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Sample records for adolescent panic attacks

  1. Parent-Reported Predictors of Adolescent Panic Attacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Chris; Wilson, Kimberly A.; Lagle, Kristy; Killen, Joel D.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To identify parent-reported risk factors for adolescent panic attacks. Method: Structured diagnostic interviews were obtained from 770 parents of participants in a school-based risk factor study for adolescent panic. Parent-reported risk factors assessed included characteristics of the child (negative affect, separation anxiety disorder…

  2. [Panic attacks and panic syndrome--diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Katschnig, H; Nutzinger, D O

    1990-01-01

    Paroxysmal states of anxiety that cannot be traced back to somatic causes have been called panic attacks since the publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM III) of the American Psychiatric Association. This term has since been accepted as part of psychiatric everyday language in many countries. The present review discusses initially the diagnostic and differential diagnostic aspects against the background of nosological classifications as practised to date, with particular emphasis on the requirements of the practising psychiatrist. The authors of this review hold the opinion that whereas the phenomenon of panic attack is a valid concept, the conceptualisation of a panic disorder is still largely hypothetical. The often observed "natural history"--after panic attacks, anticipatory anxiety, coupling of attacks to certain situations, avoidance of these situations, as well as agoraphobia, depressivity, self-medication with tranquilisers and alcohol, hypochondriacal fears with increased consultation of doctors, and family conflicts may develop--requires early therapeutic intervention. Hence, the second part of this article presents the pharmacological and psychotherapeutical treatment methods for panic attacks and their complications as developed and successfully tried out during the past few years. The efficacy has been proven of drug therapy on the one hand of prophylactic treatment using tricyclic antidepressives, MAO-inhibitors and alprazolam or clonazepam, and on the other hand also of a non-continuous attack-related treatment strategy. Of the more recent psychotherapeutic methods, relaxation methods and the cognitive treatment of panic attacks are discussed. This direct focus on panic attacks seems to be more promising than the conventional treatment methods centered on secondary symptoms such as anticipatory anxiety or agoraphobia. PMID:2179978

  3. Panic attacks and panic disorder: the great neurologic imposters.

    PubMed

    Stahl, S M; Soefje, S

    1995-06-01

    Patients who experience panic attacks, panic disorder, or agoraphobia have significant impairment associated with their disorders. The cost to society in health care costs as well as the human suffering and mortality is high and may be even higher than necessary because of misdiagnosis and inadequate treatment of these patients. Although we do not have many answers in the areas of pathophysiology or neurochemistry of panic disorder, we do have effective treatments for panic disorder and agoraphobia. If these are conceptualized as distinct disorders with specific symptoms, making a diagnosis of panic disorder or agoraphobia is relatively easy. Making the correct diagnosis may save the patient many months or years of suffering and many inappropriate tests or treatments. PMID:7481132

  4. Panic Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip breadcrumb navigation Panic Disorder In Children And Adolescents Quick Links Facts For Families Guide Facts For ... is a common and treatable disorder. Children and adolescents with panic disorder have unexpected and repeated periods ...

  5. Use of the Panic Attack Questionnaire-IV to assess non-clinical panic attacks and limited symptom panic attacks in student and community samples.

    PubMed

    Norton, Peter J; Zvolensky, Michael J; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O; Cox, Brian J; Norton, G Ron

    2008-10-01

    Since its development in the mid-1980s, the Panic Attack Questionnaire (PAQ) has been one of the more, if not the most, commonly used self-report tools for assessing panic attacks. The usage of the instrument, however, has come amid potential concerns that instructions and descriptions may lead to an over-estimate of the prevalence of panic attacks. Furthermore, the instrument has not been revised since 1992, despite changes in DSM-IV criteria and more recent developments in the understanding of panic attacks. As a result, this paper describes a revision of the PAQ to improve the instruction and descriptive set, and to fully assess features of panic derived from recent conceptualizations. Students meeting DSM-IV panic attack criteria and those endorsing panic attacks, but not meeting criteria, showed few differences with the exception that those not meeting DSM-IV criteria typically reported a longer onset-to-peak intensity time than did Panickers. Results were cross-validated and extended using an independent Community Sample. A full descriptive phenomenology of panic attacks is described, and future directions for studying panic attacks using the PAQ are presented. PMID:18243647

  6. Smoking Behavior and Alcohol Consumption in Individuals With Panic Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Amanda R.; Norton, Peter J.; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Buckner, Julia D.; Smits, Jasper A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with anxiety often report greater smoking and drinking behaviors relative to those without a history of anxiety. In particular, smoking and alcohol use have been directly implicated among individuals experiencing panic attacks, diagnosed with panic disorder, or high on panic-relevant risk factors such as anxiety sensitivity. Less is known, however, about specific features of panic that may differentiate among those who do or do not use cigarettes or alcohol. The purpose of the current study was to replicate previous research findings of an association between panic symptomatology, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption, as well as extend findings by examining whether specific symptoms of panic attacks differentiated among those who do or do not use cigarettes or alcohol. Participants (n = 489) completed the Panic Attack Questionnaire-IV, a highly detailed assessment of panic attacks and symptoms, as well as self-report measures of smoking history and alcohol use. Consistent with previous research, participants who reported a history of panic attacks (n = 107) were significantly more likely to report current daily or lifetime daily cigarette smoking, and significantly greater hazardous or harmful alcohol use than participants with no panic history (n = 382). Although smoking and hazardous alcohol use were highly associated regardless of panic status, participants with panic attacks showed elevated hazardous alcohol use after controlling for daily or lifetime smoking. Surprisingly, although participants who reported having had at least one panic attack were more likely to smoke, panic attack symptoms, intensity, or frequency did not differentiate panickers who did or did not smoke. Furthermore, panic-related variables were not shown to differentially relate to problematic drinking among panickers. Implications for understanding the complex relationship between panic attacks and smoking and drinking behaviors are discussed. PMID:21915160

  7. The panic attack-posttraumatic stress disorder model: applicability to orthostatic panic among Cambodian refugees.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Hofmann, Stefan G; Pitman, Roger K; Pollack, Mark H; Barlow, David H

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the ability of the panic attack-posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) model to predict how panic attacks are generated and how panic attacks worsen PTSD. The article does so by determining the validity of the panic attack-PTSD model in respect to one type of panic attack among traumatized Cambodian refugees: orthostatic panic (OP) attacks (i.e. panic attacks generated by moving from lying or sitting to standing). Among Cambodian refugees attending a psychiatric clinic, the authors conducted two studies to explore the validity of the panic attack-PTSD model as applied to OP patients (i.e. patients with at least one episode of OP in the previous month). In Study 1, the panic attack-PTSD model accurately indicated how OP is seemingly generated: among OP patients (N = 58), orthostasis-associated flashbacks and catastrophic cognitions predicted OP severity beyond a measure of anxious-depressive distress (Symptom Checklist-90-R subscales), and OP severity significantly mediated the effect of anxious-depressive distress on Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale severity. In Study 2, as predicted by the panic attack-PTSD model, OP had a mediational role in respect to the effect of treatment on PTSD severity: among Cambodian refugees with PTSD and comorbid OP who participated in a cognitive behavioural therapy study (N = 56), improvement in PTSD severity was partially mediated by improvement in OP severity. PMID:18470741

  8. Assessment and treatment of nocturnal panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Craske, Michelle G; Tsao, Jennie C I

    2005-06-01

    Nocturnal panic (NP), waking from sleep in a state of panic, is a common occurrence among patients with panic disorder, with 44-71% reporting at least one such attack. NP is a non-REM event that is distinct from sleep terrors, sleep apnea, nightmares or dream-induced arousals. This review outlines recent advances in the characterization of NP, as well as current approaches to the assessment and treatment of NP. In contrast to earlier work, more recent studies suggest that patients with NP do not differ from patients without NP on sleep architecture, sleep physiology, self-reported sleep quality and severity of panic disorder. However, more precise measurement of physiological precipitants and features is warranted. Assessment of NP focuses on ruling out other explanations for NP, with differential diagnosis based on interviews, sleep polysomnography and ambulatory recording of sleep. Psychological treatment (cognitive-behavioral therapy) targets misappraisals of anxiety sensations, hyperventilatory response, and conditioned reactions to internal, physical cues. Recent evidence supports the efficacy of this approach, however, controlled studies on pharmacological agents in the treatment of NP are lacking. Research is needed to examine the effects of combined cognitive-behavioral therapy and medications, compared to medication alone in the treatment of NP. PMID:15893248

  9. Is There Anybody There? A Psychodynamic View of Panic Attack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizq, Rosemary

    2002-01-01

    Presents a process analysis of a psychodynamic intervention for a client with panic attacks. Discusses how a psychodynamic understanding of the complex etiology of the client's panic attacks that ultimately produced improved coping skills and a subjective sense of improvement for her. Process analysis is used to illustrate the theoretical base,…

  10. Panic attacks and interoceptive acuity for cardiac sensations.

    PubMed

    Asmundson, G J; Sandler, L S; Wilson, K G; Norton, G R

    1993-02-01

    It has been suggested that perception of visceral changes, and cognitive reactions to such changes, may be important for triggering panic attacks. It remains to be determined, however, whether people with panic attacks are actually characterized by enhanced perceptual acuity for interoceptive stimuli. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between panic attacks and awareness for cardiac sensations using an objective heartbeat discrimination procedure. Twenty panickers and 20 nonpanickers were given 60 trials of the Whitehead heartbeat discrimination procedure. Thirty trials were given during rest and 30 following hyperventilation. Results indicated that panic attacks were not related to enhanced interoceptive acuity for cardiac sensations, either at rest or following hyperventilation. These results are discussed in terms of their relevance to cognitive models of panic. PMID:8442744

  11. Myocardial perfusion imaging study of CO(2)-induced panic attack.

    PubMed

    Soares-Filho, Gastão L F; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Santulli, Gaetano; Mesquita, Claudio T; Cosci, Fiammetta; Silva, Adriana C; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-01-15

    Chest pain is often seen alongside with panic attacks. Moreover, panic disorder has been suggested as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and even a trigger for acute coronary syndrome. Patients with coronary artery disease may have myocardial ischemia in response to mental stress, in which panic attack is a strong component, by an increase in coronary vasomotor tone or sympathetic hyperactivity setting off an increase in myocardial oxygen consumption. Indeed, coronary artery spasm was presumed to be present in cases of cardiac ischemia linked to panic disorder. These findings correlating panic disorder with coronary artery disease lead us to raise questions about the favorable prognosis of chest pain in panic attack. To investigate whether myocardial ischemia is the genesis of chest pain in panic attacks, we developed a myocardial perfusion study through research by myocardial scintigraphy in patients with panic attacks induced in the laboratory by inhalation of 35% carbon dioxide. In conclusion, from the data obtained, some hypotheses are discussed from the viewpoint of endothelial dysfunction and microvascular disease present in mental stress response. PMID:24188891

  12. Smoking and panic attacks, panic disorder, and agoraphobia: a review of the empirical literature.

    PubMed

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Feldner, Matthew T; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W; McLeish, Alison C

    2005-09-01

    The empirical literature regarding panic-spectrum problems (i.e., panic attacks, panic disorder, and agoraphobia) and cigarette smoking is reviewed. In the first section of the paper, empirical studies that document the prevalence of smoking and panic-related problems are presented and discussed. In the second section of the paper, studies pertaining to the role cigarette smoking may play in the onset and maintenance of panic-related problems are critically reviewed. In the third section of the paper, studies related to the association between panic vulnerability factors and the nature of smoking behavior are presented. In the fourth section of the paper, specific areas not otherwise covered in the review are presented to stimulate further development in these areas (e.g., specialized treatment development). PMID:15975699

  13. The weight of cognitions in panic: the link between misinterpretations and panic attacks.

    PubMed

    De Cort, Klara; Hermans, Dirk; Noortman, Daphne; Arends, Wiesje; Griez, Eric J L; Schruers, Koen R J

    2013-01-01

    In cognitive theory it is hypothesized that panic attacks are provoked by catastrophic misinterpretations of bodily sensations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of associated word pairs referring to catastrophic thinking (e.g. palpitations-heart attack) in producing panic attacks. Patients with PD (n = 20), patients with mixed anxiety disorders (n = 20), and a healthy control group (n = 30) participated in the present study. To enhance ecological validity we first conducted a stimulus validation experiment. Subsequently, nine suitable panic and neutral word pairs were presented in block to the participants. Anxiety levels were assessed before and after the presentation. PD patients were more anxious when reading these word pairs, compared to neutral word pairs. However, none of the participants experienced a panic attack upon reading the word pairs. From the present results it seems that catastrophic thinking is rather related to the anticipatory anxiety for panic attacks, but not necessarily with the occurrence of the panic attacks themselves. PMID:23940559

  14. Panic attacks, panic disorder, and agoraphobia: associations with substance use, abuse, and dependence.

    PubMed

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Bernstein, Amit; Marshall, Erin C; Feldner, Matthew T

    2006-08-01

    Anxiety and substance use disorders frequently co-occur. Despite the clinical importance of this co-occurrence, theory and research addressing the relations between anxiety-substance use disorder comorbidity remain limited. The present commentary is intended to briefly review and summarize key aspects of this literature, with a specific focus on panic-spectrum psychopathology (panic attacks, panic disorder, and agoraphobia) and its associations with tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use, abuse, and dependence. A heuristic theoretical model for better understanding the panic-substance use relations also is offered. Extant data suggest clinically meaningful bidirectional associations are evident between panic problems and premorbid risk factors for such problems and various forms of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use. Key clinical implications and future directions are outlined based upon the review. PMID:16879791

  15. Ambient ozone concentration and emergency department visits for panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaelim; Choi, Yoon Jung; Sohn, Jungwoo; Suh, Mina; Cho, Seong-Kyung; Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Changsoo; Shin, Dong Chun

    2015-03-01

    The effect of ambient air pollution on panic disorder in the general population has not yet been thoroughly elucidated, although the occurrence of panic disorder in workers exposed to organic solvents has been reported previously. We investigated the association of ambient air pollution with the risk of panic attack-related emergency department visits. Using health insurance claims, we collected data from emergency department visits for panic attacks in Seoul, Republic of Korea (2005-2009). Daily air pollutant concentrations were obtained using automatic monitoring system data. We conducted a time-series study using a generalized additive model with Poisson distribution, which included spline variables (date of visit, daily mean temperature, and relative humidity) and parametric variables (daily mean air pollutant concentration, national holiday, and day of the week). In addition to single lag models (lag1 to lag3), cumulative lag models (lag0-1 to lag0-3) were constructed using moving-average concentrations on the days leading up to the visit. The risk was expressed as relative risk (RR) per one standard deviation of each air pollutant and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI). A total of 2320 emergency department visits for panic attacks were observed during the study period. The adjusted RR of panic attack-related emergency department visits was 1.051 (95% CI, 1.014-1.090) for same-day exposure to ozone. In cumulative models, adjusted RRs were 1.068 (1.029-1.107) in lag0-2 and 1.074 (1.035-1.114) in lag0-3. The ambient ozone concentration was significantly associated with emergency department visits for panic attacks. PMID:25669697

  16. Panic attack symptom dimensions and their relationship to illness characteristics in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Meuret, Alicia E; White, Kamila S; Ritz, Thomas; Roth, Walton T; Hofmann, Stefan G; Brown, Timothy A

    2006-09-01

    Subtyping panic disorder by predominant symptom constellations, such as cognitive or respiratory, has been done for some time, but criteria have varied considerably between studies. We sought to identify statistically symptom dimensions from intensity ratings of 13 DSM-IV panic symptoms in 343 panic patients interviewed with the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV Lifetime Version. We then explored the relation of symptom dimensions to selected illness characteristics. Ratings were submitted to exploratory maximum likelihood factor analysis with a Promax rotation. A three-factor solution was found to account best for the variance. Symptoms loading highest on the first factor were palpitations, shortness of breath, choking, chest pain, and numbness, which define a cardio-respiratory type (with fear of dying). Symptoms loading highest on the second factor were sweating, trembling, nausea, chills/hot flashes, and dizziness, which defines a mixed somatic subtype. Symptoms loading highest on the third factor were feeling of unreality, fear of going crazy, and fear of losing control, which defines a cognitive subtype. Subscales based on these factors showed moderate intercorrelations. In a series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses, the cardio-respiratory subscale was a strong predictor of panic severity, frequency of panic attacks, and agoraphobic avoidance, while the cognitive subscale mostly predicted worry due to panic. In addition, patients with comorbid asthma had higher scores on the cardio-respiratory subscale. We conclude that partly independent panic symptom dimensions can be identified that have different implications for severity and control of panic disorder. PMID:16293263

  17. Somatic panic-attack equivalents in a community sample of Rwandan widows who survived the 1994 genocide

    PubMed Central

    Hagengimana, Athanase; Hinton, Devon; Bird, Bruce; Pollack, Mark; Pitman, Roger K.

    2009-01-01

    The present study is the first to attempt to determine rates of panic attacks, especially ‘somatically focused’ panic attacks, panic disorder, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depression levels in a population of Rwandans traumatized by the 1994 genocide. The following measures were utilized: the Rwandan Panic-Disorder Survey (RPDS); the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ); and the PTSD Checklist (PCL). Forty of 100 Rwandan widows suffered somatically focused panic attacks during the previous 4 weeks. Thirty-five (87%) of those having panic attacks suffered panic disorder, making the rate of panic disorder for the entire sample 35%. Rwandan widows with panic attacks had greater psychopathology on all measures. Somatically focused panic-attack subtypes seem to constitute a key response to trauma in the Rwandan population. Future studies of traumatized non-Western populations should carefully assess not only somatoform disorder but also somatically focused panic attacks. PMID:12581815

  18. Characteristics of individuals meeting criteria for new onset panic attacks following exposure to a typhoon.

    PubMed

    Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Berenz, Erin C; Acierno, Ron; Tran, Trinh Luong; Trung, Lam Tu; Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Tuan, Tran; Buoi, La Thi; Ha, Tran Thu; Thach, Tran Duc; Amstadter, Ananda B

    2013-10-30

    The association between trauma exposure and panic attacks has received increased attention over the past decade, with mounting evidence suggesting an overlapping etiologic pathway. This study examined the incidence of new onset panic attacks in 775 Vietnamese individuals in the 2-3 months following Typhoon Xangsane. Pre-typhoon (Wave 1) and post-typhoon (Wave 2) assessments were conducted, allowing for consideration of factors occurring prior to the typhoon in addition to typhoon-relevant responding. Of the 775 participants, 11.6% (n=90) met criteria for lifetime panic attack pre-typhoon and 2.8% (n=22) met post-typhoon panic attack criteria. Individuals with pre-typhoon panic were significantly older and reported less education compared to the no-panic group. Individuals in both panic groups were more likely to screen positive on a Wave1 psychiatric screening measure, endorse greater typhoon exposure and prior traumatic event exposure and were significantly more likely to meet DSM-IV criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression (MDD) post-typhoon compared with persons reporting no history of panic attacks. Pre and post-typhoon panic exhibited similar patterns across variables and both panic conditions were associated with the development of PTSD and MDD, suggesting that persons experiencing panic attacks may represent a vulnerable population in need of early intervention services. PMID:23778303

  19. A panic attack-like unusual stress reaction.

    PubMed

    Schenberg, Luiz Carlos; Dos Reis, Adelina Martha; Ferreira Póvoa, Raner Miguel; Tufik, Sérgio; Silva, Sara Regina

    2008-11-01

    Ever since the seminal studies of Hans Selye, activation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is emblematic of stress. Consequently, the lack of HPA axis responses following the undisputable psychological stress of a panic attack stands out as one of the most intriguing findings of contemporary psychiatry. On the other hand, the defensive behaviors and aversive emotions produced by stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG) have been proposed as a model of panic attacks. Therefore, we examined whether the plasma levels of 'stress hormones' corticotropin and prolactin show any change following the DPAG-evoked freezing and flight behaviors of the rat. Rats bearing an electrode into the DPAG and an intra-atrial catheter were stimulated at 9:00 a.m., 18-24 h after the catheter implantation. Blood samples were withdrawn just before 1-min stimulation of DPAG, immediately after (5 or 15 min) and throughout 3 to 27 h following stimulation. In another experiment, samples were withdrawn either before or following a prolonged stimulation (5 min) of the DPAG with flight threshold intensity. Hormones were measured by either chemiluminescent or double-antibody immunoassays. Hormone plasma levels following freezing and flight behaviors were compared to those of resting or restraint-stressed rats. Data show that stress hormones remain unaltered following the DPAG-evoked defensive behaviors. Not even the 5-min stimulation of DPAG with the flight threshold intensity changed corticotropin plasma levels significantly. As far as we known, this is the first demonstration of the lack of stress hormone responses following the intense emotional arousal and physical exertion of a fear-like behavior in rats. Data add new evidence of DPAG involvement in spontaneous panic attacks. PMID:18423636

  20. Panic Disorder in Clinically Referred Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerfler, Leonard A.; Connor, Daniel F.; Volungis, Adam M.; Toscano, Peter F., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the frequency and characteristics of panic disorder in children and adolescents who had been referred to a pediatric psychopharmacology clinic. Of the 280 children and adolescents evaluated in this clinic, 35 were diagnosed with panic disorder using a semi-structured clinical interview (K-SADS) and other objective…

  1. Examining the Panic Attack Specifier in Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Allan, Nicholas P; Oglesby, Mary E; Short, Nicole A; Schmidt, Norman B

    2016-04-01

    Panic attacks (PAs) are characterized by overwhelming surges of fear and discomfort and are one of the most frequently occurring symptoms in psychiatric populations. The most recent version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (i.e. DSM-5) allows for a panic attack (PA) specifier for all disorders, including social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, there is little research examining differences between individuals diagnosed with SAD with the PA specifier versus individuals diagnosed with SAD without the PA specifier. The current study examined social anxiety, mood, anxiety, and anxiety sensitivity social concerns, a risk factor for social anxiety in SAD-diagnosed individuals without (N = 52) and with (N = 14) the PA specifier. The groups differed only in somatic symptoms of anxiety. Result of the current study provides preliminary evidence that the presence of the PA specifier in social anxiety does not result in elevated levels of comorbidity or a more severe presentation of social anxiety. PMID:26750995

  2. Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Vietnamese Refugees with PTSD and Comorbid Panic Attacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Devon E.; Safren, Steven A.; Pollack, Mark H.; Tran, Minh

    2006-01-01

    For Vietnamese refugees, we describe (a) how headache- and orthostasis-focused panic attacks are generated, (b) a culturally sensitive treatment for PTSD with comorbid headache- and orthostasis-focused panic attacks, and (c) the outcome of a treatment series. In a multiple-baseline, across-subjects design (N = 3), all patients demonstrated…

  3. Brain Circulation during Panic Attack: A Transcranial Doppler Study with Clomipramine Challenge.

    PubMed

    Rotella, Francesco; Marinoni, Marinella; Lejeune, Francesca; Alari, Fabiana; Depinesi, Daniela; Cosci, Fiammetta; Faravelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cerebral blood flow has been well studied in patients with panic disorder, but only few studies analyzed the mechanisms underlying the onset of a panic attack. The aim of the present study was to monitor the cerebral hemodynamics modifications during a panic attack. Materials and Methods. 10 panic disorder patients with recent onset, fully drug naïve, were compared to 13 patients with panic disorder with a previous history of treatment and to 14 controls. A continuous bilateral monitoring of mean flow velocities in right and left middle cerebral arteries was performed by transcranial Doppler. Clomipramine was chosen as challenge. Results. Eight out of 10 patients drug naïve and 6 control subjects out of 13 had a full blown panic attack during the test, whereas none of the patients with a history of treatment panicked. The occurrence of a panic attack was accompanied by a rapid decrease of flow velocities in both right and left middle cerebral arteries. Discussion. The bilateral acute decrease of mean flow velocity during a panic attack suggests the vasoconstriction of the microcirculation of deep brain structures perfused by middle cerebral arteries and involved in the so-called "fear circuitry," thus suggesting that cerebral homeostatic dysfunctions seem to have a key role in the onset of a panic attack. PMID:24829899

  4. Panic Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... your head? No. Most likely, you had a panic attack. Panic attacks can last from minutes to hours. They may ... made after a person experiences at least 2 panic attacks that occur without reason and are followed by ...

  5. Panic attacks and possession by djinns: lessons from ethnopsychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Del Puente, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    This clinical case report shows how important it is for a psychiatrist to have a knowledge of the cultural and religious context of the patient, in order to understand fully his or her complaints. Culture and religion, in fact, are not neutral, but convey symbols, meanings, and myths that should be properly explored to shed light on the patient’s inner world. Patient D was a 19-year-old Muslim Italo-Tunisian girl, who consulted a psychiatrist for anxiety and panic attacks, and reported being possessed by djinns (ie, “evil creatures”, as described in the Qur’an). A culturally informed interview was carried out, together with administration of psychometric scales, including the Symptom Checklist-90 Revised and Psychological Measure of Islamic Religiousness. Based on her scores and the results of this multidimensional assessment, patient D was treated with transcultural psychotherapy and fluoxetine. After a year of follow-up, she reported no further episodes of panic disorder. For proper assessment and treatment, a combined anthropological, sociological, and psychopathological approach was necessary. PMID:23293545

  6. Panic Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... panic disorder? Panic disorder is characterized by recurrent panic attacks—an uncontrollable and terrifying response to ordinary, nonthreatening ... is also persistent anxiety or fear about the panic attacks and changes in behavior in an attempt to ...

  7. Anxiety Sensitivity and Panic Attacks: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wen; Zinbarg, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a risk factor for panic genesis has obtained compelling support, but the clinical/practical importance of AS in panic genesis has been questioned. In addition, the association between panic experience and AS increase has not been clearly demonstrated. Through this 1-year longitudinal study among…

  8. Olfactory-Triggered Panic Attacks Among Khmer Refugees: A Contextual Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Devon; Pich, Vuth; Chhean, Dara; Pollack, Mark

    2009-01-01

    One hundred Khmer refugees attending a psychiatric clinic were surveyed to determine the prevalence of olfactory-triggered panic attacks as well as certain characteristics of the episodes, including trigger (i.e. type of odor), frequency, length, somatic symptoms, and the rate of associated flashbacks and catastrophic cognitions. Forty-five of the 100 patients had experienced an olfactory-triggered panic attack in the last month. Trauma associations and catastrophic cognitions (e.g. fears of a ‘wind attack,’ ‘weakness,’ and ‘weak heart’) were common during events of olfactory panic. Several case examples are presented. A multifactorial model of the generation of olfactory panic is adduced. The therapeutic implications of this model for the treatment of olfactory panic are discussed. PMID:15446720

  9. Panic Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... by recurrent episodes of paralyzing fear, known as panic attacks. Panic disorder, which affects three million to six ... Americans, typically surfaces between ages fifteen and nineteen. Panic attacks may be precipitated by specific events, but they ...

  10. A laboratory-based test of the relation between adolescent alcohol use and panic-relevant responding.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Heidemarie; Cloutier, Renee M; Zamboanga, Byron L; Bunaciu, Liviu; Knapp, Ashley A

    2015-10-01

    A burgeoning literature supports a link between alcohol use and panic-spectrum problems (e.g., panic attacks, disorder) among adolescents, but the direction of influence has yet to be properly examined. From a theoretical perspective, panic-spectrum problems may increase risk for problematic drinking via affect regulation efforts (e.g., self-medication), and problematic consumption also may increase or initiate panic-relevant responding (e.g., learning or kindling models). The objective of the current investigation was to examine the role of prior alcohol use in predicting panic-relevant responding, as well as panic symptom history in predicting the desire to consume alcohol, in the context of either a voluntary hyperventilation or a low-arousal task. Participants were community-recruited adolescents aged 12-17 years (n = 92, Mage = 15.42, SD = 1.51; 39.1% girls). Results indicated that prior alcohol use predicted panic-relevant responding among those undergoing the hyperventilation task (but not the low-arousal task), and that this finding was robust to the inclusion of theoretically relevant covariates (i.e., age, sex, negative affectivity). However, panic symptom history did not predict the desire to consume alcohol as a function of either the hyperventilation or low-arousal condition. This work sheds further light on the nature of the relation between panic-spectrum problems and problematic alcohol use in adolescence. Specifically, the current findings suggest that frequent alcohol use may increase panic vulnerability among adolescents, whereas acute panic symptoms may not elicit the immediate (self-reported) desire to drink. PMID:26053320

  11. A Laboratory-Based Test of the Relation between Adolescent Alcohol Use and Panic-Relevant Responding

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Heidemarie; Cloutier, Renee M.; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Bunaciu, Liviu; Knapp, Ashley A.

    2015-01-01

    A burgeoning literature supports a link between alcohol use and panic-spectrum problems (e.g., panic attacks, disorder) among adolescents, but the direction of influence has yet to be properly examined. From a theoretical perspective, panic-spectrum problems may increase risk for problematic drinking via affect regulation efforts (e.g., self-medication), and problematic consumption also may increase or initiate panic-relevant responding (e.g., learning or kindling models). The objective of the current investigation was to examine the role of prior alcohol use in predicting panic-relevant responding, as well as panic symptom history in predicting the desire to consume alcohol, in the context of either a voluntary hyperventilation or a low-arousal task. Participants were community-recruited adolescents aged 12-17 years (n = 92, Mage = 15.42, SD = 1.51; 39.1% girls). Results indicated that prior alcohol use predicted panic-relevant responding among those undergoing the hyperventilation task (but not the low-arousal task), and that this finding was robust to the inclusion of theoretically-relevant covariates (i.e. age, sex, negative affectivity). However, panic symptom history did not predict the desire to consume alcohol as a function of either the hyperventilation or low-arousal condition. This work sheds further light on the nature of the relation between panic-spectrum problems and problematic alcohol use in adolescence. Specifically, the current findings suggest that frequent alcohol use may increase panic vulnerability among adolescents, whereas acute panic symptoms may not elicit the immediate (self-reported) desire to drink. PMID:26053320

  12. Cerebral blood flow changes during sodium-lactate-induced panic attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.S.; Devous, M.D. Sr.; Rush, A.J.; Lane, L.; Bonte, F.J.

    1988-04-01

    Dynamic single-photon emission computed axial tomography (CAT) with inhaled xenon-133 was used to measure regional cerebral blood flow in 10 drug-free patients with DSM-III-diagnosed panic disorder and in five normal control subjects. All subjects underwent regional cerebral blood flow studies while at rest or during normal saline infusion and during sodium lactate infusion. Six of the 10 patients and none of the control subjects experienced lactate-induced panic attacks. Lactate infusion markedly raised hemispheric blood flow levels in both control subjects and patients who did not panic. Patients who did panic experienced either a minimal increase or a decrease in hemispheric blood flow.

  13. Symptom Induction and De-escalation in the Treatment of Panic Attacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dattilio, Frank M.

    1990-01-01

    Describes technique known as symptom induction and de-escalation for panic attacks in which goal is to reproduce the type of situation that may precipitate an attack and then to show the client how the attacks can be "turned on" as well as "turned off." (ABL)

  14. Development of mental health first aid guidelines for panic attacks: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Claire M; Jorm, Anthony F; Kitchener, Betty A

    2009-01-01

    Background Panic attacks are common, and while they are not life-threatening events, they can lead to the development of panic disorder and agoraphobia. Appropriate help at the time that a panic attack occurs may decrease the fear associated with the attack and reduce the risk of developing an anxiety disorder. However, few people have the knowledge and skills required to assist. Simple first aid guidelines may help members of the public to offer help to people who experience panic attacks. Methods The Delphi method was used to reach consensus in a panel of experts. Experts included 50 professionals and 6 people who had experience of panic attacks and were active in mental health advocacy. Statements about how to assist someone who is having a panic attack were sourced through a systematic search of both professional and lay literature. These statements were rated for importance as first aid guidelines by the expert and consumer panels and guidelines were written using the items most consistently endorsed. Results Of 144 statements presented to the panels, 27 were accepted. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. Conclusion There are a number of actions which are considered to be useful for members of the public to do if they encounter someone who is having a panic attack. These guidelines will be useful in revision of curricula of mental health first aid programs. They can also be used by members of the public who want immediate information about how to assist someone who is experiencing panic attacks. PMID:19664244

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Panic Disorder in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pincus, Donna B.; May, Jill Ehrenreich; Whitton, Sarah W.; Mattis, Sara G.; Barlow, David H.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation represents the first randomized controlled trial to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of Panic Control Treatment for Adolescents (PCT-A). Thirteen adolescents, ages 14 to 17, were randomized to 11 weekly sessions of PCT-A treatment, whereas 13 were randomized to a self-monitoring control group. Results indicate that…

  16. The psychodynamic of panic attacks: a useful integration of psychoanalysis and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    De Masi, Franco

    2004-04-01

    This article tries to explain, in the light of some neuroscientific and psychoanalytical considerations, the repetitive pattern of panic attacks. Freud considered the panic attack as an 'actual neurosis' not involving any conflictual process. Recent neuroscientific findings indicate that psychosomatic reactions, set off by a danger situation, depend on the primitive circuit of fear (including the amygdala) characterised by its speed, but lack accurate responses and may also be activated by harmless stimuli perceived erroneously as dangerous. The traumatic terror is stored in implicit memory and may be set off by a conditioned stimulus linked to a previous danger situation. In the panic attack, the traumatic event is created by the imagination and this construction (a micro-delusion), built in loneliness and anxiety, has the same power as the real trauma. A mutual psychosomatic short-circuit between body and psyche, in which terror reinforces the somatic reactions and the psychic construction, is established. Therefore, it is important to highlight these constructions in order to analyse and transform them. In the second part of the article the author reviews the main psychoanalytical theories about panic attacks, stressing how, in his opinion, panic attack is a consequence of the breakdown of the defence organisation at various levels and may appear during periods of life crisis. Two patients suffering from a deficit of personal identity are presented. The various organisations and the different levels (biological, neuroscientific, associative, traumatic) of the panic attack determine different kinds of therapeutic approaches (pharmacological, cognitive and psychoanalytical). While the psychopharmacological treatment is aimed at reducing the neurovegetative reaction and the cognitive method is attempting to correct the associative and perceptive processes of fear signals, psychoanalytical therapy represents both a specific means to free patients from panic attacks

  17. Perievent Panic Attack and Depression after the World Trade Center Disaster: A Structural Equation Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Richard E.; Boscarino, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that perievent panic attackspanic attacks in temporal proximity to traumatic events – are predictive of later mental health status, including the onset of depression. Using a community sample of New York City residents interviewed 1 year and 2 years after the World Trade Center Disaster, we estimated a structural equation model (SEM) using pre-disaster psychological status and post-disaster life events, together with psychosocial resources, to assess the relationship between perievent panic and later onset depression. Bivariate results revealed a significant association between perievent panic and both year-1 and year-2 depression. Results for the SEM, however, showed that perievent panic was predictive of year-1 depression, but not year-2 depression, once potential confounders were controlled. Year-2 stressors and year-2 psychosocial resources were the best predictors of year-2 depression onset. Pre-disaster psychological problems were directly implicated in year-1 depression, but not year-2 depression. We conclude that a conceptual model that includes pre- and post-disaster variables best explains the complex causal pathways between psychological status, stressor exposure, perievent panic attacks, and depression onset two years after the World Trade Center attacks. PMID:21957721

  18. Panic attack symptoms differentiate patients with epilepsy from those with psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNES).

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Rick; Popescu, Alexandra; Dixit, Ronak; Ghearing, Gena; Bagic, Anto

    2014-08-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNES) are frequently challenging to differentiate from epileptic seizures. The experience of panic attack symptoms during an event may assist in distinguishing PNES from seizures secondary to epilepsy. A retrospective analysis of 354 patients diagnosed with PNES (N=224) or with epilepsy (N=130) investigated the thirteen Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV-Text Revision panic attack criteria endorsed by the two groups. We found a statistically higher mean number of symptoms reported by patients with PNES compared with those with epilepsy. In addition, the majority of the panic attack symptoms including heart palpitations, sweating, shortness of breath, choking feeling, chest discomfort, dizziness/unsteadiness, derealization or depersonalization, fear of dying, paresthesias, and chills or hot flashes were significantly more frequent in those with PNES. As patients with PNES frequently have poor clinical outcomes, treatment addressing the anxiety symptomatology may be beneficial. PMID:25084477

  19. Panic attack triggering myocardial ischemia documented by myocardial perfusion imaging study. A case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chest pain, a key element in the investigation of coronary artery disease is often regarded as a benign prognosis when present in panic attacks. However, panic disorder has been suggested as an independent risk factor for long-term prognosis of cardiovascular diseases and a trigger of acute myocardial infarction. Objective Faced with the extreme importance in differentiate from ischemic to non-ischemic chest pain, we report a case of panic attack induced by inhalation of 35% carbon dioxide triggering myocardial ischemia, documented by myocardial perfusion imaging study. Discussion Panic attack is undoubtedly a strong component of mental stress. Patients with coronary artery disease may present myocardial ischemia in mental stress response by two ways: an increase in coronary vasomotor tone or a sympathetic hyperactivity leading to a rise in myocardial oxygen consumption. Coronary artery spasm was presumed to be present in cases of cardiac ischemia linked to panic disorder. Possibly the carbon dioxide challenge test could trigger myocardial ischemia by the same mechanisms. Conclusion The use of mental stress has been suggested as an alternative method for myocardial ischemia investigation. Based on translational medicine objectives the use of CO2 challenge followed by Sestamibi SPECT could be a useful method to allow improved application of research-based knowledge to the medical field, specifically at the interface of PD and cardiovascular disease. PMID:22999016

  20. Panic Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a type of anxiety disorder. It causes panic attacks, which are sudden feelings of terror when there ... or a cold chill Tingly or numb hands Panic attacks can happen anytime, anywhere, and without warning. You ...

  1. Developmental Course(s) of Lifetime Cigarette Use and Panic Attack Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Amit; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Schmidt, Norman B.; Sachs-Ericcson, Natalie

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation examined the developmental course(s) of lifetime cigarette use and panic attack comorbidity. Participants included 4,409 adults, ages 15 to 54 years of age (M[Age] = 33.1, SD = 10.7, N (females) = 2,221) from the National Comorbidity Survey (NCS). The primary objective of the present investigation was to better understand…

  2. Hot Flashes and Panic Attacks: A Comparison of Symptomatology, Neurobiology, Treatment, and a Role for Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanisch, Laura J.; Hantsoo, Liisa; Freeman, Ellen W.; Sullivan, Gregory M.; Coyne, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the causal mechanisms of hot flashes are not adequately understood, and a biopsychosocial perspective on hot flashes remains underdeveloped. This article explores overlooked parallels between hot flashes and panic attacks within 5 areas: course and symptomatology, physiological indicators, neurocircuitry and…

  3. The Use of Paradoxical Intention in the Treatment of Panic Attacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dattilio, Frank M.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the counseling use of paradoxical intention, in which clients are told to perform responses that seem incompatible with the goal for which they are seeking help. The use of paradoxical intention in the treatment of panic attacks is described and a case example is included. The nature and implementation of the technique are discussed.…

  4. Changes in neuroactive steroid secretion associated with CO2-induced panic attacks in normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Francesca; Perini, Giulia; Serra, Mariangela; Pisu, Maria Giuseppina; Zanone, Stefano; Toffanin, Tommaso; Milleri, Stefano; Garcia, Cristina Segura; Biggio, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Neuroactive steroids modulate anxiety in experimental animals and possibly in humans. The secretion of these compounds has been found to be altered in panic disorder (PD), with such alterations having been suggested to be a possible cause or effect of panic symptomatology. Panic-like attacks can be induced in healthy individuals by administration of panicogenic agents or by physical procedures, and we have now measured the plasma concentrations of neuroactive steroids in such individuals before, during, and after panicogenic inhalation of CO2 in order to investigate whether abnormalities of neuroactive steroid secretion might contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Fifty-nine psychologically and physically healthy subjects, including 42 women (11 in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, 14 in the luteal phase, and 17 taking contraceptive pills) and 17 men, who experienced a panic-like attack on previous exposure to 7% CO2 were again administered 7% CO2 for 20min. Thirty-three of these individuals (responders) again experienced a panic-like attack, whereas the remaining 26 subjects did not (nonresponders). All subjects were examined with the VAS-A and PSL-III-R scales for anxiety and panic symptomatology before and after CO2 inhalation. The plasma concentrations of progesterone, 3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone (3α,5α-THPROG=allopregnanolone), 3α,5α-tetrahydrodesoxycorticosterone (3α,5α-THDOC), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and cortisol were measured 15min and immediately before the onset of CO2 administration as well as immediately, 10, 30, and 50min after the end of CO2 inhalation. Neuroactive steroids were measured in the laboratory of Prof. Biggio in Cagliari, Sardinia, Italy. Neurosteroid levels did not change significantly in both responders and nonresponders before, during, or after CO2 inhalation. These data suggest that neuroactive steroid concentrations before, during, or after CO2 inhalation do not seem to correlate with panic symptomatology

  5. Panic attacks 10 years after heart transplantation successfully treated with low-dose citalopram: a case report

    PubMed Central

    YE, Chenyu; ZHUANG, Yamin; JI, Jianlin; CHEN, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Summary Panic attacks are common among patients who have undergone heart transplantation, but there are no clinical guidelines for the treatment of panic attacks in this group of patients. This report describes a 22-year-old woman who experienced panic attacks 10 years after heart transplant surgery. The attacks started after she discovered that the average post-transplantation survival is 10 years. Treated with citalopram 10 mg/d, her symptoms improved significantly after 2 weeks and had completely resolved after 8 weeks. A positive physician-patient relationship with the doctors who regularly followed her medical condition was crucial to encouraging her to adhere to the treatment with citalopram. She continued taking the citalopram for 7 months without any adverse effects. When followed up 3 months after stopping the citalopram, she had had no recurrence of the panic attacks. PMID:27199531

  6. Panic attacks 10 years after heart transplantation successfully treated with low-dose citalopram: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chenyu; Zhuang, Yamin; Ji, Jianlin; Chen, Hao

    2015-12-25

    Panic attacks are common among patients who have undergone heart transplantation, but there are no clinical guidelines for the treatment of panic attacks in this group of patients. This report describes a 22-year-old woman who experienced panic attacks 10 years after heart transplant surgery. The attacks started after she discovered that the average post-transplantation survival is 10 years. Treated with citalopram 10 mg/d, her symptoms improved significantly after 2 weeks and had completely resolved after 8 weeks. A positive physician-patient relationship with the doctors who regularly followed her medical condition was crucial to encouraging her to adhere to the treatment with citalopram. She continued taking the citalopram for 7 months without any adverse effects. When followed up 3 months after stopping the citalopram, she had had no recurrence of the panic attacks. PMID:27199531

  7. ETIOLOGY, TRIGGERS AND NEUROCHEMICAL CIRCUITS ASSOCIATED WITH UNEXPECTED, EXPECTED, AND LABORATORY-INDUCED PANIC ATTACKS

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip L.; Federici, Lauren M.; Shekhar, Anantha

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a severe anxiety disorder that is characterized by recurrent panic attacks (PA), which can be unexpected (uPA, i.e., no clear identifiable trigger) or expected (ePA). Panic typically involves an abrupt feeling of catastrophic fear or distress accompanied by physiological symptoms such as palpitations, racing heart, thermal sensations, and sweating. Recurrent uPA and ePA can also lead to agoraphobia, where subjects with PD avoid situations that were associated with PA. Here we will review recent developments in our understanding of PD, which includes discussions on: symptoms and signs associated with uPA and ePAs; Diagnosis of PD and the new DSM-V; biological etiology such as heritability and gene x environment and gene x hormonal development interactions; comparisons between laboratory and naturally occurring uPAs and ePAs; neurochemical systems that are associated with clinical PAs (e.g. gene associations; targets for triggering or treating PAs), adaptive fear and panic response concepts in the context of new NIH RDoc approach; and finally strengths and weaknesses of translational animal models of adaptive and pathological panic states. PMID:25130976

  8. Interoceptive fear learning to mild breathlessness as a laboratory model for unexpected panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Pappens, Meike; Vandenbossche, Evelien; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Fear learning is thought to play an important role in panic disorder. Benign interoceptive sensations can become predictors (conditioned stimuli - CSs) of massive fear when experienced in the context of an initial panic attack (unconditioned stimulus - US). The mere encounter of these CSs on a later moment can induce anxiety and fear, and precipitate a new panic attack. It has been suggested that fear learning to interoceptive cues would result in unpredictable panic. The present study aimed to investigate whether fear learning to an interoceptive CS is possible without declarative knowledge of the CS-US contingency. The CS consisted of mild breathlessness (or: dyspnea), the US was a suffocation experience. During acquisition, the experimental group received six presentations of mild breathlessness immediately followed by suffocation; for the control group both experiences were always separated by an intertrial interval. In the subsequent extinction phase, participants received six unreinforced presentations of the CS. Expectancy of the US was rated continuously and startle eyeblink electromyographic, skin conductance, and respiration were measured. Declarative knowledge of the CS-US relationship was also assessed with a post-experimental questionnaire. At the end of acquisition, both groups displayed the same levels of US expectancy and skin conductance in response to the CS, but the experimental group showed a fear potentiated startle eyeblink and a different respiratory response to the CS compared to the control group. Further analyses on a subgroup of CS-US unaware participants confirmed the presence of startle eyeblink conditioning in the experimental group but not in the control group. Our findings suggest that interoceptive fear learning is not dependent on declarative knowledge of the CS-US relationship. The present interoceptive fear conditioning paradigm may serve as an ecologically valid laboratory model for unexpected panic attacks. PMID:26300830

  9. Interoceptive fear learning to mild breathlessness as a laboratory model for unexpected panic attacks

    PubMed Central

    Pappens, Meike; Vandenbossche, Evelien; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Fear learning is thought to play an important role in panic disorder. Benign interoceptive sensations can become predictors (conditioned stimuli – CSs) of massive fear when experienced in the context of an initial panic attack (unconditioned stimulus – US). The mere encounter of these CSs on a later moment can induce anxiety and fear, and precipitate a new panic attack. It has been suggested that fear learning to interoceptive cues would result in unpredictable panic. The present study aimed to investigate whether fear learning to an interoceptive CS is possible without declarative knowledge of the CS–US contingency. The CS consisted of mild breathlessness (or: dyspnea), the US was a suffocation experience. During acquisition, the experimental group received six presentations of mild breathlessness immediately followed by suffocation; for the control group both experiences were always separated by an intertrial interval. In the subsequent extinction phase, participants received six unreinforced presentations of the CS. Expectancy of the US was rated continuously and startle eyeblink electromyographic, skin conductance, and respiration were measured. Declarative knowledge of the CS–US relationship was also assessed with a post-experimental questionnaire. At the end of acquisition, both groups displayed the same levels of US expectancy and skin conductance in response to the CS, but the experimental group showed a fear potentiated startle eyeblink and a different respiratory response to the CS compared to the control group. Further analyses on a subgroup of CS–US unaware participants confirmed the presence of startle eyeblink conditioning in the experimental group but not in the control group. Our findings suggest that interoceptive fear learning is not dependent on declarative knowledge of the CS–US relationship. The present interoceptive fear conditioning paradigm may serve as an ecologically valid laboratory model for unexpected panic attacks. PMID

  10. Panic Disorder: When Fear Overwhelms

    MedlinePlus

    ... for several minutes or longer. These are called panic attacks . Panic attacks are characterized by a fear of disaster or ... also have a strong physical reaction during a panic attack. It may feel like having a heart attack. ...

  11. The phenomenology of the first panic attack in clinical and community-based samples.

    PubMed

    Pané-Farré, Christiane A; Stender, Jan P; Fenske, Kristin; Deckert, Jürgen; Reif, Andreas; John, Ulrich; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Schulz, Andrea; Lang, Thomas; Alpers, Georg W; Kircher, Tilo; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anna N; Grabe, Hans J; Hamm, Alfons O

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to contrast first panic attacks (PAs) of patients with panic disorder (PD) with vs. without agoraphobia and to explore differences between first PAs leading to the development of PD and those that remain isolated. Data were drawn from a community survey (N=2259 including 88 isolated PAs and 75 PD cases). An additional sample of 234 PD patients was recruited in a clinical setting. A standardized interview assessed the symptoms of the first PA, context of its occurrence and subsequent coping attempts. Persons who developed PD reported more severe first PAs, more medical service utilization and exposure-limiting coping attempts than those with isolated PAs. The context of the first PA did not differ between PD and isolated PAs. PD with agoraphobia was specifically associated with greater symptom severity and occurrence of first attacks in public. Future research should validate these findings using a longitudinal approach. PMID:24973697

  12. Psychopathology in the Adolescent Offspring of Parents with Panic Disorder and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhat, Amritha S.; Srinivasan, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the prevalence of psychiatric diagnosis and psychopathology in adolescent offspring of parents with panic disorder, depression and normal controls. Methods: Adolescent offspring (11-16 years) of parents with a diagnosis of panic disorder and major depression, and normal controls were interviewed using Missouri Assessment of Genetics…

  13. Treatment of Adolescent Panic Disorder: A Nonrandomized Comparison of Intensive versus Weekly CBT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rhea M.; Whitton, Sarah W.; Pincus, Donna B.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the relative efficacy of intensive versus weekly panic control treatment (PCT) for adolescent panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA). Twenty-six adolescents participated in weekly sessions and 25 received intensive treatment involving daily sessions. Both groups demonstrated significant and comparable reductions in panic…

  14. Identifying Efficacious Treatment Components of Panic Control Treatment for Adolescents: A Preliminary Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micco, Jamie A.; Choate-Summers, Molly L.; Ehrenreich, Jill T.; Pincus, Donna B.; Mattis, Sara G.

    2007-01-01

    Panic Control Treatment for Adolescents (PCT-A) is a developmentally sensitive and efficacious treatment for adolescents with panic disorder. The present study is a preliminary examination of the relative efficacy of individual treatment components in PCT-A in a sample of treatment completers; the study identified when rapid improvements in panic…

  15. Explaining health care utilization for panic attacks using cusp catastrophe modeling.

    PubMed

    Katerndahl, David

    2008-10-01

    Despite increased health care utilization, patients with panic disorder continue to report unmet needs. The objective was to compare the fit of linear and Cusp Catastrophe Modeling in explaining changes in utilization of emergency, general and mental health settings, and self-treatments for panic symptoms. This community-based study surveyed 97 subjects with panic attacks drawn from a sample of randomly-selected adults from randomly-selected households. The stressor (splitting) variable used was Phobic Anxiety while predisposing variables included Family Health Care Utilization, Perceived Life Threat and Need For Treatment, and Treatment Experience. Outcomes consisted of the number of sites and self-treatments used for panic symptoms when first seeking care and during the 2 months prior to survey. Use of mental health sites and self-treatments demonstrated superior modeling with cusp catastrophe approaches using treatment experience as the predisposing variable, accounting for 47% and 38% of variances respectively, improving the fit by over 20% compared to the best linear models in both cases. Cusp catastrophe modeling accounted for more variance than all linear models when describing use of mental health settings and self-treatments. Cusp catastrophe may explain bimodal distributions in behavior, delays in behavior change, and sudden shifts in behavior in stressful situations. PMID:18765074

  16. [Autonomic regulation in patients with panic attacks based on longitudinal study data on the variability of the heart rhythm].

    PubMed

    Khaspekova, N B; Diukova, G M; Tumalaeva, Z N; Alieva, Kh K

    1999-01-01

    During a repeated study in recumbent position as well as during 48-hour monitoring of the indices of variability of RR intervals of ECG (MDRR) in patients with panic attacks (PA) a stable dominance of VLF (0.07-0.01 Hz) and rigidity of the spectrum typical for patients with panic attacks (PA) in period between the attacks was found. Prevalence of fear emotions as well as accompanying hypothalamic insufficiency were also associated with a decrease of HF. In prodromic period, in attack and after it, there was no dynamics in the frequency of heart's contractions, but there was a sharp increase of MDRR. In prodromic period VLF and LF considerably increased, while HF decreased. In a moment of a panic attack LF and HF continued to increase, while VLF significantly lowered. Activation of vasomotor (LF), vagal (HF) and cerebral (VLF) mechanisms was maintained during 5 minutes of the study after PA completion with a clear predominance of LF component. PMID:10441851

  17. Cognitive and performance-based treatments for panic attacks in people with varying degrees of agoraphobic disability.

    PubMed

    Williams, S L; Falbo, J

    1996-03-01

    Compared the effectiveness of cognitive therapy and performance-based exposure as treatments for panic attacks. Subjects were 48 panicky individuals selected without regard to agoraphobic disability, and who varied widely in that respect. Subjects were assigned randomly to either cognitive treatment, performance-based exposure treatment, a combined cognitive/performance treatment, or a no-treatment control condition. All three treatments led to marked and enduring improvements in panic, and did not differ from one another in effectiveness, whereas the control condition produced little benefit. However, on several measures of phobia and panic-related cognitions, performance exposure was significantly more effective than cognitive therapy. Degree of agoraphobic disability had a significant bearing on panic treatment effectiveness. Whereas 94% of the low agoraphobia Ss were free of panic after treatment, only 52% of the high agoraphobia Ss became panic-free. The findings suggest that when panic treatment research excludes people with serious phobias, as it has routinely done in recent years, an overly positive estimate of panic treatment effectiveness can result. PMID:8881094

  18. Panic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anxiety disorder - panic attacks References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  19. Panic Disorder and Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your state. Panic Attacks, Panic Disorder, and Agoraphobia (Copyright © American Academy of Family Physicians) - This online ... and examples of co-existing conditions. Panic Disorder & Agoraphobia (Copyright © Anxiety Disorders Association of America) - This web ...

  20. Multiple Channel Exposure Therapy: Combining Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder with Panic Attacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falsetti, Sherry A.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Davis, Joanne

    2005-01-01

    A large proportion of patients who present for treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience comorbid panic attacks, yet it is unclear to what extent currently available PTSD treatment programs address this problem. Here we describe a newly developed treatment, multiple-channel exposure therapy (M-CET), for comorbid PTSD and panic…

  1. Low serum concentrations of vitamin B6 and iron are related to panic attack and hyperventilation attack.

    PubMed

    Mikawa, Yasuhito; Mizobuchi, Satoshi; Egi, Moritoki; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Patients undergoing a panic attack (PA) or a hyperventilation attack (HVA) are sometimes admitted to emergency departments (EDs). Reduced serotonin level is known as one of the causes of PA and HVA. Serotonin is synthesized from tryptophan. For the synthesis of serotonin, vitamin B6 (Vit B6) and iron play important roles as cofactors. To clarify the pathophysiology of PA and HVA, we investigated the serum levels of vitamins B2, B6, and B12 and iron in patients with PA or HVA attending an ED. We measured each parameter in 21 PA or HVA patients and compared the values with those from 20 volunteers. We found that both Vit B6 and iron levels were significantly lower in the PA/HVA group than in the volunteer group. There was no significant difference in the serum levels of vitamins B2 or B12. These results suggest that low serum concentrations of Vit B6 and iron are involved in PA and HVA. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms involved in such differences. PMID:23603926

  2. 'The ghost pushes you down': sleep paralysis-type panic attacks in a Khmer refugee population.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Pich, Vuth; Chhean, Dara; Pollack, Mark H

    2005-03-01

    Among a psychiatric population of Cambodian refugees (N = 100), 42% had current--i.e. at least once in the last year--sleep paralysis (SP). Of those experiencing SP, 91% (38/42) had visual hallucinations of an approaching being, and 100% (42/42) had panic attacks. Among patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD; n = 45), 67% (30/45) had SP, whereas among those without PTSD, only 22.4% (11/45) had SP (chi2 = 20.4, p < .001). Of the patients with PTSD, 60% (27/45) had monthly episodes of SP. The Cambodian panic response to SP seems to be greatly heightened by elaborate cultural ideas--with SP generating concerns about physical status, 'good luck' status, 'bad luck' status, sorcery assault, and ghost assault--and by trauma associations to the figure seen in SP. Case vignettes illustrate cultural beliefs about, and trauma resonances of, SP. A model to explain the high rate of SP in this population is presented. SP is a core aspect of the Cambodian refugees response to trauma; when assessing Cambodian refugees, and traumatized refugees in general, clinicians should assess for its presence. PMID:15881268

  3. "But it might be a heart attack": intolerance of uncertainty and panic disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Carleton, R Nicholas; Duranceau, Sophie; Freeston, Mark H; Boelen, Paul A; McCabe, Randi E; Antony, Martin M

    2014-06-01

    Panic disorder models describe interactions between feared anxiety-related physical sensations (i.e., anxiety sensitivity; AS) and catastrophic interpretations therein. Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has been implicated as necessary for catastrophic interpretations in community samples. The current study examined relationships between IU, AS, and panic disorder symptoms in a clinical sample. Participants had a principal diagnosis of panic disorder, with or without agoraphobia (n=132; 66% women). IU was expected to account for significant variance in panic symptoms controlling for AS. AS was expected to mediate the relationship between IU and panic symptoms, whereas IU was expected to moderate the relationship between AS and panic symptoms. Hierarchical linear regressions indicated that IU accounted for significant unique variance in panic symptoms relative to AS, with comparable part correlations. Mediation and moderation models were also tested and suggested direct and indirect effects of IU on panic symptoms through AS; however, an interaction effect was not supported. The current cross-sectional evidence supports a role for IU in panic symptoms, independent of AS. PMID:24873884

  4. Panic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... overcome your fears. The following may also help reduce the number or severity of panic attacks: Not drinking alcohol Eating at regular times Getting plenty of exercise Getting enough sleep Reducing or avoiding caffeine, certain cold medicines, and stimulants

  5. Orthostatically Induced Panic Attacks among Cambodian Refugees: Flashbacks, Catastrophic Cognitions, and Associated Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Devon E.; Pollack, Mark H.; Pich, Vuth; Fama, Jeanne M.; Barlow, David H.

    2005-01-01

    Consecutive Cambodian refugees (N = 100) attending a psychiatric clinic were assessed for the presence and severity of current orthostatic panic (OP), which is defined as panic triggered by standing up. The patients with current OP (n = 36) had significantly greater psychopathology than patients without current OP. During OP, trauma associations…

  6. Concordance between Measures of Anxiety and Physiological Arousal Following Treatment of Panic Disorder in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacow, Terri Landon; May, Jill Ehrenreich; Choate-Summers, Molly; Pincus, Donna B.; Mattis, Sara G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the concordance (or synchrony/desynchrony) between adolescents' self-reports of anxiety and physiological measures of arousal (heart rate) both prior to and after treatment for panic disorder. Results indicated a decline in reported subjective units of distress (SUDS) for the treatment group only at the post-treatment…

  7. Preliminary Validation of a Screening Tool for Adolescent Panic Disorder in Pediatric Primary Care Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, Alexander H.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Hershorin, Eugene R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the validity of a brief screening tool for adolescent panic disorder (PD) in a primary care setting. A total of 165 participants (ages 12-17 years) seen in two pediatric primary care clinics completed the Autonomic Nervous System Questionnaire (ANS; Stein et al. in Psychosomatic Med 61:359-364, 40). A subset of those screening…

  8. Israeli Adolescents' Coping Strategies in Relation to Terrorist Attacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Moshe; Amram, Sima

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to terrorism seriously threatens the well-being of children and adolescents. Israeli citizens have witnessed massive ongoing terrorist attacks during the last few years. The present research, conducted among 330 Israeli adolescents, examined coping strategies in relation to terrorist attacks. We found that adolescents utilize more…

  9. Symptom control in end-of-life care: pain, eating, acute illnesses, panic attacks, and aggressive care.

    PubMed

    Lamers, William M

    2005-01-01

    This feature is based on actual questions and answers adapted from a service provided by the Hospice Foundation of America. Queries addressing the propriety of managing acute medical conditions in patients enrolled in a terminal care program and the mistaken belief that death from cancer is always painful are provided. Questions included in this set address management of acute medical conditions during end-of-life care, the lack of inevitability of pain with cancer, nutrition in advanced disease, managing panic attacks, and appropriate care for a dying 90 year old gentleman. PMID:16431836

  10. Emotion Regulation Difficulties Associated with the Experience of Uncued Panic Attacks: Evidence of Experiential Avoidance, Emotional Nonacceptance, and Decreased Emotional Clarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tull, Matthew T.; Roemer, Lizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Emotion regulation difficulties among nonclinical uncued panickers were examined in two studies. In Study 1, participants with a recent history of uncued panic attacks (n=91), compared to a nonpanic sample (n=91), reported significantly greater levels of experiential avoidance, lack of emotional acceptance, and lack of emotional clarity. In Study…

  11. Isolated sleep paralysis and fearful isolated sleep paralysis in outpatients with panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Sharpless, Brian A; McCarthy, Kevin S; Chambless, Dianne L; Milrod, Barbara L; Khalsa, Shabad-Ratan; Barber, Jacques P

    2010-12-01

    Isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) has received scant attention in clinical populations, and there has been little empirical consideration of the role of fear in ISP episodes. To facilitate research and clinical work in this area, the authors developed a reliable semistructured interview (the Fearful Isolated Sleep Paralysis Interview) to assess ISP and their proposed fearful ISP (FISP) episode criteria in 133 patients presenting for panic disorder treatment. Of these, 29.3% met lifetime ISP episode criteria, 20.3% met the authors' lifetime FISP episode criteria, and 12.8% met their recurrent FISP criteria. Both ISP and FISP were associated with minority status and comorbidity. However, only FISP was significantly associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, body mass, anxiety sensitivity, and mood and anxiety disorder symptomatology. PMID:20715166

  12. Understanding Panic Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Mary Lynn

    This booklet is part of the National Institute of Mental Health's efforts to educate the public and health care professionals about panic disorder. Discussed here are the causes, definition, and symptoms of the disorder. Panic attacks, which can seriously interfere with a person's life, may strike more than three million U.S. citizens at some time…

  13. Behavioral inhibition in childhood predicts smaller hippocampal volume in adolescent offspring of parents with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C E; Kunwar, P S; Hirshfeld-Becker, D R; Henin, A; Vangel, M G; Rauch, S L; Biederman, J; Rosenbaum, J F

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a genetically influenced behavioral profile seen in 15-20% of 2-year-old children. Children with BI are timid with people, objects and situations that are novel or unfamiliar, and are more reactive physiologically to these challenges as evidenced by higher heart rate, pupillary dilation, vocal cord tension and higher levels of cortisol. BI predisposes to the later development of anxiety, depression and substance abuse. Reduced hippocampal volumes have been observed in anxiety disorders, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Animal models have demonstrated that chronic stress can damage the hippocampal formation and implicated cortisol in these effects. We, therefore, hypothesized that the hippocampi of late adolescents who had been behaviorally inhibited as children would be smaller compared with those who had not been inhibited. Hippocampal volume was measured with high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging in 43 females and 40 males at 17 years of age who were determined to be BI+ or BI- based on behaviors observed in the laboratory as young children. BI in childhood predicted reduced hippocampal volumes in the adolescents who were offspring of parents with panic disorder, or panic disorder with comorbid major depression. We discuss genetic and environmental factors emanating from both child and parent that may explain these findings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a relationship between the most extensively studied form of temperamentally based human trait anxiety, BI, and hippocampal structure. The reduction in hippocampal volume, as reported by us, suggests a role for the hippocampus in human trait anxiety and anxiety disorder that warrants further investigation. PMID:26196438

  14. Panic Attack or Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with echocardiography. It is a good first-line test for a woman with symptoms and risk factors for heart disease. Echocardiography uses sound waves technology to give detailed information about the heart muscle, ...

  15. 31-Year-Old Female Shows Marked Improvement in Depression, Agitation, and Panic Attacks after Genetic Testing Was Used to Inform Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Scott

    2014-01-01

    This case describes a 31-year-old female Caucasian patient with complaints of ongoing depression, agitation, and severe panic attacks. The patient was untreated until a recent unsuccessful trial of citalopram followed by venlafaxine which produced a partial response. Genetic testing was performed to assist in treatment decisions and revealed the patient to be heterozygous for polymorphisms in 5HT2C, ANK3, and MTHFR and homozygous for a polymorphism in SLC6A4 and the low activity (Met/Met) COMT allele. In response to genetic results and clinical presentation, venlafaxine was maintained and lamotrigine was added leading to remission of agitation and depression. PMID:24744941

  16. Anxiety in adolescent epilepsy. A clinimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Carrozzino, Danilo; Marchetti, Daniela; Laino, Daniela; Minna, Maria; Verrocchio, Maria Cristina; Fulcheri, Mario; Verrotti, Alberto; Bech, Per

    2016-08-01

    Background Anxiety and depression have been considered to be neglected disorders in epilepsy. Because panic disorder is one of the most important anxiety disorders, it has been problematic to use very comprehensive anxiety questionnaires in epilepsy patients, as panic attacks and epileptic seizures, although two distinct clinical entities from a diagnostic point of view, show a significant overlap of symptoms. Aims We have focused on single items for anxiety and depression as screening candidates in adolescent epilepsy. Methods The individual panic attack item in the Screen for Children Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Scale (SCARED) and the single depression item in the Kellner Symptom Questionnaire were tested. Our samples consisted of adolescent patients with epilepsy and a matched control group with healthy participants, as well as two numerical groups acting as controls. Results The single panic attack item identified panic anxiety in 24.1% in the group of patients with epilepsy and 0.0% in the matched control group (p = 0.01). The single depression item identified 52.2% with depression in the epilepsy group and 6.2% in the matched control group (p = 0.001). Conclusion As screening instruments, single items of panic attack and depression are sufficient to screen for these affective states in adolescent epilepsy. The clinical implications are that it is important to be quite specific when screening for depression and panic attacks in adolescent patients with epilepsy. PMID:26906494

  17. Panic, hyperventilation and perpetuation of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Dratcu, L

    2000-10-01

    1. Studies on the pathogenesis of panic disorder (PD) have concentrated on panic attacks. However, PD runs a chronic or episodic course and panic patients remain clinically unwell between attacks. Panic patients chronically hyperventilate, but the implications of this are unclear. 2. Provocation of panic experimentally has indicated that several biological mechanisms may be involved in the onset of panic symptoms. Evidence from provocation studies using lactate, but particularly carbon dioxide (CO2) mixtures, suggests that panic patients may have hypersensitive CO2 chemoreceptors. Klein proposed that PD may be due to a dysfunctional brain's suffocation alarm and that panic patients hyperventilate to keep pCO2 low. 3. Studies of panic patients in the non-panic state have shown EEG abnormalities in this patient group, as well as abnormalities in cerebral blood flow and cerebral glucose metabolism. These abnormalities can be interpreted as signs of cerebral hypoxia that may have resulted from hyperventilation. 4. Cerebral hypoxia is probably involved in the causation of symptoms of anxiety in sufferers of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. By chronically hyperventilating, panic patients may likewise be at risk of exposure to prolonged periods of cerebral hypoxia which, in turn, may contribute to the chronicity of their panic and anxiety symptoms. 5. Chronic hyperventilation may engender a self-perpetuating mechanism within the pathophysiology of PD, a hypothesis which warrants further studies of panic patients in the non-panic state. PMID:11131173

  18. The utility of the panic disorder concept.

    PubMed

    Klein, D F; Klein, H M

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the theory that agoraphobic avoidances are central and spontaneous panics an epiphenomenon to the development of agoraphobia. Moreover we discuss the theory that posits a fixed cognitive-catastrophizing set as causal for panic. We conclude these theories do not fit the facts. We argue that it is important to distinguish between spontaneous panic and chronic or anticipatory anxiety and avoidance. Such a distinction allows for an understanding of the roles of anti-spontaneous panic medications such as tricyclics and MAOI's as well as exposure therapy, in the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia. The former serves the purpose of blocking panic attacks while the latter undermines phobic avoidance, but only after the panic attacks have ceased through proper medication. We conclude that recognizing the key role of spontaneous panic and its variants in anxiety nosology is a necessary guide for etiological, psychophysiological and therapeutic research in this rapidly developing area. PMID:2670574

  19. Your Adolescent: Anxiety and Avoidant Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of uneasiness. At other times, it develops into panic attacks and phobias. Identifying the Signs Anxiety disorders vary ... specific situations, in which case they are called panic attacks. A panic attack is an abrupt episode of ...

  20. Panic anxiety, under the weather?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulbena, A.; Pailhez, G.; Aceña, R.; Cunillera, J.; Rius, A.; Garcia-Ribera, C.; Gutiérrez, J.; Rojo, C.

    2005-03-01

    The relationship between weather conditions and psychiatric disorders has been a continuous subject of speculation due to contradictory findings. This study attempts to further clarify this relationship by focussing on specific conditions such as panic attacks and non-panic anxiety in relation to specific meteorological variables. All psychiatric emergencies attended at a general hospital in Barcelona (Spain) during 2002 with anxiety as main complaint were classified as panic or non-panic anxiety according to strict independent and retrospective criteria. Both groups were assessed and compared with meteorological data (wind speed and direction, daily rainfall, temperature, humidity and solar radiation). Seasons and weekend days were also included as independent variables. Non-parametric statistics were used throughout since most variables do not follow a normal distribution. Logistic regression models were applied to predict days with and without the clinical condition. Episodes of panic were three times more common with the poniente wind (hot wind), twice less often with rainfall, and one and a half times more common in autumn than in other seasons. These three trends (hot wind, rainfall and autumn) were accumulative for panic episodes in a logistic regression formula. Significant reduction of episodes on weekends was found only for non-panic episodes. Panic attacks, unlike other anxiety episodes, in a psychiatric emergency department in Barcelona seem to show significant meteorotropism. Assessing specific disorders instead of overall emergencies or other variables of a more general quality could shed new light on the relationship between weather conditions and behaviour.

  1. Panic control treatment and its applications.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, S G; Spiegel, D A

    1999-01-01

    Panic Control Treatment (PCT) is a widely used, empirically validated cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder. Initially developed for the treatment of panic disorder with limited agoraphobic avoidance, PCT more recently has been finding broader applications. It has been used as an aid to pharmacotherapy discontinuation in panic disorder; in the treatment of panic attacks associated with other disorders such as schizophrenia; and, in combination with a situational exposure component, in the treatment of patients with moderate to severe agoraphobia. The authors critically review the evidence for the clinical efficacy of PCT and recent work directed at further enhancing the long-term efficacy and cost-effectiveness of treatment. PMID:9888103

  2. Help-Seeking Behaviours of Adolescents in Relation to Terrorist Attacks: The Perceptions of Israeli Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Moshe; Amram, Sima; Kelman, Talia

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to terrorism poses a challenge for children and adolescents as well as parents. For many years, Israeli citizens have been exposed to ongoing terrorist attacks. The present article is aimed at revealing the reactions of Israeli parents when facing terrorist attacks and their perceptions regarding the help-seeking behaviours of their…

  3. THE PANIC ATTACK–PTSD MODEL: APPLICABILITY TO ORTHOSTATIC PANIC AMONG CAMBODIAN REFUGEES

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Devon E.; Hofmann, Stefan G.; Pitman, Roger K.; Pollack, Mark H.; Barlow, David H.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the ability of the “Panic Attack–PTSD Model” to predict how panic attacks are generated and how panic attacks worsen posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The article does so by determining the validity of the Panic Attack–PTSD Model in respect to one type of panic attacks among traumatized Cambodian refugees: orthostatic panic (OP) attacks, that is, panic attacks generated by moving from lying or sitting to standing. Among Cambodian refugees attending a psychiatric clinic, we conducted two studies to explore the validity of the Panic Attack–PTSD Model as applied to OP patients, meaning patients with at least one episode of OP in the previous month. In Study 1, the “Panic Attack–PTSD Model” accurately indicated how OP is seemingly generated: among OP patients (N = 58), orthostasis-associated flashbacks and catastrophic cognitions predicted OP severity beyond a measure of anxious–depressive distress (SCL subscales), and OP severity significantly mediated the effect of anxious–depressive distress on CAPS severity. In Study 2, as predicted by the Panic Attack–PTSD Model, OP had a mediational role in respect to the effect of treatment on PTSD severity: among Cambodian refugees with PTSD and comorbid OP who participated in a CBT study (N = 56), improvement in PTSD severity was partially mediated by improvement in OP severity. PMID:18470741

  4. Adolescents' Mental Health Outcomes According to Different Types of Exposure to Ongoing Terror Attacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Celestin-Westreich, Smadar; Celestin, Leon-Patrice; Verte, Dominique; Ponjaert-Kristoffersen, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of several types of exposure to terror attacks on adolescents' psychological outcomes in the context of ongoing terror. A total of 913 adolescents (51 girls) aged 12 to 18 years (12-13.6 = 33%; 13.7-15.6 = 38%; 15.7-18 = 28%) took part in the study. Detailed data were collected concerning objective, subjective…

  5. Simultaneous prepubertal onset of panic disorder, night terrors, and somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Garland, E J; Smith, D H

    1991-07-01

    Concurrent acute onset of night terrors, somnambulism, and spontaneous daytime panic attacks meeting the criteria for panic disorder is reported in a 10-year-old boy with a family history of panic disorder. Both the parasomnias and the panic disorder were fully responsive to therapeutic doses of imipramine. A second case of night terrors and infrequent full symptom panic attacks is noted in another 10-year-old boy whose mother has panic disorder with agoraphobia. The clinical resemblance and reported differences between night terrors and panic attacks are described. The absence of previous reports of this comorbidity is notable. It is hypothesized that night terror disorder and panic disorder involve a similar constitutional vulnerability to dysregulation of brainstem altering systems. PMID:1890087

  6. Treatment of Panic Disorder: A Clinical Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamish, Patricia M.; Belcastro, Amy L.; Granello, Darcy Haag

    This article presents specific, practical information to guide mental health counselors in treating individuals who meet the criteria for panic disorder. It delineates the specific strategies identified in the research literature for use by mental health counselors. Full resolution of panic attacks by one form of treatment may not always be…

  7. Reexperiencing symptoms, dissociation, and avoidance behaviors in daily life of patients with PTSD and patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Pfaltz, Monique C; Michael, Tanja; Meyer, Andrea H; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2013-08-01

    Panic attacks are frequently perceived as life threatening. Panic disorder (PD) patients may therefore experience symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The authors explored this in 28 healthy controls, 17 PTSD patients, and 24 PD patients with agoraphobia who completed electronic diaries 36 times during 1 week. Patient groups frequently reported dissociation as well as thoughts, memories, and reliving of their trauma or panic attacks. PTSD patients reported more trauma/panic attack thoughts (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 2.9) and memories (IRR = 2.8) than PD patients. Patient groups relived their trauma or panic attacks equally frequently, and reported comparable bodily reactions and distress associated with trauma or panic attack memories. Clinical groups avoided trauma or panic attack reminders more often than healthy controls (avoidance of trauma- or panic attack-related thoughts (IRR = 8.0); avoidance of things associated with the trauma or panic attack (IRR = 40.7). PD patients avoided trauma or panic attack reminders less often than PTSD patients (avoidance of trauma- or panic attack-related thoughts [IRR = 2.5]; avoidance of things associated with the trauma or panic attack [IRR = 4.1]), yet these differences were nonsignificant when controlling for functional impairment. In conclusion, trauma-like symptoms are common in PD with agoraphobia and panic attacks may be processed similarly as trauma in PTSD. PMID:23893375

  8. Is Nocturnal Panic a Distinct Disease Category? Comparison of Clinical Characteristics among Patients with Primary Nocturnal Panic, Daytime Panic, and Coexistence of Nocturnal and Daytime Panic

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Masaki; Sugiura, Tatsuki; Nishida, Shingo; Komada, Yoko; Inoue, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Many patients with panic disorder (PD) experience nocturnal panic attacks. We investigated the differences in demographic variables and symptom characteristics as well as response to treatment among patients with primary day panic (DP), primary nocturnal panic (NP), and the coexistence of DP and NP (DP/NP), and discuss whether NP is a distinct disease category. Method: One hundred one consecutive untreated patients with PD were enrolled and subsequently divided into the NP, DP, and DP/NP groups. The presence of 13 panic attack symptom items as well as scores on the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were compared among the groups. After 3 months of regular treatment, PDSS scores were assessed again to evaluate treatment response. Results: Nocturnal panic attacks of the participants were mostly reported to occur in the first tertile of nocturnal sleep. The number of males, onset age, and presence of choking sensation were significantly higher, and the PDSS score was significantly lower in the NP group compared with the other groups. The DP/NP group showed the highest PDSS score, and participants in this group were prescribed the highest doses of medication among all groups. Only diagnostic sub-category was significantly associated with treatment response. The total score for PDSS and PSQI correlated significantly only in the NP group. Conclusions: DP/NP could be a severe form of PD, while primary NP could be a relatively mild subcategory that may partially share common pathophysiology with adult type night terror. Citation: Nakamura M; Sugiura T; Nishida S; Komada Y; Inoue Y. Is nocturnal panic a distinct disease category? Comparison of clinical characteristics among patients with primary nocturnal panic, daytime panic, and coexistence of nocturnal and daytime panic. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(5):461-467. PMID:23674937

  9. Sense of Coherence, Hope and Values among Adolescents under Missile Attacks: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Sagy, Shifra

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to explore measures of spirituality--sense of coherence (SOC), hope and values--among adolescents living in a violent political area and experiencing missile attacks. The three variables represent attributes of spirituality, such as searching for meaning and purpose in life, hope and feelings about the future, as well as values…

  10. Management of Treatment-Resistant Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a severe, chronic disorder characterized by one or more unexpected panic attacks followed by worry about additional attacks and/or the implications of the attacks. If attacks are sufficiently severe or frequent, they can promote marked, sometimes debilitating behavioral changes. Many panic disorder sufferers appear to be incompletely responsive to treatment and are subject to relapse after remission. In this article, we highlight the current understanding of the pathophysiology of PD using a “fear circuit” model. Using this model as a reference point, we review the evidence base supporting existing and emerging treatments and suggest strategies for optimizing initial treatment response. Finally, a differential diagnostic approach for clinical evaluation of unsatisfactory response to treatment in PD is presented. PMID:20428311

  11. Reliving and disorganization in posttraumatic stress disorder and panic disorder memories.

    PubMed

    Hagenaars, Muriel A; van Minnen, Agnes; Hoogduin, Kees A L

    2009-08-01

    Intense, disorganized recollections are one of the core symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and considered to be the result of inadequate processing of trauma information. A first panic attack resembles trauma in being an unexpected frightening and subjectively life-threatening event, and like PTSD, panic disorder with agoraphobia also involves fear conditioning after the first event. Therefore, a panic attack may be processed similarly to a trauma, and as a result, memories of a panic attack may share characteristics like reliving and disorganization with PTSD trauma memories. To test this hypothesis, scripts of PTSD trauma memories (n = 21) were compared with scripts of panic disorder with agoraphobia panic memories (n = 25) using a narrative rating scale. No differences were found between reliving intensity and disorganization levels in the scripts of both patient groups. The results suggest a panic attack may affect information processing similarly to a traumatic event. PMID:19684502

  12. Adolescents' mental health outcomes according to different types of exposure to ongoing terror attacks.

    PubMed

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Celestin-Westreich, Smadar; Celestin, Leon-Patrice; Verté, Dominique; Ponjaert-Kristoffersen, Ingrid

    2009-07-01

    This study investigates the impact of several types of exposure to terror attacks on adolescents' psychological outcomes in the context of ongoing terror. A total of 913 adolescents (51% girls) aged 12 to 18 years (12-13.6 = 33%; 13.7-15.6 = 38%; 15.7-18 = 28%) took part in the study. Detailed data were collected concerning objective, subjective and "mixed" types of exposure to terror, as well as demographics, post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), emotional and behavioral problems and overall psychological and psychiatric difficulties. Subjective exposure was found to be the most important contributor to adolescents' post-traumatic stress and other mental health problems in this context. Gender also had important effects. The effects of objective and mixed types of exposure, as well as age, were less prominent. We did find, however, that the more adolescents consulted media, the less they experienced behavioral and emotional problems. Given that subjective experiences appear to be the best factor in explaining mental health outcomes when adolescents are confronted with persistent terror, the cognitive and emotional dynamics along with the coping behavior linked to such experiences merit further investigation. PMID:19636786

  13. Coping behavior in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kumiko; Fujii, Isao; Akiyoshi, Jotaro; Nagayama, Haruo

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to investigate the role of coping behavior in patients with panic disorder (PD). This was done by evaluating three items of coping behavior (seeking of social support, wishful thinking and avoidance) in the Ways of Coping Checklist. The subjects consisted of 30 patients with PD (26 with agoraphobia). Coping behavior and the severity of PD was investigated at baseline and at 24 months (the final outcome). At baseline there were no gender differences in coping behavior. The severity of panic attacks significantly correlated with that of agoraphobia. The baseline severity of PD (panic attacks and agoraphobia) did not correlate with coping behavior. At the outcome assessment there was no significant correlation between the severity of panic attack and coping behavior. The severity of agoraphobia at final outcome and the coping behavior (seeking of social support) at baseline were significantly correlated. In the group that had remission in agoraphobia (the good outcome group), the severity of agoraphobia at baseline was significantly lower and the seeking of social support coping behavior was significantly higher than that of the poor outcome group. No significant difference in panic attack severity was noted between the good and poor outcome groups. Discriminant analysis revealed that seeking of social support coping behavior was a significant discriminant factor of agoraphobia. Although these are preliminary data, special coping behavior might be related to improvement of agoraphobia in patients with PD. PMID:15009823

  14. Anxiety Sensitivity: A Missing Piece to the Agoraphobia-without-Panic Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Chris; Wilson, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the controversy surrounding the diagnosis of agoraphobia without panic attacks and proposes a key role for anxiety sensitivity in explaining agoraphobic avoidance among those who have never experienced panic. Although rare in clinical samples, agoraphobia without panic is commonly observed in population-based surveys,…

  15. A Comparison of Alprazolam and Behavior Therapy in Treatment of Panic Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klosko, Janet S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared panic control treatment (PCT), behavior therapy for panic disorders, with alprazolam medication, placebo, and waiting-list control groups. Percentage of clients (N=57) completing study who were free of panic attacks following PCT was 87 percent, compared with 50 percent for alprazolam, 36 percent for placebo, and 33 percent for…

  16. Ambulatory Assessment in Panic Disorder and Specific Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpers, Georg W.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental disorders. In panic disorder, panic attacks often occur at unpredictable times, making it difficult to study these episodes in the laboratory. In specific phobias, symptoms occur in very circumscribed situations and specific triggers are sometimes difficult to reproduce in the laboratory.…

  17. Screening for Panic Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Membership Journal & Multimedia Resources Awards Consumers Screening for Panic Disorder Main navigation FAQs Screen Yourself Screening for Depression ... Screening for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Screening for Panic Disorder Screening for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Screening for ...

  18. Are Current Theories of Panic Falsifiable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Walton T.; Wilhelm, Frank H.; Pettit, Dean

    2005-01-01

    The authors examine 6 theories of panic attacks as to whether empirical approaches are capable of falsifying them and their heuristic value. The authors conclude that the catastrophic cognitions theory is least falsifiable because of the elusive nature of thoughts but that it has greatly stimulated research and therapy. The vicious circle theory…

  19. Brief Report: Adolescents under Missile Attacks: Sense of Coherence as a Mediator between Exposure and Stress-Related Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Sagy, Shifra; Roth, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Employing the salutogenic approach (Antonovsky, 1987), this pilot study aimed at exploring the mediation effect of Sense of Coherence (SOC) on the relationships between exposure to missile attacks and stress-related reactions among adolescents. A strong SOC means a tendency to see the world as more comprehensible, manageable and meaningful. Data…

  20. Perceived family social support buffers against the effects of exposure to rocket attacks on adolescent depression, aggression, and severe violence.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Golan; Henrich, Christopher C

    2016-02-01

    The authors compared the protective effects of 3 sources of perceived social support-from family members, friends, and school personnel-on internalizing and externalizing symptoms in adolescents exposed to rocket attacks. Data were based on 362 Israeli adolescents (median age = 14), chronically exposed to rockets from the Gaza Strip, for whom robust effects of exposure on internalizing and externalizing symptoms were reported during the 2009-2010 period (Henrich & Shahar, 2013). New analyses revealed that perceived family social support assessed in 2009 buffered against the effect of exposure to rocket attacks on depression, aggression, and severe violence during 2009-2010. Findings are consistent with a human-ecological perspective exposure to political violence and encourage the employment of family-based preventive interventions in afflicted areas. PMID:26690329

  1. Marijuana use and panic psychopathology among a representative sample of adults.

    PubMed

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Cougle, Jesse R; Johnson, Kirsten A; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O; Bernstein, Amit

    2010-04-01

    This study examined the relations between marijuana use and panic attacks and panic disorder using a large representative survey of adults (N = 5,672; 53% women; M(age) = 45.05 years, SD = 17.9) conducted in the United States (Kessler et al., 2004). After adjusting for sociodemographic variables (age, marital status, income, education, race, and sex) and the presence of a lifetime substance use disorder, lifetime marijuana use was significantly associated with increased odds of a lifetime panic attack history. Lifetime marijuana use also was significantly associated with an increased risk of current (past-year) panic attacks; however, this relation was not significant when controlling for nicotine dependence. Lifetime marijuana use was significantly associated with increased odds of a lifetime diagnosis of panic disorder as well as a current (past-year) diagnosis of panic disorder. Current (past-year) marijuana use was significantly associated with both lifetime and current panic attacks, but not current or lifetime panic disorder. Results are discussed in relation to the novel information they offer in regard to understanding the putative marijuana use-panic psychopathology association(s). PMID:20384424

  2. New perspective on the pathophysiology of panic: merging serotonin and opioids in the periaqueductal gray

    PubMed Central

    Graeff, F.G.

    2012-01-01

    Panic disorder patients are vulnerable to recurrent panic attacks. Two neurochemical hypotheses have been proposed to explain this susceptibility. The first assumes that panic patients have deficient serotonergic inhibition of neurons localized in the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter of the midbrain that organize defensive reactions to cope with proximal threats and of sympathomotor control areas of the rostral ventrolateral medulla that generate most of the neurovegetative symptoms of the panic attack. The second suggests that endogenous opioids buffer normal subjects from the behavioral and physiological manifestations of the panic attack, and their deficit brings about heightened suffocation sensitivity and separation anxiety in panic patients, making them more vulnerable to panic attacks. Experimental results obtained in rats performing one-way escape in the elevated T-maze, an animal model of panic, indicate that the inhibitory action of serotonin on defense is connected with activation of endogenous opioids in the periaqueductal gray. This allows reconciliation of the serotonergic and opioidergic hypotheses of panic pathophysiology, the periaqueductal gray being the fulcrum of serotonin-opioid interaction. PMID:22437485

  3. Fear and panic in humans with bilateral amygdala damage.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Justin S; Buzza, Colin; Hurlemann, Rene; Follmer, Robin L; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Coryell, William H; Welsh, Michael J; Tranel, Daniel; Wemmie, John A

    2013-03-01

    Decades of research have highlighted the amygdala's influential role in fear. We found that inhalation of 35% CO(2) evoked not only fear, but also panic attacks, in three rare patients with bilateral amygdala damage. These results indicate that the amygdala is not required for fear and panic, and make an important distinction between fear triggered by external threats from the environment versus fear triggered internally by CO(2). PMID:23377128

  4. Panic of 1907.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, MA.

    This pamphlet recaps the chain of events known as The Bank Panic of 1907. Historians view this as a watershed event that had a lasting impact on the financial system of the United States. The panic resulted from the collapse of the United Copper Company and was averted with the intervention of John D. Rockefeller and the J. P. Morgan Company. The…

  5. Depression with Panic Episodes and Coronary Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Vidovich, Mladen I.; Ahluwalia, Aneet; Manev, Radmila

    2009-01-01

    Variant (Prinzmetal's) angina is an uncommon cause of precordial pain caused by coronary vasospasm and characterized by transient ST elevation and negative markers of myocardial necrosis. This is the case of a female patient with a prior history of depression and panic attacks who presented with recurrent symptoms including chest pain. A cardiac event monitor positively documented coronary vasospasm associated with anxiety-provoking chest pain, whereas the coronary arteries were angiographically normal. We noted that the frequency of angina attacks apparently increased during the period that coincided with the introduction of Bupropion SR for treatment of the patient's depression. Considering the possibility of bupropion-associated negative impact on coronary vasospasm, the antidepressant therapy was adjusted to exclude this drug. Although Prinzmetal's angina is relatively uncommon, we suspect that a routine use of cardiac event monitors in subjects with panic disorder might reveal a greater incidence of coronary vasospasm in this patient population. PMID:20029623

  6. Acid-base dysregulation and chemosensory mechanisms in panic disorder: a translational update.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, L L; Strawn, J R; Sah, R

    2015-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD), a complex anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent panic attacks, represents a poorly understood psychiatric condition which is associated with significant morbidity and an increased risk of suicide attempts and completed suicide. Recently however, neuroimaging and panic provocation challenge studies have provided insights into the pathoetiology of panic phenomena and have begun to elucidate potential neural mechanisms that may underlie panic attacks. In this regard, accumulating evidence suggests that acidosis may be a contributing factor in induction of panic. Challenge studies in patients with PD reveal that panic attacks may be reliably provoked by agents that lead to acid-base dysbalance such as CO2 inhalation and sodium lactate infusion. Chemosensory mechanisms that translate pH into panic-relevant fear, autonomic, and respiratory responses are therefore of high relevance to the understanding of panic pathophysiology. Herein, we provide a current update on clinical and preclinical studies supporting how acid-base imbalance and diverse chemosensory mechanisms may be associated with PD and discuss future implications of these findings. PMID:26080089

  7. Acid–base dysregulation and chemosensory mechanisms in panic disorder: a translational update

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, L L; Strawn, J R; Sah, R

    2015-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD), a complex anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent panic attacks, represents a poorly understood psychiatric condition which is associated with significant morbidity and an increased risk of suicide attempts and completed suicide. Recently however, neuroimaging and panic provocation challenge studies have provided insights into the pathoetiology of panic phenomena and have begun to elucidate potential neural mechanisms that may underlie panic attacks. In this regard, accumulating evidence suggests that acidosis may be a contributing factor in induction of panic. Challenge studies in patients with PD reveal that panic attacks may be reliably provoked by agents that lead to acid–base dysbalance such as CO2 inhalation and sodium lactate infusion. Chemosensory mechanisms that translate pH into panic-relevant fear, autonomic, and respiratory responses are therefore of high relevance to the understanding of panic pathophysiology. Herein, we provide a current update on clinical and preclinical studies supporting how acid–base imbalance and diverse chemosensory mechanisms may be associated with PD and discuss future implications of these findings. PMID:26080089

  8. Intimate partner violence and mental health among Italian adolescents: gender similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Romito, Patrizia; Beltramini, Lucia; Escribà-Agüir, Vicenta

    2013-01-01

    Only a few studies have analyzed the health impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on male and female adolescents, taking into account other kinds of violence that can affect their health. In this study, 43.7% of female adolescents and 34.8% of males reported IPV; females reported more psychological and sexual IPV, with no differences for physical IPV. Controlling for family and sexual violence and other confounding factors, female adolescents exposed to IPV had significantly higher adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for depression, panic attacks, eating problems, and suicidal ideation. For male adolescents, only the OR of eating problems almost reached statistical significance. PMID:23363657

  9. Changes in Central Sodium and not Osmolarity or Lactate Induce Panic-Like Responses in a Model of Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Molosh, Andre I; Johnson, Philip L; Fitz, Stephanie D; DiMicco, Joseph A; Herman, James P; Shekhar, Anantha

    2010-01-01

    Panic disorder is a severe anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent panic attacks that can be consistently provoked with intravenous (i.v.) infusions of hypertonic (0.5 M) sodium lactate (NaLac), yet the mechanism/CNS site by which this stimulus triggers panic attacks is unclear. Chronic inhibition of GABAergic synthesis in the dorsomedial hypothalamus/perifornical region (DMH/PeF) of rats induces a vulnerability to panic-like responses after i.v. infusion of 0.5 M NaLac, providing an animal model of panic disorder. Using this panic model, we previously showed that inhibiting the anterior third ventricle region (A3Vr; containing the organum vasculosum lamina terminalis, the median preoptic nucleus, and anteroventral periventricular nucleus) attenuates cardiorespiratory and behavioral responses elicited by i.v. infusions of NaLac. In this study, we show that i.v. infusions of 0.5 M NaLac or sodium chloride, but not iso-osmolar -mannitol, increased ‘anxiety' (decreased social interaction) behaviors, heart rate, and blood pressure responses. Using whole-cell patch-clamp preparations, we also show that bath applications of NaLac (positive control), but not lactic acid (lactate stimulus) or -mannitol (osmolar stimulus), increases the firing rates of neurons in the A3Vr, which are retrogradely labeled from the DMH/PeF and which are most likely glutamatergic based on a separate study using retrograde tracing from the DMH/PeF in combination with in situ hybridization for vesicular glutamate transporter 2. These data show that hypertonic sodium, but not hyper-osmolarity or changes in lactate, is the key stimulus that provokes panic attacks in panic disorder, and is consistent with human studies. PMID:20130534

  10. High positive affect shortly after missile attacks and the heightened risk of posttraumatic stress disorder among Israeli adolescents.

    PubMed

    Israel-Cohen, Yael; Kashy-Rosenbaum, Gabriela; Kaplan, Oren

    2014-06-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that positive emotions help build psychological resources and facilitate adaptation to stress, yet few studies have considered the possible negative effects of positive emotions on stress. This study examined the relationship between high arousal, positive and negative affect, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among 503 Israeli adolescents following a period of escalated missile attacks on their city. Our findings revealed that not only negative affect, but also positive affect at very high levels exhibited 2 weeks following missile attacks were independently associated with PTSD symptoms 2½ months later (η(2) = .09, η(2) = .02, respectively). Although the literature recognizes the risk factor of negative affect on the development of PTSD, we suggest that also positive affect at high levels immediately after such experiences may be a case of emotion context insensitivity and thus a maladaptive response to trauma. Further research should examine the mechanisms associated with positive emotions and PTSD. PMID:24801888

  11. Anxiety disorders of childhood and adolescence: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, G A; Borchardt, C M

    1991-07-01

    The 1980s were a decade of advancement in the knowledge of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents; this sets the stage for research achievements in the 1990s. This review examines the anxiety disorders of childhood and adolescence (separation anxiety disorder, overanxious disorder, and avoidant disorder), including prevalence rates, demographic profiles, comparisons of clinical presentations in different developmental age groups, and comorbidity patterns. Fears and simple phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and panic disorder in children and adolescents are also evaluated. The controversy of whether panic attacks occur in prepubertal children is addressed. A brief review of behavioral and pharmacological treatment studies is included. Future directions for research are suggested. PMID:1890084

  12. Possible association of a cholecystokinin promotor polymorphism (CCK-36CT) with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Valdes, J; Noyes, R; Zoega, T; Crowe, R R

    1998-05-01

    We searched for mutations in the CCK gene in panic disorder with single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the three exons and promotor region of the gene. We found a C-->T transition at position -36 (CCK(-36C-->T)) in a GC box, a binding site for transcription factor Sp1, in the promotor region. The allele frequency was 0.168 (95% CI, 0.116-0.221) in 98 persons with panic disorder and 0.083 (95% CI, 0.059-0.107) in 247 geographically matched, unscreened controls. A transmission disequilibrium test based on panic disorder as the affected phenotype was nonsignificant (chi2 = 0.93), but when panic disorder or attacks were considered as affected, statistically significant transmission disequilibrium was detected (chi2 = 4.00, P < 0.05). Linkage analysis was uninformative. In exploratory analyses to search for clinical correlations, the "T" allele was found in 59% of 22 persons with panic attacks but not panic disorder, compared with 31% of those who met the criteria for panic disorder. An association between the CCK polymorphism and panic disorder cannot be considered established due to the inconsistencies in the results noted above, but if the provisional association can be replicated, the findings are consistent with CCK(-36C-->T) being a disease-susceptibility allele that alone is neither necessary nor sufficient to cause panic disorder but that increases vulnerability by acting epistatically. PMID:9603610

  13. Panic disorder and agoraphobia: an overview and commentary on DSM-5 changes.

    PubMed

    Asmundson, Gordon J G; Taylor, Steven; Smits, Jasper A J

    2014-06-01

    The recently published DSM-5 contains a number of changes pertinent to panic disorder and agoraphobia. These changes include separation of panic disorder and agoraphobia into separate diagnoses, the addition of criteria and guidelines for distinguishing agoraphobia from specific phobia, the addition of a 6-month duration requirement for agoraphobia, the addition of panic attacks as a specifier to any DSM-5 diagnosis, changes to descriptors of panic attack types, as well as various changes to the descriptive text. It is crucial that clinicians and researchers working with individuals presenting with panic attacks and panic-like symptoms understand these changes. The purpose of the current paper is to provide a summary of the main changes, to critique the changes in the context of available empirical evidence, and to highlight clinical implications and potential impact on mental health service utilization. Several of the changes have the potential to improve access to evidence-based treatment; yet, although certain changes appear justified in that they were based on converging evidence from different empirical sources, other changes appear questionable, at least based on the information presented in the DSM-5 text and related publications. Ongoing research of DSM-5 panic disorder and agoraphobia as well as application of the new diagnostic criteria in clinical contexts is needed to further inform the strengths and limitations of DSM-5 conceptualizations of panic disorder and agoraphobia. PMID:24865357

  14. Does 'fear of dying' indicate a more severe presentation of panic disorder?

    PubMed

    Gazarian, Douglas; Multach, Matthew D; Ellison, William D; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy; Zimmerman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Research suggests a relationship between the presence of fearful cognitions and panic disorder (PD) severity. With little existing evidence addressing the clinical significance of individual panic-cognitions, the current study examined presentation and impairment differences among 331 outpatients with PD according to whether they experience "fear of dying" (FOD) during panic attacks. Patients reporting FOD (n=153) were compared to patients denying FOD (n=178) on variables indicating PD severity (e.g., number of symptoms) and psychiatric impairment (e.g., hospitalizations). PD patients with FOD reported a greater number of panic symptoms, agoraphobia diagnoses, and were more likely to be seeking treatment primarily for PD. We found no clinical impairment or comorbidity differences between groups. Results suggest that panic attacks with FOD are related to a more acute presentation of PD. Such results substantiate past research connecting cognitive distress and PD severity and further suggest that FOD may be particularly relevant to this relationship. PMID:27105467

  15. Ambulatory assessment in panic disorder and specific phobia.

    PubMed

    Alpers, Georg W

    2009-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental disorders. In panic disorder, panic attacks often occur at unpredictable times, making it difficult to study these episodes in the laboratory. In specific phobias, symptoms occur in very circumscribed situations and specific triggers are sometimes difficult to reproduce in the laboratory. Ambulatory assessment, or ecological momentary assessment, can further the understanding of the natural course and scope of symptoms under ecologically valid circumstances. Because bodily symptoms are integral to the diagnosis of anxiety disorders, the objective assessment of physiological responses in the patients' natural environment is particularly important. On the one hand, research has highlighted intriguing discrepancies between the experience of symptoms and physiology during panic attacks. On the other hand, it has validated symptom reporting during therapeutic exposure to phobic situations. Therefore, ambulatory assessment can yield useful information about the psychopathology of anxiety disorders, and it can be used to monitor change during clinical interventions. PMID:19947782

  16. Physiological markers for anxiety: panic disorder and phobias.

    PubMed

    Roth, Walton T

    2005-01-01

    Physiological activation is a cardinal symptom of anxiety, although physiological measurement is still not used for psychiatric diagnosis. An ambulatory study of phobics who were afraid of highway driving showed a concordance between self-reported anxiety during driving, autonomic activation, hypocapnia, and sighing respiration. Patients with panic attacks do not exhibit autonomic activation when they are quietly sitting and not having panic attacks, but do have the same respiratory abnormalities as driving phobics, suggesting that these abnormalities could be a marker for panic disorder. Such abnormalities are compatible with both the false suffocation alarm (D. Klein) and hyperventilation (R. Ley) theories of panic. Hypocapnia, however, is often absent during full-blown panic attacks. Since activation functions as preparation for physical activity, it may not occur when a patient has learned that avoidance of fear by flight or fight is futile. We developed a capnometry feedback assisted breathing training therapy for panic disorder designed to reduce hyperventilation and making breathing regular. Without feedback, conventional therapeutic breathing instructions may actually increase hyperventilation by increasing dyspnea. Five weekly therapy sessions accompanied by daily home practice with a capnometer produced marked clinical improvement compared to changes in an untreated group. Improvement was sustained over a 12-month follow-up period. The therapist avoided any statements or procedures designed to alter cognitions. Improvement occurred regardless of whether patients initially reported mostly respiratory or non-respiratory symptoms during their attacks. There is evidence that modifying any of the three systems comprising a fear network can be therapeutic, as exemplified by cognitive therapy modifying thoughts, exposure therapy modifying avoidance, and breathing training procedures modifying pCO(2). PMID:16137780

  17. Evaluating emotional sensitivity and tolerance factors in the prediction of panic-relevant responding to a biological challenge.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Amanda; Marshall, Erin; Bernstein, Amit; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated anxiety sensitivity, distress tolerance (Simons & Gaher, 2005), and discomfort intolerance (Schmidt, Richey, Cromer, & Buckner, 2007) in relation to panic-relevant responding (i.e., panic attack symptoms and panic-relevant cognitions) to a 10% carbon dioxide enriched air challenge. Participants were 216 adults (52.6% female; M(age)=22.4, SD=9.0). A series of hierarchical multiple regressions was conducted with covariates of negative affectivity and past year panic attack history in step one of the model, and anxiety sensitivity, discomfort intolerance, and distress tolerance entered simultaneously into step two. Results indicated that anxiety sensitivity, but not distress tolerance or discomfort intolerance, was significantly incrementally predictive of physical panic attack symptoms and cognitive panic attack symptoms. Additionally, anxiety sensitivity was significantly predictive of variance in panic attack status during the challenge. These findings emphasize the important, unique role of anxiety sensitivity in predicting risk for panic psychopathology, even when considered in the context of other theoretically relevant emotion vulnerability variables. PMID:19720496

  18. In a rat model of panic, corticotropin responses to dorsal periaqueductal gray stimulation depend on physical exertion.

    PubMed

    de Souza Armini, Rubia; Bernabé, Cristian Setúbal; Rosa, Caroline Azevedo; Siller, Carlos Antônio; Schimitel, Fagna Giacomin; Tufik, Sérgio; Klein, Donald Franklin; Schenberg, Luiz Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Panic disorder patients are exquisitely and specifically sensitive to hypercapnia. The demonstration that carbon dioxide provokes panic in fear-unresponsive amygdala-calcified Urbach-Wiethe patients emphasizes that panic is not fear nor does it require the activation of the amygdala. This is consonant with increasing evidence suggesting that panic is mediated caudally at midbrain's dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG). Another startling feature of the apparently spontaneous clinical panic is the counterintuitive lack of increments in corticotropin, cortisol and prolactin, generally considered 'stress hormones'. Here we show that the stress hormones are not changed during DPAG-evoked panic when escape is prevented by stimulating the rat in a small compartment. Neither did the corticotropin increase when physical exertion was statistically adjusted to the same degree as non-stimulated controls, as measured by lactate plasma levels. Conversely, neuroendocrine responses to foot-shocks were independent from muscular effort. Data are consonant with DPAG mediation of panic attacks. PMID:25618592

  19. Coping strategies as mediators of the relationship between sense of coherence and stress reactions: Israeli adolescents under missile attacks.

    PubMed

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Sagy, Shifra; Roth, Guy

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationships between sense of coherence (SOC) and stress reactions as mediated by cognitive appraisal and coping strategies among adolescents facing the acute stressful situation of missile attacks. Employing the Salutogenic Model and the interactionist approach to coping, we asked what the roles of situational factors such as coping strategies and cognitive appraisal were in mediating the relationship between SOC and stress reactions. Data were gathered during January 2009 when hundreds of missiles fell in southern Israel. One hundred and thirty eight adolescents filled out questionnaires dealing with SOC, cognitive appraisal (endangerment feelings), Adolescent Coping Scale, state anxiety, state anger, and psychological distress. Overall, our model explained 55% of the variance in stress reactions. SOC had the strongest total direct and indirect effects. Previous findings have indicated SOC as playing only a limited role in explaining stress reactions in acute stress situations. The results of this study highlight the potential of SOC as a powerful resilience factor even in an acute situation, through mediation of situational factors. PMID:20582754

  20. Overgeneralization of Conditioned Fear as a Pathogenic Marker of Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lissek, Shmuel; Rabin, Stephanie; Heller, Randi E.; Lukenbaugh, David; Geraci, Marilla; Pine, Daniel S.; Grillon, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Objective Classical conditioning features prominently in many etiological accounts of panic disorder. According to such accounts, neutral conditioned stimuli present during panic attacks acquire panicogenic properties. Conditioned stimuli triggering panic symptoms are not limited to the original conditioned stimuli but are thought to generalize to stimuli resembling those co-occurring with panic, resulting in the proliferation of panic cues. The authors conducted a laboratory-based assessment of this potential correlate of panic disorder by testing the degree to which panic patients and healthy subjects manifest generalization of conditioned fear. Method Nineteen patients with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of panic disorder and 19 healthy comparison subjects were recruited for the study. The fear-generalization paradigm consisted of 10 rings of graded size presented on a computer monitor; one extreme size was a conditioned danger cue, the other extreme a conditioned safety cue, and the eight rings of intermediary size created a continuum of similarity from one extreme to the other. Generalization was assessed by conditioned fear potentiating of the startle blink reflex as measured with electromyography (EMG). Results Panic patients displayed stronger conditioned generalization than comparison subjects, as reflected by startle EMG. Conditioned fear in panic patients generalized to rings with up to three units of dissimilarity to the conditioned danger cue, whereas generalization in comparison subjects was restricted to rings with only one unit of dissimilarity. Conclusions The findings demonstrate a marked proclivity toward fear overgeneralization in panic disorder and provide a methodology for laboratory-based investigations of this central, yet understudied, conditioning correlate of panic. Given the putative molecular basis of fear conditioning, these results may have implications for novel treatments and prevention in panic disorder. PMID:19917595

  1. Kyol Goeu (‘Wind Overload’) Part I: A Cultural Syndrome of Orthostatic Panic among Khmer Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Devon; Um, Khin; Ba, Phalnarith

    2009-01-01

    Certain cultural syndromes seem to increase the risk of panic attacks by generating catastrophic cognitions about symptoms of autonomic arousal. These schemas create a constant anxious scanning of the body, hence facilitating, maintaining, and producing panic. As a case in point, a Khmer fainting syndrome,‘wind overload’ (kyol goeu), results in dire expectations concerning the autonomic symptoms experienced upon standing, thus contributing to the high rate of orthostatically induced panic observed in this population. PMID:20852723

  2. Panic and Culture: Hysterike Pnix in the Ancient Greek World.

    PubMed

    Mattern, Susan P

    2015-10-01

    Starting perhaps in the second century BCE, and with Hippocratic precedent, ancient medical writers described a condition they called hysterike pnix or "uterine suffocation." This paper argues that uterine suffocation was, in modern terms, a functional somatic syndrome characterized by chronic anxiety and panic attacks. Transcultural psychiatrists have identified and described a number of similar panic-type syndromes in modern populations, and a plausible theory of how they work has been advanced. These insights, applied to the ancient disease of hysterike pnix, demystify the condition and illuminate the experience of the women who suffered from it. PMID:25471069

  3. Contextual and Personal Predictors of Adaptive Outcomes under Terror Attack: The Case of Israeli Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeidner, Moshe

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores individual differences in perceptions of political violence, strategies for coping with violence, and adaptive outcomes. Data on political violence stress, personal variables, coping strategies, and stress reactions were gathered on a sample of 227 Israeli adolescents in Haifa and Northern Israel confronted with a prolonged…

  4. Coping resources as explanatory factors of stress reactions during missile attacks: comparing Jewish and Arab adolescents in Israel.

    PubMed

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Sagy, Shifra

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore coping resources as explanatory factors in reducing emotional distress of adolescents in an acute stress situation. We compared two ethnic groups-Jewish and Arab-Bedouin Israelis-during intensive missile attacks in January 2009. Data were gathered from 138 Israeli-Jews and 84 Israeli-Arab Bedouins, 12-18 years old, who filled out self reported questionnaires among which state anxiety, state anger, and psychological distress (SPD) were measures of emotional distress, and sense of coherence (SOC) and hope index served as measures of coping resources. Findings indicated no differences between the two groups on state anxiety, SPD and hope levels. Arab Bedouins reported higher levels of state anger and lower levels of sense of coherence. The coping resources, however, explained the stress reactions differently among the two groups. While SOC made a major contribution in explaining stress reactions among Jewish adolescents, hope index explained stress reactions only for the Arab group. The findings are discussed against the background of the salutogenic theory and the cultural differences between the two ethnic groups. PMID:20458538

  5. Interoceptive accuracy and panic.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, L A; Craske, M G

    1999-12-01

    Psychophysiological models of panic hypothesize that panickers focus attention on and become anxious about the physical sensations associated with panic. Attention on internal somatic cues has been labeled interoception. The present study examined the role of physiological arousal and subjective anxiety on interoceptive accuracy. Infrequent panickers and nonanxious participants participated in an initial baseline to examine overall interoceptive accuracy. Next, participants ingested caffeine, about which they received either safety or no safety information. Using a mental heartbeat tracking paradigm, participants' count of their heartbeats during specific time intervals were coded based on polygraph measures. Infrequent panickers were more accurate in the perception of their heartbeats than nonanxious participants. Changes in physiological arousal were not associated with increased accuracy on the heartbeat perception task. However, higher levels of self-reported anxiety were associated with superior performance. PMID:10596462

  6. Milnacipran in panic disorder with agoraphobia and major depressive disorder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Liou, Ying-Jay

    2011-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman had panic disorder with agoraphobia and major depressive disorder sequentially. The aforementioned symptoms subsided significantly after treatment with milnacipran, 125 mg, administered daily for 2 months. However, panic attacks with agoraphobia were noted frequently when she tapered down milnacipran to 50 mg daily. She consequently experienced depression that gradually increased in degree, with poor energy, poor sleep, thoughts of helplessness, and ideas of death. After administration of a daily dose of 125 mg of milnacipran for 1 month, her panic attacks with agoraphobia and depressed mood were again alleviated. The present report shows significant effects of milnacipran on the comorbidity of panic disorder with agoraphobia and major depressive disorder. PMID:21926486

  7. Neurobiology of panic and pH chemosensation in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Wemmie, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Panic disorder is a common and disabling illness for which treatments are too frequently ineffective. Greater knowledge of the underlying biology could aid the discovery of better therapies. Although panic attacks occur unpredictably, the ability to provoke them in the laboratory with challenge protocols provides an opportunity for crucial insight into the neurobiology of panic. Two of the most well-studied panic provocation challenges are CO2 inhalation and lactate infusion. Although it remains unclear how these challenges provoke panic animal models of CO2 and lactate action are beginning to emerge, and offer unprecedented opportunities to probe the molecules and circuits underlying panic attacks. Both CO2 and lactate alter pH balance and may generate acidosis that can influence neuron function through a growing list of pH-sensitive receptors. These observations suggest that a key to better understanding of panic disorder may lie in more knowledge of brain pH regulation and pH-sensitive receptors. PMID:22275852

  8. The role of 5-HT1A receptors in the anti-aversive effects of cannabidiol on panic attack-like behaviors evoked in the presence of the wild snake Epicrates cenchria crassus (Reptilia, Boidae).

    PubMed

    Twardowschy, André; Castiblanco-Urbina, Maria Angélica; Uribe-Mariño, Andres; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2013-12-01

    The potential anxiolytic and antipanic properties of cannabidiol have been shown; however, its mechanism of action seems to recruit other receptors than those involved in the endocannabinoid-mediated system. It was recently shown that the model of panic-like behaviors elicited by the encounters between mice and snakes is a good tool to investigate innate fear-related responses, and cannabidiol causes a panicolytic-like effect in this model. The aim of the present study was to investigate the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) co-participation in the panicolytic-like effects of cannabidiol on the innate fear-related behaviors evoked by a prey versus predator interaction-based paradigm. Male Swiss mice were treated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) administrations of cannabidiol (3 mg/kg, i.p.) and its vehicle and the effects of the peripheral pre-treatment with increasing doses of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 (0.1, 0.3 and 0.9 mg/kg, i.p.) on instinctive fear-induced responses evoked by the presence of a wild snake were evaluated. The present results showed that the panicolytic-like effects of cannabidiol were blocked by the pre-treatment with WAY-100635 at different doses. These findings demonstrate that cannabidiol modulates the defensive behaviors evoked by the presence of threatening stimuli, and the effects of cannabidiol are at least partially dependent on the recruitment of 5-HT1A receptors. PMID:23926240

  9. Anti-aversive effects of cannabidiol on innate fear-induced behaviors evoked by an ethological model of panic attacks based on a prey vs the wild snake Epicrates cenchria crassus confrontation paradigm.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Mariño, Andrés; Francisco, Audrey; Castiblanco-Urbina, Maria Angélica; Twardowschy, André; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Zuardi, Antônio Waldo; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2012-01-01

    Several pharmacological targets have been proposed as modulators of panic-like reactions. However, interest should be given to other potential therapeutic neurochemical agents. Recent attention has been given to the potential anxiolytic properties of cannabidiol, because of its complex actions on the endocannabinoid system together with its effects on other neurotransmitter systems. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cannabidiol on innate fear-related behaviors evoked by a prey vs predator paradigm. Male Swiss mice were submitted to habituation in an arena containing a burrow and subsequently pre-treated with intraperitoneal administrations of vehicle or cannabidiol. A constrictor snake was placed inside the arena, and defensive and non-defensive behaviors were recorded. Cannabidiol caused a clear anti-aversive effect, decreasing explosive escape and defensive immobility behaviors outside and inside the burrow. These results show that cannabidiol modulates defensive behaviors evoked by the presence of threatening stimuli, even in a potentially safe environment following a fear response, suggesting a panicolytic effect. PMID:21918503

  10. Heart rate and respiratory response to doxapram in patients with panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Jose M.; Garakani, Amir; Aaronson, Cindy J.; Gorman, Jack M.

    2015-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is characterized by anticipatory anxiety and panic, both causing physiological arousal. We investigated the differential responses between anticipatory anxiety and panic in PD and healthy controls (HC). Subjects (15 PD and 30 HC) received an injection of a respiratory stimulant, doxapram, with a high rate of producing panic attacks in PD patients, or an injection of saline. PD subjects had significantly higher scores in anxiety and panic symptoms during both conditions. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) indices showed higher sympathetic activity (LF) during anticipatory anxiety and panic states, an increase in the ratio of LF/HF during the anticipatory and panic states and a decrease in parasympathetic (HF) component in PD patients. During doxapram PD subjects increased their LF/HF ratio while HC had a reduction in LF/HF. Parasympathetic component of HRV was lower during anticipatory anxiety in PD. In general, PD showed greater sympathetic and psychological responses related to anxiety and sensations of dyspnea, reduced parasympathetic responses during anticipatory and panic states, but no differences in respiratory response. This confirms previous studies showing that PD patients do not have an intrinsic respiratory abnormality (either heightened or dysregulated) at the level of the brain stem but rather an exaggerated fear response. PMID:25819170

  11. Heart rate and respiratory response to doxapram in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jose M; Garakani, Amir; Aaronson, Cindy J; Gorman, Jack M

    2015-05-30

    Panic disorder (PD) is characterized by anticipatory anxiety and panic, both causing physiological arousal. We investigated the differential responses between anticipatory anxiety and panic in PD and healthy controls (HC). Subjects (15 PD and 30 HC) received an injection of a respiratory stimulant, doxapram, with a high rate of producing panic attacks in PD patients, or an injection of saline. PD subjects had significantly higher scores in anxiety and panic symptoms during both conditions. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) indices showed higher sympathetic activity (LF) during anticipatory anxiety and panic states, an increase in the ratio of LF/HF during the anticipatory and panic states and a decrease in parasympathetic (HF) component in PD patients. During doxapram PD subjects increased their LF/HF ratio while HC had a reduction in LF/HF. Parasympathetic component of HRV was lower during anticipatory anxiety in PD. In general, PD showed greater sympathetic and psychological responses related to anxiety and sensations of dyspnea, reduced parasympathetic responses during anticipatory and panic states, but no differences in respiratory response. This confirms previous studies showing that PD patients do not have an intrinsic respiratory abnormality (either heightened or dysregulated) at the level of the brain stem but rather an exaggerated fear response. PMID:25819170

  12. The relationship between posttraumatic stress symptoms and narrative structure among adolescent terrorist-attack survivors

    PubMed Central

    Filkuková, Petra; Jensen, Tine K.; Hafstad, Gertrud Sofie; Minde, Hanne Torvund; Dyb, Grete

    2016-01-01

    Background The structure of trauma narratives is considered to be related to posttraumatic stress symptomatology and thus the capacity to make a coherent narrative after stressful events is crucial for mental health. Objective The aim of this study is to understand more of the relationship between narrative structure and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). More specifically, we investigated whether internal and external focus, organization, fragmentation, and length differed between two groups of adolescent survivors of a mass shooting, one group with low levels of PTSS and one group with high levels of PTSS. Method The sample comprised 30 adolescents who survived the shooting at Utøya Island in Norway in 2011. They were interviewed 4–5 months after the shooting and provided a free narrative of the event. PTSS were assessed using the UCLA Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index (PTSD-RI). Results We found that survivors with high levels of PTSS described more external events and fewer internal events in their narratives compared with survivors with low levels of symptoms. The analysis also showed that especially narratives containing more descriptions of dialogue and fewer organized thoughts were related to higher levels of PTSS. The groups did not differ in levels of narrative fragmentation or in length of the narratives. Conclusion Specific attributes of narrative structure proved to be related to the level of PTSS. On the basis of our results, we can recommend that practitioners focus especially on two elements of the trauma narratives, namely, the amount of external events, particularly dialogues, within the narrative and the number of organized thoughts. Participants with high levels of PTSS provided trauma narratives with low amount of organized (explanatory) thoughts accompanied by detailed descriptions of dialogues and actions, which is indicative for “here and now” quality of recall and a lack of trauma processing. PMID:26988972

  13. The PANIC software system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez Mengual, José M.; Fernández, Matilde; Rodríguez Gómez, Julio F.; García Segura, Antonio J.; Storz, Clemens

    2010-07-01

    PANIC is the Panoramic Near Infrared Camera for the 2.2m and 3.5m telescopes at Calar Alto observatory. The aim of the project is to build a wide-field general purpose NIR camera. In this paper we describe the software system of the instrument, which comprises four main packages: GEIRS for the instrument control and the data acquisition; the Observation Tool (OT), the software used for detailed definition and pre-planning the observations, developed in Java; the Quick Look tool (PQL) for easy inspection of the data in real-time and a scientific pipeline (PAPI), both based on the Python programming language.

  14. Panic Anxiety in Humans with Bilateral Amygdala Lesions: Pharmacological Induction via Cardiorespiratory Interoceptive Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Feinstein, Justin S.; Li, Wei; Feusner, Jamie D.; Adolphs, Ralph; Hurlemann, Rene

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that carbon dioxide inhalation could induce panic anxiety in a group of rare lesion patients with focal bilateral amygdala damage. To further elucidate the amygdala-independent mechanisms leading to aversive emotional experiences, we retested two of these patients (B.G. and A.M.) to examine whether triggering palpitations and dyspnea via stimulation of non-chemosensory interoceptive channels would be sufficient to elicit panic anxiety. Participants rated their affective and sensory experiences following bolus infusions of either isoproterenol, a rapidly acting peripheral β-adrenergic agonist akin to adrenaline, or saline. Infusions were administered during two separate conditions: a panic induction and an assessment of cardiorespiratory interoception. Isoproterenol infusions induced anxiety in both patients, and full-blown panic in one (patient B.G.). Although both patients demonstrated signs of diminished awareness for cardiac sensation, patient A.M., who did not panic, reported a complete lack of awareness for dyspnea, suggestive of impaired respiratory interoception. These findings indicate that the amygdala may play a role in dynamically detecting changes in cardiorespiratory sensation. The induction of panic anxiety provides further evidence that the amygdala is not required for the conscious experience of fear induced via interoceptive sensory channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We found that monozygotic twins with focal bilateral amygdala lesions report panic anxiety in response to intravenous infusions of isoproterenol, a β-adrenergic agonist similar to adrenaline. Heightened anxiety was evident in both twins, with one twin experiencing a panic attack. The twin who did not panic displayed signs of impaired cardiorespiratory interoception, including a complete absence of dyspnea sensation. These findings highlight that the amygdala is not strictly required for the experience of panic anxiety, and suggest that neural systems beyond

  15. Response to Nadler's Commentary on Arch and Craske's (2011) "Addressing Relapse in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: Methods for Optimizing Long-Term Treatment Outcomes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arch, Joanna J.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2012-01-01

    Nadler (this issue), in his commentary of our article, "Addressing Relapse in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: Methods for Optimizing Long-Term Treatment Outcomes" (Arch & Craske, 2011), argues that we misrepresent the role of panic attacks within learning theory and overlook cognitive treatment targets. He presents several case…

  16. Effects of citalopram treatment on behavioural, cardiovascular and neuroendocrine response to cholecystokinin tetrapeptide challenge in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Shlik, J; Aluoja, A; Vasar, V; Vasar, E; Podar, T; Bradwejn, J

    1997-01-01

    Eight patients with panic disorder were administered 20 micrograms of cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) before and after 8 weeks of treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram. All patients responded to treatment by showing a significant general improvement and reaching a panic-free state for 2 weeks. At the rechallenge with CCK-4, patients displayed a marked reduction in the intensity and number of panic symptoms. The frequency of panic attacks induced with CCK-4 decreased by 50% after treatment. Citalopram treatment had no substantial effect on cardiovascular (heart rate and blood pressure) or hormonal (cortisol, prolactin and growth hormone) responses to CCK-4. Patients who still had panic attacks after treatment demonstrated a blunted growth hormone response to CCK-4 that was not seen in those who did not have panic attacks. This study suggests that treatment with an SSRI can reduce an enhanced sensitivity to CCK-4 without modifying cardiovascular and neuroendocrine responses to CCK-4 in patients with panic disorder. PMID:9401314

  17. Panic symptoms and elevated suicidal ideation and behaviors among trauma exposed individuals: Moderating effects of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Brian J; Norr, Aaron M; Capron, Daniel W; Zvolensky, Michael J; Schmidt, Norman B

    2015-08-01

    Panic attacks (PAs) are highly prevalent among trauma exposed individuals and have been associated with a number of adverse outcomes. Despite high suicide rates among trauma exposed individuals, research to date has not examined the potential relation between panic symptoms and suicidal ideation and behaviors among this high risk population. The current study tested the association of panic with suicidal ideation and behaviors among a large sample of trauma exposed smokers. Community participants (N=421) who reported a lifetime history of trauma exposure were assessed concurrently for current panic, suicidal ideation and behaviors, and psychiatric diagnoses. Those who met criteria for a current panic disorder diagnosis were removed from analyses to allow for the assessment of non-PD related panic in line with the recent addition of the PA specifier applicable to all DSM-5 disorders. Findings indicated that panic symptoms were significantly associated with suicidal ideation and behaviors beyond the effects of depression and number of trauma types experienced. Further, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic status significantly moderated this relationship, indicating that the relationship between panic and suicidal ideation and behaviors is potentiated among individuals with a current PTSD diagnosis. This investigation suggests that panic symptoms may be a valuable clinical target for the assessment and treatment of suicidal ideation and behaviors among trauma exposed individuals. PMID:26050924

  18. Panic symptoms and elevated suicidal ideation and behaviors among trauma exposed individuals: Moderating effects of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Brian J.; Norr, Aaron M.; Capron, Daniel W.; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Schmidt, Norman B.

    2015-01-01

    Panic attacks (PA) are highly prevalent among trauma exposed individuals and have been associated with a number of adverse outcomes. Despite high suicide rates among trauma exposed individuals, research to date has not examined the potential relation between panic symptoms andsuicidal ideation and behaviors among this high risk population. The current study tested the association of panic with suicidal ideation and behaviors among a large sample of trauma exposed smokers. Community participants (N = 421) who reported a lifetime history of trauma exposure were assessed concurrently for current panic, suicidal ideation and behaviors, and psychiatric diagnoses. Those who met criteria for a current panic disorder diagnosis were removed from analyses to allow for the assessment of non-PD related panic in line with the recent addition of the PA specifier applicable to all DSM-5 disorders. Findings indicated that panic symptoms were significantly associated with suicidal ideation and behaviors beyond the effects of depression and number of trauma types experienced. Further, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic status significantly moderated this relationship, indicating the relationship between panic and suicidal ideation and behaviors is potentiated among individuals with a current PTSD diagnosis. This investigation suggests panic symptoms may be a valuable clinical target for the assessment and treatment of suicidal ideation and behaviors among trauma exposed individuals. PMID:26050924

  19. Relations between PTSD and distress dimensions in an Indian child/adolescent sample following the 2008 Mumbai terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Ateka A; Mehta, Panna; Tiamiyu, Mojisola F; Hovey, Joseph D; Geers, Andrew L; Charak, Ruby; Tamburrino, Marijo B; Elhai, Jon D

    2014-08-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder's (PTSD) four-factor dysphoria model has substantial empirical support (reviewed in Elhai & Palmieri, Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 25, 849-854, 2011; Yufik & Simms, Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 119, 764-776, 2010). However, debatable is whether the model's dysphoria factor adequately captures all of PTSD's emotional distress (e.g., Marshall et al., Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 119(1), 126-135, 2010), which is relevant to understanding the assessment and psychopathology of PTSD. Thus, the present study assessed the factor-level relationship between PTSD and emotional distress in 818 children/adolescents attending school in the vicinity of the 2008 Mumbai terrorist attacks. The effective sample had a mean age of 12.85 years (SD = 1.33), with the majority being male (n = 435, 53.8 %). PTSD and emotional distress were measured by the UCLA PTSD Reaction Index (PTSD-RI) and Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) respectively. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) assessed the PTSD and BSI-18 model fit; Wald tests assessed hypothesized PTSD-distress latent-level relations; and invariance testing examined PTSD-distress parameter differences using age, gender and direct exposure as moderators. There were no moderating effects for the PTSD-distress structural parameters. BSI-18's depression and somatization factors related more to PTSD's dysphoria than PTSD's avoidance factor. The results emphasize assessing for specificity and distress variance of PTSD factors on a continuum, rather than assuming dysphoria factor's complete accountability for PTSD's inherent distress. Additionally, PTSD's dysphoria factor related more to BSI-18's depression than BSI-18's anxiety/somatization factors; this may explain PTSD's comorbidity mechanism with depressive disorders. PMID:24390471

  20. Paroxetine in panic disorder: clinical management and long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dannon, Pinhas N; Lowengrub, Katherine; Iancu, I; Kotler, Moshe

    2004-03-01

    Panic disorder is one of the most common anxiety disorders and has a lifetime prevalence of 3-5%. Panic attacks can begin at any age, but commonly have their onset in early adulthood between the ages of 20 and 40 years. Naturalistic data has shown that panic disorder has a chronic and relapsing course. Panic disorder is reported to be associated with an increased risk of suicidal behavior and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses such as depression and substance abuse. Currently, recommended treatment modalities for panic disorder include the use of antidepressant pharmacotherapy and/or cognitive behavioral therapy. Paroxetine is unique among the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors since, in addition to its effect on the CNS serotonergic neurotransmission, it also has mild noradrenergic properties demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of anxiety disorders and depression. Paroxetine treatment has the potential to cause weight gain and sexual dysfunction, primarily anorgasmia and ejaculatory dysfunction for the long term. In the short-term, treatment causes nausea, gastrointestinal disturbances, irritability, headaches and eating and sleeping difficulties. Paroxetine is an example of an selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor agent, which has been well studied in the treatment of panic disorder and is efficacious and well-tolerated. Paroxetine pharmacotherapy has been recommended to be continued for 1 year as specified in the treatment guidelines set by the American Psychiatric Association in the treatment of panic disorder. PMID:15853560

  1. Don't panic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2009-06-01

    "Don't panic" is a simple piece of advice, one that usually applies equally well to job-hunting, avoiding pandemic flu or, like the hapless Arthur Dent in the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy stories, wandering the universe in search of a decent cup of tea. Yet some statistics emerging from the current job market are undeniably alarming. Postings on the recruitment website Milkround.com, which advertises jobs and internships for recent graduates, are down by about 20% compared with this time last year, while a survey earlier this year by High Fliers, a Londonbased research firm, found that top UK employers plan to recruit 17% fewer graduates this year than in 2008. In the same study, half of the 1017 final-year students surveyed believed they would have to take "any graduate job" they were offered, regardless of their interest in the company, and a whopping 91% thought competition for vacancies would be tougher than last year.

  2. Panic and the brainstem: clues from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Perna, Giampaolo; Guerriero, Giuseppe; Brambilla, Paolo; Caldirola, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    One of the most influential theories has conceived unexpected panic attack (PA) as a primal defensive reaction to threat within the internal milieu of the body. This theory is based on findings suggesting the involvement of dysfunctional respiratory regulation and/or abnormally sensitive central neural network of carbon dioxide (CO2)/hydrogen ion (H+) chemoreception in PA. Thus, unexpected PA may be related to phylogenetically older brain structures, including the brainstem areas, which process basic functions related to the organism's internal milieu. The brainstem represents a crucial area for homeostatic regulation, including chemoreception and cardio-respiratory control. In addition, the midbrain dorsal periaqueductal gray may be involved in the unconditioned defense reactions to proximal threats, including internal physical stimuli. Our aim was to specifically consider the potential involvement of the brainstem in panic disorder (PD) by a comprehensive review of the available neuroimaging studies. Available data are limited and potentially affected by several limitations. However, preliminary evidence of a role of the brainstem in PD can be found and, secondly, the brainstem serotonergic system seems to be involved in panic modulation with indications of both altered serotonergic receptors and 5-HT transporter bindings. In conclusion, our review suggests that the brainstem may be involved in psychopathology of PD and supports the relevant role of subcortical serotonergic system in panic pathogenesis. PMID:24923341

  3. Increased Opioid Dependence in a Mouse Model of Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Xavier; Murtra, Patricia; Zamalloa, Teresa; Canals, Josep Maria; Pineda, Joseba; Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Maldonado, Rafael; Dierssen, Mara

    2009-01-01

    Panic disorder is a highly prevalent neuropsychiatric disorder that shows co-occurrence with substance abuse. Here, we demonstrate that TrkC, the high-affinity receptor for neurotrophin-3, is a key molecule involved in panic disorder and opiate dependence, using a transgenic mouse model (TgNTRK3). Constitutive TrkC overexpression in TgNTRK3 mice dramatically alters spontaneous firing rates of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons and the response of the noradrenergic system to chronic opiate exposure, possibly related to the altered regulation of neurotrophic peptides observed. Notably, TgNTRK3 LC neurons showed an increased firing rate in saline-treated conditions and profound abnormalities in their response to met5-enkephalin. Behaviorally, chronic morphine administration induced a significantly increased withdrawal syndrome in TgNTRK3 mice. In conclusion, we show here that the NT-3/TrkC system is an important regulator of neuronal firing in LC and could contribute to the adaptations of the noradrenergic system in response to chronic opiate exposure. Moreover, our results indicate that TrkC is involved in the molecular and cellular changes in noradrenergic neurons underlying both panic attacks and opiate dependence and support a functional endogenous opioid deficit in panic disorder patients. PMID:20204153

  4. Chest pain, panic disorder and coronary artery disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Soares-Filho, Gastão L F; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Santulli, Gaetano; Silva, Adriana C; Machado, Sergio; Valenca, Alexandre M; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    Chest pain may be due benign diseases but often suggests an association with coronary artery disease, which justifies a quick search for medical care. However, some people have anxiety disorder with symptoms that resemble clearly an acute coronary syndrome. More specifically, during a panic attack an abrupt feeling of fear accompanied by symptoms such as breathlessness, palpitations and chest pain, makes patients believe they have a heart attack and confuse physicians about the diagnosis. The association between panic disorder and coronary artery disease has been extensively studied in recent years and, although some studies have shown anxiety disorders coexisting or increasing the risk of heart disease, one causal hypothesis is still missing. The aim of this systematic review is to present the various ways in which the scientific community has been investigating the relation between chest pain, panic disorder and coronary artery disease. PMID:24923348

  5. An Internet-based investigation of the catastrophic misinterpretation model of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Austin, David; Kiropoulos, Litza

    2008-01-01

    The catastrophic misinterpretation (CM) model of panic disorder proposes that spontaneous panic attacks are the result of interpretation of harmless autonomic arousal as precursors to physical (e.g., heart attack) or psychological (e.g., insanity) emergency. Mixed research findings to date have provided equivocal support. The body sensations interpretation questionnaire-modified was administered via Internet to investigate core assumptions of the model among 30 people with panic disorder (PD), 28 with social anxiety disorder (SAD), and 30 non-anxious controls. The PD group gave more harm-related interpretations of ambiguous internal stimuli than both other groups, and this tendency to interpret ambiguous stimuli catastrophically was not also apparent for external/general events. Furthermore, people with PD rated harm and anxiety outcomes as more catastrophic than non-anxious controls. Results substantially support the CM model although a modification is proposed. PMID:17336037

  6. A meta-analysis of treatments for panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Clum, G A; Clum, G A; Surls, R

    1993-04-01

    In a meta-analysis, the authors compared the effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological treatments for panic disorder. Percentage of agoraphobic subjects in the sample and duration of the illness were unrelated to effect size (ES). Type of dependent variable was generally unrelated to treatment outcome, although behavioral measures yielded significantly smaller ESs. Dependent measures of general anxiety, avoidance, and panic attacks yielded larger ESs than did depression measures. Choice of control was related to ES, with comparisons with placebo controls greater than comparisons with exposure-only or "other treatment" controls. Psychological coping strategies involving relaxation training, cognitive restructuring, and exposure yielded the most consistent ESs; flooding and combination treatments (psychological and pharmacological) yielded the next most consistent ESs. Antidepressants were the most effective pharmacological intervention. PMID:8097212

  7. [Neurobiology in panic states].

    PubMed

    Fontaine, R; Breton, G; Elie, R; Dery, R

    1987-01-01

    Research in panic disorder (PD) has highlighted a low biological threshold (lactate infusion). Also, several studies have shown neurophysiological changes with PD patients: increased brain perfusion (Stewart), parahypocampal hyper-perfusion (Reiman) and we reported an increased incidence of epileptiform abnormalities. In order to assess neuroanatomical changes we carried out a study with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of P.D. as compared to controls. A prospective study with MRI was done with 13 P.D. patients and 10 controls. The inclusion criteria were outpatients with P.D. according to DSM-III criteria. All subjects (patients and controls) were right handed and between 18 and 40 years of age. Usual exclusion criteria were used. A Signa MR machine of 1.5 telsa (General Electric) was used and images in T1, T2 mode were generated. We found a higher percentage of brain atrophy in patients with PD (64%) than with controls (20%) and the differences reached significance (p-.04-Fisher ex. test). Right temporal lobe horn atrophy was the most common finding in P.D. patients. There were no difference between patients and controls for age, sex and weight. We have found anatomical changes in young P.D. patients. Whether this atrophy found with MRI and physiological changes previously reported are related should assessed further. However, our findings support biological factors in the etiology of PD and stimulates the development of better pharmacological treatments. PMID:3451675

  8. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD-heart attack; Coronary artery disease-heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  9. Israeli Adolescents' Help-Seeking Behaviours in Relation to Terrorist Attacks: The Perceptions of Students, School Counsellors and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Moshe; Amram, Sima

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to terror seriously threatens the well-being of children and adolescents. School mental health professionals cope simultaneously with the counselling needs of their clients and with their own fears and doubts. This report is based on two studies. The first study was concerned with the perceptions of Israeli adolescents of the place of…

  10. Combined pharmacotherapy and cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Gelder, M G

    1998-12-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has been combined with pharmacotherapy in the treatment of panic disorder in three ways: (1) to treat agoraphobic symptoms in the condition of panic with agoraphobia; (2) to reduce withdrawal effects during drug taper; and (3) to treat panic attacks. Exposure treatment and pharmacotherapy have a modest additive effect, although more patients drop out of exposure therapy combined with imipramine treatment compared with exposure therapy alone. CBT reduces symptoms of withdrawal from alprazolam and other benzodiazepines and improves the outcome of drug treatment. At present, sufficient data are not available to determine whether the effects of CBT combined with drug therapy are additive in treating panic disorder. The results of a large trial are awaited. Current CBT consists of 12 sessions and is not widely offered to patients because of cost considerations. Efforts are being made to decrease the number of sessions necessary by improving cognitive techniques. One of these models is the subject of an ongoing trial. Finally, efforts to educate and counsel patients in the clinical setting regarding the psychopathology of panic attacks may improve the outcome of pharmacotherapy. PMID:9872706

  11. A Comparison of Alprazolam and Behavior Therapy in Treatment of Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    KLOSKO, JANET S.; BARLOW, DAVID H.; TASSINARI, ROBIN; CERNY, JEROME A.

    1994-01-01

    The results of a clinical outcome study (N = 57) comparing behavior therapy directed at panic disorder (panic control treatment [PCT]) with alprazolam were reported. These conditions were compared with a medication placebo and a waiting-list control group. Patterns of results on measures of panic attacks, generalized anxiety, and global clinical ratings reveal that PCT was significantly more effective than placebo and waiting-list conditions on most measures. The alprazolam group differed significantly from neither PCT nor placebo. The percentage of clients completing the study who were free of panic attacks following PCT was 87%, compared with 50% for alprazolam, 36% for placebo, and 33% for the waiting-list group. Since alprazolam may work more quickly than PCT but may also interfere with the effects of behavioral treatment, these data suggest a series of studies on the feasibility of integrating these treatments and on the precise patterns and mechanisms of action of various successful treatment approaches to panic disorder. PMID:22700189

  12. How good are patients with panic disorder at perceiving their heartbeats?

    PubMed

    Ehlers, A; Breuer, P

    1996-01-01

    Palpitations are among the most common symptoms of panic attacks. The present review addresses the question of whether systematic differences in heartbeat perception exist between patients with panic disorder and control subjects. Paradigms involving the comparison of heartbeat sensations with external signals such as discrimination task have failed to find group differences. Recent improvements in methodology may give clearer results in future studies. The majority of studies using the mental tracking paradigm have shown that panic disorder patients show a better heartbeat perception than controls. Discrepant results are probably related to different instructions and differences in sample characteristics such as the inclusion of patients on medication affecting the cardiovascular system. More accurate heartbeat perception, may, however, be restricted to those patients who show agoraphobic avoidance behavior. It is also conceivable that group differences in the mental tracking paradigm are due to attentional biases or a tendency to interpret weak sensations as heartbeats rather than differences in perceptual sensitivity. More ambulatory studies are needed to test whether the results can be generalized to the patients' natural environment. So far ambulatory studies have established superior heartbeat perception only in the subgroup of panic disorder patients with cardiac neurosis. A 1-year prospective study showed that heartbeat perception as assessed with the mental tracking paradigm predicted maintenance of panic attacks. This supports the clinical significance of the findings. Increased cardiac awareness may increase the probability of anxiety-inducing bodily sensations triggering the vicious cycle of panic. Laboratory and ambulatory monitoring studies showed that panic disorder patients respond with anxiety when they think that their heart rate has accelerated. Increased cardiac awareness may also contribute to the maintenance of the disorder by motivating the

  13. Subregional Shape Alterations in the Amygdala in Patients with Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geon Ha; Kang, Hee Jin; Kim, Bori R.; Jeon, Saerom; Im, Jooyeon Jamie; Hyun, Heejung; Moon, Sohyeon; Lim, Soo Mee; Lyoo, In Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The amygdala has been known to play a pivotal role in mediating fear-related responses including panic attacks. Given the functionally distinct role of the amygdalar subregions, morphometric measurements of the amygdala may point to the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying panic disorder. The current study aimed to determine the global and local morphometric alterations of the amygdala related to panic disorder. Methods Volumetric and surface-based morphometric approach to high-resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted images was used to examine the structural variations of the amygdala, with respect to extent and location, in 23 patients with panic disorder and 31 matched healthy individuals. Results There were no significant differences in bilateral amygdalar volumes between patients with panic disorder and healthy individuals despite a trend-level right amygdalar volume reduction related to panic disorder (right, β = -0.23, p = 0.09, Cohen's d = 0.51; left, β = -0.18, p = 0.19, Cohen's d = 0.45). Amygdalar subregions were localized into three groups including the superficial, centromedial, and laterobasal groups based on the cytoarchitectonically defined probability map. Surface-based morphometric analysis revealed shape alterations in the laterobasal and centromedial groups of the right amygdala in patients with panic disorder (false discovery rate corrected p < 0.05). Conclusions The current findings suggest that subregion-specific shape alterations in the right amygdala may be involved in the development and maintenance of panic disorder, which may be attributed to the cause or effects of amygdalar hyperactivation. PMID:27336300

  14. Pubertal Status and Emotional Reactivity to a Voluntary Hyperventilation Challenge Predicting Panic Symptoms and Somatic Complaints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leen-Feldner, Ellen W.; Reardon, Laura E.; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The main and interactive effects of pubertal status and emotional reactivity to bodily sensations elicited by a voluntary hyperventilation challenge were examined in relation to panic symptoms and self- and parent-reported somatic complaints among 123 (56 females) adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 years (M[age] = 15.05; SD = 1.50). As…

  15. The relationship of isolated sleep paralysis and panic disorder to hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bell, C C; Hildreth, C J; Jenkins, E J; Carter, C

    1988-03-01

    An hypothesis is proposed that there exists a subgroup of African-American hypertensive patients whose hypertension could have been prevented by the early detection and treatment of easily recognizable symptoms that signal the initiation of the pathophysiologic processes that lead to essential hypertension.A pilot study of 31 patients with elevated blood pressure revealed that 41.9 percent had isolated sleep paralysis, 35.5 percent had panic attacks, and 9.7 percent had panic disorder. These proposed hyperadrenergic phenomena may be related to the development of hypertension in certain individuals. PMID:3351970

  16. Elites and Panic: More to Fear than Fear Itself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Lee; Chess, Caron

    2008-01-01

    Attributions of panic are almost exclusively directed at members of the general public. Here, we inquire into the relationships between elites and panic. We review current research and theorizing about panic, including problems of identifying when it has occurred. We propose three relationships: elites fearing panic, elites causing panic and…

  17. Is internet-based CBT for panic disorder and agoraphobia as effective as face-to-face CBT?

    PubMed

    Kiropoulos, Litza A; Klein, Britt; Austin, David W; Gilson, Kathryn; Pier, Ciaran; Mitchell, Joanna; Ciechomski, Lisa

    2008-12-01

    This study compared Panic Online (PO), an internet-based CBT intervention, to best-practice face-to-face CBT for people with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Eighty-six people with a primary diagnosis of panic disorder were recruited from Victoria, Australia. Participants were randomly assigned to either PO (n=46) or best practice face-to-face CBT (n=40). Effects of the internet-based CBT program were found to be comparable to those of face-to-face CBT. Both interventions produced significant reductions in panic disorder and agoraphobia clinician severity ratings, self reported panic disorder severity and panic attack frequency, measures of depression, anxiety, stress and panic related cognitions, and displayed improvements in quality of life. Participants rated both treatment conditions as equally credible and satisfying. Participants in the face-to-face CBT treatment group cited higher enjoyment with communicating with their therapist. Consistent with this, therapists' ratings for compliance to treatment and understanding of the CBT material was higher in the face-to-face CBT treatment group. PO required significantly less therapist time than the face-to-face CBT condition. PMID:18289829

  18. Do Panic Symptoms Affect the Quality of Life and Add to the Disability in Patients with Bronchial Asthma?

    PubMed

    Faye, A D; Gawande, S; Tadke, R; Kirpekar, V C; Bhave, S H; Pakhare, A P; Tayade, B

    2015-01-01

    Background. Anxiety and panic are known to be associated with bronchial asthma with variety of impact on clinical presentation, treatment outcome, comorbidities, quality of life, and functional disability in patients with asthma. This study aims to explore the pattern of panic symptoms, prevalence and severity of panic disorder (PD), quality of life, and disability in them. Methods. Sixty consecutive patients of bronchial asthma were interviewed using semistructured proforma, Panic and Agoraphobia scale, WHO Quality of life (QOL) BREF scale, and WHO disability schedule II (WHODAS II). Results. Though 60% of the participants had panic symptoms, only 46.7% had diagnosable panic attacks according to DSM IV TR diagnostic criteria and 33.3% had PD. Most common symptoms were "sensations of shortness of breath or smothering," "feeling of choking," and "fear of dying" found in 83.3% of the participants. 73.3% of the participants had poor quality of life which was most impaired in physical and environmental domains. 55% of the participants had disability score more than a mean (18.1). Conclusion. One-third of the participants had panic disorder with significant effect on physical and environmental domains of quality of life. Patients with more severe PD and bronchial asthma had more disability. PMID:26425540

  19. Anxiety sensitivity, catastrophic misinterpretations and panic self-efficacy in the prediction of panic disorder severity: towards a tripartite cognitive model of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Sandin, Bonifacio; Sánchez-Arribas, Carmen; Chorot, Paloma; Valiente, Rosa M

    2015-04-01

    The present study examined the contribution of three main cognitive factors (i.e., anxiety sensitivity, catastrophic misinterpretations of bodily symptoms, and panic self-efficacy) in predicting panic disorder (PD) severity in a sample of patients with a principal diagnosis of panic disorder. It was hypothesized that anxiety sensitivity (AS), catastrophic misinterpretation of bodily sensations, and panic self-efficacy are uniquely related to panic disorder severity. One hundred and sixty-eight participants completed measures of AS, catastrophic misinterpretations of panic-like sensations, and panic self-efficacy prior to receiving treatment. Results of multiple linear regression analyses indicated that AS, catastrophic misinterpretations and panic self-efficacy independently predicted panic disorder severity. Results of path analyses indicated that AS was direct and indirectly (mediated by catastrophic misinterpretations) related with panic severity. Results provide evidence for a tripartite cognitive account of panic disorder. PMID:25727680

  20. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack treatment works best when it's given right after symptoms occur. Prompt treatment of a heart attack can help prevent or limit damage to the heart and prevent sudden death. Call 9-1-1 Right Away A heart ...

  1. Cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder: current status.

    PubMed

    Landon, Terri M; Barlow, David H

    2004-07-01

    Is cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) appropriate for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PDA) in children, adolescents, and adults? Are its effects durable? In this review, we survey various psychological approaches to the treatment of PDA and examine the relative efficacy and clinical utility of each. A growing body of research demonstrates that CBT is well-tolerated, cost-effective, and produces substantial treatment gains for individuals with PDA over the short- and long-term. Nevertheless, not everyone benefits and there is room for improvement among those who do. We address these shortcomings and consider recent developments. PMID:15552543

  2. Learning Processes Associated with Panic-Related Symptoms in Families with and without Panic Disordered Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Albuquerque, Jiske E. G.; Munsch, Simone; Margraf, Jurgen; Schneider, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The present study compared learning processes associated with panic-related symptoms in families with and without panic disordered mothers. Using a multi-informant approach, 86 mothers [of whom 58 had a primary diagnosis of panic disorder (PD)], their partners and teenage children (mean age, 16.67 years) reported about parents' behavior (modeling…

  3. The subject in an uproar: a Lacanian perspective on panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Strubbe, Glenn; Vanheule, Stijn

    2014-04-01

    From Jacques Lacan's theory of anxiety, principles are deduced for a Lacanian-oriented treatment of panic disorder. This Lacanian approach is related to Freud's theory of the actual neuroses, and is comparable in some ways with the approach taken in Panic-Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (PFPP). The Lacanian conceptualization of panic retains the idea that both repressed material and unsymbolized mental states lie at its basis. People suffering from panic attacks are overwhelmed by signifiers, aspects of corporeal excitation, and/or existential questions that remain too Real. Psychoanalytic therapy aims to create a name for such Real elements. The three registers that Lacan situates at the basis of his psychoanalytic approach (the Symbolic, the Imaginary, and the Real) are discussed, as well as the treatment principles for conducting this clinical work. The case study of a young woman with panic disorder is presented to illustrate how a brief, Lacanian-oriented treatment (forty-eight sessions) progressed, and where the patient managed to both name and find a symbolic place for psychic experiences that were too Real. During this treatment, the patient overcame her avoidant-defensive mode of functioning and her persistent difficulties related to separation. PMID:24651266

  4. Oseltamivir (tamiflu) induced depressive episode in a female adolescent.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sungho; Joung, Yoo Sook

    2010-12-01

    Oseltamivir was developed for prophylactic and therapeutic use against influenza, specifically targeting the viral enzyme's highly-conserved active site. In recent years, there have been case reports of neuropsychiatric events during or after oseltamivir treatment, in Japan and other countries. However, a search of the literature revealed no such cases in South Korea. We present the case of a 15-year-old female adolescent diagnosed with depressive episode after taking oseltamivir. Oseltamivir is generally well tolerated. Its most frequent adverse effects include nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. In influenza patients taking oseltamivir, neuropsychiatric adverse events include delirium, behavioral disturbance, suicide, delusion, panic attack, convulsion, depressed mood, loss of consciousness, etc. Reportedly, such neuropsychiatric adverse events were more common in children than in adults and generally occurred within 48 hours of administration. Here, we report a retrospective review case of an oseltamivir-related neuropsychiatric event in a female adolescent in South Korea. PMID:21253416

  5. The role of "interoceptive" fear conditioning in the development of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    De Cort, Klara; Griez, Eric; Büchler, Marjolein; Schruers, Koen

    2012-03-01

    More than 20% of the general population experience a panic attack at least once in their lives; however, only a minority goes on to develop panic disorder (PD). Conditioning mechanisms have been proposed to explain this evolution in persons who are susceptible to developing panic disorder upon a "traumatic" panic attack. According to preparedness theory, some cues are more likely to condition than others, namely, those referring to internal, bodily signals of danger. The aim of the present study was to test this theory in a differential conditioning paradigm, making use of scripts referring to different internal, bodily sensations as conditioned stimulus (CS) and inhalation of 35% CO(2) as unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Thirty-three healthy volunteers were assigned to three scripts conditions: "suffocation," "neutral," or "urgency." During acquisition, one of two versions of a particular script was always followed by an inhalation of 35% CO(2) (CS+) and the other by room air (CS-). Acquisition was followed by a test phase, where only inhalations of room air were administered. In line with our hypothesis, only participants in the suffocation condition exhibited a selective conditioning effect. They were more fearful and showed a significantly higher increase in tidal volume than participants in the two control conditions. Results are discussed with relation to interoceptive conditioning, preparedness, and the possible role of tidal volume in PD. PMID:22304891

  6. Familial aggregation of panic in nonclinical panickers.

    PubMed

    Brown, T A

    1994-02-01

    Despite several methodological difficulties inherent in the nonclinical panic literature, some researchers have highlighted the consistent finding that a greater proportion of panickers than nonpanickers report a history of panic in first-order relatives to be supportive of the validity of nonclinical panic research findings. However, in all of these studies, familial aggregation differences have been evaluated via panickers' and nonpanickers' self-reports of familial panic history. Given evidence that questionnaire assessment of panic results in substantial false positives (Brown & Cash, 1989, Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 3, 139-148), it was hypothesized that familial aggregation differences could be largely attributable to this phenomenon as well. Consistent with this hypothesis, as in prior studies, a significantly greater proportion of panickers than nonpanickers reported first-order relatives who experienced panic; however, panickers and nonpanickers also differed in their reports of close male friends and close female friends who had experienced panic. On the basis of these data, potential caveats to prior conclusions concerning familial aggregation differences between nonclinical panickers and nonpanickers are discussed as are methodological considerations for future nonclinical panic research. PMID:8155061

  7. Anchoring the Panic Disorder Severity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keough, Meghan E.; Porter, Eliora; Kredlow, M. Alexandra; Worthington, John J.; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Pollack, Mark H.; Shear, M. Katherine; Simon, Naomi M.

    2012-01-01

    The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is a clinician-administered measure of panic disorder symptom severity widely used in clinical research. This investigation sought to provide clinically meaningful anchor points for the PDSS both in terms of clinical severity as measured by the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) and to extend…

  8. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a heart attack take part in a cardiac rehabilitation program. ... al. eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  9. Lifelong opioidergic vulnerability through early life separation: a recent extension of the false suffocation alarm theory of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Preter, Maurice; Klein, Donald F

    2014-10-01

    The present paper is the edited version of our presentations at the "First World Symposium On Translational Models Of Panic Disorder", in Vitoria, E.S., Brazil, on November 16-18, 2012. We also review relevant work that appeared after the conference. Suffocation-False Alarm Theory (Klein, 1993) postulates the existence of an evolved physiologic suffocation alarm system that monitors information about potential suffocation. Panic attacks maladaptively occur when the alarm is erroneously triggered. The expanded Suffocation-False Alarm Theory (Preter and Klein, 2008) hypothesizes that endogenous opioidergic dysregulation may underlie the respiratory pathophysiology and suffocation sensitivity in panic disorder. Opioidergic dysregulation increases sensitivity to CO2, separation distress and panic attacks. That sudden loss, bereavement and childhood separation anxiety are also antecedents of "spontaneous" panic requires an integrative explanation. Our work unveiling the lifelong endogenous opioid system impairing effects of childhood parental loss (CPL) and parental separation in non-ill, normal adults opens a new experimental, investigatory area. PMID:24726574

  10. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  11. Sleep Apnea and Risk of Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Chen, Yung-Tai; Lin, Wei-Chen; Wu, Li-An; Chang, Shi-Chuan; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Su, Wei-Juin; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lee, Yu-Chin; Chou, Kun-Ta

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Epidemiological studies have identified a trend in the development of depressive and anxiety disorders following a diagnosis of sleep apnea. The relationship between sleep apnea and subsequent panic disorder, however, remains unclear. METHODS Using a nationwide database, the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, patients with sleep apnea and age-, sex-, income-, and urbanization-matched control patients who did not have sleep apnea were enrolled between 2000 and 2010. Patients with a prior diagnosis of panic disorder before enrollment were excluded. The 2 cohorts were observed until December 31, 2010. The primary endpoint was occurrence of newly diagnosed panic disorder. RESULTS A total of 8,704 sleep apnea patients and 34,792 control patients were enrolled. Of the 43,496 patients, 263 (0.60%) suffered from panic disorder during a mean follow-up period of 3.92 years, including 117 (1.34%) from the sleep apnea cohort and 146 (0.42%) from the control group. The Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a predisposition of patients with sleep apnea to develop panic disorder (log-rank test, P <.001). After multivariate adjustment, the hazard ratio for subsequent panic disorder among the sleep apnea patients was 2.17 (95% confidence interval, 1.68–2.81; P <.001). CONCLUSIONS Sleep apnea appears to confer a higher risk for future development of panic disorder. PMID:26195676

  12. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... lower “bad” cholesterol (also called LDL, or low-density lipoprotein) levels and may help increase “good” cholesterol (also called HDL, or high-density lipoprotein). If you have had a heart attack, ...

  13. Panic anxiety after abrupt discontinuation of mianserin.

    PubMed

    Kuniyoshi, M; Arikawa, K; Miura, C; Inanaga, K

    1989-06-01

    We observed a case of withdrawal after abrupt discontinuation of mianserin. A 41-year-old woman was treated according to a diagnosis of depression, which was her 6th episode. Mianserin 30 mg/day, etizolam 1 mg/day and flunitrazepam 1 mg/day were administered. When the patient discontinued taking the drugs by herself because of subsiding of these symptoms, severe panic anxiety appeared. This panic anxiety was not relieved by taking etizolam and flunitrazepam again, but subsided rapidly by the re-administration of mianserin 30 mg/day, and because of that the depressive symptom also disappeared. From these experiences panic anxiety seemed to be a withdrawal symptom, and involvement of the noradrenergic system in panic anxiety as well as serotonergic system was suggested. PMID:2796025

  14. [Comorbidity of panic disorder and alcoholism in a sample of 100 alcoholic patients].

    PubMed

    Segui, J; Salvador, L; Canet, J; Herrera, C; Aragón, C

    1994-01-01

    Among one hundred patients with alcohol dependence (DSM-III-R) studied in a drug abuse center in the "Bajo Llobregat" area (Barcelona industrial belt it was detected that 27% had life time rate of panic disorder. The age of onset of alcoholism was earlier than the one for panic disorder. In 78.8% of these patients alcoholismo appeared first. 70.4% refer worsening of the panic attacks when drinking large amounts of alcohol. Patients with Panic Disorder: a) are younger (p < 0.05); b) have attended school longer and have higher education (p < 0.01); c) have more alcoholism family history (p < 0.05); d) have more major depressive disorders (0.05) and dysthimic disorder (p < 0.01); e) Worse social functioning according to the GAS (p < 0.01); f) higher score for the Psychological disorders Scale (p < 0.001) and a lower performance at work (p < 0.001) measured by the ASI. The clinical significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:7484297

  15. Experiential cognitive therapy in the treatment of panic disorders with agoraphobia: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Vincelli, F; Anolli, L; Bouchard, S; Wiederhold, B K; Zurloni, V; Riva, G

    2003-06-01

    The use of a multicomponent cognitive-behavioral treatment strategy for panic disorder with agoraphobia is actually one of the preferred therapeutic approaches for this disturbance. This method involves a mixture of cognitive and behavioral techniques that are intended to help patients identify and modify their dysfunctional anxiety-related thoughts, beliefs and behavior. The paper presents a new treatment protocol for Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia, named Experiential-Cognitive Therapy (ECT) that integrates the use of virtual reality (VR) in a multicomponent cognitive-behavioral treatment strategy. The VR software used for the trial is freely downloadable: www.cyberpsychology.info/try.htm. Moreover, the paper presents the result of a controlled study involving 12 consecutive patients aged 35-53. The selected subjects were randomly divided in three groups: ECT group, that experienced the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Virtual Reality assisted treatment (eight sessions), a CBT group that experienced the traditional Cognitive Behavioral approach (12 sessions) and a waiting list control group. The data showed that both CBT and ECT could significantly reduce the number of panic attacks, the level of depression and both state and trait anxiety. However, ECT procured these results using 33% fewer sessions than CBT. This datum suggests that ECT could be better than CBT in relation to the "cost of administration," justifying the added use of VR equipment in the treatment of panic disorders. PMID:12855090

  16. Enhancing panic and smoking reduction treatment with d-cycloserine: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Smits, Jasper A J; Kauffman, Brooke Y; Lee-Furman, Eunjung; Zvolensky, Michael J; Otto, Michael W; Piper, Megan E; Powers, Mark B; Rosenfield, David

    2016-05-01

    There has been relatively little attention focused on treatment strategies for smokers with panic attacks despite their increased risk of relapse. Panic and Smoking Reduction Treatment (PSRT) integrates standard smoking cessation treatment with an exposure-based intervention targeting the mechanisms underlying panic-smoking relations. Building upon emerging evidence supporting the efficacy of d-cycloserine (DCS) for augmenting exposure-based therapy, we are conducting an initial test of the efficacy of DCS for enhancing PSRT outcomes. Utilizing a randomized, double-blind trial comparing PSRT+DCS to PSRT+placebo, we will obtain initial effect sizes for short-term and long-term smoking cessation outcomes and perform an initial test of putative mechanisms. PMID:27015966

  17. Lack of specific association between panicogenic properties of caffeine and HPA-axis activation. A placebo-controlled study of caffeine challenge in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Markianos, Manolis; Oulis, Panagiotis

    2015-09-30

    A subgroup of patients with Panic Disorder (PD) exhibits increased sensitivity to caffeine administration. However, the association between caffeine-induced panic attacks and post-caffeine hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activation in PD patients remains unclear. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over experiment, 19 PD patients underwent a 400-mg caffeine-challenge and a placebo-challenge, both administered in the form of instant coffee. Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) were assessed at both baseline and post-challenge. No patient panicked after placebo-challenge, while nine patients (47.3%) panicked after caffeine-challenge. Placebo administration did not result in any significant change in hormones' plasma levels. Overall, sample's patients demonstrated significant increases in ACTH, cortisol, and DHEAS plasma levels after caffeine administration. However, post-caffeine panickers and non-panickers did not differ with respect to the magnitude of the increases. Our results indicate that in PD patients, caffeine-induced panic attacks are not specifically associated with HPA-axis activation, as this is reflected in post-caffeine increases in ACTH, cortisol and DHEAS plasma levels, suggesting that caffeine-induced panic attacks in PD patients are not specifically mediated by the biological processes underlying fear or stress. More generally, our results add to the evidence that HPA-axis activation is not a specific characteristic of panic. PMID:26243374

  18. Hippocampal hyperexcitability underlies enhanced fear memories in TgNTRK3, a panic disorder mouse model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Mónica; D'Amico, Davide; Spadoni, Ornella; Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Stork, Oliver; Dierssen, Mara

    2013-09-18

    Panic attacks are a hallmark in panic disorder (PAND). During the panic attack, a strong association with the surrounding context is established suggesting that the hippocampus may be critically involved in the pathophysiology of PAND, given its role in contextual processing. We previously showed that variation in the expression of the neurotrophin tyrosine kinase receptor type 3 (NTRK3) in both PAND patients and a transgenic mouse model (TgNTRK3) may have a role in PAND pathophysiology. Our study examines hippocampal function and activation of the brain fear network in TgNTRK3 mice. TgNTRK3 mice showed increased fear memories accompanied by impaired extinction, congruent with an altered activation pattern of the amygdala-hippocampus-medial prefrontal cortex fear circuit. Moreover, TgNTRK3 mice also showed an unbalanced excitation-to-inhibition ratio in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 (CA3)-CA1 subcircuit toward hyperexcitability. The resulting hippocampal hyperexcitability underlies the enhanced fear memories, as supported by the efficacy of tiagabine, a GABA reuptake inhibitor, to rescue fear response. The fearful phenotype appears to be the result of hippocampal hyperexcitability and aberrant fear circuit activation. We conclude that NTRK3 plays a role in PAND by regulating hippocampus-dependent fear memories. PMID:24048855

  19. Sex differences in panic-relevant responding to a 10% carbon dioxide-enriched air biological challenge.

    PubMed

    Nillni, Yael I; Berenz, Erin C; Rohan, Kelly J; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined sex differences in psychological (i.e., self-reported anxiety, panic symptoms, and avoidance) and physiological (i.e., heart rate and skin conductance level) response to, and recovery from, a laboratory biological challenge. Participants were a community-recruited sample of 128 adults (63.3% women; M(age)=23.2 years, SD=8.9) who underwent a 4-min 10% CO(2)-enriched air biological challenge. As predicted, women reported more severe physical panic symptoms and avoidance (i.e., less willingness to participate in another challenge) and demonstrated increased heart rate as compared to men above and beyond the variance accounted for by other theoretically relevant variables (recent panic attack history, neuroticism, and anxiety sensitivity). Additionally, women demonstrated a faster rate of recovery with respect to heart rate compared to men. These results are in line with literature documenting sex-specific differences in panic psychopathology, and results are discussed in the context of possible mechanisms underlying sex differences in panic vulnerability. PMID:22115836

  20. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get help immediately. It's ... few hours causes the affected heart muscle to die. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  1. An empirical study of defense mechanisms in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Busch, F N; Shear, M K; Cooper, A M; Shapiro, T; Leon, A C

    1995-05-01

    Psychodynamic factors have rarely been systematically studied in panic disorder, despite indications that these factors may be important in the understanding and treatment of panic. This is a report of a study using the Defense Mechanism Rating Scale to test the hypothesis that patients with panic disorder utilize particular defense mechanisms: reaction formation, undoing, and displacement. The use of defense mechanisms in 22 patients with primary panic disorder was compared with that of 22 patients with primary dysthymic disorder, based on Defense Mechanism Rating Scale ratings of psychodynamic interviews of these patients. Panic subjects scored significantly higher than dysthymics on the defenses of reaction formation and undoing, but not on the defense of displacement. The defense mechanisms found are consistent with a proposed psychodynamic formulation for panic disorder that emphasizes the panic patient's difficulty in tolerating angry feelings toward significant others. Knowledge of these defense mechanisms can be useful for various treatment approaches in panic disorder. PMID:7745383

  2. Outcome Studies in the Treatment of Panic Disorder: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamish, Patricia M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reviews outcome studies in the treatment of panic disorder without agoraphobia for adults. Presents evidence supporting the efficacy of psychopharmacological and cognitive-behavioral interventions. Addresses the need for standards of care in counseling persons with panic disorder. (RB)

  3. Alexithymia, suicide risk and serum lipid levels among adult outpatients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    De Berardis, Domenico; Campanella, Daniela; Serroni, Nicola; Moschetta, Francesco Saverio; Di Emidio, Fabiola; Conti, Chiara; Carano, Alessandro; Acciavatti, Tiziano; Di Iorio, Giuseppe; Martinotti, Giovanni; Siracusano, Alberto; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2013-07-01

    To elucidate the relationships between alexithymia, suicide ideation and serum lipid levels in drug-naïve adult outpatients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of Panic Disorder (PD), 72 patients were evaluated. Measures were the Panic Attack and Anticipatory Anxiety Scale, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Scale of Suicide Ideation (SSI) and the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Alexithymic patients showed higher scores on all rating scales and altered serum lipid levels than non-alexithymics. In the hierarchical regression model, the presence of lower HDL-C and higher VLDL-C levels and Difficulty in Identifying Feelings dimension of TAS-20 were associated with higher suicide ideation. In conclusion, alexithymic individuals with PD may show a cholesterol dysregulation that may be linked to suicide ideation. The authors discuss study limitations and future research needs. PMID:23332553

  4. Opto-mechanical design of PANIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Josef W.; Baumeister, Harald; Huber, Armin; Laun, Werner; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Concepción Cárdenas, M.

    2010-07-01

    PANIC, the Panoramic Near-Infrared Camera, is a new instrument for the Calar Alto Observatory. A 4x4 k detector yields a field of view of 0.5x0.5 degrees at a pixel scale of 0.45 arc sec/pixel at the 2.2m telescope. PANIC can be used also at the 3.5m telescope with half the pixel scale. The optics consists of 9 lenses and 3 folding mirrors. Mechanical tolerances are as small as 50 microns for some elements. PANIC will have a low thermal background due to cold stops. Read-out is done with MPIA's own new electronics which allows read-out of 132 channels in parallel. Weight and size limits lead to interesting design features. Here we describe the opto-mechanical design.

  5. Suicide as escape from psychotic panic.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, Mark J; Ronningstam, Elsa; Schechter, Mark; Herbstman, Benjamin; Maltsberger, John T

    2016-01-01

    Suicides of patients in states of acute persecutory panic may be provoked by a subjective experience of helpless terror threatening imminent annihilation or dismemberment. These patients are literally scared to death and try to run away. They imagine suicide is survivable and desperately attempt to escape from imaginary enemies. These states of terror occur in a wide range of psychotic illnesses and are often associated with command hallucinations and delusions. In this article, the authors consider the subjective experience of persecutory panic and the suicide response as an attempt to flee from danger. PMID:27294586

  6. Panic disorder with agoraphobia from a behavioral neuroscience perspective: Applying the research principles formulated by the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Alfons O; Richter, Jan; Pané-Farré, Christiane; Westphal, Dorte; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anna N; Gerlach, Alexander L; Gloster, Andrew T; Ströhle, Andreas; Lang, Thomas; Kircher, Tilo; Gerdes, Antje B M; Alpers, Georg W; Reif, Andreas; Deckert, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    In the current review, we reconceptualize a categorical diagnosis-panic disorder and agoraphobia-in terms of two constructs within the domain "negative valence systems" suggested by the Research Domain Criteria initiative. Panic attacks are considered as abrupt and intense fear responses to acute threat arising from inside the body, while anxious apprehension refers to anxiety responses to potential harm and more distant or uncertain threat. Taking a dimensional view, panic disorder with agoraphobia is defined with the threat-imminence model stating that defensive responses are dynamically organized along the dimension of the proximity of the threat. We tested this model within a large group of patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia (N = 369 and N = 124 in a replication sample) and found evidence that panic attacks are indeed instances of circa strike defense. This component of the defensive reactivity was related to genetic modulators within the serotonergic system. In contrast, anxious apprehension-characterized by attentive freezing during postencounter defense-was related to general distress and depressive mood, as well as to genetic modulations within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Patients with a strong behavioral tendency for active and passive avoidance responded better to exposure treatment if the therapist guides the patient through the exposure exercises. PMID:26877119

  7. Heart Attack Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Attack Risk Assessment Updated:May 31,2016 We're sorry, but ... Can You Recognize a Heart Attack? Quiz Risk Assessment Patient Information Sheets: Heart Attack Heart Attack Personal ...

  8. Serotonin in the dorsal periaqueductal gray inhibits panic-like defensive behaviors in rats exposed to acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Spiacci, A; Sergio, T de Oliveira; da Silva, G S F; Glass, M L; Schenberg, L C; Garcia-Cairasco, N; Zangrossi, H

    2015-10-29

    It has been proposed that spontaneous panic attacks are the outcome of the misfiring of an evolved suffocation alarm system. Evidence gathered in the last years is suggestive that the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) in the midbrain harbors a hypoxia-sensitive suffocation alarm system. We here investigated whether facilitation of 5-HT-mediated neurotransmission within the dPAG changes panic-like defensive reactions expressed by male Wistar rats submitted to a hypoxia challenge (7% O2), as observed in other animal models of panic. Intra-dPAG injection of 5-HT (20 nmol), (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) (8 nmol), a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, or (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo amphetamine hydrochloride (DOI) (16 nmol), a preferential 5-HT2A agonist, reduced the number of upward jumps directed to the border of the experimental chamber during hypoxia, interpreted as escape attempts, without affecting the rats' locomotion. These effects were similar to those caused by chronic, but not acute, intraperitoneal administration of the antidepressant fluoxetine (5-15 mg/kg), or acute systemic administration of the benzodiazepine receptor agonist alprazolam (1-4 mg/kg), both drugs clinically used in the treatment of panic disorder. Our findings strengthen the view that the dPAG is a key encephalic area involved in the defensive behaviors triggered by activation of the suffocation alarm system. They also support the use of hypoxia-evoked escape as a model of respiratory-type panic attacks. PMID:26319117

  9. Frontoparietal Cortical Thinning in Respiratory-Type Panic Disorder: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Kang, June; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many evidences raise the possibility that the panic disorder (PD) patients with respiratory subtype (RS) may have characteristic structural abnormalities. We aimed to explore the structural differences between PD patients with and without the respiratory symptoms. Methods Patients with PD were recruited from the Department of Psychiatry at Korea University Anam Hospital. Respiratory subtype (RS) was diagnosed when at least 4 out of 5 of the following respiratory symptoms were present during the panic attack: fear of dying, chest pain/discomfort, shortness of breath, paresthesias, and a choking sensation. We acquired high-resolution MRI scans and used FreeSurfer to obtain a measure of cortical thickness for each patient. Results Cluster based analysis revealed significantly decreased cortical thickness in the left hemisphere in the caudal-middle-frontal, superior frontal, and posterior parietal areas in the RS group. No significant difference was observed in any of the limbic areas. Conclusion Respiratory symptoms of panic disorder were associated with a reduction in cortical thickness in the left frontal and parietal areas. This finding leads to the assumption that the frontoparietal network is the crucial component in a larger cortical network underlying the perception of dyspnea in RS. PMID:26766957

  10. Evidence that the periaqueductal gray matter mediates the facilitation of panic-like reactions in neonatally-isolated adult rats.

    PubMed

    Quintino-dos-Santos, Jeyce Willig; Müller, Cláudia Janaína Torres; Bernabé, Cristie Setúbal; Rosa, Caroline Azevedo; Tufik, Sérgio; Schenberg, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Plenty of evidence suggests that childhood separation anxiety (CSA) predisposes the subject to adult-onset panic disorder (PD). As well, panic is frequently comorbid with both anxiety and depression. The brain mechanisms whereby CSA predisposes to PD are but completely unknown in spite of the increasing evidence that panic attacks are mediated at midbrain's dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG). Accordingly, here we examined whether the neonatal social isolation (NSI), a model of CSA, facilitates panic-like behaviors produced by electrical stimulations of DPAG of rats as adults. Eventual changes in anxiety and depression were also assessed in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and forced-swimming test (FST) respectively. Male pups were subjected to 3-h daily isolations from post-natal day 2 (PN2) until weaning (PN21) allotting half of litters in individual boxes inside a sound-attenuated chamber (NSI, n = 26) whilst siblings (sham-isolated rats, SHAM, n = 27) and dam were moved to another box in a separate room. Non-handled controls (CTRL, n = 18) remained undisturbed with dams until weaning. As adults, rats were implanted with electrodes into the DPAG (PN60) and subjected to sessions of intracranial stimulation (PN65), EPM (PN66) and FST (PN67-PN68). Groups were compared by Fisher's exact test (stimulation sites), likelihood ratio chi-square tests (stimulus-response threshold curves) and Bonferroni's post hoc t-tests (EPM and FST), for P<0.05. Notably, DPAG-evoked panic-like responses of immobility, exophthalmus, trotting, galloping and jumping were markedly facilitated in NSI rats relative to both SHAM and CTRL groups. Conversely, anxiety and depression scores either did not change or were even reduced in neonatally-handled groups relative to CTRL, respectively. Data are the first behavioral evidence in animals that early-life separation stress produces the selective facilitation of panic-like behaviors in adulthood. Most importantly, results implicate

  11. Treatment-resistant panic disorder: clinical significance, concept and management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2016-10-01

    Panic disorder is commonly prevalent in the population, but the treatment response for panic disorder in clinical practice is much less effective than that in our imagination. Increasing evidence suggested existence of a chronic or remitting-relapsing clinical course in panic disorder. In this systematic review, we re-examine the definition of treatment-resistant panic disorder, and present the potential risk factors related to the treatment resistance, including the characteristics of panic disorder, other psychiatric and physical comorbidities, and psychosocial stresses. Furthermore, we summarize the potential pathophysiologies, such as genetic susceptibility, altered brain functioning, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and long-term inflammation, to explain the treatment resistance. Finally, we conclude the current therapeutic strategies for treating treatment-resistant panic disorder from pharmacological and non-pharmacological views. PMID:26850787

  12. Covariation bias in panic-prone individuals.

    PubMed

    Pauli, P; Montoya, P; Martz, G E

    1996-11-01

    Covariation estimates between fear-relevant (FR; emergency situations) or fear-irrelevant (FI; mushrooms and nudes) stimuli and an aversive outcome (electrical shock) were examined in 10 high-fear (panic-prone) and 10 low-fear respondents. When the relation between slide category and outcome was random (illusory correlation), only high-fear participants markedly overestimated the contingency between FR slides and shocks. However, when there was a high contingency of shocks following FR stimuli (83%) and a low contingency of shocks following FI stimuli (17%), the group difference vanished. Reversal of contingencies back to random induced a covariation bias for FR slides in high- and low-fear respondents. Results indicate that panic-prone respondents show a covariation bias for FR stimuli and that the experience of a high contingency between FR slides and aversive outcomes may foster such a covariation bias even in low-fear respondents. PMID:8952200

  13. Panic disorder: is the PAG involved?

    PubMed

    Del-Ben, Cristina Marta; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme

    2009-01-01

    Data from studies with humans have suggested that abnormalities of midbrain structures, including the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), could be involved in the neurobiology of panic disorder (PD). The electrical stimulation of the PAG in neurosurgical patients induces panic-like symptoms and the effect of drugs that are effective in the treatment of PD in the simulation of public speaking model of anxiety is in agreement with data from animal models of PD. Structural neuroimaging studies have shown increases in gray matter volume of midbrain and pons of PD patients. There is also evidence of lower serotonin transporter and receptor binding, and increases of metabolism in the midbrain of PD patients. Nevertheless, these midbrain abnormalities can not be considered as specific findings, since neuroimaging data indicate that PD patients have abnormalities in other brain structures that process fear and anxiety. PMID:19283082

  14. Unmentalized aspects of panic and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Busch, Fredric N; Sandberg, Larry S

    2014-06-01

    Somatic or emotional experience that has not been symbolically represented, referred to as unmentalized experience, has been given an increasingly prominent role in understanding psychopathology. Panic and anxiety disorders provide a useful model for exploring these factors, as the affective and bodily symptoms can be understood in part as unmentalized experience. The authors explore models of Freud's actual neurosis, Marty and DeM'uzan's pensee operatoire, Klein's unconscious fantasy, Bion's alpha function, Bucci's multiple code system, and relational models to describe how somatic and affective experiences can be translated into symbolic representations, and what factors can interfere with these processes. Approaches to unmentalized aspects of panic and anxiety include symbolizing somatic symptoms, identifying emotional states, and identifying contextual and traumatic links to symptoms. PMID:24828589

  15. Disruption of GABAergic tone in the dorsomedial hypothalamus attenuates responses in a subset of serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus following lactate-induced panic

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip L.; Lowry, Christopher A.; Truitt, William; Shekhar, Anantha

    2011-01-01

    Panic patients are vulnerable to induction of panic attacks by subthreshold interoceptive stimuli such as intravenous (i.v.) sodium lactate infusions. Facilitation of serotonergic signaling with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can suppress anxiety and panic-like responses, but the mechanisms involved are not clearly defined. We investigated the effects of i.v. 0.5M sodium lactate or saline, in control and panic-prone rats on c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons within subdivisions of the midbrain/pontine raphe nuclei. Rats were chronically infused with either the GABA synthesis inhibitor l-allylglycine (l-AG) into the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) to make them panic-prone, or the enantiomer d-allylglycine (d-AG) in controls. Lactate increased c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons located in the ventrolateral part of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRVL) and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VLPAG) of control, but not panic-prone, rats. The distribution of lactate-sensitive serotonergic neurons in d-AG-treated rats is virtually identical to previously defined pre-sympathomotor serotonergic neurons with multisynaptic projections to peripheral organs mediating “fight-or-flight”-related autonomic and motor responses. We hypothesize that serotonergic neurons within the DRVL/VLPAG region represent a “sympathomotor control system” that normally limits autonomic/behavioral responses to innocuous interoceptive and exteroceptive stimuli, and that dysfunction of this serotonergic system contributes to an anxiety-like state and increases vulnerability to panic in animals and humans. PMID:18308791

  16. The acute phase response in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Herrán, Andrés; Sierra-Biddle, Deirdre; García-Unzueta, Maria Teresa; Puente, Jesús; Vázquez-Barquero, José Luis; Antonio Amado, José

    2005-12-01

    An acute-phase response (APR), manifested as an increase of acute-phase proteins has been shown in major depression. Panic disorder (PD) may share some aetiopathogenic mechanisms with depression, but APR has not been studied in this disorder. Forty-one panic patients in the first stages of their illness were compared with 32 healthy subjects of comparable sex, age, and body mass index. Clinical diagnosis was established with the mini international neuropsychiatric interview, and severity with the panic disorder severity scale and the CGI scale. Laboratory determinations included four acute phase proteins (APPs) [albumin, gammaglobulins, fibrinogen, C-reactive-protein (CRP)] and basal cortisol level. Patients were studied after 8-wk follow-up taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to assess the evolution of the APPs. Gammaglobulin levels were lower, and both cortisol and CRP levels were higher in PD patients than in controls. APP did not differ between patients with or without agoraphobia. At follow-up, patients who responded to SSRIs presented a decrease in albumin levels, and a trend towards a decrease in cortisol and CRP compared with levels at intake. The conclusions of this study are that there is an APR in patients suffering from PD, and this APR tends to diminish after a successful treatment with SSRIs. PMID:15927091

  17. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Aug 24,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  18. Posttraumatic stress and tendency to panic in the aftermath of the chlorine gas disaster in Graniteville, South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Jay P.; Chanda, Debjani; Bao, Haikun; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Relatively little is known about psychological effects of environmental hazard disasters. This study examines the development of posttraumatic stress (PTS) and tendency to limited panic attack after a large chlorine spill in a community. Methods In January 2005, a large chlorine spill occurred in Graniteville, SC. Acute injuries were quantified on an ordinal severity scale. Eight to ten months later, participating victims completed the Short Screening Scale for PTSD (n = 225) and the Holden Psychological Screening Inventory (HPSI) (n = 193) as part of a public health intervention. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity were likewise measured via spirometry. Two sets of univariate logistic regression models were fit to detect independent effects of each potential covariate and risk factor on PTS score and tendency to panic. A supplemental analysis examined whether poor lung function may be a confounder and/or effect modifier of the effect of acute injury on PTS score and panic. Results Of those who completed psychological screening, 36.9% exhibited PTS symptoms. FEV1, acute injury, and the HPSI psychiatric subscale were independently associated with increased PTS score. Acute injury severity scale and female sex were associated with tendency to panic. Immediate acute injury severity and poor lung function later were independently associated with PTS symptomotology. Conclusions The high prevalence of PTS and endorsement of tendency to panic within our sample show a need for mental health treatment after a chemical hazard disaster. Mental health personnel should be considerate of those with serious physical injuries. PMID:22072223

  19. Treating Comorbid Panic Disorder in Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teng, Ellen J.; Bailey, Sara D.; Chaison, Angelic D.; Petersen, Nancy J.; Hamilton, Joseph D.; Dunn, Nancy Jo

    2008-01-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of panic control treatment (PCT) with that of a psychoeducational supportive treatment (PE-SUP) in treating panic disorder among a veteran sample with a primary diagnosis of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Thirty-five patients randomized to receive 10 individual sessions of either PCT or PE-SUP…

  20. Panic Disorder among American Indians: A Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neligh, Gordon; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Screening of 50 residents of Northwest Coast Indian villages found 7 cases of panic disorder with DSM-III criteria. Four of the seven had symptoms of alcohol abuse, and individuals with panic disorder reported more than twice the lifetime prevalence of depression compared to others. Contains 24 references. (SV)

  1. Mastery of Your Anxiety and Panic and brief therapist contact in the treatment of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Jeffrey E; Losee, Melinda C; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Maki, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-eight individuals with panic disorder were provided with a copy of Mastery of Your Anxiety and Panic II and received either four sessions of group cognitive-behavior therapy (Group) or one meeting with a therapist plus three telephone contacts (Telephone). Between group repeated measures analyses revealed significant improvement over the course of treatment and maintenance of gains over the follow-up period with few treatment by trials interactions. A higher percentage of participants in the Telephone condition achieved high end-state functioning status at posttreatment compared to those who participated in group CBT (72% vs. 24%), but this difference disappeared at 6 months posttreatment (45% vs. 55%). Participants with characteristics of either borderline, dependent, or depressive personality disorders, as assessed by the MCMI-III, were unlikely to achieve high end-state functioning status at posttreatment. Trends in the data suggest that participants who met criteria for panic disorder with agoraphobia, and those with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder, were also less likely to achieve clinically significant outcome. These findings add to the growing literature indicating that self-directed treatment with brief therapist contact is a viable option for many people with panic disorder. Furthermore, the study provides preliminary data suggesting that certain comorbid conditions negatively impact self-directed treatment outcome. PMID:15033211

  2. Hippocampal Neurochemical Pathology in Patients with Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Hanefi; Gurok, M. Gurkan; Akyol, Muammer; Koseoglu, Filiz

    2012-01-01

    Objective In the present study, we measured hippocampal N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA), choline (CHO) and creatine (CRE) values in patients with panic disorder and healthy control subjects using in vivo 1H MRS. Methods We scanned 20 patients meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV) criteria for panic disorder and 20 matched healthy controls with a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa Imaging System and measured of NAA, CHO, and CRE in hippocampal regions. Results When NAA, CHO and CRE values were compared between groups, statistically significant lower levels for all ones were detected for both sides. Conclusion Consequently, in the present study we found that NAA, CHO and CRE values of the patients with panic disorder were lower than those healthy controls. Future studies involving a large number of panic patients may shed further light on the generalizability of the current findings to persons with panic disorder. PMID:22707967

  3. The Reliability and Validity of the Panic Disorder Self-Report: A New Diagnostic Screening Measure of Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Michelle G.; Holmes, Marilyn; Zuellig, Andrea R.; Kachin, Kevin E.; Behar, Evelyn

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the Panic Disorder Self-Report (PDSR), a new self-report diagnostic measure of panic disorder based on the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 1994). PDSR diagnoses were compared with structured interview diagnoses of individuals with generalized anxiety…

  4. Panic as a form of foreclosed experience.

    PubMed

    Schneider, John A

    2007-10-01

    Following a discussion of panic states and their relationship to psychosomatic illness and related disorders, the author presents an extended clinical vignette in which he initially viewed the patient's intense anxiety as a manifestation of repressed conflict and, accordingly, used verbal interpretations as the principal mode of intervention. After this approach did not prove effective, the analyst began to make use of nonverbal interventions consistent with his emerging understanding of the patient's distress as a manifestation of the foreclosure (de M'Uzan 2003) and relegation to the body of undreamable experience (Bion 1962). PMID:18085012

  5. New segregation analysis of panic disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Vieland, V.J.; Fyer, A.J.; Chapman, T.

    1996-04-09

    We performed simple segregation analyses of panic disorder using 126 families of probands with DSM-III-R panic disorder who were ascertained for a family study of anxiety disorders at an anxiety disorders research clinic. We present parameter estimates for dominant, recessive, and arbitrary single major locus models without sex effects, as well as for a nongenetic transmission model, and compare these models to each other and to models obtained by other investigators. We rejected the nongenetic transmission model when comparing it to the recessive model. Consistent with some previous reports, we find comparable support for dominant and recessive models, and in both cases estimate nonzero phenocopy rates. The effect of restricting the analysis to families of probands without any lifetime history of comorbid major depression (MDD) was also examined. No notable differences in parameter estimates were found in that subsample, although the power of that analysis was low. Consistency between the findings in our sample and in another independently collected sample suggests the possibility of pooling such samples in the future in order to achieve the necessary power for more complex analyses. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Temperament, character traits, and alexithymia in patients with panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Izci, Filiz; Gültekin, Bulent Kadri; Saglam, Sema; Koc, Merve Iris; Zincir, Selma Bozkurt; Atmaca, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary aim of the present study was to compare temperament and character traits and levels of alexithymia between patients with panic disorder and healthy controls. Methods Sixty patients with panic disorder admitted to the psychiatry clinic at Fırat University Hospital were enrolled in the study, along with 62 healthy age-matched and sex-matched controls. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV axis I (SCID-I), Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and Panic Agoraphobia Scale (PAS) were administered to all subjects. Results Within the temperament dimension, the mean subscale score for harm avoidance was significantly higher in patients with panic disorder than in controls. With respect to character traits, mean scores for self-directedness and cooperativeness were significantly lower than in healthy controls. Rates of alexithymia were 35% (n=21) and 11.3% (n=7) in patients with panic disorder and healthy controls, respectively. The difficulty identifying feelings subscale score was significantly higher in patients with panic disorder (P=0.03). A moderate positive correlation was identified between PAS and TAS scores (r=0.447, P<0.01). Moderately significant positive correlations were also noted for PAS and TCI subscale scores and scores for novelty seeking, harm avoidance, and self-transcendence. Conclusion In our study sample, patients with panic disorder and healthy controls differed in TCI parameters and rate of alexithymia. Larger prospective studies are required to assess for causal associations. PMID:24876780

  7. Anticipating Economic Market Crises Using Measures of Collective Panic

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Predicting panic is of critical importance in many areas of human and animal behavior, notably in the context of economics. The recent financial crisis is a case in point. Panic may be due to a specific external threat or self-generated nervousness. Here we show that the recent economic crisis and earlier large single-day panics were preceded by extended periods of high levels of market mimicry—direct evidence of uncertainty and nervousness, and of the comparatively weak influence of external news. High levels of mimicry can be a quite general indicator of the potential for self-organized crises. PMID:26185988

  8. Role of endocannabinoid signalling in the dorsolateral periaqueductal grey in the modulation of distinct panic-like responses.

    PubMed

    Batista, Luara A; Bastos, Juliana R; Moreira, Fabricio A

    2015-03-01

    Panic attacks, a major feature of panic disorder, can be modelled in rats by exposing animals to stimuli that induce escape reactions, such as the elevated T-maze or the activation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal grey. Since the cannabinoid CB1 receptor modulates various types of aversive responses, this study tested the hypothesis that enhancement of endocannabinoid signalling in the dorsolateral periaqueductal grey inhibits panic-like reactions in rats. Local injection of the CB1 agonist, arachidonoyl 2-Chloroethylamide (0.005-0.5 pmol), attenuated the escape response from the open arm of the elevated T-maze, a panicolytic effect. The anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, URB597 (0.3-3 nmol), did not induce consistent results. In the test of dorsolateral periaqueductal grey stimulation with d,l-homocysteic acid, arachidonoyl 2-Chloroethylamide, at the lowest dose, attenuated the escape reaction. The highest dose of URB597 also inhibited this response, contrary to the result obtained in the elevated T-maze. This effect was reversed by the CB1 antagonist, AM251 (100 pmol). The present results confirm the anti-aversive property of direct CB1 receptor activation in the dorsolateral periaqueductal grey. The effect of the anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, however, could be detected only in a model employing direct stimulation of this structure. Altogether, these results suggest that anandamide signalling is recruited only under certain types of aversive stimuli. PMID:25601395

  9. Impaired cognitive reappraisal in panic disorder revealed by the late positive potential.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing-Wei; Xu, Jing; Chang, Yi; Wang, He; Yao, Hong; Tang, Di

    2016-01-20

    According to the cognitive model of panic disorder (PD), panic attacks are triggered and maintained by catastrophic misappraisals of bodily sensations. Clinically, PD is associated with impaired cognitive emotion regulation strategies involving cognitive reappraisal. To investigate the neural correlates and time course of cognitive reappraisal in patients with PD, event-related potentials were recorded from patients with PD and demographically matched control group during passive viewing of affective images under three conditions: (a) neutral pictures preceded by neutral descriptions, (b) unpleasant pictures preceded by negative descriptions, and (c) unpleasant pictures preceded by neutral descriptions. The late positive potential (LPP), an event-related potential component sensitive to cognitive change strategies, was examined as an index of cognitive reappraisal. Consistent with previous results, the unpleasant pictures preceded by negative descriptions had decreased valence ratings, increased arousal ratings, and increased LPP amplitudes compared with the unpleasant pictures preceded by neutral descriptions in the control group. In contrast, no reliable effect of description condition was observed for valence ratings in the PD group. The patients demonstrated differing response patterns from the control participants, with higher arousal ratings and larger LPPs during the 1000-2000 ms window when unpleasant pictures were preceded by a neutral description than when unpleasant pictures were preceded by a negative description. The present study suggests that emotion regulation is impaired in patients with PD. These findings describe the first electrophysiological correlates of abnormal cognitive reappraisal in patients with PD. PMID:26656936

  10. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle ...

  11. About Heart Attacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... survive. A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or ... survive. A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or ...

  12. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000166.htm Pericarditis - after heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... occur in the days or weeks following a heart attack. Causes Two types of pericarditis can occur after ...

  13. Agoraphobia Related to Unassertiveness in Panic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Levitan, Michelle Nigri; Simoes, Pedro; Sardinha, Aline G; Nardi, Antonio E

    2016-05-01

    Despite developments in panic disorder (PD) research, a significant percentage of patients do not benefit from conventional treatments. Interpersonal factors have been identified as potential predictors of treatment failures. We aimed to evaluate assertiveness in a sample of patients with PD and its implications for treatment. Forty-six symptomatic patients with PD and 46 college students responded to assessment scales regarding assertiveness and clinical data. Seventy-five percent of the patients had a secondary diagnosis of agoraphobia. We found that the PD group was characterized as nonassertive and slightly less assertive than control subjects. Furthermore, the deficit in the level of assertiveness correlated with the severity of the PD. The diagnosis of agoraphobia was correlated with unassertiveness (p < 0.05). Agoraphobia predisposes individuals to dependency and insecurity about their ability to overcome anxiogenic situations. These data demonstrate the importance of managing assertiveness in patients with PD accompanied by agoraphobia. PMID:26915016

  14. Panic evacuation of single pedestrians and couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, G. A.; Dorso, C. O.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the timing requirements for evacuation of people has focused primarily on independent pedestrians rather than pedestrians emotionally connected. However, the main statistical effects observed in crowds, the so-called “faster is slower”, “clever is not always better” and the “low visibility enhancement”, cannot explain the overall behavior of a crowd during an evacuation process when correlated pedestrians due to, for example feelings, are present. Our research addresses this issue and examines the statistical behavior of a mixture of individuals and couples during a (panic) escaping process. We found that the attractive feeling among couples plays an important role in the time delays during the evacuation of a single exit room.

  15. Understanding Anxiety Disorders: When Panic, Fear, and Worries Overwhelm

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Understanding Anxiety Disorders When Panic, Fear, and Worries Overwhelm Many ... or help us focus. But for people with anxiety disorders, they can be overwhelming. Anxiety disorders affect ...

  16. Arousal and the attentional network in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Maximilian J; Neufang, Susanne; Stein, Dan J; Domschke, Katharina

    2014-11-01

    Although a great deal of information about the neurobiology of panic disorder is now available, there is a need for an updated etiological model integrating recent findings on the neurobiology of the arousal system and its relationship with higher cortical functions in panic disorder. The current mini-review presents psychophysiological, molecular biological/genetic and functional neuroimaging evidence for dysfunction in major arousal systems of the brain. Such dysfunction may influence the development of panic disorder by precipitating autonomic bodily symptoms and at the same time increasing vigilance to these sensations by modulating cortical attentional networks. A multilevel model of arousal, attention and anxiety-including the norepinephrine, orexin, neuropeptide S and caffeine-related adenosine systems-may be useful in integrating a range of data available on the pathogenesis of panic disorder. PMID:25311787

  17. The brain acid-base homeostasis and serotonin: A perspective on the use of carbon dioxide as human and rodent experimental model of panic.

    PubMed

    Leibold, N K; van den Hove, D L A; Esquivel, G; De Cort, K; Goossens, L; Strackx, E; Buchanan, G F; Steinbusch, H W M; Lesch, K P; Schruers, K R J

    2015-06-01

    Panic attacks (PAs), the core feature of panic disorder, represent a common phenomenon in the general adult population and are associated with a considerable decrease in quality of life and high health care costs. To date, the underlying pathophysiology of PAs is not well understood. A unique feature of PAs is that they represent a rare example of a psychopathological phenomenon that can be reliably modeled in the laboratory in panic disorder patients and healthy volunteers. The most effective techniques to experimentally trigger PAs are those that acutely disturb the acid-base homeostasis in the brain: inhalation of carbon dioxide (CO2), hyperventilation, and lactate infusion. This review particularly focuses on the use of CO2 inhalation in humans and rodents as an experimental model of panic. Besides highlighting the different methodological approaches, the cardio-respiratory and the endocrine responses to CO2 inhalation are summarized. In addition, the relationships between CO2 level, changes in brain pH, the serotonergic system, and adaptive physiological and behavioral responses to CO2 exposure are presented. We aim to present an integrated psychological and neurobiological perspective. Remaining gaps in the literature and future perspectives are discussed. PMID:25930682

  18. “Nomophobia”: Impact of Cell Phone Use Interfering with Symptoms and Emotions of Individuals with Panic Disorder Compared with a Control Group

    PubMed Central

    King, Anna Lucia Spear; Valença, Alexandre Martins; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Sancassiani, Federica; Machado, Sergio; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder refers to the frequent and recurring acute attacks of anxiety. Objective: This study describes the routine use of mobiles phones (MPs) and investigates the appearance of possible emotional alterations or symptoms related to their use in patients with panic disorder (PD). Background: We compared patients with PD and agoraphobia being treated at the Panic and Respiration Laboratory of The Institute of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to a control group of healthy volunteers. Methods: An MP-use questionnaire was administered to a consecutive sample of 50 patients and 70 controls. Results: People with PD showed significant increases in anxiety, tachycardia, respiratory alterations, trembling, perspiration, panic, fear and depression related to the lack of an MP compared to the control group. Conclusions: Both groups exhibited dependence on and were comforted by having an MP; however, people with PD and agoraphobia showed significantly more emotional alterations as well as intense physical and psychological symptoms when they were apart from or unable to use an MP compared to healthy volunteers. PMID:24669231

  19. Avoidant coping in panic disorder: a yohimbine biological challenge study.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Johanna S; Arnkoff, Diane B; Glass, Carol R; Tinsley, Ruth; Geraci, Marilla; Hernandez, Elisa; Luckenbaugh, David; Drevets, Wayne C; Carlson, Paul J

    2012-07-01

    Few studies have addressed whether the use of avoidance-oriented coping strategies is related to the development of panic in patients with panic disorder(PD). Self-report, clinician-rated, and physiological data were collected from 42 individuals who participated in a yohimbine biological challenge study, performed under double-blind, placebo-controlled conditions. Participants included 20 healthy controls and 22 currently symptomatic patients who met DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for PD. Consistent with prediction, patients with PD who had higher perceived efficacy of avoidance-oriented strategies in reducing anxiety-related thoughts reported increased severity in panic symptoms during the yohimbine challenge condition as compared to the placebo. Further, patients with PD who had more fear of cognitive dyscontrol, cardiovascular symptoms, and publicly observable anxiety also reported increased severity in panic symptoms during the challenge. Healthy controls who had more fear of cardiovascular symptoms similarly reported increased severity in panic symptoms during the challenge. No effects were found for heart rate response to the challenge agent. These results provide support for the role of avoidance-oriented coping strategies and fear of anxiety-related symptoms as risk and maintenance factors in the development of panic symptoms, particularly within a biological challenge model. PMID:21864204

  20. Isolated sleep paralysis in African Americans with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Paradis, C M; Friedman, S; Hatch, M

    1997-01-01

    Isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) was assessed in African Americans and Whites diagnosed with panic disorder and other anxiety disorders. Participants were recruited from an outpatient clinic where they were diagnosed with panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, and simple phobia. Control groups of volunteers without a history of psychiatric disorder were included. All research participants completed a questionnaire to assess for ISP. Group differences were analysed through a series of chi-square analyses. The incidence of recurrent ISP was significantly higher in African Americans with panic disorder (59.6%) as compared with African Americans with other anxiety disorders (11.1%), African American control group participants (23%), Whites with panic disorder (7.5%), Whites with other anxiety disorders (0%), and White control group participants (6%). Recurrent ISP was found to be more common among African American participants, particularly for those with panic disorder. African Americans with panic disorder may experience recurrent ISP as a feature of their disorder. PMID:9231535

  1. [Diagnosis and management of panic disorder in psychiatry (PANDA Study)].

    PubMed

    Servant, D; Parquet, P J

    2000-01-01

    Panic disorder is a genuine public health problem given by their frequency and the various and repeated consultations that they involve. PD is underdiagnosed in primary care and in medical specialist. A public campaign might lead to improved diagnosis and better treatment of panic disorder, with a beneficial effect on medico-economic indicators. Intervention by the psychiatrist is of key importance, although it has not been evaluated to any great extend. The objective of the PANDA study was to look at the prevalence and diagnostic of panic disorder, the conditions of access to and use of care, as well as the method of treatment. Four hundred and twenty three psychiatrists participated in the study and 8,137 patients seen consecutively were included. The prevalence of actual panic disorder evaluated using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) systematic is 9%. In two third of cases coexisted agoraphobia and in one third a depression. Eighty six percent of patients with actual panic disorder were treated by the psychiatrists. The diagnosis and suitable treatment of panic disorder would appear to be a significant objective in term of public health, leading to a reduction in medical and social cost of this disorder. PMID:10858913

  2. Orbito-Frontal Cortex Volumes in Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Hanefi; Gurok, M. Gurkan; Akyol, Muammer

    2012-01-01

    Objective Given the association between the pathophysiology of panic disorder and prefrontal cortex function, we aimed to perform a volumetric MRI study in patients with panic disorder and healthy controls focusing on the in vivo neuroanatomy of the OFC. Methods Twenty right-handed patients with panic disorder and 20 right-handed healthy control subjects were studied. The volumes of whole brain, total white and gray matters, and OFC were measured by using T1-weighted coronal MRI images, with 1.5-mm-thick slices, at 1.5T. In addition, for psychological valuation, Hamilton Depression Rating (HDRS) and Panic Agoraphobia Scales (PAS) were administered. Results Unadjusted mean volumes of the whole brain volume, total white and gray matter were not different between the patients and healthy controls while the patient group had significantly smaller left (t=-6.70, p<0.0001) and right (t=-5.86, p<0.0001) OFC volumes compared with healthy controls. Conclusion Our findings indicate an alteration of OFC morphology in the panic disorder and suggest that OFC abnormalities may be involved in the pathophysiology of panic disorder. PMID:23251207

  3. Metabolic decoupling in daily life in patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Pfaltz, Monique C; Kolodyazhniy, Vitaliy; Blechert, Jens; Margraf, Jürgen; Grossman, Paul; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2015-09-01

    Various studies have assessed autonomic and respiratory underpinnings of panic attacks, yet the psychophysiological functioning of panic disorder (PD) patients has rarely been examined under naturalistic conditions at times when acute attacks were not reported. We hypothesized that emotional activation in daily life causes physiologically demonstrable deviations from efficient metabolic regulation in PD patients. Metabolic coupling was estimated as within-individual correlations between heart rate (HR) and indices of metabolic activity, i.e., physical activity (measured by 3-axial accelerometry, Acc), and minute ventilation (Vm, measured by calibrated inductive plethysmography, as proxy for oxygen consumption). A total of 565 daytime hours were recorded in 19 PD patients and 20 healthy controls (HC). Pairwise cross-correlations of minute-by-minute averages of these metabolic indices were calculated for each participant and then correlated with several indices of self-reported anxiety. Ambulatory HR was elevated in PD (p = .05, d = 0.67). Patients showed reduced HR-Acc (p < .006, d = 0.97) and HR-Vm coupling (p < .009, d = 0.91). Combining Vm and Acc to predict HR showed the strongest group separation (p < .002, d = 1.07). Discriminant analyses, based on the combination of Vm and Acc to predict HR, classified 77% of all participants correctly. In PD, HR-Acc coupling was inversely related to trait anxiety sensitivity, as well as tonic and phasic daytime anxiety. The novel method that was used demonstrates that anxiety in PD may reduce efficient long-term metabolic coupling. Metabolic decoupling may serve as physiological characteristic of PD and might aid diagnostics for PD and other anxiety disorders. This measure deserves further study in research on health consequences of anxiety and psychosocial stress. PMID:26028550

  4. Seven Deadliest Network Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Prowell, Stacy J; Borkin, Michael; Kraus, Robert

    2010-05-01

    Do you need to keep up with the latest hacks, attacks, and exploits effecting networks? Then you need "Seven Deadliest Network Attacks". This book pinpoints the most dangerous hacks and exploits specific to networks, laying out the anatomy of these attacks including how to make your system more secure. You will discover the best ways to defend against these vicious hacks with step-by-step instruction and learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable. Attacks detailed in this book include: Denial of Service; War Dialing; Penetration 'Testing'; Protocol Tunneling; Spanning Tree Attacks; Man-in-the-Middle; and, Password Replay. Knowledge is power, find out about the most dominant attacks currently waging war on computers and networks globally. Discover the best ways to defend against these vicious attacks; step-by-step instruction shows you how. Institute countermeasures, don't be caught defenseless again, learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable.

  5. Functional MRI activation in response to panic-specific, non-panic aversive, and neutral pictures in patients with panic disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Engel, K R; Obst, K; Bandelow, B; Dechent, P; Gruber, O; Zerr, I; Ulrich, K; Wedekind, D

    2016-09-01

    There is evidence that besides limbic brain structures, prefrontal and insular cortical activations and deactivations are involved in the pathophysiology of panic disorder. This study investigated activation response patterns to stimulation with individually selected panic-specific pictures in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and healthy control subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Structures of interest were the prefrontal, cingulate, and insular cortex, and the amygdalo-hippocampal complex. Nineteen PDA subjects (10 females, 9 males) and 21 healthy matched controls were investigated using a Siemens 3-Tesla scanner. First, PDA subjects gave Self-Assessment Manikin (SAM) ratings on 120 pictures showing characteristic panic/agoraphobia situations, of which 20 pictures with the individually highest SAM ratings were selected. Twenty matched pictures showing aversive but not panic-specific stimuli and 80 neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System were chosen for each subject as controls. Each picture was shown twice in each of four subsequent blocks. Anxiety and depression ratings were recorded before and after the experiment. Group comparisons revealed a significantly greater activation in PDA patients than control subjects in the insular cortices, left inferior frontal gyrus, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, the left hippocampal formation, and left caudatum, when PA and N responses were compared. Comparisons for stimulation with unspecific aversive pictures showed activation of similar brain regions in both groups. Results indicate region-specific activations to panic-specific picture stimulation in PDA patients. They also imply dysfunctionality in the processing of interoceptive cues in PDA and the regulation of negative emotionality. Therefore, differences in the functional networks between PDA patients and control subjects should be further investigated. PMID:26585457

  6. New-onset panic, depression with suicidal thoughts, and somatic symptoms in a patient with a history of lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Garakani, Amir; Mitton, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    Lyme Disease, or Lyme Borreliosis, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and spread by ticks, is mainly known to cause arthritis and neurological disorders but can also cause psychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety. We present a case of a 37-year-old man with no known psychiatric history who developed panic attacks, severe depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation, and neuromuscular complaints including back spasms, joint pain, myalgias, and neuropathic pain. These symptoms began 2 years after being successfully treated for a positive Lyme test after receiving a tick bite. During inpatient psychiatric hospitalization his psychiatric and physical symptoms did not improve with antidepressant and anxiolytic treatments. The patient's panic attacks resolved after he was discharged and then, months later, treated with long-term antibiotics for suspected "chronic Lyme Disease" (CLD) despite having negative Lyme titers. He however continued to have subsyndromal depressive symptoms and chronic physical symptoms such as fatigue, myalgias, and neuropathy. We discuss the controversy surrounding the diagnosis of CLD and concerns and considerations in the treatment of suspected CLD patients with comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:25922779

  7. New-Onset Panic, Depression with Suicidal Thoughts, and Somatic Symptoms in a Patient with a History of Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garakani, Amir; Mitton, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Lyme Disease, or Lyme Borreliosis, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and spread by ticks, is mainly known to cause arthritis and neurological disorders but can also cause psychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety. We present a case of a 37-year-old man with no known psychiatric history who developed panic attacks, severe depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation, and neuromuscular complaints including back spasms, joint pain, myalgias, and neuropathic pain. These symptoms began 2 years after being successfully treated for a positive Lyme test after receiving a tick bite. During inpatient psychiatric hospitalization his psychiatric and physical symptoms did not improve with antidepressant and anxiolytic treatments. The patient's panic attacks resolved after he was discharged and then, months later, treated with long-term antibiotics for suspected “chronic Lyme Disease” (CLD) despite having negative Lyme titers. He however continued to have subsyndromal depressive symptoms and chronic physical symptoms such as fatigue, myalgias, and neuropathy. We discuss the controversy surrounding the diagnosis of CLD and concerns and considerations in the treatment of suspected CLD patients with comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:25922779

  8. Current pharmacological interventions in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Freire, Rafael C; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the recent evidences regarding the pharmacological treatment of panic disorder (PD). The authors performed a review of the literature regarding the pharmacological treatment of PD since the year 2000. The research done in the last decade brought strong evidences of effectiveness for paroxetine, venlafaxine, sertraline, fluvoxamine, citalopram, fluoxetine, clonazepam, and the relatively novel agent escitalopram. There are evidences indicating that the other new compounds inositol, duloxetine, mirtazapine, milnacipran, and nefazodone have antipanic properties and may be effective compounds in the treatment of PD. The effectiveness of reboxetine and anticonvulsants is a subject of controversy. In addition to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, benzodiazepines and atypical antipsychotics may be valid alternatives in the treatment of PD. Recent data indicate that augmentation strategies with aripiprazole, olanzapine, pindolol or clonazepam may be effective. D-cycloserine is a promising agent in the augmentation of cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:24923349

  9. The panic disorder screener (PADIS): Development of an accurate and brief population screening tool.

    PubMed

    Batterham, Philip J; Mackinnon, Andrew J; Christensen, Helen

    2015-07-30

    The Panic Disorder Screener (PADIS) was developed as a new screener to identify panic disorder in the community and to assess severity of symptoms. The PADIS was developed to fill a gap in existing screening measures, as there are no brief panic screeners available that assess severity. The current study aimed to test the performance of the screener relative to the Patient Health Questionnaire-panic scale (PHQ-panic). The 4-item PADIS was administered to 12,336 young Australian adults, together with the PHQ-panic. A subsample of 1674 participants also completed a phone-based clinical interview to determine whether they met DSM-IV criteria for panic disorder. The PADIS (77% sensitivity, 84% specificity) had higher sensitivity for identifying panic disorder based on clinical criteria than the PHQ-panic (57% sensitivity, 91% specificity), although with reduced specificity. Administration of the PADIS required a mean of 1.9 items, compared to 4.7 items for the PHQ-panic. Each one-point increase in PADIS score was associated with 69% increased odds of meeting clinical criteria for panic disorder. The PADIS was found to be a valid, reliable and brief panic screener that is freely available for use in research and clinical settings. PMID:25956758

  10. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Panic Disorder with Secondary Major Depression: A Preliminary Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laberge, Benoit; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated extent to which cognitive-behavioral therapy can be used successfully in treatment of secondary depressed panic patients. Findings from eight panic patients with major depression and seven panic patients without major depression showed that cognitive-behavioral therapy was significantly superior to information-based therapy in…

  11. The Influence of Hurricane Exposure and Anxiety Sensitivity on Panic Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley-Maloney, Lauren; Varela, R. Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Trauma exposure has been associated with panic symptoms in adult samples, but little is known about the relationship between trauma and panic in children. Anxiety sensitivity (AS), or the fear of anxiety-related bodily sensations, may help explain the relationship between trauma and panic. To examine relationships among trauma, anxiety…

  12. Decreased mean platelet volume in panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Göğçegöz Gül, Işıl; Eryılmaz, Gül; Özten, Eylem; Hızlı Sayar, Gökben

    2014-01-01

    Aim The relationship between psychological stress and platelet activation has been widely studied. It is well known that platelets may reflect certain biochemical changes that occur in the brain when different mental conditions occur. Platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is also extensively studied in psychiatry. The mean platelet volume (MPV), the accurate measure of platelet size, has been considered a marker and determinant of platelet function. The aim of the present study was to search for any probable difference in the MPV of subjects with panic disorder (PD). Methods A total of 37 drug-free subjects, aged 18 to 65 years, diagnosed with PD, with or without agoraphobia, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria and 45 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Platelet count and MPV were measured and recorded for each subject. Results There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of female/male ratio, age, or body mass index between the PD group and control group (P=0.91, P=0.82, and P=0.93, respectively). The MPV was found to be significantly lower in the PD group compared with the control group (8.8±0.9 fL vs 9.2±0.8 fL; P=0.02). All the participants had MPV values in the standard range of 6.9–10.8 fL. Conclusion We concluded that abnormalities of the 5-HT1A receptor function in the central nervous system of subjects with a diagnosis of PD are also mirrored in as an alteration in platelet activity. Measurements of platelet activity may be used as a tool for neuropsychiatric and psychopharmacological research and for studying how certain mental diseases and medications affect the central nervous system. PMID:25214790

  13. Advanced PANIC quick-look tool using Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, José-Miguel; García Segura, Antonio J.; Storz, Clemens; Fried, Josef W.; Fernández, Matilde; Rodríguez Gómez, Julio F.; Terrón, V.; Cárdenas, M. C.

    2012-09-01

    PANIC, the Panoramic Near Infrared Camera, is an instrument for the Calar Alto Observatory currently being integrated in laboratory and whose first light is foreseen for end 2012 or early 2013. We present here how the PANIC Quick-Look tool (PQL) and pipeline (PAPI) are being implemented, using existing rapid programming Python technologies and packages, together with well-known astronomical software suites (Astromatic, IRAF) and parallel processing techniques. We will briefly describe the structure of the PQL tool, whose main characteristics are the use of the SQLite database and PyQt, a Python binding of the GUI toolkit Qt.

  14. MAOA and mechanisms of panic disorder revisited: from bench to molecular psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reif, A; Richter, J; Straube, B; Höfler, M; Lueken, U; Gloster, A T; Weber, H; Domschke, K; Fehm, L; Ströhle, A; Jansen, A; Gerlach, A; Pyka, M; Reinhardt, I; Konrad, C; Wittmann, A; Pfleiderer, B; Alpers, G W; Pauli, P; Lang, T; Arolt, V; Wittchen, H-U; Hamm, A; Kircher, T; Deckert, J

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG) is a prevalent mental disorder featuring a substantial complex genetic component. At present, only a few established risk genes exist. Among these, the gene encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is noteworthy given that genetic variation has been demonstrated to influence gene expression and monoamine levels. Long alleles of the MAOA-uVNTR promoter polymorphism are associated with PD/AG and correspond with increased enzyme activity. Here, we have thus investigated the impact of MAOA-uVNTR on therapy response, behavioral avoidance and brain activity in fear conditioning in a large controlled and randomized multicenter study on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in PD/AG. The study consisted of 369 PD/AG patients, and genetic information was available for 283 patients. Carriers of the risk allele had significantly worse outcome as measured by the Hamilton Anxiety scale (46% responders vs 67%, P=0.017). This was accompanied by elevated heart rate and increased fear during an anxiety-provoking situation, that is, the behavioral avoidance task. All but one panic attack that happened during this task occurred in risk allele carriers and, furthermore, risk allele carriers did not habituate to the situation during repetitive exposure. Finally, functional neuroimaging during a classical fear conditioning paradigm evidenced that the protective allele is associated with increased activation of the anterior cingulate cortex upon presentation of the CS+ during acquisition of fear. Further differentiation between high- and low-risk subjects after treatment was observed in the inferior parietal lobes, suggesting differential brain activation patterns upon CBT. Taken together, we established that a genetic risk factor for PD/AG is associated with worse response to CBT and identify potential underlying neural mechanisms. These findings might govern how psychotherapy can include genetic information to tailor individualized treatment approaches

  15. MAOA gene hypomethylation in panic disorder—reversibility of an epigenetic risk pattern by psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, C; Richter, J; Mahr, M; Gajewska, A; Schiele, M A; Gehrmann, A; Schmidt, B; Lesch, K-P; Lang, T; Helbig-Lang, S; Pauli, P; Kircher, T; Reif, A; Rief, W; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, A N; Arolt, V; Wittchen, H-U; Hamm, A O; Deckert, J; Domschke, K

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic signatures such as methylation of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene have been found to be altered in panic disorder (PD). Hypothesizing temporal plasticity of epigenetic processes as a mechanism of successful fear extinction, the present psychotherapy-epigenetic study for we believe the first time investigated MAOA methylation changes during the course of exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in PD. MAOA methylation was compared between N=28 female Caucasian PD patients (discovery sample) and N=28 age- and sex-matched healthy controls via direct sequencing of sodium bisulfite-treated DNA extracted from blood cells. MAOA methylation was furthermore analyzed at baseline (T0) and after a 6-week CBT (T1) in the discovery sample parallelized by a waiting time in healthy controls, as well as in an independent sample of female PD patients (N=20). Patients exhibited lower MAOA methylation than healthy controls (P<0.001), and baseline PD severity correlated negatively with MAOA methylation (P=0.01). In the discovery sample, MAOA methylation increased up to the level of healthy controls along with CBT response (number of panic attacks; T0–T1: +3.37±2.17%), while non-responders further decreased in methylation (−2.00±1.28% P=0.001). In the replication sample, increases in MAOA methylation correlated with agoraphobic symptom reduction after CBT (P=0.02–0.03). The present results support previous evidence for MAOA hypomethylation as a PD risk marker and suggest reversibility of MAOA hypomethylation as a potential epigenetic correlate of response to CBT. The emerging notion of epigenetic signatures as a mechanism of action of psychotherapeutic interventions may promote epigenetic patterns as biomarkers of lasting extinction effects. PMID:27045843

  16. MAOA gene hypomethylation in panic disorder-reversibility of an epigenetic risk pattern by psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C; Richter, J; Mahr, M; Gajewska, A; Schiele, M A; Gehrmann, A; Schmidt, B; Lesch, K-P; Lang, T; Helbig-Lang, S; Pauli, P; Kircher, T; Reif, A; Rief, W; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, A N; Arolt, V; Wittchen, H-U; Hamm, A O; Deckert, J; Domschke, K

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic signatures such as methylation of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene have been found to be altered in panic disorder (PD). Hypothesizing temporal plasticity of epigenetic processes as a mechanism of successful fear extinction, the present psychotherapy-epigenetic study for we believe the first time investigated MAOA methylation changes during the course of exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in PD. MAOA methylation was compared between N=28 female Caucasian PD patients (discovery sample) and N=28 age- and sex-matched healthy controls via direct sequencing of sodium bisulfite-treated DNA extracted from blood cells. MAOA methylation was furthermore analyzed at baseline (T0) and after a 6-week CBT (T1) in the discovery sample parallelized by a waiting time in healthy controls, as well as in an independent sample of female PD patients (N=20). Patients exhibited lower MAOA methylation than healthy controls (P<0.001), and baseline PD severity correlated negatively with MAOA methylation (P=0.01). In the discovery sample, MAOA methylation increased up to the level of healthy controls along with CBT response (number of panic attacks; T0-T1: +3.37±2.17%), while non-responders further decreased in methylation (-2.00±1.28%; P=0.001). In the replication sample, increases in MAOA methylation correlated with agoraphobic symptom reduction after CBT (P=0.02-0.03). The present results support previous evidence for MAOA hypomethylation as a PD risk marker and suggest reversibility of MAOA hypomethylation as a potential epigenetic correlate of response to CBT. The emerging notion of epigenetic signatures as a mechanism of action of psychotherapeutic interventions may promote epigenetic patterns as biomarkers of lasting extinction effects. PMID:27045843

  17. Signs of a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack Heart Health and Stroke Signs of a heart attack Related information Make the Call. Don't Miss ... to top More information on Signs of a heart attack Read more from womenshealth.gov Make the Call, ...

  18. The RS685012 Polymorphism of ACCN2, the Human Ortholog of Murine Acid-Sensing Ion Channel (ASIC1) Gene, is Highly Represented in Patients with Panic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Gugliandolo, Agnese; Gangemi, Chiara; Caccamo, Daniela; Currò, Monica; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Quattrone, Diego; Crucitti, Manuela; Zoccali, Rocco Antonio; Bruno, Antonio; Muscatello, Maria Rosaria Anna

    2016-03-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a disabling anxiety disorder that is characterized by unexpected, recurrent panic attacks, associated with fear of dying and worrying about possible future attacks or other behavioral changes as a consequence of the attacks. The acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are a family of proton-sensing channels expressed throughout the nervous system. Their activity is linked to a variety of behaviors including fear, anxiety, pain, depression, learning, and memory. The human analog of ASIC1a is the amiloride-sensitive cation channel 2 (ACCN2). Adenosine A2A receptors are suggested to play an important role in different brain circuits and pathways involved in anxiety reactions. In this work we aimed to evaluate the distribution of ACCN2 rs685012 and ADORA2A rs2298383 polymorphisms in PD patients compared with healthy subjects. We found no association between ADORA2A polymorphism and PD. Instead, the C mutated allele for ACCN2 rs685012 polymorphism was significantly more frequent in patients than in controls. On the contrary, the TT homozygous wild-type genotype and also the ACCN2 TT/ADORA2A CT diplotype were significantly more represented in controls. These results are suggestive for a role of ACCN2 rs685012 polymorphism in PD development in Caucasian people. PMID:26589317

  19. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    Dressler syndrome; Post-MI pericarditis; Post-cardiac injury syndrome; Postcardiotomy pericarditis ... Two types of pericarditis can occur after a heart attack . Early pericarditis: This form most occurs within ...

  20. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (updating the 2007 guideline and replacing the 2011 ...

  1. Adaptation of Panic-Related Psychopathology Measures to Russian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotov, Roman; Schmidt, Norman B.; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Vinogradov, Alexander; Antipova, Anna V.

    2005-01-01

    The study reports results of adaptation of panic-related psychopathology measures to Russian, including the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ), and the Mobility Inventory for Agoraphobia (MIA). Psychometric properties (e.g., reliability, factor structure, endorsement) and external validity of the…

  2. Untangling genetic networks of panic, phobia, fear and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Villafuerte, Sandra; Burmeister, Margit

    2003-01-01

    As is the case for normal individual variation in anxiety levels, the conditions panic disorder, agoraphobia and other phobias have a significant genetic basis. Recent reports have started to untangle the genetic relationships between predispositions to anxiety and anxiety disorders. PMID:12914652

  3. Interoceptive Assessment and Exposure in Panic Disorder: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Trakowski, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) protocols for panic disorder (PD) typically include some form of interoceptive exposure (IE)--repeated exposure to internal sensations. Despite the widespread clinical use of IE, there is a notable absence of empirical reports about the nature of interoceptive assessments and IE. The present study was designed…

  4. A Meta-Analysis of Treatments for Panic Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clum, George A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Used metanalysis to compare effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological treatments for panic disorder. Percentage of agoraphobic subjects in sample and duration of illness were unrelated to effect size (ES). Psychological coping strategies involving relaxation training, cognitive restructuring, and exposure yielded most consistent ESs;…

  5. Mental, Emotional and Behavior Disorders in Children and Adolescents. Factsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Mental Health Services.

    This factsheet describes the different mental, emotional, and behavior problems that can occur during childhood and adolescence. The incidence and symptoms of the following disorders are discussed: (1) anxiety disorders (including phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder);…

  6. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2 allosteric potentiators prevent sodium lactate-induced panic-like response in panic-vulnerable rats

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip L; Fitz, Stephanie D; Engleman, Eric A; Svensson, Kjell A; Schkeryantz, Jeffrey M; Shekhar, Anantha

    2015-01-01

    Rats with chronic inhibition of GABA synthesis by infusion of l-allyglycine, a glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibitor, into their dorsomedial/perifornical hypothalamus are anxious and exhibit panic-like cardio-respiratory responses to treatment with intravenous (i.v.) sodium lactate (NaLac) infusions, in a manner similar to what occurs in patients with panic disorder. We previously showed that either NMDA receptor antagonists or metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2/3 receptor agonists can block such a NaLac response, suggesting that a glutamate mechanism is contributing to this panic-like state. Using this animal model of panic, we tested the efficacy of CBiPES and THIIC, which are selective group II metabotropic glutamate type 2 receptor allosteric potentiators (at 10–30mg/kg i.p.), in preventing NaLac-induced panic-like behavioral and cardiovascular responses. The positive control was alprazolam (3mg/kg i.p.), a clinically effective anti-panic benzodiazepine. As predicted, panic-prone rats given a NaLac challenge displayed NaLac-induced panic-like cardiovascular (i.e. tachycardia and hypertensive) responses and “anxiety” (i.e. decreased social interaction time) and “flight” (i.e. increased locomotion) -associated behaviors; however, systemic injection of the panic-prone rats with CBiPES, THIIC or alprazolam prior to the NaLac dose blocked all NaLac-induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses. These data suggested that in a rat animal model, selective group II metabotropic glutamate type 2 receptor allosteric potentiators show an anti-panic efficacy similar to alprazolam. PMID:22914798

  7. Automatic associations and panic disorder: Trajectories of change over the course of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Teachman, Bethany A.; Marker, Craig D.; Smith-Janik, Shannan B.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive models of anxiety and panic suggest that symptom reduction during treatment should be preceded by changes in cognitive processing, including modifying the anxious schema. The current study tests these hypotheses by using a repeated measures design to evaluate whether the trajectory of change in automatic panic associations over the course of 12-week cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is related to the trajectory of change in panic symptoms. Individuals with panic disorder (N=43) completed a measure of automatic panic associations (the Implicit Association Test, which reflects elements of the schema construct) every three weeks over the course of therapy, and measures of panic symptoms each week. Dynamic bivariate latent difference score modeling indicated that automatic panic associations not only changed over the course of CBT for panic disorder, but showed these changes were correlated with symptom reduction. Moreover, change in automatic panic associations was a significant predictor of change in panic symptom severity. These findings permit inferences about the temporality of change, suggesting that cognitive change does in fact precede and contribute to symptom change. PMID:19045967

  8. Collaborative Attack vs. Collaborative Defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shouhuai

    We have witnessed many attacks in the cyberspace. However, most attacks are launched by individual attackers even though an attack may involve many compromised computers. In this paper, we envision what we believe to be the next generation cyber attacks — collaborative attacks. Collaborative attacks can be launched by multiple attackers (i.e., human attackers or criminal organizations), each of which may have some specialized expertise. This is possible because cyber attacks can become very sophisticated and specialization of attack expertise naturally becomes relevant. To counter collaborative attacks, we might need collaborative defense because each “chain” in a collaborative attack may be only adequately dealt with by a different defender. In order to understand collaborative attack and collaborative defense, we present a high-level abstracted framework for evaluating the effectiveness of collaborative defense against collaborative attacks. As a first step towards realizing and instantiating the framework, we explore a characterization of collaborative attacks and collaborative defense from the relevant perspectives.

  9. Internet Administration of Three Commonly Used Questionnaires in Panic Research: Equivalence to Paper Administration in Australian and Swedish Samples of People With Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, David W.; Carlbring, Per; Richards, Jeffrey C.; Andersson, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the degree of equivalence between paper and Internet administration of three measures of panic and agoraphobia-related cognition and behavior: Body Sensations Questionnaire (BSQ), Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ), and Mobility Inventory (MI). Participants were 110 people with panic disorder who had registered for an…

  10. A fatal elephant attack.

    PubMed

    Hejna, Petr; Zátopková, Lenka; Safr, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    A rare case of an elephant attack is presented. A 44-year-old man working as an elephant keeper was attacked by a cow elephant when he tripped over a foot chain while the animal was being medically treated. The man fell down and was consequently repeatedly attacked with elephant tusks. The man sustained multiple stab injuries to both groin regions, a penetrating injury to the abdominal wall with traumatic prolapse of the loops of the small bowel, multiple defects of the mesentery, and incomplete laceration of the abdominal aorta with massive bleeding into the abdominal cavity. In addition to the penetrating injuries, the man sustained multiple rib fractures with contusion of both lungs and laceration of the right lobe of the liver, and comminuted fractures of the pelvic arch and left femoral body. The man died shortly after he had been received at the hospital. The cause of death was attributed to traumatic shock. PMID:22085093

  11. It is never too late to treat anxiety neurosis or panic disorder with a serotonin-reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bech, Per; Lindberg, Lone

    2014-08-01

    In a register study on patients hospitalized in the 1950s for anxiety neurosis, going until 1994 for diagnostic behaviour and until 2004 for suicidal behaviour, we found a co-existence with depression. However, the study has no information about therapy. Just after the finalization of this study, one of the patients was hospitalized in our department for depression. At that time the patient was 70 years old; at his index hospitalization in 1954 he was 30 years of age. Throughout his 40 years of illness he had received no psychiatric treatment. The spontaneous course went from panic attacks through stages of phobia and avoidance behaviour until the final stage of depression. At 70 years of age, for the first time in his life, he received antidepressant medication in the form of a specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitor. After 6 weeks of therapy not only the depression but also the anxiety disorder remitted. PMID:25988044

  12. Follow-up status of patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries and panic disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Beitman, B.D.; Kushner, M.G.; Basha, I.; Lamberti, J.; Mukerji, V.; Bartels, K. )

    1991-03-27

    Cardiology patients with normal coronary angiography demonstrate continuing and substantial social, health, and work disability. The authors hypothesized that the diagnosis of panic disorder would mark those for whom continuing disability is most likely. They interviewed 72 such patients at the time of their normal angiogram, and then again an average of 38 months later. Those with panic disorder (n=36) demonstrated significantly more disability at follow-up than did the other study patients. They conclude that those patients with normal angiograms who have panic disorder are more disabled than those who do not have panic disorder. Panic disorder in psychiatric samples has been shown to be highly treatable. Therefore, early identification and treatment of panic disorder in this group is likely to minimize the suffering associated with this condition.

  13. Fatal crocodile attack.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Shee, Biplab; Sukul, Biswajit

    2013-11-01

    Attacks on human beings by various animals leading to varied types of injuries and even death in some cases are not uncommon. Crocodile attacks on humans have been reported from a number of countries across the globe. Deaths in such attacks are mostly due to mechanical injuries or drowning. Bites by the crocodiles often cause the limbs to be separated from the body. The present case refers to an incident of a fatal attack by a crocodile on a 35 years old female where only the mutilated head of the female was recovered. Multiple lacerated wounds over the face and scalp along with fracture of the cranial bones was detected on autopsy. Two distinct bite marks in the form of punched in holes were noted over the parietal and frontal bones. Injuries on the head with its traumatic amputation from the body were sufficient to cause death. However, the presence of other fatal injuries on the unrecovered body parts could not be ruled out. PMID:24237838

  14. Word Attack Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follettie, Joseph F.

    A limited analysis of alternative approaches to phonemic-level word attack instruction is provided in this document. The instruction segment begins with training in letter-sound correspondences for which mastery of certain skills is assumed. Instruction ends with the decoding of novel items having a consonant-vowel-consonant construction. Contents…

  15. Transient Ischemic Attack

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to call 9-1-1 immediately for any stroke symptoms. Popular Topics TIA Cardiac Catheter Cholesterol Heart Attack Stent The content in this library is for educational purposes only, and therefore is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

  16. Occurrence of the Cys311 DRD2 variant in a pedigree multiply affected with panic disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.; Hoyne, J.; Diaz, P.

    1995-08-14

    Following the detection of the rare DRD2 codon 311 variant (Ser{yields}Cys) in an affected member from a large, multiply affected panic disorder family, we investigated the occurrence of this variant in other family members. The variant occurred in both affected and unaffected individuals. Further screening in panic disorder sib pairs unrelated to this family failed to detect the Cys311 variant. Our data suggests that this variant has no pathogenic role in panic disorder. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Ketamine use in Taiwan: Moral panic, civilizing processes, and democratization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Liang-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Ketamine use among young people in Taiwan has increased in recent years. Believing ketamine users to be a threat to social order and harsh punishment to be a deterrent, some legislators have called for upgrading ketamine use to a more serious criminal offence. These calls have been repeatedly rebuffed by the advisory council which sets drug policy, suggesting that the perceived problem does not correlate to the actual one. In this commentary, I argue that the calls of legislators constitute a 'moral panic,' and follow Rohloff (2011) in connecting the phenomenon to Elias' (2000) concept of civilizing and decivilizing processes. In addition, I demonstrate that moral panic - in the ketamine case at least - is shaped by the legacy of authoritarianism. PMID:24975444

  18. [An ambulatory model for treatment of panic and agoraphobia].

    PubMed

    Martinsen, E W

    1990-11-30

    The article describes an 11-session outpatient treatment programme in groups for patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia. The main components are cognitive-behavioural therapy and use of tricyclic antidepressives. Preliminary results after the first year of this programme indicate that most patients were much improved after completing the programme, and most of them had maintained their gains at follow-up. PMID:2274947

  19. Perception of early parenting in panic and agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Faravelli, C; Panichi, C; Pallanti, S; Paterniti, S; Grecu, L M; Rivelli, S

    1991-07-01

    Thirty-two patients with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of panic disorder (PD) were administered the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), a 25-item self-report questionnaire devised to evaluate parental rearing practices. Compared with 32 matched healthy controls, PD patients scored both their parents as being significantly less caring and more overprotective. Moreover, the consistency of parental attitudes between the 2 parents was significantly lower, indicating lesser uniformity in the rearing patterns. PMID:1927567

  20. Impact of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on Intolerance of Uncertainty in Patients with Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kuk; Lee, Kang Soo; Kim, Borah; Choi, Tai Kiu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is a transdiagnostic construct in various anxiety and depressive disorders. However, the relationship between IU and panic symptom severity is not yet fully understood. We examined the relationship between IU, panic, and depressive symptoms during mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in patients with panic disorder. Methods We screened 83 patients with panic disorder and subsequently enrolled 69 of them in the present study. Patients participating in MBCT for panic disorder were evaluated at baseline and at 8 weeks using the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS), Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report (PDSS-SR), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results There was a significant decrease in scores on the IUS (p<0.001), PDSS (p<0.001), and BDI (p<0.001) following MBCT for panic disorder. Pre-treatment IUS scores significantly correlated with pre-treatment PDSS (p=0.003) and BDI (p=0.003) scores. We also found a significant association between the reduction in IU and PDSS after controlling for the reduction in the BDI score (p<0.001). Conclusion IU may play a critical role in the diagnosis and treatment of panic disorder. MBCT is effective in lowering IU in patients with panic disorder. PMID:27081380

  1. The making of a germ panic, then and now.

    PubMed Central

    Tomes, N

    2000-01-01

    Over the last 2 decades, a heightened interest in germs has been evident in many aspects of American popular culture, including news coverage, advertisements, and entertainment media. Although clearly a response to the AIDS epidemic and other recent disease outbreaks, current obsessions with germs have some striking parallels with a similar period of intense anxiety about disease germs that occurred between 1900 and 1940. A comparison of these 2 periods of germ "panic" suggests some of the long-term cultural trends that contributed to their making. Both germ panics reflected anxieties about societal incorporation, associated with expanding markets, transportation networks, and mass immigration. They were also shaped by new trends in public health education, journalism, advertising, and entertainment media. In comparison to the first germ panic, the current discourse about the "revenge of the superbugs" is considerably more pessimistic because of increasing worries about the environment, suspicions of governmental authority, and distrust of expert knowledge. Yet, as popular anxieties about infectious disease have increased, public health scientists have been attracting favorable coverage in their role as "medical detectives" on the trail of the "killer germ." PMID:10667179

  2. Brief cognitive therapy for panic disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Clark, D M; Salkovskis, P M; Hackmann, A; Wells, A; Ludgate, J; Gelder, M

    1999-08-01

    Cognitive therapy (CT) is a specific and highly effective treatment for panic disorder (PD). Treatment normally involves 12-15 1-hr sessions. In an attempt to produce a more cost-effective version, a briefer treatment that made extensive use of between-sessions patient self-study modules was created. Forty-three PD patients were randomly allocated to full CT (FCT), brief CT (BCT), or a 3-month wait list. FCT and BCT were superior to wait list on all measures, and the gains obtained in treatment were maintained at 12-month follow-up. There were no significant differences between FCT and BCT. Both treatments had large (approximately 3.0) and essentially identical effect sizes. BCT required 6.5 hr of therapist time, including booster sessions. Patients' initial expectation of therapy success was negatively correlated with posttreatment panic-anxiety. Cognitive measures at the end of treatment predicted panic-anxiety at 12-month follow-up. PMID:10450630

  3. Modeling and simulating for congestion pedestrian evacuation with panic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinhuan; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Qiongyu; Yang, Peng; Hu, Xiaoming

    2015-06-01

    A new multi-agent based congestion evacuation model incorporating panic behavior is proposed in this paper for simulating pedestrian evacuation in public places such as a stadium. Different from the existing results, pedestrians in this model are divided into four classes and each pedestrian's status can be either normal, being overtaken, or casualty. The direction of action for each individual is affected by competitive ability, distance to the exits as well as number and density of occupants within the view field of the agent. Our simulations exhibit that during the evacuation process: (1) The agents gather in front of the exits spontaneously and present arched shapes close to the exits. (2) Under the panic state the agents cohere closely and almost do not change the target exit. So other alternative exits are ignored. (3) For the case without obstacle, the casualties under panic increase greatly. But if there are obstacles (chairs), the congestion can be alleviated. Thus the casualties are reduced. (4) If certain exit is partly clogged, the evacuation becomes more efficient when adding a virtual leader. The overall simulation results show that the proposed model can reproduce the real evacuation process in a stadium quite well.

  4. Evacuation of Pedestrians with Two Motion Modes for Panic System.

    PubMed

    Zou, You; Xie, Jiarong; Wang, Binghong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have captured an underlying mechanism of emergence of collective panic in pedestrian evacuations by using a modification of the lattice-gas model. We classify the motion of pedestrians into two modes according to their moods. One is gentle (mode I), the other is flustered (mode II). First, to research the cause for crowd, we fix the motion modes of pedestrians and increase the proportion of pedestrians with motion mode II (ρII). The simulation results show that the pedestrians with motion mode II are lack of evacuation efficiency and cause more casualties. Further, we use the SIS (susceptible-infective-susceptible) model to describe the spreading of the panic mood. The system can be in the high-mix state when the infection probability λ is greater than a fuzzy threshold. In addition, the distances S from wounded people to the exit are researched, the number of wounded people gets maximum at the internal S = 5∼10, which is independent of ρII and λ. This research can help us to understand and prevent the emergence of collective panic and reduce wounds in the real evacuation. PMID:27055024

  5. Evacuation of Pedestrians with Two Motion Modes for Panic System

    PubMed Central

    Zou, You; Xie, Jiarong; Wang, Binghong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have captured an underlying mechanism of emergence of collective panic in pedestrian evacuations by using a modification of the lattice-gas model. We classify the motion of pedestrians into two modes according to their moods. One is gentle (mode I), the other is flustered (mode II). First, to research the cause for crowd, we fix the motion modes of pedestrians and increase the proportion of pedestrians with motion mode II (ρII). The simulation results show that the pedestrians with motion mode II are lack of evacuation efficiency and cause more casualties. Further, we use the SIS (susceptible-infective-susceptible) model to describe the spreading of the panic mood. The system can be in the high-mix state when the infection probability λ is greater than a fuzzy threshold. In addition, the distances S from wounded people to the exit are researched, the number of wounded people gets maximum at the internal S = 5 ∼ 10, which is independent of ρII and λ. This research can help us to understand and prevent the emergence of collective panic and reduce wounds in the real evacuation. PMID:27055024

  6. Facial dog attack injuries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Patil, Pavan Manohar

    2015-02-01

    The exposed position of the face makes it vulnerable to dog bite injuries. This fact combined with the short stature of children makes them a high-risk group for such attacks. In contrast to wounds inflicted by assaults and accidents, dog bite wounds are deep puncture type wounds compounded by the presence of pathologic bacteria from the saliva of the attacking dog. This, combined with the presence of crushed, devitalized tissue makes these wounds highly susceptible to infection. Key to successful management of such wounds are meticulous cleansing of the wound, careful debridement, primary repair, appropriate antibiotic therapy, and rabies and tetanus immunization where indicated. This review presents an overview of the epidemiology, presentation, management of such emergencies, and the recent advances in the care of such patients. PMID:25829713

  7. When women attack.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Bryan; Davis, Catasha; Coppini, David; Kim, Young Mie; Knisely, Sandra; McLeod, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The common assumption that female candidates on the campaign trail should not go on the attack, because such tactics contradict gender stereotypes, has not received consistent support. We argue that in some circumstances gender stereotypes will favor female politicians going negative. To test this proposition, this study examines how gender cues affect voter reactions to negative ads in the context of a political sex scandal, a context that should prime gender stereotypes that favor females. Using an online experiment involving a national sample of U.S. adults (N = 599), we manipulate the gender and partisan affiliation of a politician who attacks a male opponent caught in a sex scandal involving sexually suggestive texting to a female intern. Results show that in the context of a sex scandal, a female candidate going on the attack is evaluated more positively than a male. Moreover, while female participants viewed the female sponsor more favorably, sponsor gender had no effect on male participants. Partisanship also influenced candidate evaluations: the Democratic female candidate was evaluated more favorably than her Republican female counterpart. PMID:26399945

  8. Acceptability of Virtual Reality Interoceptive Exposure for the Treatment of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quero, Soledad; Pérez-Ara, M. Ángeles; Bretón-López, Juana; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa M.; Botella, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Interoceptive exposure (IE) is a standard component of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for panic disorder and agoraphobia. The virtual reality (VR) program "Panic-Agoraphobia" has several virtual scenarios designed for applying exposure to agoraphobic situations; it can also simulate physical sensations. This work examines…

  9. Emerging Standards of Care for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Panic Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamish, Patrica M.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Granello, Paul F.; McSteen, Patricia B.; Stone, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Proposes eight emerging standards of care, based on a literature review, for the diagnosis and treatment of panic disorder without agoraphobia in adults. The diagnostic criteria were particularly analyzed in terms of comorbid psychological disorders, medical disorders, and substances that mimic panic symptoms. Defines minimal professional conduct.…

  10. Virtual Reality Exposure in the Treatment of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Helena Villa; Botella, Cristina; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Osma, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present a case example of the use of virtual reality exposure for the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia. The assessment protocol and procedure (including a baseline period) and the cognitive-behavioral treatment program are described. The clinical measures were categorized into target behaviors, panic and agoraphobia…

  11. Automatic Associations and Panic Disorder: Trajectories of Change over the Course of Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachman, Bethany A.; Marker, Craig D.; Smith-Janik, Shannan B.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive models of anxiety and panic suggest that symptom reduction during treatment should be preceded by changes in cognitive processing, including modifying the anxious schema. The current study tested these hypotheses by using a repeated measures design to evaluate whether the trajectory of change in automatic panic associations over a…

  12. Improving Attack Graph Visualization through Data Reduction and Attack Grouping

    SciTech Connect

    John Homer; Ashok Varikuti; Xinming Ou; Miles A. McQueen

    2008-09-01

    Various tools exist to analyze enterprise network systems and to produce attack graphs detailing how attackers might penetrate into the system. These attack graphs, however, are often complex and difficult to comprehend fully, and a human user may find it problematic to reach appropriate configuration decisions. This paper presents methodologies that can 1) automatically identify portions of an attack graph that do not help a user to understand the core security problems and so can be trimmed, and 2) automatically group similar attack steps as virtual nodes in a model of the network topology, to immediately increase the understandability of the data. We believe both methods are important steps toward improving visualization of attack graphs to make them more useful in configuration management for large enterprise networks. We implemented our methods using one of the existing attack-graph toolkits. Initial experimentation shows that the proposed approaches can 1) significantly reduce the complexity of attack graphs by trimming a large portion of the graph that is not needed for a user to understand the security problem, and 2) significantly increase the accessibility and understandability of the data presented in the attack graph by clearly showing, within a generated visualization of the network topology, the number and type of potential attacks to which each host is exposed.

  13. Peritraumatic dissociation mediates the relationship between acute panic and chronic posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Richard A; Brooks, Robert; Silove, Derrick; Creamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Meaghan; McFarlane, Alexander C

    2011-05-01

    Although peritraumatic dissociation predicts subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), little is understood about the mechanism of this relationship. This study examines the role of panic during trauma in the relationship between peritraumatic dissociation and subsequent PTSD. Randomized eligible admissions to 4 major trauma hospitals across Australia (n=244) were assessed during hospital admission and within one month of trauma exposure for panic, peritraumatic dissociation and PTSD symptoms, and subsequently re-assessed for PTSD three months after the initial assessment (n=208). Twenty (9.6%) patients met criteria for PTSD at 3-months post injury. Structural equation modeling supported the proposition that peritraumatic derealization (a subset of dissociation) mediated the effect of panic reactions during trauma and subsequent PTSD symptoms. The mediation model indicated that panic reactions are linked to severity of subsequent PTSD via derealization, indicating a significant indirect relationship. Whereas peritraumatic derealization is associated with chronic PTSD symptoms, this relationship is influenced by initial acute panic responses. PMID:21457945

  14. A new kinetic model to discuss the control of panic spreading in emergency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanghua; Shen, Huizhang; Chen, Guangming; Ye, Teng; Tang, Xiangbin; Kerr, Naphtali

    2015-01-01

    Individual panic behavior during an emergency is contagious. It often leads to collective panic behavior, which can be disruptive and even disastrous if handled incorrectly. In this paper, a novel kinetic model is developed to describe the dynamics of panic spreading in a real emergency. The global dynamics of the proposed model are analyzed by using the method of Lyapunov function and the Poincarè-Bendixson property, and the obtained theoretical results are numerically validated. The Runge-Kutta method is used for numerical simulations, and these simulations are used to investigate the impact of corresponding management strategies on the containment of individual panic behavior. Meanwhile, the implications of these simulation results are discussed with the "2011 Xiangshui chemical explosion rumor" event. Finally, some recommendations for emergency management agencies are put forward by us to reduce individual panic behavior.

  15. The Developmental Course of Anxiety Symptoms during Adolescence: The TRAILS Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Oort, F. V. A.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Verhulst, F. C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the development of anxiety symptoms from late childhood to late adolescence. The present study determined developmental trajectories of symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoPh), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in a large…

  16. Immune-related pathways including HLA-DRB1(∗)13:02 are associated with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Shimada-Sugimoto, Mihoko; Otowa, Takeshi; Miyagawa, Taku; Khor, Seik-Soon; Kashiwase, Koichi; Sugaya, Nagisa; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Umekage, Tadashi; Kojima, Hiroto; Saji, Hiroh; Miyashita, Akinori; Kuwano, Ryozo; Kaiya, Hisanobu; Kasai, Kiyoto; Tanii, Hisashi; Okazaki, Yuji; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sasaki, Tsukasa

    2015-05-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is an anxiety disorder characterized by panic attacks and anticipatory anxiety. Both genetic and environmental factors are thought to trigger PD onset. Previously, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for PD and focused on candidate SNPs with the lowest P values. However, there seemed to be a number of polymorphisms which did not reach genome-wide significance threshold due to their low allele frequencies and odds ratios, even though they were truly involved in pathogenesis. Therefore we performed pathway analyses in order to overcome the limitations of conventional single-marker analysis and identify associated SNPs with modest effects. Each pathway analysis indicated that pathways related to immunity showed the strongest association with PD (DAVID, P=2.08×10(-6); i-GSEA4GWAS, P<10(-3); ICSNPathway, P<10(-3)). Based on the results of pathway analyses and the previously performed GWAS for PD, we focused on and investigated HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 as candidate susceptibility genes for PD. We typed HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 in 744 subjects with PD and 1418 control subjects. Patients with PD were significantly more likely to carry HLA-DRB1(∗)13:02 (P=2.50×10(-4), odds ratio=1.54). Our study provided initial evidence that HLA-DRB1(∗)13:02 and genes involved in immune-related pathways are associated with PD. Future studies are necessary to confirm these results and clarify the underlying mechanisms causing PD. PMID:25582808

  17. Sulfate attack expansion mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Müllauer, Wolfram Beddoe, Robin E.; Heinz, Detlef

    2013-10-15

    A specially constructed stress cell was used to measure the stress generated in thin-walled Portland cement mortar cylinders caused by external sulfate attack. The effects of sulfate concentration of the storage solution and C{sub 3}A content of the cement were studied. Changes in mineralogical composition and pore size distribution were investigated by X-ray diffraction and mercury intrusion porosimetry, respectively. Damage is due to the formation of ettringite in small pores (10–50 nm) which generates stresses up to 8 MPa exceeding the tensile strength of the binder matrix. Higher sulfate concentrations and C{sub 3}A contents result in higher stresses. The results can be understood in terms of the effect of crystal surface energy and size on supersaturation and crystal growth pressure.

  18. Quality of Smartphone Apps Related to Panic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Van Singer, Mathias; Chatton, Anne; Khazaal, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    Quality of smartphone apps related to panic: smartphone apps have a growing role in health care. This study assessed the quality of English-language apps for panic disorder (PD) and compared paid and free apps. Keywords related to PD were entered into the Google Play Store search engine. Apps were assessed using the following quality indicators: accountability, interactivity, self-help score (the potential of smartphone apps to help users in daily life), and evidence-based content quality. The Brief DISCERN score and the criteria of the "Health on the Net" label were also used as content quality indicators as well as the number of downloads. Of 247 apps identified, 52 met all inclusion criteria. The content quality and self-help scores of these PD apps were poor. None of the assessed indicators were associated with payment status or number of downloads. Multiple linear regressions showed that the Brief DISCERN score significantly predicted the content quality and self-help scores. Poor content quality and self-help scores of PD smartphone apps highlight the gap between their technological potential and the overall quality of available products. PMID:26236242

  19. Quality of Smartphone Apps Related to Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Van Singer, Mathias; Chatton, Anne; Khazaal, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    Quality of smartphone apps related to panic: smartphone apps have a growing role in health care. This study assessed the quality of English-language apps for panic disorder (PD) and compared paid and free apps. Keywords related to PD were entered into the Google Play Store search engine. Apps were assessed using the following quality indicators: accountability, interactivity, self-help score (the potential of smartphone apps to help users in daily life), and evidence-based content quality. The Brief DISCERN score and the criteria of the “Health on the Net” label were also used as content quality indicators as well as the number of downloads. Of 247 apps identified, 52 met all inclusion criteria. The content quality and self-help scores of these PD apps were poor. None of the assessed indicators were associated with payment status or number of downloads. Multiple linear regressions showed that the Brief DISCERN score significantly predicted the content quality and self-help scores. Poor content quality and self-help scores of PD smartphone apps highlight the gap between their technological potential and the overall quality of available products. PMID:26236242

  20. Do Bartonella Infections Cause Agitation, Panic Disorder, and Treatment-Resistant Depression?

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, James L.; Burkland, Glenn A.; Langhoff, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Bartonella is an emerging infection found in cities, suburbs, and rural locations. Routine national labs offer testing for only 2 species, but at least 9 have been discovered as human infections within the last 15 years. Some authors discuss Bartonella cases having atypical presentations, with serious morbidity considered uncharacteristic of more routine Bartonella infections. Some atypical findings include distortion of vision, abdominal pain, severe liver and spleen tissue abnormalities, thrombocytopenic purpura, bone infection, arthritis, abscesses, heart tissue and heart valve problems. While some articles discuss Bartonella as a cause of neurologic illnesses, psychiatric illnesses have received limited attention. Case reports usually do not focus on psychiatric symptoms and typically only as incidental comorbid findings. In this article, we discuss patients exhibiting new-onset agitation, panic attacks, and treatment-resistant depression, all of which may be attributed to Bartonella. Methods Three patients receiving care in an outpatient clinical setting developed acute onset personality changes and agitation, depression, and panic attacks. They were retrospectively examined for evidence of Bartonella infections. The medical and psychiatric treatment progress of each patient was tracked until both were significantly resolved and the Bartonella was cured. Results The patients generally seemed to require higher dosing of antidepressants, benzodiazepines, or antipsychotics in order to function normally. Doses were reduced following antibiotic treatment and as the presumed signs of Bartonella infection remitted. All patients improved significantly following treatment and returned to their previously healthy or near-normal baseline mental health status. Discussion New Bartonella species are emerging as human infections. Most do not have antibody or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic testing at this time. Manual differential examinations are of

  1. Respiratory and Cognitive Mediators of Treatment Change in Panic Disorder: Evidence for Intervention Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Meuret, Alicia E.; Rosenfield, David; Seidel, Anke; Bhaskara, Lavanya; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective There are numerous theories of panic disorder, each proposing a unique pathway of change leading to treatment success. However, little is known about whether improvements in proposed mediators are indeed associated with treatment outcomes and whether these mediators are specific to particular treatment modalities. Our purpose in this study was to analyze pathways of change in theoretically distinct interventions using longitudinal, moderated mediation analyses. Method Forty-one patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia were randomly assigned to receive 4 weeks of training aimed at altering either respiration (capnometry-assisted respiratory training) or panic-related cognitions (cognitive training). Changes in respiration (PCO2, respiration rate), symptom appraisal, and a modality-nonspecific mediator (perceived control) were considered as possible mediators. Results The reductions in panic symptom severity and panic-related cognitions and the improvements in perceived control were significant and comparable in both treatment groups. Capnometry-assisted respiratory training, but not cognitive training, led to corrections from initially hypocapnic to normocapnic levels. Moderated mediation and temporal analyses suggested that in capnometry-assisted respiratory training, PCO2 unidirectionally mediated and preceded changes in symptom appraisal and perceived control and was unidirectionally associated with changes in panic symptom severity. In cognitive training, reductions in symptom appraisal were bidirectionally associated with perceived control and panic symptom severity. In addition, perceived control was bidirectionally related to panic symptom severity in both treatment conditions. Conclusion The findings suggest that reductions in panic symptom severity can be achieved through different pathways, consistent with the underlying models. PMID:20873904

  2. Understanding mass panic and other collective responses to threat and disaster.

    PubMed

    Mawson, Anthony R

    2005-01-01

    While mass panic (and/or violence) and self-preservation are often assumed to be the natural response to physical danger and perceived entrapment, the literature indicates that expressions of mutual aid are common and often predominate, and collective flight may be so delayed that survival is threatened. In fact, the typical response to a variety of threats and disasters is not to flee but to seek the proximity of familiar persons and places; moreover, separation from attachment figures is a greater stressor than physical danger. Such observations can be explained by an alternative "social attachment" model that recognizes the fundamentally gregarious nature of human beings and the primacy of attachments. In the relatively rare instances where flight occurs, the latter can be understood as one aspect of a more general affiliative response that involves escaping from certain situations and moving toward other situations that are perceived as familiar but which may not necessarily be objectively safe. The occurrence of flight-and-affiliation depends mainly on the social context and especially the whereabouts of familiar persons (i.e., attachment figures); their physical presence has a calming effect and reduces the probability of flight-and-affiliation, while their absence has the opposite effect. Combining the factors of perceived physical danger and the location of attachment figures results in a four-fold typology that encompasses a wide spectrum of collective responses to threat and disaster. Implications of the model for predicting community responses to terrorist attacks and/or use of weapons of mass destruction are briefly discussed. PMID:16247853

  3. Subclinical symptoms of panic disorder: new insights into pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Fava, G A; Mangelli, L

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this review was to survey the available literature on prodromal and residual symptoms of panic disorder. Both a computerized (Medline) and a manual search of the literature were performed. In a substantial proportion of patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia a prodromal phase can be identified. Most patients report residual symptoms despite successful treatment. Residual symptoms upon remission have a prognostic value. There appears to be a relationship between residual and prodromal symptomatology (the rollback phenomenon). Appraisal of subclinical symptomatology in panic disorder has important implications as to the pathophysiological model of disease, its conceptualization and treatment. PMID:10559707

  4. Preliminary Evidence for Cognitive Mediation During Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy of Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Suvak, Michael K.; Barlow, David H.; Shear, M. Katherine; Meuret, Alicia E.; Rosenfield, David; Gorman, Jack M.; Woods, Scott W.

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy are similarly effective for treating panic disorder with mild or no agoraphobia, but little is known about the mechanism through which these treatments work. The present study examined some of the criteria for cognitive mediation of treatment change in CBT alone, imipramine alone, CBT plus imipramine, and CBT plus placebo. Ninety-one individuals who received 1 of these interventions were assessed before and after acute treatment, and after a 6-month maintenance period. Multilevel moderated mediation analyses provided preliminary support for the notion that changes in panic-related cognitions mediate changes in panic severity only in treatments that include CBT. PMID:17563154

  5. New hope for a disabling condition. Cognitive-behavioral approaches to panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, M; Pallister, R

    1997-03-01

    1. Panic disorder, which encompasses both biological and psychological dimensions, is a common anxiety-related problem that can result in significant disability. 2. Cognitive-behavioral approaches to panic disorder are effective in 70% to 80% of patients treated, and generally involve a combination of patient education, relaxation training, exposure, and cognitive restructuring. 3. Mental health nurses can benefit their panic disorder patients by becoming aware of cognitive-behavioral treatment options, and should consider adding these methods to their repertoire of therapeutic skills. PMID:9076704

  6. Novel Psychological Formulation and Treatment of "Tic Attacks" in Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sally; Hedderly, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    onset and maintenance of tic attacks. These cases provide support for the view that tic attacks are triggered and maintained by psychological factors, thereby challenging the view that tic attacks merely reflect extended bouts of tics. As such, we propose that the movements seen in tic attacks may resemble a combination of tics and functional neurological movements, with tic attacks reflecting episodes of panic and anxiety for individuals with TS. PMID:27242975

  7. Thrombolytic drugs for heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007488.htm Thrombolytic drugs for heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... the management of patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes: a report ... myocardial infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology ...

  8. Panic-like defensive behavior but not fear-induced antinociception is differently organized by dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei of Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia, Muridae)

    PubMed Central

    Biagioni, A.F.; Silva, J.A.; Coimbra, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a forebrain structure critically involved in the organization of defensive responses to aversive stimuli. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic dysfunction in dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei is implicated in the origin of panic-like defensive behavior, as well as in pain modulation. The present study was conducted to test the difference between these two hypothalamic nuclei regarding defensive and antinociceptive mechanisms. Thus, the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (40 ng/0.2 µL) or saline (0.9% NaCl) was microinjected into the dorsomedial or posterior hypothalamus in independent groups. Innate fear-induced responses characterized by defensive attention, defensive immobility and elaborate escape behavior were evoked by hypothalamic blockade of GABAA receptors. Fear-induced defensive behavior organized by the posterior hypothalamus was more intense than that organized by dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei. Escape behavior elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus was followed by an increase in nociceptive threshold. Interestingly, there was no difference in the intensity or in the duration of fear-induced antinociception shown by each hypothalamic division presently investigated. The present study showed that GABAergic dysfunction in nuclei of both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus elicit panic attack-like defensive responses followed by fear-induced antinociception, although the innate fear-induced behavior originates differently in the posterior hypothalamus in comparison to the activity of medial hypothalamic subdivisions. PMID:22437484

  9. Panic-like defensive behavior but not fear-induced antinociception is differently organized by dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei of Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia, Muridae).

    PubMed

    Biagioni, A F; Silva, J A; Coimbra, N C

    2012-04-01

    The hypothalamus is a forebrain structure critically involved in the organization of defensive responses to aversive stimuli. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic dysfunction in dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei is implicated in the origin of panic-like defensive behavior, as well as in pain modulation. The present study was conducted to test the difference between these two hypothalamic nuclei regarding defensive and antinociceptive mechanisms. Thus, the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline (40 ng/0.2 µL) or saline (0.9% NaCl) was microinjected into the dorsomedial or posterior hypothalamus in independent groups. Innate fear-induced responses characterized by defensive attention, defensive immobility and elaborate escape behavior were evoked by hypothalamic blockade of GABA(A) receptors. Fear-induced defensive behavior organized by the posterior hypothalamus was more intense than that organized by dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei. Escape behavior elicited by GABA(A) receptor blockade in both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus was followed by an increase in nociceptive threshold. Interestingly, there was no difference in the intensity or in the duration of fear-induced antinociception shown by each hypothalamic division presently investigated. The present study showed that GABAergic dysfunction in nuclei of both the dorsomedial and posterior hypothalamus elicit panic attack-like defensive responses followed by fear-induced antinociception, although the innate fear-induced behavior originates differently in the posterior hypothalamus in comparison to the activity of medial hypothalamic subdivisions. PMID:22437484

  10. Framing Samuel See: the discursive detritus of the moral panic over the "double epidemic" of methamphetamines and HIV among gay men.

    PubMed

    Gideonse, Theodore K

    2016-02-01

    After being arrested for violating a restraining order against his husband, on November 24, 2013, Yale professor Samuel See died while in lockup at the Union Avenue Detention Center in New Haven, Connecticut. The death received media attention around the world, with readers arguing online about whether See's death was caused by police misconduct, as his friends and colleagues charged in interviews and during a well-publicised march and protest. When an autopsy revealed that he had died from a methamphetamine-induced heart attack, online commentary changed dramatically, with See's many supporters rhetorically abandoning him and others describing him as a stereotype of the gay meth addict who deserved his fate. In this article, I argue that this shift in the interpretation and meaning of See's death can be traced to the discursive structures left by the moral panic about crystal meth in the United States (1996-2008), which comprised within it a secondary moral panic about crystal meth in the gay community and its connection to the spread of HIV and a possible super-strain (2005-2008). PMID:26826730

  11. An examination of worry in relation to anxious responding to voluntary hyperventilation among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Leen-Feldner, Ellen W; Feldner, Matthew T; Tull, Matthew T; Roemer, Lizabeth; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2006-12-01

    This study examined the association between worry and fearful responding to a 3-min voluntary hyperventilation procedure. Participants were 160 adolescents (71 females) between the ages of 12 and 17 years (M=14.92 years). After accounting for the significant effects of state anxiety and anxiety sensitivity, results indicated that pre-challenge levels of worry indexed by the Penn State Worry Questionnaire-Child Version predicted post-challenge anxiety and intensity of panic symptoms. Results are discussed in terms of the role of worry in relation to panic-relevant emotional vulnerability among youth. PMID:16500618

  12. Fetal alcohol syndrome: the origins of a moral panic.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, E M; Abel, E L

    2000-01-01

    Since its discovery almost 30 years ago, the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) has been characterized in the USA, as a major threat to public health. In part because FAS resonated with broader social concerns in the 1970s and 1980s about alcohol's deleterious effect on American society and about a perceived increase in child abuse and neglect, it quickly achieved prominence as a social problem. In this paper, we demonstrate that, as concern about this social problem escalated beyond the level warranted by the existing evidence, FAS took on the status of a moral panic. Through examples taken from both the biomedical literature and the media about drinking during pregnancy, we illustrate the evolution of this development, and we describe its implications, particularly how it has contributed to a vapid public policy response. PMID:10869248

  13. Behavioral, Cognitive, and Pharmacological Treatments of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: Critique and Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Larry K.; Marchione, Karen

    1991-01-01

    Examines theoretical, methodologic, and research issues as well as strengths, limitations, and possible interactions pertaining to behavioral, cognitive, and pharmacological treatments of panic disorder with agoraphobia. Compares attrition, outcome, and maintenance effects and presents composite indices of significant improvement, endstate…

  14. Healthcare utilization following cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Pasquale; Marchand, André; Reinharz, Daniel; Cloutier, Karine; Mainguy, Nicole; Miller, Jean-Marc; Bégin, Jean; Turcotte, Julie

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the overall changes in healthcare services utilization after providing an empirically supported cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia. Data on healthcare utilization were collected for a total of 84 adults meeting DSM-IV criteria. Participants were completers of a cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia. Data on utilization of healthcare services and medication were obtained from semi-structured interviews from baseline to 1-year after treatment. Results of the Friedman non-parametric analysis reveal a significant decrease in overall and mental health-related costs following treatment. This study shows a significant reduction in healthcare costs following cognitive behavior therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia. More studies are needed to examine the potential long-term cost-offset effect of empirically supported treatments for panic disorder. PMID:15986784

  15. Worry, worry attacks, and PTSD among Cambodian refugees: a path analysis investigation.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Nickerson, Angela; Bryant, Richard A

    2011-06-01

    Among traumatized Cambodian refugees, this article investigates worry (e.g., the types of current life concerns) and how worry worsens posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To explore how worry worsens PTSD, we examine a path model of worry to see whether certain key variables (e.g., worry-induced somatic arousal and worry-induced trauma recall) mediate the relationship between worry and PTSD. Survey data were collected from March 2010 until May 2010 in a convenience sample of 201 adult Cambodian refugees attending a psychiatric clinic in Massachusetts, USA. We found that worry was common in this group (65%), that worry was often about current life concerns (e.g., lacking financial resources, children not attending school, health concerns, concerns about relatives in Cambodia), and that worry often induced panic attacks: in the entire sample, 41% (83/201) of the patients had "worry attacks" (i.e., worry episodes that resulted in a panic episode) in the last month. "Worry attacks" were highly associated with PTSD presence. In the entire sample, generalized anxiety disorder was also very prevalent, and was also highly associated with PTSD. Path analysis revealed that the effect of worry on PTSD severity was mediated by worry-induced somatic arousal, worry-induced catastrophic cognitions, worry-induced trauma recall, inability to stop worry, and irritability. The final model accounted for 75% of the variance in PTSD severity among patients with worry. The public health and treatment implications of the study's findings that worry may have a potent impact on PTSD severity in severely traumatized populations are discussed: worry and daily concerns are key areas of intervention for these worry-hypersensitive (and hence daily-stressor-hypersensitive) populations. PMID:21663803

  16. Homotypic versus Heterotypic Continuity of Anxiety Symptoms in Young Adolescents: Evidence for Distinctions between DSM-IV Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferdinand, Robert F.; Dieleman, Gwen; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate homotypic and heterotypic longitudinal patterns of symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social phobia (SoPh), panic disorder (PD), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in young adolescents from the Dutch general population. Method: 2,067 individuals (51.4% girls) from a…

  17. Involvement of prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex in panic-like elaborated defensive behaviour and innate fear-induced antinociception elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in the dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei: role of the endocannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renato Leonardo de; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2013-09-01

    It has been shown that GABAA receptor blockade in the dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei (DMH and VMH, respectively) induces elaborated defensive behavioural responses accompanied by antinociception, which has been utilized as an experimental model of panic attack. Furthermore, the prelimbic (PL) division of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) has been related to emotional reactions and the processing of nociceptive information. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of the PL cortex and the participation of local cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the elaboration of panic-like reactions and in innate fear-induced antinociception. Elaborated fear-induced responses were analysed during a 10-min period in an open-field test arena. Microinjection of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline into the DMH/VMH evoked panic-like behaviour and fear-induced antinociception, which was decreased by microinjection of the non-selective synaptic contact blocker cobalt chloride in the PL cortex. Moreover, microinjection of AM251 (25, 100 or 400 pmol), an endocannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, into the PL cortex also attenuated the defensive behavioural responses and the antinociception that follows innate fear behaviour elaborated by DMH/VMH. These data suggest that the PL cortex plays an important role in the organization of elaborated forward escape behaviour and that this cortical area is also involved in the elaboration of innate fear-induced antinociception. Additionally, CB1 receptors in the PL cortex modulate both panic-like behaviours and fear-induced antinociception elicited by disinhibition of the DMH/VMH through microinjection of bicuculline. PMID:23521775

  18. Subsensitive melatonin suppression by dim white light: possible biological marker of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Pradeep J.; Burrows, Graham D.; Norman, Trevor R.

    1998-12-01

    Light is involved in providing entrainment of circadian rhythms and the suppression of the pineal hormone melatonin. In patients with affective disorders, there have been indications of circadian as well as seasonal variation in illness, which may be reflected in melatonin production. Varying sensitivity to light has been noted within healthy individuals as well as in some patients with affective disorders. Recent evidence suggests that patients with panic disorder may have an altered and phase-delayed melatonin rhythm. The present study examined the nocturnal plasma melatonin rhythm in patients with panic disorder, and also examined their melatonin sensitivity to dim light. The melatonin rhythm was examined in 6 patients with panic disorder and 8 controls. The melatonin sensitivity to dim white light (200 lx) was examined in 8 patients with panic disorder and 63 controls and was compared to that of a group of 7 patients with other anxiety disorders. Patients with panic disorder demonstrated a trend towards higher and delayed peak melatonin levels compared to controls. Patients with panic disorder also had a subsensitive melatonin suppression by dim white light, compared to controls and patients with other anxiety disorders (p<0.005). The phase-delayed circadian rhythm observed in patients with panic disorder may be secondary to the subsensitivity of the melatonin response to light. It is hypothesized that the subsensitivity may be due to abnormal neurotransmitter/receptor systems involved in regulation of melatonin suppression and circadian rhythmicity, and may lead to phase- delayed circadian rhythms. The melatonin subsensitivity to light may be used as a biological marker of panic disorder. PMID:11281954

  19. Perceived parental characteristics of patients with obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Merkel, W T; Pollard, C A; Wiener, R L; Staebler, C R

    1993-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that parents of patients with obsessive compulsive disorder exhibit specific traits. 320 consecutive inpatient admissions who met criteria for OCD, depression, and panic disorder checked a list of adjectives to describe their parents. Patients with OCD were 1) less likely to perceive their mothers as disorganized than depressives, 2) more likely to perceive their mothers as overprotective than depressives and 3) less likely to perceive their fathers as demanding than patients with panic. PMID:8404245

  20. WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.

    2013-04-12

    Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

  1. The developmental psychopathology of social anxiety in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Chris; Wilson, Kimberly A; Lagle, Kristy; Kraemer, Helena C; Killen, Joel D; Taylor, C Barr

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a developmental psychopathology approach for understanding adolescent social anxiety, parent-reported predictors of social anxiety were examined in a nonclinical sample of adolescents. Structured diagnostic interviews were obtained from biological parents of 770 participants. Potential risk factors assessed included child characteristics: negative affect, shyness, separation anxiety disorder, and childhood chronic illness, as well as parent characteristics: major depression, panic disorder, and agoraphobia. Adolescent social anxiety was measured multiple times during high school. Findings indicate stability in social anxiety symptoms across time. Parent-reported, childhood negative affect, shyness, and chronic illness as well as parental panic disorder or agoraphobia were associated with adolescent social anxiety. Interactions were observed between parent-reported childhood shyness and gender and between parent-reported childhood shyness and parent-reported childhood chronic illness in the prediction of social anxiety. Parent-reported childhood shyness was a stronger predictor of adolescent social anxiety in females compared to males. The combined effect of subjects being positive for both parent-reported childhood shyness and parent-reported childhood chronic illness was greater than would be expected based on additive effects. This study provides support for a multifactorial and developmentally informed understanding of adolescent social anxiety. PMID:17348001

  2. Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... nervous and have a panic attack. What's a Panic Attack Like? Panic attacks can be really scary and may make someone ... sweat, and breathe quickly. Some people who have panic attacks might have chest pains, feel dizzy, or feel ...

  3. Antiretroviral Therapy Use, Medication Adherence, and Viral Suppression Among PLWHA with Panic Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sam, Tanyka Suzanne; Hutton, Heidi E; Lau, Bryan; McCaul, Mary E; Keruly, Jeanne; Moore, Richard; Chander, Geetanjali

    2015-11-01

    Panic symptoms are prevalent among PLWHAs, yet few studies have examined their relationship with HIV outcomes. Using data from an observational cohort study in Baltimore, MD, we examined the association between panic symptoms and antiretroviral therapy (ART) use, medication adherence, and viral suppression. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations and adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, cocaine and/or heroin use, clinic enrollment time, alcohol use, and depressive symptoms. Between June 2010 and September 2012, 1195 individuals participated in 2080 audio computer assisted interviews; 9.9 % (n = 118) of individuals endorsed current panic symptoms. In multivariate analysis, panic symptoms were associated with decreased ART use (IRR 0.94; p = 0.05). Panic symptoms were neither associated with medication adherence nor viral suppression. These findings were independent of depressive symptoms and substance use. Panic symptoms are under-recognized in primary care settings and present an important barrier to ART use. Further studies investigating the reasons for this association are needed. PMID:25903506

  4. The Deakin/Graeff hypothesis: focus on serotonergic inhibition of panic.

    PubMed

    Paul, Evan D; Johnson, Philip L; Shekhar, Anantha; Lowry, Christopher A

    2014-10-01

    The Deakin/Graeff hypothesis proposes that different subpopulations of serotonergic neurons through topographically organized projections to forebrain and brainstem structures modulate the response to acute and chronic stressors, and that dysfunction of these neurons increases vulnerability to affective and anxiety disorders, including panic disorder. We outline evidence supporting the existence of a serotonergic system originally discussed by Deakin/Graeff that is implicated in the inhibition of panic-like behavioral and physiological responses. Evidence supporting this panic inhibition system comes from the following observations: (1) serotonergic neurons located in the 'ventrolateral dorsal raphe nucleus' (DRVL) as well as the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VLPAG) inhibit dorsal periaqueductal gray-elicited panic-like responses; (2) chronic, but not acute, antidepressant treatment potentiates serotonin's panicolytic effect; (3) contextual fear activates a central nucleus of the amygdala-DRVL/VLPAG circuit implicated in mediating freezing and inhibiting panic-like escape behaviors; (4) DRVL/VLPAG serotonergic neurons are central chemoreceptors and modulate the behavioral and cardiorespiratory response to panicogenic agents such as sodium lactate and CO2. Implications of the panic inhibition system are discussed. PMID:24661986

  5. The Deakin/Graeff hypothesis: focus on serotonergic inhibition of panic

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Evan D.; Johnson, Philip L.; Shekhar, Anantha; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    The Deakin/Graeff hypothesis proposes that different subpopulations of serotonergic neurons through topographically organized projections to forebrain and brainstem structures modulate the response to acute and chronic stressors, and that dysfunction of these neurons increases vulnerability to affective and anxiety disorders, including Panic Disorder. We outline evidence supporting the existence of a serotonergic system originally discussed by Deakin/Graeff that is implicated in the inhibition of panic-like behavioral and physiological responses. Evidence supporting this panic inhibition system comes from the following observations: 1) serotonergic neurons located in the ‘ventrolateral dorsal raphe nucleus (DRVL) as well as the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VLPAG) inhibit dorsal periaqueductal gray-elicited panic-like responses; 2) chronic, but not acute, antidepressant treatment potentiates serotonin’s panicolytic effect; 3) contextual fear activates a central nucleus of the amygdala-DRVL/VLPAG circuit implicated in mediating freezing and inhibiting panic-like escape behaviors; 4) DRVL/VLPAG serotonergic neurons are central chemoreceptors and modulate the behavioral and cardiorespiratory response to panicogenic agents such as sodium lactate and CO2. Implications of the panic inhibition system are discussed. PMID:24661986

  6. Cross-cultural evaluation of the Panic Disorder Severity Scale in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ikuyo; Nakano, Yumi; Watanabe, Norio; Noda, Yumiko; Furukawa, Toshi A; Kanai, Takahiro; Takashio, Osamu; Koda, Rumiko; Otsubo, Tempei; Kamijima, Kunitoshi

    2004-01-01

    The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) [Shear et al., 1997] is rapidly gaining world-wide acceptance as a standard global severity measure of panic disorder, however, its cross-cultural validity and reliability have not been reported yet. We developed the Japanese version of the PDSS and examined its factor structure, internal consistency and inter-rater reliability and concurrent validity among Japanese patients with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. We also established rules of thumb for interpreting PDSS total scores, taking the Clinical Global Impression severity scale as the anchoring criterion. The identical one-factor structure of the PDSS was confirmed among the Japanese patients as among the United States patients. Both internal and inter-rater reliability was excellent (Cronbach's alpha was 0.86, and ANOVA ICCs were all above 0.90). Concurrent validity of the PDSS items with self-report questionnaires tapping similar or overlapping domains was satisfactory (Pearson correlation coefficients were mostly above 0.5). Using the anchor-based approach, the following interpretative guides are suggested: among those with established panic disorder diagnosis, PDSS total scores up to 10 correspond with "mild," those between 11 and 15 with "moderate," and those at or above 16 correspond with "severe" panic disorder. The present findings support the cross-cultural generalizability of panic disorder symptomatology and of the PDSS, in particular. PMID:15368592

  7. The relationships among heart rate variability, executive functions, and clinical variables in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Pallesen, Ståle; Hammar, Åsa; Hansen, Anita Lill; Thayer, Julian F; Tarvainen, Mika P; Nordhus, Inger Hilde

    2012-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in patients who suffer from panic disorder (PD). Reduced HRV is related to hypoactivity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which negatively affects executive functioning. The present study assessed the relationships between vagally mediated HRV at baseline and measures of executive functioning in 36 patients with PD. Associations between these physiological and cognitive measures and panic-related variables were also investigated. HRV was measured using HF-power (ms(2)), and executive functions were assessed with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and the Color-Word Interference Test (CWIT) from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS). Panic-related variables comprised panic frequency, panic-related distress, and duration of PD. Performance on the neuropsychological measures correlated significantly with HRV. Both panic-related distress and duration of PD were inversely related with measures of HRV and cognitive inhibition. The current findings support the purported relationship between HRV and executive functions involving the PFC. PMID:23069273

  8. Reproductive rights under attack.

    PubMed

    Mcdonald, K

    1995-01-01

    Women's groups, politicians, nongovernmental organizations, funding groups, and donor countries must all be lobbied with the message that sexual and reproductive health issues are inextricably linked to women in development, education, and future economic strength of nations worldwide. In the Beijing Nongovernmental Organization (NGO) Forum the draft Plan of Action had 35% of its language bracketed and subject to negotiation in Beijing. The previous International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo had only 15% of its language bracketed. Much of the language bracketed for Beijing had already been fully agreed upon before the Cairo conference. The bracketed language was in the health and human rights sections, and most of the language pertained to sexual and reproductive health. The increase in controversy is due to an opposition better organized in Beijing than it had been in Cairo, due to the opposition's failure to recognize the implications of the Cairo declarations on women, men, and children, and due to the opposition's general intolerance of sexual and reproductive issues. The major factor, however, was the linking of women's rights with sexual and reproductive health issues. Family planners joined with women's rights groups, which had always promoted women's control over their bodies as the cornerstone of equality. This connection was interpreted as a threat to the social order by conservative societies. NGO participants included 1400 people representing 170 countries. The NGO anti-abortion contingent was well-funded, well-organized, and large. Lobbying was conducted in an effort to convince people to oppose any language pertaining to gender, sexual and reproductive health, and adolescent rights. Anti-abortion lobbyists also rifled through documents of pro-choice participants. In Canada and the United States anti-abortion groups are lobbying hard to overturn the Cairo Plan of Action and to expand their efforts internationally among

  9. Attack vulnerability of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Kim, Beom Jun; Yoon, Chang No; Han, Seung Kee

    2002-05-01

    We study the response of complex networks subject to attacks on vertices and edges. Several existing complex network models as well as real-world networks of scientific collaborations and Internet traffic are numerically investigated, and the network performance is quantitatively measured by the average inverse geodesic length and the size of the largest connected subgraph. For each case of attacks on vertices and edges, four different attacking strategies are used: removals by the descending order of the degree and the betweenness centrality, calculated for either the initial network or the current network during the removal procedure. It is found that the removals by the recalculated degrees and betweenness centralities are often more harmful than the attack strategies based on the initial network, suggesting that the network structure changes as important vertices or edges are removed. Furthermore, the correlation between the betweenness centrality and the degree in complex networks is studied.

  10. Genetic attack on neural cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-03-15

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size.

  11. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  12. Neuropeptide S receptor gene variation modulates anterior cingulate cortex Glx levels during CCK-4 induced panic.

    PubMed

    Ruland, Tillmann; Domschke, Katharina; Schütte, Valerie; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kugel, Harald; Notzon, Swantje; Vennewald, Nadja; Ohrmann, Patricia; Arolt, Volker; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Zwanzger, Peter

    2015-10-01

    An excitatory-inhibitory neurotransmitter dysbalance has been suggested in pathogenesis of panic disorder. The neuropeptide S (NPS) system has been implicated in modulating GABA and glutamate neurotransmission in animal models and to genetically drive altered fear circuit function and an increased risk of panic disorder in humans. Probing a multi-level imaging genetic risk model of panic, in the present magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study brain glutamate+glutamine (Glx) levels in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during a pharmacological cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) panic challenge were assessed depending on the functional neuropeptide S receptor gene (NPSR1) rs324981 A/T variant in a final sample of 35 healthy male subjects. The subjective panic response (Panic Symptom Scale; PSS) as well as cortisol and ACTH levels were ascertained throughout the experiment. CCK-4 injection was followed by a strong panic response. A significant time×genotype interaction was detected (p=.008), with significantly lower ACC Glx/Cr levels in T allele carriers as compared to AA homozygotes 5min after injection (p=.003). CCK-4 induced significant HPA axis stimulation, but no effect of genotype was discerned. The present pilot data suggests NPSR1 gene variation to modulate Glx levels in the ACC during acute states of stress and anxiety, with blunted, i.e. possibly maladaptive ACC glutamatergic reactivity in T risk allele carriers. Our results underline the notion of a genetically driven rapid and dynamic response mechanism in the neural regulation of human anxiety and further strengthen the emerging role of the NPS system in anxiety. PMID:26235955

  13. Gender Differences in Associations of Glutamate Decarboxylase 1 Gene (GAD1) Variants with Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Heike; Scholz, Claus Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina; Baumann, Christian; Klauke, Benedikt; Jacob, Christian P.; Maier, Wolfgang; Fritze, Jürgen; Bandelow, Borwin; Zwanzger, Peter Michael; Lang, Thomas; Fehm, Lydia; Ströhle, Andreas; Hamm, Alfons; Gerlach, Alexander L.; Alpers, Georg W.; Kircher, Tilo; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Arolt, Volker; Pauli, Paul; Deckert, Jürgen; Reif, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background Panic disorder is common (5% prevalence) and females are twice as likely to be affected as males. The heritable component of panic disorder is estimated at 48%. Glutamic acid dehydrogenase GAD1, the key enzyme for the synthesis of the inhibitory and anxiolytic neurotransmitter GABA, is supposed to influence various mental disorders, including mood and anxiety disorders. In a recent association study in depression, which is highly comorbid with panic disorder, GAD1 risk allele associations were restricted to females. Methodology/Principal Findings Nineteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the common variation in GAD1 were genotyped in two independent gender and age matched case-control samples (discovery sample n = 478; replication sample n = 584). Thirteen SNPs passed quality control and were examined for gender-specific enrichment of risk alleles associated with panic disorder by using logistic regression including a genotype×gender interaction term. The latter was found to be nominally significant for four SNPs (rs1978340, rs3762555, rs3749034, rs2241165) in the discovery sample; of note, the respective minor/risk alleles were associated with panic disorder only in females. These findings were not confirmed in the replication sample; however, the genotype×gender interaction of rs3749034 remained significant in the combined sample. Furthermore, this polymorphism showed a nominally significant association with the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire sum score. Conclusions/Significance The present study represents the first systematic evaluation of gender-specific enrichment of risk alleles of the common SNP variation in the panic disorder candidate gene GAD1. Our tentative results provide a possible explanation for the higher susceptibility of females to panic disorder. PMID:22662185

  14. Computerized measurement of anticipated anxiety from eating increasing portions of food in adolescents with and without anorexia nervosa: Pilot studies.

    PubMed

    Kissileff, H R; Brunstrom, J M; Tesser, R; Bellace, D; Berthod, S; Thornton, J C; Halmi, K

    2016-02-01

    Dieting and excessive fear of eating coexist in vulnerable individuals, which may progress to anorexia nervosa [AN], but there is no objective measure of this fear. Therefore, we adapted a computer program that was previously developed to measure the satiating effects of foods in order to explore the potential of food to induce anxiety and fear of eating in adolescent girls. Twenty four adolescents (AN) and ten healthy controls without eating disorders rated pictures of different types of foods in varying sized portions as too large or too small and rated the expected anxiety of five different portions (20-320 kcal). Two low energy dense (potatoes and rice) and two high energy dense (pizza and M&Ms) foods were used. The regression coefficient of line lengths (0-100 mm) marked from "No anxiety" to "this would give me a panic attack", regressed from portions shown, was the measure of "expected anxiety" for a given food. The maximum tolerated portion size [kcal] (MTPS), computed by method of constant stimulus from portions shown, was significantly smaller for high energy dense foods, whereas the expected anxiety response was greater, for all foods, for patients compared to controls. For both groups, expected anxiety responses were steeper, and maximum tolerated portion sizes were larger, for low, than high, energy dense foods. Both maximum tolerated portion size and expected anxiety response were significantly predicted by severity of illness for the patients. Those who had larger maximum tolerated portion sizes had smaller anticipated anxiety to increasing portion sizes. Visual size had a greater influence than energy content for these responses. This method could be used to quantify the anxiety inducing potential of foods and for studies with neuro-imaging and phenotypic clarifications. PMID:26631251

  15. Adolescent development

    MedlinePlus

    Development - adolescent; Growth and development - adolescent ... During adolescence, children develop the ability to: Understand abstract ideas. These include grasping higher math concepts, and developing moral ...

  16. Adolescent development

    MedlinePlus

    Development - adolescent; Growth and development - adolescent ... rights and privileges. Establish and maintain satisfying relationships. Adolescents will learn to share intimacy without feeling worried ...

  17. Eyespots divert attacks by fish.

    PubMed

    Kjernsmo, Karin; Merilaita, Sami

    2013-09-01

    Eyespots (colour patterns consisting of concentric rings) are found in a wide range of animal taxa and are often assumed to have an anti-predator function. Previous experiments have found strong evidence for an intimidating effect of eyespots against passerine birds. Some eyespots have been suggested to increase prey survival by diverting attacks towards less vital body parts or a direction that would facilitate escape. While eyespots in aquatic environments are widespread, their function is extremely understudied. Therefore, we investigated the protective function of eyespots against attacking fish. We used artificial prey and predator-naive three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) as predators to test both the diversion (deflection) and the intimidation hypothesis. Interestingly, our results showed that eyespots smaller than the fish' own eye very effectively draw the attacks of the fish towards them. Furthermore, our experiment also showed that this was not due to the conspicuousness of the eyespot, because attack latency did not differ between prey items with and without eyespots. We found little support for an intimidating effect by larger eyespots. Even though also other markings might misdirect attacks, we can conclude that the misdirecting function may have played an important role in the evolution of eyespots in aquatic environments. PMID:23864602

  18. Analytical Characterization of Internet Security Attacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellke, Sarah H.

    2010-01-01

    Internet security attacks have drawn significant attention due to their enormously adverse impact. These attacks includes Malware (Viruses, Worms, Trojan Horse), Denial of Service, Packet Sniffer, and Password Attacks. There is an increasing need to provide adequate defense mechanisms against these attacks. My thesis proposal deals with analytical…

  19. Twenty-four hour Skin Conductance in Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Doberenz, Sigrun; Roth, Walton T.; Wollburg, Eileen; Breuninger, Christoph; Kim, Sunyoung

    2010-01-01

    Skin conductance, physical activity, ambient temperature, and mood were recorded for 24 hours in 22 panic disorder (PD) patients and 29 healthy controls. During the day, subjects performed standardized relaxation tests (ARTs). We hypothesized that tonically elevated anticipatory anxiety in PD during waking and sleeping would appear as elevated skin conductance level (SCL) and greater skin conductance (SC) variability. Mean SCL was higher during both usual waking activities and sleeping in PD, but not during the ARTs. Group SC variability differences did not reach significance, perhaps because of variance unrelated to anxiety. Analyses indicated that in the PD group, antidepressant medication reduced mean SCL whereas state anxiety had the opposite effect during the day. Depressive symptoms reported during the day were related to elevated mean SCL on the night of the recording. The rate and extent of SCL deactivation over the night was equal in the two groups. However, PD patients had more frequent interruptions of deactivation that could have arisen from conditioned arousal in response to threat cues during sleep. PMID:20537349

  20. PANIC: the new panoramic NIR camera for Calar Alto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, Harald; Alter, Matthias; Cárdenas Vázquez, M. Concepción; Fernandez, Matilde; Fried, Josef; Helmling, Jens; Huber, Armin; Ibáñez Mengual, Jose-Miguel; Rodríguez Gómez, Julio F.; Laun, Werner; Lenzen, Rainer; Mall, Ulrich; Naranjo, Vianak; Ramos, Jose-Ricardo; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; García Segura, Antonio; Storz, Clemens; Ubierna, Marcos; Wagner, Karl

    2008-07-01

    PANIC is a wide-field NIR camera, which is currently under development for the Calar Alto observatory (CAHA) in Spain. It uses a mosaic of four Hawaii-2RG detectors and covers the spectral range from 0.8-2.5 μm (z to K-band). The field-of-view is 30×30 arcmin. This instrument can be used at the 2.2m telescope (0.45arcsec/pixel, 0.5×0.5 degree FOV) and at the 3.5m telescope (0.23arcsec/pixel, 0.25×0.25 degree FOV). The operating temperature is about 77K, achieved by liquid Nitrogen cooling. The cryogenic optics has three flat folding mirrors with diameters up to 282 mm and nine lenses with diameters between 130 mm and 255 mm. A compact filter unit can carry up to 19 filters distributed over four filter wheels. Narrow band (1%) filters can be used. The instrument has a diameter of 1.1 m and it is about 1 m long. The weight limit of 400 kg at the 2.2m telescope requires a light-weight cryostat design. The aluminium vacuum vessel and radiation shield have wall thicknesses of only 6 mm and 3 mm respectively.

  1. A pharmacological approach to panic disorder during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Uguz, Faruk

    2016-05-01

    Anxiety disorders and pregnancy may occur concurrently in some women. Although, several epidemiological or clinical studies about anxiety disorders in pregnancy exist, data on their treatment are very limited. Similar to other anxiety disorders, specific pharmacological treatment approaches in pregnant women with panic disorder (PD) have not been discussed in the literature. An important issue in the treatment of pregnant women with any psychiatric diagnosis is the risk-benefit profile of pharmacotherapy. Therefore, the treatment should be individualized. Untreated PD seems to be associated with several negative outcomes in the pregnancy. When the results of current study regarding the safety of pharmacological agents on the fetus and their efficacy in PD were gathered, sertraline, citalopram, imipramine and clomipramine at low doses for pure PD, and venlafaxine appeared to be more favorable than the other potential drugs. However, controlled studies examining optimum dosing, efficacy of antipanic medications and risk-benefit profile of intrauterine exposure to treated or untreated PD are urgently needed. PMID:26043642

  2. Increased mean platelet volume in patients with panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kokacya, Mehmet Hanifi; Copoglu, Umit Sertan; Kivrak, Yüksel; Ari, Mustafa; Sahpolat, Musa; Ulutas, Kemal Türker

    2015-01-01

    Objective The relationship between platelet activation and psychiatric disorders has been shown in previous work. Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a measure of platelet size and a good indicator of platelet activity, which increases in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). It is known that anxiety is a considerable factor in the etiology of mortality in CVDs. The aim of the present study was to investigate any probable difference in the MPV of patients with panic disorder (PD). Methods Sixty-one drug-free patients, aged 18–65 years and diagnosed with PD according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, were included in the study, along with 63 healthy age- and sex-matched volunteers. The body mass index (BMI) was calculated and MPV measured for each subject. Results The MPV was found to be higher in the PD group compared to the control group (P=0.004). There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of platelet count or BMI. Conclusion Alterations in platelet activity may be a reflection of abnormal 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 1A receptor function in the central nervous system of subjects with a diagnosis of PD. These findings may elucidate the relationship between CVDs and PD. The findings of the present study suggest that MPV is increased in PD patients. PMID:26508858

  3. Impact of the September 11th Terrorist Attacks on Teenagers' Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Munfakh, Jimmie Lou Harris; Kleinman, Marjorie; Lubell, Keri; Provenzano, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks on adolescents' mental health is reported. Two successive cohorts of students in 6 New York state high schools, identified from health courses, completed an in-school self-report baseline assessment of hopelessness, impairment, and help-seeking behavior. One year later, these students completed a…

  4. CO2 exposure as translational cross-species experimental model for panic.

    PubMed

    Leibold, N K; van den Hove, D L A; Viechtbauer, W; Buchanan, G F; Goossens, L; Lange, I; Knuts, I; Lesch, K P; Steinbusch, H W M; Schruers, K R J

    2016-01-01

    The current diagnostic criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders are being challenged by the heterogeneity and the symptom overlap of psychiatric disorders. Therefore, a framework toward a more etiology-based classification has been initiated by the US National Institute of Mental Health, the research domain criteria project. The basic neurobiology of human psychiatric disorders is often studied in rodent models. However, the differences in outcome measurements hamper the translation of knowledge. Here, we aimed to present a translational panic model by using the same stimulus and by quantitatively comparing the same outcome measurements in rodents, healthy human subjects and panic disorder patients within one large project. We measured the behavioral-emotional and bodily response to CO2 exposure in all three samples, allowing for a reliable cross-species comparison. We show that CO2 exposure causes a robust fear response in terms of behavior in mice and panic symptom ratings in healthy volunteers and panic disorder patients. To improve comparability, we next assessed the respiratory and cardiovascular response to CO2, demonstrating corresponding respiratory and cardiovascular effects across both species. This project bridges the gap between basic and human research to improve the translation of knowledge between these disciplines. This will allow significant progress in unraveling the etiological basis of panic disorder and will be highly beneficial for refining the diagnostic categories as well as treatment strategies. PMID:27598969

  5. Feeling Anxious: A Twin Study of Panic/Somatic Ratings, Anxiety Sensitivity and Heartbeat Perception in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Thalia C.; Gregory, Alice M.; Clark, David M.; Ehlers, Anke

    2007-01-01

    Background: Little is known about mechanisms of genetic influence on panic, particularly in childhood. Cognitive theories of panic disorder highlight threatening interpretations of physical sensations, and increased awareness of such sensations. Specifically, anxiety sensitivity (AS) and heartbeat perception (HBP) have been associated with panic…

  6. Translating Empirically Supported Strategies into Accessible Interventions: The Potential Utility of Exercise for the Treatment of Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Jasper A. J.; Powers, Mark B.; Berry, Angela C.; Otto, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Many patients suffering from panic disorder do not receive adequate care. Advances in the conceptualization and treatment of panic disorder encourage innovative strategies for targeting core fears (fears of anxiety sensations) that underlie this disorder. In this article, we discuss the use of exercise as a potential strategy for therapeutic…

  7. Internet Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Panic Disorder: Does the Inclusion of Stress Management Information Improve End-State Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jeffrey C.; Klein, Britt; Austin, David W.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has established Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD) as effective in reducing panic severity and frequency. There is evidence, however, that such programs are less effective at improving overall end-state functioning, defined by a PD clinician severity rating of [less than or equal to] 2 and…

  8. Addressing Relapse in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: Methods for Optimizing Long-Term Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arch, Joanna J.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a client with panic disorder and agoraphobia who relapses following a full course of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). To frame the client's treatment, the major components of CBT for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A) are reviewed. Likely reasons for the treatment's failure and strategies for improving…

  9. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia in a Multiethnic Urban Outpatient Clinic: Initial Presentation and Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Steven; Braunstein, Jeffrey W.; Halpern, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Few studies examine the effectiveness of panic control treatment across diverse ethnic groups. In this paper we present data on 40 patients (African American, n = 24; Caucasian, n = 16) with panic disorder and comorbid agoraphobia who presented at an anxiety disorder clinic in an inner-city area. On initial assessment both groups were similar on…

  10. The Interaction of Motivation and Therapist Adherence Predicts Outcome in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huppert, Jonathan D.; Barlow, David H.; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott W.

    2006-01-01

    This report is a post-hoc, exploratory examination of the relationships among patient motivation, therapist protocol adherence, and panic disorder outcome in patients treated with cognitive behavioral therapy within the context of a randomized clinical trial for the treatment of panic disorder (Barlow, Gorman, Shear, & Woods, 2000). Results…

  11. Long-Term Outcome in Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Panic Disorder: Clinical Predictors and Alternative Strategies for Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Timothy A.; Barlow, David H.

    1995-01-01

    Examines long-term outcome of cognitive-behavioral treatment in 63 patients with panic disorder. Many patients (27%) sought further treatment for panic during follow-up because of less-than-adequate response to treatment; nevertheless, additional treatment did not result in further clinical improvement. Pretreatment severity of disorder and the…

  12. Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (CBT) for Panic Disorder: Relationship of Anxiety and Depression Comorbidity with Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    White, Kamila S.; Barlow, David H.; Shear, M. Katherine; Gorman, Jack M.; Woods, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    Research evaluating the relationship of comorbidity to treatment outcome for panic disorder has produced mixed results. The current study examined the relationship of comorbid depression and anxiety to treatment outcome in a large-scale, multi-site clinical trial for cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for panic disorder. Comorbidity was associated with more severe panic disorder symptoms, although comorbid diagnoses were not associated with treatment response. Comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) were not associated with differential improvement on a measure of panic disorder severity, although only rates of comorbid GAD were significantly lower at posttreatment. Treatment responders showed greater reductions on measures of anxiety and depressive symptoms. These data suggest that comorbid anxiety and depression are not an impediment to treatment response, and successful treatment of panic disorder is associated with reductions of comorbid anxiety and depressive symptoms. Implications for treatment specificity and conceptual understandings of comorbidity are discussed. PMID:20421906

  13. Evaluation of Word Attack Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follettie, Joseph F.

    A framework for more apt and sensitive evaluation of generalized word attack skill--the heart of oral reading skill--is presented. The paper envisions the design and development of oral reading instruction as bounded by a fully-specified evaluation scheme. (Author)

  14. Detection of complex cyber attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorio-de Souza, Ian; Berk, Vincent H.; Giani, Annarita; Bakos, George; Bates, Marion; Cybenko, George; Madory, Doug

    2006-05-01

    One significant drawback to currently available security products is their inabilty to correlate diverse sensor input. For instance, by only using network intrusion detection data, a root kit installed through a weak username-password combination may go unnoticed. Similarly, an administrator may never make the link between deteriorating response times from the database server and an attacker exfiltrating trusted data, if these facts aren't presented together. Current Security Information Management Systems (SIMS) can collect and represent diverse data but lack sufficient correlation algorithms. By using a Process Query System, we were able to quickly bring together data flowing from many sources, including NIDS, HIDS, server logs, CPU load and memory usage, etc. We constructed PQS models that describe dynamic behavior of complicated attacks and failures, allowing us to detect and differentiate simultaneous sophisticated attacks on a target network. In this paper, we discuss the benefits of implementing such a multistage cyber attack detection system using PQS. We focus on how data from multiple sources can be combined and used to detect and track comprehensive network security events that go unnoticed using conventional tools.

  15. 57 Word Attack Skill Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mara, Patricia; Sorenson, Juanita

    These 57 game cards were developed to help teachers build their resource files for word-attack skills. Cards are keyed to skills suggested by the Wisconsin Design for Reading Skill Development and are color-coded according to their appropriateness for children in kindergarten through grade three. The front of each card gives the name of the skill,…

  16. Attack Vulnerability of Network Controllability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhe-Ming; Li, Xin-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Controllability of complex networks has attracted much attention, and understanding the robustness of network controllability against potential attacks and failures is of practical significance. In this paper, we systematically investigate the attack vulnerability of network controllability for the canonical model networks as well as the real-world networks subject to attacks on nodes and edges. The attack strategies are selected based on degree and betweenness centralities calculated for either the initial network or the current network during the removal, among which random failure is as a comparison. It is found that the node-based strategies are often more harmful to the network controllability than the edge-based ones, and so are the recalculated strategies than their counterparts. The Barabási-Albert scale-free model, which has a highly biased structure, proves to be the most vulnerable of the tested model networks. In contrast, the Erdős-Rényi random model, which lacks structural bias, exhibits much better robustness to both node-based and edge-based attacks. We also survey the control robustness of 25 real-world networks, and the numerical results show that most real networks are control robust to random node failures, which has not been observed in the model networks. And the recalculated betweenness-based strategy is the most efficient way to harm the controllability of real-world networks. Besides, we find that the edge degree is not a good quantity to measure the importance of an edge in terms of network controllability. PMID:27588941

  17. Serum biomarkers predictive of depressive episodes in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, M G; Cooper, J D; Chan, M K; Bot, M; Penninx, B W J H; Bahn, S

    2016-02-01

    Panic disorder with or without comorbid agoraphobia (PD/PDA) has been linked to an increased risk to develop subsequent depressive episodes, yet the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders remains poorly understood. We aimed to identify a biomarker panel predictive for the development of a depressive disorder (major depressive disorder and/or dysthymia) within a 2-year-follow-up period. Blood serum concentrations of 165 analytes were evaluated in 120 PD/PDA patients without depressive disorder baseline diagnosis (6-month-recency) in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). We assessed the predictive performance of serum biomarkers, clinical, and self-report variables using receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC) and the area under the ROC curve (AUC). False-discovery-rate corrected logistic regression model selection of serum analytes and covariates identified an optimal predictive panel comprised of tetranectin and creatine kinase MB along with patient gender and scores from the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) rating scale. Combined, an AUC of 0.87 was reached for identifying the PD/PDA patients who developed a depressive disorder within 2 years (n = 44). The addition of biomarkers represented a significant (p = 0.010) improvement over using gender and IDS alone as predictors (AUC = 0.78). For the first time, we report on a combination of biological serum markers, clinical variables and self-report inventories that can detect PD/PDA patients at increased risk of developing subsequent depressive disorders with good predictive performance in a naturalistic cohort design. After an independent validation our proposed biomarkers could prove useful in the detection of at-risk PD/PDA patients, allowing for early therapeutic interventions and improving clinical outcome. PMID:26687614

  18. Defense style in panic disorder before and after pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Carlo; Parenti, Paola; Aprile, Sonia; Cabrino, Chiara; De Panfilis, Chiara

    2011-05-30

    Whether or not the use of maladaptive defense style is a trait, as opposed to a state dependent phenomenon, in panic disorder (PD) is a topic still very much up for debate. The aim of the study was to verify whether PD patients, both before and after treatment, used different defense style than the control group. Sixty-one PD patients (recruited from an original sample of 90 patients) and 64 healthy controls were evaluated against the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV disorders, the Symptoms Check List-90, the Hamilton Rating Scales for Anxiety and for Depression and finally the Defense Style Questionnaire-40 (DSQ). The patients were treated with paroxetine or citalopram and were evaluated monthly for one year to assess the remission. The DSQ was re-administered to the patients at the end of the study. Before treatment, PD patients used more neurotic and immature forms of defense than controls. After treatment, those in remission used the same defense styles as the control group, whereas non-remitters still used more immature defenses. However, all the aforementioned difference disappeared, after excluding the effect of symptom severity. Our data supports the hypothesis that the use of maladaptive defenses might be the consequence of PD: when subjects fall ill, their capacity to use mature adaptive defenses may diminish, but when they recover their defensive style returns to a greater maturity. The present results are however limited by the dropout rate (one third of patients did not complete the study) and the use of just one questionnaire to evaluate the complexity of defense styles. PMID:20692044

  19. Characterization and performance of the 4k x 4k Hawaii-2RG Mosaic for PANIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, Vianak; Mall, Ulrich; Ramos, José Ricardo; Storz, Clemens; Wagner, Karl; Alter, Matthias; Baumeister, Harald; Bizenberger, Peter; Cárdenas, M. C.; Fernández, Matilde; Fried, Josef W.; García Segura, Antonio J.; Helmling, Jens; Huber, Armin; Ibáñez Mengual, J. M.; Laun, Werner; Lenzen, Rainer; Rodríguez Gómez, Julio F.; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer

    2010-07-01

    PANIC, the PAnoramic Near-Infrared Camera for Calar Alto, is one of the next generation instruments for this observatory. In order to cover a field of view of approximately 30 arcmin, PANIC uses a mosaic of four 2k x 2k HAWAII-2RG arrays from Teledyne. This document presents the preliminary results of the basic characterization of the mosaic. The performance of the system as a whole, as well as the in-house readout electronics and software capabilities will also be briefly discussed.

  20. Generic attack approaches for industrial control systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, David P.

    2006-01-01

    This report suggests a generic set of attack approaches that are expected to be used against Industrial Control Systems that have been built according to a specific reference model for control systems. The posed attack approaches are ordered by the most desirable, based upon the goal of an attacker. Each attack approach is then graded by the category of adversary that would be capable of utilizing that attack approach. The goal of this report is to identify necessary levels of security required to prevent certain types of attacks against Industrial Control Systems.

  1. Intermittent hypoendorphinaemia in migraine attack.

    PubMed

    Baldi, E; Salmon, S; Anselmi, B; Spillantini, M G; Cappelli, G; Brocchi, A; Sicuteri, F

    1982-06-01

    Beta-endorphin (RIA method, previous chromatographic extraction) was evaluated in plasma of migraine sufferers in free periods and during attacks. Decreased levels of the endogenous opioid peptide were found in plasma sampled during the attacks but not in free periods. Even chronic headache sufferers exhibited significantly lowered levels of beta-endorphin, when compared with control subjects with a negative personal and family history of head pains. The mechanism of the hypoendorphinaemia is unknown: lowered levels of the neuropeptide, which controls nociception, vegetative functions and hedonia, could be important in a syndrome such as migraine, characterized by pain, dysautonomia and anhedonia. The impairment of monoaminergic synapses ("empty neuron" condition) constantly present in sufferers from serious headaches, could be due to the fact that opioid neuropeptides, because of a receptoral or metabolic impairment, poorly modulate the respective monoaminergic neurons, resulting in imbalance of synaptic neurotransmission. PMID:6290072

  2. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure ... and cholesterol levels are very important for preventing heart attacks and strokes. See your doctor who treats your ...

  3. After Heart Attack, New Threat: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... of heart attack known as STEMI (ST elevation myocardial infarction). "Patients with ischemic heart disease are at the ... failure]. This includes those who have had a myocardial infarction, also called heart attack," Gho said. "Research studying ...

  4. Half of Heart Attacks Might Be 'Silent'

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158855.html Half of Heart Attacks Might Be 'Silent' Without typical symptoms, many miss ... HealthDay News) -- As many as half of all heart attacks may be "silent" -- without the typical crushing chest ...

  5. Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159557.html Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death Study points to need for better coordinated care, ... people with diabetes have a higher risk of death after a heart attack. "We knew that following ...

  6. Heart Attacks Striking Younger, Fatter Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157946.html Heart Attacks Striking Younger, Fatter Americans: Study Doctors, patients need ... 24, 2016 THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attack victims in the United States are becoming younger ...

  7. Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159557.html Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death Study points to need for better coordinated ... are much more likely to die after a heart attack than people without the blood sugar condition, a ...

  8. Being active after a heart attack (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... best activity when you start exercising after a heart attack. Start slowly, and increase the amount of time ... best activity when you start exercising after a heart attack. Start slowly, and increase the amount of time ...

  9. Fat May Not Hike Heart Attack Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160179.html Fat May Not Hike Heart Attack Risk: Study But it does raise diabetes risk, ... that obesity may not increase the risk of heart attack or premature death. Their study of identical twins ...

  10. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000080.htm Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke To use the sharing features on ... with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure ...

  11. Half of Heart Attacks Might Be 'Silent'

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158855.html Half of Heart Attacks Might Be 'Silent' Without typical symptoms, many miss ... HealthDay News) -- As many as half of all heart attacks may be "silent" -- without the typical crushing chest ...

  12. Symptoms of Generalised Anxiety disorder but not Panic Disorder at age 15 increase the risk of depression at 18 in the ALSPAC cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Simon J C; Pearson, Rebecca; Stapinski, Lexine; Bould, Helen; Christmas, David M; Button, Katherine S; Skapinakis, Petros; Lewis, Glyn; Evans, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and Panic Disorder (PD) differ in their biology and co-morbidities. We hypothesised that GAD but not PD symptoms at 15 are associated with depression diagnosis at 18. Methods Using longitudinal data from the ALSPAC birth cohort we examined relations of GAD and PD symptoms (measured by DAWBA) at 15 to depression at 18 (by CIS-R) using logistic regression. We excluded adolescents already depressed at 15 and adjusted for social class, maternal education, birth order, gender, alcohol intake and smoking. We repeated these analyses following multiple imputation for missing data. Results In the sample with complete data (n=2835), high and moderate GAD symptoms in adolescents not depressed at 15, were associated with increased risk of depression at 18 both in unadjusted analyses and adjusting for PD symptoms at 15 and the above potential confounders. The adjusted OR for depression at 18 in adolescents with high relative to low GAD scores was 5.2 [95% C.I. 3.0 - 9.1; overall p<0.0001]. There were no associations between PD symptoms and depression at 18 in any model (high relative to low PD scores, adjusted OR= 1.3 [95% C.I. 0.3 - 4.8], overall p=0.737). Missing data imputation strengthened the relations of GAD symptoms with depression (high relative to low GAD scores, OR= 6.2, [95% C.I. 3.9 - 9.9]) but those for PD became weaker. Conclusion Symptoms of GAD but not PD at 15 are associated with depression at 18. Clinicians should be aware that adolescents with GAD symptoms may develop depression. PMID:26315278

  13. Terrorism and Resilience: Adolescents' and Teachers' Responses to September 11, 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noppe, Illene C.; Noppe, Lloyd D.; Bartell, Denise

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the impact of terrorism on adolescents, who may be resolving developmental issues regarding their vulnerability to death. Approximately 4 months after the September 11th attacks, a survey was given to 973 Upper Midwest adolescents and teachers. Quantitative analyses indicated that adolescents (especially girls) were frightened…

  14. Implementation of an Intensive Treatment Protocol for Adolescents with Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelosante, Aleta G.; Pincus, Donna B.; Whitton, Sarah W.; Cheron, Daniel; Pian, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    New and innovative ways of implementing cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are required to address the varied needs of youth with anxiety disorders. Brief treatment formats may be useful in assisting teens to return to healthy functioning quickly and can make treatment more accessible for those who may not have local access to providers of CBT.…

  15. On Mitigating Distributed Denial of Service Attacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zhiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Denial of service (DoS) attacks and distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks are probably the most ferocious threats in the Internet, resulting in tremendous economic and social implications/impacts on our daily lives that are increasingly depending on the well-being of the Internet. How to mitigate these attacks effectively and efficiently…

  16. Cyberprints: Identifying Cyber Attackers by Feature Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakely, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of attributing cyber attacks is one of increasing importance. Without a solid method of demonstrating the origin of a cyber attack, any attempts to deter would-be cyber attackers are wasted. Existing methods of attribution make unfounded assumptions about the environment in which they will operate: omniscience (the ability to gather,…

  17. Touching Practice and Physical Education: Deconstruction of a Contemporary Moral Panic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the insecurities and discursive moral panics elicited by the discussion of intergenerational touch in education, and their subsequent manifestation in "classroom panopticism". In a number of contexts, public hysteria has grown around the interaction between adult and child, and whether this interaction stays within…

  18. After the Moral Panic? Reframing the Debate about Child Safety Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facer, Keri

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the initial "moral panic" surrounding children's access to the Internet at the end of the last century by analysing more than 900 media articles and key government documents from 1997 to 2001. It explores the ambiguous settlements that this produced in adult-child relations and children's access to the Internet. The paper then…

  19. Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrecque, Joane; Marchand, Andre; Dugas, Michel J.; Letarte, Andree

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for comorbid panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by combining treatment strategies for both disorders. A single-case, multiple-baseline design across participants was used. Three participants with primary PDA and secondary…

  20. Preliminary Evidence for Cognitive Mediation during Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Rosenfield, David; Suvak, Michael K.; Barlow, David H.; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott W.

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy are similarly effective for treating panic disorder with mild or no agoraphobia, but little is known about the mechanism through which these treatments work. The present study examined some of the criteria for cognitive mediation of treatment change in CBT alone, imipramine alone, CBT plus…

  1. Sensation-Focused Intensive Treatment for Panic Disorder with Moderate to Severe Agoraphobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morissette, Sandra Baker; Spiegel, David A.; Heinrichs, Nina

    2005-01-01

    The current article presents a detailed description of an intensive treatment program for panic disorder with moderate to severe levels of agoraphobia (PDA), called Sensation-Focused Intensive Treatment (SFIT). Although the efficacy of traditional CBT treatment programs has been well established for the treatment of PDA, patients with moderate to…

  2. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J.; Marchand, Andre; Letarte, Andree

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral treatment package for comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA). A single-case, multiple-baseline, across-subjects design was used with 3 primary GAD patients with secondary PDA. The efficacy of the treatment was evaluated with…

  3. Causes and Management of Treatment-Resistant Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia: A Survey of Expert Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, William C.; Bruce, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is recognized as an effective psychological treatment for panic disorder (PD). Despite its efficacy, some clients do not respond optimally to this treatment. Unfortunately, literatures on the prediction, prevention, and management of suboptimal response are not well developed. Considering this lack of empirical…

  4. Internet-based treatment for panic disorder: does frequency of therapist contact make a difference?

    PubMed

    Klein, Britt; Austin, David; Pier, Ciaran; Kiropoulos, Litza; Shandley, Kerrie; Mitchell, Joanna; Gilson, Kathryn; Ciechomski, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Internet-based interventions with therapist support have proven effective for treating a range of mental health conditions. This study examined whether frequency of therapist contact affected treatment outcomes. Fifty-seven people with panic disorder (including 32 with agoraphobia) were randomly allocated to an 8-week Internet-based cognitive behavioural treatment intervention (Panic Online) with either frequent (three e-mails per week) or infrequent (one e-mail per week) support from a psychologist. Posttreatment, intention-to-treat analyses revealed that both treatments were effective at improving panic disorder and agoraphobia severity ratings, panic-related cognitions, negative affect, and psychological and physical quality of life domains, with no differences between conditions. High end-state functioning was achieved by 28.6% of the frequent and infrequent participants, respectively. Therapist alliance, treatment credibility, and satisfaction also did not differ between groups, despite significantly greater therapist time invested in the frequent contact condition. The results provide evidence that the effectiveness of Internet-based mental health interventions may be independent of the frequency of therapist support and may, therefore, be more cost-effective than previously reported. PMID:19306149

  5. Life events in panic disorder-an update on "candidate stressors".

    PubMed

    Klauke, Benedikt; Deckert, Jürgen; Reif, Andreas; Pauli, Paul; Domschke, Katharina

    2010-08-01

    Studies on gene-environment interactions in mental disorders are characterized by powerful genetic techniques and well defined "candidate genes," whereas a definition of "candidate stressors," in most cases assessed in the form of life events (LEs), is inconsistent or not even provided. This review addresses this problem, with particular attention to the clinical phenotype of panic disorder (PD), by providing an overview and critical discussion for which life events are known to contribute to the etiology of the disease and how they may be conceptualized. There is converging evidence for a significant impact of cumulative as well as specific life events, such as threat, interpersonal and health-related events in adulthood, and abuse or loss/separation experiences in childhood, respectively, on the pathogenesis of panic disorder with some overlapping effect across the anxiety disorder spectrum as well as on comorbid major depression. Besides genetic vulnerability factors, personality and behavioral characteristics, such as anxiety sensitivity, neuroticism, and cognitive appraisal might moderate the influence of LEs on the development of panic disorder. The present state of knowledge regarding the specification and conceptualization of LEs in PD within a more complex multifactorial model, involving mediating and moderating factors in between genes and the clinical phenotype, is hoped to aid in informing future gene-environment interaction studies in panic disorder. PMID:20112245

  6. Impact of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment on Quality of Life in Panic Disorder Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telch, Michael J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Patients (n=156) meeting criteria for panic disorder with agoraphobia were randomly assigned to group cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) or a delayed-treatment control. Compared with the control group, CBT-treated patients showed significant reductions in impairment that were maintained at follow-up. Anxiety and phobic avoidance were…

  7. Catastrophic Misinterpretations as a Predictor of Symptom Change during Treatment for Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachman, Bethany A.; Marker, Craig D.; Clerkin, Elise M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive models of panic disorder suggest that change in catastrophic misinterpretations of bodily sensations will predict symptom reduction. To examine change processes, we used a repeated measures design to evaluate whether the trajectory of change in misinterpretations over the course of 12-week cognitive behavior therapy is related…

  8. Two-Day, Intensive Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deacon, Brett

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a highly effective treatment for panic disorder. However, few patients have access to this treatment, particularly those living in rural areas. In a pilot study, the author previously described the efficacy of a 2-day, intensive, exposure-based CBT intervention that was developed for the purpose of delivering…

  9. Neural correlates of anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Sara; Radaelli, Daniele; Cucchi, Michele; Ricci, Liana; Vai, Benedetta; Smeraldi, Enrico; Benedetti, Francesco

    2015-08-30

    Panic disorder has been associated with dysfunctional neuropsychological dimensions, including anxiety sensitivity. Brain-imaging studies of the neural correlates of emotional processing have identified a network of structures that constitute the neural circuitry for emotions. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and insula, which are part of this network, are also involved in the processing of threat-related stimuli. The aim of the study was to investigate if neural activity in response to emotional stimuli in the cortico-limbic network is associated to anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder. In a sample of 18 outpatients with panic disorder, we studied neural correlates of implicit emotional processing of facial affect expressions with a face-matching paradigm; correlational analyses were performed between brain activations and anxiety sensitivity. The correlational analyses performed showed a positive correlation between anxiety sensitivity and brain activity during emotional processing in regions encompassing the PFC, ACC and insula. Our data seem to confirm that anxiety sensitivity is an important component of panic disorder. Accordingly, the neural underpinnings of anxiety sensitivity could be an interesting focus for treatment and further research. PMID:26071623

  10. Face-Emotion Processing in Offspring at Risk for Panic Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Klein, Rachel G.; Mannuzza, Salvatore; Moulton, John L., III; Lissek, Shmuel; Guardino, Mary; Woldehawariat, Girma

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Panic disorder (PD) has been linked to perturbed processing of threats. This study tested the hypotheses that offspring of parents with PD and offspring with anxiety disorders display relatively greater sensitivity and attention allocation to fear provocation. Method: Offspring of adults with PD, major depressive disorder (MDD), or no…

  11. Specificity of Treatment Effects: Cognitive Therapy and Relaxation for Generalized Anxiety and Panic Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siev, Jedidiah; Chambless, Dianne L.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to address claims that among bona fide treatments no one is more efficacious than another by comparing the relative efficacy of cognitive therapy (CT) and relaxation therapy (RT) in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder without agoraphobia (PD). Two fixed-effects meta-analyses were…

  12. Parental Bonds in Children at High and Low Familial Risk for Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszycki, Diana; Bilodeau, Cynthia; Zwanzger, Peter; Schneider, Barry H.; Flament, Martine F.; Bradwejn, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    A rejecting and overprotective parenting style is considered to be an important risk factor for the development of anxiety disorders. This study examined the role of perceived parental bonding as a potential environmental risk factor for panic disorder (PD) in unaffected offspring with parental PD. Children with a biological parent with PD (n =…

  13. At the Eye of the Storm: An Academic('s) Experience of Moral Panic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikes, Pat

    2008-01-01

    The climate of moral panic that pertains around child abuse is such that any research that touches on children and sex is almost seen in itself to be abusive, with identity and career consequences for those who engage in it. In November 2005, an article that I had written some years earlier, "Scandalous Stories and Dangerous Liaisons: When Female…

  14. Respiratory and Cognitive Mediators of Treatment Change in Panic Disorder: Evidence for Intervention Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuret, Alicia E.; Rosenfield, David; Seidel, Anke; Bhaskara, Lavanya; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: There are numerous theories of panic disorder, each proposing a unique pathway of change leading to treatment success. However, little is known about whether improvements in proposed mediators are indeed associated with treatment outcomes and whether these mediators are specific to particular treatment modalities. Our purpose in this…

  15. Lightweight Distance Bounding Protocol against Relay Attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Seok; Cho, Kookrae; Yum, Dae Hyun; Hong, Sung Je; Lee, Pil Joong

    Traditional authentication protocols are based on cryptographic techniques to achieve identity verification. Distance bounding protocols are an enhanced type of authentication protocol built upon both signal traversal time measurement and cryptographic techniques to accomplish distance verification as well as identity verification. A distance bounding protocol is usually designed to defend against the relay attack and the distance fraud attack. As there are applications to which the distance fraud attack is not a serious threat, we propose a streamlined distance bounding protocol that focuses on the relay attack. The proposed protocol is more efficient than previous protocols and has a low false acceptance rate under the relay attack.

  16. Sex Differences in Internalizing Problems During Adolescence in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Tasha M; Winter-Messiers, Mary Ann; Gibson, Brandon; Schmidt, Alexandra M; Herr, Cynthia M; Solomon, Marjorie

    2016-02-01

    We hypothesized that the double hit conferred by sex and diagnosis increases the risk for internalizing disorders in adolescent females with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In a sample of 32 adolescents with ASD and 32 controls, we examined the effects of sex, diagnostic factors, and developmental stages on depression and anxiety. A 3-way interaction revealed that females with ASD exhibited greater depressive symptoms than males with ASD and female controls particularly during early adolescence; therefore, females with ASD might have a unique combination of genetic, hormonal, and psychosocial vulnerabilities that heighten their risk for depression during early adolescence. Additionally, the ASD group reported high levels of separation anxiety and panic in late adolescence, possibly indicating atypical development of independence. PMID:26438640

  17. [Physiological adolescence, pathological adolescence].

    PubMed

    Olié, Jean-Pierre; Gourion, David; Canceil, Olivier; Lôo, Henri

    2006-11-01

    The uncertainties of looming adulthood, nostalgia for childhood, and a general malaise explain the crisis of adolescence. Rebellion, conflict, occasional failure at school or in society, and at-risk behaviors are not always signs of future psychiatric illness. In contrast, the physician must be in a position to identify tell-tale signs such as dysmorphophobia, existential anxiety, a feeling of emptiness, and school or social breakdown. Most psychiatric disorders that begin in adolescence are only diagnosed several years after onset. Yet early diagnosis is of utmost importance, as treatment becomes less effective and the long-term prognosis worsens with time. Suicide is the second cause of death during adolescence. All signs of suicidal behavior require hospitalization and evaluation in a psychiatric unit. Antidepressants may be necessary in adolescence. The recent controversy concerning a possible increase in the suicidal risk during antidepressant treatment should not mask the fact that the real public health issue is depression, and not antidepressants. Eating disorders are especially frequent among adolescent girls; it is important to identify psychiatric comorbidities such as schizophrenia, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorders, and to assess the vital risk. Illicit drug and alcohol consumption are frequent during adolescence; for example, close to half of all French adolescents have tried cannabis at least once. Once again, it is important to detect psychiatric comorbidities in substance-abusing adolescents. Phobia is an underdiagnosed anxiety disorder among adolescents; it may become chronic if proper treatment is not implemented, leading to suffering and disability. Finally, two major psychiatric disorders--schizophrenia and bipolar disorder--generally begin in adolescence. Treatment efficacy and the long-term prognosis both depend on early diagnosis. Treatment must be tailored to the individual patient. "Borderline" states are over

  18. A polymorphic genomic duplication on human chromosome 15 is a susceptibility factor for panic and phobic disorders.

    PubMed

    Gratacòs, M; Nadal, M; Martín-Santos, R; Pujana, M A; Gago, J; Peral, B; Armengol, L; Ponsa, I; Miró, R; Bulbena, A; Estivill, X

    2001-08-10

    Anxiety disorders are complex and common psychiatric illnesses associated with considerable morbidity and social cost. We have studied the molecular basis of the cooccurrence of panic and phobic disorders with joint laxity. We have identified an interstitial duplication of human chromosome 15q24-26 (named DUP25), which is significantly associated with panic/agoraphobia/social phobia/joint laxity in families, and with panic disorder in nonfamilial cases. Mosaicism, different forms of DUP25 within the same family, and absence of segregation of 15q24-26 markers with DUP25 and the psychiatric phenotypes suggest a non-Mendelian mechanism of disease-causing mutation. We propose that DUP25, which is present in 7% control subjects, is a susceptibility factor for a clinical phenotype that includes panic and phobic disorders and joint laxity. PMID:11509185

  19. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month). The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human) brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF) to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication) group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF). Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine. PMID:21936901

  20. Shoulder injuries from attacking motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Shigeru; Nishimura, Tetsu; Itoh, Masaru; Wada, Yuhei; Watanabe, Naoki

    1997-03-01

    Sports injuries have bothered professional players. Although many medical doctors try to treat injured players, to prevent sports injuries is more important. Hence, it is required to clear a kinematic mechanism of the sport injuries. A shoulder of volleyball attacker or baseball pitcher is often inured by playing motion. The injuries are mainly caused at the end of long head tendon, which is located in the upper side of scapula. Generally, a muscle and tendon have enough strength against tensile force, however, it seems that they are sometimes defeated by the lateral force. It is imagined that the effect of the lateral force has a possibility of injuring the tendon. If we find the influence of the lateral force on the injured portion, the mechanism of injuries must be cleared. In our research, volleyball attacking motion is taken by high speed video cameras. We analyze the motion as links system and obtain an acceleration of an arm and a shoulder from video image data. The generated force at a shoulder joint is calculated and resolved into the lateral and longitudinal forces. Our final goal is to discuss a possibility that the lateral force causes the injuries.

  1. Atomoxetine Augmentation in a Case of Treatment Resistant Panic Disorder with Multiple Augments Failure: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ram, Dushad; Patil, Shwetha; Gowdappa, Basavana; Rajalakshmi, Iyshwarya

    2015-12-31

    Atomoxetine, a selective norepinephrine inhibitor, is effective in comorbid anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, however its role in panic disorder is unknown. We are presenting a case of panic disorder, who initially partially responded to clonazepam. When clonazepam was added with sertraline, escitalopram, desvenlafaxin, she did not improve significantly until paroxetine was added. When clonazepam-paroxetine combination was added with propranolol, etizolam, olanzepine, risperidone and amisulpride the symptom remission did not occur until a trial of Atomoxetine was done. PMID:26598594

  2. Atomoxetine Augmentation in a Case of Treatment Resistant Panic Disorder with Multiple Augments Failure: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Dushad; Patil, Shwetha; Gowdappa, Basavana; Rajalakshmi, Iyshwarya

    2015-01-01

    Atomoxetine, a selective norepinephrine inhibitor, is effective in comorbid anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, however its role in panic disorder is unknown. We are presenting a case of panic disorder, who initially partially responded to clonazepam. When clonazepam was added with sertraline, escitalopram, desvenlafaxin, she did not improve significantly until paroxetine was added. When clonazepam-paroxetine combination was added with propranolol, etizolam, olanzepine, risperidone and amisulpride the symptom remission did not occur until a trial of Atomoxetine was done. PMID:26598594

  3. Psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent electronic and conventional cigarette use.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Strong, David R; Sussman, Steve; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Unger, Jennifer B; Barrington-Trimis, Jessica L; Audrain-McGovern, Janet

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of electronic (e-) cigarettes has greatly increased recently, particularly in adolescents. However, the extent of psychiatric comorbidity with adolescent e-cigarette use and dual use of conventional (combustible) and e-cigarettes is unknown. This study characterized psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent conventional and e-cigarette use. Ninth grade students attending high schools in Los Angeles, CA (M age = 14) completed self-report measures of conventional/e-cigarette use, emotional disorders, substance use/problems, and transdiagnostic psychiatric phenotypes consistent with the NIMH-Research Domain Criteria Initiative. Outcomes were compared by lifetime use of: (1) neither conventional nor e-cigarettes (non-use; N = 2557, 77.3%); (2) e-cigarettes only (N = 412, 12.4%); (3) conventional cigarettes only (N = 152, 4.6%); and (4) conventional and e-cigarettes (dual use; N = 189, 5.6%). In comparison to adolescents who used conventional cigarettes only, e-cigarette only users reported lower levels of internalizing syndromes (depression, generalized anxiety, panic, social phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder) and transdiagnostic phenotypes (i.e., distress intolerance, anxiety sensitivity, rash action during negative affect). Depression, panic disorder, and anhedonia were higher in e-cigarette only vs. non-users. For several externalizing outcomes (mania, rash action during positive affect, alcohol drug use/abuse) and anhedonia, an ordered pattern was observed, whereby comorbidity was lowest in non-users, moderate in single product users (conventional or e-cigarette), and highest in dual users. These findings: (1) raise question of whether emotionally-healthier ('lower-risk') adolescents who are not interested in conventional cigarettes are being attracted to e-cigarettes; (2) indicate that research, intervention, and policy dedicated to adolescent tobacco-psychiatric comorbidity should distinguish conventional cigarette, e-cigarette, and dual use

  4. Percolation of localized attack on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai; Huang, Xuqing; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-02-01

    The robustness of complex networks against node failure and malicious attack has been of interest for decades, while most of the research has focused on random attack or hub-targeted attack. In many real-world scenarios, however, attacks are neither random nor hub-targeted, but localized, where a group of neighboring nodes in a network are attacked and fail. In this paper we develop a percolation framework to analytically and numerically study the robustness of complex networks against such localized attack. In particular, we investigate this robustness in Erdős-Rényi networks, random-regular networks, and scale-free networks. Our results provide insight into how to better protect networks, enhance cybersecurity, and facilitate the design of more robust infrastructures.

  5. Impact of imperfect information on network attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchionna, Andrew; Caloca, Jesus; Squires, Shane; Antonsen, Thomas M.; Ott, Edward; Girvan, Michelle

    2015-03-01

    This paper explores the effectiveness of network attack when the attacker has imperfect information about the network. For Erdős-Rényi networks, we observe that dynamical importance and betweenness centrality-based attacks are surprisingly robust to the presence of a moderate amount of imperfect information and are more effective compared with simpler degree-based attacks even at moderate levels of network information error. In contrast, for scale-free networks the effectiveness of attack is much less degraded by a moderate level of information error. Furthermore, in the Erdős-Rényi case the effectiveness of network attack is much more degraded by missing links as compared with the same number of false links.

  6. Impact of imperfect information on network attack.

    PubMed

    Melchionna, Andrew; Caloca, Jesus; Squires, Shane; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ott, Edward; Girvan, Michelle

    2015-03-01

    This paper explores the effectiveness of network attack when the attacker has imperfect information about the network. For Erdős-Rényi networks, we observe that dynamical importance and betweenness centrality-based attacks are surprisingly robust to the presence of a moderate amount of imperfect information and are more effective compared with simpler degree-based attacks even at moderate levels of network information error. In contrast, for scale-free networks the effectiveness of attack is much less degraded by a moderate level of information error. Furthermore, in the Erdős-Rényi case the effectiveness of network attack is much more degraded by missing links as compared with the same number of false links. PMID:25871157

  7. Anxiety Distorders: Types, Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sometimes symptoms may last longer. These are called panic attacks. Panic attacks are characterized by a fear of disaster or ... also have a strong physical reaction during a panic attack. It may feel like having a heart attack. ...

  8. Detecting Denial of Service Attacks in Tor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Norman; Krizanc, Danny; Liberatore, Marc

    Tor is currently one of the more popular systems for anonymizing near real-time communications on the Internet. Recently, Borisov et al. proposed a denial of service based attack on Tor (and related systems) that significantly increases the probability of compromising the anonymity provided. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for detecting such attacks and examine the effectiveness of the obvious approach to evading such detection. We implement a simplified version of the detection algorithm and study whether the attack may be in progress on the current Tor network. Our preliminary measurements indicate that the attack was probably not implemented during the period we observed the network.

  9. Hyperventilation in Panic Disorder and Asthma: Empirical Evidence and Clinical Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Meuret, Alicia E.; Ritz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Sustained or spontaneous hyperventilation has been associated with a variety of physical symptoms and has been linked to a number of organic illnesses and mental disorders. Theories of panic disorder hold that hyperventilation either produces feared symptoms of hypocapnia or protects against feared suffocation symptoms of hypercapnia. Although the evidence for both theories is inconclusive, findings from observational, experimental, and therapeutic studies suggest an important role of low carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in this disorder. Similarly, hypocapnia and associated hyperpnia are linked to bronchoconstriction, symptom exacerbation, and lower quality of life in patients with asthma. Raising CO2 levels by means of therapeutic capnometry has proven beneficial effects in both disorders, and the reversing of hyperventilation has emerged as a potent mediator for reductions in panic symptom severity and treatment success. PMID:20685222

  10. Etizolam versus placebo in the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia: a double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Savoldi, F; Somenzini, G; Ecari, U

    1990-01-01

    Thirty out-patients suffering from panic disorders associated with agoraphobia were enrolled in a double-blind, controlled trial to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of etizolam and placebo. After a 1-week washout period on placebo, patients were allocated at random to receive twice daily doses of either 0.5 mg etizolam or placebo over a period of 4 weeks. Assessments, made at baseline and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment, used the Hamilton Rating Scales for Anxiety and for Depression, the Covi Anxiety Scale, and determination of the weekly panic crises frequency. The results showed that etizolam produced significant improvements in chronic anxiety, phobic ideas, associated depressive symptoms and episodic anxiety, and was significantly more effective than placebo. Etizolam treatment was generally well tolerated and was not significantly different from placebo in this respect. PMID:2272192

  11. An experimental study of the "faster-is-slower" effect using mice under panic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng; Ma, Jian; Liu, Tianyang; Ran, Tong; Si, Youliang; Li, Tao

    2016-06-01

    A number of crowd accidents in last decades have attracted the interests of scientists in the study of self-organized behavior of crowd under extreme conditions. The faster-is-slower effect is one of the most referenced behaviors in pedestrian dynamics. However, this behavior has not been experimentally verified yet. A series of experiments with mice under panic were conducted in a bi-dimensional space. The mice were trained to be familiar with the way of escape. A varying number of joss sticks were used to produce different levels of stimulus to drive the mice to escape. The evacuation process was video-recorded for further analysis. The experiment found that the escape times significantly increased with the levels of stimulus due to the stronger competition of selfish mice in panic condition. The faster-is-slower effect was experimentally verified. The probability distributions of time intervals showed a power law and the burst sizes exhibited an exponential behavior.

  12. Panic-modulating effects of alprazolam, moclobemide and sumatriptan in the rat elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Sant'Ana, Ana Beatriz; Weffort, Luiz Fernando; de Oliveira Sergio, Thatiane; Gomes, Rafael Calsoni; Frias, Alana Tercino; Matthiesen, Melina; Vilela-Costa, Heloisa Helena; Yamashita, Paula Shimene de Melo; Vasconcelos, Alex Teles; de Bortoli, Valquiria; Del-Ben, Cristina Marta; Zangrossi, Helio

    2016-12-15

    The elevated T-maze was developed to test the hypothesis that serotonin plays an opposing role in the regulation of defensive behaviors associated with anxiety and panic. Previous pharmacological exploitation of this test supports the association between inhibitory avoidance acquisition and escape expression with anxiety and fear/panic, respectively. In the present study, we extend the pharmacological validation of this test by investigating the effects of other putative or clinically effective anxiety- and panic-modulating drugs. The results showed that chronic, but not acute injection of the reversible monoamine oxidase-A inhibitor moclobemide (3, 10 and 30mg/kg) inhibited escape expression, indicating a panicolytic-like effect. The same effect was observed after either acute or chronic treatment with alprazolam (1, 2 and 4mg/kg), a high potency benzodiazepine. This drug also impaired inhibitory avoidance acquisition, suggesting an anxiolytic effect. On the other hand, subcutaneous administration of the 5-HT1D/1B receptor agonist sumatriptan (0.1, 0.5 and 2.5μg/kg) facilitated escape performance, indicating a panicogenic-like effect, while treatment with α-para-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA; 4days i.p injections of 100mg/kg, or a single i.p injection of 300mg/kg), which caused marked 5-HT depletion in the amygdala and striatum, was without effect. Altogether, these results are in full agreement with the clinical effects of these compounds and offer further evidence that the elevated T-maze has broad predictive validity for the effects of anxiety- and panic-modulating drugs. PMID:27531502

  13. Evidence-based Guidelines for Interpretation of the Panic Disorder Severity Scale

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Toshi A.; Shear, M. Katherine; Barlow, David H.; Gorman, Jack M.; Woods, Scott W.; Money, Roy; Etschel, Eva; Engel, Rolf R.; Leucht, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Background The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is promising to be a standard global rating scale for panic disorder. In order for a clinical scale to be useful, we need a guideline for interpreting its scores and their changes, and for defining clinical change points such as response and remission. Methods We used individual patient data from two large randomized controlled trials of panic disorder (total n=568). Study participants were administered the PDSS and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI)-Severity and -Improvement. We applied equipercentile linking technique to draw correspondences between PDSS and CGI-Severity, numeric changes in PDSS and CGI-Improvement, and percent changes in PDSS and CGI-Improvement. Results The interpretation of the PDSS total score differed according to the presence or absence of agoraphobia. When the patients were not agoraphobic, score ranges 0–1 corresponded with “Normal,” 2–5 with “Borderline”, 6–9 with “Slightly ill”, 10–13 with “Moderately ill”, and 14 and above with “Markedly ill.” When the patients were agoraphobic, score ranges 3–7 meant “Borderline ill,” 8–10 “Slightly ill,” 11–15 “Moderately ill,” and 16 and above “Markedly ill.” The relationship between PDSS change and CGI-Improvement was more linear when measured as percentile change than as numeric changes, and was indistinguishable for those with or without agoraphobia. The decrease by 75–100% was considered “Very much improved,” that by 40–74% “Much improved,” and that by 10–39% “Minimally improved.” Conclusion We propose that “remission” of panic disorder be defined by PDSS scores of 5 or less and its “response” by 40% or greater reduction. PMID:19006198

  14. The Neuroanatomical Basis of Panic Disorder and Social Phobia in Schizophrenia: A Voxel Based Morphometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Picado, Marisol; Carmona, Susanna; Hoekzema, Elseline; Pailhez, Guillem; Bergé, Daniel; Mané, Anna; Fauquet, Jordi; Hilferty, Joseph; Moreno, Ana; Cortizo, Romina; Vilarroya, Oscar; Bulbena, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Objective It is known that there is a high prevalence of certain anxiety disorders among schizophrenic patients, especially panic disorder and social phobia. However, the neural underpinnings of the comorbidity of such anxiety disorders and schizophrenia remain unclear. Our study aims to determine the neuroanatomical basis of the co-occurrence of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia. Methods Voxel-based morphometry was used in order to examine brain structure and to measure between-group differences, comparing magnetic resonance images of 20 anxious patients, 20 schizophrenic patients, 20 schizophrenic patients with comorbid anxiety, and 20 healthy control subjects. Results Compared to the schizophrenic patients, we observed smaller grey-matter volume (GMV) decreases in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and precentral gyrus in the schizophrenic-anxiety group. Additionally, the schizophrenic group showed significantly reduced GMV in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, temporal gyrus and angular/inferior parietal gyrus when compared to the control group. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the comorbidity of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia might be characterized by specific neuroanatomical and clinical alterations that may be related to maladaptive emotion regulation related to anxiety. Even thought our findings need to be replicated, our study suggests that the identification of neural abnormalities involved in anxiety, schizophrenia and schizophrenia-anxiety may lead to an improved diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:25774979

  15. Panic disorder in African-Americans: symptomatology and isolated sleep paralysis.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Steven; Paradis, Cheryl

    2002-06-01

    While attention has been paid to the study of panic disorder (PD) with or without agoraphobia among Caucasians, surprisingly little empirical research within the United States has looked at the phenomenology of PD among minority groups. In this paper we present data we have collected and review other research on the phenomenology, social supports, and coping behavior among African-Americans with panic disorder. Our studies indicate that, in comparison to Caucasians, African-Americans with PD reported more intense fears of dying or going crazy, as well as higher levels of numbing and tingling in their extremities. African-Americans reported higher rates of comorbid post traumatic disorder and more depression. African-Americans also used somewhat different coping strategies (such as religiosity and counting one's blessings), less self-blame, and were somewhat more dissatisfied with social supports. The incidence of isolated sleep paralysis was, as per previous reports, higher in African-Americans. These findings, results of other research, and the implications for assessment and treatment are discussed within a semantic network analysis of panic (Hinton and Hinton 2002, this issue). PMID:12211324

  16. Reactivity to 35% carbon dioxide in bulimia nervosa and panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Woznica, Andrea; Vickers, Kristin; Koerner, Naomi; Fracalanza, Katie

    2015-08-30

    The inhalation of 35% carbon dioxide (CO₂) induces panic and anxiety in people with panic disorder (PD) and in people with various other psychiatric disorders. The anxiogenic effect of CO₂ in people with eating disorders has received sparse attention despite the fact that PD and bulimia nervosa (BN) have several common psychological and neurobiological features. This study compared CO₂-reactivity across three groups of participants: females with BN, females with PD, and female controls without known risk factors for enhanced CO₂-reactivity (e.g., social anxiety disorder, first degree relatives with PD). Reactivity was measured by self-reported ratings of panic symptomatology and subjective anxiety, analyzed as both continuous variables (change from room-air to CO₂) and dichotomous variables (positive versus negative responses to CO₂). Analyses of each outcome measure demonstrated that CO₂-reactivity was similar across the BN and PD groups, and reactivity within each of these two groups was significantly stronger than that in the control group. This is the first study to demonstrate CO₂-hyperreactivity in individuals with BN, supporting the hypothesis that reactivity to this biological paradigm is not specific to PD. Further research would benefit from examining transdiagnostic mechanisms in CO₂-hyperreactivity, such as anxiety sensitivity, which may account for this study's results. PMID:26141602

  17. Terrorist attacks escalate in frequency and fatalities preceding highly lethal attacks.

    PubMed

    Martens, Andy; Sainudiin, Raazesh; Sibley, Chris G; Schimel, Jeff; Webber, David

    2014-01-01

    Highly lethal terrorist attacks, which we define as those killing 21 or more people, account for 50% of the total number of people killed in all terrorist attacks combined, yet comprise only 3.5% of terrorist attacks. Given the disproportionate influence of these incidents, uncovering systematic patterns in attacks that precede and anticipate these highly lethal attacks may be of value for understanding attacks that exact a heavy toll on life. Here we examined whether the activity of terrorist groups escalates--both in the number of people killed per attack and in the frequency of attacks--leading up to highly lethal attacks. Analyses of terrorist attacks drawn from a state-of-the-art international terrorism database (The Global Terrorism Database) showed evidence for both types of escalation leading up to highly lethal attacks, though complexities to the patterns emerged as well. These patterns of escalation do not emerge among terrorist groups that never commit a highly lethal attack. PMID:24755753

  18. The cost of attack in competing networks.

    PubMed

    Podobnik, B; Horvatic, D; Lipic, T; Perc, M; Buldú, J M; Stanley, H E

    2015-11-01

    Real-world attacks can be interpreted as the result of competitive interactions between networks, ranging from predator-prey networks to networks of countries under economic sanctions. Although the purpose of an attack is to damage a target network, it also curtails the ability of the attacker, which must choose the duration and magnitude of an attack to avoid negative impacts on its own functioning. Nevertheless, despite the large number of studies on interconnected networks, the consequences of initiating an attack have never been studied. Here, we address this issue by introducing a model of network competition where a resilient network is willing to partially weaken its own resilience in order to more severely damage a less resilient competitor. The attacking network can take over the competitor's nodes after their long inactivity. However, owing to a feedback mechanism the takeovers weaken the resilience of the attacking network. We define a conservation law that relates the feedback mechanism to the resilience dynamics for two competing networks. Within this formalism, we determine the cost and optimal duration of an attack, allowing a network to evaluate the risk of initiating hostilities. PMID:26490628

  19. Preventive attack in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Prebeck, S.R.

    1993-05-28

    The decline of the Soviet Union upset the world`s balance of power and opened the door to third world proliferation since the superpowers no longer have tight control over their client-states. This increase in proliferation raised the issue of how the United States (US) should respond to a third world nation that is acquiring nuclear weapons. Should the United States depend on preventive attacks to stop the proliferation of nuclear weapons. This is not a new issue. Proliferation and preventive war have both been issues since the end of World War II. The United States considered a preventive attack against the Soviet Union in the postwar years. The Soviet Union considered preventive attacks against the People`s Republic of China in 1969. Israel conducted a preventive attack in 1981 against the Osiraq nuclear reactor in Iraq. Preventive attacks are politically untenable and are not militarily possible. Without perfect political conditions, it is unacceptable for the only remaining superpower to attack a second-rate power. It is militarily impossible for the United States to guarantee the removal of all nuclear weapons in a single preventive attack. This study concludes that the United States should not depend on preventive attacks to stop proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  20. 47 CFR 76.1612 - Personal attack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personal attack. 76.1612 Section 76.1612 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1612 Personal attack. (a) When, during origination cablecasting...

  1. Combating Memory Corruption Attacks On Scada Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellettini, Carlo; Rrushi, Julian

    Memory corruption attacks on SCADA devices can cause significant disruptions to control systems and the industrial processes they operate. However, despite the presence of numerous memory corruption vulnerabilities, few, if any, techniques have been proposed for addressing the vulnerabilities or for combating memory corruption attacks. This paper describes a technique for defending against memory corruption attacks by enforcing logical boundaries between potentially hostile data and safe data in protected processes. The technique encrypts all input data using random keys; the encrypted data is stored in main memory and is decrypted according to the principle of least privilege just before it is processed by the CPU. The defensive technique affects the precision with which attackers can corrupt control data and pure data, protecting against code injection and arc injection attacks, and alleviating problems posed by the incomparability of mitigation techniques. An experimental evaluation involving the popular Modbus protocol demonstrates the feasibility and efficiency of the defensive technique.

  2. Symptoms of transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong S

    2014-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a cerebrovascular disease with temporary (<24 h) neurological symptoms. The symptoms of TIA patients are largely similar to those of ischemic stroke patients and include unilateral limb weakness, speech disturbances, sensory symptoms, visual disturbances, and gait difficulties. As these symptoms are transient, they are frequently evaluated based on patients' subjective reports, which are less precise than those of patients with stroke whose longer-lasting symptoms and signs can be reliably assessed by physicians. Some symptoms, such as monocular blindness, are much more common in TIA than in stroke, and limb shaking occurs almost exclusively in TIA patients. On the other hand, symptoms like hemivisual field defects or limb ataxia are underappreciated in TIA patients. These transient neurological symptoms are not necessarily caused by cerebrovascular diseases, but can be produced by a variety of non-vascular diseases. Careful history taking, examination, and appropriate imaging tests are needed to differentiate these TIA mimics from TIA. Each TIA symptom has a different specificity and sensitivity, and there has been an effort to assess the outcome of the patients through the use of specific clinical features. On top of this, recent developments in imaging techniques have greatly enhanced our ability to predict the outcomes of TIA patients. Perception or recognition of TIA symptoms may differ according to the race, sex, education, and specialty of physicians. Appropriate education of both the general population and physicians with regard to TIA symptoms is important as TIAs need emergent evaluation and treatment. PMID:24157558

  3. Coping styles as moderating the relationships between terrorist attacks and well-being outcomes.

    PubMed

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Celestin-Westreich, Smadar; Celestin, Leon-Patrice; Verleye, Gino; Verté, Dominique; Ponjaert-Kristoffersen, Ingrid

    2009-06-01

    This study aims to explore use of coping strategies among adolescents and their relationships with well being in the context of ongoing terrorism. Furthermore, we aim to explore to what extent coping styles in addition to exposure variables explain well being of adolescents facing ongoing terror. During September 2003, after three years of ongoing terror attacks, 913 Israeli adolescents aged 12-18 years, completed the following questionnaires during regular class sessions: Demographics, Achenbach's Youth Self Report; Exposure to Terror and Post Traumatic Stress (PTS) questionnaire; Adolescent Coping Scale (ACS) and Brief Symptoms Inventory. Adolescents employed mainly problem solving strategies which mean they have the capacity to cope well in spite of stressful events. Emotional focused coping was associated with PTS and mental health problems. Regression analysis of different exposure and coping variables revealed that exposure, appraisal (subjective exposure) and coping styles explained 26-37% of the variance of different psychological problems. The findings highlight the importance of appraisal (subjective exposure) and coping strategies, for understanding adolescents' mental health outcomes. Moreover, these findings are relevant to the development of prevention/intervention programs that facilitate youth's cognitive and emotional adjustments to ongoing trauma risks and terror threats. PMID:18775563

  4. Terrorist Attacks Escalate in Frequency and Fatalities Preceding Highly Lethal Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Andy; Sainudiin, Raazesh; Sibley, Chris G.; Schimel, Jeff; Webber, David

    2014-01-01

    Highly lethal terrorist attacks, which we define as those killing 21 or more people, account for 50% of the total number of people killed in all terrorist attacks combined, yet comprise only 3.5% of terrorist attacks. Given the disproportionate influence of these incidents, uncovering systematic patterns in attacks that precede and anticipate these highly lethal attacks may be of value for understanding attacks that exact a heavy toll on life. Here we examined whether the activity of terrorist groups escalates–both in the number of people killed per attack and in the frequency of attacks–leading up to highly lethal attacks. Analyses of terrorist attacks drawn from a state-of-the-art international terrorism database (The Global Terrorism Database) showed evidence for both types of escalation leading up to highly lethal attacks, though complexities to the patterns emerged as well. These patterns of escalation do not emerge among terrorist groups that never commit a highly lethal attack. PMID:24755753

  5. Hill-Climbing Attacks and Robust Online Signature Verification Algorithm against Hill-Climbing Attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Daigo

    Attacks using hill-climbing methods have been reported as a vulnerability of biometric authentication systems. In this paper, we propose a robust online signature verification algorithm against such attacks. Specifically, the attack considered in this paper is a hill-climbing forged data attack. Artificial forgeries are generated offline by using the hill-climbing method, and the forgeries are input to a target system to be attacked. In this paper, we analyze the menace of hill-climbing forged data attacks using six types of hill-climbing forged data and propose a robust algorithm by incorporating the hill-climbing method into an online signature verification algorithm. Experiments to evaluate the proposed system were performed using a public online signature database. The proposed algorithm showed improved performance against this kind of attack.

  6. Hypermethylation of FOXP3 Promoter and Premature Aging of the Immune System in Female Patients with Panic Disorder?

    PubMed

    Prelog, Martina; Hilligardt, Deborah; Schmidt, Christian A; Przybylski, Grzegorz K; Leierer, Johannes; Almanzar, Giovanni; El Hajj, Nady; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Arolt, Volker; Zwanzger, Peter; Haaf, Thomas; Domschke, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Immunological abnormalities associated with pathological conditions, such as higher infection rates, inflammatory diseases, cancer or cardiovascular events are common in patients with panic disorder. In the present study, T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs), Forkhead-Box-Protein P3 gene (FOXP3) methylation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and relative telomere lengths (RTLs) were investigated in a total and subsamples of 131 patients with panic disorder as compared to 131 age- and sex-matched healthy controls in order to test for a potential dysfunction and premature aging of the immune system in anxiety disorders. Significantly lower TRECs (p = 0.004) as well as significant hypermethylation of the FOXP3 promoter region (p = 0.005) were observed in female (but not in male) patients with panic disorder as compared to healthy controls. No difference in relative telomere length was discerned between patients and controls, but significantly shorter telomeres in females, smokers and older persons within the patient group. The presently observed reduced TRECs in panic disorder patients and FOXP3 hypermethylation in female patients with panic disorder potentially reflect impaired thymus and immunosuppressive Treg function, which might partly account for the known increased morbidity and mortality of anxiety disorders conferred by e.g. cancer and cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27362416

  7. Mechanisms of change in cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder: The unique effects of self-efficacy and anxiety sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Matthew W.; Payne, Laura A.; White, Kamila S.; Shear, Katherine M.; Woods, Scott W.; Gorman, Jack M.; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined temporal dependencies of change of panic symptoms and two promising mechanisms of change (self-efficacy and anxiety sensitivity) during an 11-session course of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for Panic Disorder (PD). 361 individuals with a principal diagnosis of PD completed measures of self-efficacy, anxiety sensitivity, and PD symptoms at each session during treatment. Effect size analyses indicated that the greatest changes in anxiety sensitivity occurred early in treatment, whereas the greatest changes in self-efficacy occurred later in treatment. Results of parallel process latent growth curve models indicated that changes in self-efficacy and anxiety sensitivity across treatment uniquely predicted changes in PD symptoms. Bivariate and multivariate latent difference score models indicated, as expected, that changes in anxiety sensitivity and self-efficacy temporally preceded changes in panic symptoms, and that intraindividual changes in anxiety sensitivity and self-efficacy independently predicted subsequent intraindividual changes in panic symptoms. These results provide strong evidence that changes in self-efficacy and anxiety sensitivity during CBT influence subsequent changes in panic symptoms, and that self-efficacy and anxiety sensitivity may therefore be two distinct mechanisms of change of CBT for PD that have their greatest impact at different stages of treatment. PMID:24095901

  8. Adaptive cyber-attack modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Paul G.; Dougherty, Edward T.

    2006-05-01

    The pervasiveness of software and networked information systems is evident across a broad spectrum of business and government sectors. Such reliance provides an ample opportunity not only for the nefarious exploits of lone wolf computer hackers, but for more systematic software attacks from organized entities. Much effort and focus has been placed on preventing and ameliorating network and OS attacks, a concomitant emphasis is required to address protection of mission critical software. Typical software protection technique and methodology evaluation and verification and validation (V&V) involves the use of a team of subject matter experts (SMEs) to mimic potential attackers or hackers. This manpower intensive, time-consuming, and potentially cost-prohibitive approach is not amenable to performing the necessary multiple non-subjective analyses required to support quantifying software protection levels. To facilitate the evaluation and V&V of software protection solutions, we have designed and developed a prototype adaptive cyber attack modeling system. Our approach integrates an off-line mechanism for rapid construction of Bayesian belief network (BN) attack models with an on-line model instantiation, adaptation and knowledge acquisition scheme. Off-line model construction is supported via a knowledge elicitation approach for identifying key domain requirements and a process for translating these requirements into a library of BN-based cyber-attack models. On-line attack modeling and knowledge acquisition is supported via BN evidence propagation and model parameter learning.

  9. Smart Grid Integrity Attacks: Characterizations and Countermeasures

    SciTech Connect

    Annarita Giani; Eilyan Bitar; Miles McQueen; Pramod Khargonekar; Kameshwar Poolla

    2011-10-01

    Real power injections at loads and generators, and real power flows on selected lines in a transmission network are monitored, transmitted over a SCADA network to the system operator, and used in state estimation algorithms to make dispatch, re-balance and other energy management system [EMS] decisions. Coordinated cyber attacks of power meter readings can be arranged to be undetectable by any bad data detection algorithm. These unobservable attacks present a serious threat to grid operations. Of particular interest are sparse attacks that involve the compromise of a modest number of meter readings. An efficient algorithm to find all unobservable attacks [under standard DC load flow approximations] involving the compromise of exactly two power injection meters and an arbitrary number of power meters on lines is presented. This requires O(n2m) flops for a power system with n buses and m line meters. If all lines are metered, there exist canonical forms that characterize all 3, 4, and 5-sparse unobservable attacks. These can be quickly detected in power systems using standard graph algorithms. Known secure phase measurement units [PMUs] can be used as countermeasures against an arbitrary collection of cyber attacks. Finding the minimum number of necessary PMUs is NP-hard. It is shown that p + 1 PMUs at carefully chosen buses are sufficient to neutralize a collection of p cyber attacks.

  10. Situational awareness of a coordinated cyber attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudit, Moises; Stotz, Adam; Holender, Michael

    2005-03-01

    As technology continues to advance, services and capabilities become computerized, and an ever increasing amount of business is conducted electronically the threat of cyber attacks gets compounded by the complexity of such attacks and the criticality of the information which must be secured. A new age of virtual warfare has dawned in which seconds can differentiate between the protection of vital information and/or services and a malicious attacker attaining their goal. In this paper we present a novel approach in the real-time detection of multistage coordinated cyber attacks and the promising initial testing results we have obtained. We introduce INFERD (INformation Fusion Engine for Real-time Decision-making), an adaptable information fusion engine which performs fusion at levels zero, one, and two to provide real-time situational assessment and its application to the cyber domain in the ECCARS (Event Correlation for Cyber Attack Recognition System) system. The advantages to our approach are fourfold: (1) The complexity of the attacks which we consider, (2) the level of abstraction in which the analyst interacts with the attack scenarios, (3) the speed at which the information fusion is presented and performed, and (4) our disregard for ad-hoc rules or a priori parameters.

  11. Effect of migraine attacks on paracetamol absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Tokola, R A; Neuvonen, P J

    1984-01-01

    The absorption of effervescent paracetamol (1000 mg) was investigated in nine female patients during a migraine attack and in the same patients when headache free. Migraine attack decreased (P less than 0.05) the areas under the serum paracetamol concentration-time curves (AUC) of 0-2 h, 0-4 h and 0-6 h and the peak serum concentration. The severity of nausea correlated significantly with the decrease in the AUC values. Our results support findings of delayed gastric emptying in migraine attacks. Both a delay and an impairment of drug absorption may follow. PMID:6529526

  12. Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Panic Disorder Versus Treatment as Usual in a Managed Care Setting: 2-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addis, Michael E.; Hatgis, Christina; Cardemil, Esteban; Jacob, Karen; Krasnow, Aaron D.; Mansfield, Abigail

    2006-01-01

    Eighty clients meeting criteria for panic disorder and receiving either panic control therapy (PCT; M. G. Craske, E. Meadows, & D. H. Barlow, 1994) or treatment as usual (TAU) in a managed care setting were assessed 1 and 2 years following acute treatment. PCT was provided by therapists with little or no previous exposure to cognitive-behavioral…

  13. A Pilot Study of Sensation-Focused Intensive Treatment for Panic Disorder with Moderate to Severe Agoraphobia: Preliminary Outcome and Benchmarking Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitran, Stella; Morissette, Sandra B.; Spiegel, David A.; Barlow, David H.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents results of a treatment for panic disorder with moderate to severe agoraphobia (PDA-MS) called sensation-focused intensive treatment (SFIT). SFIT is an 8-day intensive treatment that combines features of cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder, such as interoceptive exposure and cognitive restructuring with ungraded…

  14. A Typology of Retaliation Strategies against Social Aggression among Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozlowski, Karen Phelan; Warber, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Girls respond to peer attacks of indirect social aggression in various ways. This study explores when and how victims retaliate against their aggressors. Qualitative interviews with 15 adolescent girls ages 10-16 suggest that victims of social aggression are likely to retaliate when their aggressors communicate the following: identity attacks,…

  15. Neuroticism moderates the effect of maximum smoking level on lifetime panic disorder: a test using an epidemiologically defined national sample of smokers.

    PubMed

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Sachs-Ericsson, Natalie; Feldner, Matthew T; Schmidt, Norman B; Bowman, Carrie J

    2006-03-30

    The present study evaluated a moderational model of neuroticism on the relation between smoking level and panic disorder using data from the National Comorbidity Survey. Participants (n=924) included current regular smokers, as defined by a report of smoking regularly during the past month. Findings indicated that a generalized tendency to experience negative affect (neuroticism) moderated the effects of maximum smoking frequency (i.e., number of cigarettes smoked per day during the period when smoking the most) on lifetime history of panic disorder even after controlling for drug dependence, alcohol dependence, major depression, dysthymia, and gender. These effects were specific to panic disorder, as no such moderational effects were apparent for other anxiety disorders. Results are discussed in relation to refining recent panic-smoking conceptual models and elucidating different pathways to panic-related problems. PMID:16499972

  16. Sequential combination of imipramine and self-directed exposure in the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Mavissakalian, M

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-eight patients who had panic disorder with agoraphobia completed 8 weeks of treatment with imipramine followed by 8 weeks of treatment with imipramine combined with behavior therapy consisting of self-directed exposure. Sixty-three percent (24) of the patients responded markedly to this cost-effective combined pharmacologic and behavioral approach. Results also revealed that most of the improvement in panic occurred during the first 8 weeks of treatment when imipramine treatment alone was used, whereas improvement in severity, anxiety, depression, and phobias, in particular, continued to be significant between midtreatment and end of study. Further analysis revealed that improvement in phobic anxiety and avoidance in the first 8 weeks of treatment, rather than improvement in panic, predicted final outcome. Implications of these findings on the complex issue of differential antipanic and antiphobic effects of imipramine are briefly discussed. PMID:2335493

  17. Identifying and Analyzing Web Server Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Christian; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara E.; Frincke, Deborah A.; Komisarczuk, Peter; Muschevici, Radu; Welch, Ian D.

    2008-08-29

    Abstract: Client honeypots can be used to identify malicious web servers that attack web browsers and push malware to client machines. Merely recording network traffic is insufficient to perform comprehensive forensic analyses of such attacks. Custom tools are required to access and analyze network protocol data. Moreover, specialized methods are required to perform a behavioral analysis of an attack, which helps determine exactly what transpired on the attacked system. This paper proposes a record/replay mechanism that enables forensic investigators to extract application data from recorded network streams and allows applications to interact with this data in order to conduct behavioral analyses. Implementations for the HTTP and DNS protocols are presented and their utility in network forensic investigations is demonstrated.

  18. Recovery of infrastructure networks after localised attacks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fuyu; Yeung, Chi Ho; Yang, Saini; Wang, Weiping; Zeng, An

    2016-01-01

    The stability of infrastructure network is always a critical issue studied by researchers in different fields. A lot of works have been devoted to reveal the robustness of the infrastructure networks against random and malicious attacks. However, real attack scenarios such as earthquakes and typhoons are instead localised attacks which are investigated only recently. Unlike previous studies, we examine in this paper the resilience of infrastructure networks by focusing on the recovery process from localised attacks. We introduce various preferential repair strategies and found that they facilitate and improve network recovery compared to that of random repairs, especially when population size is uneven at different locations. Moreover, our strategic repair methods show similar effectiveness as the greedy repair. The validations are conducted on simulated networks, and on real networks with real disasters. Our method is meaningful in practice as it can largely enhance network resilience and contribute to network risk reduction. PMID:27075559

  19. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  20. On localization attacks against cloud infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Linqiang; Yu, Wei; Sistani, Mohammad Ali

    2013-05-01

    One of the key characteristics of cloud computing is the device and location independence that enables the user to access systems regardless of their location. Because cloud computing is heavily based on sharing resource, it is vulnerable to cyber attacks. In this paper, we investigate a localization attack that enables the adversary to leverage central processing unit (CPU) resources to localize the physical location of server used by victims. By increasing and reducing CPU usage through the malicious virtual machine (VM), the response time from the victim VM will increase and decrease correspondingly. In this way, by embedding the probing signal into the CPU usage and correlating the same pattern in the response time from the victim VM, the adversary can find the location of victim VM. To determine attack accuracy, we investigate features in both the time and frequency domains. We conduct both theoretical and experimental study to demonstrate the effectiveness of such an attack.

  1. Heart attack - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    A heart attack occurs when blood flow to a part of your heart is blocked for a period of time ... muscle is damaged. It is also called a myocardial infarction (MI). Angina is pain or pressure in the ...

  2. Dengue Virus May Bolster Zika's Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159534.html Dengue Virus May Bolster Zika's Attack Prior exposure to this other mosquito-borne ... dengue fever virus may increase the severity of Zika virus, a new study says. Early stage laboratory ...

  3. Heart attack - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle is damaged. It is also called a myocardial infarction (MI). Watch this video about: Coronary artery disease ... help you take care of yourself after a heart attack. Questions What are the signs and symptoms that ...

  4. Recovery of infrastructure networks after localised attacks

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fuyu; Yeung, Chi Ho; Yang, Saini; Wang, Weiping; Zeng, An

    2016-01-01

    The stability of infrastructure network is always a critical issue studied by researchers in different fields. A lot of works have been devoted to reveal the robustness of the infrastructure networks against random and malicious attacks. However, real attack scenarios such as earthquakes and typhoons are instead localised attacks which are investigated only recently. Unlike previous studies, we examine in this paper the resilience of infrastructure networks by focusing on the recovery process from localised attacks. We introduce various preferential repair strategies and found that they facilitate and improve network recovery compared to that of random repairs, especially when population size is uneven at different locations. Moreover, our strategic repair methods show similar effectiveness as the greedy repair. The validations are conducted on simulated networks, and on real networks with real disasters. Our method is meaningful in practice as it can largely enhance network resilience and contribute to network risk reduction. PMID:27075559

  5. Recovery of infrastructure networks after localised attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fuyu; Yeung, Chi Ho; Yang, Saini; Wang, Weiping; Zeng, An

    2016-04-01

    The stability of infrastructure network is always a critical issue studied by researchers in different fields. A lot of works have been devoted to reveal the robustness of the infrastructure networks against random and malicious attacks. However, real attack scenarios such as earthquakes and typhoons are instead localised attacks which are investigated only recently. Unlike previous studies, we examine in this paper the resilience of infrastructure networks by focusing on the recovery process from localised attacks. We introduce various preferential repair strategies and found that they facilitate and improve network recovery compared to that of random repairs, especially when population size is uneven at different locations. Moreover, our strategic repair methods show similar effectiveness as the greedy repair. The validations are conducted on simulated networks, and on real networks with real disasters. Our method is meaningful in practice as it can largely enhance network resilience and contribute to network risk reduction.

  6. Sexual obsessions and suicidal behaviors in patients with mood disorders, panic disorder and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The topic of sexual obsessions as a psychiatric symptom has not been well investigated. The aim of this study was twofold: 1) to explore the presence of sexual obsessions in patients with mood disorders (n=156), panic disorder (n=54) and schizophrenia (n=79), with respect to non-psychiatric subjects (n=100); 2) to investigate the relationship between sexual obsessions and suicidal behaviors, taking into account socio-demographic variables ad mental disorders. Methods 289 psychiatric patients with mood disorders, panic disorder or schizophrenia, were recruited at the Italian University departments of psychiatry along with 100 non-psychiatric subjects, who presented for a routine eye exam at the ophthalmology department of the same Universities. The assessments included: the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Self-Report (OBS-SR), for sexual obsession, and the Mood Spectrum-Self Report lifetime version (MOODS-SR). Suicidality was assessed by means of 6 items of the MOODS-SR. Results Sexual obsessions were more frequent in schizophrenia (54.4%), followed by mood disorders (35.9%). Among schizophrenia patients, males reported more sexual obsessions than females (P<0.01). Subjects who were more likely to report suicidal behaviors (suicidal ideation, plans and attempts) were female (adjusted OR=1.99), patients with mental disorders, specifically mood disorders (adjusted OR=11.5), schizophrenia (adjusted OR=3.7) or panic disorder (adjusted OR=2.9), and subjects who reported lifetime sexual obsessions (adjusted OR= 3.6). Sexual obsessions remained independently associated with all aspects of suicidal behaviors. Age, education, marital and employment status were not related to suicidal behaviors. Conclusions Special attention should be given to investigate and establish effective strategies of treatment for sexual obsessions, especially those with comorbid mood disorders or

  7. Patient Characteristics and Variability in Adherence and Competence in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, James F.; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Sauer-Zavala, Shannon E.; Bullis, Jacqueline; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Although associations with outcome have been inconsistent, therapist adherence and competence continues to garner attention, particularly within the context of increasing interest in the dissemination, implementation, and sustainability of evidence-based treatments. To date, research on therapist adherence and competence has focused on average levels across therapists. With a few exceptions, research has failed to address multiple sources of variability in adherence and competence, identify important factors that might account for variability, or take these sources of variability into account when examining associations with symptom change. Objective (a) statistically demonstrate between- and within-therapist variability in adherence and competence ratings and examine patient characteristics as predictors of this variability and (b) examine the relationship between adherence/competence and symptom change. Method Randomly selected audiotaped sessions from a randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder were rated for therapist adherence and competence. Patients completed a self-report measure of panic symptom severity prior to each session and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Personality Disorder Scale prior to the start of treatment. Results Significant between- and within-therapist variability in adherence and competence were observed. Adherence and competence deteriorated significantly over the course of treatment. Higher patient interpersonal aggression was associated with decrements in both adherence and competence. Neither adherence nor competence predicted subsequent panic severity. Conclusions Variability and “drift” in adherence and competence can be observed in controlled trials. Training and implementation efforts should involve continued consultation over multiple cases in order to account for relevant patient factors and promote sustainability across sessions and patients. PMID:23339537

  8. Examining the Latent Class Structure of CO2 Hypersensitivity using Time Course Trajectories of Panic Response Systems

    PubMed Central

    Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Beadel, Jessica R.; Gorlin, Eugenia I.; Latendresse, Shawn J.; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Carbon dioxide (CO2) hypersensitivity is hypothesized to be a robust endophenotypic marker of panic spectrum vulnerability. The goal of the current study was to explore the latent class trajectories of three primary response systems theoretically associated with CO2 hypersensitivity: subjective anxiety, panic symptoms, and respiratory rate (fR). Methods Participants (n=376; 56% female) underwent a maintained 7.5% CO2 breathing task that included three phases: baseline, CO2 air breathing, and recovery. Growth mixture modeling was used to compare response classes (1..n) to identify the best-fit model for each marker. Panic correlates also were examined to determine class differences in panic vulnerability. Results For subjective anxiety ratings, a three-class model was selected, with individuals in one class reporting an acute increase in anxiety during 7.5% CO2 breathing and a return to pre-CO2 levels during recovery. A second, smaller latent class was distinguished by elevated anxiety across all three phases. The third class reported low anxiety reported during room air, a mild increase in anxiety during 7.5% CO2 breathing, and a return to baseline during recovery. Latent class trajectories for fR yielded one class whereas panic symptom response yielded two classes. Limitations This study examined CO2 hypersensitivity in one of the largest samples to date, but did not ascertain a general population sample thereby limiting generalizability. Moreover, a true resting baseline measure of fR was not measured. Conclusions Two classes potentially representing different risk pathways were observed. Implications of results will be discussed in the context of panic risk research. PMID:25496936

  9. Cyber Security Audit and Attack Detection Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Dale

    2012-05-31

    This goal of this project was to develop cyber security audit and attack detection tools for industrial control systems (ICS). Digital Bond developed and released a tool named Bandolier that audits ICS components commonly used in the energy sector against an optimal security configuration. The Portaledge Project developed a capability for the PI Historian, the most widely used Historian in the energy sector, to aggregate security events and detect cyber attacks.

  10. Distinguishing attack and second-preimage attack on encrypted message authentication codes (EMAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariwibowo, Sigit; Windarta, Susila

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we show that distinguisher on CBC-MAC can be applied to Encrypted Message Authentication Code (EMAC) scheme. EMAC scheme in general is vulnerable to distinguishing attack and second preimage attack. Distinguishing attack simulation on AES-EMAC using 225 message modifications, no collision have been found. According to second preimage attack simulation on AES-EMAC no collision found between EMAC value of S1 and S2, i.e. no second preimage found for messages that have been tested. Based on distinguishing attack simulation on truncated AES-EMAC we found collision in every message therefore we cannot distinguish truncated AES-EMAC with random function. Second-preimage attack is successfully performed on truncated AES-EMAC.

  11. Spread spectrum watermarking: malicious attacks and counterattacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Frank H.; Su, Jonathan K.; Girod, Bernd

    1999-04-01

    Most watermarking methods for images and video have been proposed are based on ideas from spread spectrum radio communications, namely additive embedding of a (signal adaptive or non-adaptive) pseudo-noise watermark pattern, and watermark recovery by correlation. Even methods that are not presented as spread spectrum methods often build on these principles. Recently, some skepticism about the robustness of spread spectrum watermarks has arisen, specifically with the general availability of watermark attack software which claim to render most watermarks undetectable. In fact, spread spectrum watermarks and watermark detectors in their simplest form are vulnerable to a variety of attacks. However, with appropriate modifications to the embedding and extraction methods, spread spectrum methods can be made much more resistant against such attacks. In this paper, we review proposed attacks on spread spectrum watermarks are systematically. Further, modifications for watermark embedding and extraction are presented to avoid and counterattack these attacks. Important ingredients are, for example, to adapt the power spectrum of the watermark to the host signal power spectrum, and to employ an intelligent watermark detector with a block-wise multi-dimensional sliding correlator, which can recover the watermark even in the presence of geometric attacks.

  12. Mechanisms of change in cognitive therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Hoffart, Asle; Sexton, Harold; Hedley, Liv M; Martinsen, Egil W

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the predictions of an integrated cognitive and behavioral model of agoraphobic avoidance in patients with chronic panic disorder and agoraphobia during the process of observed therapeutic change. Treatment was residential with the majority (n=165, 88%) receiving cognitive therapy, while the remaining 23 (12%) received guided mastery therapy. The results of latent variable path modeling of the changes occurring over the course of this treatment suggested that the anxiety elicited by bodily sensations influenced catastrophic beliefs, which, in turn, increased avoidance. Avoidance increased the anxiety elicited by bodily sensations. PMID:17727812

  13. Induction of Response to Psychotropic Medications in Depression and Panic After Concurrent Treatment of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Murthy Vasantmeghna; Pradeep, Bombe Abhijeet; Sadashiv, Lokhande Chetan; Bhagwandas, Shah Nilesh

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of depression with panic disorder, which did not respond to adequate psychiatric interventions over a period of several months. However, it improved completely with the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes mellitus. Hence, we infer that comorbid diabetes mellitus can render depression resistant to psychiatric interventions and must always be ruled out when treating patients who show poor response to adequate interventions for an adequate period of time. The role of antidepressants should also be considered in poor glycemic control. PMID:24860227

  14. A Moral Panic? The Problematization of Forced Marriage in British Newspapers.

    PubMed

    Anitha, Sundari; Gill, Aisha K

    2015-09-01

    This article examines the British media's construction of forced marriage (FM) as an urgent social problem in a context where other forms of violence against women are not similarly problematized. A detailed analysis of four British newspapers over a 10-year period demonstrates that media reporting of FM constitutes a moral panic in that it is constructed as a cultural problem that threatens Britain's social order rather than as a specific form of violence against women. Thus, the current problematization of FM restricts discursive spaces for policy debates and hinders attempts to respond to this problem as part of broader efforts to tackle violence against women. PMID:26139693

  15. Anxiety During Pregnancy and Postpartum

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sufferer feels very nervous and has recurring panic attacks. During a panic attack, she may experience shortness of breath, chest pain, ... palpitations, and numbness and tingling in the extremities. Panic attacks seem to go in waves, but it is ...

  16. The Contribution of Personal and Exposure Characteristics to the Adjustment of Adolescents Following War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavi, T.; Green, O.; Dekel, R.

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the unique contribution of both personal characteristics and several types of exposure variables to the adjustment of Israeli adolescents following the Second Lebanon War. Two thousand three hundred and fourteen adolescents, who lived in areas that were the target of multiple missile attacks, completed self-report questionnaires…

  17. Panic escape polyethism in worker and soldier Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai; Henderson, Gregg; Gautam, Bal K; Chen, Jie; Bhatta, Dependra

    2016-04-01

    Termites were the first animal to form societies. Two hundred million years of evolution provide for a multitude of innate social behaviors that can be experimentally dissected. These fine-tuned patterns of behavior are especially interesting when observing group decision making in the panic mode. In this study, we examined behavioral patterns of termites under panic conditions to gain insight into how an escape flow self-organizes. One hundred worker and 10 soldier Coptotermes formosanus were released into agar plates. After a disturbance was created most workers followed each other and ran along the wall of dishes, thus forming a unidirectional escape flow, whereas soldiers showed a significantly higher frequency of moving to the center of the arena or on periphery of the escape flow as compared to workers. Agonistic behavior was usually observed as soldiers moved to center or periphery. This is the first report on the behavioral repertoire of termites when panicked, with details on the behavioral polymorphism of workers and soldiers during an escape. PMID:25630524

  18. Anxiety sensitivity, the menstrual cycle, and panic disorder: a putative neuroendocrine and psychological interaction.

    PubMed

    Nillni, Yael I; Toufexis, Donna J; Rohan, Kelly J

    2011-11-01

    The 2:1 female-to-male sex difference in the prevalence of panic disorder (PD) suggests that there is a sex-specific vulnerability involved in the etiology and/or maintenance of this disorder. The purpose of this paper is to present a new conceptual model, which emphasizes the interaction between a cognitive vulnerability for PD, anxiety sensitivity, and the effects of progesterone and its metabolite, allopregnanolone, on behavioral and physiological responses to stress during the premenstrual phase. This interaction is proposed to be a potential sex-specific pathway that may initiate and/or maintain panic and anxiety symptoms in women. This review paper presents preliminary evidence from both the human and animal literatures to support this new model. Specific topics reviewed include: psychopathology related to the menstrual cycle, anxiety sensitivity and its relationship to the menstrual cycle, PMS, and PMDD, anxiety-modulating effects of progesterone and its neuroactive metabolite, allopregnanolone, and how results from the neuroendocrine literature relate to psychopathology or symptoms associated with the menstrual cycle. PMID:21855828

  19. Recall of family factors in social phobia and panic disorder: comparison of mother and offspring reports.

    PubMed

    Rapee, R M; Melville, L F

    1997-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that adults with various anxiety disorders, especially social phobia, recall their parents as excessively protective and controlling and as low in socialization. However, it is not clear whether such results would be supported by parents. In the present study subjects with social phobia, panic disorder, and nonclinical subjects and their mothers were given parallel measures of maternal control, socialization, and offspring early introverted behaviors as well as several questions relating to two early major life events and family size. Anxious offspring reported the usual high maternal control and low paternal socialization and mother supported the data on socialization. On control, mothers provided mixed results, disagreeing on a more standard measure, but showing agreement on a more operationalized measure. The data were more consistent for social phobia than for panic disorder. In terms of early life factors, both anxiety disorders were associated with fewer friends and more introverted behaviors, while family size and two major life events did not differentiate groups. PMID:9250435

  20. Cortisol awakening response in drug-naïve panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jakuszkowiak-Wojten, Katarzyna; Landowski, Jerzy; Wiglusz, Mariusz S; Cubała, Wiesław Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis is involved in the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD). The findings remain inconsistent. Cortisol awakening response (CAR) is a noninvasive biomarker of stress system activity. We designed the study to assess CAR in drug-naïve PD patients. Materials and methods We assessed CAR in 14 psychotropic drug-naïve outpatients with PD and 14 healthy controls. The severity of PD was assessed with Panic and Agoraphobia Scale. The severity of anxiety and depression was screened with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results No significant difference in CAR between PD patients and control group was found. No correlations were observed between CAR and anxiety severity measures in PD patients and controls. Limitations The number of participating subjects was relatively small, and the study results apply to nonsuicidal drug-naïve PD patients without agoraphobia and with short-illness duration. There was a lack of control on subjects’ compliance with the sampling instructions. Conclusion The study provides no support for elevated CAR levels in drug-naïve PD patients without agoraphobia. PMID:27390521

  1. A usability assessment on a virtual reality system for panic disorder treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaelin; Kawai, Takashi; Yoshida, Nahoko; Izawa, Shuhei; Nomura, Shinobu; Eames, Douglas; Kaiya, Hisanobu

    2008-02-01

    The authors have developed a virtual reality exposure system that reflects the Japanese culture and environment. Concretely, the system focuses on the subway environment, which is the environment most patients receiving treatment for panic disorder at hospitals in Tokyo, Japan tend to avoid. The system is PC based and features realistic video images and highly interactive functionality. In particular, the system enables instant transformation of the virtual space and allows situations to be freely customized according to the condition and symptoms expressed by each patient. Positive results achieved in therapy assessments aimed at patients with panic disorder accompanying agoraphobia indicate the possibility of indoor treatment. Full utilization of the functionality available requires that the interactive functions be easily operable. Accordingly, there appears to be a need for usability testing aimed at determining whether or not a therapist can operate the system naturally while focusing fully on treatment. In this paper, the configuration of the virtual reality exposure system focusing on the subway environment is outlined. Further, the results of usability tests aimed at assessing how naturally it can be operated while focusing fully on treatment are described.

  2. Hand Test scores of panic disordered outpatients sexually abused as children.

    PubMed

    Zizolfi, S; Cilli, G; Concari, S; Colombo, G

    1997-12-01

    A history of childhood sexual abuse has been implicated in a variety of adult psychiatric disorders as more frequent in females than in males and in subjects with more prominent dissociative symptoms such as panic disorder. Previous research has varied greatly in terms of methods, measurement instruments, and reported findings. Recent studies, however, suggest that projective techniques may be useful in resolving some of these inconsistencies. The present study utilized the Hand Test to investigate the late effects of childhood sexual trauma in a group of authenticated cases of panic disordered adult outpatients sexually abused as children compared to a matched sample of presumably nonabused patients. No statistically significant differences on quantitative variables were obtained between the two groups, but the group of outpatients (n = 16) sexually abused as children showed a larger latency to the ninth card of the Hand Test (shock reaction). This may be a potentially useful index in investigating cases of suspected abuse and confirms Wagner's (1983) contention that Card IX has a psychosexual "pull" as documented also by Italian studies. PMID:9450295

  3. Independent component analysis applied to pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI): new insights into the functional networks underlying panic attacks as induced by CCK-4.

    PubMed

    Dieler, A C; Sämann, P G; Leicht, G; Eser, D; Kirsch, V; Baghai, T C; Karch, S; Schüle, C; Pogarell, O; Czisch, M; Rupprecht, R; Mulert, C

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) is a method to study effects of psychopharmacological agents on neural activation. Changes of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD), the basis of functional MRI (fMRI), are typically obtained at relatively high sampling frequencies. This has more recently been exploited in the field of fMRI by applying independent component analysis (ICA), an explorative data analysis method decomposing activation into distinct neural networks. While already successfully used to investigate resting network and task-induced activity, its use in phMRI is new. Further extension of this method to tensorial probabilistic ICA (tensor PICA) allows to group similar brain activation across the anatomical, temporal, subject or session domain. This approach is useful for pharmacological experiments when no pharmacokinetic model exists. We exemplify this method using data from a placebo-controlled cholecystokinine-4 (CCK-4) injection experiment performed on 16 neuropsychiatrically and medically healthy males (age 25.6 +/- 4.2 years). Tensor PICA identified strong increases in activity in 12 networks. Comparison with results gained from the standard approach (voxelwise regression analysis) revealed good reproduction of areas previously associated with CCK-4 action, such as the anterior cingulate, orbitofrontal cortex, cerebellum, temporolateral, left parietal and insular areas, striatum, and precuneus. Several other components such as the dorsal anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex were identified, suggesting higher sensitivity of the method. Exploration of the time courses of each activated network revealed differences, that might be lost when a fixed time course is modeled, e. g. neuronal responses to an acoustic warning signal prior to injection. Comparison of placebo and CCK-4 runs further showed that a proportion of networks are newly elicited by CCK-4 whereas other components are significantly active in the placebo conditions but further enhanced by CCK-4. In conclusion, group ICA is a promising tool for phMRI studies that allows quantifying and visualizing the modulation of neural networks by pharmacological interventions. PMID:19075726

  4. Performance Evaluation of AODV with Blackhole Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dara, Karuna

    2010-11-01

    A Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET) is a temporary network set up by a wireless mobile computers moving arbitrary in the places that have no network infrastructure. These nodes maintain connectivity in a decentralized manner. Since the nodes communicate with each other, they cooperate by forwarding data packets to other nodes in the network. Thus the nodes find a path to the destination node using routing protocols. However, due to security vulnerabilities of the routing protocols, mobile ad-hoc networks are unprotected to attacks of the malicious nodes. One of these attacks is the Black Hole Attack against network integrity absorbing all data packets in the network. Since the data packets do not reach the destination node on account of this attack, data loss will occur. In this paper, we simulated the black hole attack in various mobile ad-hoc network scenarios using AODV routing protocol of MANET and have tried to find a effect if number of nodes are increased with increase in malicious nodes.

  5. Individual triptan selection in migraine attack therapy.

    PubMed

    Belvís, Robert; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Kulisevsky, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    About 6% of men and 18% of women suffer migraine attacks. Migraine can induce a great impact in the quality of life of the patient and the costs of medical care and lost productivity can be also high. There are two therapeutic approaches in the treatment of migraine: preventive therapy and acute treatment of migraine attack. Immediate treatment with selective serotonin [5-HT1B/1T] receptor agonists (so-called triptans) is the first-line option in the acute treatment of moderate-severe migraine attacks. The introduction in early nineties of triptans was a revolution in migraine therapy and evidences about their efficacy are at present irrefutable. At the moment, there are seven marketed molecules: sumatriptan, rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, eletriptan, naratriptan, almotriptan and frovatriptan. Obviously, every molecule has different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodinamic properties and, moreover, some triptans have several formulations: tablets, dissolvable tablets, nasal and injections. The prescription of one of these seven triptans for a specified patient is based in the drug profile: efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Despite there are a lot of published studies using triptans, no clinical trial has analyzed all the molecules at the same time. Other data to take account in the final prescription are clinical characteristics of the migraine attack and patient characteristics: labour aspects, style of life and the patient medical history. We present a state-of-the-art of the triptan selection in treatment of moderate-severe migraine attacks. PMID:19149716

  6. Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke More Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack Updated:May 24,2016 Sometimes a heart attack ... Disease Go Red For Women Types of aneurysms Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) • ...

  7. A Game Theoretic Approach to Cyber Attack Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Liu

    2005-11-28

    The area investigated by this project is cyber attack prediction. With a focus on correlation-based prediction, current attack prediction methodologies overlook the strategic nature of cyber attack-defense scenarios. As a result, current cyber attack prediction methodologies are very limited in predicting strategic behaviors of attackers in enforcing nontrivial cyber attacks such as DDoS attacks, and may result in low accuracy in correlation-based predictions. This project develops a game theoretic framework for cyber attack prediction, where an automatic game-theory-based attack prediction method is proposed. Being able to quantitatively predict the likelihood of (sequences of) attack actions, our attack prediction methodology can predict fine-grained strategic behaviors of attackers and may greatly improve the accuracy of correlation-based prediction. To our best knowledge, this project develops the first comprehensive framework for incentive-based modeling and inference of attack intent, objectives, and strategies; and this project develops the first method that can predict fine-grained strategic behaviors of attackers. The significance of this research and the benefit to the public can be demonstrated to certain extent by (a) the severe threat of cyber attacks to the critical infrastructures of the nation, including many infrastructures overseen by the Department of Energy, (b) the importance of cyber security to critical infrastructure protection, and (c) the importance of cyber attack prediction to achieving cyber security.

  8. Intensive weekend group treatment for panic disorder and its impact on co-occurring PTSD: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ellen J; Barrera, Terri L; Hiatt, Emily L; Chaison, Angelic D; Dunn, Nancy Jo; Petersen, Nancy J; Stanley, Melinda A

    2015-06-01

    This pilot study examines the feasibility, acceptability, and potential effectiveness of delivering an intensive weekend group treatment for panic disorder (PD) to Veterans returning from deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan with co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The treatment program lasted 6h each day and was delivered by two experienced therapists. Patients received core components of panic treatment, including psychoeducation, cognitive restructuring, and interoceptive exposure. The interoceptive exposure exercises directly targeted anxiety sensitivity, a psychological construct also implicated in the maintenance of PTSD. Eighty-nine percent of patients who expressed interest in the treatment attended a baseline evaluation, and 63% of those who were study eligible initiated treatment. Treatment retention was high, with all 10 patients who initiated treatment completing the program. Veterans reported finding the treatment and delivery format highly acceptable and reported high levels of satisfaction. Panic symptoms improved significantly following the treatment and were maintained at a 7-month follow-up, with 71.4% of the sample reporting being panic free. Co-occurring PTSD symptoms also improved along with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Preliminary findings suggest that brief and intensive group treatments for PD/PTSD are a promising method of delivering cognitive behavioral therapy that may rapidly improve symptoms. This innovative treatment delivery format also may be a cost-effective way of increasing treatment engagement through increased access to quality care. PMID:25942646

  9. Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Panic Disorder versus Treatment as Usual in a Managed Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addis, Michael E.; Hatgis, Christina; Krasnow, Aaron D.; Jacob, Karen; Bourne, Leslie; Mansfield, Abigail

    2004-01-01

    Eighty clients enrolled in a managed care health plan who identified panic disorder as their primary presenting problem were randomly assigned to treatment by a therapist recently trained in a manual-based empirically supported psychotherapy (M. G. Craske, E. Meadows, & D. H. Barlow, 1994) or a therapist conducting treatment as usual (TAU).…

  10. Depression and anxiety among patients with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and other depressive/anxiety disorders in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Lieh; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Chen, I-Ming; Ma, Huei-Mei; Lee, Ming-Tzu; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Gau, Shur-Fen

    2016-07-30

    The aim of this study is to compare the severity of depression and anxiety in individuals with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, other depressive/anxiety disorders, and healthy controls in a Han Chinese population. According to the DSM-IV-TR-based diagnostic interviews, we recruited 152 subjects with somatoform disorders (SG), 56 with panic disorder (PG), 85 with other depressive/anxiety disorders (OG), and 179 without any psychiatric disorder (NG). The four groups reported on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) for depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively. Correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were used to determine the effects of demographic factors and psychiatric diagnoses on depressive and anxiety symptoms separately. BDI-II scores were not significantly different in SG, PG, and OG but were higher than NG. SG and PG had the highest BAI scores, whereas NG had the lowest. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that the associated factors for BDI-II were gender, residential location, somatoform disorders, panic disorder, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder, whereas BAI was significantly associated with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and MDD. Our results strongly suggest the inclusion of clinical assessment of depressive and anxious symptoms in patients with somatoform disorders. PMID:27179181

  11. Preclinical modeling of primal emotional affects (Seeking, Panic and Play): gateways to the development of new treatments for depression.

    PubMed

    Panksepp, Jaak; Yovell, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian brains contain at least 7 primal emotional systems--Seeking, Rage, Fear, Lust, Care, Panic and Play (capitalization reflects a proposed primary-process terminology, to minimize semantic confusions and mereological fallacies). These systems help organisms feel affectively balanced (e.g. euthymic) and unbalanced (e.g. depressive, irritable, manic), providing novel insights for understanding human psychopathologies. Three systems are especially important for understanding depression: The separation distress (Panic) system mediates the psychic pain of separation distress (i.e. excessive sadness and grief), which can be counteracted by minimizing Panic arousals (as with low-dose opioids). Depressive dysphoria also arises from reduced brain reward-seeking and related play urges (namely diminished enthusiasm (Seeking) and joyful exuberance (Play) which promote sustained amotivational states). We describe how an understanding of these fundamental emotional circuits can promote the development of novel antidepressive therapeutics--(i) low-dose buprenorphine to counteract depression and suicidal ideation emanating from too much psychic pain (Panic overarousal), (ii) direct stimulation of the Seeking system to counteract amotivational dysphoria, and (iii) the discovery and initial clinical testing of social-joy-promoting molecules derived from the analysis of the Play system. PMID:25341411

  12. More "C" Please: Commentary on Arch and Craske's (2011) "Addressing Relapse in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadler, Wayne P.

    2012-01-01

    Comments are offered to clarify the learning model proposed by Arch and Craske (2011) based on extensive clinical experience with the CBT model for treating panic disorder developed by Barlow and Craske (1990). Suggestions are made regarding treatment targets and several cases are offered as examples of how choice of treatment target can make a…

  13. Mechanism of Change in Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Panic Disorder: Evidence for the Fear of Fear Mediational Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Jasper A. J.; Powers, Mark B.; Cho, Yongrae; Telch, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for panic disorder. However, studies investigating the mechanisms responsible for improvement with CBT are lacking. The authors used regression analyses outlined by R. M. Baron and D. A. Kenny (1986) to test whether a reduction in fear of fear (FOF)…

  14. Physical, Mental, and Social Catastrophic Cognitions as Prognostic Factors in Cognitive-Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatments for Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Thomas V.; Leitenberg, Harold; Barlow, David H.; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, Katherine M.; Woods, Scott W.

    2005-01-01

    The authors explored the prognostic value of 3 different types of catastrophic cognitions in the treatment of panic disorder with and without mild-to-moderate agoraphobia using a sample of 143 participants who received either cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or imipramine in a randomized controlled trial. Stronger fears of social catastrophes…

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: A Randomized, Controlled Trial and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberge, Pasquale; Marchand, Andre; Reinharz, Daniel; Savard, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    A randomized, controlled trial was conducted to examine the cost-effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for panic disorder with agoraphobia. A total of 100 participants were randomly assigned to standard (n = 33), group (n = 35), and brief (n = 32) treatment conditions. Results show significant clinical and statistical improvement…

  16. Effects of ayahuasca on psychometric measures of anxiety, panic-like and hopelessness in Santo Daime members.

    PubMed

    Santos, R G; Landeira-Fernandez, J; Strassman, R J; Motta, V; Cruz, A P M

    2007-07-25

    The use of the hallucinogenic brew ayahuasca, obtained from infusing the shredded stalk of the malpighiaceous plant Banisteriopsis caapi with the leaves of other plants such as Psychotria viridis, is growing in urban centers of Europe, South and North America in the last several decades. Despite this diffusion, little is known about its effects on emotional states. The present study investigated the effects of ayahuasca on psychometric measures of anxiety, panic-like and hopelessness in members of the Santo Daime, an ayahuasca-using religion. Standard questionnaires were used to evaluate state-anxiety (STAI-state), trait-anxiety (STAI-trait), panic-like (ASI-R) and hopelessness (BHS) in participants that ingested ayahuasca for at least 10 consecutive years. The study was done in the Santo Daime church, where the questionnaires were administered 1h after the ingestion of the brew, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled procedure. While under the acute effects of ayahuasca, participants scored lower on the scales for panic and hopelessness related states. Ayahuasca ingestion did not modify state- or trait-anxiety. The results are discussed in terms of the possible use of ayahuasca in alleviating signs of hopelessness and panic-like related symptoms. PMID:17532158

  17. The Effects of Aggression on Symptom Severity and Treatment Response in a Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cassiello-Robbins, Clair; Conklin, Laren R.; Anakwenze, Ujunwa; Gorman, Jack M.; Woods, Scott W.; Shear, M. Katherine; Barlow, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests that patients with panic disorder exhibit higher levels of aggression than patients with other anxiety disorders. This aggression is associated with more severe symptomatology and interpersonal problems. However, few studies have examined whether higher levels of aggression are associated with a worse treatment response in this population. Methods The present study sought to examine the association of aggression with panic disorder symptom severity in a sample of 379 patients who participated in a trial examining long-term strategies for the treatment of panic disorder. Results We found that aggression was significantly associated with higher baseline levels of panic disorder symptoms, anxiety, depression, and functional impairment. Further, we found that patients higher in aggression did not achieve the same level of improvement in general anxiety symptoms during treatment compared to patients lower in aggression, even when controlling for baseline anxiety symptom severity. Conclusion These results suggest that more research is needed concerning patients with anxiety disorders with higher aggression, as they may be a group in need of additional treatment considerations. PMID:25987198

  18. Popular Culture and Moral Panics about "Children at Risk": Revisiting the Sexualisation-of-Young-Girls Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaliki, Liza

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to resist moral panics over children's media consumption, and especially girls' consumption of hyper-sexualised popular media, this paper aims to offer a more positive account of popular culture and young children's, especially girls', engagement with it. By adopting a historical approach to modern childhood and the moral panics…

  19. Attacks on public telephone networks: technologies and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosloff, T.; Moore, Tyler; Keller, J.; Manes, Gavin W.; Shenoi, Sujeet

    2003-09-01

    Signaling System 7 (SS7) is vital to signaling and control in America's public telephone networks. This paper describes a class of attacks on SS7 networks involving the insertion of malicious signaling messages via compromised SS7 network components. Three attacks are discussed in detail: IAM flood attacks, redirection attacks and point code spoofing attacks. Depending on their scale of execution, these attacks can produce effects ranging from network congestion to service disruption. Methods for detecting these denial-of-service attacks and mitigating their effects are also presented.

  20. [Adolescent pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Fatichi, B

    1991-10-01

    This exploration of adolescent pregnancy focuses on adolescents whose pregnancies are undesired. The physical and psychic transformations of puberty and adolescence may be experienced differently in different social contexts. The prolongation of school attendance in Western societies means that most adolescents remain financially dependent on their parents. But greater sexual freedom in the society at large has been reflected in an increase in early sexual activity among adolescents. Wider use of contraception has not completely eliminated prenatal pregnancy among adolescents. Adolescent pregnancies have actually declined in France as a proportion of all pregnancies carried to term, from 4% to 1.5-2% in the past 10 or 15 years. But in 1986, 42.5% of all induced abortions were performed on adolescents. Among causes of unwanted pregnancy in adolescents are their frequent inability to believe that they may be at risk of pregnancy, or that pregnancy can result from the 1st sexual intercourse. The episodic nature of sexual relations, the lack of ready availability of contraception, and specific shortcomings of different methods are factors in the frequent failure of adolescents to protect themselves against undesired pregnancy. Adolescents may become pregnant out of loneliness or to prove that they are women, or as a result of incest or prostitution. Adolescents who seek abortions are those who have discovered and acknowledged their pregnancies before the 12th week and had the courage to inform their parents and obtain legal permission for the abortion. Pregnancy terminations are more frequent in more advantaged societal sectors with more structured family life. The moral shock and sense of failure associated with abortion are often deeply felt by adolescents. Their experience is greatly influenced by the attitudes of those around them. Adolescents who carry their pregnancies to term are those who have not sought abortion in the 1st 12 weeks. Often they refuse to admit

  1. Cooperative regulation of anxiety and panic-related defensive behaviors in the rat periaqueductal grey matter by 5-HT1A and μ-receptors.

    PubMed

    Roncon, Camila M; Biesdorf, Carla; Coimbra, Norberto C; Audi, Elisabeth A; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico G

    2013-12-01

    Previous results with the elevated T-maze (ETM) test indicate that the antipanic action of serotonin (5-HT) in the dorsal periaqueductal grey (dPAG) depends on the activation endogenous opioid peptides. The aim of the present work was to investigate the interaction between opioid- and serotonin-mediated neurotransmission in the modulation of defensive responses in rats submitted to the ETM. The obtained results showed that intra-dPAG administration of morphine significantly increased escape latency, a panicolytic-like effect that was blocked by pre-treatment with intra-dPAG injection of either naloxone or the 5-HT1A antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1 piperazinyl] ethyl] -N- 2- pyridinyl-ciclohexanecarboxamide maleate (WAY-100635). In addition, previous administration of naloxone antagonized both the anti-escape and the anti-avoidance (anxiolytic-like) effect of the 5-HT1A agonist (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT), but did not affect the anti-escape effect of the 5-HT2A agonist (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI). Moreover, the combination of sub-effective doses of locally administered 5-HT and morphine significantly impaired ETM escape performance. Finally, the µ-antagonist D-PHE-CYS-TYR-D-TRP-ORN-THR-PEN (CTOP) blocked the anti-avoidance as well as the anti-escape effect of 8-OHDPAT, and the association of sub-effective doses of the µ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin acetate salt (DAMGO) and of 8-OHDPAT had anti-escape and anti-avoidance effects in the ETM. These results suggest a synergic interaction between the 5-HT1A and the µ-opioid receptor at post-synaptic level on neurons of the dPAG that regulate proximal defense, theoretically related to panic attacks. PMID:23598399

  2. The effect of constant threat of terror on Israeli Jewish and Arab adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Miri; Eid, Jawdat

    2007-03-01

    The effect on Israeli Jewish and Arab adolescents of living under constant threat of terrorist attacks was assessed in a sample of 346 adolescents. The study probed their direct and indirect exposure to terrorist attacks, avoidance of public centers, sharing feelings with significant others, and stress reaction symptoms. The adolescents showed mild to low levels of stress symptoms in reaction to terrorist attacks in Israel, with no significant differences between Jews and Arabs. The Jewish adolescents reported knowing more people involved in terror attacks and being more informed by their parents about them. Demographic and exposure variables explained 39% of the variance of stress reaction symptoms. Being female, knowing someone injured, having parents who discuss terrorist attacks or forbid going out, and more sharing of feelings were significantly related to higher stress symptoms. For Jewish adolescents, greater levels of sharing of feelings were related to higher distress. Jewish and Arab adolescents proved to be similarly affected by the threat of terror but were also resilient even in highly unusual circumstances. PMID:17999214

  3. Characterization of attacks on public telephone networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Gary V.; Manes, Gavin W.; Hale, John C.; Marks, Donald; Davis, Kenneth; Shenoi, Sujeet

    2001-02-01

    The U.S. Public Telephone Network (PTN) is a massively connected distributed information systems, much like the Internet. PTN signaling, transmission and operations functions must be protected from physical and cyber attacks to ensure the reliable delivery of telecommunications services. The increasing convergence of PTNs with wireless communications systems, computer networks and the Internet itself poses serious threats to our nation's telecommunications infrastructure. Legacy technologies and advanced services encumber well-known and as of yet undiscovered vulnerabilities that render them susceptible to cyber attacks. This paper presents a taxonomy of cyber attacks on PTNs in converged environments that synthesizes exploits in computer and communications network domains. The taxonomy provides an opportunity for the systematic exploration of mitigative and preventive strategies, as well as for the identification and classification of emerging threats.

  4. Responding to chemical attack. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bagley, R.W.

    1991-02-11

    In view of Iraq's stated intention of using chemical weapons in the Persian Gulf War, the Coalition forces must be prepared to respond. Iraq is capable of conducting such an attack. While the use of chemical weapons may not be militarily significant, the political effect of the use and the response to it may be very significant. Responses including the use of chemical and nuclear weapons are assessed in terms of their legality, political cost, and military effectiveness and found unacceptable. Reliance on diplomatic protests and on post-war criminal sanctions are judged ineffective. A response in the form of increased conventional attack on the Iraqi chemical infrastructure is recommended because that response will preserve the present Coalition, effectively counter the chemical attack, contribute to regional stability, and enhance the reputation of the United States for lawfulness and dependability.

  5. Robustness of interdependent networks under targeted attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuqing; Gao, Jianxi; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-06-01

    When an initial failure of nodes occurs in interdependent networks, a cascade of failure between the networks occurs. Earlier studies focused on random initial failures. Here we study the robustness of interdependent networks under targeted attack on high or low degree nodes. We introduce a general technique which maps the targeted-attack problem in interdependent networks to the random-attack problem in a transformed pair of interdependent networks. We find that when the highly connected nodes are protected and have lower probability to fail, in contrast to single scale-free (SF) networks where the percolation threshold pc=0, coupled SF networks are significantly more vulnerable with pc significantly larger than zero. The result implies that interdependent networks are difficult to defend by strategies such as protecting the high degree nodes that have been found useful to significantly improve robustness of single networks.

  6. Robustness of interdependent networks under targeted attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuqing; Gao, Jianxi; Buldyrev, Sergey; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2012-02-01

    When an initial failure of nodes occurs in interdependent networks, a cascade of failure between the networks occurs. Earlier studies focused on random initial failures. Here we study the robustness of interdependent networks under targeted attack on high or low degree nodes. We introduce a general technique which maps the targeted-attack problem in interdependent networks to the random-attack problem in a transformed pair of interdependent networks. We find that when the highly connected nodes are protected and have lower probability to fail, in contrast to single scale-free (SF) networks where the percolation threshold pc=0, coupled SF networks are significantly more vulnerable with pc significantly larger than zero. The result implies that interdependent networks are difficult to defend by strategies such as protecting the high degree nodes that have been found useful to significantly improve robustness of single networks.

  7. Quantifying Mixed Uncertainties in Cyber Attacker Payoffs

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Samrat; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Tipireddy, Ramakrishna; Oster, Matthew R.; Saha, Sudip

    2015-04-15

    Representation and propagation of uncertainty in cyber attacker payoffs is a key aspect of security games. Past research has primarily focused on representing the defender’s beliefs about attacker payoffs as point utility estimates. More recently, within the physical security domain, attacker payoff uncertainties have been represented as Uniform and Gaussian probability distributions, and intervals. Within cyber-settings, continuous probability distributions may still be appropriate for addressing statistical (aleatory) uncertainties where the defender may assume that the attacker’s payoffs differ over time. However, systematic (epistemic) uncertainties may exist, where the defender may not have sufficient knowledge or there is insufficient information about the attacker’s payoff generation mechanism. Such epistemic uncertainties are more suitably represented as probability boxes with intervals. In this study, we explore the mathematical treatment of such mixed payoff uncertainties.

  8. Counteracting Power Analysis Attacks by Masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Elisabeth; Mangard, Stefan

    The publication of power analysis attacks [12] has triggered a lot of research activities. On the one hand these activities have been dedicated toward the development of secure and efficient countermeasures. On the other hand also new and improved attacks have been developed. In fact, there has been a continuous arms race between designers of countermeasures and attackers. This chapter provides a brief overview of the state-of-the art in the arms race in the context of a countermeasure called masking. Masking is a popular countermeasure that has been extensively discussed in the scientific community. Numerous articles have been published that explain different types of masking and that analyze weaknesses of this countermeasure.

  9. Counseling adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yamuna, Srinivasan

    2013-11-01

    Skills for counseling adolescents are acquired over a period of time by all practitioners of adolescent health. Though the principles of counseling remain the same the process of counseling an adolescent differs considerably from that of a child or an adult. Adolescents are in their transition between childhood and adulthood with physical, emotional and social challenges to face. The maturity level of each adolescent differs and that decides the pace and contents of each session. The counselor sets the context in a non judgmental manner so that the adolescent feels the ease and eagerness to self disclose. Privacy and confidentiality are two key issues that have to be taken care of during counseling. PMID:23888379

  10. Attack optimization for unequal moderate forces

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-06-01

    Attack allocation optimizations produce stability indices for unsymmetrical forces that indicate significant regions of both stability and instability and that have their minimum values roughly when the two sides have equal forces. This note derives combined stability indices for unsymmetrical offensive force configurations. The indices are based on optimal allocations of offensive missiles between vulnerable missiles and value based on the minimization of first strike cost, which is done analytically. Exchanges are modeled probabalistically and their results are converted into first and second strike costs through approximations to the damage to the value target sets held at risk. The stability index is the product of the ratio of first to second strike costs seen by the two sides. Optimal allocations scale directly on the opponent`s vulnerable missiles, inversely on one`s own total weapons, and only logarithmically on the attacker`s damage preference, kill probability, and relative target set. The defender`s allocation scales in a similar manner on the attacker`s parameters. First and second strike magnitudes increase roughly linearly for the side with greater forces and decrease linearly for the side with fewer. Conversely, the first and second strike magnitudes decrease for the side with greater forces and increase for the side with fewer. These trends are derived and discussed analytically. The resulting stability indices exhibit a minimum where the two sides have roughly equal forces. If one side has much larger forces than the other, his costs drop to levels low enough that he is relatively insensitive to whether he strikes first or second. These calculations are performed with the analytic attack allocation appropriate for moderate forces, so some differences could be expected for the largest of the forces considered.

  11. Discovering Collaborative Cyber Attack Patterns Using Social Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Haitao; Yang, Shanchieh Jay

    This paper investigates collaborative cyber attacks based on social network analysis. An Attack Social Graph (ASG) is defined to represent cyber attacks on the Internet. Features are extracted from ASGs to analyze collaborative patterns. We use principle component analysis to reduce the feature space, and hierarchical clustering to group attack sources that exhibit similar behavior. Experiments with real world data illustrate that our framework can effectively reduce from large dataset to clusters of attack sources exhibiting critical collaborative patterns.

  12. Airfoil Lift with Changing Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Elliott G

    1927-01-01

    Tests have been made in the atmospheric wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine the effects of pitching oscillations upon the lift of an airfoil. It has been found that the lift of an airfoil, while pitching, is usually less than that which would exist at the same angle of attack in the stationary condition, although exceptions may occur when the lift is small or if the angle of attack is being rapidly reduced. It is also shown that the behavior of a pitching airfoil may be qualitatively explained on the basis of accepted aerodynamic theory.

  13. Counterfactual attack on counterfactual quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Wnang, Jian; Tang, Chao Jing

    2012-05-01

    It is interesting that counterfactual quantum cryptography protocols allow two remotely separated parties to share a secret key without transmitting any signal particles. Generally, these protocols, expected to provide security advantages, base their security on a translated no-cloning theorem. Therefore, they potentially exhibit unconditional security in theory. In this letter, we propose a new Trojan horse attack, by which an eavesdropper Eve can gain full information about the key without being noticed, to real implementations of a counterfactual quantum cryptography system. Most importantly, the presented attack is available even if the system has negligible imperfections. Therefore, it shows that the present realization of counterfactual quantum key distribution is vulnerable.

  14. Differential attack on mini-AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajeng Gemellia, Asadini Dwi; Indarjani, Santi

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents the results of differential attack on Mini-AES algorithm. The differential trails are constructed using all combinations of propagation ratio without repetition. To give practical results, we implement the key extraction for differential characteristics which have the highest and lowest probability as a comparison. Based on total propagation ratio and complexity resulted, Mini-AES algorithms are vulnerable to differential attack. The best differential characteristic is the differential characteristic using a single active s-box with the propagation ratio of 8 / 16.

  15. The PHQ-PD as a Screening Tool for Panic Disorder in the Primary Care Setting in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Cristina Mae; Ruíz-Rodríguez, Paloma; Tomás-Tomás, Patricia; Gracia-Gracia, Irene; Dongil-Collado, Esperanza; Iruarrizaga, M. Iciar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Panic disorder is a common anxiety disorder and is highly prevalent in Spanish primary care centres. The use of validated tools can improve the detection of panic disorder in primary care populations, thus enabling referral for specialized treatment. The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy of the Patient Health Questionnaire-Panic Disorder (PHQ-PD) as a screening and diagnostic tool for panic disorder in Spanish primary care centres. Method We compared the psychometric properties of the PHQ-PD to the reference standard, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) interview. General practitioners referred 178 patients who completed the entire PHQ test, including the PHQ-PD, to undergo the SCID-I. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and positive and negative likelihood ratios of the PHQ-PD were assessed. Results The operating characteristics of the PHQ-PD are moderate. The best cut-off score was 5 (sensitivity .77, specificity .72). Modifications to the questionnaire's algorithms improved test characteristics (sensitivity .77, specificity .72) compared to the original algorithm. The screening question alone yielded the highest sensitivity score (.83). Conclusion Although the modified algorithm of the PHQ-PD only yielded moderate results as a diagnostic test for panic disorder, it was better than the original. Using only the first question of the PHQ-PD showed the best psychometric properties (sensitivity). Based on these findings, we suggest the use of the screening questions for screening purposes and the modified algorithm for diagnostic purposes. PMID:27525977

  16. Management of migraine in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kabbouche, Marielle A; Gilman, Deborah K

    2008-01-01

    Headaches in children and adolescents are still under-diagnosed. 75% of children are affected by primary headache by the age of 15 with 28% fitting the ICHD2 criteria of migraine. Migraine is considered a chronic disorder that can severely impact a child’s daily activities, including schooling and socializing. Early recognition and aggressive therapy, with acute and prophylactic treatments, as well as intensive biobehavioral interventions, are essential to control the migraine attacks and reverse the progression into intractable disabling headache. PMID:18830400

  17. Intrusion-Tolerant Replication under Attack

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Much of our critical infrastructure is controlled by large software systems whose participants are distributed across the Internet. As our dependence on these critical systems continues to grow, it becomes increasingly important that they meet strict availability and performance requirements, even in the face of malicious attacks, including those…

  18. Heart Attack - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Heart Attack - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional ( ...

  19. Modified localized attack on complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Gaogao; Du, Ruijin; Hao, Huifang; Tian, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Since a shell structure contains a wealth of information, it is not only very important for understanding the transport properties of the network, but also essential to identify influential spreaders in complex networks. Nodes within each shell can be classified into two categories: protected nodes and unprotected nodes. In this paper, we propose a generalization of the localized attack, modified localized attack, which means that when a randomly chosen node (root node) is under attack, protected nodes will not be removed, but unprotected nodes in the nearest shells will fail. We numerically and analytically study the system robustness under this attack by taking an Erdös-Rényi (ER) network, a regular random (RR) network and a scale-free (SF) network as examples. Moreover, a fraction of nodes belonging to giant component S and a critical threshold q c , where S approaches to zero, are given. The result implies that increasing connection density has been found to be useful to significantly improve network robustness.

  20. Responses to the September 11, 2001 Attacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Frances E.

    2001-01-01

    This editorial introduces a special section devoted to chronicling the responses of art therapists after the September 11th attacks. The section contains 10 articles from therapists in New York City, New Jersey, Long Island, Washington, DC, and California. Articles include stories of the reactions of the therapists as well as their work with…

  1. Union, States Wage Frontal Attack on NCLB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Bess; Sack, Joetta L.

    2005-01-01

    Widespread sniping at the Bush administration's centerpiece education law escalated into a frontal attack as the nation's largest teachers' union. Several school districts sued federal officials over the measure, just a day after the Utah legislature approved a bill challenging the reach of the law. The National Education Association's suit…

  2. Adversarial Feature Selection Against Evasion Attacks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Chan, Patrick P K; Biggio, Battista; Yeung, Daniel S; Roli, Fabio

    2016-03-01

    Pattern recognition and machine learning techniques have been increasingly adopted in adversarial settings such as spam, intrusion, and malware detection, although their security against well-crafted attacks that aim to evade detection by manipulating data at test time has not yet been thoroughly assessed. While previous work has been mainly focused on devising adversary-aware classification algorithms to counter evasion attempts, only few authors have considered the impact of using reduced feature sets on classifier security against the same attacks. An interesting, preliminary result is that classifier security to evasion may be even worsened by the application of feature selection. In this paper, we provide a more detailed investigation of this aspect, shedding some light on the security properties of feature selection against evasion attacks. Inspired by previous work on adversary-aware classifiers, we propose a novel adversary-aware feature selection model that can improve classifier security against evasion attacks, by incorporating specific assumptions on the adversary's data manipulation strategy. We focus on an efficient, wrapper-based implementation of our approach, and experimentally validate its soundness on different application examples, including spam and malware detection. PMID:25910268

  3. Method for detecting sophisticated cyber attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Potok, Thomas E.

    2008-11-18

    A method of analyzing computer intrusion detection information that looks beyond known attacks and abnormal access patterns to the critical information that an intruder may want to access. Unique target identifiers and type of work performed by the networked targets is added to audit log records. Analysis using vector space modeling, dissimilarity matrix comparison, and clustering of the event records is then performed.

  4. Survival of child after lion attack

    PubMed Central

    Dabdoub, Carlos F.; Dabdoub, Carlos B.; Chavez, Mario; Molina, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Background: Injuries to humans caused by attacks from large predators are very rare, especially in the United States, Europe, or Latin America. A few cases were reported on accidents in zoos or animal farms, being very uncommon in children. The purposes of this report include describing the case of a child who sustained an attack by a lion named “Bang-Bang”, which resulted in injuries to the head, chest, and abdomen, as well as the subsequent neurosurgical treatment and providing a review of the literature. Case Description: We report the case of an 8-year-old boy who was attacked by a lion during a circus show. The patient underwent an emergent neurosurgical procedure, including parietal craniectomy, cleaning, and extensive surgical debridement of the wounds. Despite open severe head trauma with brain damage as well as thorax and abdomen trauma, the child survived, with minimal neurological sequelae. Conclusions: Human injury resulting from encounters with nondomesticated animals is increasingly rising throughout the world. This case highlights the potentially violent and aggressive nature of wild mammals held in captivity. Unusual wild animal attacks and the complex injuries that result may pose a challenge to surgeons practicing in resource-limited settings. In this sense, the best treatment in the mentioned case is the prevention of human injuries by these animals. In addition, to attend to these infrequent cases, the authors emphasize the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best cosmetic and functional results. PMID:23869277

  5. Rhode Island School Terrorist Attack Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Michael W. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the state of safety and terrorist attack preparedness in Rhode Island Schools as determined by Rhode Island school leader perceptions. The study is descriptive in nature as it gathers data to describe a particular event or situation. Using a researcher generated survey based on terrorist preparedness guidelines and suggestions…

  6. Shark Attack! Sinking Your Teeth into Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    Presents a real life shark attack story and studies arm reattachment surgery to teach human anatomy. Discusses how knowledge of anatomy can be put to use in the real world and how the arm functions. Includes teaching notes and suggestions for classroom management. (YDS)

  7. CASE STUDY: DIELDRIN ATTACK IN DALYAN LAGOON

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the first two weeks of December 2005, NATO sponsored an Advanced Study Institute (ASI) in Istanbul, Turkey. Part of this ASI involved a case study of a terrorist attack, where a chemical was assumed to be dumped into Sulunger Lake in Turkey. This chapter documents the re...

  8. Association between Terror Attacks and Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weizman, Tal; Yagil, Yaron; Schreiber, Shaul

    2009-01-01

    Based on Durkheim's "Control theory," we explored the association between frequency of terror attacks in Israel and the frequency of suicide attempts admitted to the Emergency Room of a major general hospital in Tel-Aviv (1999-2004). Analysis of the six-year study period as a whole revealed no significant correlation between the variables, with…

  9. Plant defences against herbivore and insect attack

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants deploy a number of defences against attack by insects and other herbivores. Direct defence is conferred by plant products and structures that deter or kill the herbivores. Chemical toxins and deterrents vary widely among plant species, and some typical toxins include alkaloids, terpenoids, st...

  10. After Heart Attack, New Threat: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159007.html After Heart Attack, New Threat: Heart Failure 1 in 4 survivors develops this serious ... TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Risk of heart failure appears high within a few years of ...

  11. America under attack: the "10 commandments" of responding to mass terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Everly, G S; Mitchell, J T

    2001-01-01

    On September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks caused the catastrophic collapse of the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City. Approximately 40 minutes after the World Trade Center was attacked, a similar terrorist attack was perpetrated against the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Although the resultant physical devastation was beyond anything this nation has ever experienced, the psychological devastation may not be known for months, or even years. This paper discusses, not only a structure for understanding the phases of terrorism, but offers 10 recommendations for responding to acts of terrorism. PMID:11642190

  12. Error and attack vulnerability of temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajanovski, S.; Scellato, S.; Leontiadis, I.

    2012-06-01

    The study of real-world communication systems via complex network models has greatly expanded our understanding on how information flows, even in completely decentralized architectures such as mobile wireless networks. Nonetheless, static network models cannot capture the time-varying aspects and, therefore, various temporal metrics have been introduced. In this paper, we investigate the robustness of time-varying networks under various failures and intelligent attacks. We adopt a methodology to evaluate the impact of such events on the network connectivity by employing temporal metrics in order to select and remove nodes based on how critical they are considered for the network. We also define the temporal robustness range, a new metric that quantifies the disruption caused by an attack strategy to a given temporal network. Our results show that in real-world networks, where some nodes are more dominant than others, temporal connectivity is significantly more affected by intelligent attacks than by random failures. Moreover, different intelligent attack strategies have a similar effect on the robustness: even small subsets of highly connected nodes act as a bottleneck in the temporal information flow, becoming critical weak points of the entire system. Additionally, the same nodes are the most important across a range of different importance metrics, expressing the correlation between highly connected nodes and those that trigger most of the changes in the optimal information spreading. Contrarily, we show that in randomly generated networks, where all the nodes have similar properties, random errors and intelligent attacks exhibit similar behavior. These conclusions may help us in design of more robust systems and fault-tolerant network architectures.

  13. Recovery of human remains after shark attack.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W; James, Ross A; Heath, Karen J

    2006-09-01

    Two cases of fatal shark attack are reported where the only tissues recovered were fragments of lung. Case 1: An 18-year-old male who was in the sea behind a boat was observed by friends to be taken by a great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias). The shark dragged him under the water and then, with a second shark, dismembered the body. Witnesses noted a large amount of blood and unrecognizable body parts coming to the surface. The only tissues recovered despite an intensive beach and sea search were 2 fragments of lung. Case 2: A 19-year-old male was attacked by a great white shark while diving. A witness saw the shark swim away with the victim's body in its mouth. Again, despite intensive beach and sea searches, the only tissue recovered was a single piece of lung, along with pieces of wetsuit and diving equipment. These cases indicate that the only tissue to escape being consumed or lost in fatal shark attacks, where there is a significant attack with dismemberment and disruption of the integrity of the body, may be lung. The buoyancy of aerated pulmonary tissue ensures that it rises quickly to the surface, where it may be recovered by searchers soon after the attack. Aeration of the lung would be in keeping with death from trauma rather than from drowning and may be a useful marker in unwitnessed deaths to separate ante- from postmortem injury, using only relatively small amounts of tissues. Early organ recovery enhances the identification of human tissues as the extent of morphologic alterations by putrefactive processes and sea scavengers will have been minimized. DNA testing is also possible on such recovered fragments, enabling confirmation of the identity of the victim. PMID:16936505

  14. "Panic": the impact of Le Bon's crowd psychology on U.S. military thought.

    PubMed

    Bendersky, Joseph W

    2007-01-01

    The controversial crowd psychology of Gustave Le Bon has been both praised as an incisive contribution to social theory and also condemned as a doctrine of irrationality and mass manipulation associated with fascism. New archival documentation now demonstrates that Le Bon exercised significant influence on U.S. military thinking and practice through World War II. Army writings and officer training on morale, leadership, and battlefield psychology rested substantially on his theory of crowds, particularly regarding races and panic. Le Bon's racial psychology took on additional importance when the African-American 92 nd Infantry Division panicked during combat in Italy. This new evidence offers an excellent case study of the direct and enduring impact of a peculiar type of social psychology on the institutional culture of the army from the classrooms at the Army War College to the battlefield itself. PMID:17623871

  15. Obstacle optimization for panic flow--reducing the tangential momentum increases the escape speed.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Li, Jingyu; Shen, Chao; Yang, Sicong; Han, Zhangang

    2014-01-01

    A disastrous form of pedestrian behavior is a stampede occurring in an event involving a large crowd in a panic situation. To deal with such stampedes, the possibility to increase the outflow by suitably placing a pillar or some other shaped obstacles in front of the exit has been demonstrated. We present a social force based genetic algorithm to optimize the best design of architectural entities to deal with large crowds. Unlike existing literature, our simulation results indicate that appropriately placing two pillars on both sides but not in front of the door can maximize the escape efficiency. Human experiments using 80 participants correspond well with the simulations. We observed a peculiar property named tangential momentum, the escape speed and the tangential momentum are found to be negatively correlated. The idea to reduce the tangential momentum has practical implications in crowd architectural design. PMID:25531676

  16. Ergotism and the Salem witch panic: a critical analysis and an alternative conceptualization.

    PubMed

    Spanos, N P

    1983-10-01

    The controversial hypothesis that the Salem witchcraft panic of 1692 resulted from ergot poisoning was recently defended by Mary Matossian. She argued that (a) weather conditions in Salem were conducive to the growth of ergot, (b) new evidence concerning the age distribution of ergot sufferers is consistent with the ages of those who exhibited symptoms at Salem, and (c) the symptoms displayed and reported at Salem were those of convulsive ergotism. Each of these propositions is critically examined and rejected, and the events purportedly explained by the ergot hypothesis are accounted for within a social psychological framework. This perspective views the Salem crisis as a sociopolitical drama played out in terms of the worldview shared by seventeenth-century Puritans. The symptoms of demonic affliction are conceptualized as role enactments learned in and legitimated by the community, rather than as the results of disease. PMID:6361114

  17. Parental predictors of pediatric panic disorder/agoraphobia: a controlled study in high-risk offspring.

    PubMed

    Biederman, Joseph; Petty, Carter; Faraone, Stephen V; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R; Henin, Aude; Dougherty, Meghan; Lebel, Teresa J; Pollack, Mark; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate parental risk factors for pediatric-onset panic disorder/agoraphobia (PD/AG) in offspring at high risk for PD/AG. Comparisons were made between parents with PD who had a child with PD or AG (N = 27) and parents with PD without children with PD or AG (N = 79). Comparisons were also made between the spouses of these parents with PD. Separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and bipolar disorder in the parents with PD and their spouses accounted for the risk for childhood onset PD/AG in the offspring. This risk was particularly high if both parents were affected with social phobia. These findings suggest that psychiatric comorbidity with other anxiety disorders and with bipolar disorder in parents with PD and their spouses confer a particularly high risk in their offspring to develop PD/AG in childhood. PMID:16193490

  18. Insomnia Symptoms Following Treatment for Comorbid Panic Disorder With Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Héloïse; Marchand, André; Bouchard, Stéphane; Bélanger, Claude; Gosselin, Patrick; Langlois, Frédéric; Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J; Belleville, Geneviève

    2016-04-01

    Patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) frequently also suffer from insomnia. However, the impact of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders on insomnia has been understudied. Furthermore, comorbidity between anxiety disorders is common. Our main objective was to assess the impact of CBT for PDA or GAD on insomnia. In a quasi-experimental design, 86 participants with PDA and GAD received conventional CBT for their primary disorder or combined CBT for both disorders. Overall, CBTs had a significant impact on reducing insomnia symptoms (η = 0.58). However, among people with insomnia at pretest (67%), 33% still had an insomnia diagnosis, and the majority (63%) had clinically significant residual insomnia following treatment. In conclusion, the CBTs had a positive effect on the reduction of insomnia, but a significant proportion of participants still had insomnia problems following treatment. Clinicians should address insomnia during CBT for PDA and GAD. PMID:27019339

  19. Efficacy of telephone-administered behavioral therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Swinson, R P; Fergus, K D; Cox, B J; Wickwire, K

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a structured exposure-based behavior therapy program delivered by telephone to agoraphobic individuals who were isolated from specialized treatment centres. Forty-two individuals with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of panic disorder with agoraphobia who were living in rural areas of Ontario were assigned to either an eight-session telephone behavior therapy program or wait-list control condition. There were significant treatment x time interaction effects on several outcome variables. Patients originally in the wait-list group then received the same type of therapy and they also significantly improved. All treatment gains were maintained at three-month and six-month follow-up. Telephone behavior therapy appears to be a cost-effective and efficacious treatment for agoraphobics living in remote regions where specialized anxiety disorder services are not readily available. PMID:7755536

  20. From neural to genetic substrates of panic disorder: Insights from human and mouse studies.

    PubMed

    Santos, Mónica; D'Amico, Davide; Dierssen, Mara

    2015-07-15

    Fear is an ancestral emotion, an intrinsic defensive response present in every organism. Although fear is an evolutionarily advantageous emotion, under certain pathologies such as panic disorder it might become exaggerated and non-adaptive. Clinical and preclinical work pinpoints that changes in cognitive processes, such as perception and interpretation of environmental stimuli that rely on brain regions responsible for high-level function, are essential for the development of fear-related disorders. This review focuses on the involvement of cognitive function to fear circuitry disorders. Moreover, we address how animal models are contributing to understand the involvement of human candidate genes to pathological fear and helping achieve progress in this field. Multidisciplinary approaches that integrate human genetic findings with state of the art genetic mouse models will allow to elucidate the mechanisms underlying pathology and to develop new strategies for therapeutic targeting. PMID:25818748