <75 years) cohorts. Results: A total of 2,312 patients, including 452 (20%) elderly and 1,860 (80%) younger patients, were studied. The elderly patients were more likely to be women (36% vs. 27%, p <.01) and to have other malignancies (23% vs. 13%, p <.01), Stage I or II disease (38% vs. 32%, p <.01), and N0 status (56% vs. 42%, p <.01). Treatment was less often curative in intent (79% vs. 93%, p <.01). For the 1,487 patients who received definitive radiotherapy (RT), no differences were found between the elderly (n = 238) and younger (n = 1,249) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. Within the subset of 760 patients who received intensified treatment (concurrent chemoradiotherapy or hyperfractionated accelerated RT), no difference was seen between the elderly (n = 46) and younger (n = 714) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. After a median follow-up of 2.5 years, the 2-year cause-specific survival rate after definitive RT was 72% (range, 65-78%) for the elderly vs. 86% (range, 84-88%) for the younger patients (p <.01). Conclusion: Elderly head-and-neck cancer patients exhibited different clinical characteristics and experienced different patterns of care from younger patients. Although age itself was an adverse predictor of cause-specific survival, its effect was modest. Elderly patients selected for definitive RT or intensified RT showed no evidence of impaired treatment tolerance.

  4. Developing a tool for nurses to assess risk of infection in pediatric oncology patients in China: a modified Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng; Cui, Yan; Wang, Hong; Wang, Fang; Lu, Chao; Shen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infections are identified as the most common preventable cause of death in pediatric oncology patients. Assessing and stratifying risk of infections are essential to prevent infection in these patients. To date, no tool can fulfill this demand in China. This study aimed to develop a nursing work-based and Chinese-specific tool for pediatric nurses to assess risk of infection in oncology patients. This research was a modified Delphi study. Based on a literature review, a 37-item questionnaire rating on a 0–5 scale was developed. Twenty-four experts from 8 hospitals in 6 provinces of China were consulted for three rounds. Consensus for each item in the first round was defined as: the rating mean was > 3 and the coefficient of variation (CV) was < 0.5. Consensus for each item in the second round was defined as CV < 0.3. Consensus among experts was defined as: P value of Kendall's coefficient of concordance (W) < 0.05. After three rounds of consultation, a two-part tool was developed: the Immune Status Scale (ISS) and the Checklist of Risk Factors of Infection (CRFI). There were 5 items in the ISS and 14 in the CRFI. Based on the ISS score, nurses could stratify children into the low-risk and high-risk groups. For high-risk children, nurses should screen risk factors of infection every day by the CRFI, and twice weekly for low-risk children. Further study is needed to verify this tool's efficacy.

  5. Longterm quality of life after oncologic surgery and microvascular free flap reconstruction in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, Gregor-Franziskus; Guentsch, Arndt; Roshanghias, Korosh; Eichmann, Francy; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) has become increasingly important in cancer treatment. It refers to the patient’s perception of the effects of the disease and therapy, and their impact on daily functioning and general feeling of well being. Material and Methods n this prospective study, a total of 100 patients treated at our institution, completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 questionnaire and the specific EORTC QLQ-H&N35 module. The questionnaires were distributed to the patients between 12 and 60 months postoperatively. Results Global QoL score was 58.3 and mean score for functioning scale was 76.7. Fatigue (28.7 ± 26.1), followed by financial problems (27.7 ± 33.5), insomnia (26.7 ± 34.5) and pain (26.3 ± 29.9) had highest symptom score on QLQ-C30. Fatigue (r=-0.488), insomnia (r=-0.416) and pain (r =-0.448) showed highest value for significantly negative correlation to global QoL. In the H&N35 module, restriction of mouth opening (43.3 ± 38.6), dry mouth (40.7 ± 36.9), sticky saliva (37.3 ± 37.1) and eating in public (33.8 ± 31.9) were the four worst symptoms. Swallowing problem (r=-0.438), eating in public (r=-0.420) and persistent severe speech (r=-0.398) ranked as the three worst symptoms with highest value for significantly negative correlation to global QoL. Conclusions Longterm QoL after oncologic surgery and microvascular free flap reconstruction in patients with oral cancer is satisfactory. Measuring QoL should be considered as part of the evaluation of cancer treatment. Key words:Longterm quality of life, oral cancer, oncologic surgery, microvascular free flap reconstruction. PMID:27031070

  6. A comparison of preliminary oncologic outcome and postoperative complications between patients undergoing either open or robotic radical cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cusano, Antonio; Haddock, Peter; Jackson, Max; Staff, Ilene; Wagner, Joseph; Meraney, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To compare complications and outcomes in patients undergoing either open radical cystectomy (ORC) or robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RRC). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively identified patients that underwent ORC or RRC between 2003- 2013. We statistically compared preliminary oncologic outcomes of patients for each surgical modality. Results: 92 (43.2%) and 121 (56.8%) patients underwent ORC and RRC, respectively. While operative time was shorter for ORC patients (403 vs. 508 min; p<0.001), surgical blood loss and transfusion rates were significantly lower in RRC patients (p<0.001 and 0.006). Length of stay was not different between groups (p=0.221). There was no difference in the proportion of lymph node-positive patients between groups. However, RRC patients had a greater number of lymph nodes removed during surgery (18 vs. 11.5; p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the incidence of pre-existing comorbidities or in the Clavien distribution of complications between groups. ORC and RRC patients were followed for a median of 1.38 (0.55-2.7) and 1.40 (0.582.59) years, respectively (p=0.850). During this period, a lower proportion (22.3%) of RRC patients experienced disease recurrence vs. ORC patients (34.8%). However, there was no significant difference in time to recurrence between groups. While ORC was associated with a higher all-cause mortality rate (p=0.049), there was no significant difference in disease-free survival time between groups. Conclusions: ORC and RRC patients experience postoperative complications of similar rates and severity. However, RRC may offer indirect benefits via reduced surgical blood loss and need for transfusion. PMID:27564275

  7. Imaging ‘the lost tribe’: a review of adolescent cancer imaging. Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Zerizer, I.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Although a small proportion of all cancer registrations, malignancy in adolescence and young adulthood remains the most common natural cause of death in this age group. Advances in the management and outcomes of childhood cancer have not been matched within the adolescent population, with increasing incidence and poorer survival seen amongst teenagers with cancer compared with other populations. There have been increasing moves towards specific adolescent oncology centres, with the aim of centralising expertise, however, ‘adolescent imaging’ does not exist as a speciality in the same way that paediatric imaging does, with responsibility for imaging adolescent patients sometimes falling to paediatric radiologists and sometimes to ‘adult’ radiologists, usually with a specific interest in a tumour type or body system. In this article, imaging of the more common malignancies, encountered in adolescent patients is reviewed. Complications of treatment are reviewed in another article to give an overview of adolescent oncology imaging practice. PMID:19933020

  8. [CROATIAN SOCIETY FOR MEDICAL ONCOLOGY CLINICAL GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND FOLLOW-UP OF PATIENTS WITH MELANOMA].

    PubMed

    Herceg, Davorin; Buzina, Daska Stulhofer; Ceović, Romana; Dotlić, Snjezana; Ilić, Ivana; Orehovec, Sanda Smuđ; Herceg, Gordana Horvatić; Mijatović, Davor; Separović, Robert; Silovski, Tajana; Vrbanec, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma in the Western world has an increasing incidence. One of the most important factor for the increase in incidence is sporadic, uncontrolled exposure to the sun. The basis for the treatment of primary melanoma is surgical treatment. Treatment of metastatic disease of melanoma in recent years experienced significant changes. BRAF and MEK inhibitors, immunotherapy with programmed cell-death immune checkpoint inhibitors (anti-PD-1-antibodies) are new options for the treatment of metastatic disease. A mulitidisiplinary team of Croatian Society for Medical Oncology provides recommendations for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of melanoma primarily driven to the discovery of new drugs and therapeutic options, that change the prognosis of patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:27290810

  9. Cultural differences in spiritual care: findings of an Israeli oncologic questionnaire examining patient interest in spiritual care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As professional spiritual care (chaplaincy) is introduced to new cultures worldwide, it bears examining which elements of screening and care are universal and, for those elements showing cultural difference, to study them in each culture. No quantitative spiritual care patient study had previously been done in Israel. Our objectives were twofold: 1) to examine who wants spiritual care in Israel, including demographic and clinical variables, and to compare against other results worldwide to further develop universal screening protocols 2) to see what patients want from spiritual care specifically in the Israeli setting. Methods Self-administered patient questionnaire examining spirituality/religiosity, interest in spiritual care (subdivided by type of care), and key demographic, social, and clinical data. The study setting was an Israeli oncology center at which spiritual care had been recently introduced. Results Data from 364 oncology patient questionnaires found 41% interest in spiritual care, as compared to 35%-54% in American studies. Having previously been visited by a spiritual caregiver predicted patient interest in further spiritual care (AOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.6), suggesting that the new service is being well-received. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis identified additional predictors of openness to receiving spiritual care: self-describing as somewhat/very spiritual vs. not spiritual (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.9 and 6.3, 95% CI 1.8-8.6 and 2.6-15.1) or traditional/religious vs. secular (AOR 2.2 and 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.6 and 1.1-4.0); and receiving one visit a week or less from family and friends (AOR 5.6, 95% CI 2.1-15.1). These findings are in line with previous American studies, suggesting universality across cultures that could be utilized in screening. Differences in demographic data and medical condition were not significant predictors of patient interest, suggesting a cultural difference, where age and education were

  10. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance. PMID:26897865

  11. Hepatitis B Virus Screening for Patients With Cancer Before Therapy: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion Update

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jessica P.; Somerfield, Mark R.; Alston-Johnson, Devena E.; Cryer, Donna R.; Feld, Jordan J.; Kramer, Barnett S.; Sabichi, Anita L.; Wong, Sandra L.; Artz, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This updated provisional clinical opinion presents a revised opinion based on American Society of Clinical Oncology panel consensus in the context of an evolving database. Context Despite the 2010 provisional clinical opinion recommendation, there is still evidence of suboptimal hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening among patients at high risk for HBV infection or HBV reactivation after chemotherapy. This updated provisional clinical opinion introduces a risk-adaptive strategy to identify and treat patients with HBV infection to reduce their risk of HBV reactivation. Provisional Clinical Opinion Medical providers should screen by testing patients for HBV infection before starting anti-CD20 therapy or hematopoietic cell transplantation. Providers should also screen patients with risk factors for HBV infection. Screening should include both hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc), because reactivation can occur in patients who are HBsAg positive/anti-HBc positive or HBsAg negative/anti-HBc positive. Either total anti-HBc or anti-HBc immunoglobulin G (not immunoglobulin M) test should be used. Clinicians should start antiviral therapy for HBsAg-positive/anti-HBc–positive patients before or contemporaneously with cancer therapy and monitor HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc–positive patients for reactivation with HBV DNA and ALT levels, promptly starting antivirals if reactivation occurs. Clinicians can initiate antivirals for HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc–positive patients anticipating cancer therapies associated with a high risk of reactivation, or they can monitor HBV DNA and ALT levels and initiate on-demand antivirals. For patients who neither have HBV risk factors nor anticipate cancer therapy associated with a high risk of reactivation, current evidence does not support HBV screening before initiation of cancer therapy. Two panel members provided a minority viewpoint, involving a strategy of universal HBsAg and selective anti

  12. Pretreatment Quality of Life Predicts for Locoregional Control in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Pajak, Thomas F.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Konski, Andre A.; Coyne, James C.; Gwede, Clement K.; Garden, Adam S.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Jones, Christopher; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prospectively collected health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data from patients enrolled in two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group randomized Phase III head and neck cancer trials (90-03 and 91-11) to assess their value as an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control (LRC) and/or overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: HRQOL questionnaires, using a validated instrument, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H and N), version 2, were completed by patients before the start of treatment. OS and LRC were the outcome measures analyzed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Baseline FACT-H and N data were available for 1,093 patients and missing for 417 patients. No significant difference in outcome was found between the patients with and without baseline FACT-H and N data (p = 0.58). The median follow-up time was 27.2 months for all patients and 49 months for surviving patients. Multivariate analyses were performed for both OS and LRC. Beyond tumor and nodal stage, Karnofsky performance status, primary site, cigarette use, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and altered fractionation schedules, the FACT-H and N score was independently predictive of LRC (but not OS), with p = 0.0038. The functional well-being component of the FACT-H and N predicted most significantly for LRC (p = 0.0004). Conclusions: This study represents, to our knowledge, the largest analysis of HRQOL as a prognostic factor in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. The results of this study have demonstrated the importance of baseline HRQOL as a significant and independent predictor of LRC in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  13. Breast cancer patients' narrative experiences about communication during the oncology care process: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abt Sacks, A; Perestelo-Perez, L; Rodriguez-Martin, B; Cuellar-Pompa, L; Algara López, M; González Hernández, N; Serrano-Aguilar, P

    2016-09-01

    To analyse the perception about the information and communication received to evaluate oncologic care of breast cancer patients in Spain. Qualitative study based on conducting in-depth interviews. An inductive thematic analysis of the illness narratives was performed. Intentional theoretical sampling of 41 people diagnosed with breast cancer. The information provided during care process is assessed as appropriate, as it includes personalised skills focused on communication and considers organisational and contextual issues. In some cases, the information was considered partial, heterogeneous and at times contradictory, which revealed a lack of continuity. To provide and adequately cover information needs from the patient perspective, it is necessary to ensure access, both in its physical (material) and intellectual (comprehension) dimension, keeping in mind elements of social capital (social networks) and cultural capital (values, beliefs, non-verbal language) that facilitate or hinder access. The current state of transition to a horizontal model in the doctor-patient relationship, could account for the difficulties, deficits and contradictions in communication and information that breast cancer patients perceive in many contexts.

  14. Breast cancer patients' narrative experiences about communication during the oncology care process: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abt Sacks, A; Perestelo-Perez, L; Rodriguez-Martin, B; Cuellar-Pompa, L; Algara López, M; González Hernández, N; Serrano-Aguilar, P

    2016-09-01

    To analyse the perception about the information and communication received to evaluate oncologic care of breast cancer patients in Spain. Qualitative study based on conducting in-depth interviews. An inductive thematic analysis of the illness narratives was performed. Intentional theoretical sampling of 41 people diagnosed with breast cancer. The information provided during care process is assessed as appropriate, as it includes personalised skills focused on communication and considers organisational and contextual issues. In some cases, the information was considered partial, heterogeneous and at times contradictory, which revealed a lack of continuity. To provide and adequately cover information needs from the patient perspective, it is necessary to ensure access, both in its physical (material) and intellectual (comprehension) dimension, keeping in mind elements of social capital (social networks) and cultural capital (values, beliefs, non-verbal language) that facilitate or hinder access. The current state of transition to a horizontal model in the doctor-patient relationship, could account for the difficulties, deficits and contradictions in communication and information that breast cancer patients perceive in many contexts. PMID:26412025

  15. Assessment of serologic immunity to diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis after treatment of Korean pediatric hematology and oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyo Jin; Lee, Jae-Wook; Chung, Nak-Gyun; Cho, Bin; Kim, Hack-Ki; Kang, Jin Han

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis antibody titers after antineoplastic treatment and to suggest an appropriate vaccination approach for pediatric hemato-oncologic patients. A total of 146 children with either malignancy in remission after cessation of therapy or bone marrow failure were recruited. All children had received routine immunization including diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccination before diagnosis of cancer. The serologic immunity to diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was classified as: completely protective, partially protective, or non-protective. Non-protective serum antibody titer for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was detected in 6.2%, 11.6%, and 62.3% of patients, respectively, and partial protective serum antibody titer for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was seen in 37%, 28.1%, and 8.9% of patients. There was no significant correlation between the severity of immune defect and age, gender or underlying disease. Revaccination after antineoplastic therapy showed significantly higher levels of antibody for each vaccine antigen. Our data indicates that a large proportion of children lacked protective serum concentrations of antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. This suggests that reimmunization of these patients is necessary after completion of antineoplastic treatment. Also, prospective studies should be undertaken with the aim of devising a common strategy of revaccination.

  16. Clinical and oncological outcomes after surgical excision of parotid gland tumours in patients aged over 80 years.

    PubMed

    Fakhry, N; Aldosari, B; Michel, J; Giorgi, R; Collet, C; Santini, L; Giovanni, A; Dessi, P

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the surgical and long-term outcomes of a series of patients aged over 80 years, operated on for parotid neoplasms. Among 614 parotidectomies for neoplasms performed between 1998 and 2008, 34 patients (5.5%) aged over 80 years were identified retrospectively. Pathological examination showed a malignant tumour in 24 and a benign tumour in 10 cases. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. A search for parameters that could influence the postoperative complication rate and long-term outcomes was carried out by univariate analysis. There was no postoperative death. Eight patients (24%) had postoperative complications. Malignant histopathology (P=0.05) and radical resection (P=0.033) were found to have a significant negative impact on the postoperative course. Focusing on malignant tumours, only histopathological type (metastasis vs primary tumour) was found to have a negative impact on OS. The 2- and 5-year OS rates were 86% and 86%, respectively, for primary tumours, and 67% and 29%, respectively, for metastasis (P=0.05). Malignant or benign histopathology had no impact on OS. Our results showed acceptable clinical and long-term oncological outcomes in very elderly patients operated on for parotid tumours, including malignant tumours.

  17. Effect of Preoperative Risk Group Stratification on Oncologic Outcomes of Patients with Adverse Pathologic Findings at Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won Sik; Kim, Lawrence H. C.; Yoon, Cheol Yong; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon; Ham, Won Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy based only on adverse pathologic findings (APFs), irrespective of preoperative risk group. We assessed whether a model incorporating both the preoperative risk group and APFs could predict long-term oncologic outcomes better than a model based on APFs alone. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 4,404 men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) at our institution between 1992 and 2014. After excluding patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy or with incomplete pathological or follow-up data, 3,092 men were included in the final analysis. APFs were defined as extraprostatic extension (EPE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), or a positive surgical margin (PSM). The adequacy of model fit to the data was compared using the likelihood-ratio test between the models with and without risk groups, and model discrimination was compared with the concordance index (c-index) for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). We performed multivariate Cox proportional hazard model and competing risk regression analyses to identify predictors of BCR and PCSM in the total patient group and each of the risk groups. Results Adding risk groups to the model containing only APFs significantly improved the fit to the data (likelihood-ratio test, p <0.001) and the c-index increased from 0.693 to 0.732 for BCR and from 0.707 to 0.747 for PCSM. A RP Gleason score (GS) ≥8 and a PSM were independently associated with BCR in the total patient group and also each risk group. However, only a GS ≥8 and SVI were associated with PCSM in the total patient group (GS ≥8: hazard ratio [HR] 5.39 and SVI: HR 3.36) and the high-risk group (GS ≥8: HR 6.31 and SVI: HR 4.05). Conclusion The postoperative estimation of oncologic outcomes in men with APFs at RP was improved by considering preoperative risk group stratification. Although a PSM was an

  18. Experiences of patients with cancer and their nurses on the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in oncology units

    PubMed Central

    Rassouli, Maryam; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ghahramanian, Akram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Nikanfar, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although nurses acknowledge that spiritual care is part of their role, in reality, it is performed to a lesser extent. The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses’ and patients’ experiences about the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in the oncology units of Tabriz. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in the oncology units of hospitals in Tabriz. Data were collected through purposive sampling by conducting unstructured interviews with 10 patients and 7 nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: Three categories emerged from the study: (1) “perceived barriers for providing spiritual care” including “lack of preparation for spiritual care,” “time and space constraints,” “unprofessional view,” and “lack of support”; (2) “communication: A way for Strengthening spirituality despite the limitations” including “manifestation of spirituality in the appearances and communicative behaviors of nurses” and “communication: Transmission of spiritual energy”; and (3) “religion-related spiritual experiences” including “life events as divine will and divine exam,” “death as reincarnation,” “trust in God,” “prayer/recourse to Holy Imams,” and “acceptance of divine providence.” Although nurses had little skills in assessing and responding to the patients’ spiritual needs and did not have the organizational and clergymen's support in dealing with the spiritual distress of patients, they were the source of energy, joy, hope, and power for patients by showing empathy and compassion. The patients and nurses were using religious beliefs mentioned in Islam to strengthen the patients’ spiritual dimension. Conclusions: According to the results, integration of spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing is recommended. Patients and

  19. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  20. A Novel Digital Patient-Reported Outcome Platform for Head and Neck Oncology Patients—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Maria K.; Lehikoinen, Joel S.; Sippola, Lauri T.; Saarilahti, Kauko; Mäkitie, Antti A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The patient’s role in toxicity reporting is increasingly acknowledged. There is also a need for developing modern communication methods between the patient and the medical personnel. Furthermore, the increasing number of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients is reflected in the volume of treatment follow-up visits, which remains a challenge for the health care. Electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) measures may provide a cost-efficient way to organize follow-up for cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS We tested a novel ePRO application called Kaiku®, which enables real-time, online collection of patient-reported outcomes, such as side effects caused by treatment and quality of life. We conducted a pilot study to assess the suitability of Kaiku® for HNC patients at the Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Patients used Kaiku® during and one month after radiotherapy to report treatment-related side effects and quality of life. Two physicians and a nurse performed the practical electronic communication part of the study. RESULTS Five of the nine patients agreed to participate in the study: three of them had local early-stage larynx cancer (T2N0, T1aN0, and T2N0) and the remaining two patients had early-stage base of tongue cancer (T2N0 and T1N2b). The degree of side effects reported by the patients via Kaiku® ranged from mild to life threatening. The number of outcome data points on patients’ progress was significantly increased, which resulted in a better follow-up and improved communication between the patient and the care team. CONCLUSIONS Kaiku® seems to be a suitable tool to monitor side effects and quality of life during and after radiotherapy among HNC patients. Kaiku® and similar tools could be useful in organizing a cost-effective follow-up process for HNC patients. We recommend conducting a larger study to further assess the impact of an ePRO solution in routine clinical practice. ePRO solutions

  1. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p < .001) and the importance of receiving dental care (p < .001) were significant factors in relation to self-rated dental health. Perceived overall health (p < .001) also had a significant association with cancer status and the need for organ transplants. This study provided the ODSC at UMKC and other specialty clinics with vital information that can contribute to future planning efforts.

  2. Patterns of Chemotherapy-Induced Toxicities in Younger Children and Adolescents with Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group Soft Tissue Sarcoma Committee

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Abha A.; Anderson, James R.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Dasgupta, Roshni; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Hawkins, Douglas S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Patients aged older than 10 years with rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) have an inferior outcome compared to patients aged 1–9 years which might be explained by toxicities (adverse events, AE) resulting in chemotherapy dose reductions. Methods AEs observed during one of 3 randomized chemotherapy regimens (VAC, VAI or VIE) in Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS)-IV were recorded. The incidence of toxicities by age and treatment regimen was determined. The odds of developing an AE in a particular age group (5–9, 10–14, and 15–20 years) were compared to the control age group, 1–4 years. Results 657 patients were eligible for analysis. Estimated 5-year EFS were 78%, 83%, 67%, and 58% for age groups 1–4, 5–9, 10–14, and 15–20, respectively. Patients 15–20 years experienced less neutropenia (OR 0.43, p<0.0001), thrombocytopenia (OR 0.41, p<0.0001), anemia (OR 0.34, p<0.0001) and infection (OR 0.41, p<0.0001) compared to younger patients, despite receiving similar amounts of chemotherapy. In contrast, peripheral nervous system (PNS) toxicity was higher in adolescents older than 10 years (OR 4.18, p<0.0001). Females experienced more neutropenia (OR 1.28, p=0.05) and thrombocytopenia (OR 1.26, p=0.06) compared to males. Conclusions Adolescents receiving treatment for RMS experience significantly less hematologic and more PNS toxicity compared to younger children despite receiving similar amounts of chemotherapy. Although outcome is inferior in adolescents, it is unclear whether the differences in toxicity observed in our study impact on outcome. Future studies examining the age and gender-related differences in pharmacokinetics of chemotherapy are necessary. PMID:21761400

  3. The current and future role of the medical oncologist in the professional care for cancer patients: a position paper by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    PubMed

    Popescu, R A; Schäfer, R; Califano, R; Eckert, R; Coleman, R; Douillard, J-Y; Cervantes, A; Casali, P G; Sessa, C; Van Cutsem, E; de Vries, E; Pavlidis, N; Fumasoli, K; Wörmann, B; Samonigg, H; Cascinu, S; Cruz Hernández, J J; Howard, A J; Ciardiello, F; Stahel, R A; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    The number of cancer patients in Europe is rising and significant advances in basic and applied cancer research are making the provision of optimal care more challenging. The concept of cancer as a systemic, highly heterogeneous and complex disease has increased the awareness that quality cancer care should be provided by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of highly qualified healthcare professionals. Cancer patients also have the right to benefit from medical progress by receiving optimal treatment from adequately trained and highly skilled medical professionals. Built on the highest standards of professional training and continuing medical education, medical oncology is recognised as an independent medical specialty in many European countries. Medical oncology is a core member of the MDT and offers cancer patients a comprehensive and systemic approach to treatment and care, while ensuring evidence-based, safe and cost-effective use of cancer drugs and preserving the quality of life of cancer patients through the entire 'cancer journey'. Medical oncologists are also engaged in clinical and translational research to promote innovation and new therapies and they contribute to cancer diagnosis, prevention and research, making a difference for patients in a dynamic, stimulating professional environment. Medical oncologists play an important role in shaping the future of healthcare through innovation and are also actively involved at the political level to ensure a maximum contribution of the profession to Society and to tackle future challenges. This position paper summarises the multifarious and vital contributions of medical oncology and medical oncologists to today's and tomorrow's professional cancer care.

  4. Daily baseline skin care in the prevention, treatment, and supportive care of skin toxicity in oncology patients: recommendations from a multinational expert panel

    PubMed Central

    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Humbert, Phillipe; Krutman, Jean; Luger, Thomas; Triller, Raoul; Rougier, André; Seite, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Skin reactions due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy are a significant problem for an important number of cancer patients. While effective for treating cancer, they disturb cutaneous barrier function, causing a reaction soon after initiation of treatment that impacts patient quality of life. Managing these symptoms with cosmetics and nonpharmaceutical skin care products for camouflage or personal hygiene may be important for increasing patient self-esteem. However, inappropriate product choice or use could worsen side effects. Although recommendations exist for the pharmaceutical treatment of skin reactions, there are no recommendations for the choice or use of dermatologic skin care products for oncology patients. The present guidelines were developed by a board of European experts in dermatology and oncology to provide cancer care professionals with guidance for the appropriate use of non-pharmaceutical, dermocosmetic skin care management of cutaneous toxicities associated with radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, including epidermal growth factor inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. The experts hope that these recommendations will improve the management of cutaneous side effects and hence quality of life for oncology patients. PMID:24353440

  5. Food intake and nutritional status influence outcomes in hospitalized hematology-oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Calleja Fernández, Alicia; Pintor de la Maza, Begoña; Vidal Casariego, Alfonso; Villar Taibo, Rocío; López Gómez, Juan José; Cano Rodríguez, Isidoro; Ballesteros Pomar, María D

    2015-06-01

    Introducción: la malnutrición en el paciente oncohematológico es importante debido a su prevalencia y a su morbimortalidad asociadas. El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar la prevalencia de malnutrición en el paciente oncohematológico y determinar si la ingesta o la malnutrición afectan a las complicaciones del paciente hospitalizado. Metodología: estudio de corte realizado en todos los pacientes admitidos en las plantas de oncología y hematología durante un periodo de 30 días. La valoración nutricional se realizó durante las 24 primeras horas tras el ingreso y se repitió a los 7 días de hospitalización, incluyendo Valoración Subjetiva Global, antropometría, recuerdo de 24 horas y estimación de las necesidades calóricas y proteicas. Las historias médicas fueron revisadas a los 30 días tras el alta. Resultados: setenta y tres pacientes fueron evaluados al ingreso y 29 a los siete días de su hospitalización. La prevalencia de malnutrición fue 47,7%. Al ingreso, los pacientes consumieron 71,6 (DE 22,0)% de las calorías prescritas y 68,2 (DE 22,0)% de las proteínas prescritas. La tasa de fallecimientos fue 2,8% entre los pacientes que consumieron ≥75% y 17,9% entre aquellos que consumieron.

  6. Using a screening tool to improve timely referral of patients from acute oncology-haematology to palliative care services

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Akhtari

    2013-01-01

    This project was done at specialist cancer hospital in Qatar. At a haematology-oncology inpatient department most patients were not getting access to palliative care unless they were at the very end stages of life. Data collected from 2008-2011 showed significant numbers of patients were dying within one month of their transfer to palliative care. There was no standard measure to identify the prospective palliative care patients. A multidisciplinary team developed a Palliative care referral screening tool based on the National Cancer Care Network guideline. Retrospective medical record review done from January to April 2012 showed a mean of 68% of patients who scored more than five were not consulted, 32% of patients who scored more than seven were not transferred to palliative care and seven percent died without any referral. The team used various kinds of quality planning, analysis and improvement tools in the form of process mapping, value analysis, Fish Bone diagrams, stakeholders' analysis and communication, physician survey, “Pareto's principal” (80 / 20 rule, the law of vital few) and other data collection tools. The palliative care referral process was standardised by preparing and implementing an objective scoring tool based on international best practice. It changed the referral culture and helped manage the psychological barriers of patients, families and caregivers. Extensive orientation and education of all key stakeholders was implemented. Monthly auditing of patient records was carried out. The aim has been achieved, exceeded and sustained, and we reduced the percentage of patients who scored more than five without palliative consultation from a mean of 68% to 16% and those who scored more than seven without palliative care transfer from a mean of thirty two percent to three percent, after four months of the project's implementation. Standardising the referral process and creating an objective referral tool is needed to facilitate safe

  7. Iron chelation with deferasirox for the treatment of secondary hemosiderosis in pediatric oncology patients: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Ktena, Yiouli P; Athanasiadou, Anastasia; Lambrou, George; Adamaki, Maria; Moschovi, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric oncology patients are often iron overloaded, due to the multiple blood transfusions necessary during the course of chemotherapy. Our aim is to report the efficacy and safety of deferasirox, an oral iron chelator, in this patient group. Deferasirox was administered to 13 children with malignancies in remission and iron overload. Ferritin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, transaminases, and bilirubin were recorded at 4- to 8-week intervals, and hepatic and cardiac iron overload were assessed with magnetic resonance imaging before initiation of treatment. Deferasirox was administered for an average of 6 months (SD=4.5; range, 0.3 to 18.2). Two children presented with skin rash, 1 with gastrointestinal disturbances, and 1 with fully reversible acute renal failure. The mean monthly rate of change in ferritin levels was -10.8 μg/L before initiation of treatment (95% confidence interval [CI], -19.8 to -1.8; P=0.02) and -93.6 μg/L during deferasirox treatment (95% CI, -118.1 to -69.1; P<0.001). The difference in the monthly rate of change in ferritin levels before and after treatment initiation was -82.8 μg/L (95% CI, -111.6 to -53.9; P<0.001). Deferasirox was effective in reducing the iron burden. The adverse effects were easily monitored and managed. Further studies are warranted to investigate the effect of deferasirox on mortality and morbidity in this population.

  8. Early Benefit Assessments in Oncology in Germany: How Can a Clinically Relevant Endpoint Not Be Relevant to Patients?

    PubMed

    Ruof, Jörg; Flückiger, Olivier; Andre, Niko

    2015-09-01

    After 4 years of early benefit assessment (EBA) in Germany, it is becoming evident that the Federal Joint Committee (FJC) frequently considers well-established clinical endpoints as not being relevant to patients. Focusing on assessments of oncology medicines, we analysed the FJC's view on primary endpoints and compared it with the approach used by regulatory authorities. Mortality data were accepted by both stakeholders. Whereas regulatory authorities accepted primary morbidity endpoints such as progression-free survival and response rates, the FJC mostly excluded these from its assessments. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data have been poorly reflected in the approval process; for EBAs, those data have rarely impacted on benefit ratings. We argue that agreement between regulatory authorities and the FJC is required regarding primary study endpoints that are relevant to patients, and that clarification of acceptable endpoints by the FJC, especially in the morbidity domain, has to be provided. Moreover, in order to fully acknowledge the benefit of a new medicinal product, mortality, morbidity and HRQoL should be weighted differentially, according to the condition. PMID:26286202

  9. [Using arts therapies in psycho-oncology: evaluation of an exploratory study implemented in an out-patient setting].

    PubMed

    Schiltz, L; Zimoch, A

    2013-01-01

    According to the state-of-the-art in health psychology and psycho-oncology, a cancerous disease, as well as the accompanying medical treatments, is a source ofintense emotional stress. As feelings of insecurity and anxiety are likely to induce negative effects on immune defences, those effects may overlap with the cancerous disease and complicate its evolution. As arts therapies tend to favour the imaginary and symbolic elaboration of the tensions of daily life, as well as the re appropriation of one's body and personal history, different artistic mediations may occupy an important function in the psychological follow-up of the patient. Following an exploratory study in a hospital, we carried out an action-research in an out-patient setting during six moths. The arts therapeutic treatment comprehended alternatively drawing and writing sessions while listening to music, opening tracks for a thorough verbal elaboration. The evaluation was based on psychometric scales (HADS and MDBF), rating scales for the pictorial and literary production and a semi-structured interview. According to the results of the quantitative analyses, based on non parametric statistical procedures for small groups and non metric data, as well as to the qualitative content analyses, arts therapies could become a valuable treating measure within a multidisciplinary bio-psycho-social approach.

  10. Prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients before the start of chemotherapy: potential of the distress thermometer as an ultra-brief screening instrument

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Jorge; Campla, Cristóbal; D’Aguzan, Nicole; Barraza, Soledad; Padilla, Oslando; Sánchez, Cesar; Palma, Silvia; González, Matías

    2014-01-01

    Emotional distress (ED) is greater for oncology patients in comparison with the general population, and this has implications for the quality of life of the patient and his/her family, adherence to the treatment, and eventually, survivorship. In general, the detection of these symptoms is low, which explains the need for detection systems appropriate to the clinical reality of the oncology team. The objective of this study is to evaluate for the first time the usefulness of an ultra-brief screening instrument [distress thermometer (DT)], in a group of Chilean oncology patients. A total of 166 outpatients were evaluated at the Cancer Center of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, before starting chemotherapy. Two screening instruments were applied: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and DT. The application of HADS resulted in a prevalence of 32.7% of anxiety symptoms (HADS-A ≥ 8), 15.7% of depression symptoms (HADS-D ≥ 8), and 39.8% had a total score of HADS-T ≥ 11. The DT resulted in the prevalence of 32.5% of distress or ED (DT ≥ 5). The validity of the DT was evaluated as a screening tool in comparison with HADS, observing, in relation to the anxiety scale (HADS-A), a sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 78.4% (DT ≥ 4); depression (HADS-D), a sensitivity of 69.2% and specificity of 74.3% (DT ≥ 5); and in relation to the total scale (HADS-T), a sensitivity of 68.2% and specificity of 73.0% (DT ≥ 4). This study demonstrates the elevated prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients, before the start of chemotherapy, and confirms the potential of the DT as a brief screening instrument with easy application. The DT will allow the clinician to increase the detection threshold in the Chilean oncology population, intervene in a timely manner, and contribute to the comprehensive handling of the oncology patient without affecting the time needed for assistance. PMID:24966889

  11. Which patients with resectable pancreatic cancer truly benefit from oncological resection: is it destiny or biology?

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis. A technically perfect surgical operation may still not provide a survival advantage for patients with technically resectable pancreatic cancer. Appropriate selection of patients for surgical resections is an imminent issue. Recent studies have provided an important clue on what serum biomarkers may be used to select out the patients who would unlikely benefit from the surgical resection.

  12. Nuclear Medicine in Thyroid Diseases in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Volkan-Salancı, Bilge; Özgen Kıratlı, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    Both benign and malignant diseases of the thyroid are rare in the pediatric and adolescent population, except congenital hypothyroidism. Nuclear medicine plays a major role, both in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid pathologies. Use of radioactivity in pediatric population is strictly controlled due to possible side effects such as secondary cancers; therefore, management of pediatric patients requires detailed literature knowledge. This article aims to overview current algorithms in the management of thyroid diseases and use of radionuclide therapy in pediatric and adolescent population. PMID:26316469

  13. Utilitarian prioritization of radiation oncology patients based on maximization of population tumour control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Li, W.; Jennings, L.; Kearvell, R.; Bydder, S.

    2013-06-01

    An objective method for establishing patient prioritization in the context of a radiotherapy waiting list is investigated. This is based on a utilitarian objective, being the greatest probability of local tumour control in the population of patients. A numerical simulation is developed and a clinical patient case-mix is used to determine the influence of the characteristics of the patient population on resulting optimal patient scheduling. With the utilitarian objective, large gains in tumour control probability (TCP) can be achieved for individuals or cohorts by prioritizing patients for that fraction of the patient population with relatively small sacrifices in TCP for a smaller fraction of the population. For a waiting list in steady state with five patients per day commencing treatment and leaving the list (and so with five patients per day entering the list), and a mean wait time of 35 days and a maximum of 90 days, optimized wait times ranged from a mean of one day for patients with tumour types with short effective doubling times to a mean of 66.9 days for prostate cancer patients. It is found that, when seeking the optimal daily order of patients on the waiting list in a constrained simulation, the relative rather than absolute value of TCP is the determinant of the resulting optimal waiting times. An increase in the mean waiting time mostly influences (increases) the optimal waiting times of patients with fast-growing tumours. The proportional representation of groups (separated by tumour type) in the patient population has an influence on the resulting distribution of optimal waiting times for patients in those groups, though has only a minor influence on the optimal mean waiting time for each group.

  14. Utilitarian prioritization of radiation oncology patients based on maximization of population tumour control.

    PubMed

    Ebert, M A; Li, W; Jennings, L; Kearvell, R; Bydder, S

    2013-06-21

    An objective method for establishing patient prioritization in the context of a radiotherapy waiting list is investigated. This is based on a utilitarian objective, being the greatest probability of local tumour control in the population of patients. A numerical simulation is developed and a clinical patient case-mix is used to determine the influence of the characteristics of the patient population on resulting optimal patient scheduling. With the utilitarian objective, large gains in tumour control probability (TCP) can be achieved for individuals or cohorts by prioritizing patients for that fraction of the patient population with relatively small sacrifices in TCP for a smaller fraction of the population. For a waiting list in steady state with five patients per day commencing treatment and leaving the list (and so with five patients per day entering the list), and a mean wait time of 35 days and a maximum of 90 days, optimized wait times ranged from a mean of one day for patients with tumour types with short effective doubling times to a mean of 66.9 days for prostate cancer patients. It is found that, when seeking the optimal daily order of patients on the waiting list in a constrained simulation, the relative rather than absolute value of TCP is the determinant of the resulting optimal waiting times. An increase in the mean waiting time mostly influences (increases) the optimal waiting times of patients with fast-growing tumours. The proportional representation of groups (separated by tumour type) in the patient population has an influence on the resulting distribution of optimal waiting times for patients in those groups, though has only a minor influence on the optimal mean waiting time for each group.

  15. Interprofessional patient-centred practice in oncology teams: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Karine; Dubois, Sylvie; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2015-03-01

    Studies on interprofessional practice usually report professionals' viewpoints and document organizational, procedural and relational factors influencing that practice. Considering the importance of interprofessional patient-centred (IPPC) practice, it seems necessary to describe it in detail in an actual context of care, from the perspective of patients, their families and health-care professionals. The goal of this study was to describe IPPC practice throughout the continuum of cancer care. A qualitative multiple case study was completed with two interprofessional teams from a Canadian teaching hospital. Interviews were conducted with patients, their families and professionals, and observation was carried out. Three themes were illustrated by current team practice: welcoming the person as a unique individual, but still requiring the patient to comply; the paradoxical coexistence of patient-centred discourse and professional-centred practice; and triggering team collaboration with the culmination of the patient's situation. Several influential factors were described, including the way the team works; the physical environment; professionals' and patients'/family members' stance on the collaboration; professionals' stance on patients and their families; and patients' stance on professionals. Finally, themes describing the desired IPPC practice reflect the wish of most participants to be more involved. They were: providing support in line with the patient's experience and involvement; respecting patients by not imposing professionals' values and goals; and consistency and regularity in the collaboration of all members. PMID:25070427

  16. Interprofessional patient-centred practice in oncology teams: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Karine; Dubois, Sylvie; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2015-03-01

    Studies on interprofessional practice usually report professionals' viewpoints and document organizational, procedural and relational factors influencing that practice. Considering the importance of interprofessional patient-centred (IPPC) practice, it seems necessary to describe it in detail in an actual context of care, from the perspective of patients, their families and health-care professionals. The goal of this study was to describe IPPC practice throughout the continuum of cancer care. A qualitative multiple case study was completed with two interprofessional teams from a Canadian teaching hospital. Interviews were conducted with patients, their families and professionals, and observation was carried out. Three themes were illustrated by current team practice: welcoming the person as a unique individual, but still requiring the patient to comply; the paradoxical coexistence of patient-centred discourse and professional-centred practice; and triggering team collaboration with the culmination of the patient's situation. Several influential factors were described, including the way the team works; the physical environment; professionals' and patients'/family members' stance on the collaboration; professionals' stance on patients and their families; and patients' stance on professionals. Finally, themes describing the desired IPPC practice reflect the wish of most participants to be more involved. They were: providing support in line with the patient's experience and involvement; respecting patients by not imposing professionals' values and goals; and consistency and regularity in the collaboration of all members.

  17. The development of audio-visual materials to prepare patients for medical procedures: an oncology application.

    PubMed

    Carey, M; Schofield, P; Jefford, M; Krishnasamy, M; Aranda, S

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes a systematic process for the development of educational audio-visual materials that are designed to prepare patients for potentially threatening procedures. Literature relating to the preparation of patients for potentially threatening medical procedures, psychological theory, theory of diffusion of innovations and patient information was examined. Four key principles were identified as being important: (1) stakeholder consultation, (2) provision of information to prepare patients for the medical procedure, (3) evidence-based content, and (4) promotion of patient confidence. These principles are described along with an example of the development of an audio-visual resource to prepare patients for chemotherapy treatment. Using this example, practical strategies for the application of each of the principles are described. The principles and strategies described may provide a practical, evidence-based guide to the development of other types of patient audio-visual materials.

  18. Length of Stay in Ambulatory Surgical Oncology Patients at High Risk for Sleep Apnea as Predicted by STOP-BANG Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Saadia A.; Hernandez, Mike; Bashoura, Lara; Cherian, Sujith V.; French, Katy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The STOP-BANG questionnaire has been used to identify surgical patients at risk for undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by classifying patients as low risk (LR) if STOP-BANG score < 3 or high risk (HR) if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3. Few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are increased in HR patients and none have been described in oncologic patients. Objective. This retrospective study examined if HR patients experience increased complications evidenced by an increased length of stay (LOS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Methods. We retrospectively measured LOS and the frequency of oxygen desaturation (<93%) in cancer patients who were given the STOP-BANG questionnaire prior to cystoscopy for urologic disease in an ambulatory surgery center. Results. The majority of patients in our study were men (77.7%), over the age of 50 (90.1%), and had BMI < 30 kg/m2 (88.4%). STOP-BANG results were obtained on 404 patients. Cumulative incidence of the time to discharge between HR and the LR groups was plotted. By 8 hours, LR patients showed a higher cumulative probability of being discharged early (80% versus 74%, P = 0.008). Conclusions. Urologic oncology patients at HR for OSA based on the STOP-BANG questionnaire were less likely to be discharged early from the PACU compared to LR patients.

  19. Length of Stay in Ambulatory Surgical Oncology Patients at High Risk for Sleep Apnea as Predicted by STOP-BANG Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Diwakar D; Faiz, Saadia A; Hernandez, Mike; Kowalski, Alicia M; Bashoura, Lara; Goravanchi, Farzin; Cherian, Sujith V; Rebello, Elizabeth; Kee, Spencer S; French, Katy E

    2016-01-01

    Background. The STOP-BANG questionnaire has been used to identify surgical patients at risk for undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by classifying patients as low risk (LR) if STOP-BANG score < 3 or high risk (HR) if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3. Few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are increased in HR patients and none have been described in oncologic patients. Objective. This retrospective study examined if HR patients experience increased complications evidenced by an increased length of stay (LOS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Methods. We retrospectively measured LOS and the frequency of oxygen desaturation (<93%) in cancer patients who were given the STOP-BANG questionnaire prior to cystoscopy for urologic disease in an ambulatory surgery center. Results. The majority of patients in our study were men (77.7%), over the age of 50 (90.1%), and had BMI < 30 kg/m(2) (88.4%). STOP-BANG results were obtained on 404 patients. Cumulative incidence of the time to discharge between HR and the LR groups was plotted. By 8 hours, LR patients showed a higher cumulative probability of being discharged early (80% versus 74%, P = 0.008). Conclusions. Urologic oncology patients at HR for OSA based on the STOP-BANG questionnaire were less likely to be discharged early from the PACU compared to LR patients. PMID:27610133

  20. Length of Stay in Ambulatory Surgical Oncology Patients at High Risk for Sleep Apnea as Predicted by STOP-BANG Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Saadia A.; Hernandez, Mike; Bashoura, Lara; Cherian, Sujith V.; French, Katy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The STOP-BANG questionnaire has been used to identify surgical patients at risk for undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by classifying patients as low risk (LR) if STOP-BANG score < 3 or high risk (HR) if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3. Few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are increased in HR patients and none have been described in oncologic patients. Objective. This retrospective study examined if HR patients experience increased complications evidenced by an increased length of stay (LOS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Methods. We retrospectively measured LOS and the frequency of oxygen desaturation (<93%) in cancer patients who were given the STOP-BANG questionnaire prior to cystoscopy for urologic disease in an ambulatory surgery center. Results. The majority of patients in our study were men (77.7%), over the age of 50 (90.1%), and had BMI < 30 kg/m2 (88.4%). STOP-BANG results were obtained on 404 patients. Cumulative incidence of the time to discharge between HR and the LR groups was plotted. By 8 hours, LR patients showed a higher cumulative probability of being discharged early (80% versus 74%, P = 0.008). Conclusions. Urologic oncology patients at HR for OSA based on the STOP-BANG questionnaire were less likely to be discharged early from the PACU compared to LR patients. PMID:27610133

  1. Cervical Cancer in Ethiopia: Survival of 1,059 Patients Who Received Oncologic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moelle, Ulrike; Begoihn, Matthias; Addissie, Adamu; Trocchi, Pietro; Yonas, Bekuretsion; Hezkiel, Petros; Stang, Andreas; Thomssen, Christoph; Vordermark, Dirk; Gemechu, Tufa; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Wondemagegnehu, Tigeneh; Aynalem, Abreha; Mathewos, Assefa

    2014-01-01

    Background. Almost 500,000 women are newly diagnosed with cervical cancer (CC) every year, the majority from developing countries. There is little information on the survival of these patients. Our primary objective was to evaluate consecutive CC patients presenting over 4 years at the only radiotherapy center in Ethiopia. Methods. All patients with CC from September 2008 to September 2012 who received radiotherapy and/or surgery were included (without brachytherapy). Vital status was obtained through telephone contact or patient cards. Results. Of 2,300 CC patients, 1,059 patients with standardized treatment were included. At the end of the study, 249 patients had died; surviving patients had a median follow-up of 16.5 months; the 10% and 90% percentiles were 3.0 and 32.7 months, respectively. Mean age was 49 years (21–91 years). The majority of patients presented with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIb–IIIa (46.7%). Because of progression during the waiting time (median 3.8 months), this proportion declined to 19.3% at the beginning of radiotherapy. The 1- and 2-year overall survival probabilities were 90.4% and 73.6%. If assuming a worst-case scenario (i.e., if all patients not available for follow-up after 6 months had died), the 2-year survival probability would be 45.4%. Conclusion. This study gives a thorough 4-year overview of treated patients with CC in Ethiopia. Given the limited treatment availability, a relatively high proportion of patients survived 2 years. More prevention and early detection at all levels of the health care system are needed. Increasing the capacity for external-beam radiation as well as options for brachytherapy would facilitate treatment with curative intention. PMID:24951611

  2. Oncologic Impact of Fewer Than 12 Lymph Nodes in Patients Who Underwent Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Followed by Total Mesorectal Excision for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Ram; Han, Yoon Dae; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A minimum of 12 harvested lymph nodes (hLNs) are recommended in colorectal cancer. However, a paucity of hLNs is frequently presented after preoperative chemoradiation (pCRT) in rectal cancer and the significance of this is still uncertain. The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of hLNs on long-term oncologic outcomes. A total of 302 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent pCRT and curative resection between 1989 and 2009 were reviewed. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to the number of hLNs: <12 versus ≥12 LN. The 2 groups were compared with respect to 5-year disease-free and overall survival. The optimal number or ratio of hLNs was investigated in subgroup analysis according to LN status. The median follow-up was 57 months. Patient characteristics other than age did not differ between the 2 groups. The group with <12 LNs had more favorable ypTNM and ypN stage than those with ≥12 LNs. However, the long-term oncologic outcomes were not significantly different between the 2 groups. In subgroup analysis of ypN(−), the group with <5 hLNs had the most favorable oncologic outcomes. In ypN(+) cases, a higher LN ratio tended to be associated with poorer 5-year overall survival. The paucity of hLNs in locally advanced rectal cancer after chemoradiation did not imply poor oncologic outcomes in this study. In addition, <5 hLNs in ypN(−) patients could reflect a good tumor response rather than suboptimal radicality. PMID:26181550

  3. Psycho-oncological support for breast cancer patients: A brief overview of breast cancer services certification schemes and national health policies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Neamţiu, L; Deandrea, S; Pylkkänen, L; Freeman, C; López Alcalde, J; Bramesfeld, A; Saz-Parkinson, Z; Ulutürk, A; Lerda, D

    2016-10-01

    Psycho-oncology addresses the psychological, social, behavioural, and ethical aspects of cancer. Identification and proper management of the patients' psychosocial needs, as well as the needs of their caregivers and family are essential for a person-centred concept of breast cancer care. The aim of this overview is to describe how psychosocial support in breast cancer is incorporated in cancer-related policy documents, such as national cancer plans and breast cancer care certification schemes.

  4. Radiation Therapy and Psychological Distress in Gynecologic Oncology Patients: Outcomes and Recommendations for Enhancing Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Jennifer A.; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Radiotherapy is used commonly in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies. Many patients experience emotional distress prior to the initiation of radiotherapy, during the course of treatment, or after the completion of treatment. This paper describes treatment experiences from the patients’ perspective, reviews the empirical data concerning patients’ emotional responses to these treatments, and overviews strategies for reducing patient distress. PMID:19844609

  5. The natural history of postoperative venous thromboemboli in gynecologic oncology: a prospective study of 382 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Synan, I.S.; Colemen, R.E.; Hinshaw, W.; Creasman, W.T.

    1984-04-15

    Three hundred eighty-two patients who underwent major operations for gynecologic malignancy were studied prospectively to determine the natural history of postoperative venous thromboemboli. Iodine 125-labeled fibrinogen leg counting, to diagnose deep venous thrombosis, was performed daily. Sixty-three patients (17%) developed postoperative venous thromboembolic complications. Deep venous thrombosis initially arose in the calf veins in 52 patients. Twenty-seven percent of these thrombi lysed spontaneously. Four percent of thrombi in the calf veins progressed to deep venous thrombosis in the femoral vein, and 4% resulted in pulmonary emboli. Nine other patients developed proximal deep venous thrombosis without prior thrombosis in the calf veins. One patient with proximal deep venous thrombosis also had a pulmonary embolus. Two patients with no evidence of deep venous thrombosis on prospective /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen leg counting developed pulmonary emboli, including one fatal pulmonary embolus that was found at autopsy to have arisen from the internal iliac veins. Fifty percent of all venous thromboemboli were detected within 48 hours of operation, although two patients developed significant deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary emboli after discharge from the hospital. These results add important information to our understanding of this disease process, and raise issues related to appropriate treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in patients after gynecologic operations.

  6. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tralongo, Paolo; Ferraù, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Verderame, Francesco; Caruso, Michele; Giuffrida, Dario; Butera, Alfredo; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients’ needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients’ needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective. PMID:21941445

  7. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  8. Recruiting Terminally Ill Patients into Non-Therapeutic Oncology Studies: views of Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-therapeutic trials in which terminally ill cancer patients are asked to undergo procedures such as biopsies or venipunctures for research purposes, have become increasingly important to learn more about how cancer cells work and to realize the full potential of clinical research. Considering that implementing non-therapeutic studies is not likely to result in direct benefits for the patient, some authors are concerned that involving patients in such research may be exploitive of vulnerable patients and should not occur at all, or should be greatly restricted, while some proponents doubt whether such restrictions are appropriate. Our objective was to explore clinician-researcher attitudes and concerns when recruiting patients who are in advanced stages of cancer into non-therapeutic research. Methods We conducted a qualitative exploratory study by carrying out open-ended interviews with health professionals, including physicians, research nurses, and study coordinators. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Analysis was carried out using grounded theory. Results The analysis of the interviews unveiled three prominent themes: 1) ethical considerations; 2) patient-centered issues; 3) health professional issues. Respondents identified ethical issues surrounding autonomy, respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, discrimination, and confidentiality; bringing to light that patients contribute to science because of a sense of altruism and that they want reassurance before consenting. Several patient-centered and health professional issues are having an impact on the recruitment of patients for non-therapeutic research. Facilitators were most commonly associated with patient-centered issues enhancing communication, whereas barriers in non-therapeutic research were most often professionally based, including the doctor-patient relationship, time constraints, and a lack of education and training in research. Conclusions This paper aims to

  9. Preoperative quality of life and surgical outcomes in gynecologic oncology patients: A new predictor of operative risk?

    PubMed Central

    Doll, KM; Snavely, AC; Kalinowski, A; Irwin, DE; Bensen, JT; Bae-Jump, V; Boggess, JF; Soper, JT; Brewster, WR; Gehrig, PA

    2014-01-01

    Objective Quality of life (QoL) for women with gynecologic malignancies is predictive of chemotherapy related toxicity and overall survival but has not been studied in relation to surgical outcomes and hospital readmissions. Our goal was to evaluate the association between baseline, pre-operative QoL measures and 30-day post-operative morbidity and health resource utilization by gynecologic oncology patients. Methods We analyzed prospectively collected survey data from an institution-wide cohort study. Patients were enrolled from 8/2012 – 6/2013 and medical records data was abstracted (demographics, comorbid conditions, and operative outcomes). Responses from several validated health-related QoL instruments were collected. Bivariate tests and multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to evaluate factors associated with QoL scores. Results Of 182 women with suspected gynecologic malignancies, 152 (84%) were surveyed pre-operatively and 148 (81%) underwent surgery. Uterine (94; 63.5%), ovarian (26; 17.5%), cervical (15; 10%), vulvar/vaginal (8; 5.4%), and other (5; 3.4%) cancers were represented. There were 37 (25%) cases of postoperative morbidity (PM), 18 (12%) unplanned ER visits, 9(6%) unplanned clinic visits, and 17 (11.5%) hospital readmissions(HR) within 30 days of surgery. On adjusted analysis, lower functional well-being scores resulted in increased odds of PM (OR 1.07, 95%CI 1.01-.1.21) and HR (OR 1.11, 95%CI 1.03-1.19). A subjective global assessment score was also strongly associated with HR (OR 1.89, 95%CI 1.14, 3.16). Conclusion Lower pre-operative QoL scores are significantly associated with post-operative morbidity and hospital readmission in gynecologic cancer patients. This relationship may be a novel indicator of operative risk. PMID:24726615

  10. Cancer-related neuropathic pain in out-patient oncology clinics: a European survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although pain is frequently experienced by patients with cancer, it remains under-treated. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of cancer-related neuropathic pain (CRNP) in patients with chronic pain who attended an outpatient clinic for standard care in Europe (irrespective of the reason or stage of the cancer). The secondary aims of this study were to characterise pain and cancer in patients with CRNP (including treatment) and to evaluate the usefulness of the painDETECT (PD-Q) screening tool to help physicians identify a potential neuropathic component of cancer-related pain. Methods An observational, non-interventional, cross-sectional, multi-centre study of adult patients with cancer using patient and physician case report forms (CRFs). Patients with CRNP were identified by physicians’ clinical assessments after examining the completed PD-Q. Results A total of 951 patients visiting outpatient clinics across Europe were enrolled in this study between August 2010 and July 2011. Of these, 310 patients (32.60%; 95% confidence interval 29.62, 35.58) were identified as having CRNP. Twenty-nine of 39 (74.4%) physicians who completed the CRF relating to the PD-Q considered it a useful tool to help detect CRNP in daily practice and 28 of 39 (71.8%) indicated that they would use this tool in the future for most or some of their patients. Data from physicians before and after review of the completed PD-Qs showed a shift in clinical opinion (either to positive CRNP diagnosis [yes] or negative CRNP diagnosis [no]) in respect of 142 patients; about half of which (74) were categorised with an initial diagnosis of unknown. Opinions also shifted from a no to a yes diagnosis in 10 patients and from a yes to a no diagnosis in 51 patients. Conclusions Approximately one-third of adults with cancer experiencing chronic pain attending outpatient clinics as part of routine care were considered to have CRNP in the opinion of the physicians after

  11. [Factitious diseases in oncology].

    PubMed

    Reich, Michel; Clermont, Amélie; Amela, Éric; Kotecki, Nuria

    2015-12-01

    Factitious diseases and pathomimias and particularly Munchausen's syndrome, due to their rarity, are poorly diagnosed by medical teams working in oncology. Consequences can be serious and result in unadapted surgery or non justified implementation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens. These patients simulate diseases in order to attract medical attention. They might become belligerent and are likely to promptly discharge themselves from hospital if they do not get the desired attention or are unmasked. With two following case reports and literature review, we would like to alert clinicians about difficulties encountered in diagnosis and management of factitious disorders. When faced with this diagnosis, the patient will tend to deny reality and break contact with the medical team who exposed him. Medical peregrinating behavior surrounded by conflicts with medical team, past psychiatric illness, history of working in the medical and paramedical field and social isolation can guide the diagnosis. Somaticians and especially surgeons working in the oncologic field must remain vigilant about this diagnosis and collaborate with either the psycho-oncologic team or the consultation-liaison psychiatric team. Some recommendations for medical professionals how to cope with these patients will be suggested. PMID:26597474

  12. [Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Radiobacter) as an infectious agent in an oncological patient].

    PubMed

    Franková, H; Churý, Z; Gaislerová, V; Jílková, J; Hejlová, N; Mach, J

    1999-05-01

    The authors submit the description of a 62-year-old patient with multiple myeloma where the causal agent of pyretic reactions was Agrobacterium tumefaciens (radiobacter). It was a patient with an implanted venous port which was colonized by the above bacterium. This finding most probably has not been described so far in the Czech literature. In the English literature the authors found 36 cases. The authors draw attention to the possible higher incidence of future infections caused by organisms hitherto considered non-pathogenic for man, in particular in immunocompromised patients.

  13. Art Therapy with an Oncology Care Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nainis, Nancy A.

    2005-01-01

    Oncology nurses are particularly vulnerable to "burnout" syndrome due to the intensity of their work and the ongoing losses they experience while providing oncology care to their patients. High levels of stress in the workplace left untended lead to high job turnover, poor productivity, and diminished quality of care for patients. Attention to…

  14. Methemoglobinemia in a Pediatric Oncology Patient Receiving Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Timothy G.; Carroll, Megan G.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 6-month Final Diagnosis: Methemoglobinemia Symptoms: — Medication: Sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim Clinical Procedure: Methylene blue administration Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Methemoglobinemia due to the administration of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim has been documented in a series of case reports. However, all of these reports are on adult patients, and all patients received at least daily administration of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim for the treatment of active or suspected infection. Case Report: Herein we report the development of methemoglobinemia in a pediatric patient receiving sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim three times weekly for the prophylaxis of opportunistic infections. Conclusions: The clinician should always consider sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, even when administered for opportunistic infection prophylaxis at reduced doses and intervals, as a possible cause of methemoglobinemia. PMID:27424851

  15. Use of herbs or vitamin/mineral/nutrient supplements by pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Ayşe Bozkurt; Bör, Özcan

    2016-05-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread and increasing. We sought to study the frequency and factors affecting of its use in children with cancer. We designed a questionnaire that was administered to the parents of children between September 2013 and March 2014. A total of 74 patients were enrolled into the study. Fifty patients (67.5%) had used one or more than one type of herbs or vitamin/mineral/nutrient. The most commonly used CAM treatment was grape molasses (36.6%). The main source of information to families was the internet. No correlation found between the use of CAM and parents' education status, the level of income, socioeconomic status, chemotherapy treatment. Patients with cancer highly tended to use CAM treatment without informing healthcare professionals. The integration of complementary methods to the conventional treatments is interesting and seem to respond to the needs of patients allowing a more comprehensive approach to care.

  16. Patient Centeredness and Engagement in Quality-of-Care Oncology Research.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Steven B; Gayer, Christopher; Murphy, Elizabeth; Majhail, Navneet S; Baker, K Scott

    2015-05-01

    More than a decade after the Institute of Medicine (IOM) first studied the quality of cancer care, obstacles to achieving high-quality care remain, and studies suggest that cancer care is often not as patient centered, accessible, coordinated, or evidence based as it could be. Patients, their families, and clinicians face a wide range of complex and often confusing choices regarding their health and health care concerns and require trustworthy information to decide which options are best for them. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) strives to fund clinical comparative effectiveness research, guided by patients, caregivers, and the broader health care community, that will provide high-integrity, evidence-based information to help people make informed health care decisions. This mission is well aligned with the IOM's recent conceptual framework and corresponding recommendations that recognize that addressing the needs of patients with cancer and their families is the most important component of a high-quality cancer care delivery system. PCORI seeks the opportunity to partner with diverse interdisciplinary research teams who demonstrate a strong commitment to the inclusion and engagement of patients and stakeholders as they work to develop high-quality cancer care delivery systems. We see rich opportunities for such partnership in the cancer care community, given the wealth of well-established patient advocacy groups and organizations and cutting-edge research institutions, all of which are working toward the common goal of improving the quality of cancer care for patients and their families. This article and the project it describes provide an example of an avenue for advancing this goal. PMID:25852140

  17. Epidemiology and outcome of candidaemia in patients with oncological and haematological malignancies: results from a population-based surveillance in Spain.

    PubMed

    Puig-Asensio, M; Ruiz-Camps, I; Fernández-Ruiz, M; Aguado, J M; Muñoz, P; Valerio, M; Delgado-Iribarren, A; Merino, P; Bereciartua, E; Fortún, J; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Almirante, B

    2015-05-01

    A prospective, population-based surveillance on candidaemia was implemented in five metropolitan areas of Spain from May 2010 to April 2011. We aimed to describe the distribution and susceptibility pattern of Candida species, and to evaluate risk factors for mortality in patients with oncological (solid tumours) and haematological malignancies. Adults (≥ 16 years) with cancer were included in the present report. Impact of therapeutic strategies on 7- and 30-day mortality were analysed by logistic regression, adjusting for propensity score by inverse weighting probability of receiving early antifungal treatment and catheter removal. We included 238 (32.6%) patients (195 oncological, 43 haematological). Compared with oncological patients, haematological patients were more likely to have received chemotherapy (53.5% versus 17.4%, p < 0.001) or corticosteroids (41.9% versus 21%, p < 0.001), and have neutropenia (44.2% versus 1.5%, p < 0.001). Overall, 14.8% of patients developed breakthrough candidaemia. Non-albicans Candida species (71.1% versus 55.6%, p 0.056) and Candida tropicalis (22.2% versus 7.6%, p 0.011) were more frequent in haematological patients. Based on EUCAST breakpoints, 27.6% of Candida isolates were non-susceptible to fluconazole. Resistance to echinocandins was negligible. Mortality at 7 and 30 days was 12.2% and 31.5%, respectively, and did not differ significantly between the patient groups. Prompt antifungal therapy together with catheter removal (≤ 48 hours) was associated with lower mortality at 7 days (adjusted OR 0.05; 95% CI 0.01-0.42) and 30 days (adjusted OR 0.27; 95% CI 0.16-0.46). In conclusion, non-albicans species are emerging as the predominant isolates, particularly in haematological patients. Prompt, adequate antifungal treatment plus catheter removal may lead to a reduction in mortality.

  18. Hematologic toxicity in patients undergoing radical anti- cancer therapy: a cross-sectional analysis of patients in an oncology ward in India.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumyajit; Mallick, Supriya; Raza, Md Waseem; Haresh, Kunhi Parambath; Gupta, Subhash; Sharma, Daya Nand; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Rath, Goura Kisore

    2014-01-01

    Burden of cancer is progressively increasing in developing countries like India which has also led to a steep rise in toxicity due to anti-cancer therapy. A cross-sectional analysis was here conducted for patients with different malignancies (except leukaemia) who while undergoing radical anti-cancer therapy were admitted to our oncology ward from January-July 2013. In a total of 280 patients, the total number of toxicity events was 473. Nine patients expired over this time period. Among the events, grade 2 anaemia the most common (n=189) while the most common grades of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were grade 4 (n=114) and grade 2 (n=48), respectively. Among the tracable microbial etiologies, gram negative bacteria were the most commonly found pathogens. Treatment interruptions took place in 240 patients (median duration=8.8 days). Prolonged hospital admission, intensive care and artificial ventilation support was needed to be given in 48, 7 and 13 patients respectively. Advanced NSCLC, KPS <70, pancytopenia and artificial ventilation requirement were found to have a significant impact on death. Such studies show the prevailing practice from institutes of our country and may guide us formulating a guideline for managing such toxicities for this part of the world. PMID:24870762

  19. Does referral to specialist paediatric palliative care services reduce hospital admissions in oncology patients at the end of life?

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, L K; van Laar, M; Miller, M; Aldridge, J; McKinney, P A; Parslow, R C; Feltbower, R G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in the treatment of childhood cancer, some children continue to die from their disease. This study aimed to assess the impact of specialist paediatric palliative care services (SPPCSs) on the number of hospital admissions in children who subsequently died from cancer in Yorkshire, UK. Methods: An extract of patients aged 0–19 years from the Yorkshire Specialist Register of Cancer in Children and Young People (YSRCCYP) diagnosed from 1990 to 2009 were linked to inpatient hospital episodes data and a SPPCS database. Deaths were included if they occurred before 31 August 2011. Differences in hospital admission patterns were assessed using negative binomial regression and presented as incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Results: Of 2508 children on the YSRCCYP, 657 (26%) had died by the censoring date. A total of 211 children had been referred to the local SPPCS, of whom 182 (86%) had subsequently died. Referral to SPPCS was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of planned hospital admissions (IRR=0.60, 95% CI 0.43–0.85). Central nervous system tumours showed significant decreases for all planned and emergency admissions compared with all other diagnostic groups. Conclusion: Referral to SPPCS significantly reduced the number of planned hospital admissions for children and young people with cancer before their death, which are often integral to paediatric oncology treatment regimens. Overall, our findings show that SPPCS have a role in reducing hospital admissions during end of life care of paediatric cancer patients with potential personal, social and economic benefits. PMID:23449361

  20. Risk Assessment of BRONJ in Oncologic Patients Treated with Bisphosphonates: Follow-Up to 18 Months.

    PubMed

    Sparabombe, Scilla; Vitali, Lucia; Nori, Alessandra; Berlin, Ricarda Sara; Mazur, Marta; Orsini, Giovanna; Putignano, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Bisphosphonates related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a pathological condition characterized by bone exposure or latent infection in patients treated with the drug. The aim of the study is to monitor the BRONJ level of risk health in patients with cancer, according to a preventive clinical protocol, which is firstly aimed at reducing risk factors such as the periodontal infections. Materials and Methods. 10 patients participated in the protocol and were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 18 months of treatment with bisphosphonates, through full mouth plaque and bleeding scores (FMPS and FMBS), clinical attachment level (CAL) measurement, and the occurrence of osteonecrosis. Results. The mean plaque and bleeding were reduced and the CAL has not shown significant changes and in no cases was there manifestation of BRONJ. Conclusion. The protocol proved crucial for the maintenance of good oral health conditions by eliminating the risk of BRONJ during the observation period. PMID:25258628

  1. Risk Assessment of BRONJ in Oncologic Patients Treated with Bisphosphonates: Follow-Up to 18 Months

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Lucia; Nori, Alessandra; Berlin, Ricarda Sara; Mazur, Marta; Orsini, Giovanna; Putignano, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Bisphosphonates related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a pathological condition characterized by bone exposure or latent infection in patients treated with the drug. The aim of the study is to monitor the BRONJ level of risk health in patients with cancer, according to a preventive clinical protocol, which is firstly aimed at reducing risk factors such as the periodontal infections. Materials and Methods. 10 patients participated in the protocol and were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 18 months of treatment with bisphosphonates, through full mouth plaque and bleeding scores (FMPS and FMBS), clinical attachment level (CAL) measurement, and the occurrence of osteonecrosis. Results. The mean plaque and bleeding were reduced and the CAL has not shown significant changes and in no cases was there manifestation of BRONJ. Conclusion. The protocol proved crucial for the maintenance of good oral health conditions by eliminating the risk of BRONJ during the observation period. PMID:25258628

  2. The importance of cleanrooms for the treatment of haemato-oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Holý, Ondřej; Matoušková, Ivanka

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of cleanrooms in health care centres is to prevent hospital infections or leakage of a highly infectious agent (the source of haemorrhagic fevers, SARS, etc.) into the ambient environment and subsequently possibly threatening other individuals. Patients with haematological malignancies or after autologous or allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) rank among immunosuppressed individuals. Prolonged and deep neutropenia is considered a key risk factor of the occurrence of an exogenous infection. One of the possibilities of preventing an exogenous infection in these patients is to place them in a "cleanroom" for the crucial period of time. Cleanrooms are intensive care units with reverse isolation. The final part of the general article below provides an overview of the technology and types of cleanrooms for immunosuppressed patients in compliance with the current recommendations and technical standards.

  3. Qualitative approach to patient-reported outcomes in oncology: protocol of a French study

    PubMed Central

    Orri, Massimiliano; Sibeoni, Jordan; Labey, Mathilde; Bousquet, Guilhem; Verneuil, Laurence; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The past decade has been characterised by movement from a doctor-centred to a patient-centred approach to treatment outcomes, in which doctors try to see the illness through their patients’ eyes. Patients, family members and doctors are the three participants in cancer care, but their perspectives about what have been helpful during cancer treatment have never simultaneously and explicitly compared in the same qualitative study. The aim of this study project is to explore patients’ perspectives about the care they receive, as well as families’ and doctors’ perspectives about what have been helpful for the patient. These three points of view will be compared and contrasted in order to analyse the convergences and divergences in these perspectives. Methods and analysis This is a national multicentre qualitative study. Participants will be constituted by three different subsamples: (1) patients with cancer (skin, breast, urological and lung cancers), (2) their relatives, and (3) their referring physicians. Recruitment will follow the purposive sample technique, and the final sample size will be determined by data saturation. Data will be collected through open-ended semistructured interviews and independently analysed with NVivo V.10 software by three researchers according to the principles of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Ethics and dissemination The research protocol received approval from the University Paris Descartes review board (IRB number: 20140600001072), and participants will provide written consent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to focus on the simultaneous exploration of the separate points of view of patients, families and doctors about the care received during the cancer care journey. We expect that our findings will help to improve communication and relationships between doctors, patients and families. Comparison of these three points of view will provide information about the convergences and

  4. [Immunity state of oncological patients during long-term treatment with tramal].

    PubMed

    Novikov, Iu A; Kon'kov, Sh Kh; Shumilov, E I

    1994-01-01

    Narcotic analgesics have an inhibiting effect on the immunity and that is why their use for pain relief in cancer patients cannot be regarded as adequate. The effect of a new synthetic analgesic tramal (tramal hydrochloride) on the immune system has been studied. Cellular immunity indexes, immunoglobulin level, and phagocytic activity of neutrophils have been determined before treatment and 1 and 2 weeks after the treatment started. The data obtained have shown that tramal does not inhibit the immune system. It has been also noted that pain relief in cancer patients improved the indexes of cellular and humoral immunity.

  5. Patients' experience of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery: a phenomenological analysis.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, Cheryl; Davison, Jean

    2016-09-12

    Background Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is a three-dimensional curvature of the spine of unknown cause that occurs in often otherwise fit young people. A complex surgical procedure is required for the most severe curves. Quantitative literature suggests scoliosis surgery improves patients' lives, while qualitative literature focuses on patients' concerns rather than their experience. Aims To explore how adolescents interpret their perioperative experience. Method Six participants, aged 15-18, were interviewed and transcripts were analysed. Findings Four themes were identified: shock, fears and worries; parental interaction; coping; and motivation and positivity. Conclusion Participants were reluctant to share concerns, however those they shared related more to fear of the unknown and lack of control than specific issues such as pain. Participants depended on their parents, especially their mothers, during the perioperative period, and they recognised their parents' stress. Participants coped well, were motivated and had a positive outlook. PMID:27615585

  6. Patients' experience of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery: a phenomenological analysis.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, Cheryl; Davison, Jean

    2016-09-12

    Background Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is a three-dimensional curvature of the spine of unknown cause that occurs in often otherwise fit young people. A complex surgical procedure is required for the most severe curves. Quantitative literature suggests scoliosis surgery improves patients' lives, while qualitative literature focuses on patients' concerns rather than their experience. Aims To explore how adolescents interpret their perioperative experience. Method Six participants, aged 15-18, were interviewed and transcripts were analysed. Findings Four themes were identified: shock, fears and worries; parental interaction; coping; and motivation and positivity. Conclusion Participants were reluctant to share concerns, however those they shared related more to fear of the unknown and lack of control than specific issues such as pain. Participants depended on their parents, especially their mothers, during the perioperative period, and they recognised their parents' stress. Participants coped well, were motivated and had a positive outlook.

  7. Violent Behavior in Cancer Patients--A Rarely Addressed Phenomenon in Oncological Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grube, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dealing with violent cancer patients can be particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to collect data on the frequency, quality, and underlying variables affecting violent behavior as well as to examine the role played by this behavior in the premature interruption of treatment. A total of 388 cancer inpatients were examined by…

  8. Oncology Nursing Education: Nursing Students' Commitment of "Presence" with the Dying Patient and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Sandra M.; Hogan, Nancy S.

    2003-01-01

    Following a chaplain's lecture on the end of life, nursing students wrote reaction papers on appropriate ways to support dying patients and their families. Six processes emerged, including the core concept of the nurse's presence at the bedside. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  9. Patient/Caregiver influences for declining participation in supportive oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Buss, Mary K; DuBenske, Lori L; Dinauer, Susan; Gustafson, David H; McTavish, Fiona; Cleary, James F

    2008-04-01

    Enrolling adequate numbers of subjects to research projects that focus on the supportive needs of patients and caregivers is difficult, and this difficulty significantly impedes investigation of this important research area. We report reasons that patients or their informal caregivers declined to participate in one of two randomized, longitudinal clinical trials testing the Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS), a Web-based information and support scheme for people with advanced cancer and their primary informal caregivers. Patients were asked why they declined participation in these trials; their responses then were recorded and coded into themes. The leading reasons included factors related to using a computer (eg, lack of familiarity with using this technology, access to other resources), being attended to by a caregiver (eg, poor caregiver health, caregiver burden, patient doing well and not needing a caregiver), taking part in a study (eg, survey burden, privacy concerns, wording of the consent form), dealing with personal issues (eg, time commitment, timing of study, feelings of being overwhelmed, and coping styles), and lack of interest. By using eligibility criteria that largely parallel those for studies of chemotherapeutic regimens, this research project highlighted reasons why subjects decline participation in clinical trials. This information was specific to supportive care trials; it may help researchers plan recruitment strategies and enrollment targets.

  10. Identification of medication non-adherence factors in adolescent transplant patients: the patient's viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Bullington, Pamela; Pawola, Larry; Walker, Rosemary; Valenta, Annette; Briars, Leslie; John, Eunice

    2007-12-01

    Studies report a clear association between medication non-adherence and an unfavorable transplant outcome. The adolescent population, in particular, has difficulty adhering to post-transplant medication regimens. The purpose of this study is to identify, categorize and understand the opinions of adolescent transplant patients regarding why they may not take their medications as prescribed. From January to August 2005, nine adolescent kidney transplant patients at an urban medical center were surveyed and asked to rank-order 33 statements regarding their opinions on why adolescents may not take their medications as prescribed. Q-methodology, a powerful tool in subjective study, was used to identify and categorize the viewpoints of adolescents on this subject. Three factors emerged and were labeled to reflect their distinct viewpoints: (1) Medication Issues (e.g. taste, size, frequency, schedule), (2) Troubled Adolescent (e.g. poor home life, depression, overwhelming situation), and (3) Deliberate Non-Adherer (e.g. attention-seeker, infallible attitude). By understanding these different viewpoints and the factors that contribute to them, it may be easier to identify which management approach to non-adherence works best in specific subgroups of patients. PMID:17976128

  11. Social Media and Oncology: The past, present, and future of electronic communication between physician and patient

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mark A.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between patient and physician is in flux with the advent of electronic media that are advancing and enhancing communication. We perform a retrospective, current, and forward-looking examination of the technologies by which information is exchanged within the healthcare community. The evolution from email and listservs to blogs and the modern social networks is described, with emphasis on the advantages and pitfalls of each medium, especially in regard to maintaining the standards of privacy and professionalism to which doctors are held accountable. We support the use of contemporary platforms like Twitter and Facebook for physicians to establish themselves as trustworthy online sources of medical knowledge, and anticipate ongoing collaboration between researchers, patients, and their advocates in trial design and accrual. PMID:26433557

  12. Social Media and Oncology: The Past, Present, and Future of Electronic Communication Between Physician and Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mark A; Dicker, Adam P

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between patient and physician is in flux with the advent of electronic media that are advancing and enhancing communication. We perform a retrospective, current, and forward-looking examination of the technologies by which information is exchanged within the healthcare community. The evolution from e-mail and listservs to blogs and the modern social networks is described, with emphasis on the advantages and pitfalls of each medium, especially in regard to maintaining the standards of privacy and professionalism to which doctors are held accountable. We support the use of contemporary platforms like Twitter and Facebook for physicians to establish themselves as trustworthy online sources of medical knowledge, and anticipate ongoing collaboration between researchers, patients, and their advocates in trial design and accrual.

  13. Social Media and Oncology: The Past, Present, and Future of Electronic Communication Between Physician and Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mark A; Dicker, Adam P

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between patient and physician is in flux with the advent of electronic media that are advancing and enhancing communication. We perform a retrospective, current, and forward-looking examination of the technologies by which information is exchanged within the healthcare community. The evolution from e-mail and listservs to blogs and the modern social networks is described, with emphasis on the advantages and pitfalls of each medium, especially in regard to maintaining the standards of privacy and professionalism to which doctors are held accountable. We support the use of contemporary platforms like Twitter and Facebook for physicians to establish themselves as trustworthy online sources of medical knowledge, and anticipate ongoing collaboration between researchers, patients, and their advocates in trial design and accrual. PMID:26433557

  14. Market and patient access to new oncology products in Europe: a current, multidisciplinary perspective.

    PubMed

    McCabe, C; Bergmann, L; Bosanquet, N; Ellis, M; Enzmann, H; von Euler, M; Jönsson, B; Kallen, K-J; Newling, D; Nüssler, V; Paschen, B; de Wilde, R; Wilking, N; Teale, C; Zwierzina, H

    2009-03-01

    To air challenging issues related to patient and market access to new anticancer agents, the Biotherapy Development Association--an international group focused on developing targeted cancer therapies using biological agents--convened a meeting on 29 November 2007 in Brussels, Belgium. The meeting provided a forum for representatives of pharmaceutical companies and academia to interact with European regulatory and postregulatory agencies. The goal was to increase all parties' understanding of their counterparts' roles in the development, licensure, and appraisal of new agents for cancer treatment, events guided by an understanding that cancer patients should have rapid and equitable access to life-prolonging treatments. Among the outcomes of the meeting were a greater understanding of the barriers facing drug developers in an evolving postregulatory world, clarity about what regulatory and postregulatory bodies expect to see in dossiers of new anticancer agents as they contemplate licensure and reimbursement, and several sets of recommendations to optimize patients' access to innovative, safe, effective, and fairly priced cancer treatments.

  15. A national study of the provision of oncology sperm banking services among Canadian fertility clinics.

    PubMed

    Yee, S; Buckett, W; Campbell, S; Yanofsky, R A; Barr, R D

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the current state of oncology sperm banking services provided by fertility clinics across Canada. A total of 78 Canadian fertility facilities were invited to complete a questionnaire related to the availability, accessibility, affordability and utilisation of sperm banking services for cancer patients. The total response rate was 59%, with 20 (69%) in vitro fertilisation clinics and 26 (53%) other fertility centres returning the survey. A total of 24 responding facilities accepted oncology sperm banking referrals. The time frame to book the first banking appointment for 19 (79%) facilities was within 2 days. Inconsistent practice was found regarding the consent process for cancer patients who are of minority age. Eight (33%) facilities did not provide any subsidy and charged a standard banking fee regardless of patients' financial situations. Overall, the utilisation of oncology sperm banking services was low despite its availability and established efficacy, suggesting that Canadian cancer patients are notably underserved. The study has highlighted some important issues for further consideration in improving access to sperm banking services for cancer patients, especially for adolescents. Better collaboration between oncology and reproductive medicine to target healthcare providers would help to improve sperm banking rates.

  16. Early Versus Delayed Initiation of Concurrent Palliative Oncology Care: Patient Outcomes in the ENABLE III Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bakitas, Marie A.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Li, Zhigang; Lyons, Kathleen D.; Hull, Jay G.; Li, Zhongze; Dionne-Odom, J. Nicholas; Frost, Jennifer; Dragnev, Konstantin H.; Hegel, Mark T.; Azuero, Andres; Ahles, Tim A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Randomized controlled trials have supported integrated oncology and palliative care (PC); however, optimal timing has not been evaluated. We investigated the effect of early versus delayed PC on quality of life (QOL), symptom impact, mood, 1-year survival, and resource use. Patients and Methods Between October 2010 and March 2013, 207 patients with advanced cancer at a National Cancer Institute cancer center, a Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and community outreach clinics were randomly assigned to receive an in-person PC consultation, structured PC telehealth nurse coaching sessions (once per week for six sessions), and monthly follow-up either early after enrollment or 3 months later. Outcomes were QOL, symptom impact, mood, 1-year survival, and resource use (hospital/intensive care unit days, emergency room visits, chemotherapy in last 14 days, and death location). Results Overall patient-reported outcomes were not statistically significant after enrollment (QOL, P = .34; symptom impact, P = .09; mood, P = .33) or before death (QOL, P = .73; symptom impact, P = .30; mood, P = .82). Kaplan-Meier 1-year survival rates were 63% in the early group and 48% in the delayed group (difference, 15%; P = .038). Relative rates of early to delayed decedents' resource use were similar for hospital days (0.73; 95% CI, 0.41 to 1.27; P = .26), intensive care unit days (0.68; 95% CI, 0.23 to 2.02; P = .49), emergency room visits (0.73; 95% CI, 0.45 to 1.19; P = .21), chemotherapy in last 14 days (1.57; 95% CI, 0.37 to 6.7; P = .27), and home death (27 [54%] v 28 [47%]; P = .60). Conclusion Early-entry participants' patient-reported outcomes and resource use were not statistically different; however, their survival 1-year after enrollment was improved compared with those who began 3 months later. Understanding the complex mechanisms whereby PC may improve survival remains an important research priority. PMID:25800768

  17. Bezoar in a Pediatric Oncology Patient Treated with Coca-Cola

    PubMed Central

    Naramore, Sara; Virojanapa, Amy; Bell, Moshe; Jhaveri, Punit N.

    2015-01-01

    A bezoar is a mass of indigestible material. Bezoars can present with a gradual onset of non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. However, bezoars can result in more serious conditions such as intestinal bleeding or obstruction. Without quick recognition, particularly in susceptible individuals, the diagnosis and treatment can be delayed. Currently resolution is achieved with enzymatic dissolution, endoscopic fragmentation or surgery. We describe, to our knowledge, the first pediatric patient with lymphoma to have had a bezoar treated with Coca-Cola. PMID:26269699

  18. Bezoar in a Pediatric Oncology Patient Treated with Coca-Cola.

    PubMed

    Naramore, Sara; Virojanapa, Amy; Bell, Moshe; Jhaveri, Punit N

    2015-01-01

    A bezoar is a mass of indigestible material. Bezoars can present with a gradual onset of non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. However, bezoars can result in more serious conditions such as intestinal bleeding or obstruction. Without quick recognition, particularly in susceptible individuals, the diagnosis and treatment can be delayed. Currently resolution is achieved with enzymatic dissolution, endoscopic fragmentation or surgery. We describe, to our knowledge, the first pediatric patient with lymphoma to have had a bezoar treated with Coca-Cola.

  19. Malnutrition and obesity in pediatric oncology patients: causes, consequences, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Co-Reyes, Erica; Li, Rhea; Huh, Winston; Chandra, Joya

    2012-12-15

    In children with cancer, suboptimal nutrition states are common consequences of the disease and its treatment. These nutrition states have been attributed to a number of etiologies dependent on the patient's tumor type and treatment, and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Interventions vary from psychosocial to pharmacological and surgical management. Further research is necessary to understand the epidemiology and etiology of these nutrition states. Of great importance is the development and implementation of effective interventions to optimize nutritional status among children with cancer during and after therapy.

  20. Shared Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Implications for Preventive Health and Clinical Care in Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher B; Davis, Margot K; Law, Angeline; Sulpher, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    The cardiovascular toxicity of cancer therapy has raised awareness of the importance of heart disease in cancer care among oncologists and cardiologists, leading to the new interdisciplinary field of cardio-oncology. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease are also related to an increased incidence of cancer and excess cancer mortality. We review the epidemiologic evidence that smoking, obesity, poor diet, and inactivity can cause both heart disease and cancer. The importance of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors in adversely affecting oncological outcomes and leading to increased cancer mortality is discussed. Cardiotoxicity prediction tools that incorporate cardiac disease and risk factors are described. Raising awareness about shared risk factors for cancer and heart disease may result in more effective advocacy to promote healthy lifestyle changes through the combined efforts of the historically separate specialties of cardiology and oncology. PMID:27343745

  1. Advances in caring for the older cancer patient: a report from the 2015 conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Stepney, Rob

    2016-01-01

    A paradox in cancer research is that the majority of patients enrolled in clinical trials are relatively young and fit while typical patients in daily practice are elderly and have comorbidities and impaired organ function. Given these differences, many major studies provide an imperfect guide to optimizing the treatment of the majority of patients. Since cancer incidence is highly correlated with age, and since the world's population is rapidly ageing, this problem can only increase. For this reason, oncologists and geriatricians need to collaborate in developing tools to systematically assess the health status of elderly patients and their fitness to receive cancer therapies of various intensity. Tailoring anti-cancer treatments and supportive care to individual needs should be seen as part of the move towards personalized medicine. Achieving this goal is as much of a challenge to developing and middle-income countries as it is to western nations. The 2015 annual conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) held in Prague, Czech Republic, November 2015 and had a global focus on advancing the science of geriatric oncology and supportive care. Central to this approach is the systematic assessment of life expectancy, independent functioning, and the physical and psychological health of older cancer patients. The assumption behind comprehensive geriatric assessment is that elderly cancer patients have complex needs. The implication is that effective intervention will require a multidisciplinary team. Examples of effective geriatric assessment, multidisciplinary working and supportive care were presented at the SIOG conference.

  2. CogState computerized memory tests in patients with brain metastases: secondary endpoint results of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933.

    PubMed

    Caine, Chip; Deshmukh, Snehal; Gondi, Vinai; Mehta, Minesh; Tomé, Wolfgang; Corn, Benjamin W; Kanner, Andrew; Rowley, Howard; Kundapur, Vijayananda; DeNittis, Albert; Greenspoon, Jeffrey Noah; Konski, Andre A; Bauman, Glenn S; Raben, Adam; Shi, Wenyin; Wendland, Merideth; Kachnic, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is associated with memory dysfunction. As part of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933, a phase II study of WBRT for brain metastases that conformally avoided the hippocampal stem cell compartment (HA-WBRT), memory was assessed pre- and post-HA-WBRT using both traditional and computerized memory tests. We examined whether the computerized tests yielded similar findings and might serve as possible alternatives for assessment of memory in multi-institution clinical trials. Adult patients with brain metastases received HA-WBRT to 30 Gy in ten fractions and completed Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R), CogState International Shopping List Test (ISLT) and One Card Learning Test (OCLT), at baseline, 2 and 4 months. Tests' completion rates were 52-53 % at 2 months and 34-42 % at 4 months. All baseline correlations between HVLT-R and CogState tests were significant (p ≤ 0.003). At baseline, both CogState tests and one component of HVLT-R differentiated those who were alive at 6 months and those who had died (p ≤ 0.01). At 4 months, mean relative decline was 7.0 % for HVLT-R Delayed Recall and 18.0 % for ISLT Delayed Recall. OCLT showed an 8.0 % increase. A reliable change index found no significant changes from baseline to 2 and 4 months for ISLT Delayed Recall (z = -0.40, p = 0.34; z = -0.68, p = 0.25) or OCLT (z = 0.15, p = 0.56; z = 0.41, p = 0.66). Study findings support the possibility that hippocampal avoidance may be associated with preservation of memory test performance, and that these computerized tests also may be useful and valid memory assessments in multi-institution adult brain tumor trials. PMID:26511494

  3. CogState computerized memory tests in patients with brain metastases: secondary endpoint results of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933.

    PubMed

    Caine, Chip; Deshmukh, Snehal; Gondi, Vinai; Mehta, Minesh; Tomé, Wolfgang; Corn, Benjamin W; Kanner, Andrew; Rowley, Howard; Kundapur, Vijayananda; DeNittis, Albert; Greenspoon, Jeffrey Noah; Konski, Andre A; Bauman, Glenn S; Raben, Adam; Shi, Wenyin; Wendland, Merideth; Kachnic, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is associated with memory dysfunction. As part of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933, a phase II study of WBRT for brain metastases that conformally avoided the hippocampal stem cell compartment (HA-WBRT), memory was assessed pre- and post-HA-WBRT using both traditional and computerized memory tests. We examined whether the computerized tests yielded similar findings and might serve as possible alternatives for assessment of memory in multi-institution clinical trials. Adult patients with brain metastases received HA-WBRT to 30 Gy in ten fractions and completed Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R), CogState International Shopping List Test (ISLT) and One Card Learning Test (OCLT), at baseline, 2 and 4 months. Tests' completion rates were 52-53 % at 2 months and 34-42 % at 4 months. All baseline correlations between HVLT-R and CogState tests were significant (p ≤ 0.003). At baseline, both CogState tests and one component of HVLT-R differentiated those who were alive at 6 months and those who had died (p ≤ 0.01). At 4 months, mean relative decline was 7.0 % for HVLT-R Delayed Recall and 18.0 % for ISLT Delayed Recall. OCLT showed an 8.0 % increase. A reliable change index found no significant changes from baseline to 2 and 4 months for ISLT Delayed Recall (z = -0.40, p = 0.34; z = -0.68, p = 0.25) or OCLT (z = 0.15, p = 0.56; z = 0.41, p = 0.66). Study findings support the possibility that hippocampal avoidance may be associated with preservation of memory test performance, and that these computerized tests also may be useful and valid memory assessments in multi-institution adult brain tumor trials.

  4. [Dignity therapy in oncology].

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Carla Ida

    2016-04-01

    In oncology, little is known about dignity, dignity-related distress and the issues that influence the sense of dignity for patients. Dignity is personal, subject to changes depending on the experience and the path of life. In oncology some patients feel that their dignity is directly related to the disease, to physical and emotional symptoms, to the highest level of physical and cognitive autonomy and to the continuity of the self. Patient dignity inventory (PDI) is a validate tool designed to measure various sources of dignity-related distress among patients nearing the end of life and serve as a screening tool to assess a broad range of issues that influence the sense of dignity. Dignity therapy is a novel focused psychotherapy consisting in a brief semi-structured interview, audio-recorded and transcribed in order to obtain the "generativity document". The patients are invited to tell about their life history, and to leave words of guidance and offer instructions to pass along to their son, daughters, husband, wife, parents, others. The generativity document is the result of process of emotional and existential care for the patients and a gift for everybody will receive it. PMID:27093325

  5. [Dignity therapy in oncology].

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Carla Ida

    2016-04-01

    In oncology, little is known about dignity, dignity-related distress and the issues that influence the sense of dignity for patients. Dignity is personal, subject to changes depending on the experience and the path of life. In oncology some patients feel that their dignity is directly related to the disease, to physical and emotional symptoms, to the highest level of physical and cognitive autonomy and to the continuity of the self. Patient dignity inventory (PDI) is a validate tool designed to measure various sources of dignity-related distress among patients nearing the end of life and serve as a screening tool to assess a broad range of issues that influence the sense of dignity. Dignity therapy is a novel focused psychotherapy consisting in a brief semi-structured interview, audio-recorded and transcribed in order to obtain the "generativity document". The patients are invited to tell about their life history, and to leave words of guidance and offer instructions to pass along to their son, daughters, husband, wife, parents, others. The generativity document is the result of process of emotional and existential care for the patients and a gift for everybody will receive it.

  6. A knowledge management system to study the quality of life in head and neck oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joaquim; Silveira, Augusta; Rocha, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    The perception that an individual holds about his place in life, which depends upon his culture and values, defines this individual's Quality of Life (QoL). When applied in a health context this known as: Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The assessment of HRQoL is a Medical goal; it is used in clinical research, medical practice, health-related economic studies and in planning health management measures and strategies. Obtaining a patient self-assessment with QoL measuring instruments on the platform developed in this project, through user-friendly software, aids the study, promotes the creation of databases, and accelerates its statistical treatment. The possibility of graphically representing results that physician needs to analyze, immediately after the answer collection, makes this assessment a diagnosis instrument ready to be used routinely in clinical practice. Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) applied to this context enable knowledge creation and storage, and guide therapeutic decisions.

  7. A knowledge management system to study the quality of life in head and neck oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joaquim; Silveira, Augusta; Rocha, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    The perception that an individual holds about his place in life, which depends upon his culture and values, defines this individual's Quality of Life (QoL). When applied in a health context this known as: Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The assessment of HRQoL is a Medical goal; it is used in clinical research, medical practice, health-related economic studies and in planning health management measures and strategies. Obtaining a patient self-assessment with QoL measuring instruments on the platform developed in this project, through user-friendly software, aids the study, promotes the creation of databases, and accelerates its statistical treatment. The possibility of graphically representing results that physician needs to analyze, immediately after the answer collection, makes this assessment a diagnosis instrument ready to be used routinely in clinical practice. Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) applied to this context enable knowledge creation and storage, and guide therapeutic decisions. PMID:21685582

  8. Overcoming psychosocial and developmental barriers to blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) in an adolescent/young adult (AYA) transgender patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khazal, Sajad; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Kapoor, Neena; Mahadeo, Kris M

    2014-11-01

    Adolescents/young adults (AYAs) afflicted with cancer face unique barriers to potentially standard curative therapies, such as blood and marrow transplantation (BMT). Transgender AYAs face additional barriers and there is a dearth of published literature regarding their oncology-related experience. We present the case of an AYA male-to-female (MTF) transgender patient on cross-sex hormone therapy, with a history of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) and significant psychosocial barriers, which initially served as a barrier to BMT at two different centers; we modified our standard consent and education process and was able to successfully proceed with BMT and subsequently cure her CML. Despite unique challenges, AYA and transgender patients with significant psychosocial barriers may achieve successful outcomes with BMT. Research is needed regarding guidelines for cross-sex hormone therapy administration for patients undergoing BMT and other issues, which may be unique to the transgender experience.

  9. Treatment of the adolescent patient with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Samantha M; Dayal, Molina

    2003-06-01

    Frequently, a multidisciplinary approach is needed in the management of the adolescent with PCOS. Treatment must be provided in a supportive environment. Because adolescent females are concerned about their appearance any image, short-term treatment goals are usually directed toward the amelioration of hirsutism, acne, and irregular menstruation. Although not immediately concerning to the adolescent, the prevention of long-term sequelae from anovulation and hyperinsulinemia is also important. Multiple concomitant therapies are often necessary to address the variety of symptoms and achieve better results. Recent studies have investigated the role of the insulin-sensitizing agent, metformin, in the treatment of PCOS. Although most studies show a benefit, the conclusions are limited owing to the small numbers of select patients, observational designs, and short durations of follow-up. In addition, there are few data comparing insulin-sensitizing drugs with traditional therapies for PCOS. More long-term, randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the utility of insulin-sensitizing agents, their long-term benefits, and the ideal patient population for their use.

  10. [Patient education for children and adolescents with chronic diseases].

    PubMed

    Tubiana-Rufi, Nadia

    2009-12-01

    The education of children with chronic diseases and of their parents is a treatment procedure that must be integrated into the management of the child's disease: it is essential for his or her physical and psychological health and quality of life. This continuous process is part of long-term follow-up and of the child's development; it is not a procedure that can be carried out once and for all. The program must include initial, follow-up, and advanced education. Treatment education for parents occurs simultaneously with the child's medical management and has the same requirements as that of the child (which means that the time spent in this education requires financial support). The role of the pediatrics departments serving these children is essential, and they must work with other participants, whose roles are not identical to they perform in education for adult patients. Pediatric patient education requires an interdisciplinary pediatric team with specific skills and appropriate liaison with those involved in other aspects of the child's life (e.g., daycare and school). The child's psychological development is central to the design and implementation of pediatric patient education programs. Knowledge of child development is critical in providing these services for children and adolescents; training in this field is required in addition to that necessary for adult patient education. Epidemiologic findings of the increased incidence of several chronic diseases in children must be considered in decisions about the resources allocated to coping with them. The particularities and requirements of adolescence and its interactions with chronic disease must also be considered in specific patient education programs for adolescents, and in the training and skills of healthcare professionals.

  11. A Non-inferiority Pilot Study Comparing the Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Generic Wide-spectrum Antibiotic Use in Septic Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Araya, I; Fasce, G; Núñez, E; Opazo, J L; Saez, E; Hurtado, V; Contreras, S; Quiñones, L A

    2015-12-01

    The present study is a non-inferiority study based on a descriptive and comparative case series for comparison of generic vs. original intravenous antimicrobials in septic oncology patients at an oncology private ICU. 1906 cancer patients admitted to Arturo Lopez Perez Foundation, Chile, were included in this study. After recruitment, a first retrospective group of 206 septic cancer patients recorded from 1st January, 2008 until July 14th, 2010, treated with original antibiotics (cefoperazone-sulbactam, imipenem-cilastatin, piperacillin-tazobactam) were included for analyses and a second prospective group of 143 septic cancer patients recorded from July 15th, 2010 until January 02, 2013, treated with the same but generic antibiotics were also included for comparisons. The trial protocol was developed in accordance with Helsinki and Good Clinical Practices recommendations. The results of this study showed no significant differences between the 2 groups in days of treatment, rate of success and lab test determinations (white cell count, PCR and procalcitonin), with lower, but not significant, total bed days and CPU bed days for generic antibiotics. Therefore, we conclude that the safety and efficacy of the generic antibiotics cefactam®, imipen® and Piperazam® are not inferior to original antibiotics for the treatment of severe sepsis in hospitalised patients at the Arturo Lopez Perez Foundation. PMID:25811220

  12. A Non-inferiority Pilot Study Comparing the Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Generic Wide-spectrum Antibiotic Use in Septic Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Araya, I; Fasce, G; Núñez, E; Opazo, J L; Saez, E; Hurtado, V; Contreras, S; Quiñones, L A

    2015-12-01

    The present study is a non-inferiority study based on a descriptive and comparative case series for comparison of generic vs. original intravenous antimicrobials in septic oncology patients at an oncology private ICU. 1906 cancer patients admitted to Arturo Lopez Perez Foundation, Chile, were included in this study. After recruitment, a first retrospective group of 206 septic cancer patients recorded from 1st January, 2008 until July 14th, 2010, treated with original antibiotics (cefoperazone-sulbactam, imipenem-cilastatin, piperacillin-tazobactam) were included for analyses and a second prospective group of 143 septic cancer patients recorded from July 15th, 2010 until January 02, 2013, treated with the same but generic antibiotics were also included for comparisons. The trial protocol was developed in accordance with Helsinki and Good Clinical Practices recommendations. The results of this study showed no significant differences between the 2 groups in days of treatment, rate of success and lab test determinations (white cell count, PCR and procalcitonin), with lower, but not significant, total bed days and CPU bed days for generic antibiotics. Therefore, we conclude that the safety and efficacy of the generic antibiotics cefactam®, imipen® and Piperazam® are not inferior to original antibiotics for the treatment of severe sepsis in hospitalised patients at the Arturo Lopez Perez Foundation.

  13. Breast Cancer Patients Have Greatly Benefited from the Progress in Molecular Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Groner, Bernd L.; Hynes, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has become a global enterprise, and the number of researchers, as well as the cost for their activities, has skyrocketed. The budget for the National Cancer Institute of the United States National Institutes of Health alone was US$5.2 billion in 2015. Since most of the research is funded by public money, it is perfectly legitimate to ask if these large expenses are worth it. In this brief commentary, we recapitulate some of the breakthroughs that mark the history of breast cancer research over the past decades and emphasize the resulting benefits for afflicted women. In 1971, only 40% of women diagnosed with breast cancer would live another 10 years. Today, nearly 80% of women reach that significant milestone in most developed countries. This dramatic change has afforded breast cancer patients many productive years and a better quality of life. Progress resulted largely from advances in the understanding of the molecular details of the disease and their translation into innovative, rationally designed therapies. These developments are founded on the revolution in molecular and cellular biology, an entirely new array of methods and technologies, the enthusiasm, optimism, and diligence of scientists and clinicians, and the considerable funding efforts from public and private sources. We were lucky to be able to spend our productive years in a period of scientific upheaval in which methods and concepts were revolutionized and that allowed us to contribute, within the global scientific community, to the progress in basic science and clinical practice. PMID:27684370

  14. Rituximab pharmacokinetics in children and adolescents with de novo intermediate and advanced mature B-cell lymphoma/leukaemia: a Children's Oncology Group report.

    PubMed

    Barth, Matthew J; Goldman, Stanton; Smith, Lynette; Perkins, Sherrie; Shiramizu, Bruce; Gross, Thomas G; Harrison, Lauren; Sanger, Warren; Geyer, Mark B; Giulino-Roth, Lisa; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2013-09-01

    The ANHL01P1 trial was undertaken to determine pharmacokinetics and safety following the addition of rituximab to French-American-British/Lymphome Malins de Burkitt (FAB/LMB96) chemotherapy in 41 children and adolescents with Stage III/IV mature B-cell lymphoma/leukaemia. Patients received rituximab (375 mg/m(2) ) days -2 and 0 of two induction cycles and day 0 of two consolidation cycles. Highest peak levels were achieved following the second dose of each induction cycle [299 ± 19 and 384 ± 25 μg/ml (Group-B); 245 ± 31 and 321 ± 32 μg/ml (Group-C)] with sustained troughs and t½ of 26-29 d. Rituximab can be safely added to FAB chemotherapy with high early rituximab peak/trough levels and a long t½. PMID:23802659

  15. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    PubMed

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel.

  16. Cancer Screening in Patients with Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism--a Position Paper of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology Working Group on Hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Matzdorff, Axel; Riess, Hanno; Bergmann, Frauke; Bisping, Guido; Koschmieder, Steffen; Parmentier, Stefani; Petrides, Petro E; Sosada, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Cancer can trigger thromboembolism. There is a 4-10% chance of finding an asymptomatic occult cancer in patients with idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE). Current guidelines recommend limited cancer screening with history, physical examination, and screening examinations according to age after idiopathic VTE. Recent studies found that a more extensive screening program, including endoscopy and computed tomography, may increase the cancer detection rate. The Hemostasis Working Group of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology recommends a more extensive screening program after idiopathic VTE.

  17. Nomograms Predicting Progression-Free Survival, Overall Survival, and Pelvic Recurrence in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Developed From an Analysis of Identifiable Prognostic Factors in Patients From NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Randomized Trials of Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter G.; Java, James; Whitney, Charles W.; Stehman, Frederick B.; Lanciano, Rachelle; Thomas, Gillian M.; DiSilvestro, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prognostic factors in locally advanced cervical cancer limited to the pelvis and develop nomograms for 2-year progression-free survival (PFS), 5-year overall survival (OS), and pelvic recurrence. Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 2,042 patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma enrolled onto Gynecologic Oncology Group clinical trials of concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nomograms for 2-year PFS, five-year OS, and pelvic recurrence were created as visualizations of Cox proportional hazards regression models. The models were validated by bootstrap-corrected, relatively unbiased estimates of discrimination and calibration. Results Multivariable analysis identified prognostic factors including histology, race/ethnicity, performance status, tumor size, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, tumor grade, pelvic node status, and treatment with concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. PFS, OS, and pelvic recurrence nomograms had bootstrap-corrected concordance indices of 0.62, 0.64, and 0.73, respectively, and were well calibrated. Conclusion Prognostic factors were used to develop nomograms for 2-year PFS, 5-year OS, and pelvic recurrence for locally advanced cervical cancer clinically limited to the pelvis treated with concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These nomograms can be used to better estimate individual and collective outcomes. PMID:25732170

  18. Palliative medicine and medical oncology.

    PubMed

    Maltoni, M; Amadori, D

    2001-04-01

    Traditionally, medical oncology and palliative care have been considered two distinct and separate disciplines, both as regards treatment objectives and delivery times. Palliative care in terminal stages, aimed exclusively at evaluating and improving quality of life, followed antitumor therapies, which concentrated solely on quantitative results (cure, prolongation of life, tumoral mass shrinkage). Over the years, more modern concepts have developed on the subject. Medical oncology, dealing with the skills and strategic co-ordination of oncologic interventions from primary prevention to terminal phases, should also include assessment and treatment of patients' subjective needs. Anticancer therapies should be evaluated in terms of both the quantitative and qualititative impact on patients' lives. Hence, the traditional view of palliative care has to be modified: it constitutes a philosophical and methodological approach to be adopted from the early phases of illness. It is not the evident cultural necessity of integrating medical oncology with palliative medicine that may be a matter of argument, but rather the organizational models needed to put this combined care into practice: should continuous care be guaranteed by a single figure, the medical oncologist, or rather by an interdisciplinary providers' team, including full-time doctors well-equipped for palliative care? In this paper the needs of cancer patients and the part that a complete oncologist should play to deal with such difficult and far-reaching problems are firstly described. Then, as mild provocation, data and critical considerations on the ever increasing needs of palliative care, the present shortcomings in quality of life and pain assessment and management by medical oncologists, and the uncertain efficacy of interventional programmes to change clinical practice are described. Finally, a model of therapeutic continuity is presented. which in our view is realistic and feasible: an Oncologic

  19. Personalized care in neuro-oncology coming of age: why we need MGMT and 1p/19q testing for malignant glioma patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Weller, Michael; Stupp, Roger; Hegi, Monika E; van den Bent, Martin; Tonn, Joerg C; Sanson, Marc; Wick, Wolfgang; Reifenberger, Guido

    2012-09-01

    Histological subtyping and grading by malignancy are the cornerstones of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. They shall provide clinicians with guidance as to the course of disease to be expected and the choices of treatment to be made. Nonetheless, patients with histologically identical tumors may have very different outcomes, notably in patients with astrocytic and oligodendroglial gliomas of WHO grades II and III. In gliomas of adulthood, 3 molecular markers have undergone extensive studies in recent years: 1p/19q chromosomal codeletion, O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2. However, the assessment of these molecular markers has so far not been implemented in clinical routine because of the lack of therapeutic implications. In fact, these markers were considered to be prognostic irrespective of whether patients were receiving radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy, or both (1p/19q, IDH1/2), or of limited value because testing is too complex and no chemotherapy alternative to temozolomide was available (MGMT). In 2012, this situation has changed: long-term follow-up of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9402 and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 26951 trials demonstrated an overall survival benefit from the addition to RT of chemotherapy with procarbazine/CCNU/vincristine confined to patients with anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors with (vs without) 1p/19q codeletion. Furthermore, in elderly glioblastoma patients, the NOA-08 and the Nordic trial of RT alone versus temozolomide alone demonstrated a profound impact of MGMT promoter methylation on outcome by therapy and thus established MGMT as a predictive biomarker in this patient population. These recent results call for the routine implementation of 1p/19q and MGMT testing at least in subpopulations of malignant glioma patients and represent an

  20. Preventing transmission of infectious agents in the pediatric in-patients hematology-oncology setting: what is the role for non-pharmacological prophylaxis?

    PubMed

    Caselli, Désirée; Cesaro, Simone; Livadiotti, Susanna; Ziino, Ottavio; Paolicchi, Olivia; Zanazzo, Giulio; Milano, Giuseppe M; Licciardello, Maria; Barone, Angelica; Cellini, Monica; Raffaella, De Santis; Giacchino, Mareva; Rossi, Mario Renato; Aricò, Maurizio; Castagnola, Elio

    2011-02-24

    The most intensive chemotherapy regimens were used in the past for leukemia patients who were the main focus of trials on infections; today there are increasing numbers of children with solid cancer and considerable risk of infection who do receive intensive standard-dose chemotherapy. Despite a continuous will to protect the immune-compromised child from infections, evidence-based indications for intervention by non-pharmacological tools is still lacking in the pediatric hematology-oncology literature. Guidelines on standard precautions as well as precautions to avoid transmission of specific infectious agents are available. As a result of a consensus discussion, the Italian Association for Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (AIEOP) Cooperative Group centers agree that for children treated with chemotherapy both of these approaches should be implemented and vigorously enforced, while additional policies, including strict environmental isolation, should be restricted to patients with selected clinical conditions or complications. We present here a study by the working group on infectious diseases of AIEOP.

  1. Oncology in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Eav, S; Schraub, S; Dufour, P; Taisant, D; Ra, C; Bunda, P

    2012-01-01

    Cambodia, a country of 14 million inhabitants, was devastated during the Khmer Rouge period and thereafter. The resources of treatment are rare: only one radiotherapy department, renovated in 2003, with an old cobalt machine; few surgeons trained to operate on cancer patients; no hematology; no facilities to use intensive chemotherapy; no nuclear medicine department and no palliative care unit. Cervical cancer incidence is one of the highest in the world, while in men liver cancer ranks first (20% of all male cancers). Cancers are seen at stage 3 or 4 for 70% of patients. There is no prevention program - only a vaccination program against hepatitis B for newborns - and no screening program for cervical cancer or breast cancer. In 2010, oncology, recognized as a full specialty, was created to train the future oncologists on site at the University of Phnom Penh. A new National Cancer Center will be built in 2013 with modern facilities for radiotherapy, medical oncology, hematology and nuclear medicine. Cooperation with foreign countries, especially France, and international organizations has been established and is ongoing. Progress is occurring slowly due to the shortage of money for Cambodian institutions and the lay public.

  2. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in adolescents: experiences in 378 adolescent NHL patients treated according to pediatric NHL-BFM protocols.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, B; Oschlies, I; Klapper, W; Zimmermann, M; Woessmann, W; Meinhardt, A; Landmann, E; Attarbaschi, A; Niggli, F; Schrappe, M; Reiter, A

    2011-01-01

    Age-related differences in the distribution, biology and treatment response of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adolescents remain to be elucidated. The current analyses present clinical parameters and outcomes of adolescents treated in pediatric NHL-BFM trials. Patients were stratified by histological subtype: lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL); mature B-NHL, including Burkitt's lymphoma/leukemia (BL/B-AL), diffuse B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL-CB) and mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMLBL); and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Between October 1986 and December 2007, 2915 patients were registered, including 378 (13%) adolescents (15-18 years) with BL/B-AL (n=101), ALCL (n=74), DLBCL-CB (n=55), T-LBL (n=45), PMLBL (n=24), pB-LBL (n=13) and rare or not-specified NHL subtypes (n=66). The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) was 79±2% for adolescents compared with 85±1% for patients aged <15 years (P=0.014). EFS was 83±7% for adolescents with T-LBL, 82±4% with BL/B-AL, 85±5% with DLBCL-CB, 57±10% with PMLBL and 70±6% with ALCL. According to sex, the 5-year EFS in females versus males, respectively, was 70±5 versus 83±2% overall (P=0.004), 57±17 versus 92±6% (P=0.0036) for T-LBL patients and 71±9 versus 97±3% (P=0.0067) for DLBCL-CB patients. Adolescents with NHL treated according to pediatric NHL-BFM protocols had an EFS of 79±2%, which is marginally inferior to that of children. In adolescents with T-LBL and DLBCL-CB, female sex was associated with a worse prognosis. PMID:21030984

  3. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, A

    2008-01-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe. PMID:21611002

  4. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse.

    PubMed

    Quinn, A

    2008-07-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe.

  5. Phase 1 Trial and Pharmacokinetic Study of the Farnesyl Transferase Inhibitor Tipifarnib in Children and Adolescents with Refractory Leukemias: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Widemann, Brigitte C.; Arceci, Robert J.; Jayaprakash, Nalini; Fox, Elizabeth; Zannikos, Peter; Goodspeed, Wendy; Goodwin, Anne; Wright, John J.; Blaney, Susan M.; Adamson, Peter C.; Balis, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The objectives of this trial were to define the toxicity profile, dose, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the farnesyl transferase (FTase) inhibitor, tipifarnib, in children and adolescents with hematological malignancies. Procedure Tipifarnib was administered twice daily for 21 days, repeated every 28 days starting at a dose of 300 mg/m2/dose. Pharmacokinetic sampling was performed for 36 hours after the first dose and leukemic blasts were collected pre-treatment and at steady state for determination of FTase activity. Results Of 29 patients enrolled, 18 were fully evaluable for toxicity, and 23 for response; 26 had pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic sampling. The recommended dose is 300 mg/m2/dose and toxicities included skin rash, mucositis, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Neurotoxicity, which was dose-limiting in adults at doses exceeding 600 mg/dose, was infrequent and mild. The plasma pharmacokinetics of tipifarnib were highly variable but comparable to adults with acute leukemia and children with solid tumors. The median apparent clearance of tipifarnib was 630 mL/min/m2 and the median half-life was 4.7 hours. At steady state on 300 mg/m2/dose, FTase activity was inhibited by 82% in leukemic blasts. No objective responses were observed. Conclusions Oral tipifarnib is well tolerated in children with leukemia on a twice daily for 21days schedule at 300 mg/m2/dose. PMID:20860038

  6. Adaptation and validation of the Urticaria Patient Daily Diary for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Susan D; Tschosik, Elizabeth A; Zazzali, James L

    2012-01-01

    The Urticaria Patient Daily Diary, including the Urticaria Activity Score, has recently been validated in adults with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), but its validity in adolescents is unknown. This study was designed to (1) assess the content validity of the Adolescent Urticaria Patient Daily Diary and, (2) collect exploratory data on symptom experiences, sleep interference, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of adolescents with CIU. The Urticaria Patient Daily Diary was modified to increase its relevance with an adolescent population. A qualitative, cross-sectional, multicenter study was then conducted in the United States so that adolescent subjects could provide information on the impact of urticaria on their lives and comment on the diary. Data were collected via in-person semistructured interviews with subjects 12-17 years of age with moderate-to-severe CIU. The most bothersome symptom was itching (44%). The impact of CIU on HRQOL varied. The majority of subjects (78%) reported waking up at least once a night. Overall, subjects found the diary to be clear, easy to comprehend, and easy to complete. Revisions were made to the diary based on feedback from subjects. After nine interviews, no new information was received. The symptoms of CIU are bothersome to adolescents, particularly itch, and urticaria has a negative impact on the sleep of adolescent patients. The final Adolescent Urticaria Patient Daily Diary has evidence of content validity in patients with CIU ranging from 12 to 17 years of age.

  7. Impact of portable air filtration units on exposure of haematology-oncology patients to airborne Aspergillus fumigatus spores under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Engelhart, S; Hanfland, J; Glasmacher, A; Krizek, L; Schmidt-Wolf, I G H; Exner, M

    2003-08-01

    We undertook a one-year study to investigate the impact of the NSA model 7100A/B portable air filtration unit on exposure of haematology-oncology patients to airborne Aspergillus fumigatus spores under field conditions. Weekly measurements for airborne A. fumigatus were conducted in indoor and outdoor air, and surveillance for invasive aspergillosis was based on a combination of ward liaison, targeted chart review and consultation with the medical staff. The mean indoor A. fumigatus counts (8.1 cfu/m3; range, <0.8 to 42 cfu/m3) reflected the fungal load of outdoor air (9.4 cfu/m3; range, <0.8 to 50 cfu/m3), and were reduced by only about one third in rooms with portable air filtration units (5.3 cfu/m3; range, <0.8 to 41 cfu/m3). During the study period, a total of five cases (incidence density, 0.8 per 1000 patient-days) of invasive aspergillosis (one proven case, four suspected cases; case fatality rate 40%) were recorded. None of these five patients was allocated to a room with portable air filtration unit, however, the difference between incidence densities in rooms with and without portable air filtration units was non-significant (Fisher's exact test, P=0.33). Due to the noise level and thermal discomfort, patient compliance with the air filtration units was poor. We conclude that under field conditions this air filtration unit cannot be recommended for prevention of invasive aspergillosis in neutropenic haematology-oncology patients.

  8. [Adolescents with cancer: the "Youth Project" at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Andrea; Veneroni, Laura; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Spreafico, Filippo; Terenziani, Monica; Massimino, Maura; Luksch, Roberto; Casanova, Michela; Meazza, Cristina; Polastri, Daniela; Gandola, Lorenza

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents with cancer are a particular group of patients who are less likely to gain access to optimal cancer services at comprehensive cancer Centers: many studies suggest adolescents fare less well than children with the same disease. The paper describes the key issues of the "Youth Project" of the Pediatric Oncology Unit IRCCS Fondazione Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, dedicated to adolescents (over 15 years old) and young adults (up to 25 years old) with solid tumors. This project is a possible clinical and organizational model to address the unique needs of patients in this age group and for bridge the gap in access to care and in recruitment in clinical trials, in clinical and psycho-social management and in curves of healing. The paper also describes the activity of the Adolescent Commission established by the Italian Pediatric Hematology Oncology (AIEOP).

  9. [Genomics medicine and oncology].

    PubMed

    Michielin, Olivier; Coukos, George

    2014-05-01

    Progress in genomics with, in particular, high throughput next generation sequencing is revolutionizing oncology. The impact of these techniques is seen on the one hand the identification of germline mutations that predispose to a given type of cancer, allowing for a personalized care of patients or healthy carriers and, on the other hand, the characterization of all acquired somatic mutation of the tumor cell, opening the door to personalized treatment targeting the driver oncogenes. In both cases, next generation sequencing techniques allow a global approach whereby the integrality of the genome mutations is analyzed and correlated with the clinical data. The benefits on the quality of care delivered to our patients are extremely impressive. PMID:24800772

  10. Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists' Practices in Assisting Their Adolescent Patients Who Smoke to Quit Smoking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.; Sidani, Jaime E.; Price, Joy A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This national study examined the practices and perceptions of smoking cessation activities among child and adolescent psychiatrists. Method: A random sample of child and adolescent psychiatrists was identified from the membership list of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and was mailed a valid and reliable 34-item…

  11. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology.

  12. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  13. Nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine as first-line palliative chemotherapy in a patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2

    PubMed Central

    MARTÍN, ANDRÉS J. MUÑOZ; ALFONSO, PILAR GARCÍA; RUPÉREZ, ANA B.; JIMÉNEZ, MIGUEL MARTÍN

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer (PC) has been associated with a considerably poor prognosis. Due to its toxicity, first-line combination chemotherapy is limited to patients with a good performance status (PS). Previously nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine has been demonstrated to improve the overall survival rate in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer with a good PS. The present study reports a case of a patient with metastatic PC with a poor PS (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 2) and a complex set of comorbidities treated with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine as a first-line palliative therapy. Adjusted doses of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine reached a favourable clinical, radiological and biochemical response in the present patient, which increased the quality of life for the patient. Eventually, the patient succumbed to acute cholangitis. Based on the results of the present study, nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine appears to be a favourable treatment as first-line palliative chemotherapy for patients with metastatic PC, comorbidities and poor PS. PMID:27347207

  14. The National Oncology Working Group (NOW) initiative: payer and provider collaborations in oncology benefits management.

    PubMed

    Soper, Aileen M; Reeder, C E; Brown, Loreen M; Stojanovska, Ana; Lennert, Barbara J

    2010-04-01

    Payers recognize the need to expand benefits management for oncology but struggle to find effective solutions amid the complexity of available therapies and skepticism from oncologists, who are facing their own set of economic pressures. An effort called the National Oncology Working Group (NOW) Initiative is trying to change the sometimes adversarial relationship between payers and oncologists through a collaborative model. The group, which is supported by pharmaceutical manufacturer sanofi-aventis, is developing patient-centered strategies for successful and sustainable oncology benefits management. The focus includes finding consensus between payers and providers and devising solutions for oncology management such as decreasing variability of cancer care and improving end-of-life care for patients with terminal illness. NOW is designing tools that will be tested in small-scale regional demonstration projects, which NOW participants anticipate will set an example for successful oncology benefits management that can be replicated and expanded.

  15. Social Support as Predictor of Psychopathology in the Adolescent Offspring of Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoefnagels, Cees; Meesters, Cor; Simenon, Joke

    2007-01-01

    The potential role of social support for the adolescent offspring of psychiatric patients has hitherto not been examined. We examined whether the adolescent's level of psychiatric symptoms is dependent on the content and the function of social support (whether direct or moderating), controlling for perceived stress. In a cross-sectional design, 40…

  16. Stainless steel crown bridge replacing permanent molar in the adolescent patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dimri, M; Jain, A

    2001-06-01

    The loss of a permanent molar in young adolescent patient creates a need for early space maintenance and restoration of function. To establish function and esthetics short-term treatments include interim restorative approaches. This paper describes a functional, cost-effective stainless steel crown bridge as an interim restoration after the loss of permanent first molar in an early adolescent dentition.

  17. The correlation between impaired attention and emotional reactivity in depressed adolescent patients.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Yuval; Aviram, Shai; Faibel, Nurit; Govezensky, Jose; Braw, Yoram; Rabany, Liron; Walter, Garry

    2013-01-01

    A group of 20 drug-naïve depressed adolescents and 20 matched controls underwent cognitive evaluations and assessment of emotional reactivity. Emotional reactivity correlated only with attention and only in depressed patients. The cognitive-emotional construct may enhance the understanding of adolescent depression and aid diagnosis. PMID:24026716

  18. Utilisation of a thoracic oncology database to capture radiological and pathological images for evaluation of response to chemotherapy in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Carey, George B; Kazantsev, Stephanie; Surati, Mosmi; Rolle, Cleo E; Kanteti, Archana; Sadiq, Ahad; Bahroos, Neil; Raumann, Brigitte; Madduri, Ravi; Dave, Paul; Starkey, Adam; Hensing, Thomas; Husain, Aliya N; Vokes, Everett E; Vigneswaran, Wickii; Armato, Samuel G; Kindler, Hedy L; Salgia, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Objective An area of need in cancer informatics is the ability to store images in a comprehensive database as part of translational cancer research. To meet this need, we have implemented a novel tandem database infrastructure that facilitates image storage and utilisation. Background We had previously implemented the Thoracic Oncology Program Database Project (TOPDP) database for our translational cancer research needs. While useful for many research endeavours, it is unable to store images, hence our need to implement an imaging database which could communicate easily with the TOPDP database. Methods The Thoracic Oncology Research Program (TORP) imaging database was designed using the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) platform, which was developed by Vanderbilt University. To demonstrate proof of principle and evaluate utility, we performed a retrospective investigation into tumour response for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) patients treated at the University of Chicago Medical Center with either of two analogous chemotherapy regimens and consented to at least one of two UCMC IRB protocols, 9571 and 13473A. Results A cohort of 22 MPM patients was identified using clinical data in the TOPDP database. After measurements were acquired, two representative CT images and 0–35 histological images per patient were successfully stored in the TORP database, along with clinical and demographic data. Discussion We implemented the TORP imaging database to be used in conjunction with our comprehensive TOPDP database. While it requires an additional effort to use two databases, our database infrastructure facilitates more comprehensive translational research. Conclusions The investigation described herein demonstrates the successful implementation of this novel tandem imaging database infrastructure, as well as the potential utility of investigations enabled by it. The data model presented here can be utilised as the basis for further development of other larger

  19. [The national union for private hospital oncology].

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Gérard

    2013-06-01

    In the French health system, social security is the same for both public and private hospitals regardless of their status. In terms of number of patients screened, diagnosed, or treated, independant medicine is the most important sector in the French oncology. The multitude of organizations representing private hospitals or independant oncologists, physicians, radiologists or pathologists have a common organization, the National Union for Private Hospital Oncology (UNHPC). It bases its action on two founding postulates to ensure the quality of the oncology practice : the medical and managerial cultures are complementary and should be articulated ; the quality of organizations is as important as professional competence.

  20. Male adolescent fertility preservation.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jared L; Choi, Andrew Wonho; Fitzgerald Keeter, Mary Kate; Brannigan, Robert E

    2016-02-01

    Until the 1960s, few adolescents and young adults (AYAs) survived their initial cancer diagnoses. Now, ∼12,400 AYA patients are diagnosed with cancer each year, and almost 80% will now achieve a long-term cure. This dramatic improvement in survival is primarily due to multimodal treatments and combined chemotherapeutic regimens. Unfortunately, the increase in survival is often accompanied by treatment-related toxicities due to chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgical procedures. Despite guidelines published by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and numerous other professional organizations, high percentages of male AYA oncology patients are not properly counseled regarding their fertility preservation options before cancer treatment. Although administering fertility preservation care to adolescent males can be challenging in many ways, numerous studies show that this care can be delivered with high degrees of success and high levels of patient and parent satisfaction. The key to this success at many institutions has been the implementation of formalized integrated fertility preservation programs with infrastructure geared toward the delivery of comprehensive expedited care.

  1. Barriers to optimal care between physicians and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning adolescent patients.

    PubMed

    Kitts, Robert Li

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article was to identify barriers to optimal care between physicians and LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning) adolescents. To this end, 464 anonymous, self-administered surveys were distributed in 2003 to residents and attending physicians in pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics-gynecology, psychiatry, emergency medicine, and family practice at Upstate Medical University. The survey included questions pertaining to practice, knowledge, and attitude pertaining to lesbian, gay, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) adolescents. One hundred eight four surveys were returned. The majority of physicians would not regularly discuss sexual orientation, sexual attraction, or gender identity while taking a sexual history from a sexually active adolescent. As well, the majority of physicians would not ask patients about sexual orientation if an adolescent presented with depression, suicidal thoughts, or had attempted suicide. If an adolescent stated that he or she was not sexually active, 41% of physicians reported that they would not ask additional sexual health-related questions. Only 57% agreed to an association between being a LGBTQ adolescent and suicide. The majority of physicians did not believe that they had all the skills they needed to address issues of sexual orientation with adolescents, and that sexual orientation should be addressed more often with these patients and in the course of training. This study concludes that barriers in providing optimal care for LGBTQ adolescents can be found with regard to practice, knowledge, and attitude regardless of medical field and other demographics collected. Opportunities exist to enhance care for LGBTQ adolescents.

  2. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention.

    PubMed

    Gröber, Uwe; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F; Adamietz, Irenäus A

    2016-03-01

    Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%-90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better-with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations-when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient's medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual's background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician. PMID:26985904

  3. [History of Oncology in Slovakia].

    PubMed

    Ondruš, D; Kaušitz, J

    2016-01-01

    The history of oncology in Slovakia is closely linked to the history of St. Elizabeth Hospital, which was set up in the mid-18th century by nuns of the St. Elizabeth Order in Bratislava. In the first half of the 20th century, a unit was set up in the hospital dedicated to diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Shortly after World War II, the unit was turned into the Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment. In 1950, St. Elizabeth Hospital was nationalized, and the Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Science and the Institute of Clinical Oncology were located there as centers for oncological diagnosis and treatment. After the restitution of church property in the early 1990s, the hospital was returned to the Order of St. Elizabeth, which set up the St. Elisabeth Cancer Institute in the hospital premises in January of 1996. This year marks the 20th anniversary of this institute in its new premises and the 85th anniversary of the Institute of Radiumtherapy founded in Bratislava, and thus the establishment of institutional healthcare for cancer patients in Slovakia is the reason for balancing. We present a view of the consecutive changes in the organization, space and staff of the Institute and evaluate the impact of celebrities on medicine who developed oncology as a clinical, scientific and educational discipline in Bratislava and in other cities and regions of Slovakia. PMID:27296401

  4. [History of Oncology in Slovakia].

    PubMed

    Ondruš, D; Kaušitz, J

    2016-01-01

    The history of oncology in Slovakia is closely linked to the history of St. Elizabeth Hospital, which was set up in the mid-18th century by nuns of the St. Elizabeth Order in Bratislava. In the first half of the 20th century, a unit was set up in the hospital dedicated to diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Shortly after World War II, the unit was turned into the Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment. In 1950, St. Elizabeth Hospital was nationalized, and the Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Science and the Institute of Clinical Oncology were located there as centers for oncological diagnosis and treatment. After the restitution of church property in the early 1990s, the hospital was returned to the Order of St. Elizabeth, which set up the St. Elisabeth Cancer Institute in the hospital premises in January of 1996. This year marks the 20th anniversary of this institute in its new premises and the 85th anniversary of the Institute of Radiumtherapy founded in Bratislava, and thus the establishment of institutional healthcare for cancer patients in Slovakia is the reason for balancing. We present a view of the consecutive changes in the organization, space and staff of the Institute and evaluate the impact of celebrities on medicine who developed oncology as a clinical, scientific and educational discipline in Bratislava and in other cities and regions of Slovakia.

  5. Simulated-patient-based programs for teaching communication with adolescents: the link between guidelines and practice.

    PubMed

    Hardoff, D; Benita, S; Ziv, A

    2008-03-01

    Adolescents frequently tend not to share personal issues with their health care providers, thus communication with the adolescent patient and frequently also with his or her parents requires unique skills on behalf of the physician. Guidelines for obtaining information regarding adolescents' risk behaviors and other psychosocial issues that have been developed, do not provide the necessary tools for optimal communication with adolescents. Communication skills are best obtained in role-play models where either colleagues or actors simulate the patients' roles. Simulation-based medical education offers a safe and "mistake forgiving" environment that enables consideration of the trainees' needs, without the use of real patients that is associated with traditional bedside teaching. Training programs to improve physicians' communication skills with adolescents have been developed at the Israel Center for Medical Simulation (MSR). Between 2003 and 2007, 470 physicians were trained at MSR in 40 one-day courses. These courses dealt with common adolescent health issues that require unique communication skills on behalf of the clinician, utilizing the simulated-patient-based programs. At each training day up to 12 physicians were exposed to 8 typical adolescent health related scenarios simulated by professional actors in rooms equipped with video facilities and one-way mirrors. Following the encounters with the simulated patients, the different scenarios were discussed in debriefing group sessions with experienced facilitators utilizing the encounters' video recording. Feedbacks from participants in the programs were excellent, emphasizing the need to include simulation-based programs in physicians' training curricula.

  6. Simulated-patient-based programs for teaching communication with adolescents: the link between guidelines and practice.

    PubMed

    Hardoff, D; Benita, S; Ziv, A

    2008-03-01

    Adolescents frequently tend not to share personal issues with their health care providers, thus communication with the adolescent patient and frequently also with his or her parents requires unique skills on behalf of the physician. Guidelines for obtaining information regarding adolescents' risk behaviors and other psychosocial issues that have been developed, do not provide the necessary tools for optimal communication with adolescents. Communication skills are best obtained in role-play models where either colleagues or actors simulate the patients' roles. Simulation-based medical education offers a safe and "mistake forgiving" environment that enables consideration of the trainees' needs, without the use of real patients that is associated with traditional bedside teaching. Training programs to improve physicians' communication skills with adolescents have been developed at the Israel Center for Medical Simulation (MSR). Between 2003 and 2007, 470 physicians were trained at MSR in 40 one-day courses. These courses dealt with common adolescent health issues that require unique communication skills on behalf of the clinician, utilizing the simulated-patient-based programs. At each training day up to 12 physicians were exposed to 8 typical adolescent health related scenarios simulated by professional actors in rooms equipped with video facilities and one-way mirrors. Following the encounters with the simulated patients, the different scenarios were discussed in debriefing group sessions with experienced facilitators utilizing the encounters' video recording. Feedbacks from participants in the programs were excellent, emphasizing the need to include simulation-based programs in physicians' training curricula. PMID:18403816

  7. Preliminary Evidence of an Association Between a Functional IL6 Polymorphism and Fatigue and Sleep Disturbance in Oncology Patients and Their Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Miaskowski, Christine; Dodd, Marylin; Lee, Kathryn; West, Claudia; Paul, Steven M.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Wara, William; Swift, Patrick S.; Dunn, Laura B.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2010-01-01

    Context Fatigue and sleep disturbance are common problems in oncology patients and their family caregivers (FCs). However, little is known about factors that contribute to inter-individual variability in these symptoms or to their underlying biologic mechanisms. Objectives An evaluation was done on whether genetic variation in a prominent pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6 c.-6101A>T (rs4719714)) was associated with mean ratings of evening fatigue, morning fatigue, and sleep disturbance, as well as with the trajectories of these symptoms. Methods Over six months, participants completed standardized measures of fatigue and sleep disturbance. Linear regression was used to assess the effect of the IL6 genotype and other covariates on mean fatigue and sleep disturbance scores. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the effect of IL6 genotype on symptom trajectories. Common allele homozygotes reported higher levels of evening fatigue (P=0.003), morning fatigue (P=0.09), and sleep disturbance (P=0.003) than minor allele carriers. Predictors of baseline level and trajectories of evening fatigue included age, gender, and genotype (intercepts) and baseline level of evening fatigue (slope), respectively. Predictors of baseline level and trajectories of morning fatigue included age and genotype (intercept) and age and baseline level of morning fatigue (slope). Predictors of baseline level and trajectories of sleep disturbance included age and genotype (intercept) and baseline level of sleep disturbance (slope). Conclusions Findings provide preliminary evidence of a genetic association between a functional promoter polymorphism in the IL6 gene and severity of evening fatigue, morning fatigue, and sleep disturbance in oncology patients and their FCs. PMID:20570482

  8. Effect of Remote Ischaemic Conditioning in Oncology Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy: Rationale and Design of the ERIC‐ONC Study—A Single‐Center, Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Robin; Maulik, Angshuman; Hamarneh, Ashraf; Hochhauser, Daniel; Hausenloy, Derek J.; Walker, J. Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer survival continues to improve, and thus cardiovascular consequences of chemotherapy are increasingly important determinants of long‐term morbidity and mortality. Conventional strategies to protect the heart from chemotherapy have important hemodynamic or myelosuppressive side effects. Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) using intermittent limb ischemia‐reperfusion reduces myocardial injury in the setting of percutaneous coronary intervention. Anthracycline cardiotoxicity and ischemia‐reperfusion injury share common biochemical pathways in cardiomyocytes. The potential for RIC as a novel treatment to reduce subclinical myocyte injury in chemotherapy has never been explored and will be investigated in the Effect of Remote Ischaemic Conditioning in Oncology (ERIC‐ONC) trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT 02471885). The ERIC‐ONC trial is a single‐center, blinded, randomized, sham‐controlled study. We aim to recruit 128 adult oncology patients undergoing anthracycline‐based chemotherapy treatment, randomized in a 1:1 ratio into 2 groups: (1) sham procedure or (2) RIC, comprising 4, 5‐minute cycles of upper arm blood pressure cuff inflations and deflations, immediately before each cycle of chemotherapy. The primary outcome measure, defining cardiac injury, will be high‐sensitivity troponin‐T over 6 cycles of chemotherapy and 12 months follow‐up. Secondary outcome measures will include clinical, electrical, structural, and biochemical endpoints comprising major adverse cardiovascular clinical events, incidence of cardiac arrhythmia over 14 days at cycle 5/6, echocardiographic ventricular function, N‐terminal pro‐brain natriuretic peptide levels at 3 months follow‐up, and changes in mitochondrial DNA, micro‐RNA, and proteomics after chemotherapy. The ERIC‐ONC trial will determine the efficacy of RIC as a novel, noninvasive, nonpharmacological, low‐cost cardioprotectant in cancer patients undergoing anthracycline

  9. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F.; Adamietz, Irenäus A.

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%–90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better—with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations—when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient’s medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual’s background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician. PMID:26985904

  10. Complementary and alternative medicine research initiatives in the Children's Oncology Group and the role of the pediatric oncology nurse.

    PubMed

    Hawks, Ria

    2006-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has emerged as a new area of investigation in cancer research and treatment. CAM modalities are widely used, but little is known about their efficacy. The Children's Oncology Group has made a major commitment to CAM research in childhood and adolescent cancer, beginning with studies of CAM in the area of supportive care. Pediatric oncology nurses, as implementing clinicians and collaborating researchers, are critical to the success of these studies.

  11. A Unique Patient Population? Health-Related Quality of Life in Adolescent Athletes Versus General, Healthy Adolescent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kenneth C.; Valier, Alison R. Snyder; Bay, R. Curtis; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich

    2013-01-01

    Context: Normative scores for patient-rated outcome (PRO) instruments are important for providing patient-centered, whole-person care and making informed clinical decisions. Although normative values for the Pediatric Quality of Life Generic Core Scale (PedsQL) have been established in the general, healthy adolescent population, whether adolescent athletes demonstrate similar values is unclear. Objective: To compare PedsQL scores between adolescent athletes and general, healthy adolescent individuals. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Secondary schools. Patients or Other Participants: A convenience sample of 2659 interscholastic athletes (males = 2059, females = 600, age = 15.7 ± 1.1 years) represented the athlete group (ATH), and a previously published normative dataset represented the general, healthy adolescent group (GEN). Intervention(s): All participants completed the PedsQL during 1 testing session. Main Outcome Measure(s): The PedsQL consists of 2 summary scores (total, psychosocial) and 4 subscale scores (physical, emotional, social, school), with higher scores indicating better health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Groups were stratified by age (14, 15, or 16 years old). Independent-samples t tests were conducted to compare between-groups and sex differences. Results: The ATH group scored higher than the GEN group across all ages for total and psychosocial summary scores and for emotional and social functioning subscale scores (P ≤ .005). For physical functioning, scores of the 15-year-old ATH were higher than for their GEN counterparts (P = .001). Both 14- and 15-year-old ATH scored higher than their GEN counterparts for the school functioning subscale (P ≤ .013), but differences between 16-year olds were not significant (P = .228). Male adolescent athletes reported higher scores than female adolescent athletes across all scores (P ≤ .001) except for social functioning (P = .229). Conclusions: Adolescent athletes reported better HRQOL than

  12. Phase II trial of fluorouracil and recombinant interferon alfa-2a in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Wadler, S; Lembersky, B; Atkins, M; Kirkwood, J; Petrelli, N

    1991-10-01

    In a pilot clinical trial, treatment of patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma with the combination of fluorouracil (5FU) and recombinant interferon alfa-2a (IFN) resulted in objective tumor regression in 62% of patients. To confirm these findings in a multiinstitutional setting, a phase II clinical trial was initiated by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) in 1989. The treatment regimen was identical to that used in the earlier study: 5FU 750 mg/m2/d for 5 days as a continuous infusion followed by weekly outpatient bolus therapy and IFN 9MU subcutaneously beginning day 1 and administered three times per week. Doses were modified for gastrointestinal, hematologic, and neurologic toxicity and for fatigue, similarly to those used in the previous pilot trial. Thirty-eight patients were registered; 36 are evaluable for response (one lost to follow-up and one with nonmeasurable disease). All patients had metastatic or locally recurrent disease beyond the scope of resection; 31 of 38 had liver metastases, and 20 of 38 had two or more sites of involvement. Eight patients had grade 4 toxicities, including sepsis (nonneutropenic) (one), watery diarrhea (two), and granulocytopenia (six). Grade 3 neurologic toxicities were observed in two (5%) patients and included slurred speech and gait disturbance. Objective response was 42% (95% confidence interval [Cl], 27% to 58%), including one clinical complete responder and 14 partial responders. Among the responding patients, the median time to treatment failure was 8 months. Two patients remain on treatment at 10+ and 16+ months: median survival has not been reached. The results of this multiinstitutional trial suggest that the addition of IFN to 5FU enhances the objective response rates achieved in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma and that the toxicities of this regimen are acceptable. PMID:1919631

  13. A Model for Rural Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Heifetz, Laurence J.; Christensen, Scott D.; deVere-White, Ralph W.; Meyers, Fredrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Small rural hospitals in the United States have had challenging issues developing sustainable oncology programs. This is a report on the development of a successful rural oncology program. In 2006, the Tahoe Forest Health System in Truckee, CA, a remote mountain resort town, started a cancer program that was focused on addressing patient and family fears that are common to all cancer patients but more frightening in the rural setting. Four years later, it is a thriving program with significant community support, a creative academic affiliation, and a central focus of the future of the hospital. The Tahoe Forest Cancer Center developed a sustainable model for high quality cancer care that overcomes geographic, cultural and financial barriers. This structure may serve as a model for national rural health care. PMID:21886498

  14. Cognitive Function in Adolescent Patients with Anorexia Nervosa and Unipolar Affective Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sarrar, Lea; Holzhausen, Martin; Warschburger, Petra; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Schneider, Nora

    2016-05-01

    Studies have shown impairments in cognitive function among adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and affective disorders (AD). The association between cognitive dysfunctions, AN and AD as well as the specificity for these psychiatric diagnoses remains unclear. Therefore, we examined cognitive flexibility and processing speed in 47 female adolescent patients with AN, 21 female adolescent patients with unipolar affective disorders and 48 female healthy adolescents. All participants completed a neuropsychological test battery. There were no significant group differences regarding cognitive function, except for psychomotor processing speed with poorer performance in patients with AN. A further analysis revealed that all groups performed with the normal range, although patients with AN were over represented in the poorest performing quartile. We found no severe cognitive impairments in either patient group. Nevertheless, belonging to the AN group contributed significantly to poor performances in neuropsychological tasks. Therefore, we conclude that the risk for cognitive impairments is slightly higher for patients with AN.

  15. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Brawley, Otis W.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Thomas, Charles R.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  16. Gender, Race, and Survival: A Study in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases Patients Utilizing the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Chao, Samuel T.; Rice, Thomas W.; Adelstein, David J.; Barnett, Gene H.; Mekhail, Tarek M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To explore whether gender and race influence survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with brain metastases, using our large single-institution brain tumor database and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) brain metastases classification. Methods and materials: A retrospective review of a single-institution brain metastasis database for the interval January 1982 to September 2004 yielded 835 NSCLC patients with brain metastases for analysis. Patient subsets based on combinations of gender, race, and RPA class were then analyzed for survival differences. Results: Median follow-up was 5.4 months (range, 0-122.9 months). There were 485 male patients (M) (58.4%) and 346 female patients (F) (41.6%). Of the 828 evaluable patients (99%), 143 (17%) were black/African American (B) and 685 (83%) were white/Caucasian (W). Median survival time (MST) from time of brain metastasis diagnosis for all patients was 5.8 months. Median survival time by gender (F vs. M) and race (W vs. B) was 6.3 months vs. 5.5 months (p = 0.013) and 6.0 months vs. 5.2 months (p = 0.08), respectively. For patients stratified by RPA class, gender, and race, MST significantly favored BFs over BMs in Class II: 11.2 months vs. 4.6 months (p = 0.021). On multivariable analysis, significant variables were gender (p = 0.041, relative risk [RR] 0.83) and RPA class (p < 0.0001, RR 0.28 for I vs. III; p < 0.0001, RR 0.51 for II vs. III) but not race. Conclusions: Gender significantly influences NSCLC brain metastasis survival. Race trended to significance in overall survival but was not significant on multivariable analysis. Multivariable analysis identified gender and RPA classification as significant variables with respect to survival.

  17. Integrative oncology in North America.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-01-01

    Integrative oncology is an evolving evidence-based specialty that uses complementary therapies in concert with medical treatment to enhance its efficacy, improve symptom control, alleviate patient distress and reduce suffering. In North America the evolution of research into complementary therapies was delayed by the narrow focus of the Flexner Report. A government-funded research agenda and incorporation of complementary therapies into medical school curricula have been driven by early evidence of efficacy and patient demand. Integrative oncology focuses on the role of natural health products (botanicals, vitamins, and minerals), nutrition, acupuncture, meditation and other mind-body approaches, music therapy, touch therapies, fitness therapies, and more. Some natural health products, such as herbs and their constituent phytochemicals, may be biologic response modifiers that could increase cancer control. Current research stretches from the laboratory to health services. Institutions are exploring the effectiveness gap in their clinical services and are determining efficacy of complementary therapies through randomized controlled trials. Eventually, the goal is to establish practice guidelines through determining relative effectiveness and value through cost-utility studies. The aim of integrative oncology should be one medicine, not alternative; it should be patient-focused; it should be evidence-based; and it should provide the best care for cancer cure, prevention, symptom control, and quality of life.

  18. Nuclear medicine in oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1996-12-31

    Radioactivity was discovered in the late 1890s, and as early as 1903, Alexander Graham Bell advocated that radioactivity be used to treat tumors. In 1913, the first paper describing therapeutic uses of radium was published; in 1936, {sup 24}Na was administered as a therapy to a leukemia patient. Three years later, uptake of {sup 89}Sr was noted in bone metastases. During the 1940s, there was increasing use of iodine therapy for thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Diagnostic {open_quotes}imaging{close_quotes} with radioisotopes was increasingly employed in the 1930s and 40s using probes and grew in importance and utility with the development of scintillation detectors with photorecording systems. Although coincidence counting to detect positron emissions was developed in 1953, the first medical center cyclotron was not installed until 1961. The 1960s saw the development of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, emission reconstruction tomography [giving rise to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)], and {sup 64}Ga tumor imaging. Nuclear medicine was recognized as a medical specialty in 1971. Radiolabeled antibodies targeting human tumors in animals was reported in 1973; antibody tumor imaging in humans was reported in 1978. Technology has continued to advance, including the development of SPECT cameras with coincidence detection able to perform FDG/PET imaging. With this overview as as backdrop, this paper focuses on the role of nuclear medicine in oncology from three perspectives: nonspecific tumor imaging agents, specific tumor imaging agents, and radioisotopes for tumor therapy. In summary, while tumor diagnosis and treatment were among the first uses explored for radioactivity, these areas have yet to reach their full potential. Development of new radioisotopes and new radiopharmaceuticals, coupled with improvements in technology, make nuclear oncology an area of growth for nuclear medicine.

  19. [The second opinion in oncology].

    PubMed

    Cifaldi, Luciano; Felicetti, Viviana; Cristina, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The medical second opinion (MSO) means the process through which it is possible to consult any available medical institution or a single physician, to compare, confirm and/or review a first diagnosis and/or a proposed treatment. The MSO is of the utmost importance when patients are suffering serious and disabling diseases or when risking their lives. Oncology is a really complex discipline in which, daily, doctors and patients have to deal with new clinical, managerial and sociological problems. Most patients are now better informed-often having gathered information from the Web, newspapers, magazines.This information is often very mixed and confusing and the number of MSO is increasing.

  20. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. II. The case of T2N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Frata, Paolo; Cellai, Enrico; Magrini, Stefano M. . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; Tonoli, Sandro; Buglione, Michela; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second-tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T2 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 256 T2 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Cumulative probability of local control (LC), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups by both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage were evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late-damage incidence and second-tumor cumulative probability (STP) were also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year OS rates were, respectively, 73%, 59%, and 37%. Corresponding values for cumulative LC probability were 73%, 73%, and 70% and for DSS, 89%, 86%, and 85%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Seventy-three percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were larger tumor extent and impaired cord mobility. At multivariate analysis, the same factors retained statistical significance. Twenty-year STP was 23%, with second-tumor deaths less frequent than larynx cancer deaths (20 of 256 vs. 30 of 256). Incidence of late damage was higher in the first decade of accrual (22%) than in the last decade (10%, p = 0.03); the same was true for severe late damage (9% vs. 1.8%). Conclusion: Present-day radical radiotherapy can be considered a standard treatment for T2 glottic cancer. Better results are obtained in patients with less extended disease. Late damage is relatively

  1. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. I. The case of T1N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cellai, Enrico; Frata, Paolo; Magrini, Stefano M. . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; De Stefani, Agostina; Buglione, Michela; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T1 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 831 T1 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia-Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Actuarial cumulative local control probability (LC), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates have been calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups with both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage have been evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late damage incidence and second tumor cumulative probability (STP) have been also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-, 5-, and 10-year OS was equal to 86%, 77%, and 57%, respectively. Corresponding values for LC were 86%, 84%, and 83% and for DSS 96%, 95%, and 93%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Eighty-seven percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were: male gender, earlier treatment period, larger tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and the use of Cobalt 60. At multivariate analysis, only gender, tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and beam type retained statistical significance. Higher total doses and larger field sizes are significantly related (logistic regression) with a higher late damage incidence. Scatterplot analysis of various combinations of field dimensions and total dose showed that field dimensions >35 and <49 cm{sup 2}, together with doses of >65 Gy, offer the best local control results together with an acceptably low late damage incidence

  2. Traumeel S in preventing and treating mucositis in young patients undergoing SCT: a report of the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Sencer, SF; Zhou, T; Freedman, LS; Ives, JA; Chen, Z; Wall, D; Nieder, ML; Grupp, SA; Yu, LC; Sahdev, I; Jonas, WB; Wallace, JD; Oberbaum, M

    2012-01-01

    Mucositis can be a serious complication of hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). A previous phase II trial in 32 children undergoing HSCT reported a beneficial effect of the homeopathic remedy Traumeel S. The Children’s Oncology Group sought to replicate the results in a multi-institutional trial. The study was an international multi-center, double-blind, randomized trial comparing Traumeel with placebo in patients aged 3–25 years undergoing myeloablative HSCT. Traumeel/placebo was started on Day −1 as a five-time daily mouth rinse. Efficacy of the treatment was assessed using the modified Walsh scale for mucositis, scored daily from Day −1 to 20 days after HCST. The main outcome was the sum of Walsh scale scores (area-under-the-curve (AUC)) over this period. Other outcomes included narcotic use, days of total parenteral feeding, days of nasogastric feeding and adverse events. In 181 evaluable patients, there was no statistical difference in mucositis (AUC) in the Traumeel group (76.7) compared with placebo (67.3) (P = 0.13). There was a trend towards less narcotic usage in the Traumeel patients. No statistically beneficial effect from Traumeel was demonstrated for mucositis. We could not confirm that Traumeel is an effective treatment for mucositis in children undergoing HSCT. PMID:22504933

  3. Space maintainer for the loss of a permanent molar in the adolescent patient: report of case.

    PubMed

    Lindemeyer, R G; Glavich, G G

    1996-01-01

    An adolescent patient who loses a permanent first molar presents a clinical challenge for the practitioner. The ideal space maintainer should not only maintain the edentulous space, but it should also maintain inter-arch integrity. An esthetic, inexpensive unilateral space maintainer has been designed for the replacement of a permanent first molar in an adolescent patient. The appliance has demonstrated high patient satisfaction, as well as, a good clinical result. This appliance is designed to remain in place until the patient is old enough to receive an implant or a more permanent prosthetic replacement.

  4. Timing of Salvage Hormonal Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients With Unfavorable Prognosis Treated With Radiotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31

    SciTech Connect

    Souhami, Luis; Bae, Kyounghwa; Pilepich, Miljenko; Sandler, Howard

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31 was a randomized trial comparing radiotherapy (RT) alone vs. RT plus adjuvant androgen suppression for life in unfavorable-prognosis carcinoma of the prostate. We examined the impact of early initiation of salvage hormonal therapy (HT) in relapsing patients randomized to RT alone arm. Methods and Materials: Patients were divided into two groups: early salvage HT and late salvage HT. The early salvage group was defined as receiving HT with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of less than 10 ng/mL, and the late salvage HT group had a PSA level of 10 ng/mL or greater. The outcomes were overall survival (OS), cause-specific mortality (CSM), and local failure (LF). The Kaplan-Meier estimation and log-rank test were used for OS, and the cumulative incidence estimation and Gray's test were used for CSM and LF. Proportional hazards regression models were used to compare the outcomes adjusted for other covariates. Results: The median follow-up times of surviving patients in the early and late salvage HT groups were about 11 and 13 years, respectively. The late salvage HT group had significantly more post-prostatectomy patients and patients with high Gleason scores. After adjustment for all covariates, OS was significantly longer in the early salvage HT group (hazard ratio, 1.5; p = 0.01). However, there were no statistically significant differences in LF or CSM between the groups. Conclusions: The early introduction of salvage HT resulted in improved OS but not improved CSM and LF. A randomized trial to define the optimal salvage hormonal timing is warranted in this group of patients with PSA recurrence after RT.

  5. Clinical evaluation with 18 months follow-up of new PTTM enhanced dental implants in maxillo-facial post-oncological patients

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Piero; Jamshir, Sara; Brauner, Edoardo; Di Carlo, Stefano; Ceci, Antonio; Piccoli, Luca; Pompa, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of this study is to present 18 months follow-up results of porous tantalum trabecular metal-enhanced titanium dental implant (PTTM) in implant supported prosthesis in post-oncological patients. Materials and methods A total of 25 PTTM implants were placed in each jaw of 6 patients that met specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Resonance Frequency Analysis (RFA) was conducted and Implant stability was recorded in ISQ values (Osstell ISQ, Osstell AB, Goteborg, Sweden) at implant placement and after 2,4,6,12 and 18 months of functional loading. Mean bone loss was also evaluated at the same interval of time on each periapical radiographs, bone levels were calculated by measuring the distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone to implant contact. Results Cumulative implant survival rate is 100% (n=25/25) to date and mean ISQ values recorded were: 72.14±5.61 (range= 50–81) at surgery, 64.39±8.12 (range=44–74) after 2 months, 74.26±7.14 (range=44–74) after 4 months, 76.84±7.65 (range=60–83) after 6 months, 78.13±4.14 (range=64–84) after 12 months and 80.22±6.23 (range=68–89) after 18 months of functional loading. Mean crestal marginal bone loss was 0.19±0.25 mm after 2 months of functional loading on periapical radiographs, 0.22±0.4 mm at 4 months, 0.3±0.46 mm at 6 months, 0.57±0.62 at 1 year and 0.64±0.60 mm after 18 months. Conclusions The results of this study, even if limited by the number of implants placed indicate that PTTM dental implants have a clinical efficacy in prosthetic rehabilitation of post-oncological patients, due to trabecular structure of the porous Ta metal that increases bone-implant connection values. PMID:25774249

  6. Healthcare Providers’ Beliefs and Attitudes About Electronic Cigarettes and Preventive Counseling for Adolescent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pepper, Jessica K.; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Gilkey, Melissa B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are battery-powered nicotine delivery systems that may serve as a “gateway” to tobacco use by adolescents. Use of e-cigarettes by U.S. adolescents rose from 3% in 2011 to 7% in 2012. We sought to describe healthcare providers’ awareness of e-cigarettes and to assess their comfort with and attitudes toward discussing e-cigarettes with adolescent patients and their parents. Methods A statewide sample (n = 561) of Minnesota healthcare providers (46% family medicine physicians, 20% pediatricians, and 34% nurse practitioners) who treat adolescents completed an online survey in April 2013. Results Nearly all providers (92%) were aware of e-cigarettes, and 11% reported having treated an adolescent patient who had used them. The most frequently cited sources of information about e-cigarettes were patients, news stories, and advertisements, rather than professional sources. Providers expressed considerable concern that e-cigarettes could be a gateway to tobacco use but had moderately low levels of knowledge about and comfort discussing e-cigarettes with adolescent patients and their parents. Compared with pediatricians and nurse practitioners, family medicine physicians reported knowing more about e-cigarettes and being more comfortable discussing them with patients (both p < .05). Nearly all respondents (92%) wanted to learn more about e-cigarettes. Conclusions Healthcare providers who treat adolescents may need to incorporate screening and counseling about e-cigarettes into routine preventive services, particularly if the prevalence of use continues to increase in this population. Education about e-cigarettes could help providers deliver comprehensive preventive services to adolescents at risk of tobacco use. PMID:24332394

  7. Comparing illness presentation, treatment and functioning between patients with adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Christy Lai-Ming; Li, Adrienne Wing-Yee; Leung, Chung-Ming; Chang, Wing-Chung; Chan, Sherry Kit-Wa; Lee, Edwin Ho-Ming; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai

    2014-12-30

    Studies have shown that early- and adult-onset schizophrenia patients differ in pre-morbid traits, illness presentation, psychopathology, and prognosis. We aimed to compare adult-onset patients (age range 26-55 years) with an adolescent-onset cohort (15-25 years) in demographics, illness presentation and functioning at baseline. Participants were from two territory-wide early intervention services for adolescent-onset (n=671) and adult-onset psychosis patients (n=360) in Hong Kong. The adolescent-onset cohort had their initial psychotic episode from 2001-2003; retrospective data collection was done through systematic case note review. The adult-onset cohort was recruited for a larger interventional study from 2009-2011; information was collected via face-to-face interviews. Adult-onset psychosis was significantly associated with more females, more smokers, more non-local birth, more full-time employment, better functioning, poorer medication adherence, more psychiatric hospitalization and fewer with schizophrenia than adolescent-onset psychosis (mean age: 20.4). The effect sizes were small, except for medication adherence where a robust effect was found. No group difference in DUP was found. The finding that adult-onset patients had better functioning challenges the view that adolescent- and adult-onset psychoses share a similar prognostic trajectory. Implications for adapting intervention processes for adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis are discussed.

  8. Adolescents with personality disorders suffer from severe psychiatric stigma: evidence from a sample of 131 patients

    PubMed Central

    Catthoor, Kirsten; Feenstra, Dine J; Hutsebaut, Joost; Schrijvers, Didier; Sabbe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to assess the severity of psychiatric stigma in a sample of personality disordered adolescents in order to evaluate whether differences in stigma can be found in adolescents with different types and severity of personality disorders (PDs). Not only adults but children and adolescents with mental health problems suffer from psychiatric stigma. In contrast to the abundance of research in adult psychiatric samples, stigma in children and adolescents has hardly been investigated. Personality disordered adolescents with fragile identities and self-esteem might be especially prone to feeling stigmatized, an experience which might further shape their identity throughout this critical developmental phase. Materials and methods One hundred thirty-one adolescent patients underwent a standard assessment with Axis I and Axis II diagnostic interviews and two stigma instruments, Stigma Consciousness Questionnaire (SCQ) and Perceived Devaluation–Discrimination Questionnaire (PDDQ). Independent sample t-tests were used to investigate differences in the mean SCQ and PDDQ total scores for patients with and without a PD. Multiple regression main effect analyses were conducted to explore the impact of the different PDs on level of stigma, as well as comorbid Axis I disorders. Age and sex were also entered in the regression models. Results and conclusions Adolescents with severe mental health problems experience a burden of stigma. Personality disordered patients experience more stigma than adolescents with other severe psychiatric Axis I disorders. Borderline PD is the strongest predictor of experiences of stigma. More severely personality disordered adolescents tend to experience the highest level of stigma. PMID:25999774

  9. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring. PMID:27249776

  10. Patient selection for partial breast irradiation by intraoperative radiation therapy: can magnetic resonance imaging be useful?—perspective from radiation oncology point of view

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Carla; Deantonio, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The guidelines of the European and American Societies of Radiation Oncology (GEC-ESTRO and ASTRO) defined the selection criteria to offer partial breast irradiation (PBI) after lumpectomy in patients with low risk breast cancer regardless pre-operative staging. A recent publication by Tallet et al. explored the impact of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on patient eligibility for PBI. From their study, an ipsilateral BC was detected in 4% of patients, excluding these patients from intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). The authors suggested that preoperative MRI should be used routinely for patient’s candidate to IORT, because of the rate of ipsilateral breast cancer detected. In view of Tallet’s article, we analyzed some aspects of this issue in order to envisage some possible perspective on how to better identify those patients who could benefit from PBI, especially using IORT. From historical studies, the risk of breast cancer recurrence outside index quadrant without irradiation is in the range of 1.5–3.5%. MRI sensitivity for detection of invasive cancer is reported up to 100%, and it is particularly useful in dense breast. Other imaging technique did not achieve the same sensibility and specificity as conventional MRI. Of note, none of randomized trials published and ongoing on PBI included preoperative MRI as part of staging. To perform a preoperative MRI in PBI setting is an interesting issue, but the available data suggest that this issue should be preferably studied in the setting of prospective clinical trials to clarify the role of MRI and the clinical meaning of the discovered additional foci. PMID:27747042

  11. Does Hormone Therapy Reduce Disease Recurrence in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy? An Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06

    SciTech Connect

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Bae, Kwounghwa; Michalski, Jeff; Sandler, Howard; Shipley, William; Lin, Alex; Cox, James

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect on freedom from biochemical failure (bNED) or disease-free survival (DFS) by adding hormone therapy (HT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (HDRT). Methods and Materials: We used 883 analyzable prostate cancer patients who enrolled on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-06, a Phase I/II dose escalation trial, and whose mean planning target volume dose exceeded 73.8 Gy (mean, 78.5 Gy; maximum, 84.3 Gy). We defined biochemical failure according to the Phoenix definition. Results: A total of 259 men started HT 2 to 3 months before HDRT, but not longer than 6 months, and 66 men with high-risk prostate cancer received HT for a longer duration. At 5 years, the biochemical failure rates after HDRT alone were 12%, 18%, and 29% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis adjusted for covariates revealed that pretreatment PSA level was a significant factor, whereas risk group, Gleason score, T-stage, and age were not. When the patients were stratified by risk groups, the Cox proportion hazards regression model (after adjusting for pretreatment PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and T stage) did not reveal a significant effect on bNED or DFS by adding HT to HDRT Conclusion: The addition of HT did not significantly improve bNED survival or DFS in all prostate cancer patients receiving HDRT, but did approach significance in high-risk patient subgroup. The result of this study is hypothesis generating and requires testing in a prospective randomized trial.

  12. Concordance between the Chang and the International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP) ototoxicity grading scales in patients treated with cisplatin for medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Johnnie K.; Huang, Jie; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Chang, Kay W.; Bhagat, Shaum P.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Bartels, Ute; Gururangan, Sridharan; Hassall, Tim; Heath, John A.; McCowage, Geoffrey; Cohn, Richard J.; Fisher, Michael J.; Robinson, Giles; Broniscer, Alberto; Gajjar, Amar; Gurney, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Reporting ototoxicity is frequently complicated by use of various ototoxicity criteria. The International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP) ototoxicity grading scale was recently proposed for standardized use in reporting hearing loss outcomes across institutions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concordance between the Chang and SIOP ototoxicity grading scales. Differences between the two scales were identified and the implications these differences may have in the clinical setting were discussed. Procedure Audiological evaluations were reviewed for 379 patients with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma (ages 3–21 years). Each patient was enrolled on one of two St. Jude clinical protocols that included craniospinal radiation therapy and four courses of 75 mg/m2 cisplatin chemotherapy. The latest audiogram conducted 5.5 – 24.5 months post-protocol treatment initiation was graded using the Chang and SIOP ototoxicity criteria. Clinically significant hearing loss was defined as Chang grade ≥ 2a and SIOP ≥2. Hearing loss was considered serious (requiring a hearing aid) at the level of Chang grade ≥ 2b and SIOP ≥ 3. Results A strong concordance was observed between the Chang and SIOP ototoxicity scales (Stuart’s tau-c statistic = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.86, 0.91). Among those patients diagnosed with serious hearing loss, the two scales were in good agreement. However, the scales deviated from one another in classifying patients with less serious or no hearing loss. Conclusions Although discrepancies between the Chang and SIOP ototoxicity scales exist primarily for patients with no or minimal hearing loss, the scales share a strong concordance overall. PMID:24504791

  13. The role of CRP, PCT, IL-6 and presepsin in early diagnosis of bacterial infectious complications in paediatric haemato-oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Plesko, M; Suvada, J; Makohusova, M; Waczulikova, I; Behulova, D; Vasilenkova, A; Vargova, M; Stecova, A; Kaiserova, E; Kolenova, A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection is the most common complication in paediatric oncological patients during cancer treatment. A suitable tool for early prediction of unfavourable course of infection is still needed. We performed a prospective longitudinal observational study to evaluate of the role of serum biomarkers (C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, interleukin-6, presepsin) in the early diagnosis of bacteraemia (gram-negative versus gram-positive) in patients with haematological malignancies. We observed 69 febrile episodes in 33 patients (17 male, 16 female; 1.5-18.9 years, mean 7.31 years, median 5 years). Within this sample, there were 22 cases of positive blood cultures, 16 cases of sepsis, 38 cases of fever with no signs or symptoms of sepsis, and two deaths from infectious complications. All markers tested had good negative predictive value (73% - 93%). CRP was characterized by good specificity for registration bacteraemia (96%, 95% CI: 85% - 99%), but other results were inconclusive. We identified comparably balanced sensitivity (64% - 81%) and specificity (61% - 88%) for interleukin-6 and procalcitonin, and we proved their quality to predict positive blood culture and clinical signs of sepsis as well. Patients with gram-negative bacteraemia had significantly elevated levels of PCT and IL-6 in comparison with a group of patients with gram-positive bacteraemia (p = 0.04 for PCT and p = 0.005 for IL-6). Presepsin was characterized by poor specificity (27%, 95% CI: 15% - 43%) and positive predictive value (24%, 95% CI: 12 - 39%) for predicting bacteraemia, and by better sensitivity (84%, 95% CI: 55% - 98%) and specificity (58%, 95% CI: 42% - 73%) for predicting clinical signs of sepsis. PMID:27468879

  14. Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Dilling, Thomas J.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Garden, Adam S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Kian Ang, K.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

  15. Correlation between bullying and clinical depression in adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Fröjd, Sari

    2011-01-01

    A literature review of the associations between involvement in bullying and depression is presented. Many studies have demonstrated a concurrent association between involvement in bullying and depression in adolescent population samples. Not only victims but also bullies display increased risk of depression, although not all studies have confirmed this for the bullies. Retrospective studies among adults support the notion that victimization is followed by depression. Prospective follow-up studies have suggested both that victimization from bullying may be a risk factor for depression and that depression may predispose adolescents to bullying. Research among clinically referred adolescents is scarce but suggests that correlations between victimization from bullying and depression are likely to be similar in clinical and population samples. Adolescents who bully present with elevated numbers of psychiatric symptoms and psychiatric and social welfare treatment contacts. PMID:24600274

  16. Global radiation oncology waybill

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garzón, Victor; Rovirosa, Ángeles; Ramos, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Radiation oncology covers many different fields of knowledge and skills. Indeed, this medical specialty links physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even rehabilitation and aesthetics. The current socio-economic situation and professional competences affect the development and future or this specialty. The aim of this article was to analyze and highlight the underlying pillars and foundations of radiation oncology, indicating the steps implicated in the future developments or competences of each. Methods This study has collected data from the literature and includes highlights from discussions carried out during the XVII Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) held in Vigo in June, 2013. Most of the aspects and domains of radiation oncology were analyzed, achieving recommendations for the many skills and knowledge related to physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even supportive care and management. Results Considering the data from the literature and the discussions of the XVII SEOR Meeting, the “waybill” for the forthcoming years has been described in this article including all the aspects related to the needs of radiation oncology. Conclusions Professional competences affect the development and future of this specialty. All the types of radio-modulation are competences of radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the pillars of Radiation Oncology are based on experience and research in every area of Radiation Oncology. PMID:24416572

  17. Pediatric oncology in Morocco: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hessissen, Laila; Madani, Abdellah

    2012-03-01

    Cancer in children is quickly becoming one of the leading causes of non traumatic death among children. In pediatric oncology, palliative care is a primary component of the cancer control plan. In low income countries also known as emerging nations or developing countries access to adequate care remains a challenge for most pediatric oncology patients. In Morocco the situation has dramatically improved in the last few years as both the government and NGOs have become more aware of the importance and urgency of the issue. The incidence of cancer in patients under 15 years of age in Morocco is estimated to be 1000 new cases per year and the incidence of leukemia to be 100 new cases diagnosed per year. Pediatric cancer patients are mostly managed by public hospitals. Thus they are highly influenced by the Moroccan public health system, which is now considering cancer management a priority. Since health cover is very limited, most chemotherapy drugs were purchased by local parent associations. Recently, a new large Moroccan NGO (ALSC) provides anti-cancer drugs to all government-run oncology units. Despite all the progress, Morocco has witnessed in the pediatric oncology field, the palliative aspect of the care is not yet organized. Pediatric oncology is supported by the work of the National Society of Pediatric Oncolgy. The opioide therapy is available. However its use is strongly limited by the current restrictive and obsolete legislation which represents a major barrier to care. Despite the latest progress, pediatric oncology in Morocco still needs to improve in order to achieve performances comparable to those of the developed world. These improvements include better survival rates, less treatment abandonment, developing new techniques, improving quality of life and creating data collection teams. In order for this action to succeed all the stakeholders (government, NGOs, medical societies, oncology teams) must work together and coordinate their efforts.

  18. A prospective observational study to evaluate G-CSF usage in patients with solid tumors receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy in Italian clinical oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Barni, S; Lorusso, V; Giordano, M; Sogno, G; Gamucci, T; Santoro, A; Passalacqua, R; Iaffaioli, V; Zilembo, N; Mencoboni, M; Roselli, M; Pappagallo, G; Pronzato, P

    2014-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a severe dose-limiting side effect of myelosuppressive chemotherapy in patients with solid tumors. Clinical practice guidelines recommend primary prophylaxis with G-CSF in patients with an overall ≥ 20 % risk of FN. AIOM Italian guidelines recommend starting G-CSF within 24-72 h after chemotherapy; for daily G-CSF, administration should continue until the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) is 1 × 10(9)/L post-nadir and should not be terminated after ANC increase in the early days of administration. The aim of this study was to assess guideline adherence in oncology practice in Italy. In this multicenter, prospective, observational study, patients were enrolled at the first G-CSF use in any cycle and were followed for two subsequent cycles (or until the end of chemotherapy if less than two additional cycles). Primary objective was to explore G-CSF use in Italian clinical practice; therefore, data were collected on the G-CSF type, timing of administration, and number of doses. 512 eligible patients were enrolled (median age, 62). The most common tumor types were breast (36 %), lung (18 %), and colorectal (13 %). A total of 1,164 G-CSF cycles (daily G-CSF, 718; pegfilgrastim, 446) were observed. Daily G-CSF was administered later than 72 h after chemotherapy in 42 % of cycles, and the median [range] number of doses was four [1, 10]. Pegfilgrastim was administered later than 72 h in 8 % of cycles. G-CSF prophylaxis in Italy is frequently administered in a manner which is not supported by evidence-based guidelines. As this practice may lead to poor outcomes, educational initiatives are recommended. PMID:24307348

  19. Infectious, autoimmune, and allergic diseases and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents: A Children’s Oncology Group (COG) study

    PubMed Central

    Linabery, Amy M.; Erhardt, Erik B.; Fonstad, Rachel K.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Bunin, Greta R.; Ross, Julie A.; Spector, Logan G.; Grufferman, Seymour

    2014-01-01

    An infectious origin for pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has long been suspected and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in a subset of cases. Increased HL incidence in children with congenital and acquired immunodeficiencies, consistent associations between autoimmune diseases and adult HL, and genome-wide association and other genetic studies together suggest immune dysregulation is involved in lymphomagenesis. Here, healthy control children identified by random digit dialing were matched on sex, race/ethnicity, and age to HL cases diagnosed in 1989-2003 at 0-14 years at Children’s Oncology Group institutions. Parents of 517 cases and 784 controls completed telephone interviews, including items regarding medical histories. Tumor EBV status was determined for 355 cases. Using conditional logistic regression, we calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of HL. Cases were more likely to have had an infection >1 year prior to HL diagnosis (OR=1.69, 95% CI:0.98-2.91); case siblings were also more likely to have had a prior infection (OR=2.04, 95% CI:1.01-4.14). Parental history of autoimmunity associated with increased EBV+ HL risk (OR=2.97, 95% CI:1.34-6.58), while having a parent (OR=1.47, 95% CI:1.01-2.14) or sibling (OR=1.62, 95% CI:1.11-2.36) with an allergy was associated with EBV− HL. These results may indicate true increased risk for infections and increased risk with family history of autoimmune and allergic conditions that varies by tumor EBV status, or they may be attributable to inaccurate recall. In addition to employing biomarkers to confirm the role of immune-modulating conditions in pediatric HL, future studies should focus on family-based designs. PMID:24523151

  20. Decision making in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Lamb, B; Green, J S A; Vincent, C; Sevdalis, N

    2011-09-01

    Decisions in surgical oncology are increasingly being made by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs). Although MDTs have been widely accepted as the preferred model for cancer service delivery, the process of decision making has not been well described and there is little evidence pointing to the ideal structure of an MDT. Performance in surgery has been shown to depend on non-technical skills, such as decision making, as well as patient factors and the technical skills of the healthcare team. Application of this systems approach to MDT working allows the identification of factors that affect the quality of decision making for cancer patients. In this article we review the literature on decision making in surgical oncology and by drawing from the systems approach to surgical performance we provide a framework for understanding the process of decision making in MDTs. Technical factors that affect decision making include the information about patients, robust ICT and video-conferencing equipment, a minimum dataset with expert review of radiological and pathological information, implementation and recording of the MDTs decision. Non-technical factors with an impact on decision making include attendance of team members at meetings, leadership, teamwork, open discussion, consensus on decisions and communication with patients and primary care. Optimising these factors will strengthen the decision making process and raise the quality of care for cancer patients.

  1. Decision making in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Lamb, B; Green, J S A; Vincent, C; Sevdalis, N

    2011-09-01

    Decisions in surgical oncology are increasingly being made by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs). Although MDTs have been widely accepted as the preferred model for cancer service delivery, the process of decision making has not been well described and there is little evidence pointing to the ideal structure of an MDT. Performance in surgery has been shown to depend on non-technical skills, such as decision making, as well as patient factors and the technical skills of the healthcare team. Application of this systems approach to MDT working allows the identification of factors that affect the quality of decision making for cancer patients. In this article we review the literature on decision making in surgical oncology and by drawing from the systems approach to surgical performance we provide a framework for understanding the process of decision making in MDTs. Technical factors that affect decision making include the information about patients, robust ICT and video-conferencing equipment, a minimum dataset with expert review of radiological and pathological information, implementation and recording of the MDTs decision. Non-technical factors with an impact on decision making include attendance of team members at meetings, leadership, teamwork, open discussion, consensus on decisions and communication with patients and primary care. Optimising these factors will strengthen the decision making process and raise the quality of care for cancer patients. PMID:20719499

  2. The role of plastic surgery in reconstruction after oncological surgery.

    PubMed

    Vamadeva, S V; Curnier, A

    2016-06-01

    One in three people is affected by cancer in their lifetime. Surgical treatment commonly has the greatest impact on long-term survival, so a large proportion of patients undergo major oncological resection. This is the first in a symposium of four articles describing plastic surgical reconstruction after oncological resection. PMID:27269747

  3. Strategies to optimize treatment adherence in adolescent patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bishay, Lara C; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2016-01-01

    While development of new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to a significant improvement in survival age, routine daily treatment for CF is complex, burdensome, and time intensive. Adolescence is a period of decline in pulmonary function in CF, and is also a time when adherence to prescribed treatment plans for CF tends to decrease. Challenges to adherence in adolescents with CF include decreased parental involvement, time management and significant treatment burden, and adolescent perceptions of the necessity and value of the treatments prescribed. Studies of interventions to improve adherence are limited and focus on education, without significant evidence of success. Smaller studies on behavioral techniques do not focus on adolescents. Other challenges for improving adherence in adolescents with CF include infection control practices limiting in-person interactions. This review focuses on the existing evidence base on adherence intervention in adolescents with CF. Future directions for efforts to optimize treatment adherence in adolescents with CF include reducing treatment burden, developing patient-driven technology to improve tracking, communication, and online support, and rethinking the CF health services model to include assessment of individualized adherence barriers. PMID:27799838

  4. Gaps in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version provides background for the curriculum and identifies gaps in current and desired comprehensive cancer care.

  5. Ki-67 Is an Independent Predictor of Metastasis and Cause-Specific Mortality for Prostate Cancer Patients Treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoven, Bret; Yan, Yan; Ritter, Mark; Khor, Li-Yan; Hammond, Elizabeth; Jones, Christopher; Amin, Mahul; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Zeitzer, Kenneth; Pollack, Alan

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: The association of Ki-67 staining index (Ki67-SI) with overall survival (OS), disease-specific mortality (DSM), distant metastasis (DM), and biochemical failure (BF) was examined in men with favorable- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer receiving radiation therapy (RT) alone or with short-term androgen deprivation (ADT) in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08. Methods and Materials: 468 patients (23.6%) on RTOG 94-08 had sufficient tissue for Ki67-SI analysis. The median follow-up time was 7.9 years. Ki67-SI was determined by immunohistochemistry and quantified manually and by image analysis. Correlative analysis versus clinical outcome was performed using the third quartile (≥Q3) cutpoint. A proportional hazards multivariable analysis (MVA) dichotomized covariates in accordance with trial stratification and randomization criteria. Results: In MVAs adjusted for all treatment covariates, high Ki67-SI (≥Q3) was correlated with increased DSM (hazard ratio [HR] 2.48, P=.03), DM (HR 3.5, P=.002), and BF (HR 3.55, P<.0001). MVA revealed similar Ki67-associated hazard ratios in each separate treatment arm for DSM, DM, and BF; these reached significance only for DM in the RT-alone arm and for BF in both arms. Ki67-SI was not a significant predictor of intraprostatic recurrence assessed by repeated biopsy 2 years after treatment. Patients with a high or low Ki67-SI seemed to experience a similar relative benefit from the addition of ADT to radiation. Conclusions: High Ki67-SI independently predicts for increased DSM, DM, and protocol BF in primarily intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with RT with or without ADT on RTOG 94-08 but does not predict for local recurrence or for increased relative benefit from ADT. This and prior studies lend support for the use of Ki67-SI as a stratification factor in future trials.

  6. Quality of life in oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia: validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory and the Deglutition Handicap Index.

    PubMed

    Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Baijens, Laura W; Vrijenhoef, Femke H; Otters, Elsemieke F; Roodenburg, Nel; Bogaardt, Hans C

    2011-12-01

    Quality of life is an important outcome measurement in objectifying the current health status or therapy effects in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. In this study, the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the Deglutition Handicap Index (DHI) and the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) have been determined for oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. At Maastricht University Medical Center, 76 consecutive patients were selected and asked to fill in three questionnaires on quality of life related to oropharyngeal dysphagia (the SWAL-QOL, the MDADI, and the DHI) as well as a simple one-item visual analog Dysphagia Severity Scale. None of the quality-of-life questionnaires showed any floor or ceiling effect. The test-retest reliability of the MDADI and the Dysphagia Severity Scale proved to be good. The test-retest reliability of the DHI could not be determined because of insufficient data, but the intraclass correlation coefficients were rather high. The internal consistency proved to be good. However, confirmatory factor analysis could not distinguish the underlying constructs as defined by the subscales per questionnaire. When assessing criterion validity, both the MDADI and the DHI showed satisfactory associations with the SWAL-QOL (reference or gold standard) after having removed the less relevant subscales of the SWAL-QOL. In conclusion, when assessing the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the DHI or the MDADI, not all psychometric properties have been adequately met. In general, because of difficulties in the interpretation of study results when using questionnaires lacking sufficient psychometric quality, it is recommended that researchers strive to use questionnaires with the most optimal psychometric properties.

  7. Randomized Clinical Trial of Therapeutic Music Video Intervention for Resilience Outcomes in Adolescents/Young Adults Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Sheri L.; Burns, Debra S.; Stegenga, Kristin A.; Haut, Paul R.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Meza, Jane; Stump, Timothy E.; Cherven, Brooke O.; Docherty, Sharron L.; Hendricks-Ferguson, Verna L.; Kintner, Eileen K.; Haight, Ann E.; Wall, Donna A.; Haase, Joan E.

    2013-01-01

    Background To reduce the risk of adjustment problems associated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) for adolescents/young adults (AYA), we examined efficacy of a therapeutic music video (TMV) intervention delivered during the acute phase of HSCT to: (a) increase protective factors of spiritual perspective, social integration, family environment, courageous coping, and hope-derived meaning; (b) decrease risk factors of illness-related distress and defensive coping; and (c) increase outcomes of self-transcendence and resilience. Methods A multi-site, randomized controlled trial (COG-ANUR0631) conducted at 8 Children’s Oncology Group sites involving 113 AYA aged 11–24 years undergoing myeloablative HSCT. Participants, randomized to the TMV or low-dose control (audiobooks) group, completed 6 sessions over 3 weeks with a board-certified music therapist. Variables were based on Haase’s Resilience in Illness Model. Participants completed measures related to latent variables of illness-related distress, social integration, spiritual perspective, family environment, coping, hope-derived meaning and resilience at baseline (T1), post-intervention (T2), and 100-days post-transplant (T3). Results At T2, the TMV group reported significantly better courageous coping (ES=0.505; P=0.030). At T3, the TMV group reported significantly better social integration (ES=0.543; P=.028) and family environment (ES=0.663; P=0.008), as well as moderate non-significant effect sizes for spiritual perspective (E=0.450; P=0.071) and self-transcendence (ES=0.424; P=0.088). Conclusion The TMV intervention improves positive health outcomes of courageous coping, social integration, and family environment during a high risk cancer treatment. We recommend the TMV be examined in a broader population of AYA with high risk cancers. PMID:24469862

  8. The Significance of Marijuana Use Among Alcohol Using Adolescent ED Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Thomas H.; Spirito, Anthony; Hernández, Lynn; Fairlie, Anne M.; Sindelar-Manning, Holly; Eaton, Cheryl A.; Lewander, William

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine if adolescents presenting to a Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) for an alcohol-related event requiring medical care differ in terms of substance use, behavioral and mental health problems, peer relationships, and parental monitoring, based on their history of marijuana use. Methods Cross-sectional comparison of adolescents 13–17 years old, with evidence of recent alcohol use, 13–17 years old, presenting to a PED based on a self-reported history of marijuana use. Assessment tools included the Adolescent Drinking Inventory, Adolescent Drinking Questionnaire, Young Adult Drinking and Driving Questionnaire, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Behavioral Assessment System for Children, and Peer Substance Use and Tolerance of Substance Use Scale, Results Compared to alcohol only (AO) using adolescents, adolescents who use alcohol and marijuana (AM) have higher rates of smoking (F=23.62) and binge drinking (F=11.56), consume more drinks per sitting (F=9.03), have more externalizing behavior problems (F=12.53), and report both greater peer tolerance of substance use (F=12.99) and lower parental monitoring (F=7.12). Conclusions Adolescents who use both AM report greater substance use and more risk factors for substance abuse than AO using adolescents. Screening for a history of marijuana use may be important when treating adolescents presenting with an alcohol-related event. Alcohol and marijuana co-use may identify a high risk population, which may have important implications for ED clinicians in the ED care of these patients, providing parental guidance, and planning follow-up care. PMID:20078438

  9. Evaluation of the Safety and Benefit of Phase I Oncology Trials for Patients With Primary CNS Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Mrinal M.; Nayak, Lakshmi; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Muzikansky, Alona; Sanchez, Armando J.; Desideri, Serena; Ye, Xiaobu; Ivy, S. Percy; Nabors, L. Burt; Prados, Michael; Grossman, Stuart; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with high-grade gliomas (HGG) are frequently excluded from first-in-human solid tumor trials because of perceived poor prognosis, excessive toxicities, concomitant drug interactions, and poor efficacy. We conducted an analysis of outcomes from select, single-agent phase I studies in patients with HGG. We compared outcomes to pooled analysis of published studies in solid tumors with various molecular and cytotoxic drugs evaluated as single agents or as combinations. Patient and Methods Individual records of patients with recurrent HGG enrolled onto Adult Brain Tumor Consortium trials of single-agent, cytotoxic or molecular agents from 2000 to 2008 were analyzed for baseline characteristics, toxicities, responses, and survival. Results Our analysis included 327 patients with advanced, refractory HGG who were enrolled onto eight trials involving targeted molecular (n = 5) and cytotoxic (n = 3) therapies. At enrollment, patients had a median Karnofsky performance score of 90 and median age of 52 years; 62% were men, 63% had glioblastoma, and the median number of prior systemic chemotherapies was one. Baseline laboratory values were in an acceptable range to meet eligibility criteria. Patients were on the study for a median of two cycles (range, < one to 56 cycles), and 96% were evaluable for primary end points. During cycle 1, grade ≥ 3 nonhematologic and grade ≥ 4 hematologic toxicities were 5% (28 of 565 adverse events) and 0.9% (five of 565 adverse events), respectively, and 66% of these occurred at the highest dose level. There was one death attributed to drug. Overall response rate (complete and partial response) was 5.5%. Median progression-free and overall survival times were 1.8 and 6 months, respectively. Conclusion Patients with HGG who meet standard eligibility criteria may be good candidates for solid tumor phase I studies with single-agent molecular or cytotoxic drugs with favorable preclinical rationale and pharmacokinetic properties

  10. The effects of Reiki therapy on pain and anxiety in patients attending a day oncology and infusion services unit.

    PubMed

    Birocco, Nadia; Guillame, Camilla; Storto, Silvana; Ritorto, Giuliana; Catino, Cristiana; Gir, Nisha; Balestra, Lucia; Tealdi, Giancarla; Orecchia, Cristina; Vito, Giovanna De; Giaretto, Lorena; Donadio, Michela; Bertetto, Oscar; Schena, Marina; Ciuffreda, Libero

    2012-06-01

    Reiki is a system of natural healing techniques administered by laying of hands and transferring energy from the Reiki practitioner to the recipient. We investigated the role of Reiki in the management of anxiety, pain and global wellness in cancer patients. Building on the results of a pilot project conducted between 2003 and 2005 by a volunteer association at our hospital, a wider, 3-year study was conducted at the same center. The volunteer Reiki practitioners received 2 years of theory and practical training. The study population was 118 patients (67 women and 51 men; mean age, 55 years) with cancer at any stage and receiving any kind of chemotherapy. Before each session, the nurses collected the patient's personal data and clinical history. Pain and anxiety were evaluated according to a numeric rating scale by the Reiki practitioners. Each session lasted about 30 min; pain and anxiety scores were recorded using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS), together with a description of the physical feelings the patients perceived during the session. All 118 patients received at least 1 Reiki treatment (total number, 238). In the subgroup of 22 patients who underwent the full cycle of 4 treatments, the mean VAS anxiety score decreased from 6.77 to 2.28 (P <.000001) and the mean VAS pain score from 4.4 to 2.32 (P = .091). Overall, the sessions were felt helpful in improving well-being, relaxation, pain relief, sleep quality and reducing anxiety. Offering Reiki therapy in hospitals could respond to patients' physical and emotional needs. PMID:21998438

  11. Quantitative radiology: applications to oncology.

    PubMed

    Herskovits, Edward H

    2014-01-01

    Oncologists, clinician-scientists, and basic scientists collect computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography images in the process of caring for patients, managing clinical trials, and investigating cancer biology. As we have developed more sophisticated means for noninvasively delineating and characterizing neoplasms, these image data have come to play a central role in oncology. In parallel, the increasing complexity and volume of these data have necessitated the development of quantitative methods for assessing tumor burden, and by proxy, disease-free survival. PMID:25287685

  12. Oncology and medical education—past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Oncologists should contribute to the undergraduate curriculum whenever they can, and should teach communication skills, acute oncology, prescribing, and other transferable skills. Newly qualified doctors will care for many patients with cancer in their first years of work, and all doctors need to know when an urgent oncology referral is required and to be aware of the pace of change in oncology. Oncologists should involve their patients in teaching whenever it is appropriate. We should aim to inspire junior doctors to consider a career in oncology. The oncology education community should adopt new teaching methods, for example simulation, mock MDTs and student led clinics. CPD provided by honorable organisations, including online learning, is becoming more important for oncologists to keep up to date. PMID:27350792

  13. Parental Perspectives on a Behavioral Health Music Intervention for Adolescent/Young Adult Resilience during Cancer Treatment: Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Sharron L.; Robb, Sheri L.; Phillips-Salimi, Celeste; Cherven, Brooke; Stegenga, Kristin; Hendricks-Ferguson, Verna; Roll, Lona; Stickler, Molly Donovan; Haase, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes parental perspectives on the helpfulness and meaningfulness of a behavioral health music therapy intervention targeted to adolescents/young adults (AYA) with cancer undergoing stem cell transplantation. We demonstrate how qualitative methods may be used to understand critical aspects of an intervention and mechanisms by which the intervention impacts the target AYA outcomes resilience and quality of life. Methods A qualitative descriptive design was used to obtain parents’ perspectives. Maximum variation purposive sampling was used to sample 16 parents whose AYA had been randomized to the intervention group. A semi-structured, open-ended interview was conducted between 100 and 160 days following their AYA’s transplant. Results Results are grouped into three categories: (1) helpfulness and meaningfulness of the intervention to AYA adjustment to the transplantation experience; (2) helpfulness and meaningfulness of the intervention for parents; and (3) AYA ability to participate in the intervention during acute phase of transplantation. Conclusions Parents observed and interacted with their AYA who participated in a targeted, behavioral intervention. Thus parents were able to describe mechanisms through which the intervention was helpful and meaningful for the AYA and indirect personal benefits for themselves. The results suggest the importance of the targeted outcomes identified in the Resilience in Illness Model and mechanisms of action in the Contextual Support Model of Music Therapy and identifies approaches for future study. PMID:23332481

  14. Suicide Probability Scale and Its Utility with Adolescent Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eltz, Michael; Evans, Allison Schettini; Celio, Mark; Dyl, Jennifer; Hunt, Jeffrey; Armstrong, Laura; Spirito, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Suicide Probability Scale (SPS) in a sample of 226 (80 male, 146 female) adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Confirmatory factor analyses provided only some support for the original subscales. Exploratory factor analyses revealed some overlap with the original scales, but…

  15. Clinical effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole as antifungal prophylaxis in hematology–oncology patients: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Hsiang-Chi; Johnson, Melissa D; Drew, Richard H; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Perfect, John R

    2014-01-01

    In preventing invasive fungal disease (IFD) in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), clinical trials demonstrated efficacy of posaconazole over fluconazole and itraconazole. However, effectiveness of posaconazole has not been investigated in the United States in real-world setting outside the environment of controlled clinical trial. We performed a single-center, retrospective cohort study of 130 evaluable patients ≥18 years of age admitted to Duke University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 who received either posaconazole or fluconazole as prophylaxis during first induction or first reinduction chemotherapy for AML or MDS. The primary endpoint was possible, probable, or definite breakthrough IFD. Baseline characteristics were well balanced between groups, except that posaconazole recipients received reinduction chemotherapy and cytarabine more frequently. IFD occurred in 17/65 (27.0%) in the fluconazole group and in 6/65 (9.2%) in the posaconazole group (P = 0.012). Definite/probable IFDs occurred in 7 (10.8%) and 0 patients (0%), respectively (P = 0.0013). In multivariate analysis, fluconazole prophylaxis and duration of neutropenia were predictors of IFD. Mortality was similar between groups. This study demonstrates superior effectiveness of posaconazole over fluconazole as prophylaxis of IFD in AML and MDS patients. Such superiority did not translate to reductions in 100-day all-cause mortality. PMID:24644249

  16. Clinical ineffectiveness of IL-2 and/or IFN alpha administration after autologous PBSC transplantation in pediatric oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Vlk, V; Eckschlager, T; Kavan, P; Kabícková, E; Koutecký, J; Sobota, V; Bubenik, J; Pospísilová, D

    2000-01-01

    Clinical impact of s.c. administration of IL-2 and/or IFN alpha was studied in 23 pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (IFN alpha group) and sarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, peripheral neuroepitelioma, neuroblastoma, and embryonic carcinoma (IL-2 + IFN alpha group) after autologous PBSC transplantation. Expression of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25, CD38, CD56, CD71, CD122, and HLA-DR antigens, serum level of the soluble IL-2R alpha, and NK activity against K562 cell line were evaluated in 11 patients representative for both types of immunotherapy. T and, more markedly, NK cell proliferation, induction of activation markers on the surface of T and NK subsets, and elevation of sIL-2R alpha concentrations were seen in the IL-2 + IFN alpha subgroup. In the IFN alpha subgroup, the total number of lymphocytes and expression of activation markers remained unchanged, but the number of CD8+ T cells increased at the expense of CD4+ T and NK cells during the therapy. Cytotoxic activity against K562 cells was not influenced by the immunotherapy in either subgroup. No significant clinical benefit of the immunotherapy was seen in these patients compared to 27 control patients with relevant diagnoses who did not receive immunotherapy.

  17. Improving Cultural Competency and Disease Awareness among Oncology Nurses Caring for Adult T-Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortese-Peske, Marisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Foreign-born residents face significant challenges accessing and receiving quality healthcare in the U.S. These obstacles include a lack of information on how to access care, fear, as well as communication and cultural barriers (Portes, Fernandez-Kelly & Light, 2012). Increasing healthcare providers' knowledge regarding a patient's…

  18. Domperidone-Associated QT Interval Prolongation in Non-oncologic Pediatric Patients: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Amy D; Chen, Jennifer; Lau, Elaine; Poh, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Domperidone is a prokinetic agent used to treat pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease. Health Canada has issued warnings about an increased risk of domperidone-associated ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. However, the supporting data referred only to adult patients; therefore, extrapolating the safety risks to pediatric patients is difficult. Objective: To summarize and evaluate the evidence for domperidone-associated QT interval prolongation, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death to determine the safety of this drug for pediatric patients. Data Sources: Two databases (MEDLINE [1946 to August 2015] and Embase [1980 to August 2015]) were searched with the following Medical Subject Headings and keywords: “domperidone”, “arrhythmias, cardiac”, “death, sudden, cardiac”, “electrocardiography”, “heart diseases”, “long QT syndrome”, “tachycardia, ventricular”, “torsades de pointes”, and “ventricular fibrillation”. The search was limited to studies conducted in humans under 18 years of age and published in English. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Original research included in this review reported on the cardiac-related safety of domperidone in nononcologic patients under 18 years of age. Data Synthesis: Of the 5 studies meeting the inclusion criteria (n = 137 patients), one reported a statistically significant change in the corrected QT (QTc) interval, but the clinical significance was unclear. Most of the studies reported rare occurrences of pathological QTc intervals in a limited number of patients. However, confounding factors (e.g., abnormal electrolyte level or concurrent medications) were not consistently considered. Potential bias might have been alleviated by blinding of electrocardiogram (ECG) assessors; however, this was not consistently implemented. The designs of the included studies did not allow assessment of causality. The results should be interpreted with caution

  19. CNS infections in patients with hematological disorders (including allogeneic stem-cell transplantation)—Guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO)

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Hieber, M.; Silling, G.; Schalk, E.; Heinz, W.; Panse, J.; Penack, O.; Christopeit, M.; Buchheidt, D.; Meyding-Lamadé, U.; Hähnel, S.; Wolf, H. H.; Ruhnke, M.; Schwartz, S.; Maschmeyer, G.

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are infrequently diagnosed in immunocompetent patients, but they do occur in a significant proportion of patients with hematological disorders. In particular, patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation carry a high risk for CNS infections of up to 15%. Fungi and Toxoplasma gondii are the predominant causative agents. The diagnosis of CNS infections is based on neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid examination and biopsy of suspicious lesions in selected patients. However, identification of CNS infections in immunocompromised patients could represent a major challenge since metabolic disturbances, side-effects of antineoplastic or immunosuppressive drugs and CNS involvement of the underlying hematological disorder may mimic symptoms of a CNS infection. The prognosis of CNS infections is generally poor in these patients, albeit the introduction of novel substances (e.g. voriconazole) has improved the outcome in distinct patient subgroups. This guideline has been developed by the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) with the contribution of a panel of 14 experts certified in internal medicine, hematology/oncology, infectious diseases, intensive care, neurology and neuroradiology. Grades of recommendation and levels of evidence were categorized by using novel criteria, as recently published by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. PMID:27052648

  20. Neuro-ocular damage in pediatric oncology patients: predictor of long-term visual disability or tool for limiting toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, N.M.; Donaldson, S.; de Wit, S.; King, O.; Wilbur, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    We present a group of eight pediatric cancer patients with a spectrum of visual afferent pathway abnormalities. Changes include decreased visual acuity, visual field alterations, abnormal visual evoked potentials, changes in the optic disc and nerve fiber layer of the retina, radiation retinopathy, and CNS injury. These changes occur in long term survivors of pediatric malignancy (especially those with prolonged, multimodal, and multicourse therapy), but they may be minimally symptomatic. The changes appear to be analogous to the CNS changes (leukoencephalopathy) described in patients with leukemia and attributed to multimodal therapy. By taking advantage of opportunities to detect adverse effects earlier in the treatment course, the present excellent cure rate may be improved by refinements in therapy that also improve the quality of survival.

  1. [CLINICAL GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND MONITORING OF PATIENTS WITH INVASIVE BREAST CANCER--CROATIAN ONCOLOGY SOCIETY].

    PubMed

    Šeparović, Robert; Ban, Marija; Silovska, Tajana; Oresković, Lidija Beketić; Soldić, Željko; Podolski, Paula; Pleština, Stjepko; Gugić, Damir; Petković, Marija; Jakić-Razumović, Jasminka; Vojnović, Zeljko; Miše, Branka Petrić; Tomić, Snježana; Stanec, Zdenko; Vrdoljak, Danko Velemir; Drinković, Ivan; Brkljačić, Boris; Mustać, Elvira; Utrobičić, Ivan; Vrdoljak, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. It can be diagnosed in early stage through screening, early detection and educational programs, and when diagnosed early it can be efficiently treated. Treatment modalities include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy and targeted biologic therapy, according to the stage of the disease and patient condition. Treatment decisions should be made after multidisciplinary team discussion. Due to the significance of this disease it is important to define and implement standardized approach for diagnostic, treatment and monitoring algorithm as well. The following text presents the clinical guidelines in order to standardize the procedures and criteria for diagnosis, management, treatment and monitoring of patients with breast cancer in the Republic of Croatia. PMID:26380471

  2. After plastic surgery: adolescent-reported appearance ratings and appearance-related burdens in patient and general population groups.

    PubMed

    Simis, Kuni J; Hovius, Steven E R; de Beaufort, Inez D; Verhulst, Frank C; Koot, Hans M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of appearance-related surgery on psychosocial functioning during adolescence. To this end, changes in bodily attitudes and appearance-related burdens in adolescents undergoing corrective (for aesthetic deformities) and reconstructive (for congenital or acquired deformities) surgery were compared with those in a general population sample.A group of 184 adolescent plastic surgery patients (corrective, n = 100; reconstructive, n = 84), and a comparison group of 83 adolescents at random selected from three municipalities (corrective, n = 67; reconstructive, n = 16), aged 12 to 22 years, were studied at two time points with a 6-month interval. The plastic surgical patients were studied presurgically and postsurgically. Using fully structured telephone interviews and postal questionnaires, adolescents' ratings of their appearance, bodily satisfaction and attitudes, and appearance-related burdens were obtained. All patients reported a significant decrease in burdens after surgery compared with the comparison group, indicating a much more prominent improvement in the patient sample compared with the developmental changes that may be expected to occur in adolescence. The corrective patient group reported least burdens after the operation. More specifically, the "breasts" group benefited most from the operation, indicating that breast corrections are rewarding interventions. The findings of this study imply that adolescents can be regarded as good candidates for plastic surgery. They gain bodily satisfaction, and they are relieved of many appearance-related burdens. Physical, social, and psychological burdens related to appearance satisfaction improve considerably in both corrective and reconstructive adolescent patients.

  3. NEURO-ONCOLOGIC PHYSICAL THERAPY FOR THE OLDER PERSON.

    PubMed

    Ching, Willie; Luhmann, Melissa

    2011-07-01

    Due to the uncertainty of the course of diagnoses, patients with neuro-oncological malignancies present challenges to the physical therapist. At times, the presentation of impairments and disabilities of these patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses do not necessarily coincide with the involved area of the brain or spinal cord. It is our intention to provide guidance to the physical therapist who will be working with these patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses, in hopes that their encounters will be more productive and meaningful. This article describes a brief overview of common central nervous system malignancies, its medical treatment, as well as possible complications and side effects that would need to be considered in rehabilitating these patients. Special consideration is given to the elderly patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses. Pertinent physical therapy assessments and interventions are discussed.

  4. Potential role for metformin in urologic oncology

    PubMed Central

    Sayyid, Rashid Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is one of the most commonly used drugs worldwide. It is currently considered first-line pharmacological agent for management of diabetes mellitus type 2. Recent studies have suggested that metformin may have further benefits, especially in the field of urologic oncology. Use of metformin has been shown to be associated with decreased incidence and improved outcomes of prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer. These studies suggest that metformin does have a future role in the prevention and management of urologic malignancies. In this review, we will discuss the latest findings in this field and its implications on the management of urologic oncology patients. PMID:27195314

  5. Integrative Oncology in Indian Subcontinent: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Janardhanan, Sunitha; Jeevakarunyam, Sathiyajeeva; Jeddy, Nadheem; Eagappan, Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Integrative oncology is a combination of one where complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with conventional cancer treatment modalities is used to manage symptoms, control side-effects and improve the state of mental wellbeing. The ancient Indian medicinal approach in cancer treatment and management has a wide array of herbs and practices. There is an increasing demand for traditional and natural medicine by the cancer patients. The conventional oncologic surgeons and physicians should be aware of the role of cCAM that are available in Indian subcontinent and provide a treatment that focuses on the physical and mental state of wellness in combating cancer. PMID:25954692

  6. Precision oncology: origins, optimism, and potential.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vinay; Fojo, Tito; Brada, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Imatinib, the first and arguably the best targeted therapy, became the springboard for developing drugs aimed at molecular targets deemed crucial to tumours. As this development unfolded, a revolution in the speed and cost of genetic sequencing occurred. The result--an armamentarium of drugs and an array of molecular targets--set the stage for precision oncology, a hypothesis that cancer treatment could be markedly improved if therapies were guided by a tumour's genomic alterations. Drawing lessons from the biological basis of cancer and recent empirical investigations, we take a more measured view of precision oncology's promise. Ultimately, the promise is not our concern, but the threshold at which we declare success. We review reports of precision oncology alongside those of precision diagnostics and novel radiotherapy approaches. Although confirmatory evidence is scarce, these interventions have been widely endorsed. We conclude that the current path will probably not be successful or, at a minimum, will have to undergo substantive adjustments before it can be successful. For the sake of patients with cancer, we hope one form of precision oncology will deliver on its promise. However, until confirmatory studies are completed, precision oncology remains unproven, and as such, a hypothesis in need of rigorous testing.

  7. Parotid area lymph node metastases from preliminarily diagnosed patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: report on tumor characteristics and oncologic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Youping; Zong, Jingfeng; Qiu, Sufang; Bai, Penggang; Dai, Yitao; Zhou, Lin; Chen, Xiaolin; Zheng, Wei; Chen, Yunbin; Lin, Shaojun; Pan, Jianji

    2016-01-01

    The parotid area lymph node (PLN) is an uncommon site of metastasis originating from nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The study aimed to investigate clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with preliminarily diagnosed NPC with PLN metastases. Here we retrospectively reviewed Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 2221 patients with untreated nonmetastatic NPC who received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Finally, 64 (2.9%) patients were identified with PLN metastases, of which, 34 received PLN-sparing IMRT and 30 received PLN-radical IMRT. We also found that 42.2% had N3 disease and 95.3% had stages III-IVb. PLN metastases on MRI were characterized by ipsilateral retropharyngeal lymph node (RLN) or level II nodal extracapsular spread (ECS), ipsilateral giant cervical nodes, ipsilateral parapharyngeal extension, or solitary parotid metastasis. The 5-year overall survival, distant metastasis-free survival, regional relapse-free survival, and parotid relapse-free survival rates were 70.4%, 64.3%, 76.7%, and 87.9%, respectively. Distant metastases were the main cause of treatment failure and death. Using PLN-sparing IMRT, sparing PLN with minimal axial diameter of <10 mm, could increase the risk of parotid recurrence. However, it was not an independent prognostic factor. N classification and concurrent-based chemotherapy were almost statistically significant for distant failure and death. Overall, we demonstrated that the PLN metastases might be derived from RLN or level II nodal ECS, giant cervical nodes in a retrograde fashion, or parapharyngeal extension. Sparing PLN of <10 mm by IMRT should consider the risk of parotid recurrence. Distant metastases remained the dominant treatment failure. Further effective systemic chemotherapy should be explored. PMID:26934439

  8. Pitfalls in oncology: a unique case of thoracic splenosis mimicking malignancy in a patient with resected breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Maria Rita; Marchianò, Alfonso; Duca, Matteo; Mariani, Paola; Aliberti, Gianluca; Maccauro, Marco; Duranti, Leonardo; Capri, Giuseppe; de Braud, Filippo Guglielmo; Bianchi, Giulia Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic splenosis (TS) is a condition of autotransplantation of splenic tissue into the pleural cavity after thoraco-abdominal trauma, with diaphragmatic and spleen injury. It is usually asymptomatic and discovered as an incidental finding at imaging performed for other reasons. Its differential diagnosis regards different benign and malignant conditions and should be discerned avoiding invasive procedures. We report a case of thoracic mass associated with pleural nodules mimicking malignancy in a patient with resected breast cancer for whom a diagnosis of TS was made early by using non-invasive methods. Briefly, we review the literature data on TS, comment concisely the possible implications of using invasive procedures and describe the current non-invasive techniques available. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an accurate medical history collection, the role of the multidisciplinary board and their impact on treatment decision making. Finally, we conclude that clinical information and imaging would be the discriminating factors to avoid unnecessary invasive procedures. PMID:27293867

  9. Evaluation methods for pretransplant oncologic markers and their prognostic impacts in patient undergoing living donor liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shindoh, Junichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Nagata, Rihito; Kaneko, Junichi; Tamura, Sumihito; Aoki, Taku; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2014-04-01

    Tumor markers [alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) or des-gamma-carboxyprothrombin (DCP)] and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) reportedly correlate with long-term outcomes for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, no standardized method has been established for evaluating the pretransplant data. One hundred and twenty-four patients who underwent living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) were retrospectively reviewed. The best predictive parameters for tumor recurrence were maximum values for AFP or DCP and 90-day mean values for NLR, respectively, and multivariate analysis confirmed these values were correlated with tumor recurrence. However, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that discriminative powers were sufficient only in maximum AFP [area under the curve (AUC) 0.88, P < 0.001] and maximum DCP (AUC 0.76, P < 0.001), while mean NLR was less predictive (AUC 0.62, P = 0.20). When incorporating AFP and DCP to the Tokyo criteria (≤5 tumors with each tumor ≤ 5 cm), the presence of at least two of the following factors: (i) beyond the Tokyo criteria, (ii) AFP>250 ng/ml, and (iii) DCP > 450 mAu/ml (>450 ng/ml), was correlated with a worse 5-year disease-free survival rate (20.0% vs. 96.8%, P < 0.001) and 5-year overall survival rate (20.0% vs. 84.0%, P < 0.001). The prognosis of patients undergoing LDLT for HCC strongly relies on maximum AFP or DCP values before transplantation, while the prognostic impact of NLR is limited. PMID:24472068

  10. [Prognostic significance of cytogenetic changes in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). (Analysis of results in 105 patients treated at the Hemato-oncology Clinic of the University Hospital in Olomouc from 1997 to 2000].

    PubMed

    Jarosová, M; Indrák, K; Holzerová, M; Hubácek, J; Faber, E; Papajík, T; Raida, L; Szotkowski, T; Knotková, R; Hlusí, T; Jedlicková, K; Pikalová, Z; Sulovská, I

    2001-09-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are one of the most important prognostic factors in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This work present analysis of conventional cytogenetic results completed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) obtained from 105 patients in the time of diagnosis of AML. The median age of patients was 51 years (range 19-79 years), with slight predominance of women (female to male ratio 1.2:1). The evaluated group involved all patients with AML diagnosis, treated by intensive induction chemotherapy in the Department of Hematology-oncology, University Hospital, Olomouc during last 4 years with assessable cytogenetic results. Chromosomal changes were found in 63 (60%) patients. The most often affected chromosomes in succession of frequency were 8, 17, 7, 5, 11, 15, 16 a 21. Based on found specific and frequent chromosomal changes the patients were divided into 3 prognostic subgroups and the significance of chromosomal aberrations was evaluated. The subgroup of 17 patients with good prognosis consisted of a patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia with translocation t(15;17), 4 patients with t(8;21) and 4 patients with inv(16). 14 patients of 17 live in complete remission, median of overall survival (OS) is 63 weeks. The subgroup of intermediate prognosis was formed by 60 patients, 42 had normal karyotype and 18 patients had other chromosomal abnormalities. Median OS of this group was 35 weeks. The third subgroup with poor prognosis consisted of 28 patients with changes of chromosomes 3, 5, 7, 11 and complex karyotype. 64.3% of patients received complete remission and median OS was 35 weeks. Statistical evaluation of OS showed significant difference (p = 0.002) in subgroup with good prognosis versus subgroup with poor prognosis and in subgroup with good prognosis versus subgroup with intermediate prognosis (p = 0.014). Statistical significance of OS in subgroup with intermediate prognosis versus subgroup with poor prognosis was not proved (p

  11. Ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses1

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Kely Regina; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira; Schmidtt, Pablo Henrique; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Tomaschewski-Barlem, Jamila Geri; da Rosa, Luciana Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to know the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses. Method: descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed in inpatient units and in chemotherapy out-patients units that provide assistance to oncological patients in two capitals in the South region of Brazil. Eighteen nurses participated in this study, selected by snowball sampling type. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out, which were recorded and transcribed, and then analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: two categories were established: when informing or not becomes a dilemma - showing the main difficulties related to oncological treatment information regarding health staff, health system, and infrastructure; to invest or not - dilemmas related to finitude - showing situations of dilemmas related to pain and confrontation with finitude. Conclusion: for the effective confrontation of the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses to occur, it is important to invest in the training of these professionals, preparing them in an ethical and human way to act as lawyers of the patient with cancer, in a context of dilemmas related mainly to the possibility of finitude. PMID:26626012

  12. [Radiological trap and oncological precautions in a patient who has undergone a permanent withdrawal of PIP breast implants].

    PubMed

    Koutsomanis, A; Bruant-Rodier, C; Roedlich, M-N; Bretz-Grenier, M-F; Perrot, P; Bodin, F

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a 57-year-old patient who presented radiological images similar to ruptured breast implants one year after the supposed withdrawal of the latter. This woman had benefited for the first time from cosmetic PIP breast implants in 2000. Early in 2014, she requested the removal of the implants without renewal because she was feeling pain and functional discomfort. A few months after the operation, she consulted for breast swelling in the upper pole of the breast. Radiological assessment showed liquid formations compatible with the presence of implants. At our request, the rereading of the MRI by the radiologist definitively concluded on a bilateral seroma within the persistent fibrous capsule. In the absence of symptoms, clinical monitoring had been decided. But at the recrudescence of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases associated with breast implants, a cytological sampling was intended. In case of cytological abnormality or recurrence of the seroma, a surgical procedure should be performed. In conclusion, the removal of a breast implant without capsulectomy may result in the formation of a seroma whose images resemble those of an implant. It is always worthwhile to provide precise clinical data to the radiologist in order to help him to make informed interpretations. Every serous effusion in a breast lodge having contained a silicone implant must evoke the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. PMID:26232069

  13. Participatory design with children in the development of a support system for patient-centered care in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Ruland, Cornelia M; Starren, Justin; Vatne, Torun M

    2008-08-01

    Developing software for children with severe illness poses a number of design challenges. In this paper we describe participatory design methods used in the development of SISOM, a support system for children with cancer age 7-12 to help children elicit and report their symptoms/problems in a child-friendly, age-adjusted manner, and to assist clinicians at the point of care in addressing and integrating children's reported symptoms and problems in patient care. The particular design challenges in the development of a clinical support tool for seriously ill children are described, followed by the participatory design techniques we used to meet these challenges. Healthy children and children with cancer participated actively in different stages of the design process. We describe how children contributed to the graphical design of the system's interface; selection of understandable, child-friendly terms used in the system; iconic and graphical representations; and its usability. The methods applied helped us to significantly improve and adapt SISOM to children's cognitive and emotional developmental stage. Working with children as partners in the design also provided important insights into the role children can play in participatory design that may be helpful for other system developers who wish to design support applications for ill children. Children had very creative design ideas that considerably improved the software. However, system development for seriously ill children also requires psychological and pedagogical insights and design and usability expertise. This limits the role children can play as full design partners.

  14. Pharmacological interventions for ADHD: how do adolescent and adult patient beliefs and attitudes impact treatment adherence?

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to medication can be problematic for patients, especially so for patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Effective medications are available for the treatment of ADHD; however, nonadherence rates for ADHD medication range from 13.2%–64%. The reasons for nonadherence can be complex. This review aims to look at how the beliefs and attitudes of adolescents and adults impact ADHD treatment adherence. PMID:25284990

  15. Facial soft-tissue morphology of adolescent patients with nonsyndromic bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Nadia; Majidi, Mohammad Reza; Kianifar, Hamidreza; Eslami, Neda

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to cephalometrically evaluate the facial soft-tissue characteristics of adolescent patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) and to compare them with a noncleft control group. Lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained from 56 adolescents with nonsyndromic BCLP (29 boys and 27 girls) were analyzed and compared with 67 control subjects (29 boys and 38 girls) who were matched for sex, age, and ethnicity. All patients had been operated on before the age of 2 years for the surgical repair of cleft lip and palate. None had received any orthopedic or orthodontic treatment. Independent-samples t test revealed that patients with BCLP significantly differed from the control group by having a flatter facial profile, thinner and more retruded nasal base, flatter nasal tip (in males), and reduced upper-lip length. Furthermore, thicker lower-lip pit, shallower mentolabial sulcus, and increased inclination angles of the upper and lower lips relative to the horizontal plane were observed in female patients compared with the normal group. The findings of the current study suggested that adolescent patients with BCLP showed several facial soft-tissue deformities when compared with normal individuals with the same age, sex, and ethnic origin. This study provides objective measures that could lead to better treatment planning and prediction of the need for corrective surgeries in patients with BCLP.

  16. Does Mental Illness Stigma Contribute to Adolescent Standardized Patients' Discomfort With Simulations of Mental Illness and Adverse Psychosocial Experiences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mark D.; Johnson, Samantha; Niec, Anne; Pietrantonio, Anna Marie; High, Bradley; MacMillan, Harriet; Eva, Kevin W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Adolescent mental illness stigma-related factors may contribute to adolescent standardized patients' (ASP) discomfort with simulations of psychiatric conditions/adverse psychosocial experiences. Paradoxically, however, ASP involvement may provide a stigma-reduction strategy. This article reports an investigation of this hypothetical…

  17. Oncological image analysis.

    PubMed

    Brady, Sir Michael; Highnam, Ralph; Irving, Benjamin; Schnabel, Julia A

    2016-10-01

    Cancer is one of the world's major healthcare challenges and, as such, an important application of medical image analysis. After a brief introduction to cancer, we summarise some of the major developments in oncological image analysis over the past 20 years, but concentrating those in the authors' laboratories, and then outline opportunities and challenges for the next decade.

  18. Quality Assessment in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-07-01

    The movement to improve healthcare quality has led to a need for carefully designed quality indicators that accurately reflect the quality of care. Many different measures have been proposed and continue to be developed by governmental agencies and accrediting bodies. However, given the inherent differences in the delivery of care among medical specialties, the same indicators will not be valid across all of them. Specifically, oncology is a field in which it can be difficult to develop quality indicators, because the effectiveness of an oncologic intervention is often not immediately apparent, and the multidisciplinary nature of the field necessarily involves many different specialties. Existing and emerging comparative effectiveness data are helping to guide evidence-based practice, and the increasing availability of these data provides the opportunity to identify key structure and process measures that predict for quality outcomes. The increasing emphasis on quality and efficiency will continue to compel the medical profession to identify appropriate quality measures to facilitate quality improvement efforts and to guide accreditation, credentialing, and reimbursement. Given the wide-reaching implications of quality metrics, it is essential that they be developed and implemented with scientific rigor. The aims of the present report were to review the current state of quality assessment in oncology, identify existing indicators with the best evidence to support their implementation, and propose a framework for identifying and refining measures most indicative of true quality in oncologic care.

  19. Minimal Disease Assessment in the Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Intermediate-Risk (Stage III/IV) B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Children’s Oncology Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Shiramizu, Bruce; Goldman, Stanton; Kusao, Ian; Agsalda, Melissa; Lynch, James; Smith, Lynette; Harrison, Lauren; Morris, Erin; Gross, Thomas G.; Sanger, Warren; Perkins, Sherrie; Cairo, Mitchell S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Children/adolescents with mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) have an excellent prognosis but relapses still occur. While chromosomal aberrations and/or clonal immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements may indicate risk of failure, a more universal approach was developed to detect minimal disease (MD). Children/adolescents with intermediate-risk B-NHL were treated with French-British-American/Lymphome Malins de Burkitt 96 (FAB/LMB96) B4 modified chemotherapy and rituximab. Specimens from diagnosis, end of induction (EOI), and end of therapy (EOT) were assayed for MD. Initial specimens were screened for IGHV family usage with primer pools followed by individual primers to identify MD. Thirty-two diagnostic/staging specimens screened positive with primer pools and unique IGHV family primers were identified. Two patients relapsed; first relapse (4 months from diagnosis) was MD-positive at EOI, the second (36 months from diagnosis) was MD-positive at EOT. At EOI, recurrent rates were similar between the MRD-positive and MRD-negative patients (p=0.40). At EOT, only 13/32 patients had MRD data available with 1 relapse in the MRD-positive group and no recurrences in the MRD-negative group (p=0.077). The study demonstrated molecular-disseminated disease in which IgIGHV primer pools could be used to assess MD. This feasibility study supports future investigations to assess the validity and significance of MD screening in a larger cohort of patients with intermediate-risk mature B-NHL. PMID:21496005

  20. Minimal disease assessment in the treatment of children and adolescents with intermediate-risk (Stage III/IV) B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a children's oncology group report.

    PubMed

    Shiramizu, Bruce; Goldman, Stanton; Kusao, Ian; Agsalda, Melissa; Lynch, James; Smith, Lynette; Harrison, Lauren; Morris, Erin; Gross, Thomas G; Sanger, Warren; Perkins, Sherrie; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2011-06-01

    Children/adolescents with mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) have an excellent prognosis but relapses still occur. While chromosomal aberrations and/or clonal immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements may indicate risk of failure, a more universal approach was developed to detect minimal disease (MD). Children/adolescents with intermediate-risk B-NHL were treated with French-British-American/Lymphome Malins de Burkitt 96 (FAB/LMB96) B4 modified chemotherapy and rituximab. Specimens from diagnosis, end of induction (EOI), and end of therapy (EOT) were assayed for MD. Initial specimens were screened for IGHV family usage with primer pools followed by individual primers to identify MD. Thirty-two diagnostic/staging specimens screened positive with primer pools and unique IGHV family primers were identified. Two patients relapsed; first relapse (4 months from diagnosis) was MD-positive at EOI, the second (36 months from diagnosis) was MD-positive at EOT. At EOI, recurrent rates were similar between the MRD-positive and MRD-negative patients (P = 0·40). At EOT, only 13/32 patients had MRD data available with one relapse in the MRD-positive group and no recurrences in the MRD-negative group (P = 0·077). The study demonstrated molecular-disseminated disease in which IgIGHV primer pools could be used to assess MD. This feasibility study supports future investigations to assess the validity and significance of MD screening in a larger cohort of patients with intermediate-risk mature B-NHL. PMID:21496005

  1. Quality of life in adolescent and young adult cancer patients: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Gonçalves, Vânia; Sehovic, Ivana; Bowman, Meghan L; Reed, Damon R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors experience many unique challenges and quality of life (QoL) effects that persist beyond cancer diagnosis and treatment. Due to continuous improvements in technology and cancer treatments resulting in improved survival rates, the identification of late effects, survivorship issues, and QoL is moving to the forefront of cancer research. The goal of this systematic review was to identify key psychosocial factors impacting QoL in AYA oncology populations. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted using combinations of these phrases or keywords: “adolescent and young adult or AYA” AND “health outcomes OR quality of life OR psychology” AND “neoplasm OR cancer OR oncology”. A total of 35 articles were included in this review. Studies were classified into two categories: AYA perceptions and stakeholder perceptions. Results AYA cancer survivors were more likely to have “worse” or impaired QoL compared with the general population, regardless of other demographic factors. AYAs described both positive and negatives experiences with their medical care, the educational information received, and the supportive care services. Although health care professionals were likely to underestimate or misjudge the health preferences and support needs of AYAs, these perceptions varied across disciplines and levels of experience. Conclusion The literature is lacking in sufficient evidence-based interventions to improve QoL in AYA cancer populations. Further, the tools to adequately measure QoL in this population are also unsatisfactory. The literature, however, consistently shows agreement regarding the unique needs of this population, indicating a trend toward health care standardization within age ranges or life stages. We suggest the need for AYA-specific programs in health care institutions that comprise a multidisciplinary team that addresses all the unique medical and QoL needs of AYAs. PMID

  2. Sensory reweighting is altered in adolescent patients with scoliosis: Evidence from a neuromechanical model.

    PubMed

    Pialasse, Jean-Philippe; Descarreaux, Martin; Mercier, Pierre; Simoneau, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis is the most frequent spinal deformity in adolescence. While its aetiology remains unclear, impairments in balance control suggest a dysfunction of the sensorimotor control mechanisms. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the ability of patients with idiopathic scoliosis to reweigh sensory information. Using a neuromechanical model, the relative sensory weighting of vestibular and proprioceptive information was assessed. Sixteen healthy adolescents and respectively 20 and 16 adolescents with mild or severe scoliosis were recruited. Binaural bipolar galvanic vestibular stimulation was delivered to elicit postural movement along the coronal plane. The kinematics of the upper body, using normalized horizontal displacement of the 7th cervical vertebra, was recorded 1s before, 2s during, and 1s following vestibular stimulation. The neuromechanical model included active feedback mechanisms that generated corrective torque from the vestibular and proprioceptive error signals. The model successfully predicted the normalized horizontal displacement of the 7th cervical vertebra. All groups showed similar balance control before vestibular stimulation; however, the amplitude (i.e., peak horizontal displacement) of the body sway during and immediately following vestibular stimulation was approximately 3 times larger in patients compared to control adolescents. The outcome of the model revealed that patients assigned a larger weight to vestibular information compared to controls; vestibular weight was 6.03% for controls, whereas it was 13.09% and 13.26% for the mild and severe scoliosis groups, respectively. These results suggest that despite the amplitude of spine deformation, the sensory reweighting mechanism is altered similarly in adolescent patients with scoliosis.

  3. Nine-year change in statistical design, profile, and success rates of Phase II oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Paul, Barry; Marchenko, Olga; Song, Guochen; Patel, Neerali; Moschos, Stergios J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated nine-year trends in statistical design and other features of Phase II oncology clinical trials published in 2005, 2010, and 2014 in five leading oncology journals: Cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, and Lancet Oncology. The features analyzed included cancer type, multicenter vs. single-institution, statistical design, primary endpoint, number of treatment arms, number of patients per treatment arm, whether or not statistical methods were well described, whether the drug was found effective based on rigorous statistical testing of the null hypothesis, and whether the drug was recommended for future studies.

  4. Oncology Nursing as Ethical Practice.

    PubMed

    Barton-Burke, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    Many of us have patients we remember who left us with lasting memories. One such patient I cared for was a young man from Ghana. This young man had a wife, two children, and terminal cancer. He would not discuss the seriousness of his illness with his doctors, his nurses, his wife, or his community. However, from his hospital bed, he decided to go to Ghana to visit his mother. I was the clinical nurse specialist on the oncology unit at the time, and the nurses on the unit became upset with this man's plan because they knew that he would probably never return from Ghana. He would not die with his wife or his children surrounding his bedside, as in a U.S. healthcare setting. He would die with his mother in his country--in his own way.

  5. Evaluating ego defense mechanisms using clinical interviews: an empirical study of adolescent diabetic and psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, A M; Beardslee, W; Hauser, S T; Noam, G G; Powers, S I; Houlihan, J; Rider, E

    1986-12-01

    Ego defense mechanisms were studied in three groups of early adolescents: diabetic patients, non-psychotic psychiatric patients, and healthy high school students. Defenses were assessed from ratings of open-ended, in-depth interviews. High levels of denial and low levels of asceticism were found in all three groups. Comparisons between groups indicated that psychiatric patients had a distinctive profile of defense usage, in comparison to adolescents from the other two groups. An independent measure of ego development was positively correlated with the defenses of altruism, intellectualization, and suppression, while it was negatively correlated with acting out, avoidance, denial, displacement, projection, and repression. The findings of substantial differences in defense usage between the psychiatric and non-psychiatric samples, and the size and directions of the correlations with ego development level, lend support to the validity of the defense codes.

  6. Model of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: The Youth Project in Milan.

    PubMed

    Magni, Chiara; Veneroni, Laura; Silva, Matteo; Casanova, Michela; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Massimino, Maura; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Ferrari, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer form a particular group of patients with unique characteristics, who inhabit a so-called "no man's land" between pediatric and adult services. In the last 10 years, the scientific oncology community has started to pay attention to these patients, implementing dedicated programs. A standardized model of care directed toward patients in this age range has yet to be developed and neither the pediatric nor the adult oncologic systems perfectly fit these patients' needs. The Youth Project of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, dedicated to AYA with pediatric-type solid tumors, can be seen as a model of care for AYA patients, with its heterogeneous multidisciplinary staff and close cooperation with adult medical oncologists and surgeons. Further progress in the care of AYA cancer patients is still needed to improve their outcomes. PMID:27606308

  7. Personalized oncology: recent advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Madhu

    2013-01-01

    Personalized oncology is evidence-based, individualized medicine that delivers the right care to the right cancer patient at the right time and results in measurable improvements in outcomes and a reduction on health care costs. Evolving topics in personalized oncology such as genomic analysis, targeted drugs, cancer therapeutics and molecular diagnostics will be discussed in this review. Biomarkers and molecular individualized medicine are replacing the traditional "one size fits all" medicine. In the next decade the treatment of cancer will move from a reactive to a proactive discipline. The essence of personalized oncology lies in the use of biomarkers. These biomarkers can be from tissue, serum, urine or imaging and must be validated. Personalized oncology based on biomarkers is already having a remarkable impact. Three different types of biomarkers are of particular importance: predictive, prognostic and early response biomarkers. Tools for implementing preemptive medicine based on genetic and molecular diagnostic and interventions will improve cancer prevention. Imaging technologies such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Positron Emitted Tomography (PET) are already influencing the early detection and management of the cancer patient. Future advances in imaging are expected to be in the field of molecular imaging, integrated diagnostics, biology driven interventional radiology and theranostics. Molecular diagnostics identify individual cancer patients who are more likely to respond positively to targeted chemotherapies. Molecular diagnostics include testing for genes, gene expression, proteins and metabolites. The use of companion molecular diagnostics is expected to grow significantly in the future and will be integrated into new cancer therapies a single (bundled) package which will provide greater efficiency, value and cost savings. This approach represents a unique opportunity for integration, increased value in personalized oncology.

  8. Patient and Provider Factors Associated With American Indian and Alaska Native Adolescent Tobacco Use Screening

    PubMed Central

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y.; Suchy-Dicey, Astrid M.; Garroutte, Eva M.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tobacco use is the leading behavioral cause of death among adults 25 years or older. American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) communities confront some of the highest rates of tobacco use and of its sequelae. Primary care–based screening of adolescents is an integral step in the reduction of tobacco use, yet remains virtually unstudied. We examined whether delivery of tobacco screening in primary care visits is associated with patient and provider characteristics among AI/AN adolescents. Methods We used a cross-sectional analysis to examine tobacco screening among 4757 adolescent AI/AN patients served by 56 primary care providers at a large tribally managed health system between October 1, 2011 and May 31, 2014. Screening prevalence was examined in association with categorical patient characteristics (gender, age, clinic visited, insurance coverage) and provider characteristics (gender, age, tenure) using multilevel logistic regressions with individual provider identity as the nesting variable. Results Thirty-seven percent of eligible patients were screened. Gender of both providers and patients was associated with screening. Male providers delivered screening more often than female providers (odds ratio [OR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.7–3.9). Male patients had 20% lower odds of screening receipt (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.7–0.9) than female patients, independent of patient age and provider characteristics. Individual provider identity significantly contributed to variability in the mixed-effects model (variance component 2.2; 95% CI 1.4–3.4), suggesting individual provider effect. Conclusions Low tobacco screening delivery by female providers and the low receipt of screening among younger, male patients may identify targets for screening interventions. PMID:26319931

  9. The Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO) Project

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vidula; Sukhatme, Vikas P.; Vikas, P.

    2014-01-01

    The Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO) Project seeks to repurpose well-known and well-characterised non-cancer drugs for new uses in oncology. The rationale for this project is presented, examining current issues in oncological drug development, challenges for health systems, and existing and future patient needs. In addition to discussing the advantages of repurposing, the paper also outlines some of the characteristics used in the selection of drug candidates by this project. Challenges in moving candidate drugs into clinical trial and subsequent practice are also discussed. PMID:25075216

  10. Quality in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J.

    2007-05-15

    A modern approach to quality was developed in the United States at Bell Telephone Laboratories during the first part of the 20th century. Over the years, those quality techniques have been adopted and extended by almost every industry. Medicine in general and radiation oncology in particular have been slow to adopt modern quality techniques. This work contains a brief description of the history of research on quality that led to the development of organization-wide quality programs such as Six Sigma. The aim is to discuss the current approach to quality in radiation oncology as well as where quality should be in the future. A strategy is suggested with the goal to provide a threshold improvement in quality over the next 10 years.

  11. [Biosimilars in oncology].

    PubMed

    Barroso, Sérgio; Coutinho, Jorge; Damasceno, Margarida; Dinis, José; Forjaz de Lacerda, João; Gervásio, Helena; Leal da Costa, Fernando; Marques Pereira, Ana; Parreira, António; Principe, Fernando; Rodrigues, Helena; Sá, Anabela; Teixeira, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    The development of biotechnology drugs represents one of the great advances in medical therapy and it was observed an exponential growth in its use. The resource to these drugs in Oncology and Hematology is no exception and it soon became an essential element of an integrated and directed therapy strategy. The expiry of the first biotechnology drugs patents has opened the door for the development and marketing of biosimilars, which entry in the Portuguese market was recently approved. This article was built on the analysis of the available state-of-the-art information on biotechnology drugs, biosimilars and current legislation and it expresses the opinion of Oncology and Hematology experts about the substituition of biological drugs by biosimilars in clinical practice.

  12. Fertility Risk Assessment and Preservation in Male and Female Prepubertal and Adolescent Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zavras, Nikolaos; Siristatidis, Charalampos; Siatelis, Argyris; Koumarianou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Cancer represents the second cause of death in prepubertal children and adolescents, although it is currently associated with an overall survival rate of 80%–85%. The annual incidence rate is 186.6 per 1 million children and adolescents aged up to 19 years. Both disease and treatment options are associated with life-altering, long-term effects that require monitoring. Infertility is a common issue, and as such, fertility preservation represents an essential part in the management of young patients with cancer who are at risk of premature gonadal failure. This review deals with the up-to-date available data on fertility risk assessment and preservation strategies that should be addressed prior to antineoplastic therapy in this vulnerable subgroup of cancer patients. PMID:27398041

  13. An exploratory examination of patient and parental self-efficacy as predictors of weight gain in adolescents with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Catherine E.; Accurso, Erin C.; Arnow, Katherine D.; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether increases in adolescent or parental self-efficacy predicted subsequent weight gain in two different therapies for adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN). Method Participants were 121 adolescents with AN (M = 14.4 years, SD = 1.6), from a two-site randomized clinical trial for family-based treatment (FBT) and individual adolescent focused therapy (AFT). Both adolescent and parental self-efficacy were assessed at baseline and sessions 2, 4, 6, and 8. Adolescent self-efficacy was assessed using a generic measure of self-efficacy, while parental self-efficacy was assessed using a measure specific to the recovery of an eating disorder. Weight was assessed at baseline, sessions 1 through 8, and end of treatment. Mixed-effects models were used to evaluate the relation between patient and parent self-efficacy and subsequent weight gain, controlling for weight at the previous time point. Results For families who received FBT, greater within-treatment increases in parental self-efficacy predicted greater subsequent adolescent weight gain compared to those who received FBT with lesser change in parental self-efficacy and those who received AFT. Interestingly, adolescent self-efficacy did not significantly predict subsequent weight gain. Discussion Greater increases in parental self-efficacy predicted significantly greater subsequent weight gain for adolescents who received FBT, but the same was not true for adolescents who received AFT. Neither overall level nor change in adolescent self-efficacy significantly predicted subsequent weight gain in either treatment group. These findings emphasize the importance of increasing parental self-efficacy in FBT in order to impact adolescent weight outcomes. PMID:25808269

  14. Oncology Nursing and Shared Decision Making for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tariman, Joseph D; Mehmeti, Enisa; Spawn, Nadia; McCarter, Sarah P; Bishop-Royse, Jessica; Garcia, Ima; Hartle, Lisa; Szubski, Katharine

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to describe the contemporary role of the oncology nurse throughout the entire cancer shared decision-making (SDM) process. Study participants consisted of 30 nurses and nurse practitioners who are actively involved in direct care of patients with cancer in the inpatient or outpatient setting. The major themes that emerged from the content analysis are: oncology nurses have various roles at different time points and settings of cancer SDM processes; patient education, advocacy, and treatment side effects management are among the top nursing roles; oncology nurses value their participation in the cancer SDM process; oncology nurses believe they have a voice, but with various degrees of influence in actual treatment decisions; nurses' level of disease knowledge influences the degree of participation in cancer SDM; and the nursing role during cancer SDM can be complicated and requires flexibility.
. PMID:27668378

  15. Pediatric oncology in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kebudi, Rejin

    2012-03-01

    The survival of children with cancer has increased dramatically in the last decades, as a result of advances in diagnosis, treatment and supportive care. Each year in Turkey, 2500-3000 new childhood cancer cases are expected. According to the Turkish Pediatric Oncology Group and Turkish Pediatric Hematology Societies Registry, about 2000 new pediatric cancer cases are reported each year. The population in Turkey is relatively young. One fourth of the population is younger than 15 years of age. According to childhood mortality, cancer is the fourth cause of death (7.2%) after infections, cardiac deaths and accidents. The major cancers in children in Turkey are leukemia (31%), lymphoma (19%), central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms (13%), neuroblastomas (7%), bone tumors (6.1%), soft tissue sarcomas (6%), followed by renal tumors, germ cell tumors, retinoblastoma, carcinomas-epithelial neoplasms, hepatic tumors and others. Lymphomas rank second in frequency as in many developing countries in contrast to West Europe or USA, where CNS neoplasms rank second in frequency. The seven-year survival rate in children with malignancies in Turkey is 65.8%. The history of modern Pediatric Oncology in Turkey dates back to the 1970's. Pediatric Oncology has been accepted as a subspecialty in Turkey since 1983. Pediatric Oncologists are all well trained and dedicated. All costs for the diagnosis and treatment of children with cancer is covered by the government. Education and infrastructure for palliative care needs improvement.

  16. Model of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: The Youth Project in Milan

    PubMed Central

    Magni, Chiara; Veneroni, Laura; Silva, Matteo; Casanova, Michela; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Massimino, Maura; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Ferrari, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer form a particular group of patients with unique characteristics, who inhabit a so-called “no man’s land” between pediatric and adult services. In the last 10 years, the scientific oncology community has started to pay attention to these patients, implementing dedicated programs. A standardized model of care directed toward patients in this age range has yet to be developed and neither the pediatric nor the adult oncologic systems perfectly fit these patients’ needs. The Youth Project of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, dedicated to AYA with pediatric-type solid tumors, can be seen as a model of care for AYA patients, with its heterogeneous multidisciplinary staff and close cooperation with adult medical oncologists and surgeons. Further progress in the care of AYA cancer patients is still needed to improve their outcomes. PMID:27606308

  17. Model of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: The Youth Project in Milan

    PubMed Central

    Magni, Chiara; Veneroni, Laura; Silva, Matteo; Casanova, Michela; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Massimino, Maura; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Ferrari, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer form a particular group of patients with unique characteristics, who inhabit a so-called “no man’s land” between pediatric and adult services. In the last 10 years, the scientific oncology community has started to pay attention to these patients, implementing dedicated programs. A standardized model of care directed toward patients in this age range has yet to be developed and neither the pediatric nor the adult oncologic systems perfectly fit these patients’ needs. The Youth Project of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, dedicated to AYA with pediatric-type solid tumors, can be seen as a model of care for AYA patients, with its heterogeneous multidisciplinary staff and close cooperation with adult medical oncologists and surgeons. Further progress in the care of AYA cancer patients is still needed to improve their outcomes.

  18. A Follow-Up Study of School Phobic Adolescents Admitted to an In-Patient Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Jan

    1970-01-01

    of the 1/3 to 2/3 of school phobic adolescents who had returned to school after treatment at the in-patient unit, 1/3 of the group were well-adjusted, 1/3 had limited functioning, and 1/3 were severely incapacitated by neurotic problems and interpersonal difficulties. This paper is the basis of a talk delivered, by invitation, at the Charles Burns…

  19. Smile design for the adolescent patient--interdisciplinary management of anterior tooth size discrepancies.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Alexander B

    2008-05-01

    Adolescent patients often seek orthodontic treatment to correct spacing of the maxillary anterior teeth. If the spacing is caused by a tooth size discrepancy that affects one or more anterior teeth, an interdisciplinary treatment plan involving orthodontic, restorative, and periodontal treatment is recommended to achieve a harmonious esthetic result. This article describes a clinical approach for treatment of these complex cases, focusing on the importance of tooth form, gingival esthetics, and treatment sequencing.

  20. Using plain language skills to create an educational brochure about sperm banking for adolescent and young adult males with cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Kim; Wizowski, Lindsay; Duckworth, JoAnn; Cassano, Jane; Hahn, Shirley Ann; Neal, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Writing in plain language makes it easier for patients to read, understand, and make informed decisions about sperm banking. Greater attention to the issue and properly designed educational brochures for use by nurses in oncology and reproductive health is of evident importance but of unknown impact. A multidisciplinary clinical team followed an evidence-based, patient-centered approach to develop "plain language" patient education materials about sperm banking for adolescent and young adult (AYA) males with cancer. A patient education booklet was produced and implemented as part of the planned patient education for AYA male oncology patients at McMaster Children's Hospital, Hamilton Health Sciences, in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The patient education booklet for use by health professionals as a teaching tool to facilitate discussion with AYA males has been produced with the hope that it will contribute to better informed decision making regarding sperm banking and increased use of this technology for fertility preservation.

  1. Quality Indicators in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Das, Prajnan

    2013-03-15

    Oncologic specialty societies and multidisciplinary collaborative groups have dedicated considerable effort to developing evidence-based quality indicators (QIs) to facilitate quality improvement, accreditation, benchmarking, reimbursement, maintenance of certification, and regulatory reporting. In particular, the field of radiation oncology has a long history of organized quality assessment efforts and continues to work toward developing consensus quality standards in the face of continually evolving technologies and standards of care. This report provides a comprehensive review of the current state of quality assessment in radiation oncology. Specifically, this report highlights implications of the healthcare quality movement for radiation oncology and reviews existing efforts to define and measure quality in the field, with focus on dimensions of quality specific to radiation oncology within the “big picture” of oncologic quality assessment efforts.

  2. Quality and safety in pediatric hematology/oncology.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Brigitta U

    2014-06-01

    Many principles of quality of care and patient safety are at the foundation of pediatric hematology/oncology. However, we still see too many errors, continue to have problems with communication, and the culture in many of our areas is still one of worrying about retribution when mentioning a problem. This review explores why specialists in pediatric hematology/oncology should be leaders in the field of quality and safety in healthcare.

  3. The cancer registry: a clinical repository of oncology data.

    PubMed

    Hoyler, S S

    1997-02-01

    Health care institutions need complete and accurate data to plan, monitor, and evaluate their oncology programs. Although financial and discharge data are available, clinical repositories generally are not. For oncology, the cancer registry database serves as a clinical repository. The data in the registry are complete, accurate, and readily available. They can be used to plan new services, evaluate existing programs, and monitor patient care. PMID:10165382

  4. Diagnostic value of symptoms and laboratory data for pertussis in adolescent and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several symptoms are classically thought to be suggestive of pertussis in children, but the diagnostic value of these symptoms in adolescent and adult patients is unclear. We evaluated the accuracy of the clinical findings for the early presumptive diagnosis of pertussis in adolescent and adult patients. Furthermore, we measured fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) with regard to whether we could distinguish eosinophilic inflammation of the airway and pertussis. FeNO is not expected to be associated with pertussis. Methods We compared 183 cases with laboratory-confirmed pertussis using serology and polymerase chain reaction and 1,132 cases without laboratory-confirmed pertussis. Results Among pertussis patients, paroxysmal cough was common with 90% sensitivity, but the specificity was low (25%). Posttussive vomiting and whoop were less common (sensitivity 25% and 19%, respectively), but both showed greater specificity for pertussis (80% and 86%, respectively). Posttussive gagging was observed with intermediate frequency and provided greater specificity (49% and 77%, respectively). Pertussis cases were most frequent between May and August with a peak in June. The mean FeNO value for the pertussis patients was 18.2 ± 9.2 ppb, which was significantly lower than that in asthma patients (56.9 ± 20.3 ppb, p <0.001). The most useful definition was posttussive vomiting and/or gagging, and a plus normal FeNO value, which had a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 70%. Conclusions Clinical symptoms and laboratory data are of limited value in making the diagnosis of pertussis, and it was clinically difficult to differentiate adolescent and adult patients with or without pertussis. However, pertussis should be considered if patients have posttussive vomiting and/or gagging and a normal FeNO concentration. PMID:23496900

  5. Audit of pediatric hematology-oncology outpatients in Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Menon, Bina Sharine; Juraida, Eni; Ibrahim, Hishamshah; Mohamed, Mahfuzah; Ho, Caroline; Khuzaiah, Raja

    2008-07-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the types of cancers and hematological disorders in patients attending a pediatric hematology-oncology clinic. This was a prospective study at the Pediatric Institute, General Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from June 2005-November 2006. During the 18-month study, 803 patients attended the clinic, 730 had oncological problems and 73 had hematological problems. The age range was from 2 months to 28 years (median 6 years). The patients were Malay (66%), Chinese (23%), Indian (10%) and other races (1%). Of the oncological patients, 51% had either leukemia (n=293) or lymphoma (n=77). The other most common diagnoses were retinoblastoma, followed by Wilm's tumor and germ cell tumors. Six patients (0.8%) developed a second malignant neoplasm. Of the hematological patients, 60% had platelet disorders, most commonly chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Twenty-four per cent had bone marrow failure and 16% had red cell disorders.

  6. Use of electronic medical records in oncology outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Kanas, Gena; Morimoto, Libby; Mowat, Fionna; O'Malley, Cynthia; Fryzek, Jon; Nordyke, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Oncology outcomes research could benefit from the use of an oncology-specific electronic medical record (EMR) network. The benefits and challenges of using EMR in general health research have been investigated; however, the utility of EMR for oncology outcomes research has not been explored. Compared to current available oncology databases and registries, an oncology-specific EMR could provide comprehensive and accurate information on clinical diagnoses, personal and medical histories, planned and actual treatment regimens, and post-treatment outcomes, to address research questions from patients, policy makers, the pharmaceutical industry, and clinicians/researchers. Specific challenges related to structural (eg, interoperability, data format/entry), clinical (eg, maintenance and continuity of records, variety of coding schemes), and research-related (eg, missing data, generalizability, privacy) issues must be addressed when building an oncology-specific EMR system. Researchers should engage with medical professional groups to guide development of EMR systems that would ultimately help improve the quality of cancer care through oncology outcomes research.

  7. Interventional oncology in multidisciplinary cancer treatment in the 21(st) century.

    PubMed

    Adam, Andreas; Kenny, Lizbeth M

    2015-02-01

    Interventional oncology is an evolving branch of interventional radiology, which relies on rapidly evolving, highly sophisticated treatment tools and precise imaging guidance to target and destroy malignant tumours. The development of this field has important potential benefits for patients and the health-care system, but as a new discipline, interventional oncology has not yet fully established its place in the wider field of oncology; its application does not have a comprehensive evidence base, or a clinical or quality-assurance framework within which to operate. In this regard, radiation oncology, a cornerstone of modern cancer care, has a lot of important information to offer to interventional oncologists. A strong collaboration between radiation oncology and interventional oncology, both of which aim to cure or control tumours or to relieve symptoms with as little collateral damage to normal tissue as possible, will have substantial advantages for both disciplines. A close relationship with radiation oncology will help facilitate the development of a robust quality-assurance framework and accumulation of evidence to support the integration of interventional oncology into multidisciplinary care. Furthermore, collaboration between interventional oncology and radiation oncology fields will have great benefits to practitioners, people affected by cancer, and to the wider field of oncology.

  8. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Moughan, Jennifer; Garofalo, Michael C.; Bendell, Johanna; Berger, Adam C.; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Perera, Francisco; Jabbour, Salma K.; Nowlan, Adam; DeNittis, Albert; Crane, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  9. Paediatric radiation oncology in the care of childhood cancer: A position paper by the International Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS).

    PubMed

    Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Freeman, Carolyn; Marcus, Karen; Claude, Line; Dieckmann, Karin; Halperin, Edward; Esiashvili, Natia; Paulino, Arnold; Mahajan, Anita; Seiersen, Klaus; Ahern, Verity; Ricardi, Umberto; Carrie, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Paediatric malignancies are a challenge for the radiation oncologist due to their rarity, the great variety of histological types, and the complexity of treatment concepts that evolve over time. The Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS) is the only internationally operating society for paediatric radiation oncology. The objectives of PROS are to set a world-wide standard of excellence with respect to radiation oncology aspects in curing children and adolescents with cancer, to provide a forum for communication between radiation oncologists, and to exchange information with all professionals involved in the management of paediatric and adolescent cancer. Challenges include the need to promote education and support practice in low and middle income countries (LMIC) as well as the cost and availability of modern treatment technologies for all but most especially these countries. Collaborations with other societies that include for example the education programmes provided jointly with ESTRO, and the upgraded technical platform of the PROS web site offer new possibilities to enhance the efficacy of PROS in education and support of paediatric radiation oncology practice world-wide. PROS has made an important contribution to the management of childhood malignancies over the past decade and new and developing collaborations between PROS and other societies or organizations will ultimately lead to a reduction in world-wide health care inequalities. PMID:27106553

  10. Clinicopathologic analysis of isolated hematuria in child/adolescent and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, GuangLei; Zhu, Jun; Song, MingHui; Ma, Lu; Pan, Tao; Yang, Qi; Zhang, WenSheng

    2015-12-01

    To our knowledge, no in-depth clinicopathologic study of isolated hematuria (IH) is currently available. To address this gap, we analyzed the clinicopathologic features of IH as it manifests in child/adolescent and adult patients. The clinical data and pathological types of 543 IH patients who underwent renal pathological examinations from January 2005 to June 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical manifestations differed among the age groups: children/adolescents exhibited the highest percentage of mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (41.78%), whereas adults showed the highest percentage of immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) (52.39%). In addition, the percentage of IH patients who were classified according to clinical pathology differed from that of patients who were classified according to renal pathological type. Patients with IgAN who were found to have minimal proteinuria had more severe IH. For IH patients, especially those with a small amount of proteinuria, renal biopsy should be performed as early as possible in order to develop a long-term treatment plan and prognosis evaluation. PMID:27003766

  11. Perioperative transfusion of leukocyte depleted blood products in gastric cancer patients negatively influences oncologic outcome: A retrospective propensity score weighted analysis on 610 curatively resected gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Reim, Daniel; Strobl, Andreas N; Buchner, Christian; Schirren, Rebekka; Mueller, Werner; Luppa, Peter; Ankerst, Donna Pauler; Friess, Helmut; Novotny, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The influence of perioperative transfusion (PT) on outcome following surgery for gastric cancer (GC) remains controversial, with randomized trials lacking and observational series confounded by patient risk factors. This analysis determines the association between reception of leukocyte-depleted blood products and post-operative survival for GC.Data from 610 patients who underwent curative surgery for GC in a German tertiary care clinic from 2001 to 2013 were included. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied to determine the association of PT and clinical and patient risk factors for overall and relapse-free survival. Propensity score analysis was performed to adjust for observational biases in reception of PT.Higher Union International Contre le Cancer/American Joint Committee on Cancer (UICC/AJCC)-stages (P <0.001), postoperative complications and severity according to the Clavien-Dindo (CD) classification (P <0.001), PT (P = 0.02), higher age (P <0.001), and neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P <0.001) were related to increased mortality rates. Higher UICC-stages (P <0.001), neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P <0.001), and type of surgery (P = 0.02) were independently associated with increased relapse rates. Patients were more likely to receive PT with higher age (P = 0.05), surgical extension to adjacent organs/structures (P = 0.002), tumor location (P = 0.003), and female gender (P = 0.03). In the adjusted propensity score weighted analysis, PT remained associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio (HR): 1.31, 95% CI: 1.01-1.69, P = 0.04).Because of the association of PT with negative influence on patient survival following resection for GC, risks from application of blood products should be weighed against the potential benefits. PMID:27442682

  12. Guidelines for treatment naming in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Denton, Travis R; Shields, Lisa B E; Hahl, Michael; Maudlin, Casey; Bassett, Mark; Spalding, Aaron C

    2016-01-01

    Safety concerns may arise from a lack of standardization and ambiguity during the treatment planning and delivery process in radiation therapy. A standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention in radiation therapy was developed by a task force comprised of several Radiation Oncology Societies. We present a nested-survey approach in a community setting to determine the methodology for radiation oncology departments to standardize their practice. Our Institution's continuous quality improvement (CQI) committee recognized that, due to growth from one to three centers, significant variability existed within plan parameters specific to patients' treatment. A multidiscipline, multiclinical site consortium was established to create a guideline for standard naming. Input was gathered using anonymous, electronic surveys from physicians, physicists, dosimetrists, chief therapists, and nurse managers. Surveys consisted of several primary areas of interest: anatomical sites, course naming, treatment plan naming, and treatment field naming. Additional concepts included capitalization, specification of laterality, course naming in the event of multiple sites being treated within the same course of treatment, primary versus boost planning, the use of bolus, revisions for plans, image-guidance field naming, forbidden characters, and standard units for commonly used physical quantities in radiation oncology practice. Guidelines for standard treatment naming were developed that could be readily adopted. This multidisciplinary study provides a clear, straightforward, and easily implemented protocol for the radiotherapy treatment process. Standard nomenclature facilitates the safe means of communication between team members in radiation oncology. The guidelines presented in this work serve as a model for radiation oncology clinics to standardize their practices. PMID:27074449

  13. Comparative Effectiveness Research in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although randomized controlled trials represent the gold standard for comparative effective research (CER), a number of additional methods are available when randomized controlled trials are lacking or inconclusive because of the limitations of such trials. In addition to more relevant, efficient, and generalizable trials, there is a need for additional approaches utilizing rigorous methodology while fully recognizing their inherent limitations. CER is an important construct for defining and summarizing evidence on effectiveness and safety and comparing the value of competing strategies so that patients, providers, and policymakers can be offered appropriate recommendations for optimal patient care. Nevertheless, methodological as well as political and social challenges for CER remain. CER requires constant and sophisticated methodological oversight of study design and analysis similar to that required for randomized trials to reduce the potential for bias. At the same time, if appropriately conducted, CER offers an opportunity to identify the most effective and safe approach to patient care. Despite rising and unsustainable increases in health care costs, an even greater challenge to the implementation of CER arises from the social and political environment questioning the very motives and goals of CER. Oncologists and oncology professional societies are uniquely positioned to provide informed clinical and methodological expertise to steer the appropriate application of CER toward critical discussions related to health care costs, cost-effectiveness, and the comparative value of the available options for appropriate care of patients with cancer. PMID:23697601

  14. Oncology Nurse Participation in Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Oncology nurses are playing an important role in the provision of survivorship care. Their involvement includes educating and coordinating multidiscipline teams to initiate and provide care to patients and families. Oncology nurses participate in this evolving model of care in a variety of ways. Using the IOM report recommendations for the provision of quality cancer care nurses provide care based on the specific characteristics of individual health care settings and the populations they serve. Evaluating the settings resources and goals for desired survivorship activities as part of the planning process can be the difference between success and failure. Collaborating with local and national resources for cancer survivors can help expand services for a setting in an efficient and cost effective manner. Models of care vary and resources and communication differs among cancer care settings. Survivorship care differs as a result, across different models. Nurses are key to the dissemination and coordination of survivorship activities and are critical in facilitating communication between health care providers, the patients and caregivers. Nurses have a significant role in the dissemination and coordination of information between the patient and other health care providers. Oncology care does not end when treatment ends. PMID:21112849

  15. Attitudes of Chinese Oncology Physicians Toward Death with Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-ping; Huang, Bo-yan; Yi, Ting-wu; Deng, Yao-Tiao; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yu-qing; Zhang, Zong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Death with dignity (DWD) refers to the refusal of life-prolonging measures for terminally ill patients by “living wills” forms in advance. More and more oncology physicians are receiving DWD requests from advance cancer patients in mainland China. Objective: The study objective was to investigate the attitudes of Chinese oncology physicians toward the legalization and implementation of DWD. Methods: A questionnaire investigating the understanding and attitudes toward DWD was administered to 257 oncology physicians from 11 hospitals in mainland China. Results: The effective response rate was 86.8% (223/257). The majority of oncology physicians (69.1%) had received DWD requests from patients. Half of the participants (52.5%) thought that the most important reason was the patients' unwillingness to maintain survival through machines. One-third of participants (33.0%) attributed the most important reason to suffering from painful symptoms. Most oncology physicians (78.9%) had knowledge about DWD. A fifth of respondents did not know the difference between DWD and euthanasia, and a few even considered DWD as euthanasia. The majority of oncology physicians supported the legalization (88.3%) and implementation (83.9%) of DWD. Conclusions: Many Chinese oncology physicians have received advanced cancer patients' DWD requests and think that DWD should be legalized and implemented. Chinese health management departments should consider the demands of physicians and patients. It is important to inform physicians about the difference between DWD and euthanasia, as one-fifth of them were confused about it. PMID:27022774

  16. [Postoperative radiotherapy in patients with invasive uterine cervix cancer treated previously with simple hysterectomy. Results from the Hospital de Oncología, Centro Médico Nacional SXXI. ].

    PubMed

    Huerta Bahena, Judith; Labastida Almendaro, Sonia; Cortez Arroyo, Héctor; Calva, Angel

    2003-06-01

    Invasive carcinoma found after simple hysterectomy for several causes is an increasing clinical condition. That situation results in the necessity for further therapy: re-operation or radiotherapy. The purpose of this review is to analyze our results with postoperative radiotherapy for these patients. In 1998, 59 patients were submitted to postoperative radiotherapy at the Oncology Hospital, Medical Cancer Center for invasive cervical cancer found after simple hysterectomy for several causes. All patients had postoperative radiotherapy, the dose depended of the magnitude of residual disease after surgery (range 10-80 Gy). After surgery 27 patients had gross residual disease; and no residual disease or microscopic disease was present in 32 patients. Three years overall survival rate was 59% for the whole group. With the results of the univariate analysis, prognostic factors found that significantly affect disease free survival were interval between hysterectomy and radiotherapy of more than 6 months, radiotherapy dose less than 50 Grays and histology. With multivariate analysis only presence of gross residual disease affect significantly disease free survival p = 0.0000. Postoperative radiotherapy results in patients with invasor cervical cancer incidentally found in hysterectomy specimens with minimal residual disease are excellent. However with the presence of more extensive residual disease the results in disease free survival are worse than those obtained in patients with similar stages who had not been treated with hysterectomy. A well established diagnostic procedure must be done in all patients candidates to simple hysterectomy.

  17. Nasal septum changes in adolescent patients treated with rapid maxillary expansion

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Tehnia; Wheatley, Francis Carter; Ansari, Kal; Lagravere, Manuel; Major, Michael; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans to measure changes in nasal septal deviation (NSD) after rapid maxillary expansion (RME) treatment in adolescent patients. Methods: This retrospective study involved 33 patients presenting with moderate to severe nasal septum deviation as an incidental finding. Out of these 33 patients, 26 were treated for transverse maxillary constriction with RME and seven, who did not undergo RME treatment, were included in the study as control group. CBCT scans were taken before appliance insertion and after appliance removal. These images were analyzed to measure changes in nasal septum deviation (NSD). Analysis of variance for repeated measures (ANOVA) was used. Results: No significant changes were identified in NSD regardless of the application or not of RME treatment and irrespective of the baseline deviation degree. Conclusion: This study did not provide strong evidence to suggest that RME treatment has any effect on NSD in adolescent patients; however, the results should be interpreted with caution, due to the small sample size and large variation amongst individual patient characteristics. PMID:27007761

  18. [Oncological care according Alfred Schütz].

    PubMed

    Popim, Regina Célia; Boemer, Magali Roseira

    2005-01-01

    The study was realized among oncological nurses in their daily work routine and aimed to understand these professionals' subjective action, starting from their relation with patients, adopting a phenomenological reference framework based on the ideas of Alfred Schütz. The question: what does working in oncological care mean to you? Please describe, was used to collect statements, which were analyzed and clarified the typical action of a nurse caregiver in this daily routine. The study revealed that oncological care implies dealing with humans in a fragile situation; requires a relationship of affectivity; is care delivery that entails the genesis of professional burnout. Care delivery in oncology is highly complex, requiring a professional competence that goes beyond the technical-scientific sphere. Nursing professionals need to seek strategies which enable them to face the fatigue they are submitted to in their work. PMID:16308624

  19. Regulatory and clinical considerations for biosimilar oncology drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L; Chen, Brian; Hermanson, Terhi; Wyatt, Michael D; Schulz, Richard M; Georgantopoulos, Peter; Kessler, Samuel; Raisch, Dennis W; Qureshi, Zaina P; Lu, Z Kevin; Love, Bryan L; Noxon, Virginia; Bobolts, Laura; Armitage, Melissa; Bian, John; Ray, Paul; Ablin, Richard J; Hrushesky, William J; Macdougall, Iain C; Sartor, Oliver; Armitage, James O

    2015-01-01

    Biological oncology products are integral to cancer treatment, but their high costs pose challenges to patients, families, providers, and insurers. The introduction of biosimilar agents—molecules that are similar in structure, function, activity, immunogenicity, and safety to the original biological drugs—provide opportunities both to improve healthcare access and outcomes, and to reduce costs. Several international regulatory pathways have been developed to expedite entry of biosimilars into global marketplaces. The first wave of oncology biosimilar use was in Europe and India in 2007. Oncology biosimilars are now widely marketed in several countries in Europe, and in Australia, Japan, China, Russia, India, and South Korea. Their use is emerging worldwide, with the notable exception of the USA, where several regulatory and cost barriers to biosimilar approval exist. In this Review, we discuss oncology biosimilars and summarise their regulatory frameworks, clinical experiences, and safety concerns. PMID:25456378

  20. Regulatory and clinical considerations for biosimilar oncology drugs.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Charles L; Chen, Brian; Hermanson, Terhi; Wyatt, Michael D; Schulz, Richard M; Georgantopoulos, Peter; Kessler, Samuel; Raisch, Dennis W; Qureshi, Zaina P; Lu, Z Kevin; Love, Bryan L; Noxon, Virginia; Bobolts, Laura; Armitage, Melissa; Bian, John; Ray, Paul; Ablin, Richard J; Hrushesky, William J; Macdougall, Iain C; Sartor, Oliver; Armitage, James O

    2014-12-01

    Biological oncology products are integral to cancer treatment, but their high costs pose challenges to patients, families, providers, and insurers. The introduction of biosimilar agents-molecules that are similar in structure, function, activity, immunogenicity, and safety to the original biological drugs-provide opportunities both to improve health-care access and outcomes, and to reduce costs. Several international regulatory pathways have been developed to expedite entry of biosimilars into global marketplaces. The first wave of oncology biosimilar use was in Europe and India in 2007. Oncology biosimilars are now widely marketed in several countries in Europe, and in Australia, Japan, China, Russia, India, and South Korea. Their use is emerging worldwide, with the notable exception of the USA, where several regulatory and cost barriers to biosimilar approval exist. In this Review, we discuss oncology biosimilars and summarise their regulatory frameworks, clinical experiences, and safety concerns.

  1. The Future of Precision Medicine in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Millner, Lori M; Strotman, Lindsay N

    2016-09-01

    Precision medicine in oncology focuses on identifying which therapies are most effective for each patient based on genetic characterization of the cancer. Traditional chemotherapy is cytotoxic and destroys all cells that are rapidly dividing. The foundation of precision medicine is targeted therapies and selecting patients who will benefit most from these therapies. One of the newest aspects of precision medicine is liquid biopsy. A liquid biopsy includes analysis of circulating tumor cells, cell-free nucleic acid, or exosomes obtained from a peripheral blood draw. These can be studied individually or in combination and collected serially, providing real-time information as a patient's cancer changes. PMID:27514468

  2. 12-step participation and outcomes over 7 years among adolescent substance use patients with and without psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Chi, Felicia W; Sterling, Stacy; Campbell, Cynthia I; Weisner, Constance

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the associations between 12-step participation and outcomes over 7 years among 419 adolescent substance use patients with and without psychiatric comorbidities. Although level of participation decreased over time for both groups, comorbid adolescents participated in 12-step groups at comparable or higher levels across time points. Results from mixed-effects logistic regression models indicated that for both groups, 12-step participation was associated with both alcohol and drug abstinence at follow-ups, increasing the likelihood of either by at least 3 times. Findings highlight the potential benefits of 12-step participation in maintaining long-term recovery for adolescents with and without psychiatric disorders. PMID:23327502

  3. 12-step participation and outcomes over 7 years among adolescent substance use patients with and without psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Chi, Felicia W; Sterling, Stacy; Campbell, Cynthia I; Weisner, Constance

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the associations between 12-step participation and outcomes over 7 years among 419 adolescent substance use patients with and without psychiatric comorbidities. Although level of participation decreased over time for both groups, comorbid adolescents participated in 12-step groups at comparable or higher levels across time points. Results from mixed-effects logistic regression models indicated that for both groups, 12-step participation was associated with both alcohol and drug abstinence at follow-ups, increasing the likelihood of either by at least 3 times. Findings highlight the potential benefits of 12-step participation in maintaining long-term recovery for adolescents with and without psychiatric disorders.

  4. Prospective Changes in Body Image Dissatisfaction among Adolescent Bariatric Patients: The Importance of Body Size Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, M.B.; Eshleman, K.E.; Reiter-Purtill, J.; Zeller, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Body image dissatisfaction (BID) is pervasive among patients presenting for bariatric surgery but significantly improves post-operatively. These findings are based primarily on studies of adults. Objective The objective of this study was to examine changes in BID among adolescents with extreme obesity from baseline/preoperative to 6 and 12 months following bariatric surgery using body size estimation. Setting Pediatric Medical Center. Methods BID was prospectively assessed among 16 adolescent bariatric patients (Mage=16.3±1.2, MBMI=66.2±12.0, 67% female) using a standard visual/perceptual measure [i.e., Stunkard Figure Rating Scale. Participants identified Current and Ideal body size, with a discrepancy score (Current – Ideal) indicating BID. Body size estimation ratings were compared to attitudinal (i.e., IWQOL-Kids: Body Esteem and Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents: Physical Appearance) body image scores, BMI (kg/m2), and Total weight-related quality of life (WRQOL). Results There was a significant reduction in Current body size (7.9 to 6.4, p<.001) from baseline to 6 months but not from 6 to 12 months. Current body size was related to BMI and %EWL but not attitudinal body image at each time point. Smaller Discrepancy (Current – Ideal) was associated with higher Total WRQOL (r=−0.68), with a trend towards significance for Body Esteem (r=−0.65) at 12 months. Conclusions Adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery experience significantly decreased BID within the first 12 months post-surgery, with the most substantial change between baseline and 6 months. Post-operative WRQOL is more closely associated to body size discrepancy than current body size. PMID:22154271

  5. [Psychosocial problems of lymphedema patients in adolescence. Two case reports].

    PubMed

    Rogge, H

    1993-08-01

    Two case reports are presented. A ten year-old boy is impeded in his social activities as sports and a seventeen year-old girl in uptaking the normal activities of a young woman. Both are threatened by the "lymphologic rules" and possibly overprotective mothers, in consequence adverse psychic structures may develop. Physiotherapist and physicians are requested to give advice to the young patients and their parents. PMID:8379247

  6. Spirituality and religion in oncology.

    PubMed

    Peteet, John R; Balboni, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the difficulty in clearly defining and measuring spirituality, a growing literature describes its importance in oncology and survivorship. Religious/spiritual beliefs influence patients' decision-making with respect to both complementary therapies and aggressive care at the end of life. Measures of spirituality and spiritual well-being correlate with quality of life in cancer patients, cancer survivors, and caregivers. Spiritual needs, reflective of existential concerns in several domains, are a source of significant distress, and care for these needs has been correlated with better psychological and spiritual adjustment as well as with less aggressive care at the end of life. Studies show that while clinicians such as nurses and physicians regard some spiritual care as an appropriate aspect of their role, patients report that they provide it infrequently. Many clinicians report that their religious/spiritual beliefs influence their practice, and practices such as mindfulness have been shown to enhance clinician self-care and equanimity. Challenges remain in the areas of conceptualizing and measuring spirituality, developing and implementing training for spiritual care, and coordinating and partnering with chaplains and religious communities.

  7. Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Hurkmans, Coen; Mutic, Sasa; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Brame, Scott; Straube, William; Galvin, James; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Michalski, Jeff; Bosch, Walter

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were

  8. Escitalopram: in the treatment of major depressive disorder in adolescent patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lily P H; Scott, Lesley J

    2010-06-01

    Escitalopram is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), and is the second antidepressant to be approved for use in treating major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescent patients (aged 12-17 years) in the US. In a randomized, double-blind, flexible-dose, multicenter trial, once-daily escitalopram 10-20 mg (n = 154) for 8 weeks was significantly better than placebo (n = 157) in improving the severity of depressive symptoms (as assessed by the change in the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised [CDRS-R] total score) in adolescent patients with MDD. Preliminary data from a combined analysis of the double-blind data from this trial and double-blind data from a 16-week, fixed-dose, extension study suggest a significant difference between escitalopram and placebo recipients in the change in CDRS-R total scores after 24 weeks of treatment. In a similarly designed flexible-dose trial in pediatric patients (aged 6-17 years), a significant difference between once-daily escitalopram 10-20 mg (n = 77) and placebo (n = 80) for 8 weeks, as assessed by the change in CDRS-R total score, was not shown in the primary analysis (i.e. patients of all ages). In a pre-specified subgroup of adolescent patients, no significant difference was shown between the escitalopram and the placebo groups when analyzed using the last observation carried forward method, but was shown using the observed case method. Escitalopram 10-20 mg/day showed better efficacy than placebo for some secondary endpoints (e.g. the change in the Clinical Global Impression [CGI]-Severity score, the CGI-Improvement response rate) but not others (e.g. CDRS-R response rate, rate of remission) [corrected].Once-daily escitalopram 10-20 mg for 8 weeks was generally well tolerated in clinical trials in adolescent or pediatric patients with MDD. The incidence of suicidality-related adverse events was generally similar between escitalopram and placebo recipients.

  9. Vandetanib Successfully Controls Medullary Thyroid Cancer-Related Cushing Syndrome in an Adolescent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nella, A. A.; Fox, E.; Balis, F. M.; Quezado, M. M.; Whitcomb, P. O.; Derdak, J.; Kebebew, E.; Widemann, B. C.; Stratakis, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ectopic Cushing syndrome due to ACTH secretion from metastatic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: The aim of the study was to describe the first case of Cushing syndrome associated with MTC in a pediatric patient and the successful reversal of Cushing syndrome with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (vandetanib) therapy. Patient and Methods: A 17-year-old Brazilian adolescent presented with metastatic MTC and associated ACTH-dependent ectopic Cushing syndrome in the context of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B. When the patient was treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, rapid decrease in serum cortisol and improvement of clinical symptoms were observed. Conclusion: We describe the first pediatric case of clinical and biochemical improvement of paraneoplastic MTC-related Cushing syndrome after treatment with vandetanib. Vandetanib and possibly other tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be a novel beneficial option in patients with neuroendocrine tumor-related ectopic Cushing syndrome. PMID:24617713

  10. Cerebral thrombotic complications in adolescent leukemia/lymphoma patients treated with L-asparaginase-containing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Toshihiko; Morimoto, Akira; Kato, Ryuichi; Izumi, Moriatu; Murakami, Aki; Matuo, Satoshi; Kiyosawa, Nobuyuki; Kano, Gen; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2005-05-01

    We described the cerebral thrombotic complications developed in 2 adolescent patients treated with L-asparaginase-containing regimens. For determining risk factors, we retrospectively analysed hemostatic markers in 19 pediatric patients with leukemia or lymphoma who were treated with either 1 of the 2 L-asparaginase-containing regimens; 11 were treated with VLP1 and the remaining 8 were treated with the VLAD protocol. The data indicated that low coagulation factors in association with increased plasma D-dimer levels during or post-L-asparaginase administration combined with fresh frozen plasma infusion might have activated coagulation processes in these patients. Careful management is required to prevent such episodes in patients with markedly decreased coagulation factors and increased D-dimer levels following L-asparaginase administration.

  11. [Novel quality assurance method in oncology: the two-level, multi-disciplinary and oncotherapy oncology team system].

    PubMed

    Mangel, László; Kövér, Erika; Szilágyi, István; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Bércesi, Eva; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Holcz, Tibor; Karádi, Oszkár; Farkas, Róbert; Csák, Szilvia; Csere, Tibor; Kásler, Miklós

    2012-12-16

    By now therapy decision taken by a multi-disciplinary oncology team in cancer care has become a routine method in worldwide. However, multi-disciplinary oncology team has to face more and more difficulties in keeping abreast with the fast development in oncology science, increasing expectations, and financial considerations. Naturally the not properly controlled decision mechanisms, the permanent lack of time and shortage of professionals are also hindering factors. Perhaps it would be a way out if the staff meetings and discussions of physicians in the oncology departments were transformed and provided with administrative, legal and decision credentials corresponding to those of multi-disciplinary oncology team. The new form of the oncotherapy oncoteam might be able to decide the optimal and particular treatment after previous consultation with the patient. The oncotherapy oncoteam is also suitable to carry out training and tasks of a cancer centre and by diminishing the psychological burden of the doctors it contributes to an improved patient care. This study presents the two-level multi-disciplinary and oncotherapy oncology team system at the University of Pécs including the detailed analysis of the considerations above.

  12. Integrative Physical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Chauviere, Arnaud; Bauer, Amy L.; Leier, André; Lewis, Michael T.; Macklin, Paul; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T.; Bearer, Elaine L.; Cristini, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is arguably the ultimate complex biological system. Solid tumors are micro-structured soft matter that evolves as a consequence of spatio-temporal events at the intracellular (e.g., signaling pathways, macromolecular trafficking), intercellular (e.g., cell-cell adhesion/communication), and tissue (e.g., cell-extracellular matrix interactions, mechanical forces) scales. To gain insight, tumor and developmental biologists have gathered a wealth of molecular, cellular and genetic data, including immunohistochemical measurements of cell type-specific division and death rates, lineage tracing, and gain-of-function/loss-of-function mutational analyses. These data are empirically extrapolated to a diagnosis/prognosis of tissue-scale behavior, e.g., for clinical decision. Integrative Physical Oncology (IPO) is the science that develops physically consistent mathematical approaches to address the significant challenge of bridging the nano (nm)-micro (μm) to macro (mm, cm) scales with respect to tumor development and progression. In the current literature, such approaches are referred to as multiscale modeling. In the present review, we attempt to assess recent modeling approaches on each separate scale and critically evaluate the current “hybrid-multiscale” models used to investigate tumor growth in the context of brain and breast cancers. Finally, we provide our perspective on the further development and the impact of Integrative Physical Oncology. PMID:21853537

  13. Evaluation of the Immediate Dentofacial Changes in Late Adolescent Patients Treated with the Forsus™ FRD

    PubMed Central

    Gunay, Esen Ali; Arun, Tulin; Nalbantgil, Didem

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term dentoalveolar and soft tissue changes in late adolescent patients treated with the Forsus™ FRD. Methods: A prospective study was carried out on 54 lateral cephalometric radiograms that were taken before placement and after removal of the appliance in the treatment group (15 subjects) and at the beginning and six months after in the control group (12 subjects). The patient selection criteria were as follows: skeletal and dental Class II malocclusion due to retrognatic mandible, normal or low-angle growth pattern, post-peak growth period, no extracted or congenitally missing permanent teeth, and minimum crowding in the lower dental arch. Results: The statistical assesment of the data suggested the following results: No sagital and vertical skeletal changes were induced. The mandibular incisors were protruded and intruded, while the maxillary incisors were retruded and extruded. The occlusal plane was rotated in clockwise direction as a result of these dentoalveolar changes. Overbite and overjet were reduced in all patients. Soft tissue profile slightly improved. Conclusions: The results revealed that, in late-adolescent patients Forsus™ FRD corrected Class II discrepancies through maxillary and mandibular dentoalveolar changes. PMID:22589581

  14. Learning needs of Oncology Nursing Society members.

    PubMed

    Itano, J; Miller, C A

    1990-01-01

    The ONS mission is to promote excellence in oncology nursing. In its effort to carry out this mission, ONS has a responsibility to provide high-quality continuing education (CE) for cancer nurses. An important first step in the provision of quality CE is determining learners' needs. The ONS Continuing Education Provider Committee (CEPC) conducted a comprehensive educational needs assessment of the ONS membership during 1988. Preferred content (98 topics were included), level of content needed (basic versus advanced), preferred teaching-learning methods, and items related to the logistics of CE programs (i.e., preferred length, days of week, employer reimbursement) were assessed. Half of the 1988 ONS membership (6,500) was randomly surveyed, with a 30.8% (2,002) return rate. Analysis revealed the five topics of most interest to be oncologic emergencies, pain, critical care of the patient with cancer, legal issues, and advanced nursing practice roles.

  15. Value: a framework for radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Teckie, Sewit; McCloskey, Susan A; Steinberg, Michael L

    2014-09-10

    In the current health care system, high costs without proportional improvements in quality or outcome have prompted widespread calls for change in how we deliver and pay for care. Value-based health care delivery models have been proposed. Multiple impediments exist to achieving value, including misaligned patient and provider incentives, information asymmetries, convoluted and opaque cost structures, and cultural attitudes toward cancer treatment. Radiation oncology as a specialty has recently become a focus of the value discussion. Escalating costs secondary to rapidly evolving technologies, safety breaches, and variable, nonstandardized structures and processes of delivering care have garnered attention. In response, we present a framework for the value discussion in radiation oncology and identify approaches for attaining value, including economic and structural models, process improvements, outcome measurement, and cost assessment.

  16. Value: A Framework for Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Teckie, Sewit; McCloskey, Susan A.; Steinberg, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    In the current health care system, high costs without proportional improvements in quality or outcome have prompted widespread calls for change in how we deliver and pay for care. Value-based health care delivery models have been proposed. Multiple impediments exist to achieving value, including misaligned patient and provider incentives, information asymmetries, convoluted and opaque cost structures, and cultural attitudes toward cancer treatment. Radiation oncology as a specialty has recently become a focus of the value discussion. Escalating costs secondary to rapidly evolving technologies, safety breaches, and variable, nonstandardized structures and processes of delivering care have garnered attention. In response, we present a framework for the value discussion in radiation oncology and identify approaches for attaining value, including economic and structural models, process improvements, outcome measurement, and cost assessment. PMID:25113759

  17. Mind-body therapies in integrative oncology.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary; Fisher, William; Johnson, Aimee

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in mind-body therapies as adjuncts to mainstream cancer treatment, and an increasing number of patients turn to these interventions for the control of emotional stress associated with cancer. Increased research funding has enabled many such interventions to be evaluated for their efficacy, including studies of mind-body interventions to reduce pain, anxiety, insomnia, anticipatory, and treatment-related nauseas, hot flashes, and improved mood. Mind-body treatments evaluated for their utility in oncology include relaxation therapies, biofeedback, meditation and hypnosis, yoga, art and music therapy, tai chi, and qigong. Although studies are not always methodologically sound and results mixed, a growing number of well-designed studies provide convincing evidence that mind-body techniques are beneficial adjuncts to cancer treatment. The evidence is sufficient to recommend further investigation and adoption of these techniques in mainstream oncology care.

  18. Mind-body therapies in integrative oncology.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary; Fisher, William; Johnson, Aimee

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in mind-body therapies as adjuncts to mainstream cancer treatment, and an increasing number of patients turn to these interventions for the control of emotional stress associated with cancer. Increased research funding has enabled many such interventions to be evaluated for their efficacy, including studies of mind-body interventions to reduce pain, anxiety, insomnia, anticipatory, and treatment-related nauseas, hot flashes, and improved mood. Mind-body treatments evaluated for their utility in oncology include relaxation therapies, biofeedback, meditation and hypnosis, yoga, art and music therapy, tai chi, and qigong. Although studies are not always methodologically sound and results mixed, a growing number of well-designed studies provide convincing evidence that mind-body techniques are beneficial adjuncts to cancer treatment. The evidence is sufficient to recommend further investigation and adoption of these techniques in mainstream oncology care. PMID:21116746

  19. [Donatori di Musica: when oncology meets music].

    PubMed

    Graiff, Claudio

    2014-10-01

    Donatori di Musica is a network of musicians - both physicians and volunteers - that was initially founded in 2009 with the aim to set up and coordinate classical music concerts in hospitals. This activity was initially started and led by the Oncology Departments at Carrara and Bolzano Hospitals, where high profile professional musicians make themselves available for concerts in support of Oncological in/out-patients of that specific Hospital. A live classical music performance is a deeply touching experience - particularly for those who live a critical condition like cancer. Main characteristics of Donatori di Musica concerts are: continuity (concerts are part of a regular and non-stopping music season); quality (concerts are held by well-established professional musicians); philanthropic attitude (musicians do not wear a suit and usually chat with patients; they also select an easy-to-listen program; a convivial event is usually organized after the performance with the aim of overcoming distinctions and barriers between physician and patient); no profit: musicians perform for free - travel expenses and/or overnight staying only can be claimed; concerts have free access for patients, their families and hospital staff.Patients and musicians therefore do get in close contact and music is able to merge each other experiences - with patients being treated by the beauty of music and musicians being treated theirselves by patients daily-life feedback. The Donatori di Musica experience is therefore able to help Medicine to retrieve its very first significance - the medical act regain that human and cultural dimension that seems to be abandoned in the last decades in favour of a mere technicism. This is the spirit and the deep significance of Donatori di Musica - «[…] the hope that Music can become a key support to medical treatments in every Oncology department» (by Gian Andrea Lodovici).

  20. [Donatori di Musica: when oncology meets music].

    PubMed

    Graiff, Claudio

    2014-10-01

    Donatori di Musica is a network of musicians - both physicians and volunteers - that was initially founded in 2009 with the aim to set up and coordinate classical music concerts in hospitals. This activity was initially started and led by the Oncology Departments at Carrara and Bolzano Hospitals, where high profile professional musicians make themselves available for concerts in support of Oncological in/out-patients of that specific Hospital. A live classical music performance is a deeply touching experience - particularly for those who live a critical condition like cancer. Main characteristics of Donatori di Musica concerts are: continuity (concerts are part of a regular and non-stopping music season); quality (concerts are held by well-established professional musicians); philanthropic attitude (musicians do not wear a suit and usually chat with patients; they also select an easy-to-listen program; a convivial event is usually organized after the performance with the aim of overcoming distinctions and barriers between physician and patient); no profit: musicians perform for free - travel expenses and/or overnight staying only can be claimed; concerts have free access for patients, their families and hospital staff.Patients and musicians therefore do get in close contact and music is able to merge each other experiences - with patients being treated by the beauty of music and musicians being treated theirselves by patients daily-life feedback. The Donatori di Musica experience is therefore able to help Medicine to retrieve its very first significance - the medical act regain that human and cultural dimension that seems to be abandoned in the last decades in favour of a mere technicism. This is the spirit and the deep significance of Donatori di Musica - «[…] the hope that Music can become a key support to medical treatments in every Oncology department» (by Gian Andrea Lodovici). PMID:25282347

  1. Anxiety: its management during the treatment of the adolescent dental patient.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, D

    1982-03-01

    Surveys indicate that the adolescent, in particular, suffers from acute anxiety in relation to dentistry. This anxiety is promoted by the general opinion they form of dentists and dentistry through portrayal by their peers and the media. In addition, their own attitude to dentistry, both positive and negative, is influenced to a large extent by the dentist himself. This patient-dentist relationship is, therefore, especially important when treating the adolescent and this should be emphasized in the dental undergraduate curriculum. Psychological methods can be effective in overcoming anxiety but they may be time-consuming. The technique of rapid induction analgesia, using hypnosis by indirect suggestion, may be the most practical modality in this field. Pharmacological techniques remain the principal method of stress reduction. The oral sedative-hypnotic of choice has progressed from the barbiturates to the benzodiazepines mainly due to the selective action of the latter on the limbic system coupled with their high therapeutic index. The newer benzodiazepines combine a more rapid onset with accelerated recovery. Nitrous oxide remains a safe and predictable agent for sedation but its ability to reinforce post-hypnotic suggestion has not been fully realized in the past. Intravenous sedation has evolved from a general anaesthetic technique to a predictable conscious sedation technique with the benzodiazepines again dominating the field. The advent of newer benzodiazepines with much shorter half-lives will improve their properties further. With the combination of the psychological and pharmacological techniques available, anxiety for the adolescent in dentistry may be overcome. PMID:6122648

  2. Michigan Oncology Medical Home Demonstration Project: first-year results.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Gordon; Tozer, Jane M; Snegosky, Jeff; Fox, John; Neumann, Kurt

    2014-09-01

    Launched in May 2012, the Michigan Oncology Medical Home Demonstration Project is an innovative multipractice oncology medical home model supported by payment reform. In the first year of the project, four oncology practices (29 physicians) participated and enrolled 85 patients receiving chemotherapy for a cancer diagnosis (96 new chemotherapy starts). By creating an oncology medical home for patients, the project reduced costs associated with unnecessary emergency room visits and inpatient admissions, with an average estimated cost savings of $550 per patient, while also enhancing payments to providers. The total estimated cost savings for year 1 was $46,228. In addition to the financial savings realized through reductions in emergency room visits and hospitalizations, the program also demonstrated that participating practices had high adherence to national and practice-selected guidelines, instituted advance care planning, and provided effective and standardized symptom management. The results are promising and provide evidence that community oncology practices will embrace the transformation to a patient-centered model with properly aligned incentives and administrative assistance.

  3. Significant Reduction of Late Toxicities in Patients With Extremity Sarcoma Treated With Image-Guided Radiation Therapy to a Reduced Target Volume: Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group RTOG-0630 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dian; Zhang, Qiang; Eisenberg, Burton L.; Kane, John M.; Li, X. Allen; Lucas, David; Petersen, Ivy A.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Freeman, Carolyn R.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Bedi, Manpreet; Singh, Anurag K.; Dundas, George; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We performed a multi-institutional prospective phase II trial to assess late toxicities in patients with extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS) treated with preoperative image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to a reduced target volume. Patients and Methods Patients with extremity STS received IGRT with (cohort A) or without (cohort B) chemotherapy followed by limb-sparing resection. Daily pretreatment images were coregistered with digitally reconstructed radiographs so that the patient position could be adjusted before each treatment. All patients received IGRT to reduced tumor volumes according to strict protocol guidelines. Late toxicities were assessed at 2 years. Results In all, 98 patients were accrued (cohort A, 12; cohort B, 86). Cohort A was closed prematurely because of poor accrual and is not reported. Seventy-nine eligible patients from cohort B form the basis of this report. At a median follow-up of 3.6 years, five patients did not have surgery because of disease progression. There were five local treatment failures, all of which were in field. Of the 57 patients assessed for late toxicities at 2 years, 10.5% experienced at least one grade ≥ 2 toxicity as compared with 37% of patients in the National Cancer Institute of Canada SR2 (CAN-NCIC-SR2: Phase III Randomized Study of Pre- vs Postoperative Radiotherapy in Curable Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma) trial receiving preoperative radiation therapy without IGRT (P < .001). Conclusion The significant reduction of late toxicities in patients with extremity STS who were treated with preoperative IGRT and absence of marginal-field recurrences suggest that the target volumes used in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group RTOG-0630 (A Phase II Trial of Image-Guided Preoperative Radiotherapy for Primary Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity) study are appropriate for preoperative IGRT for extremity STS. PMID:25667281

  4. Higher Caloric Refeeding Is Safe in Hospitalised Adolescent Patients with Restrictive Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Elizabeth K.; Faruquie, Sahrish S.; Anderson, Gail; Gomes, Linette; Kennedy, Andrew; Wearne, Christine M.; Kohn, Michael R.; Clarke, Simon D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study examines weight gain and assesses complications associated with refeeding hospitalised adolescents with restrictive eating disorders (EDs) prescribed initial calories above current recommendations. Methods. Patients admitted to an adolescent ED structured “rapid refeeding” program for >48 hours and receiving ≥2400 kcal/day were included in a 3-year retrospective chart review. Results. The mean (SD) age of the 162 adolescents was 16.7 years (0.9), admission % median BMI was 80.1% (10.2), and discharge % median BMI was 93.1% (7.0). The mean (SD) starting caloric intake was 2611.7 kcal/day (261.5) equating to 58.4 kcal/kg (10.2). Most patients (92.6%) were treated with nasogastric tube feeding. The mean (SD) length of stay was 3.6 weeks (1.9), and average weekly weight gain was 2.1 kg (0.8). No patients developed cardiac signs of RFS or delirium; complications included 4% peripheral oedema, 1% hypophosphatemia (<0.75 mmol/L), 7% hypomagnesaemia (<0.70 mmol/L), and 2% hypokalaemia (<3.2 mmol/L). Caloric prescription on admission was associated with developing oedema (95% CI 1.001 to 1.047; p = 0.039). No statistical significance was found between electrolytes and calories provided during refeeding. Conclusion. A rapid refeeding protocol with the inclusion of phosphate supplementation can safely achieve rapid weight restoration without increased complications associated with refeeding syndrome. PMID:27293884

  5. National Institutes of Health Funding in Radiation Oncology: A Snapshot

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Michael; McBride, William H.; Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Currently, pay lines for National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants are at a historical low. In this climate of fierce competition, knowledge about the funding situation in a small field like radiation oncology becomes very important for career planning and recruitment of faculty. Unfortunately, these data cannot be easily extracted from the NIH's database because it does not discriminate between radiology and radiation oncology departments. At the start of fiscal year 2013 we extracted records for 952 individual grants, which were active at the time of analysis from the NIH database. Proposals originating from radiation oncology departments were identified manually. Descriptive statistics were generated using the JMP statistical software package. Our analysis identified 197 grants in radiation oncology. These proposals came from 134 individual investigators in 43 academic institutions. The majority of the grants (118) were awarded to principal investigators at the full professor level, and 122 principal investigators held a PhD degree. In 79% of the grants, the research topic fell into the field of biology, 13% in the field of medical physics. Only 7.6% of the proposals were clinical investigations. Our data suggest that the field of radiation oncology is underfunded by the NIH and that the current level of support does not match the relevance of radiation oncology for cancer patients or the potential of its academic work force.

  6. NIH funding in Radiation Oncology – A snapshot

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Michael; McBride, William H.; Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Currently, pay lines for NIH grants are at a historical low. In this climate of fierce competition knowledge about the funding situation in a small field like Radiation Oncology becomes very important for career planning and recruitment of faculty. Unfortunately, this data cannot be easily extracted from the NIH s database because it does not discriminate between Radiology and Radiation Oncology Departments. At the start of fiscal year 2013, we extracted records for 952 individual grants, which were active at the time of analysis from the NIH database. Proposals originating from Radiation Oncology Departments were identified manually. Descriptive statistics were generated using the JMP statistical software package. Our analysis identified 197 grants in Radiation Oncology. These proposals came from 134 individual investigators in 43 academic institutions. The majority of the grants (118) were awarded to PIs at the Full Professor level and 122 PIs held a PhD degree. In 79% of the grants the research topic fell into the field of Biology, in 13 % into the field of Medical Physics. Only 7.6% of the proposals were clinical investigations. Our data suggests that the field of Radiation Oncology is underfunded by the NIH, and that the current level of support does not match the relevance of Radiation Oncology for cancer patients or the potential of its academic work force. PMID:23523324

  7. Endocrine complications during and after adolescence in a patient with cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Moon Bae; Kim, Sung Eun; Cho, Won Kyoung; Suh, Byung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Cystinosis is a rare disease characterized by abnormal lysosomal cystine accumulation of cystine due to impaired lysosomal transport. We previously reported the first case of cystinosis in Korea in a 12-year-old boy with short stature, general weakness, and photophobia. The diagnosis was confirmed based on ophthalmic findings and biochemical analyses (serum leukocyte cystine measurement). Major endocrine manifestations at diagnosis included hypothyroidism, growth retardation, and hypogonadism. Despite oral cysteamine administration and renal replacement therapy, multiple complications including both endocrine and nonendocrine disorders developed during and after adolescence. In this report, we review the presenting features and factors related to the long-term complications in a patient with cystinosis. PMID:27777912

  8. Multicriteria decision analysis in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Adunlin, Georges; Diaby, Vakaramoko; Montero, Alberto J.; Xiao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background There has been a growing interest in the development and application of alternative decision-making frameworks within health care, including multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). Even though the literature includes several reviews on MCDA methods, applications of MCDA in oncology are lacking. Aim The aim of this paper is to discuss a rationale for the use of MCDA in oncology. In this context, the following research question emerged: How can MCDA be used to develop a clinical decision support tool in oncology? Methods In this paper, a brief background on decision making is presented, followed by an overview of MCDA methods and process. The paper discusses some applications of MCDA, proposes research opportunities in the context of oncology and presents an illustrative example of how MCDA can be applied to oncology. Findings Decisions in oncology involve trade-offs between possible benefits and harms. MCDA can help analyse trade-off preferences. A wide range of MCDA methods exist. Each method has its strengths and weaknesses. Choosing the appropriate method varies depending on the source and nature of information used to inform decision making. The literature review identified eight studies. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was the most often used method in the identified studies. Conclusion Overall, MCDA appears to be a promising tool that can be used to assist clinical decision making in oncology. Nonetheless, field testing is desirable before MCDA becomes an established decision-making tool in this field. PMID:24635949

  9. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  10. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Apte, Sachin M; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  11. International outreach: what is the responsibility of ASTRO and the major international radiation oncology societies?

    PubMed

    Mayr, Nina A; Hu, Kenneth S; Liao, Zhongxing; Viswanathan, Akila N; Wall, Terry J; Amendola, Beatriz E; Calaguas, Miriam J; Palta, Jatinder R; Yue, Ning J; Rengan, Ramesh; Williams, Timothy R

    2014-07-01

    In this era of globalization and rapid advances in radiation oncology worldwide, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is committed to help decrease profound regional disparities through the work of the International Education Subcommittee (IES). The IES has expanded its base, reach, and activities to foster educational advances through a variety of educational methods with broad scope, in addition to committing to the advancement of radiation oncology care for cancer patients around the world, through close collaboration with our sister radiation oncology societies and other educational, governmental, and organizational groups. PMID:24929158

  12. International outreach: what is the responsibility of ASTRO and the major international radiation oncology societies?

    PubMed

    Mayr, Nina A; Hu, Kenneth S; Liao, Zhongxing; Viswanathan, Akila N; Wall, Terry J; Amendola, Beatriz E; Calaguas, Miriam J; Palta, Jatinder R; Yue, Ning J; Rengan, Ramesh; Williams, Timothy R

    2014-07-01

    In this era of globalization and rapid advances in radiation oncology worldwide, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is committed to help decrease profound regional disparities through the work of the International Education Subcommittee (IES). The IES has expanded its base, reach, and activities to foster educational advances through a variety of educational methods with broad scope, in addition to committing to the advancement of radiation oncology care for cancer patients around the world, through close collaboration with our sister radiation oncology societies and other educational, governmental, and organizational groups.

  13. International Outreach: What Is the Responsibility of ASTRO and the Major International Radiation Oncology Societies?

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Nina A.; Hu, Kenneth S.; Liao, Zhongxing; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Amendola, Beatriz E.; Calaguas, Miriam J.; Palta, Jatinder R.; Yue, Ning J.; Rengan, Ramesh; Williams, Timothy R.

    2014-07-01

    In this era of globalization and rapid advances in radiation oncology worldwide, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is committed to help decrease profound regional disparities through the work of the International Education Subcommittee (IES). The IES has expanded its base, reach, and activities to foster educational advances through a variety of educational methods with broad scope, in addition to committing to the advancement of radiation oncology care for cancer patients around the world, through close collaboration with our sister radiation oncology societies and other educational, governmental, and organizational groups.

  14. Adjuvant intrahepatic chemotherapy with mitomycin and 5-FU combined with hepatic irradiation in high-risk patients with carcinoma of the colon: a Southwest Oncology Group phase II pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, J.D.; Weatherall, T.J.; Oishi, N.; Janaki, L.; Boyer, C.

    1985-01-01

    The Southwest Oncology Group conducted a pilot study in patients who had had total clinical resection of cancer of the colon and had a high risk of recurrence (Duke's C); the purpose of the study was to determine the toxic effects of intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with hepatic radiotherapy, in anticipation of their potential use in an adjuvant groupwide protocol. The treatment plan included intra-arterial chemotherapy with mitomycin (3 mg/m2) on Days 1, 4, 35, and 38 by slow intra-arterial push and 5-FU (1000 mg/m2) on Days 1-4 and 35-38 by continuous 96-hour infusion. Radiation therapy was begun on Day 8 of therapy and consisted of 1950 rads in 13 fractions over 2 1/2 weeks. Nineteen patients have been studied. Of 13 fully evaluable patients, two have relapsed in the liver. Eleven patients have developed significant, persistent liver enzyme elevations, and one patient has died from therapy-related liver failure. Combined radiotherapy and intra-arterial chemotherapy may result in significant chronic liver damage, and caution should be exercised in future adjuvant trials.

  15. Radiation oncology (Vol. 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.L.; Wara, W.

    1987-01-01

    This volume of the Radiation Oncology series features update reports on the current status of primary therapy for lung cancer and the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of hepatomas. Other articles describe the use of stereotaxic interstitial implantation in the treatment of malignant brain tumors and discuss the indications for and results of radiation as the primary or adjuvant treatment of large bowel cancer. Reports on new technological developments examine the biological basis and clinical potential of local-regional hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy. Included are reviews of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnostic evaluation of cancer and of three-dimensional treatment planning for high energy external beam radiotherapy.

  16. The role of resilience and mindful leadership in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Rishel, Cindy J

    2015-03-01

    When oncology nurses think of the word resilient, they often describe the term in the context of the patients and families they care for each day. When patients face a diagnosis of cancer, their lives have suddenly been altered in a frightening manner. Everything changes, and they must find a way to navigate the troubled waters ahead. 
. PMID:25806887

  17. Assessment of palliative care training in gynecologic oncology: A gynecologic oncology fellow research network study

    PubMed Central

    Eskander, Ramez N.; Osann, Kathryn; Dickson, Elizabeth; Holman, Laura L.; Rauh-Hain, J. Alejandro; Spoozak, Lori; Wu, Eijean; Krill, Lauren; Fader, Amanda Nickles; Tewari, Krishnansu S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Palliative care is recognized as an important component of oncologic care. We sought to assess the quality/quantity of palliative care education in gynecologic oncology fellowship. Methods A self-administered on-line questionnaire was distributed to current gynecologic oncology fellow and candidate members during the 2013 academic year. Descriptive statistics, bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results Of 201 fellow and candidate members, 74.1% (n = 149) responded. Respondents were primarily women (75%) and white (76%). Only 11% of respondents participated in a palliative care rotation. Respondents rated the overall quality of teaching received on management of ovarian cancer significantly higher than management of patients at end of life (EOL), independent of level of training (8.25 vs. 6.23; p < 0.0005). Forty-six percent reported never being observed discussing transition of care from curative to palliative with a patient, and 56% never received feedback about technique regarding discussions on EOL care. When asked to recall their most recent patient who had died, 83% reported enrollment in hospice within 4 weeks of death. Fellows reporting higher quality EOL education were significantly more likely to feel prepared to care for patients at EOL (p < 0.0005). Mean ranking of preparedness increased with the number of times a fellow reported discussing changing goals from curative to palliative and the number of times he/she received feedback from an attending (p < 0.0005). Conclusions Gynecologic oncology fellow/candidate members reported insufficient palliative care education. Those respondents reporting higher quality EOL training felt more prepared to care for dying patients and to address complications commonly encountered in this setting. PMID:24887355

  18. Update on genomics in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Breen, Matthew

    2009-08-01

    The release of an annotated human genome sequence assembly and the emergence of genomics technologies have led to significant advances in our understanding of many human diseases including cancers. As DNA sequencing technology has become less costly, the field of comparative genomics has progressed rapidly and attention has turned now to generating whole genome assemblies and dedicated genomics resources for veterinary species. Such progress brings a whole new series of opportunities to advance veterinary medicine. Many human and animal diseases share a pathogenetic basis, and although veterinary species need advances in biomedical research in their own right, the consideration of companion animals also as good comparative models for human disease saw the emergence of the "one medicine" concept. The future of many areas of human and veterinary biomedical research is very much interdependent, with one of the closest associations being in oncology. It is inevitable that veterinary oncology will benefit enormously from data derived from genomics and that this era will see a huge shift in the ways in which companion animal cancer patients are evaluated and subsequently treated. Here, we will review some of the advancements of genomics as they relate to veterinary oncology. PMID:19732729

  19. 2016 AAHA Oncology Guidelines for Dogs and Cats.

    PubMed

    Biller, Barb; Berg, John; Garrett, Laura; Ruslander, David; Wearing, Richard; Abbott, Bonnie; Patel, Mithun; Smith, Diana; Bryan, Christine

    2016-01-01

    All companion animal practices will be presented with oncology cases on a regular basis, making diagnosis and treatment of cancer an essential part of comprehensive primary care. Because each oncology case is medically unique, these guidelines recommend a patient-specific approach consisting of the following components: diagnosis, staging, therapeutic intervention, provisions for patient and personnel safety in handling chemotherapy agents, referral to an oncology specialty practice when appropriate, and a strong emphasis on client support. Determination of tumor type by histologic examination of a biopsy sample should be the basis for all subsequent steps in oncology case management. Diagnostic staging determines the extent of local disease and presence or absence of regional or distant metastasis. The choice of therapeutic modalities is based on tumor type, histologic grade, and stage, and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and adjunctive therapies, such as nutritional support and pain management. These guidelines discuss the strict safety precautions that should be observed in handling chemotherapy agents, which are now commonly used in veterinary oncology. Because cancer is often a disease of older pets, the time of life when the pet-owner relationship is usually strongest, a satisfying outcome for all parties involved is highly dependent on good communication between the entire healthcare team and the client, particularly when death or euthanasia of the patient is being considered. These guidelines include comprehensive tables of common canine and feline cancers as a resource for case management and a sample case history. PMID:27259020

  20. Prospective study of the UGT1A1*27 gene polymorphism during irinotecan therapy in patients with lung cancer: Results of Lung Oncology Group in Kyusyu (LOGIK1004B)

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Takayuki; Shimada, Midori; Kitazaki, Takeshi; Hashiguchi, Kohji; Kishimoto, Junji; Harada, Taishi; Seto, Takashi; Ebi, Noriyuki; Takayama, Koichi; Sugio, Kenji; Semba, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Ichinose, Yukito

    2016-01-01

    Background Uridine 5′‐diphospho‐glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1*27) is known to impair the effect of UGT in basic research; however, little clinical investigation has been conducted. To evaluate the effect of the UGT1A1*27 polymorphism in irinotecan therapy, we conducted a prospective study. Methods Eligibility criteria included: lung cancer patients; scheduled irinotecan therapy doses of single ≥ 80, combination ≥ 50, radiation with single ≥ 50, or radiation with combination ≥ 40 mg/m2; age ≥ 20; and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score (PS) 0–2. Patients were examined for UGT1A1*28 and *6 polymorphisms and received irinotecan. When the UGT1A1*28 polymorphism was detected, a search for UGT1A1*27 was conducted. Fifty patients were enrolled, with 48 patients determined eligible. Results UGT1A1 polymorphisms *28/*28, *6/*6, *28/*6, *28/−, *6/−, −/− observed 0 (0%), 1 (2%), 1 (2%), 7 (15%), 17 (35%) and 22 (46%), respectively. UGT1A1*27 were examined in nine patients including one ineligible patient; however, no polymorphisms were found. The study ceased after interim analysis. In an evaluation of the side effects of irinotecan, patients with UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1*6 polymorphisms had a higher tendency to experience febrile neutropenia than wild type (25% and 32% vs. 14%). Incidences of grade 3/4 leukopenia and neutropenia were significantly higher in patients with UGT1A1*28 polymorphisms compared with wild type (75% vs. 32%, P = 0.049; 75% vs. 36%, P = 0.039, respectively). Conclusion Our prospective study did not locate the UGT1A1*27 polymorphism, suggesting that UGT1A1*27 does not significantly predict severe irinotecan toxicity in cancer patients. PMID:27385990

  1. Children's Oncology Group's 2013 blueprint for research: nursing discipline.

    PubMed

    Landier, Wendy; Leonard, Marcia; Ruccione, Kathleen S

    2013-06-01

    Integration of the nursing discipline within cooperative groups conducting pediatric oncology clinical trials provides unique opportunities to maximize nursing's contribution to clinical care, and to pursue research questions that extend beyond cure of disease to address important gaps in knowledge surrounding the illness experience. Key areas of importance to the advancement of the nursing discipline's scientific knowledge are understanding the effective delivery of patient/family education, and reducing illness-related distress, both of which are integral to facilitating parental/child coping with the diagnosis and treatment of childhood cancer, and to promoting resilience and well-being of pediatric oncology patients and their families.

  2. Effects of Age Expectations on Oncology Social Workers' Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Annemarie; Choi, Namkee G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of oncology social workers' expectations regarding aging (ERA) and ERA with cancer (ERAC) on their clinical judgment. Methods: Oncology social workers (N = 322) were randomly assigned to one of four vignettes describing a patient with lung cancer. The vignettes were identical except for the…

  3. Response to "The Evidence Behind Integrating Palliative Care Into Oncology Practice"
.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    I am writing in response to "The Evidence Behind Integrating Palliative Care Into Oncology Practice" (Dailey, 2016). I have 16 years of oncology experience and work at the University Health Systems in San Antonio, Texas. Our facility's palliative care program holds the Advanced Certification awarded by the Joint Commission, and we have dedicated inpatient beds for palliative care patients. PMID:27668363

  4. A real time Teleconsultation System for Sharing an Oncologic Web-based Electronic Medical Record.

    PubMed

    Forti, Stefano; Galvagni, Michele; Galligioni, Enzo; Eccher, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    This poster presents an innovative real-time Teleconsultation System for synchronized navigation of the pages of a web-based Oncological Electronic Medical Record, designed to provide clinicians a cooperative work tool supporting the oncologic patient management between different hospitals. The system embeds additional tools supporting the discussion: digital whiteboard, chat and a digital audio channel.

  5. Consultation for Disordered Puberty: What Do Adolescent Medicine Patients Teach Us?

    PubMed

    Michaud, Pierre-André; Ambresin, Anne-Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    The period of adolescence is not only marked by important growth and pubertal events, but is also characterized by important psychosocial changes driven by a search for autonomy and the construction of one's identity. It can thus be easily understood that puberty disorders interfere heavily with these process, requiring from the endocrinologist not only medical knowledge, but also a great deal of emotional and psychological skills. They must progressively move from an educational approach that heavily involves the parents to one of shared information and decision making that places the young patient at the center of the therapeutic process. This can be achieved in several ways: respecting the affective and cognitive development of the adolescent; securing his privacy and (if requested by him) confidentiality; exploring his self-image and self-esteem and adapting the therapeutic process to the patient's expectations; reviewing the teenager's lifestyle, including the issue of sexuality and sexual behavior, and involving him in any therapeutic choice that has to be made, even if it does not match with the parents' expectations. The skills required for this respectful and holistic follow-up often exceed the abilities of any physician; it is thus suggested that a team approach involving a clinical nurse and/or a psychologist and/or social worker(s) be set up whenever possible. PMID:26680583

  6. Consultation for Disordered Puberty: What Do Adolescent Medicine Patients Teach Us?

    PubMed

    Michaud, Pierre-André; Ambresin, Anne-Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    The period of adolescence is not only marked by important growth and pubertal events, but is also characterized by important psychosocial changes driven by a search for autonomy and the construction of one's identity. It can thus be easily understood that puberty disorders interfere heavily with these process, requiring from the endocrinologist not only medical knowledge, but also a great deal of emotional and psychological skills. They must progressively move from an educational approach that heavily involves the parents to one of shared information and decision making that places the young patient at the center of the therapeutic process. This can be achieved in several ways: respecting the affective and cognitive development of the adolescent; securing his privacy and (if requested by him) confidentiality; exploring his self-image and self-esteem and adapting the therapeutic process to the patient's expectations; reviewing the teenager's lifestyle, including the issue of sexuality and sexual behavior, and involving him in any therapeutic choice that has to be made, even if it does not match with the parents' expectations. The skills required for this respectful and holistic follow-up often exceed the abilities of any physician; it is thus suggested that a team approach involving a clinical nurse and/or a psychologist and/or social worker(s) be set up whenever possible.

  7. Treatment Adherence in Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Perceptions from Adolescent Patients and Their Families

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Odell, Shannon; Sander, Emily; Baldassano, Robert N.; Barg, Frances K.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine patient- and parent-perceived factors that impact adherence to inflammatory bowel disease treatment using a qualitative descriptive individual interview approach. Sixteen adolescents and their parents were recruited from May through August 2007 and interviewed about medication adherence using an open-ended semi-structured interview format. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded into themes. Parent-child dyads identified forgetting, interfering activities, parent-child conflict and oppositional behaviour, and inadequate planning for treatment as challenges to adherence. Participants reported that family support and good parent-child relationships, routines, monitoring and reminding, and organizational tools such as pill boxes facilitated treatment adherence. Other issues that emerged included immediacy of treatment effects and parent-adolescent responsibility for treatment. Patients and parents experience a number of challenges related to adherence within behavioural, educational, organizational, and health belief domains. Behavioural interventions should focus on these issues, reduction of perceived barriers, and effective transition of responsibility for treatment adherence. Future research considerations are discussed. PMID:21143544

  8. Community oncology in an era of payment reform.

    PubMed

    Cox, John V; Ward, Jeffery C; Hornberger, John C; Temel, Jennifer S; McAneny, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    Patients and payers (government and private) are frustrated with the fee-for-service system (FFS) of payment for outpatient health services. FFS rewards volume and highly valued services, including expensive diagnostics and therapeutics, over lesser valued cognitive services. Proposed payment schemes would incent collaboration and coordination of care among providers and reward quality. In oncology, new payment schemes must address the high costs of all services, particularly drugs, while preserving the robust distribution of sites of service available to patients in the United States. Information technology and personalized cancer care are changing the practice of oncology. Twenty-first century oncology will require increasing cognitive work and shared decision making, both of which are not well regarded in the FFS model. A high proportion of health care dollars are consumed in the final months of life. Effective delivery of palliative and end-of-life care must be addressed by practice and by new models of payment. Value-based reimbursement schemes will require oncology practices to change how they are structured. Lessons drawn from the principles of primary care's Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) will help oncology practice to prepare for new schemes. PCMH principles place a premium on proactively addressing toxicities of therapies, coordinating care with other providers, and engaging patients in shared decision making, supporting the ideal of value defined in the triple aim-to measurably improve patient experience and quality of care at less cost. Payment reform will be disruptive to all. Oncology must be engaged in policy discussions and guide rational shifts in priorities defined by new payment models.

  9. THE IMPACT OF CONCURRENT GRANULOCYTE MACROPHAGE-COLONY STIMULATING FACTOR ON QUALITY OF LIFE IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS: RESULTS OF THE RANDOMIZED, PLACEBO-CONTROLED RADIATION THERAPY ONCOLOGY GROUP 9901 TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Stephanie; James, Jennifer L.; Scarantino, Charles; Movsas, Benjamin; Valicenti, Richard K.; Fortin, Andre; Pollock, JonDavid; Kim, Harold; Brachman, David G.; Berk, Lawrence B.; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Kachnic, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, trial evaluating the efficacy of GM-CSF in reducing mucosal injury and symptom burden from curative radiotherapy for head-and-neck (H&N) cancer. Methods Eligible patients with H&N cancer receiving radiation encompassing ≥ 50% of the oral cavity or oropharynx received subcutaneous GM-CSF or placebo. Quality of life (QoL) was assessed using the RTOG modified University of Washington H&N symptom questionnaire at baseline, 4, 13, 26 and 48 weeks from radiation initiation. Results Of 125 eligible patients, 114 were evaluable for QoL (58 GM-CSF, 56 placebo). Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and baseline symptom scores were well balanced between the treatment arms. At the end of the acute period (13 weeks) patients in both arms reported negative change in total symptom score indicating increase in symptom burden relative to baseline (mean −18.4 GM-CSF, −20.8 placebo). There was no difference in change in total symptom score (p>0.05) or change in mucous, pain, eating, or activity domain scores (p>0.01) between patients in the GM-CSF and placebo arms. Analysis limited to patients treated per protocol or with an acceptable protocol deviation also found no difference in change in total symptom score (p>0.05) or change in domain scores (p>0.01) between treatment arms. Provider assessment of acute mucositis during treatment did not correlate with patient-reported mucous domain and total symptom scores (p>0.05) Conclusion GM-CSF administered concurrently during head-and-neck radiation does not appear to significantly improve patient-reported QoL symptom burden. PMID:24492945

  10. Best Practices in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Focus on Asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Boissel, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of asparaginase in chemotherapy regimens to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has had a positive impact on survival in pediatric patients. Historically, asparaginase has been excluded from most treatment protocols for adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients because of perceived toxicity in this population, and this is believed to have contributed to poorer outcomes in these patients. However, retrospective analyses over the past 12 years have shown that 2-, 5-, and 7-year overall survival of AYA patients is significantly improved with pediatric versus adult protocols. The addition of asparaginase to adult protocols yielded high rates of first remission and improved survival. However, long-term survival remains lower compared with what has been seen in pediatrics. The notion that asparaginase is poorly tolerated by AYA patients has been challenged in multiple studies. In some, but not all, studies, the incidences of hepatic and pancreatic toxicities were higher in AYA patients, whereas the rates of hypersensitivity reactions did not appear to differ with age. There is an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, and management with anti-coagulation therapy is recommended. Overall, the risk of therapy-related mortality is low. Together, this suggests that high-intensity pediatric protocols offer an effective and tolerable approach to treating ALL in the AYA population. PMID:26421220

  11. Potentials of Web 2.0 for Diabetes Education of Adolescent Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabestari, Omid; Roudsari, Abdul

    Diabetes is a very common chronic disease which produces compli-cations in almost all body organs and consumes a huge amount of the health budget. Although education has proved to be useful in diabetes management, there is a great need to improve the availability of these courses for the increasing number of diabetic patients. E-learning can facilitate this service, but the current education system should be tailored towards e-learning standards. Amongst diabetic patients, adolescents as computer natives are suggested as the best target to e-learning diabetes education. With regards to its features, Web 2.0 can be a very good technology to build a framework for diabetes education and consequent evaluation of this education.

  12. Juvenile fibromyalgia in an adolescent patient with sickle cell disease presenting with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Ramprakash, Stalin; Fishman, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Juvenile fibromyalgia in children with sickle cell disease has not been reported in the literature. We report an adolescent patient with sickle cell whose pain symptoms progressed from having recurrent acute sickle cell pain crisis episodes to a chronic pain syndrome over several years. He was eventually diagnosed with juvenile fibromyalgia based on the clinical history and myofascial tender points and his pain symptoms responded better to multidisciplinary strategies for chronic fibromyalgia pain. Chronic pain in sickle cell disease is an area of poor research, and in addition there is inconsistency in the definition of chronic pain in sickle cell disease. Central sensitisation to pain is shown to occur after recurrent painful stimuli in a genetically vulnerable individual. In a chronic pain condition such as fibromyalgia central sensitisation is thought to play a key role. Fibromyalgia should be considered as one of the main differential diagnosis in any sickle cell patient with chronic pain.

  13. Overview of Accountable Care Organizations for Oncology Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anish J.; Macklis, Roger M.

    2013-01-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are poised to become major components of health care delivery in the United States. The practice of oncology, often laden with high charges, is likely to undergo major shifts as ACOs become widespread. In this article, we review the economic factors leading to the growth of ACOs and discuss some elements of the current ACO model proposed in the Affordable Care Act. Oncology specialists—in medicine, surgery, and radiation oncology—will have important roles in determining the place of specialty care in an ACO framework and will have to take the lead in educating patients, primary care physicians, and administrators on the value propositions related to their activities. We also describe how oncology specialists may participate in the model to ensure success for physicians and patients. PMID:23942925

  14. Association of family background with adolescent smoking and regular use of illicit substances among underage psychiatric in-patients.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether adolescent's family type was associated with regular smoking or the use of illicit substances (cannabis or hard drugs) among underage adolescent psychiatric in-patients. The sample consisted of 471 adolescents aged 12-17 years admitted to psychiatric hospital between April 2001 and March 2006 at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. The information on family factors and substance use was based on the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime interview and the European modification of the Addiction Severity Index questionnaire. Compared to adolescent boys from two-parent families, those from child welfare placement were more likely to regularly use both cannabis (odds ratio [OR]=4.4; 95%confidence interval [CI]=1.4-13.7; P=.012) and hard drugs (OR=8.4; 95% CI=1.7-42.1; P=.01).Among girls, no association was found between family type and the use of illicit substances. Two-parent or foster family units may protect adolescents from involvement with illicit substances. In clinical adolescent psychiatric practice more attention should be paid to family interventions and parental support. PMID:19062350

  15. Association of family background with adolescent smoking and regular use of illicit substances among underage psychiatric in-patients.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether adolescent's family type was associated with regular smoking or the use of illicit substances (cannabis or hard drugs) among underage adolescent psychiatric in-patients. The sample consisted of 471 adolescents aged 12-17 years admitted to psychiatric hospital between April 2001 and March 2006 at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. The information on family factors and substance use was based on the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime interview and the European modification of the Addiction Severity Index questionnaire. Compared to adolescent boys from two-parent families, those from child welfare placement were more likely to regularly use both cannabis (odds ratio [OR]=4.4; 95%confidence interval [CI]=1.4-13.7; P=.012) and hard drugs (OR=8.4; 95% CI=1.7-42.1; P=.01).Among girls, no association was found between family type and the use of illicit substances. Two-parent or foster family units may protec