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Sample records for adolescent pregnancy rates

  1. [Adolescent pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Lachcar, P

    1990-01-01

    The number of adolescent pregnancies brought to term in France has continued to decline while the number of abortions remains stable. Adolescent pregnancies cannot be considered "accidents" either in their social or psychological aspects. Pregnant adolescents carrying to term tend to be more disadvantaged than those seeking abortions. Early pregnancy may be a response to difficult life conditions. Despite appearing to constitute an infraction of a social code, adolescent pregnancy may in fact represent an attempt at social integration through motherhood. Adolescents failing in school, with poor employment prospects and feeling family pressures may view pregnancy as a means of social recognition. But such factors by themselves do not explain pregnancy; the primordial role of psychological factors must be examined. For some adolescents, pregnancy may represent an attempt to understand their own sexual identity as the transformations of puberty unsettle their previous self-images. Or they may be failing to perceive or actively denying the possibility of pregnancy. Adolescent pregnancies may be the result of transgressions of prohibitions. The traditional prohibition of sexual activity has relaxed to the degree that it is being replaced by a new prohibition on adolescent pregnancy and a prescription to use contraception. But contraception deprives an adolescent in search of sexual identity of proof of fertility as well as of the image of spontaneity and naturalness. Use of contraception is in conflict with the questions, doubts, and anxieties of adolescence. For adolescents in a reactivated oedipal stage, heterosexuality is often at the service of incestuous fantasies involving the mother. Abortion and perhaps pregnancy itself may assume the character of a rite of passage into adulthood for some adolescents. The important thing for many is the ability to become pregnant, to be a mother like their own mother.

  2. Adolescent Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leftwich, Heidi K; Alves, Marcus Vinicius Ortega

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent pregnancy, although on the decline, represents a significant public health concern. Often adolescents present late to prenatal care, either from lack of knowledge, fear of consequences, limited access, stigma, or all of the above. Although multifaceted, there are many risks both to mother and child that are increased in adolescent pregnancy. Many are unintended and are at risk for repeat adolescent pregnancy, especially within the first 2 years. Risks include but are not limited to: low birth weight, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and preeclampsia, as well as feelings of social isolation, delayed or neglected educational goals, and maternal depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Short, J D; Slusher, I L

    1994-01-01

    Kentucky has the fourth highest percentage of infants born to teenage mothers in the US. Risk factors for adolescent pregnancy are poor academic performance, family history of adolescent pregnancy, absence of one or both biological parents in the home, troubled family relationships, family violence, history of substance abuse, and poor self-concept. Pregnancy adds new developmental requirements to the continual developmental crisis of adolescence. Some of these developmental requirements are dealing with pregnancy and birth of a child and peer and family reactions and relationships. Pregnant teens are at high risk for anemia, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, and low birth weight infants. The health care team must assess the abilities, needs, practices, and priorities of teens. Nurses should promote health and positive health practices in teens. They should focus on prevention of adolescent pregnancy and on meeting the needs of pregnant teens. Adolescent pregnancy interventions include education and adolescent-centered special programs. Peer groups, role playing, videos, and computer games are individualized and effective education techniques for teens. Formal adolescent pregnancy prevention programs are abstinence education, knowledge-based programs, and clinic-focused or school-based programs. A combination of approaches is more effective than using just one approach. Adolescent pregnancy prevention interventions should promote the value of education, discourage substance abuse, and provide counseling for victims of child abuse. Pregnant teens should receive prenatal care as soon as possible. One health care agency should combine physical care, psychosocial support, and education for teens. Kentucky schools help pregnant teens continue their education and help them obtain information and support for care for themselves and their babies. Nurses can be effective at reducing the number of unwanted teen pregnancies.

  4. Sustained Reduction in Adolescent Pregnancy Rates through School and Community-Based Education, 1982-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Murray; Drane, J. Wanzer; Joshi, Praphul; Shankarnarayan, Saikiran; Nimmons, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    The resident population of Bamberg County, SC, has been exposed to multiples of public health information and education interventions since October 1982 with the intent to reduce the occurrence of unintended pregnancies among unmarried adolescents. Data analyses were conducted to compare 20 years of pregnancy rates among girls aged 14-17 years for…

  5. Adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    1991-04-01

    Adolescent pregnancy poses health risks to both mother and child. For example, females 15 years old are more likely to die from pregnancy complications than older women. Adolescents often have poor eating habits, smoke, drink alcohol, and take drugs all of which can contribute to premature or prolonged labor. Further, these actions coupled with not seeking prenatal care during the 1st 3 months of pregnancy (70% of pregnant teenagers do not do so) increase the odds of having a low birth weight baby. These babies often have immature organ systems and problems regulating body temperature and blood sugar levels. They often are mentally retarded. Finally their mortality risk is significantly higher than that of normal weight babies. Teenage pregnancy often results in the mother dropping out of school thereby lacking job skills. Her income is 50% lower than that of women who wait to have their 1st child in their 20s. Even if a teenage mother weds, the couple most likely will divorce. Teenagers encounter much misinformation about sexuality at the same time that their sexual urge increases greatly. They often experiment with sex, sometimes under peer pressure, without using contraception resulting in unwanted pregnancies. Supportive and loving parents and/or an adult with whom they are comfortable can help them sort through their feelings and the confusion about sex. Parents should foster candid and open discussion about sex, sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy, and contraception. It is important that teenagers know the difference between effective and ineffective contraceptives. They also need to discuss the advantages, disadvantages, and health risk of contraceptives with a physician or family planning counselor. County health departments, community family planning clinics, and family physicians all can help parents and/or adolescents learn more about responsible sexual behavior.

  6. Adolescent pregnancy, birth, and abortion rates across countries: levels and recent trends.

    PubMed

    Sedgh, Gilda; Finer, Lawrence B; Bankole, Akinrinola; Eilers, Michelle A; Singh, Susheela

    2015-02-01

    To examine pregnancy rates and outcomes (births and abortions) among 15- to 19-year olds and 10- to 14-year olds in all countries for which recent information could be obtained and to examine trends since the mid-1990s. Information was obtained from countries' vital statistics reports and the United Nations Statistics Division for most countries in this study. Alternate sources of information were used if needed and available. We present estimates primarily for 2011 and compare them to estimates published for the mid-1990s. Among the 21 countries with complete statistics, the pregnancy rate among 15- to 19-year olds was the highest in the United States (57 pregnancies per 1,000 females) and the lowest rate was in Switzerland (8). Rates were higher in some former Soviet countries with incomplete statistics; they were the highest in Mexico and Sub-Saharan African countries with available information. Among countries with reliable evidence, the highest rate among 10- to 14-year olds was in Hungary. The proportion of teen pregnancies that ended in abortion ranged from 17% in Slovakia to 69% in Sweden. The proportion of pregnancies that ended in live births tended to be higher in countries with high teen pregnancy rates (p = .02). The pregnancy rate has declined since the mid-1990s in the majority of the 16 countries where trends could be assessed. Despite recent declines, teen pregnancy rates remain high in many countries. Research on the planning status of these pregnancies and on factors that determine how teens resolve their pregnancies could further inform programs and policies. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Behavioral and Community Correlates of Adolescent Pregnancy and Chlamydia Rates in Rural Counties in Minnesota1

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Enns, Eva; Blauer-Peterson, Cori; Farris, Jill; Kahn, Judith; Kulasingam, Shalini

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Identifying co-occurring community risk factors, specific to rural communities, may suggest new strategies and partnerships for addressing sexual health issues among rural youth. We conducted an ecological analysis to identify the county-level correlates of pregnancy and chlamydia rates among adolescents in rural (nonmetropolitan) counties in Minnesota. Methods Pregnancy and chlamydia infection rates among 15–19 year-old females were compared across Minnesota’s 87 counties, stratified by rural/urban designations. Regression models for rural counties (n=66) in Minnesota were developed based on publicly available, county-level information on behaviors and risk exposures to identify associations with teen pregnancy and chlamydia rates in rural settings. Findings Adolescent pregnancy rates were higher in rural counties than in urban counties. Among rural counties, factors independently associated with elevated county-level rates of teen pregnancy included inconsistent contraceptive use by 12th-grade males, fewer 12th graders reporting feeling safe in their neighborhoods, more 9th graders reporting feeling overweight, fewer 12th graders reporting 30 min of physical activity daily, high county rates of single parenthood, and higher age-adjusted mortality (P < .05 for all associations). Factors associated with higher county level rates of chlamydia among rural counties were inconsistent condom use reported by 12th-grade males, more 12th graders reporting feeling overweight, and more 12th graders skipping school in the past month because they felt unsafe. Conclusions This ecologic analysis suggests that programmatic approaches focusing on behavior change among male adolescents, self-esteem, and community health and safety may be complementary to interventions addressing teen sexual health in rural areas; such approaches warrant further study. PMID:25344773

  8. Behavioral and community correlates of adolescent pregnancy and Chlamydia rates in rural counties in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Kozhimannil, Katy B; Enns, Eva; Blauer-Peterson, Cori; Farris, Jill; Kahn, Judith; Kulasingam, Shalini

    2015-06-01

    Identifying co-occurring community risk factors, specific to rural communities, may suggest new strategies and partnerships for addressing sexual health issues among rural youth. We conducted an ecological analysis to identify the county-level correlates of pregnancy and chlamydia rates among adolescents in rural (nonmetropolitan) counties in Minnesota. Pregnancy and chlamydia infection rates among 15-19 year-old females were compared across Minnesota's 87 counties, stratified by rural/urban designations. Regression models for rural counties (n = 66) in Minnesota were developed based on publicly available, county-level information on behaviors and risk exposures to identify associations with teen pregnancy and chlamydia rates in rural settings. Adolescent pregnancy rates were higher in rural counties than in urban counties. Among rural counties, factors independently associated with elevated county-level rates of teen pregnancy included inconsistent contraceptive use by 12th-grade males, fewer 12th graders reporting feeling safe in their neighborhoods, more 9th graders reporting feeling overweight, fewer 12th graders reporting 30 min of physical activity daily, high county rates of single parenthood, and higher age-adjusted mortality (P < .05 for all associations). Factors associated with higher county level rates of chlamydia among rural counties were inconsistent condom use reported by 12th-grade males, more 12th graders reporting feeling overweight, and more 12th graders skipping school in the past month because they felt unsafe. This ecologic analysis suggests that programmatic approaches focusing on behavior change among male adolescents, self-esteem, and community health and safety may be complementary to interventions addressing teen sexual health in rural areas; such approaches warrant further study.

  9. Adolescent pregnancy and loss.

    PubMed

    Bright, P D

    1987-01-01

    Adolescents have a perinatal and infant mortality rate two times as high as that found in the adult population, and yet few have investigated the characteristics of adolescent grief over pregnancy loss. The mourning response of adolescents appears to differ from that of older females: adult signs of depression are either nonexistent or fleeting. Adolescents who are having difficulties moving away from dependence on their mothers may become pregnant in order to demonstrate a semblance of adulthood and also to circumvent the depression common to this phase of development. When reproductive loss occurs, two outcomes often are seen: mother-daughter conflict concerning independence accelerates, which, in turn, provides the impetus for re-impregnation soon afterward. Since pregnancy interferes with mourning, the adolescent may not be able to bond with subsequent children, thus continuing the mother-child conflict into another generation.

  10. Teen clinics: missing the mark? Comparing pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections rates among enrolled and non-enrolled adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Souradet Y; Metge, Colleen; Taylor, Carole; Chartier, Mariette; Charette, Catherine; Lix, Lisa; Santos, Rob; Sarkar, Joykrishna; Nickel, Nathan C; Burland, Elaine; Chateau, Dan; Katz, Alan; Brownell, Marni; Martens, Patricia J

    2016-06-21

    In Manitoba, Canada, school-based clinics providing sexual and reproductive health services for adolescents have been implemented to address high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and pregnancies. The objectives of this population-based study were to compare pregnancy and STI rates between adolescents enrolled in schools with school-based clinics, those in schools without clinics, and those not enrolled in school. Data were from the PATHS Data Resource held in the Population Health Research Data Repository housed at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy. Adolescents aged 14 to 19 between 2003 and 2009 were included in the study. Annualized rates of pregnancies and positive STI tests were estimated and Poisson regression models were used to test for differences in rates amongst the three groups. As a proportion, pregnancies among non-enrolled female adolescents accounted for 55 % of all pregnancies in this age group during the study period. Pregnancy rates were 2-3 times as high among non-enrolled female adolescents. Compared to adolescents enrolled in schools without school-based clinics, age-adjusted STI rates were 3.5 times (p < .001) higher in non-enrolled males and 2.3 times (p < .001) higher in non-enrolled females. The highest rates for pregnancies and STIs were observed among non-enrolled adolescents. Although provision of reproductive and health services to in-school adolescents should remain a priority, program planning and design should consider optimal strategies to engage out of school youth.

  11. Adolescent pregnancy and contraception.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Jessica; Hayon, Ronni; Carlson, Jensena

    2014-09-01

    7% of US teen women became pregnant in 2008, totaling 750,000 pregnancies nationwide. For women ages 15 to 19, 82% of pregnancies are unintended. Adolescents have a disproportionate risk of medical complications in pregnancy. Furthermore, adolescent parents and their infants both tend to suffer poor psychosocial outcomes. Preventing unintended and adolescent pregnancies are key public health objectives for Healthy People 2020. Screening for sexual activity and pregnancy risk should be a routine part of all adolescent visits. Proven reductions in unintended pregnancy in teens are attained by providing access to contraception at no cost and promoting the most-effective methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adolescent Pregnancy Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Nathalie; O'Driscoll, Teresa; Becker, Gisela; Spitzer, Rachel F

    2015-08-01

    To describe the needs and evidence-based practice specific to care of the pregnant adolescent in Canada, including special populations. Healthy pregnancies for adolescent women in Canada, with culturally sensitive and age-appropriate care to ensure the best possible outcomes for these young women and their infants and young families, and to reduce repeat pregnancy rates. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed and The Cochrane Library on May 23, 2012 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., Pregnancy in Adolescence) and key words (e.g., pregnancy, teen, youth). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Results were limited to English or French language materials published in or after 1990. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to July 6, 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, national and international medical specialty societies, and clinical practice guideline collections. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). BENEFITS/HARMS/COSTS: These guidelines are designed to help practitioners caring for adolescent women during pregnancy in Canada and allow them to take the best care of these young women in a manner appropriate for their age, cultural backgrounds, and risk profiles. 1. Health care providers should adapt their prenatal care for adolescents and offer multidisciplinary care that is easily accessible to the adolescent early in the pregnancy, recognizing that adolescents often present to care later than their adult counterparts. A model that provides an opportunity to address all of these needs at one site may be the preferred model of care for pregnant adolescents. (II-1A) 2. Health

  13. Adolescent pregnancy options.

    PubMed

    Resnick, M D

    1992-09-01

    The range of pregnancy options available to adolescents each have significant ramifications for future educational and economic achievement. The changing societal context of adolescent pregnancy decision-making are described, and the characteristics of adolescents who choose to terminate their pregnancy, parent their child, or place for adoption are examined. The role of significant others in decision-making and the implications of mandatory parental involvement in pregnancy decision-making is discussed, as well as the roles of schools in promoting the well-being and potential of adolescents considering pregnancy decisions.

  14. Pregnancy in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda Y; Fleming, Nathalie A; Rome, Ellen S

    2012-04-01

    Adolescent pregnancy remains a public health issue with significant medical, emotional, and societal consequences for the adolescent mother, her child, and her family. Teenage pregnancies are at higher risk of many adverse outcomes, including preterm delivery, low birth weight, and neonatal and infant mortality. Teen pregnancy and motherhood may have detrimental effects on the teen mother and her child; antenatal and postpartum care need to be adapted to meet the special needs of pregnant adolescents because standard obstetrical environments may not do so. This comprehensive review of adolescent pregnancy will highlight global statistics, factors contributing to adolescent pregnancy, social implications of adolescent pregnancy, obstetrical and neonatal outcomes, and the importance of multidisciplinary antenatal and postnatal care.

  15. Association of State-Mandated Abstinence-only Sexuality Education with Rates of Adolescent HIV Infection and Teenage Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Elliot, L M; Booth, M M; Patterson, G; Althoff, M; Bush, C K; Dery, M A

    2017-01-01

    Abstinence-only sexuality education (AOSE); is required in the public school systems of many states, raising public health concerns and perpetuating health disparities through school systems. This study aimed to determine the correlations between state-mandated AOSE and the rates of adolescent HIV and teen pregnancy. Using publicly available data on all 50 United States' laws and policies on AOSE, states were ranked according to their level of abstinence emphasis on sexuality education (Level 0 - Level 3);. We calculated the relative proportion of Black students in public schools and the proportion of families below the federal poverty line then ranked them by state. We compared the states' ranks to the incidence of adolescent HIV and teen pregnancy in those states to identify associations between variables. The majority of states (~44 percent ); have legally mandated AOSE policies (Level 3); and adolescent HIV and teen pregnancy rates were highest in these Level 3 states. There were significant, positive correlations between HIV incidence rates of 13-19 year olds, HIV rates of 20-24 year olds, teen pregnancy rates, and AOSE level, with the proportion of the population that lives below the federal poverty level, and whether they attended schools that had a greater than 50 percent of an African American population. These data show a clear association between state sexuality education policies and adolescent HIV and teen pregnancy rates not previously demonstrated. Our data further show that states that have higher proportions of at-risk populations, with higher adolescent HIV and teen pregnancy rates, are more likely to also have restrictive AOSE policies. These populations may be more likely to attend public schools where AOSE is taught, increasing their risk for HIV and teen pregnancy. The World Health Organization considers fact-based Comprehensive Sexuality Education a human right, and the authors believe it is past time to end harmful, discriminatory sexuality

  16. Social change in adolescent sexual behavior, mate selection, and premarital pregnancy rates in a Kikuyu community.

    PubMed

    Worthman, C M; Whiting, J W

    1987-06-01

    This report documents an example of interactions of cultural change with adolescent fertility and marriage patterns in an East African community. Between 1950 and 1980 the rate of unwed motherhood in Ngeca, Kenya, showed a marked increase from 0% in the 1940s to 11.4% in the 1960s. The authors present evidence of recent changes in Kikuyu culture that may account for this change. Traditional Kikuyu culture structured adolescence through status and role changes bounded and reinforced by ritual and instruction. Abandonment of traditional initiation rites and attenuation of the age-set system have most markedly altered the structure of adolescent experience by shifting the content and context of socialization. Major agents for change in this process have been the school, church, and modern economy. Responsibility for mate selection has remained with young people, but the determinants of partner desirability and gender ratios in partner availability have shifted considerably. Traditional criteria of male desirability included ability to pay bridewealth and to provide the wife with land; diligence and demeanor measured female attractiveness. At present, education and wage earning capacity affect partner attractiveness of each sex. The decline of polygyny has both shifted the balance of competition for spouses toward females, and has had significant repercussions in the marital and reproductive histories of males. Decreases in brideprice and reversals in direction of transfers of wealth at marriage are tangible signs of change in the marriage market. Deritualization of genital operations and attendant weakening of the age-set system have interrupted the flow of information on sex behavior and reproduction, controlled physical intimacy, and partner selection reinforced by peer pressure. Denial of contraception, the continued importance of marriage and fertility, and ambivalence toward sexual activity in adolescence all support adolescent sexual experimentation and

  17. Pregnancy in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Davis, S

    1989-06-01

    The United States must improve its efforts to reduce teen pregnancy. We occupy an alarming position in the developed world from the standpoint of the magnitude of the pregnancy issue. While our society promotes sexuality to sell all sorts of consumer goods, it still refuses for the most part to make contraceptives familiar and available to sexually active teens. The youngest adolescents, 10 to 14 years, are having sex and babies at an increasing rate. Their children will have limited futures. Only by stepping up our efforts to prevent early pregnancy will we make possible a life of opportunity and choice for the young people of our country. Consequences will be costly and tragic if we do not.

  18. Adolescent pregnancy: a regional tragedy.

    PubMed

    Conner, S L

    1992-12-01

    Adolescent childbearing increased 16% over 1986-90 in the Southern region of the US from 38.4 to 44.6 births/1000 girls aged 15-17; adolescent birth rates declined only in Oklahoma at the rate of 1%. Southern states spent more than $5.7 billion in Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Medicaid, and food stamps in 1991 to support families started by adolescent mothers, but federal and state spending combined for the primary prevention of adolescent pregnancy totalled only $110 million in the same states. Public expenditures related to adolescent childbearing in Alabama in fiscal year 1991 totalled more than $117 million, yet less than $1.5 million is spent on preventing teen pregnancy. The author stresses the need for stronger state commitment, leadership, and funds for programs to prevent pregnancy. Thus far, Alabama has definitely not done enough to address the HIV and AIDS pandemic.

  19. Low rates of pregnancy screening in adolescents before teratogenic exposures in a national sample of children's hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rao, Pooja; Li, Yimei; Getz, Kelly D; Miller, Tamara P; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Wilkes, Jennifer J; Seif, Alix E; Bagatell, Rochelle; Fisher, Brian T; Gracia, Clarisa; Aplenc, Richard

    2016-11-15

    Adolescents with cancer engage in sexual behaviors and are exposed to teratogenic chemotherapy. There are no data regarding pregnancy screening patterns for adolescents before chemotherapy exposure. A cross-sectional study of leukemia and emergency room (ER) admissions in the Pediatric Health Information System from 1999 to 2011 was conducted. Females who were 10 to 18 years old and 1) had newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or 2) had ER visits with computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen/pelvis were included. The exposure was a hospital visit with either chemotherapy or an abdominal/pelvic CT scan. The main outcome was a pregnancy test billed on the same day or before the teratogenic exposure within the same index admission. Log-binomial regressions were used to compute prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals comparing pregnancy screening in the leukemia and ER cohorts. A total of 35,650 admissions were identified. The proportion of visits with an appropriately timed pregnancy test was 35%, 64%, and 58% in the ALL (n = 889), AML (n = 127), and ER cohorts (n = 34,634), respectively. Patients with ALL were significantly less likely to have a pregnancy test than the ER cohort (adjusted prevalence ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.78), but there was no significant difference between the AML and ER cohorts (adjusted prevalence ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.27). There was substantial hospital-level variation in pregnancy screening patterns. Adolescents with acute leukemia and ER visits have low rates of pregnancy screening before teratogenic exposures. Standardized practice guidelines for pregnancy screening among adolescents may improve screening rates. Cancer 2016;122:3394-3400. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  20. Adolescent Pregnancy in America: Causes and Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domenico, Desirae M.; Jones, Karen H.

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy has occurred throughout America's history. Only in recent years has it been deemed an urgent crisis, as more young adolescent mothers give birth outside of marriage. At-risk circumstances associated with adolescent pregnancy include medical and health complications, less schooling and higher dropout rates, lower career…

  1. [Motivations for adolescent pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Álvarez Nieto, Carmen; Pastor Moreno, Guadalupe; Linares Abad, Manuel; Serrano Martos, Juan; Rodríguez Olalla, Laura

    2012-01-01

    To identify the motivations (beliefs, values) for adolescent pregnancy among girls aged less than 17 years old. We performed a phenomenological qualitative study with audio recording of in-depth interviews with 12 pregnant adolescents between March and September 2008. Purposive sampling of pregnant adolescents (14-16 years) in the high-risk obstetric unit of the Hospital of Jaen (Spain) was performed, using education, voluntariness of pregnancy, urban-rural setting of the family residence and family socioeconomic status as heterogeneity criteria. A content analysis was performed with coding, triangulation of categories, and extraction and verification of results. The adolescent's sociocultural context was of considerable weight in sexual and reproductive decisions. Adolescents with unplanned pregnancies felt that their responsibility was relative, showing an attitude of acceptance and resignation, which later became a tendency to rationalize the events and claim that the child was wanted or even planned. Girls with a wanted pregnancy did not have a clear idea of the consequences of having a child. Previous ideas about pregnancy were mainly related to physical changes without taking into account other changes that occur during and after pregnancy. The family context and socialization of girls are based on a traditional division of gender roles in which the traditional role of the female caregiver is strongly internalized. The reasons for teenage pregnancy are unclear; pregnant adolescents lacked a sense of self-determination and felt that their lives were determined by circumstances. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. [Adolescent pregnancy: epidemiological perspectives].

    PubMed

    1985-01-01

    A specialized obstetrical section for single adolescent mothers was created at a University of Chile hospital to test the hypothesis that adequate and appropriate medical care could improve the outcome for adolescent mothers and their infants. The team consisted of an obstetrician-gynecologist, a pediatrician, a psychologist, a midwife, a nurse, a social worker, and a nurse's aide. A nutritionist and a psychiatrist were later added. Between November 1981-March 1985, 610 pregnancies were followed and 490 deliveries were attended. The psychosocial characteristics of the 1st 300 adolescents were studied, the obstetrical and preinatal outcomes of the 1st 200 deliveries were compared with those of 200 deliveries of adolescents not participating in the prenatal program but delivering at the same hospital, and a 2nd control group of 100 single primaparas was used to compare maternal morbidity and mortality and neonatal pathology. 11.6% were aged 11-14, 32.7% were 15-16, 30.3% were 17, and the remainder were 18 or 19. 5% of the fathers were under 15, 33.3% were 15-19, and the rest were 20 or above. The father's age and other characteristics were unknown in 6 pregnancies resulting from rape. 1.3% of the mothers had no education, 67% had some basic education, and 31.7% had a middle level or higher. Of the adolescent mothers and the fathers respectively, 50.3% and 23.0% were students, 17.0% and 26.3% had stable employment, 32.7% and 12.0% had no economic activity, and 32.0% of fathers were subemployed. Only 35.7% of the adolescents mothers lived in stable family environments. 94.7% of the adolescents had negative attitudes on learning of their pregnancies, but 79.7% had positive attitudes when they began receiving prenatal care. 89.7% of the 213 legitimate adolescent mothers but only 64.4% of the 87 illegitimate mothers had positive attitudes toward their pregnancies at the end of the prenatal period. Cases were younger than either group of controls, with 27.0% of cases and

  3. Adolescent Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion Rates Across Countries: Levels and Recent Trends

    PubMed Central

    Sedgh, Gilda; Finer, Lawrence B.; Bankole, Akinrinola; Eilers, Michelle A.; Singh, Susheela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine pregnancy rates and outcomes (births and abortions) among 15- to 19-year olds and 10- to 14-year olds in all countries for which recent information could be obtained and to examine trends since the mid-1990s. Methods Information was obtained from countries’ vital statistics reports and the United Nations Statistics Division for most countries in this study. Alternate sources of information were used if needed and available. We present estimates primarily for 2011 and compare them to estimates published for the mid-1990s. Results Among the 21 countries with complete statistics, the pregnancy rate among 15- to 19-year olds was the highest in the United States (57 pregnancies per 1,000 females) and the lowest rate was in Switzerland (8). Rates were higher in some former Soviet countries with incomplete statistics; they were the highest in Mexico and Sub-Saharan African countries with available information. Among countries with reliable evidence, the highest rate among 10- to 14-year olds was in Hungary. The proportion of teen pregnancies that ended in abortion ranged from 17% in Slovakia to 69% in Sweden. The proportion of pregnancies that ended in live births tended to be higher in countries with high teen pregnancy rates (p =.02). The pregnancy rate has declined since the mid-1990s in the majority of the 16 countries where trends could be assessed. Conclusions Despite recent declines, teen pregnancy rates remain high in many countries. Research on the planning status of these pregnancies and on factors that determine how teens resolve their pregnancies could further inform programs and policies. PMID:25620306

  4. Pregnancy after gastric bypass surgery in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Roehrig, Helmut R; Xanthakos, Stavra A; Sweeney, Jenny; Zeller, Meg H; Inge, Thomas H

    2007-07-01

    There is no previous research or documentation of the incidence of pregnancy or pregnancy outcomes in female adolescents after undergoing bariatric surgery. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted for female patients who had bariatric surgery in our adolescent program from 2001-2007. Descriptive and clinical data were abstracted from the medical records, including data from the initial assessment and from follow-up clinic visits pre- and postoperatively. 47 adolescents (age <19 years) underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). 7 pregnancies occurred in 6 Caucasian females and resulted in 6 reported healthy term deliveries (1 pending). 6 of the 7 pregnancies were conceived between 10 and 22 months following surgery. In this small cohort of adolescent females, the pregnancy rate was 12.8%. The program pregnancy rate for adolescent females in this cohort was greater than anticipated, compared with national pregnancy rates for age and race-matched females in the USA. Risk factors that may contribute to an increased incidence of adolescent pregnancy in this unique bariatric population are unclear, but may include poor adherence to contraceptive therapy and psychosocial factors. Further research is required to define risk factors, improve adherence to contraceptive therapy, and encourage postponement of pregnancy after surgery.

  5. Body image in adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zaltzman, Alina; Falcon, Bani; Harrison, Megan E

    2015-04-01

    To review the existing literature on body image in adolescent pregnancy and explore concepts about the relationship between the two. A systematic review. Peer-reviewed articles were identified through MEDLINE (1946-present) and PsycINFO (1806-November 2013), conducted in any setting. Pregnant and postpartum adolescents ages 13-19 y. None. The outcome measures used in the studies reviewed varied: themes from focus groups, diary entry analysis, Pregnancy and weight gain attitude scale, Edinburgh postnatal depression scale, Parenting stress index, Eating disorder inventory, Tennessee self concept scale. The search yielded a total of 149 studies, of which 6 were relevant to the specific topic and age group. The very limited research shows a dichotomy in body image perception during pregnancy in adolescence; some studies show an increase in body image disturbance and dissatisfaction during pregnancy in adolescents, and other studies reviewed found that the majority of pregnant adolescents had positive body image and positive attitudes towards weight gain. A bidirectional link between depression and negative body image in adolescent pregnancy is suggested. The current research exploring the relationshp between body image and pregnancy in adolescence is limited, both in quality and quantity. Future research is needed to evaluate longitudinal models that will better inform about potential risk factors for body dissatisfaction during pregnancy in adolescence, including the possible role of depression. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychosocial Correlates of Adolescent Males’ Pregnancy Intention

    PubMed Central

    Rosengard, Cynthia; Phipps, Maureen G.; Adler, Nancy E.; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective To identify psychosocial differences between sexually experienced male adolescents who indicate intentions to get someone pregnant and those who do not. Methodology Cross-sectional study of 101 sexually experienced adolescent males recruited from an STD clinic in northern California. Student’s t-tests and regressions examined psychosocial differences between males who reported any intention versus no intention to get someone pregnant in the next six months. ANOVAs examined differences among different combinations of pregnancy plans/likelihood. Results Adolescents’ reports of their plans for getting someone pregnant differed from their assessments of the likelihood that they would do so (χ2 = 24.33, df = 1, p < .0001). Attitudes toward pregnancy and participants’ mothers’ educational attainment differentiated those with clear pregnancy intentions (Planning, and Likely) from those with clear intentions to avoid pregnancy (Not Planning & Not Likely) Conclusions To reduce the rates of adolescent childbearing, males’ pregnancy intentions must be assessed and asked about in multiple ways. PMID:16140687

  7. Adolescent pregnancies: complications, birth outcomes and the possible solutions.

    PubMed

    Çift, Tayfur; Korkmazer, Engin; Temur, Muzaffer; Bulut, Berk; Korkmaz, Bariş; Ozdenoğlu, Onur; Akaltun, Cem; Üstünyurt, Emin

    2017-01-01

    In this study we aim to evaluate antenatal, perinatal and postnatal outcomes and complications of adolescent pregnancies, as well as to discuss the social and psychological consequences of these pregnancies. We compare a total of 243 pregnant women at age 14-18 years to a vast control group at age 19-36 who all delivered at Bursa Yüksek Ihtisas Training and Research Hospital between years 2005-2014. Antenatal care (folic acid supplementation, pre-conception counseling) was significantly higher in adolescent pregnancy group. Unplanned pregnancy rate was significantly higher in in study group (p < 0.001). Preterm delivery (before 37th week) ratio was statistically higher in pregnancy complications. Adolescent pregnancy is a social entity which should be regulated and prevented by legal measures. Planned pregnancies should be promoted and the public should be educated and informed about the Hazards of adolescent pregnancies. Press institutions, public broadcasting services support the efforts to decrease adolescent pregnancies.

  8. Adolescent Pregnancy: A Challenge for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Carolyn D.; Miller, Gary M.

    1980-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy has medical, psychological, sociological and educational repercussions. The counselor's objective is to assist the adolescent in developing adaptive mechanisms for dealing with adolescence and pregnancy and to integrate the two conditions into a growth-producing situation. (Author)

  9. Family planning and adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Molina, Ramiro Cartes; Roca, Carolina Gonzalez; Zamorano, Jorge Sandoval; Araya, Electra Gonzales

    2010-04-01

    High adolescent fecundity principally affects developing countries. In spite of a decrease in the incidence of pregnancies in the developing countries over the past 13 years, the differences that exist with respect to developed countries turn adolescent fecundity into an indicator of the level of development of countries. The impact of adolescent pregnancy is evident in maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Nonetheless, in addition to the age involved in precocious pregnancy, it also reflects previous conditions such as malnutrition, infectious diseases and deficiencies in the health care given to pregnant adolescents. The most important impact lies in the psychosocial area: it contributes to a loss of self-esteem, a destruction of life projects and the maintenance of the circle of poverty. This affects both adolescent mothers and fathers; the latter have been studied very little. Intervention with comprehensive health services and the maintenance of the education of adolescent mothers and fathers prevents repeat pregnancies. Evidence shows success in the prevention of the first pregnancy when the intervention includes comprehensive sexual education, the existence of preferential sexual and reproductive health services for adolescents, the handout of modern contraceptives gauged to the adolescence stage of the subjects and the existence of an information network. There is little research in contraception for adolescents, and for this reason, the indications given are projections of data obtained from adults.

  10. Fertility rates and perinatal outcomes of adolescent pregnancies: a retrospective population-based study.

    PubMed

    Souza, Maria de Lourdes de; Lynn, Fiona Ann; Johnston, Linda; Tavares, Eduardo Cardoso Teixeira; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Botelho, Lúcio José

    2017-04-06

    analyze trends in fertility rates and associations with perinatal outcomes for adolescents in Santa Catarina, Brazil. a population-based study covering 2006 to 2013 was carried out to evaluate associations between perinatal outcomes and age groups, using odds ratios, and Chi-squared tests. differences in the fertility rate among female adolescents across regions and time period were observed, ranging from 40.9 to 72.0 per 1,000 in mothers aged 15-19 years. Adolescents had fewer prenatal care appointments than mothers ≥20 years, and a higher proportion had no partner. Mothers aged 15-19 years were more likely to experience preterm birth (OR:1.1; CI:1.08-1.13; p<0.001), have an infant with low birthweight (OR:1.1; CI:1.10-1.15; p<0.001) and low Apgar score at 5 minutes (OR:1.4; CI:1.34-1.45; p<0.001) than mothers ≥20 years, with the odds for adverse outcomes greater for those aged 10-14 years. this study provides evidence of fertility rates among adolescents remaining higher in regions of social and economic deprivation. Adolescent mothers and their infants more likely to experience adverse perinatal outcomes. Nurses, public health practitioners, health and social care professionals and educators need to work collaboratively to better target strategies for adolescents at greater risk; to help reduce fertility rates and improve outcomes. analizar as tendências das taxas de fertilidade e associações com desfechos perinatais entre adolescentes em Santa Catarina, Brasil. estudo populacional conduzido de 2016 à 2013. Associações entre desfechos perinatais e grupos por faixa etária foram investigadas usando odds Ratio e teste Chi-quadrado. as diferenças encontradas nas taxas de fertilidade entre mães adolescentes nas regiões e período observado variaram de 40,9-72,0 por 1.000 entre mães de 15 a 19 anos de idade. As adolescentes atenderam menos consultas pré-natais, quando comparadas às mães com 20 anos ou mais, e a maioria não tinha parceiro. M

  11. Is Parenting Child's Play? Kids Count in Missouri Report on Adolescent Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citizens for Missouri's Children, St. Louis.

    This Kids Count report presents current information on adolescent pregnancy rates in Missouri. Part 1, "Overview of Adolescent Pregnancy in Missouri," discusses the changing pregnancy, abortion, and birth rates for 15- to 19-year-old adolescents, racial differences in pregnancy risk, regional differences suggesting a link between…

  12. Never-pregnant African American adolescent girls' perceptions of adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Childs, Gwendolyn D; Knight, Candace; White, Reashanda

    2015-01-01

    Despite the decrease in adolescent pregnancy rates, rates among African American girls remain higher than other racial/ethnic adolescent groups. This descriptive qualitative study explored never-pregnant African American adolescent girls' perceptions about adolescent pregnancy. Sixty-four participants participated in individual interviews and focus groups. Individual interviews examined beliefs about adolescent pregnancy and perceptions of life changes resulting from becoming pregnant during adolescence. Focus groups were held to validate findings from the interviews. Participants agreed that becoming pregnant during adolescence would negatively impact their education, family, and peers. Participants anticipated feelings of shame and embarrassment in the event that they became pregnant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiple Dimensions of Adolescent Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Ann H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses what the Jacksonville (Florida) community is doing for teens to prevent pregnancy, help pregnant adolescents, and help adolescent parents. Discusses whether these activities are sufficient and effective. Suggests specific ways to improve programs and indicates that there are many factors to consider when attempting to deter teen…

  14. Update on adolescent pregnancy in the Black community.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Kellie D

    2006-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a social issue that severely jeopardizes the quality of life for young parents and their children. It is estimated that if fertility rates remain unchanged, the United States will see a 26% increase in the number of adolescent pregnancies and births due to an increase in the adolescent population (Henshaw, 1996). With a disproportional rate of Black adolescents becoming pregnant, there is a need to examine factors related to the high adolescent pregnancy rate among the Black community. Black adolescent mothers and their children face additional adverse psychosocial effects due to healthcare disparities, a higher incidence of health problems, and an increase risk of financial hardship (Hogan, Astone, & Kitagawa, 1985; J. V. Horn, 1998; Morgan, Chapar, & Fisher, 1995). Although the teenage pregnancy rate has declined, it is important for practitioners to continue to implement interventions that promote abstinence and increase contraceptive use among sexually active adolescents.

  15. Adolescent pregnancy: an intervention challenge.

    PubMed

    Trad, P V

    1993-01-01

    Even in the best of circumstances, pregnancy is a time of emotional upheaval. This is especially true for pregnant adolescents who are also attempting to adjust to pubertal status and to establish an identity independent from their family. Although research has focused on the etiology of teenage pregnancy, relatively few interventions consider the developmental obstacles encountered when treating pregnant teenagers. In particular, adolescents are cognitively unprepared to predict long-term outcomes, a skill essential for confronting the challenges of pregnancy. One new intervention, known as previewing, seeks to overcome this deficit. Previewing encourages expectant teenage mothers to represent future scenarios with the infant as a means of predicting and rehearsing adaptive outcomes.

  16. Native Teen Voices: adolescent pregnancy prevention recommendations.

    PubMed

    Garwick, Ann W; Rhodes, Kristine L; Peterson-Hickey, Melanie; Hellerstedt, Wendy L

    2008-01-01

    American Indian adolescent pregnancy rates are high, yet little is known about how Native youth view primary pregnancy prevention. The aim was to identify pregnancy prevention strategies from the perspectives of both male and female urban Native youth to inform program development. Native Teen Voices (NTV) was a community-based participatory action research study in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. Twenty focus groups were held with 148 Native youth who had never been involved in a pregnancy. Groups were stratified by age (13-15 and 16-18 years) and sex. Participants were asked what they would do to prevent adolescent pregnancy if they were in charge of programs for Native youth. Content analyses were used to identify and categorize the range and types of participants' recommendations within and across the age and sex cohorts. Participants in all cohorts emphasized the following themes: show the consequences of adolescent pregnancy; enhance and develop more pregnancy prevention programs for Native youth in schools and community-based organizations; improve access to contraceptives; discuss teen pregnancy with Native youth; and use key messages and media to reach Native youth. Native youth perceived limited access to comprehensive pregnancy prevention education, community-based programs and contraceptives. They suggested a variety of venues and mechanisms to address gaps in sexual health services and emphasized enhancing school-based resources and involving knowledgeable Native peers and elders in school and community-based adolescent pregnancy prevention initiatives. A few recommendations varied by age and sex, consistent with differences in cognitive and emotional development.

  17. A global perspective on adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Holness, Nola

    2015-10-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is an international dilemma affecting not just the adolescent and her infant, but entire societies. Of almost 300 million female adolescents worldwide, 16 million give birth yearly, accounting for 11% of all births worldwide. The Millennium Development Goal # 5 incorporates reducing adolescent births worldwide. The purpose of this paper is a comprehensive critique of findings on a global perspective on adolescent pregnancy and evaluation of strategies to reduce this international concern. In Latin America and the Caribbean, unmet need for family planning made little change in 20 years. In Dutch and Scandinavian countries, there are national sex education programmes and family planning clinics run by nurse midwives with direct authority to prescribe contraceptives. In Japan, strong conservative norms exist about premarital sex. In the UK, a lack of consistent targeted sex education, delay in access to contraception and contraceptive use failure are associated with high teen pregnancy rates. In the United States, 750,000 teen pregnancies occur yearly, costing $9 billion per year. Health disparities exist: Whites had 11, Blacks had 32 and Hispanics had 41 per 1000 births. Programmes to reduce teen pregnancy should incorporate family, contraception and abstinence education, and sustained commitment of media, businesses, religious and civic organizations. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Pregnancy threat to adolescent health.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) is investigating factors which affect the nutritional status of adolescent girls in Benin, Cameroon, Ecuador, Guatemala, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Nepal, and the Philippines. The research is funded through the US Agency for International Development's Office of Nutrition. 22.5% of women in Nepal marry before they reach age 14 years, with most marrying before age 18. The research in the country has found pregnancy to be a burden among these young women which threatens their nutritional and health status as well as that of their offspring. Unequal distribution of food in the household and heavy workloads increase the level of risk faced by adolescent females. Postponing pregnancy in adolescents, however, delays the onset of increased nutritional needs in girls who are already likely to be undernourished. Delayed pregnancy also gives girls more time to complete their physical growth and avoids the risk of medical emergencies in childbirth, such as hemorrhage which, if survived, can lead to anemia which is aggravated by nutritional deficiencies. The ICRW has therefore proposed four strategies for postponing first births among female adolescents: encouraging later marriage, providing family planning and reproductive health services specially for adolescents, providing family life education about options for the future, and increasing educational opportunities for girls.

  19. Adolescent Pregnancy Intentions and Pregnancy Outcomes: A Longitudinal Examination

    PubMed Central

    ROSENGARD, CYNTHIA; PHIPPS, MAUREEN G.; ADLER, NANCY E.; ELLEN, JONATHAN M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose (a) To examine different methods of assessing pregnancy intention; (b) to identify psychosocial differences between those who indicate pregnancy intentions and those who do not; and (c) to examine the relationship between pregnancy intentions and subsequent pregnancy at 6-month follow-up in nonpregnant (at baseline), sexually experienced adolescent females. Methods Longitudinal cohort study of 354 sexually experienced female adolescents attending either a STD clinic or HMO adolescent medicine clinic in northern California. Student’s t-tests and regressions examined psychosocial differences between females who reported “any” and “no” pregnancy intentions. ANOVAs examined differences among different combinations of pregnancy plans/likelihood. Chi-square analyses assessed associations between baseline pregnancy intentions and subsequent pregnancy. Results Adolescents’ reports of their pregnancy plans and their assessments of pregnancy likelihood differed from one another (χ2 = 50.39, df = 1, p < .001). Pregnancy attitudes and baseline contraceptive use differentiated those with inconsistent pregnancy intentions (Not Planning, but Likely) from those with clear pregnancy intentions (Planning and Likely, and Not Planning and Not Likely) (Pregnancy Attitudes: F [2,338] = 68.96, p < .0001; Contraceptive Use: F [2,308] = 14.87, p < .0001). Suspected pregnancies and positive pregnancy test results were associated with baseline pregnancy intentions (Suspected: χ2 = 19.08, df = 2, p < .01; Positive Results: χ2 = 8.84, df = 2, p = .015). Conclusions To reduce adolescent childbearing we must assess pregnancy intentions in multiple ways. Information/education might benefit those female adolescents with inconsistent reports of pregnancy intentions. PMID:15581524

  20. Adolescent pregnancy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Clear, specific information about sexual behavior and its consequences is frequently not provided to adolescents by their families, schools and communities. The "sex education" that many receive comes from misinformed or uninformed peers.

  1. Pregnancy feelings among adolescents awaiting pregnancy test results.

    PubMed Central

    Hellerstedt, W. L.; Fee, R. M.; McNeely, C. A.; Sieving, R. E.; Shew, M. L.; Resnick, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors surveyed adolescent girls about their feelings regarding pregnancy. METHODS: A survey was administered to 117 13- to 18-year-olds who obtained pregnancy tests at nine clinics in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1998. The survey included four measures of pregnancy feelings. The authors used bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to examine the associations of these measures with engagement with school, future expectations, social and environmental characteristics, and perceived partner desire for pregnancy. RESULTS: The four measures of pregnancy feelings were highly correlated (P = 0.0001). Participants reported a range of positive, negative, and ambivalent feelings on all measures. Perceived partner desire for pregnancy, limited future expectations, and lack of school engagement were significantly associated with positive pregnancy feelings for the four measures. CONCLUSIONS: Successful adolescent pregnancy prevention interventions may include the involvement of partners and key adults as well as strategies to enhance the educational or employment aspirations of girls and adolescents. PMID:11889284

  2. Teenage pregnancy rates and associations with other health risk behaviours: a three-wave cross-sectional study among South African school-going adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kim; Crutzen, Rik; van den Borne, Bart; Sewpaul, Ronel; Reddy, Priscilla

    2016-05-04

    Teenage pregnancy still remains high in low and middle-income countries (LMIC), as well as in high-income countries (HIC). It is a major contributor to maternal and child morbidity and mortality rates. Furthermore, it has social consequences, such as perpetuating the cycle of poverty including early school dropout by the pregnant adolescent, especially in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Few studies in SSA have investigated the trends in teenage pregnancy and the associated factors, while this is critical in fully understanding teenage pregnancy and for promotion of reproductive health among adolescents at large in SSA. To examine the trends in teenage pregnancy and to identify associations with other health risk behaviours in South Africa (SA), a total of 31 816 South African school-going adolescents between 11 to 19 years of age were interviewed in three cross-sectional surveys. Data from the first (2002, n = 10 549), second (2008, n = 10 270) and the third (2011, n = 10 997) nationally representative South African youth risk behaviour surveys (YRBS) were used for this study. The overall prevalence of having ever been pregnant among the combined 3-survey sample was self-reported to be 11.0 % and stable across the three surveys. Sexual intercourse among adolescents in SA has decreased from 41.9 % in 2002 to 36.9 % in 2011. However, pregnancy among girls who ever had sex increased from 17.3 % (95 % CI: 0.16-0.19) in 2002, to 23.6 % (95 % CI: 0.21-0.26) in 2008 and decreased to 21.3 % (95 % CI: 0.19-0.23) in 2011. The odds for ever been pregnant were higher for girls who had 2 or more sexual partners (OR: 1.250, 95 % CI: 1.039-1.503), girls who ever used alcohol before sex (OR: 1.373, 95 % CI: 1.004-1.878), practised binge-drinking during the last month (OR: 0.624, 95 % CI: 0.503-0.774), and girls who used mandrax (OR: 1.968, 95 % CI: 1,243-3.117). The odds for never been pregnant were lower for those who used condoms (OR: 0.462, 95 % CI: 0

  3. Personality and adolescent pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Harville, Emily W.; Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Xie, Yiqiong

    2014-01-01

    Aims To examine the relationship between personality, pregnancy and birth outcomes in adolescents Background Personality has been shown to be a strong predictor of many health outcomes. Adolescents who become pregnant have worse birth outcomes than adults. Design Cross-sectional study using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (baseline, 1994-1995; follow-up, 2007-2008). Methods The study sample was 6529 girls, 820 of whom reported on pregnancy outcomes for a teenage birth. Personality data was taken from the Mini International Personality Item Pool personality tool, which measures the five-factor personality traits of neuroticism, conscientiousness, intellect/imagination, extraversion and agreeableness. Logistic regression was used to predict teen pregnancy and linear regression was used to predict birth weight and gestational age with adjustment for confounders and stratification by race. Results Agreeableness and intellect/imagination were associated with a reduced likelihood of becoming pregnant as an adolescent, while neuroticism, conscientiousness and extraversion were all associated with an increased likelihood of becoming pregnant. Higher neuroticism was associated with lower birth weight and gestational age among Black girls, but not non-Black. Conscientiousness was associated with lower gestational age among non-Black girls. No relationships were found with extraversion or agreeableness and birth outcomes. Receiving late or no prenatal care was associated with higher intellect/imagination. Conclusions Personality is understudied with respect to pregnancy and birth outcomes compared with other health outcomes. Such research could help professionals and clinicians design and target programs that best fit the characteristics of the population most likely to need them, such as those with high neuroticism. PMID:25040691

  4. Adolescent pregnancy: a 25-year review.

    PubMed

    Clark, J F; Westney, L S; Lawyer, C J

    1987-04-01

    A five-year update of a previous 20-year study of adolescent pregnancy is presented. For the 25-year period, data were collected on 2,789 adolescents. Prematurity and low birth weight infants continue to have a high incidence in adolescent pregnancy. This study found that there has been a significant decrease in preeclampsia and toxemia of pregnancy and a large increase in the incidence of cesarean section.

  5. Adolescent pregnancy revisited.

    PubMed

    Fielding, J E

    1978-10-19

    The proportion of teenage births to the total births in the U.S. has increased in recent years. Births are increasing particularly among the younger teenagers. This trend would be even more marked if it were not for the recent liberalization of legal abortions and the increased availability of contraception to teenagers. Despite wide use of abortion among teenage girls, the U.S. still ranks very high in terms of birthrates among females 15-19 years old in comparison with other Western countries. The following 3 problems are associated with teenage pregnancy: 1) increased health risk to the mother; 2) increased health risk to the baby; and 3) social and economic disadvantages, e.g., lost educational opportunities, unstable marriages, and financial problems. Recent surveys have shown that, while sexual activity among teenagers is increasing, contraceptive use is not. The best strategies for preventing teenage pregnancies include sex education starting early in school, availability of contraception for teenagers, family planning counseling, and education to alert parents to the sexuality of their teenagers. Education must be emphasized.

  6. Adolescent Pregnancy and the First 1000 Days (the Philippine Situation).

    PubMed

    Capanzana, Mario V; Aguila, Divorah V; Javier, Charina A; Mendoza, Teresa S; Santos-Abalos, Virginia M

    2015-01-01

    The Seminar on Adolescent Pregnancy and the First 1000 Days (the Philippine Situation) was held in Metro Manila on September 2013. The objectives were to: 1) describe the current nutrition and health status of Filipino adolescent females, including those pregnant and lactating; 2) discuss existing programs that address their concerns; and 3) identify gaps in existing knowledge and programs, and ways to address these gaps. Adolescent pregnancy rates had increased from 8% in 2003 to 10% in 2008. In 2008, more than 35 percent of pregnant women below 20 years old were considered nutritionally-at-risk. Iodine deficiency and anaemia were major health problems in both pregnant and lactating women of all ages. While government programs exist to address the needs of pregnant women, none were geared towards meeting the specific needs of pregnant adolescents. Studies are needed to find ways to improve adolescent health and to effectively prevent and deal with unwanted pregnancies among adolescents. Recommendations include 1) developing adolescent-friendly health centers, information and education materials to increase reproductive and health awareness among youth and health workers, 2) examining the psychosocial and nutritional factors that determine birth outcomes and nutritional status of pregnant/non-pregnant adolescents, 3) examining adolescent growth patterns following delivery, 4) evaluating the im-pact of current programs and interventions geared towards improving adolescent and maternal health, and more importantly, 5) identifying the underlying reasons for the continued rise in adolescent pregnancy in the country.

  7. Adolescent pregnancy and sex roles.

    PubMed

    Ireson, C J

    1984-08-01

    This study seeks to link adolescent pregnancy with several aspects of sex-role traditionality and other variables that may be related to sex roles. It is hypothesized that orientation to traditional sex roles is related to the occurrence of pregnancy among sexually active teenagers. For the study sample of teenage females receiving birth control or pregnancy testing services, it is hypothesized that the pregnant teenagers will be more likely than other teenagers to be oriented toward traditional sex roles. The sample consisted of 161 young women, ranging in age from 13-18, with an average age of 16.5 years. Data were collected at selected health related agencies in a city in the Pacific Northwest by staff members who were blind to the hypotheses of the study. The respondents usually completed a brief questionnaire while they waited for a desired service. Of the total sample, 43 were pregnant; 34 had positive pregnancy tests and 9 others already knew they were pregnant when they filled out the questionnaire. 82 obtained birth control information or services and 36 experienced negative pregnancy tests. These groups are referred to as the pregnant group, the birth control group, and the negative pregnancy test group. Sex role values were determined by asking the respondent to indicate degree of agreement or disagreement with a series of opinion statements. The results provide some support for the main hypothesis. Pregnant teenagers were more likely than others to be oriented toward traditional sex roles. Pregnant teenagers, when compared with the birth control seeking group, showed more traditional sex-typing of activities, lower educational expectations and occupational aspirations, lower grades, and were more likely to have dropped out of school. There was only 1 significant difference between the pregnant adolescents and those in the negative pregnant test group. The pregnant teens had lower educational expectations. When all the independent and control variables

  8. Complications in adolescent pregnancy: systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Walter Fernandes; Diniz, Michele Baffi; da Fonseca, Eduardo Sérgio Valério Borges; de Azevedo, Lícia Maria Ricarte; Evangelista, Carla Braz

    2015-01-01

    Sexual activity during adolescence can lead to unwanted pregnancy, which in turn can result in serious maternal and fetal complications. The present study aimed to evaluate the complications related to adolescent pregnancy, through a systematic review using the Medical Subject Headings: “pregnancy complication” AND “adolescent” OR “pregnancy in adolescence”. Only full original articles in English or Portuguese with a clearly described methodology, were included. No qualitative studies, reviews or meta-analyses, editorials, case series, or case reports were included. The sample consisted of 15 articles; in that 10 were cross-sectional and 5 were cohort studies. The overall prevalence of adolescent pregnancy was 10%, and among the Brazilian studies, the adolescent pregnancy rate was 26%. The cesarean delivery rate was lower than that reported in the general population. The main maternal and neonatal complications were hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, prematurity and low birth weight, respectively. Adolescent pregnancy is related to increased frequency of neonatal and maternal complications and lower prevalence of cesarean delivery. PMID:26061075

  9. Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Programs: Theoretical Models for Effective Program Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Jeanne A.

    2005-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy and parenting remains a pressing social and public health concern because the United States continues to have the highest teen pregnancy rate among Western developed nations and because of the attendant social, psychological, and physical problems for young parents and their children. Prevention efforts to reduce the incidence…

  10. Experiences of pregnancy among Iranian adolescents: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Tajvidi, Mansooreh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy rate among Iranian adolescents below 20 years of age is increasing. Pregnancy during adolescence is considered a social issue associated with medical, emotional, and social outcomes for the mother, child, and family. The current research examines the experience of pregnancy among Iranian adolescents. Materials and Methods: The qualitative content analysis method was used. A purposive sample of 14 pregnant adolescents was enrolled in the study. Deep interviews were carried out with them. Results: Three themes were came up after analyzing the interviews: 1. Psychological reactions including three subthemes of feelings, concerns, and fears; 2. physical reactions including the subthemes of symptoms and feelings; and 3. spiritual reactions including religious beliefs and faith. Conclusions: The present study showed that for the purpose of assessing pregnancy in adolescents, one should consider the context and culture in which the adolescent lives. This is because factors such as preplanned or unwanted pregnancy and imposed or consensual marriage within or outside the family may draw different reactions from adolescents. Hence, all those factors need to be considered in order to plan health education during pregnancy for this age group. PMID:25949255

  11. Approaches to adolescent pregnancy prevention.

    PubMed

    Haffner, D; Casey, S

    1986-09-01

    The US has one of the highest teenage pregnancy rates in the industrialized world, over 1,000,000 a year. This can add to social problems including poverty, unemployment, family breakup, juvenile crime, school dropouts, and child abuse. In several studies various approaches have been developed and it is concluded that teens must not only be given the knowledge to avoid teen pregnancies, but the motivation to do so. Sex education is an important part of pregnancy prevention, but few programs go beyond the facts of reproduction and less than 14% of them are 40 hours long. Studies have shown mixed results as to the effect of education on teen pregnancy. There are many programs that have been developed by different communities, including computer programs and youth service agencies. Religious groups also play an important part in sex education and they have some distinct advantages in affecting teens' sexual values and activities. Education programs for teen's parents appear to be very important since studies show when sexuality is discussed at home, the teens begin activity later and use birth control more. Clinics have had difficulty recruiting and retaining teen patients and devote special attention to establishing a rapport with them. The school-based clinic is becoming increasingly popular and can provide birth control counseling, contraceptives, family planning clinic referral, examinations, pregnancy testing, and prenatal care. There success is due to confidentiality, convenience, and comprehensive service. However, since nearly all efforts on teen pregnancy prevention are directed at girls, 1/2 of those involved in teen pregnancies--males--are not participating in programs. This must change for longterm success of these programs and also the involvement of the community and media.

  12. Sexual Attitudes and Behavior of Guatemalan Teenagers: Considerations for Prevention of Adolescent Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berganza, Carlos E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Conducted 2 studies to explore prevalence of adolescence pregnancy in Guatemala and identify level of contraception. In first study found 89 percent of male and 38 percent of female adolescents (N=850) had experienced coitus. In the second study found pregnancy rate of minors (N=551) in a gynecology clinic was highest for adolescents aged 13-14.…

  13. Pregnancy during adolescence: wanted vs. unwanted.

    PubMed

    Pinto e Silva, J L

    1998-12-01

    Pregnancy among adolescents is an important problem in most developing countries. The phenomenon in Brazil seems numerically stable for the age group from 15 to 19 years old, with a trend of increase in the first segment of adolescence, below 15. The majority of pregnancies are unwanted, with medical, psychological and mainly social repercussions. The disadvantages are clearer for multipara adolescents. The main immediate consequences of an unwanted pregnancy are: induced abortion, lack of prenatal care, personal and family disruption, adoption and abandonment. Some intervention policies are suggested for the reduction of this phenomenon through programs of sexual education, services for special care of adolescents, access to orientation and contraceptive methods, and support for the pregnancies to be carried on until term.

  14. Preventing adolescent pregnancy and associated risks.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R.

    1995-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a complex and frustrating problem that exacts a large social and personal cost. This year approximately 40,000 Canadian teenagers will become pregnant. With proper prevention, this number could be reduced. Pregnant teenagers seem to be at increased risk for some obstetric complications and their children for some neonatal complications. Family physicians who see patients over the course of a lifetime are in a good position to prevent adolescent pregnancy and the associated complications. PMID:8520241

  15. Preventing adolescent pregnancy and associated risks.

    PubMed

    Miller, R

    1995-09-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a complex and frustrating problem that exacts a large social and personal cost. This year approximately 40,000 Canadian teenagers will become pregnant. With proper prevention, this number could be reduced. Pregnant teenagers seem to be at increased risk for some obstetric complications and their children for some neonatal complications. Family physicians who see patients over the course of a lifetime are in a good position to prevent adolescent pregnancy and the associated complications.

  16. Pregnancy intentions among expectant adolescent couples.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Amy; Mitchell, Stephanie J; Hodgkinson, Stacy; Gilmore, Jasmine; Beers, Lee S

    2014-06-01

    To examine the self-reported pregnancy intentions of the male partners of expectant adolescent mothers, the accuracy of adolescent mothers' perceptions of their partner's pregnancy intentions, and the concordance between young mothers' and fathers' pregnancy intentions. This cross-sectional pilot study collected interview data from expectant adolescent mothers and their male partners. Data were collected in participants' homes. 35 expectant couples were interviewed separately. Most participants were African American (89% of mothers, 74% of fathers). 69% of mothers were 17-18 years old, and half of the fathers were ≥19. Parents responded to survey questions adapted from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System Questionnaire. 44% of fathers reported wanting their partner to get pregnant. Another 15% were ambivalent. A kappa statistic of 0.12 (P = .33) indicated very little "accuracy" of mothers' perceptions of their partners' pregnancy intentions. Further, there was low concordance between the pregnancy intentions of mothers and fathers. Young fathers who wanted or were ambivalent about pregnancy were significantly more likely to use no contraception or withdrawal. For a notable number of minority couples, adolescent mothers do not have an accurate perception of their partners' pregnancy intentions and use contraceptive methods that are not within their control. These findings indicate that teen pregnancy prevention interventions must target young males in addition to females and sexually active adolescents should be encouraged to discuss pregnancy intentions with each other. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Planned adolescent pregnancy: what they needed.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, K S

    2001-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy represents a significant portion of all pregnancies that occur in the United States. However, little is known about adolescents who plan to become pregnant. This phenomenologic investigation attempts to fill the gap in the current literature by addressing this question. Eight adolescent girls between the ages of 14 and 17 were interviewed regarding their experiences planning pregnancy. Participants were recruited from a prenatal clinic in a large tertiary care center in New York City. Themes that emerged from the interviews were related to planning the pregnancy and to the pregnancy. Themes related to planning the pregnancy were further classified as either needs or wants of the adolescent participants. The themes related to adolescent needs are presented in this article and include: that certain important criteria were met for pregnancy including financial, relationship, and age-related goals; planning involved the boyfriend at least to some extent; environmental issues; and the need for stability. Each theme is discussed in depth and recommendations for practice are addressed.

  18. Adolescent Pregnancy and Poverty: Implications for Social Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Clara L.

    Adolescent pregnancy is examined from 2 viewpoints: (1) the marital status of young adolescent girls who become mothers at a too young age is less relevant to the social problem of adolescent pregnancy than the attendant adverse effects, i.e., adolescent pregnancy, per se, rather than illegitimacy is the social problem; and (2) too early marriage…

  19. Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy: A Youth Development Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse on Families and Youth, Silver Spring, MD.

    This booklet presents the youth development approach to supporting adolescents in dealing with all the issues they face, including preventing unintended pregnancies. The Department of Health and Human Services promotes five principles that research and experience suggest are key to community efforts to prevent teen pregnancy: (1) parental and…

  20. Sexual initiation, contraceptive use, and pregnancy among young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Finer, Lawrence B; Philbin, Jesse M

    2013-05-01

    To present new data on sexual initiation, contraceptive use, and pregnancy among US adolescents aged 10 to 19, and to compare the youngest adolescents' behaviors with those of older adolescents. Using nationally representative data from several rounds of the National Survey of Family Growth, we performed event history (ie, survival) analyses to examine timing of sexual initiation and contraceptive use. We calculated adolescent pregnancy rates by single year of age using data from the National Center for Health Statistics, the Guttmacher Institute, and the US Census Bureau. Sexual activity is and has long been rare among those 12 and younger; most is nonconsensual. By contrast, most older teens (aged 17-19) are sexually active. Approximately 30% of those aged 15 to 16 have had sex. Pregnancy rates among the youngest teens are exceedingly low, for example, ∼1 per 10 000 girls aged 12. Contraceptive uptake among girls as young as 15 is similar to that of their older counterparts, whereas girls who start having sex at 14 or younger are less likely to have used a method at first sex and take longer to begin using contraception. Sexual activity and pregnancy are rare among the youngest adolescents, whose behavior represents a different public health concern than the broader issue of pregnancies to older teens. Health professionals can improve outcomes for teenagers by recognizing the higher likelihood of nonconsensual sex among younger teens and by teaching and making contraceptive methods available to teen patients before they become sexually active.

  1. Adolescent pregnancy and childbearing: levels and trends in developed countries.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Darroch, J E

    2000-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy occurs in all societies, but the level of teenage pregnancy and childbearing varies from country to country. A cross-country analysis of birth and abortion measures is valuable for understanding trends, for identifying countries that are exceptional and for seeing where further in-depth studies are needed to understand observed patterns. Birth, abortion and population data were obtained from various sources, such as national vital statistics reports, official statistics, published national and international sources, and government statistical offices. Trend data on adolescent birthrates were compiled for 46 countries over the period 1970-1995. Abortion rates for a recent year were available for 33 of the 46 countries, and data on trends in abortion rates could be gathered for 25 of the 46 countries. The level of adolescent pregnancy varies by a factor of almost 10 across the developed countries, from a very low rate in the Netherlands (12 pregnancies per 1,000 adolescents per year) to an extremely high rate in the Russian Federation (more than 100 per 1,000). Japan and most western European countries have very low or low pregnancy rates (under 40 per 1,000); moderate rates (40-69 per 1,000) occur in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and a number of European countries. A group of five countries--Belarus, Bulgaria, Romania, the Russian Federation and the United States--have pregnancy rates of 70 or more per 1,000. The adolescent birthrate has declined in the majority of industrialized countries over the past 25 years, and in some cases has been more than halved. Similarly, pregnancy rates in 12 of the 18 countries with accurate abortion reporting showed declines. Decreases in the adolescent abortion rate, however, were less prevalent. The trend toward lower adolescent birthrates and pregnancy rates over the past 25 years is widespread and is occurring across the industrialized world, suggesting that the reasons for this general trend are broader

  2. Comprehensive Adolescent Pregnancy Services: A Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, K. A., Ed.; Langlykke, K., Ed.

    This resource guide was compiled to assist state, county, and community personnel in developing comprehensive adolescent health programs which address adolescent pregnancy, prevention, and care. It includes a broad range of topics with materials suitable for both professionals and consumers and for use by regional, state, and local government…

  3. Ovarian ectopic pregnancy in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Ana Gonçalves; Rocha, Sara; Marques, Catarina O; Simões, Mafalda; Martins, Isabel; Biscaia, Isabel; F Barros, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Ovarian pregnancy is one of the rarest types of extrauterine pregnancy. Its preoperative diagnosis remains a challenge since it presents quite similarly to tubal pregnancy and complicated ovarian cysts. Although in most cases, histology is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, we present an ovarian pregnancy in a teenager, correctly diagnosed during ultrasound examination. PMID:26576271

  4. Pregnancy Prevention and Termination of Pregnancy in Adolescence: Facts, Ethics, Law and Politics.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Menachem; Ben Shlomo, Izhar; Solt, Ido; Burke, Yechiel Z

    2015-11-01

    We present an overview of the current sexual behavior of adolescents in Israel, including the related social and moral issues, and compare it to that in Western countries. An important factor is the existence of liberal versus conservative views regarding the use of contraception and termination of pregnancy in these young subjects. We describe the current situation where in most cases the medical providers do not provide adequate contraceptive advice to adolescent girls, resulting ultimately in a high rate of unintended pregnancy. In our opinion, it is essential to make effective contraception more accessible to this vulnerable group.

  5. Adolescent Pregnancy in an Urban Environment: Issues, Programs, and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Janet B.; Zabin, Laurie Schwab

    An in-depth discussion of national and local statistics regarding teenage and adolescent pregnancy and the developmental issues involved opens this analysis. Problems and adverse consequences of adolescent pregnancy in an urban setting are explored using a city-wide random sample of adolescent births. A model pregnancy and parenting program and…

  6. Adolescent Pregnancy in an Urban Environment: Issues, Programs, and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Janet B.; Zabin, Laurie Schwab

    An in-depth discussion of national and local statistics regarding teenage and adolescent pregnancy and the developmental issues involved opens this analysis. Problems and adverse consequences of adolescent pregnancy in an urban setting are explored using a city-wide random sample of adolescent births. A model pregnancy and parenting program and…

  7. Afrocentric perspective of adolescent pregnancy in African American families: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Mims, B L

    1998-01-01

    This article gives a detailed overview of the literature on adolescent pregnancy in African American families. According to the latest data available from the National Center for Health Statistics (1998), the greatest decline in adolescent pregnancy was among African Americans. In spite of the decline of 21% from 1991-1996, African American adolescent's birth rate was still almost twice the rate of European Americans. The purpose of this paper was to provide information that may assist health care professionals or others interested in repeat adolescent pregnancy to more effectively provide care and/or to conduct research from an Afrocentric perspective.

  8. Perceptions of Adolescent Pregnancy Among Teenage Girls in Rakai, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Maly, Christina; McClendon, Katherine A; Baumgartner, Joy Noel; Nakyanjo, Neema; Ddaaki, William George; Serwadda, David; Nalugoda, Fred Kakaire; Wawer, Maria J; Bonnevie, Erika; Wagman, Jennifer A

    2017-01-01

    The leading causes of death and disability among Ugandan female adolescents aged 15 to 19 years are pregnancy complications, unsafe abortions, and childbirth. Despite these statistics, our understanding of how girls perceive adolescent pregnancy is limited. This qualitative study explored the social and contextual factors shaping the perceptions of adolescent pregnancy and childbirth among a sample of 12 currently pregnant and 14 never pregnant girls living in the rural Rakai District of Uganda. Interviews were conducted to elicit perceived risk factors for pregnancy, associated community attitudes, and personal opinions on adolescent pregnancy. Findings indicate that notions of adolescent pregnancy are primarily influenced by perceptions of control over getting pregnant and readiness for childbearing. Premarital pregnancy was perceived as negative whereas postmarital pregnancy was regarded as positive. Greater understanding of the individual and contextual factors influencing perceptions can aid in development of salient, culturally appropriate policies and programs to mitigate unintended adolescent pregnancies.

  9. Perceptions of Adolescent Pregnancy Among Teenage Girls in Rakai, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Christina; McClendon, Katherine A.; Baumgartner, Joy Noel; Nakyanjo, Neema; Ddaaki, William George; Serwadda, David; Nalugoda, Fred Kakaire; Wawer, Maria J.; Bonnevie, Erika; Wagman, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    The leading causes of death and disability among Ugandan female adolescents aged 15 to 19 years are pregnancy complications, unsafe abortions, and childbirth. Despite these statistics, our understanding of how girls perceive adolescent pregnancy is limited. This qualitative study explored the social and contextual factors shaping the perceptions of adolescent pregnancy and childbirth among a sample of 12 currently pregnant and 14 never pregnant girls living in the rural Rakai District of Uganda. Interviews were conducted to elicit perceived risk factors for pregnancy, associated community attitudes, and personal opinions on adolescent pregnancy. Findings indicate that notions of adolescent pregnancy are primarily influenced by perceptions of control over getting pregnant and readiness for childbearing. Premarital pregnancy was perceived as negative whereas postmarital pregnancy was regarded as positive. Greater understanding of the individual and contextual factors influencing perceptions can aid in development of salient, culturally appropriate policies and programs to mitigate unintended adolescent pregnancies. PMID:28835911

  10. Comparison of perinatal outcome between adolescent and adult pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Bildircin, Fatma Devran; Kurtoglu, Emel; Kokcu, Arif; Işik, Yuksel; Ozkarci, Murat; Kuruoglu, Serkan

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare perinatal outcomes between adolescent and adult pregnancies. In 527 adolescent and 1334 adult pregnant women who delivered at Ondokuz Mayis University Obstetrics and Gynecology Department between 2006 and 2013, perinatal outcomes were retrospectively compared in terms of including spontaneous abortion, induced abortion rate, dilatation and curettage (D&C), pregnancy-induced hypertension, premature prelabor and prelabor rupture of membranes, polihydramnios, oligohydramnios, maternal anemia, delivery modes and also neonatal outcomes including 5th minute Apgar score and fetal birth weight. The ratio of pregnancy induced hypertension and postpartum hemorrhage was higher in adults, but, anemia was more common in adolescents. There was statistically significant difference in the mode of delivery; the ratio of cesarean section was higher in adults whereas the rate of induced abortions and D&C significantly increased in adolescents. Low birth weight (LBW) and extremely LBW rates were significantly higher in adolescents, however, 5th minute Apgar scores were found to be higher than adult group. These results show that the perinatal care is fairly improved in Turkey.

  11. Helping Adolescents Deal with Pregnancy: A Psychiatric Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Stanley

    1982-01-01

    Addresses the issue of pregnancy in adolescent girls from a psychiatric viewpoint. Explores why adolescent girls become pregnant; how pregnancy affects the adolescent's emotional process; pregnant adolescents becoming emotional/physical "at-risk" cases; and which factors affect the birth-delivery process. Discusses how sex education can help…

  12. Associations of Adolescent Hopelessness and Self-Worth With Pregnancy Attempts and Pregnancy Desire

    PubMed Central

    Fedorowicz, Anna R.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Bolland, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the associations of pregnancy desire (ambivalence or happiness about a pregnancy in the next year) and recent pregnancy attempts with hopelessness and self-worth among low-income adolescents. Methods. To evaluate independent associations among the study variables, we conducted gender-stratified multivariable logistic regression analyses with data derived from 2285 sexually experienced 9- to 18-year-old participants in the Mobile Youth Survey between 2006 and 2009. Results. Fifty-seven percent of youths reported a desire for pregnancy and 9% reported pregnancy attempts. In multivariable analyses, hopelessness was positively associated and self-worth was negatively associated with pregnancy attempts among both female and male youths. Hopelessness was weakly associated (P = .05) with pregnancy desire among female youths. Conclusions. The negative association of self-worth and the positive association of hopelessness with pregnancy attempts among young men as well as young women and the association of hopelessness with pregnancy desire among young women raise questions about why pregnancy is apparently valued by youths who rate their social and cognitive competence as low and who live in an environment with few options for material success. PMID:24922147

  13. Associations of adolescent hopelessness and self-worth with pregnancy attempts and pregnancy desire.

    PubMed

    Fedorowicz, Anna R; Hellerstedt, Wendy L; Schreiner, Pamela J; Bolland, John M

    2014-08-01

    We examined the associations of pregnancy desire (ambivalence or happiness about a pregnancy in the next year) and recent pregnancy attempts with hopelessness and self-worth among low-income adolescents. To evaluate independent associations among the study variables, we conducted gender-stratified multivariable logistic regression analyses with data derived from 2285 sexually experienced 9- to 18-year-old participants in the Mobile Youth Survey between 2006 and 2009. Fifty-seven percent of youths reported a desire for pregnancy and 9% reported pregnancy attempts. In multivariable analyses, hopelessness was positively associated and self-worth was negatively associated with pregnancy attempts among both female and male youths. Hopelessness was weakly associated (P = .05) with pregnancy desire among female youths. The negative association of self-worth and the positive association of hopelessness with pregnancy attempts among young men as well as young women and the association of hopelessness with pregnancy desire among young women raise questions about why pregnancy is apparently valued by youths who rate their social and cognitive competence as low and who live in an environment with few options for material success.

  14. School-based adolescent pregnancy classes.

    PubMed

    Podgurski, M J

    1993-01-01

    School-based adolescent pregnancy classes provide the childbirth educator with a unique opportunity to be visible to students. Attitudes about sexuality and pregnancy can be changed within the mainstream population by the presence of prepared childbirth classes at schools. The problems of absenteeism and denial of pregnancy that result in late reporting to health care providers can be minimized. The expectant teen-ager can be encouraged to attend school and given self-confidence in assuming the role of a parent after birth. Support can be engendered from faculty, students, and the teen-ager's support person.

  15. Gynecologic age is an important risk factor for obstetric and perinatal outcomes in adolescent pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Kaplanoglu, Mustafa; Bülbül, Mehmet; Konca, Capan; Kaplanoglu, Dilek; Tabak, Mehmet Selcuk; Ata, Barıs

    2015-12-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is an important public health problem. Physiological maturity affects obstetric and perinatal outcomes. Almost all assessments of adolescent pregnancies are based on chronological age. Gynecologic age (GA) is defined as age in years at conception minus age at menarche and it is an indicator of physiological maturity. To compare obstetric and perinatal outcomes between adult and adolescent pregnancies as categorized according to GA. In this retrospective study, 233 adolescent pregnant women were divided into two groups based on GA≤3 years (101 women) and GA>3 years (132 women). Their obstetric and perinatal results were compared with 202 adult pregnancies who gave birth in the same period. Gestational age at delivery, APGAR scores, birth weight, and incidence of preterm birth, admission to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), intrauterine growth restriction, low birth weight, and premature rupture of membranes were significantly different between the study groups. Compared to adolescent pregnancies with GA>3 years, adolescent pregnancies with GA≤3 years had significantly lower birth weight, gestational age, APGAR scores, and significantly higher incidence of intrauterine growth restriction, low birth weight and admission to NICU. Low GA is associated with an increased rate of obstetric and perinatal complications in adolescent pregnancies. Although the main aim is the prevention of adolescent pregnancies, a detailed evaluation of such pregnancies including determination of the gynecological age together with a multidisciplinary approach may decrease potential complications. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Social representations of motherhood and pregnancy in adolescents attending their first pregnancy and adolescents with more than one pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sotelo, Ángela; Gutiérrez-Malaver, María E; Izzedin-Bouquet, Romina; Sánchez-Martínez, Lilián M; Herrera-Medina, Nelson E; Ballesteros-Cabrera, Magnolia

    2012-01-01

    Characterizingze the social representations of motherhood and pregnancy in two groups, adolescents who are attending their first pregnancy and adolescents with more than one pregnancy. The study used a design based on interpretative and qualitative research method. Our data were collected as a network of associations, depth interviews and participant observation. Individual methodological triangulation from the groups of participants and the whole group were performed. Social representations of pregnancy and childbearing among adolescents in both groups converges on: new social status, fear of family rejection and important decisions. And while the exclusive social representations of the adolescents in their first pregnancy are: the postponement of studies, family and economic dependence and the figure of the father as a provider; those adolescents with more than one pregnancy are linked to school dropout, family and economic independence and the father of the child being the emotional container. Besides, baby ranks a distintic place in both groups. While the figurative nucleous attached wih love is present in women with more than one pregnancy, this is not the care center and such importance becomes relegated to different representation contents. The study absolutely show that it isn't through ignorance or lack of information that teenagers become pregnant. Teenage pregnancy is a complex phenomenon and the prevention of it should focus on the construction of the subjects to whom specific interventions are targeted.

  17. Adolescent Pregnancy and Childbearing: Findings from Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilman, Catherine S.; And Others

    Issues and trends related to adolescent pregnancy and childbearing in the United States are discussed in the 12 papers collected in this publication. Chapters I and II delineate trends in teenage childbearing and explore aspects of psychosocial development and social problems associated with teenage illegitimacy. Chapters III and IV describe…

  18. Nutrition & Adolescent Pregnancy: A Selected Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Agricultural Library (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This annotated bibliography on nutrition and adolescent pregnancy is intended to be a source of technical assistance for nurses, nutritionists, physicians, educators, social workers, and other personnel concerned with improving the health of teenage mothers and their babies. It is divided into two major sections. The first section lists selected…

  19. Social Disadvantage as a Risk for First Pregnancy Among Adolescent Females in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Upadhya, Krishna K.; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Differences in underlying determinants of pregnancy at different stages of adolescent development have implications for prevention strategies. We sought to determine whether social disparities in rates of adolescent pregnancy vary between early, middle and late adolescence. We hypothesized that as age increases, racial and socioeconomic disparities in rates of teen conception decrease. Methods Data were obtained from the National Survey of Family Growth Cycle 6. Outcome variables indicated whether respondents' had a first pregnancy at ages <15 years, 15–17 years, or 18–19 years. Independent variables were race and maternal education level. Logistic regression was used to calculate the relative odds of first conception in a given age range by race and maternal education level. Results The disparity in odds of pregnancy between black and white teens is maximal in early adolescence (OR <15years 3.89) and decreased by up to 40% in late adolescence (OR 18–19 years 2.01, p<0.01). After stratifying by maternal education level, the same trends are seen. Conclusions In accordance with our hypothesis, we found that social disparities in pregnancy rates decrease between early and late adolescence. While pregnancy prevention efforts often target those at social risk including poor minority youth, fewer acknowledge and target the risks associated with development of sexuality in all teens. Efforts to better define the nature of healthy adolescent sexual development may lead to pregnancy prevention interventions focused on developmental risk that can apply to a wider set of adolescents. PMID:22018570

  20. Are pregnant adolescents stigmatized by pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Wiemann, Constance M; Rickert, Vaughn I; Berenson, Abbey B; Volk, Robert J

    2005-04-01

    To identify prevalence and correlates, including substance use and exposure to violence, of feeling stigmatized by being pregnant as an adolescent. A total of 925 low-income African-American, Mexican-American, and Caucasian pregnant adolescents aged adolescents (39.1%) reported feeling stigmatized by their pregnancy. As compared with their nonstigmatized peers, stigmatized adolescents were more likely to report having seriously considered abortion, being afraid to tell parents about pregnancy, feeling that parents/teachers thought pregnancy a mistake, and feeling abandoned by the fathers of their babies. Stepwise logistic regression revealed the following correlates independently associated with feeling stigmatized: white race/ethnicity, not being legally/common-law married or engaged to the baby's father, feelings of social isolation, aspirations to complete college, experiencing verbal abuse or being fearful of being hurt by other teenagers, and experiencing family criticism. In contrast, greater self-esteem and having dropped out of school before conception were protective of reporting feelings of stigma. Significant proportions of pregnant adolescents feel stigmatized by pregnancy and are at increased risk of social isolation and abuse. These young women may need special attention during and after pregnancy to develop concrete strategies to care for themselves and their children to complete their education and avoid becoming clinically depressed.

  1. Birth Defects and Adolescent Pregnancies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, James

    1975-01-01

    Home economists who work with adolescents can help prepare them for responsible parenthood later in life by explaining the known causes of various birth defects; providing basic information about human genetics, prenatal nutrition, and drug and alcohol effects; and motivating adolescents to exercise increased responsibility in their sexual…

  2. Birth Defects and Adolescent Pregnancies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, James

    1975-01-01

    Home economists who work with adolescents can help prepare them for responsible parenthood later in life by explaining the known causes of various birth defects; providing basic information about human genetics, prenatal nutrition, and drug and alcohol effects; and motivating adolescents to exercise increased responsibility in their sexual…

  3. Perceived social support, self esteem, and pregnancy status among Dominican adolescents.

    PubMed

    Babington, Lynn M; Malone, Linda; Kelley, Barbara R

    2015-05-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a major health concern among Dominicans in the U.S. and in the Dominican Republic (DR). Twenty three percent of adolescents age 15-19 have experienced pregnancy and this trend is rising. The purpose of this study was to explore and compare social support, self-esteem and pregnancy between Dominican adolescents in the DR with those who have immigrated to the U.S. This study used an exploratory, descriptive design including study samples from both the U.S. and DR. Findings showed that young women with stronger social support and higher self esteem experienced lower pregnancy rates in both the DR and U.S. Neither self esteem nor social support was found to be predictors of pregnancy. Important findings from this study will inform the development of interventions aimed at preventing pregnancy in adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Applying an intervention framework to assess North Carolina's adolescent pregnancy prevention efforts.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Brittany D; Ma, Alice

    2016-06-01

    We assessed the extent to which implementing adolescent pregnancy prevention programs in conjunction with three level implementation strategies reduces adolescent pregnancy rates at the county-level in North Carolina (NC). Fixsen and colleagues' (2005) three levels of implementation were used to organize the prevention strategies: core (e.g., training, fidelity monitoring), organizational (e.g., administrative support), and external (e.g., community resources). Counties that had adolescent friendly clinic/services (external) were more likely to report lower adolescent pregnancy rates in comparison to counties that did not have access to such services. Findings suggest external implementation strategies are key to reducing adolescent pregnancy rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Pregnancy in adolescence. A review of 840 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Ortiz Sanchez, E

    1991-10-01

    Pregnancy during adolescence is a medical problem and a social phenomenon of increasing importance. Opportune medical care may resolve pregnancy risk, but the lacks of this stage of life, and the lack of resources of certain communities, may frustrate the mother's desires, in such a way, that pregnancy in adolescence, will mean more a social problem than a medical one.

  6. Sexual Initiation, Contraceptive Use, and Pregnancy Among Young Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Philbin, Jesse M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present new data on sexual initiation, contraceptive use, and pregnancy among US adolescents aged 10 to 19, and to compare the youngest adolescents’ behaviors with those of older adolescents. METHODS: Using nationally representative data from several rounds of the National Survey of Family Growth, we performed event history (ie, survival) analyses to examine timing of sexual initiation and contraceptive use. We calculated adolescent pregnancy rates by single year of age using data from the National Center for Health Statistics, the Guttmacher Institute, and the US Census Bureau. RESULTS: Sexual activity is and has long been rare among those 12 and younger; most is nonconsensual. By contrast, most older teens (aged 17–19) are sexually active. Approximately 30% of those aged 15 to 16 have had sex. Pregnancy rates among the youngest teens are exceedingly low, for example, ∼1 per 10 000 girls aged 12. Contraceptive uptake among girls as young as 15 is similar to that of their older counterparts, whereas girls who start having sex at 14 or younger are less likely to have used a method at first sex and take longer to begin using contraception. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual activity and pregnancy are rare among the youngest adolescents, whose behavior represents a different public health concern than the broader issue of pregnancies to older teens. Health professionals can improve outcomes for teenagers by recognizing the higher likelihood of nonconsensual sex among younger teens and by teaching and making contraceptive methods available to teen patients before they become sexually active. PMID:23545373

  7. Trends, characteristics, and outcomes of adolescent pregnancy in eastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Edirne, Tamer; Can, Muhammet; Kolusari, Ali; Yildizhan, Recep; Adali, Ertan; Akdag, Beyza

    2010-08-01

    To determine the proportion of adolescent births in Van, Turkey, and to identify characteristics and related outcomes. Mothers who gave birth at three maternity centers in Van, Turkey, were chosen randomly and were invited to complete a face-to-face questionnaire. Participants were asked for demographic information and pregnancy history. Pregnancy outcomes were obtained from the birth records. Of 1872 mothers who completed the questionnaires, 211 (11.3%) were younger than 19 years. Adolescent mothers showed significantly more inappropriate education for age (82.5% vs 70.1; P<0.001) and were married to less educated partners (76.3% vs 59.4%; P<0.001) following unofficial matrimonies (25.6% vs 10.7%; P<0.001) than older mothers. There were no differences between the age groups in rates of arranged marriages with relatives, income, and household structure. Adolescent mothers reported higher rates of intimate partner violence (17.1% vs 10.8%; P=0.008) and inadequate prenatal care use (28.4% vs 17.6%; P<0.001) compared with older mothers. Adolescent births were associated with an increased risk for preterm delivery (P<0.001) and low birth weight (P<0.001). Cultural factors rather than economic factors seem to be related to early age at marriage and adolescent childbearing, which are associated with poor birth outcomes. Copyright 2010 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Female adolescents' perceptions of male partners' pregnancy desire.

    PubMed

    Heavey, Elizabeth J; Moysich, Kirsten B; Hyland, Andrew; Druschel, Charlotte M; Sill, Michael W

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to examine the relationship between pregnancy desire among female adolescents and their perception of desire for pregnancy in their male partners. This is an observational cross-sectional study which examined 92 surveys administered to adolescent women between the ages of 14 to 19 years at two obstetrical care services serving a population from limited socioeconomic backgrounds. Participants were all pregnant or awaiting pregnancy test results. Participants were asked about their levels of pregnancy happiness and desire and their partners' levels of pregnancy happiness and desire. Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated and discordant pairs were examined with McNemar's test. Logistic regression was utilized to examine the relationship between male and female pregnancy happiness and desire. We found that there was a significant correlation between the adolescents' feelings about pregnancy and their perceptions of their male partners' feelings about pregnancy (0.326; P = .004). McNemar's test indicated that male partners were significantly more likely to be reported to feel positively about the pregnancy than female partners (P = .017). Female adolescents who reported male partners who felt positively about the pregnancy were four times as likely to report having desired their pregnancy now or sooner (odds ratio [OR] = 4.35). We conclude that male partners may impact adolescent pregnancy desire. Further prospective studies are needed and male-focused adolescent pregnancy interventions should be developed.

  9. Adolescent Pregnancy: Implications for Prevention Strategies in Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paget, Kathleen D.

    1988-01-01

    An overview of research on pre-adolescent and adolescent pregnancy is provided, and innovative school and community-based prevention programs are discussed. The implications for psychologists with respect to preventive programing in school settings are considered. (SLD)

  10. Adolescent Pregnancy and Unfinished Developmental Tasks of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Carol

    1987-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy may occur when childhood developmental needs have not been met adequately. Once the needs have been identified, intervention for the adolescent and her child can be tailored to fill developmental gaps. (Author/MT)

  11. The Effects of Parental Involvement Laws and the AIDS Epidemic on the Pregnancy and Abortion Rates of Minors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman-Palm, Nancy; Tremblay, Carol Horton

    1998-01-01

    Explores the effects of legislation requiring parental consent for a minor's abortion and the risk of acquiring AIDS on adolescent pregnancy and abortion rates. Finds lower pregnancy and abortion rates for women 15-17 in states with parental involvement legislation, while abortion doubles and pregnancy rates decline with the incidence of AIDS.…

  12. Pleased to be pregnant? Positive pregnancy attitudes among sexually active adolescent females in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lau, May; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn

    2014-08-01

    To identify factors associated with a positive pregnancy attitude among sexually active US teen females. Secondary database analysis of the National Survey of Family Growth. Adolescent females 15-19 years old. Nationally representative sample. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were performed of the 2002 and 2006-08 cycles to examine whether sociodemographic factors, contraceptive history, sexual education and behavior history, medical services history, and family and sexual attitudes were associated with a positive pregnancy attitude among sexually active teen females. Among the 975 sexually active US adolescent females surveyed, 15% reported a positive pregnancy attitude. Compared with adolescent females with a negative pregnancy attitude, those females with a positive pregnancy attitude were significantly (P < .05) more likely to have public insurance (43% vs 20%), to be poor (33% vs 10%), to have reached menarche at an earlier age (12 years old vs 13 years old), ever have HIV tested (35% vs 23%), but less likely to have ever been forced to have sex (1% vs 10%). In multivariable analyses, Latino race/ethnicity was associated with triple the odds, and African-American double the odds, of a positive pregnancy attitude. Older age of menarche and higher family income were associated with reduced odds of a positive pregnancy attitude. One in 7 sexually active US adolescent females had a positive pregnancy attitude. Minority race/ethnicity was associated with greater odds of a positive pregnancy attitude, whereas older age of menarche and a higher family income were associated with lower odds of a positive pregnancy attitude. Assessing pregnancy attitudes for these groups of adolescent females might prove useful to decrease adolescent pregnancy rates. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Health effects of adolescent pregnancy: implications for social workers.

    PubMed

    Combs-orme, T

    1993-06-01

    Adolescent pregnancy increases the risk of pregnancy complications, low birth weight (LBW), and infant mortality. Complications include urinary tract infections, acute pyelonephritis, and preeclampsia. Full eclampsia is often fatal, thus preeclamptic women are delivered immediately. LBW (below 2500 g) is caused by prematurity and intrauterine growth retardation, both of which factors are associated with adolescence. In 1989, approximately 7% of all live births in the US were LBW (5.7% White and 13.5% Black). A large sample of births in 1975-78 found increased risk of neonatal mortality for the infants of adolescents, possibly owing to higher rates of LBW. In 1991, a random sample of 389 adolescent mothers who had given birth in 1983 indicated a 54% rate of depression, and even higher rates existed among those with 2 or more pregnancies. Additional risk factors include socioeconomic circumstances (poor housing, nutrition, and cultural deprivation). In a 1991 study of adolescent mothers, 80% of Blacks and 57% of Whites lived in female-headed households. Of the total, 1% of Blacks and 25% of Whites were married and living together. 45% of Whites and 58% of Blacks lived in poverty. Only 44% of these women used prenatal care in the 1st trimester, and 11% had no regular source of health care at 15-18 months after childbirth. A 1989 study of 253 pregnant women aged 19 or younger showed that 52.2% admitted drinking alcohol, 31.6% admitted using marijuana, and 13.8% admitted using cocaine during pregnancy. Nutritional problems included skipping meals and eating junk food, as well as not getting enough food, although they were entitled to government food stamps. Immaturity and lack of knowledge also contributed to poor health. Prenatal clinics, school-based clinics, and hospitals have to encourage prenatal care (e.g., the Johns Hopkins University comprehensive maternity-care program for adolescents), treat depression, assess their concrete needs regarding services and

  14. Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenthood. Highlights: An ERIC/CAPS Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danziger, Sandra; Farber, Naomi

    This digest reviews trends in adolescent sexual activity and discusses conceptual and programmatic approaches to pregnancy prevention. It discusses a pregnant adolescent's choices for resolving an unplanned pregnancy (i.e. abortion, adoption, keeping the baby, and marriage), and the challenges faced by teenage parents. The final section touches on…

  15. [Association between unplanned pregnancy and adolescence onset asthma].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Nava, Francisco; Gil-Lara, Bertoldo; Cruz-Torres, Leoncio; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Carlos F; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Eliza M; Felizardo-Ávalos, Jorge; Llanes-Castillo, Arturo; Córdova-Fernández, José A

    2013-01-01

    The association between asthma and pregnancy has been documented previously. The relationship between unplanned pregnancy and onset asthma in adolescence has not been studied. To determine the association between unplanned pregnancy and adolescence onset asthma. A cross-sectional study was done gathering information about asthma, unplanned pregnancy, family atopy and active or passive smoking in 3,130 adolescents aged 13-19 years. Asthma diagnosis was established through a selfquestionnaire based on the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood. Odds ratios for asthma were determined using logistic regression model and chi-squared test. Mean age of the participants was 16.37 ± 1.93 years. The prevalence of active smoking was 16.1%, of passive smoking 40% and of family atopy 9.8%. From the pregnant adolescents (785), 59.5% reported had planned not to have a child before pregnancy. Prevalence of wheezing during the year prior to the study was 9.3% and of wheezing during the pregnancy 2%. The prevalence of adolescence onset asthma was 5.4%. The age of initiation of asthma in the adolescence was 14.75 ± 1.60 years. The analysis showed that unplanned pregnancy has a slight risk for the development of asthma during adolescence. (Crude OR=1.03; CI 95% 1.02-1.05; p=0.000). Unplanned pregnancy, family atopy, active smoking and smoking friends are associated with the onset-asthma in the adolescence.

  16. Report and Recommendations on Adolescent Pregnancy in Mississippi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Governor's Office of Federal-State Programs, Jackson.

    This document contains the conclusions and recommendations of a task force established to review the status of adolescent pregnancy and childbearing in Mississippi and to make recommendations for programs and policies that would serve to prevent or lessen the negative impact of adolescent pregnancy. The introduction of the report presents…

  17. The Psychosocial Meaning of Pregnancy among Adolescents in Mexico City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, Lucille C.; Alatorre-Rico, Javier

    Adolescent childbearing has historically been a relatively frequent phenomenon in Mexico and has only recently begun to decline. This study was designed to identify to what extent urban Mexican adolescents, who became pregnant out-of-wedlock and who carried their pregnancy to term, received social support during pregnancy and their emotional…

  18. Impact of adolescent pregnancy on hypertension in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee Soo; Jung, Inkyung; Youn, Jong-Chan; Cho, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported the detrimental effects on maternal health due to pregnancy during adolescence, but no studies have reported the influence of adolescent pregnancy on blood pressure in women's later life. We investigated whether there was an association between adolescent pregnancy and the risk of hypertension in Korean postmenopausal women. This study used the data of 2538 postmenopausal women from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2010-2011. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the independent association between adolescent pregnancy and hypertension by adjusting for potential confounding factors. Postmenopausal women with a history of adolescent pregnancy had a higher prevalence of hypertension than those without a history of adolescent pregnancy. After fully adjusting for potential confounding factors such as age, lifestyle, sociodemographic factors, known hypertension risk factors, and reproductive factors, a history of adolescent pregnancy was significantly associated with hypertension (odds ratio, 1.702; 95% confidence interval, 1.125-2.574). This study showed that a history of adolescent pregnancy is significantly and independently associated with a higher risk of hypertension in postmenopausal women.

  19. The Psychosocial Meaning of Pregnancy among Adolescents in Mexico City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, Lucille C.; Alatorre-Rico, Javier

    Adolescent childbearing has historically been a relatively frequent phenomenon in Mexico and has only recently begun to decline. This study was designed to identify to what extent urban Mexican adolescents, who became pregnant out-of-wedlock and who carried their pregnancy to term, received social support during pregnancy and their emotional…

  20. Pregnancy during Adolescence and Associated Risks: An 8-Year Hospital-Based Cohort Study (2007-2014) in Romania, the Country with the Highest Rate of Teenage Pregnancy in Europe.

    PubMed

    Socolov, Demetra-Gabriela; Iorga, Magdalena; Carauleanu, Alexandru; Ilea, Ciprian; Blidaru, Iolanda; Boiculese, Lucian; Socolov, Razvan-Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To determine pregnancy and delivery outcomes among teenagers. Materials and Methods. An 8-year retrospective comparative hospital-based cohort study is analysing singleton pregnancy comorbidities and delivery parameters of a teenage group under the age of 20 compared with a young adult group 20-24 years of age in a university hospital. Results. Teenage is a risk factor for preterm birth <37 weeks (1.21 [1.08-1.35]), foetal growth restriction (1.34 [1.21-1.48]), episiotomy (1.27 [1.21-1.34]), uterine revision (1.15 [1.06-1.25]), APGAR <7 at 1 min (2.42 [1.21-1.67]), cephalopelvic disproportion (1.26 [1.07-1.48]), and postpartum haemorrhage (1.42 [1.25-1.62]); however, caesarean delivery occurs less frequently in teenagers than in adults (0.75 [0.70-0.80]). The following comorbidities are risk factors for teenage pregnancy (risk ratio [CI 95%]): anaemia (1.13 [1.10-1.17]), low urinary tract infection (1.10 [1.03-1.18]), pediculosis (2.42 [1.90-3.00]), anogenital condyloma (1.50 [1.04-2.17]), and trichomoniasis (1.74 [1.12-2.68]). The risks for hepatitis B and hepatitis C, premature rupture of membranes, and placenta praevia were lower compared with those in the young adult group, respectively, 0.43 (0.26-0.71), 0.90 (0.85-0.96), and 0.29 (0.20-0.41), while the risk for gestational diabetes and preeclampsia were the same in both groups. Conclusion. Considering the high risks for teenage pregnancy, this information should be provided to pregnant adolescent women and their caregivers.

  1. Early adolescent pregnancy increases risk of incident HIV infection in the Eastern Cape, South Africa: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Nicola J; Jewkes, Rachel K; Dunkle, Kristin L; Nduna, Mzikazi; Shai, Nwabisa Jama; Sterk, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents having unprotected heterosexual intercourse are at risk of HIV infection and unwanted pregnancy. However, there is little evidence to indicate whether pregnancy in early adolescence increases the risk of subsequent HIV infection. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that adolescent pregnancy (aged 15 or younger) increases the risk of incident HIV infection in young South African women. We assessed 1099 HIV-negative women, aged 15-26 years, who were volunteer participants in a cluster-randomized, controlled HIV prevention trial in the predominantly rural Eastern Cape province of South Africa. All of these young women had at least one additional HIV test over two years of follow-up. Outcomes were HIV incidence rates per 100 person years and HIV incidence rate ratios (IRRs) estimated by Poisson multivariate models. Three pregnancy categories were created for the Poisson model: early adolescent pregnancy (a first pregnancy at age 15 years or younger); later adolescent pregnancy (a first pregnancy at age 16 to 19 years); and women who did not report an adolescent pregnancy. Models were adjusted for study design, age, education, time since first sexual experience, socio-economic status, childhood trauma and herpes simplex virus type 2 infection. HIV incidence rates were 6.0 per 100 person years over two years of follow-up. The adjusted IRR was 3.02 (95% CI 1.50-6.09) for a pregnancy occurring at age 15 or younger. Women with pregnancies occurring between 16 and 19 years of age did not have a higher incidence of HIV (IRR 1.08; 95% CI 0.64-1.84). Early adolescent pregnancies were associated with higher partner numbers and a greater age difference with partners. Early adolescent pregnancies increase the incidence of HIV among South African women. The higher risk is associated with sexual risk behaviours such as higher partner numbers and a greater age difference with partners rather than a biological explanation of hormonal changes during pregnancy.

  2. Pregnancy rates in central Yellowstone bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gogan, Peter J.; Russell, Robin E.; Olexa, Edward M.; Podruzny, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Plains bison (Bison b. bison) centered on Yellowstone National Park are chronically infected with brucellosis (Brucella abortus) and culled along the park boundaries to reduce the probability of disease transmission to domestic livestock. We evaluated the relationship between pregnancy rates and age, dressed carcass weight, and serological status for brucellosis among bison culled from the central Yellowstone subpopulation during the winters of 1996–1997, 2001–2002, and 2002–2003. A model with only dressed carcass weight was the best predictor of pregnancy status for all ages with the odds of pregnancy increasing by 1.03 (95% CI = 1.02–1.04) for every 1-kg increase in weight. We found no effect of age or the serological status for brucellosis on pregnancy rates across age classes; however, we did find a positive association between age and pregnancy rates for bison ≥2 years old. Bison ≥2 years old had an overall pregnancy rate of 65% with markedly different rates in alternate ages for animals between 3 and 7 years old. Pregnancy rates were 0.50 (95% CI = 0.31–0.69) for brucellosis positive and 0.57 (95% CI = 0.34–0.78) for brucellosis negative 2- and 3-year-olds and 0.74 (95% CI = 0.60–0.85) in brucellosis positive and 0.69 (95% CI = 0.49–0.85) in brucellosis negative bison ≥4 years old. Only 1 of 21 bison <2 years old was pregnant. Our findings are important to accurately predict the effects of brucellosis on Yellowstone bison population dynamics. We review our results relative to other studies of Yellowstone bison that concluded serological status for brucellosis influences pregnancy rates.

  3. Adolescent pregnancy and associated factors in South African youth.

    PubMed

    Mchunu, G; Peltzer, K; Tutshana, B; Seutlwadi, L

    2012-12-01

    Adolescent pregnancy, occurring in girls aged 10-19 years, remains a serious health and social problem worldwide, and has been associated with numerous risk factors evident in the young people's family, peer, school, and neighbourhood contexts. To assess the prevalence of adolescent pregnancy and associated factors in the South African context, as part of a population-based household survey that formed part of an evaluation of the impact of loveLife, South Africa's national HIV prevention campaign for young people. A cross-sectional population-based household survey was conducted using a multi-stage stratified cluster sampling approach. The total sample included 3123 participants, aged 18-24, 54.6% men and 45.4% women, from four of nine provinces in South Africa (Eastern Cape, Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga). Among female youth 19.2% said that they had an adolescent pregnancy, while 5.8% of male youth indicated that they had impregnated a girl when they were an adolescent (12-19 years), 16.2% of the women indicated that they ever had an unwanted pregnancy and 6.7% had ever terminated a pregnancy. In multivariable analysis among women it was found that being employed or unemployed, greater poverty, having higher sexually permissive attitudes and scoring higher on the contraceptive or the condom use index was associated with adolescent pregnancy, and among men wanting the pregnancy and having a sense of the future were associated with adolescent pregnancy. Adolescent pregnancy was found to be high in this sample of South African youth. Multiple factors contributing to adolescent pregnancy have been identified which can be used in targeting young people on the prevention of adolescent pregnancy.

  4. Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives to reduce the rate of teen pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rome, Ellen

    2015-11-01

    Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) are safe for use in adolescents and do not rely on compliance or adherence for effectiveness. Continuation rates are higher and pregnancy rates are lower for adolescent users of LARCs compared with short-acting methods such as oral contraceptives. Similarly, repeat pregnancy rates are lower when LARCs are used compared with other forms of contraception. Myths and misconceptions about LARCs and other contraceptives remain a barrier to their use. Health care providers are in a unique position to provide confidential care to adolescents, and should provide education to them about the various contraceptive options, especially LARCs. Copyright © 2015 Cleveland Clinic.

  5. Adolescent Stress, Coping, and Academic Persistence in Rural Appalachia: The Unacknowledged Import of Early Adolescent Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Linda; Bickel, Robert

    This paper examines pregnancy in early adolescence, among West Virginia females aged 10-14, as it relates to local economic and social contexts. Although research on adolescent pregnancy is substantial, it is generally limited to the experiences of older adolescents and premised on assumptions of methodological individualism--that the correlates…

  6. Temporal trends in adolescent pregnancies in Lombardy, Italy: 1996-2010.

    PubMed

    Parazzini, Fabio; Ricci, Elena; Cipriani, Sonia; Motta, Tiziano; Chiaffarino, Francesca; Malvezzi, Matteo; Bulfoni, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    Data from southern European countries concerning teenage pregnancy have not been properly analysed so far. We provide the temporal trend of adolescent pregnancy rates in Lombardy, Northern Italy. Using the hospital discharge register (1996-2010), teenage pregnancy-related admission rates per 1000 girls aged 13 to 19 years, residing in Lombardy, were computed. Miscarriage-, induced abortion-, and delivery ratios/100 pregnancies, and caesarean section ratio/100 deliveries, were calculated. The pregnancy rate increased from 9.07 in 1996-2000 to 10.20 in 2001-2005, and remained at that level (10.27) in 2006-2010. However, the rates by country of birth (native Italian and non-native Italian) showed a steady decline in 2003-2010, when data about residents in Lombardy, categorised by sex, age and country of birth, were available. The induced abortion rate rose from 5.38/1000 to 5.55/1000, then decreased slightly in 2006-2010. The abortion ratio/100 pregnancies diminished from 59.3 in 1996-2000 to 50.3 in 2006-2010. Between 1996 and 2010, the overall teenage pregnancy rate has risen in Lombardy. When the rates were calculated separately for adolescents born in Italy and immigrants, the trends reverted in the period 2003-2010: in both groups pregnancy- and birth rates steadily declined. Pregnancy-, abortion-, and birth rates in non-native Italians, after having dropped, are all still much higher than those among native Italians. Because the number of non-native Italian adolescent girls markedly increased over the last two decades, their group--with decreasing, but still higher, birth- and abortion rates--has caused the observed rise in those rates when all adolescents residing in Lombardy are considered indistinctly.

  7. Pregnancy termination among South African adolescents.

    PubMed

    Varga, Christine A

    2002-12-01

    Although African adolescents' risk of undergoing abortion and of related health complications is well-documented, little is known about the procedure's prominence in their lives and the pathways that lead to their reliance upon it. This study investigates abortion dynamics among male and female Zulu adolescents in KwaZulu/Natal, South Africa. It explores the role of abortion in young people's sexual and reproductive experience, its acceptability, the reasons and likelihood of young people's choosing abortion, and the commonly used methods of pregnancy termination. The study, a rural-urban comparison using focus-group discussions, narrative workshops, and role playing, involved surveys and in-depth interviews. Factors contributing to the commonplace nature of backstreet procedures among adolescents include: social stigma, inadequate knowledge of the legal status of abortion, and a complex group decisionmaking process. Young people invoke "relative moralities" concerning adolescent abortion, recognizing and condoning it on a context-specific basis. Age, gender, and geographic differences are examined. The methodological triangulation used offers the opportunity for alternative theoretical and methodological approaches to research on abortion-related issues.

  8. Factors Associated With Being Pleased With a Female Partner Pregnancy Among Sexually Active U.S. Adolescent Males.

    PubMed

    Lau, May; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn

    2016-05-01

    Adolescent pregnancy remains a major U.S. public health problem. Little is known about pregnancy attitudes in U.S. adolescent males. The study objective was to identify factors from different domains that are associated with sexually active U.S. adolescent males who would be pleased with a female partner pregnancy (hereafter known as pleased with a pregnancy). The National Survey of Family Growth is a nationally representative survey of those 15 to 44 years old. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were performed of the 2002 and 2006-2010 cycles to examine factors associated with being pleased with a pregnancy among sexually active U.S. males. Among the 1,445 sexually active U.S. adolescent males surveyed, 25% would be pleased with a pregnancy. In bivariate analyses, ever being suspended from school, having sporadic health insurance, age, and ever HIV tested were significantly associated with being pleased with a pregnancy. In final multivariable analyses, sporadic insurance was associated with almost triple the odds, and being older and ever HIV tested with double the odds of being pleased with a pregnancy. Higher educational attainment for both adolescent males and adolescent males' fathers was associated with reduced odds of a being pleased with a pregnancy. One quarter of sexually active U.S. adolescent males would be pleased with a pregnancy. Adolescent males who have been sporadically insured, are older, and ever HIV tested have higher odds of being pleased with a pregnancy. Targeting these adolescent males for more focused pregnancy-prevention counseling may prove useful in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Pregnancy Rates among Juvenile Justice Girls in Two Randomized Controlled Trials of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, David C. R.; Leve, Leslie D.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Preventing adolescent pregnancy is a national research priority that has had limited success. In the present study, the authors examined whether Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) relative to intervention services as usual (group care [GC]) decreased pregnancy rates among juvenile justice girls mandated to out-of-home care. Girls (13-17…

  10. Pregnancy Rates among Juvenile Justice Girls in Two Randomized Controlled Trials of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, David C. R.; Leve, Leslie D.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Preventing adolescent pregnancy is a national research priority that has had limited success. In the present study, the authors examined whether Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) relative to intervention services as usual (group care [GC]) decreased pregnancy rates among juvenile justice girls mandated to out-of-home care. Girls (13-17…

  11. Socioeconomic status and stress rate during pregnancy in Iran.

    PubMed

    Shishehgar, Sara; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Majd, Hamid Alavi; Bakhtiary, Maryam

    2014-04-22

    Stress during pregnancy can have serious adverse outcomes on the mother, the fetus, newborn, children and even adolescents. Socioeconomic status has been recognized as a predictor of stress amongst pregnant women. The first aim of this study was to investigate the role of socioeconomic status in pregnancy stress rates. The second aim was to examine the most important items of socioeconomic status including monthly family income, husband occupational status as well as mother's educational level and their influence on the rate of maternal stress. This study was cross-sectional research and was conducted on 210 pregnant women in three trimesters of pregnancy who attended Shahryar hospital for prenatal care between August-October 2012. They completed two questionnaires of Socioeconomic Status and Specific Pregnancy Stress. Collected data were analyzed by SPSS version 19 including T-test, one-way ANOVA and Spearman correlation. In this study, we considered family income, education and husbands' occupations as the most important variables which may influence perceived stress during pregnancy. The mean age of women was 27±4.8 years. The final result showed that there is no significant relationship between SES and pregnancy stress level (P > 0.05), while we found a significant relationship, as well as indirect correlation between husbands' occupational status and pregnancy stress (P < 0.05, r= -0.364). Further investigations may be considered for extending the results to all pregnant women. Thus, health officials and universities should finance other studies to investigate this fact and whether other dimensions of SES influence pregnancy stress levels or not.

  12. Socioeconomic Status and Stress Rate during Pregnancy in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shishehgar, Sara; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Majd, Hamid Alavi; Bakhtiary, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stress during pregnancy can have serious adverse outcomes on the mother, the fetus, newborn, children and even adolescents. Socioeconomic status has been recognized as a predictor of stress amongst pregnant women. Objectives: The first aim of this study was to investigate the role of socioeconomic status in pregnancy stress rates. The second aim was to examine the most important items of socioeconomic status including monthly family income, husband occupational status as well as mother’s educational level and their influence on the rate of maternal stress. Methods: This study was cross-sectional research and was conducted on 210 pregnant women in three trimesters of pregnancy who attended Shahryar hospital for prenatal care between August-October 2012. They completed two questionnaires of Socioeconomic Status and Specific Pregnancy Stress. Collected data were analyzed by SPSS version 19 including T-test, one-way ANOVA and Spearman correlation. Results: In this study, we considered family income, education and husbands’ occupations as the most important variables which may influence perceived stress during pregnancy. The mean age of women was 27±4.8 years. The final result showed that there is no significant relationship between SES and pregnancy stress level (P>0.05), while we found a significant relationship, as well as indirect correlation between husbands’ occupational status and pregnancy stress (P<0.05, r= -0.364). Conclusion: Further investigations may be considered for extending the results to all pregnant women. Thus, health officials and universities should finance other studies to investigate this fact and whether other dimensions of SES influence pregnancy stress levels or not. PMID:24999123

  13. Taking love seriously: the context of adolescent pregnancy in Colombia.

    PubMed

    de la Cuesta, C

    2001-07-01

    Findings from a qualitative research study of the context of adolescent pregnancy are presented. Participants were 21 pregnant adolescents from Medellín, Colombia, and nearby villages in the region. Data were collected by means of 21 qualitative interviews, and analysis followed grounded theory procedures. The study reveals that adolescent pregnancy occurs in the context of a "genuine love affair" in which ideas of romantic love and gender rules guide young women's behaviour. Regarding an adolescent as immature or in a process of becoming might hinder adolescents' distinctive culture and circumstances. Ideas of romantic love and gender rules were powerful influences on those who unintentionally got pregnant.

  14. Teen Pregnancy: Not Simply a Result of Adolescent Ignorance. and Poor and at Risk for Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomer, Susan; Roesel, Rosalyn

    1987-01-01

    Consists of two articles on teen pregnancy. Newcomer describes why pregnancy prevention programs do not always work and tells what must be done to make them more effective. She also discusses curriculum content. Roesel describes a program to serve adolescents who are at risk for pregnancy. (CH)

  15. Data Archive on Adolescent Pregnancy and Pregnancy Prevention (DAAPPP). Catalog of Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sociometrics Corp., Los Altos, CA.

    This catalog of products from the Data Archive on Adolescent Pregnancy and Pregnancy Prevention (DAAPPP) contains a list of DAAPPP social science Data Sets on topics related to teenage pregnancy and family planning. Each Data Set listing contains the following information: (1) name of study or program; (2) name of investigator or sponsoring…

  16. Risk Factors for Adolescent Pregnancy Reports among African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Johnson, Shari; C. Winn, Donna-Marie; Coie, John D.; Malone, Patrick S.; Lochman, John

    2004-01-01

    This study examined childhood and adolescent risk factors for males' reports of getting someone pregnant during adolescence. These questions were examined in an urban sample of 335 African American males involved in a prospective, longitudinal study. Childhood aggression significantly predicted reported pregnancies during adolescence. Boys who…

  17. Adolescents' and Teachers' Perceptions of a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Cheryl L.; Gleason, Jamie H.; Johnson, Stephanie A.; Fahlman, Mariane M.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of adolescent and teacher perceptions of adolescent pregnancy-prevention programs using dolls that simulate infant behavior. Uses experimental and control groups of high school students from Midwest suburban areas. Finds increased appreciation for difficulty of infant care among adolescents in experimental groups. Majority of teachers…

  18. [Pregnancy in adolescence: reason and perceptions of adolescents].

    PubMed

    Ximenes Neto, Francisco Rosemiro Guimãres; Dias, Maria do Socorro de Araújo; Rocha, José; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal

    2007-01-01

    This research encompasses the capital Aracaju, Sergipe, and its surroundings health districts. It was dealt from October to December 2002 with 216 pregnant adolescents assisted by the Strategy of the Family Health Program. Its main goal is to raise and identify the social-demographic and the gynecological profile of those young ladies, by identifying the reason which led them to pregnancy and by knowing their pereption of it. The vast majority of them are 17, colored, literate, house-wives who have one single steady partner and survive with less than the minimum wage. Among those 32.4% got their first period by the age of 12; 25% had their first sexual intercourse by the age of 16; anf 72.7% had their first gestation. The reason which stood out from the others was the will to become a mother, for their perception towards pregnancy is related to happiness and personal achievement.

  19. Maternal attitudes in pregnancy predict drinking initiation in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Delyse M; Alati, Rosa; Najman, Jake M; Mattick, Richard P; Bor, William; O'Callaghan, Michael; Williams, Gail M

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether maternal attitudes to pregnancy and infant caregiving predict drinking initiation in adolescence. Data were used from the Mater University Study of Pregnancy, an Australian longitudinal study of mothers and their children from pregnancy to when the children were 14 years. Logistic regression analyses examined whether maternal attitudes to pregnancy and infant caregiving at birth and 6 months contributed to the prediction of drinking initiation at age 14, after controlling for a range of confounding covariates. Mother's negative feelings about being pregnant and not planning/wanting the pregnancy predicted adolescent alcohol initiation at the 14 year follow up. Negative maternal attitudes to infant caregiving at birth and 6 months did not predict adolescent alcohol initiation. Maternal attitudes in pregnancy are important and there is a need for effective perinatal interventions.

  20. Pregnancy during Adolescence and Associated Risks: An 8-Year Hospital-Based Cohort Study (2007–2014) in Romania, the Country with the Highest Rate of Teenage Pregnancy in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Socolov, Demetra-Gabriela; Carauleanu, Alexandru; Ilea, Ciprian; Blidaru, Iolanda; Boiculese, Lucian; Socolov, Razvan-Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To determine pregnancy and delivery outcomes among teenagers. Materials and Methods. An 8-year retrospective comparative hospital-based cohort study is analysing singleton pregnancy comorbidities and delivery parameters of a teenage group under the age of 20 compared with a young adult group 20–24 years of age in a university hospital. Results. Teenage is a risk factor for preterm birth <37 weeks (1.21 [1.08–1.35]), foetal growth restriction (1.34 [1.21–1.48]), episiotomy (1.27 [1.21–1.34]), uterine revision (1.15 [1.06–1.25]), APGAR <7 at 1 min (2.42 [1.21–1.67]), cephalopelvic disproportion (1.26 [1.07–1.48]), and postpartum haemorrhage (1.42 [1.25–1.62]); however, caesarean delivery occurs less frequently in teenagers than in adults (0.75 [0.70–0.80]). The following comorbidities are risk factors for teenage pregnancy (risk ratio [CI 95%]): anaemia (1.13 [1.10–1.17]), low urinary tract infection (1.10 [1.03–1.18]), pediculosis (2.42 [1.90–3.00]), anogenital condyloma (1.50 [1.04–2.17]), and trichomoniasis (1.74 [1.12–2.68]). The risks for hepatitis B and hepatitis C, premature rupture of membranes, and placenta praevia were lower compared with those in the young adult group, respectively, 0.43 (0.26–0.71), 0.90 (0.85–0.96), and 0.29 (0.20–0.41), while the risk for gestational diabetes and preeclampsia were the same in both groups. Conclusion. Considering the high risks for teenage pregnancy, this information should be provided to pregnant adolescent women and their caregivers. PMID:28133615

  1. The effect of an educational approach to pregnancy prevention among high-risk early and late adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yoost, Jennie L; Hertweck, Susan Paige; Barnett, Susan N

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate a novel approach to adolescent pregnancy prevention through scheduled educational clinic visits, focusing to retain patients within the clinic system. This is a retrospective chart review conducted at the Center for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention, a privately funded clinic located in an urban setting serving only adolescents and young adults. Subjects included adolescent patients aged 11-18 years who were seen between January 2007 and December 2010. The primary outcomes studied were 12- and 24-month continuation rates of birth control options, total length of follow-up, time until gaps in follow-up, and any incident pregnancies. Results were stratified based on age at initial visit: early adolescents (aged 11-15 years) or late adolescents (aged 16-18 years). There were 121 patients who met inclusion and had more than one visit. There were seven incident pregnancies over the study period, all in the late adolescent group. The relative risk of pregnancy among those with a gap in follow-up of >12 months compared with those without a gap was 4.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-19.4). The early adolescents had a greater rate of continuation of birth control at 12 months compared with late adolescents (66.6% vs. 42.2%, relative risk [RR] 1.57, 95% CI 1.12-2.20) and had higher rates of continuation at 24 months (41.6% vs. 18.3%, RR 2.27, 95% CI 1.25-4.11). The educational approach at Center for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention may decrease adolescent pregnancy among high-risk adolescents that stay within the clinic system. This educational model may be more effective for early adolescents than late adolescent patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Pregnancy and birth rates after oocyte donation.

    PubMed

    Remohí, J; Gartner, B; Gallardo, E; Yalil, S; Simón, C; Pellicer, A

    1997-04-01

    To determine accumulated conception and live birth rates in ovum donation. Retrospective study from a computer database. Pregnancies with one gestational sac observed by ultrasound have been included as conceptional cycles and pregnancies that resulted in one live child were recorded for the analysis of the live birth rates. Life table analysis was applied. Oocyte donation program at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad. Three hundred ninety-seven recipients undergoing a total of 627 ETs were analyzed. Ovarian stimulation and ovum pick-up in donors. Uterine ET in recipients after appropriate exogenous steroid replacement. Accumulated and estimated (95% confidence intervals [CI]) conception and live birth rates in the oocyte donation program as well as considering age and cause of infertility of the recipients. Pregnancy rate after one cycle was 53.4% (CI 50.9% to 55.9%), with a delivery rate of 42.6% (CI 40.1% to 45.1%). Accumulated pregnancy rate increased up to 94.8% (CI 90.6% to 99.0%) after four transfers. Similarly, live birth rates reached 88.7% (CI 88.1% to 89.3%) after four attempts of ET by ovum donation. Cycle fecundity rates were maintained at approximately 50% after each attempt. Implantation rate was 18.3% (430/2,340 replaced embryos). Age and cause of entering the program did not influence the overall results of ovum donation. Oocyte donation is a successful treatment modality for infertile couples that offers even higher success rates than natural conception. No difference in cumulative pregnancy rate was observed regardless of recipient age, indication for oocyte donation, or number of cycles attempted.

  3. Adolescent pregnancy: an interpersonal skill training approach to prevention.

    PubMed

    Schinke, S P; Gilchrist, L D

    1977-01-01

    The research literature reports numerous negative consequences of adolescent pregnancy. Unfortunately, contemporary approaches to preventing teenage pregnancies have been largely unsuccessful. Recent evidence, however, suggests that interpersonal communication skill training may represent an important step in helping adolescents deal with their sexual and contraceptive behavior. This describes a pilot study of an interpersonal skill training model for sexually active inner-city teenagers. Results show that this training model is a feasible and attractive approach to modifying the youths' communication patterns. Findings indicate that such training is a fruitful direction for future pregnancy prevention research with the adolescent target population.

  4. Maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and cognitive performance in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kafouri, S; Leonard, G; Perron, M; Richer, L; Séguin, J R; Veillette, S; Pausova, Z; Paus, T

    2009-02-01

    The incidence of cigarette smoking during pregnancy remains high. Maternal smoking during pregnancy is known to be associated with cognitive and behavioural sequelae in childhood and adolescence. We assessed the relationship between maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and cognitive abilities in adolescent offspring (n = 503, 12- to 18-years old) using an extensive 6-h battery of tests. Non-exposed adolescents (controls) were matched to exposed adolescents (cases) by maternal education and school attended. Cognitive abilities were evaluated using a neuropsychological battery consisting of 33 tasks measuring verbal abilities, visuo-spatial skills, verbal and visual memory, processing speed, resistance to interference and motor dexterity. We found no differences between cases and controls in any of the cognitive domains whether potential confounders were included in the model or not. In addition to maternal smoking during pregnancy, we also evaluated the effect of sex and age on the various cognitive abilities in this large adolescent sample and found that most of the abilities continue to improve during adolescence to the same extent in girls and boys, with several age-independent sex differences. We found no effect of maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy on cognitive abilities of the adolescent offspring when matching cases and controls by maternal education, the most common confounder of maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy.

  5. Early pregnancy in adolescents: diagnosis, assessment, options counseling, and referral.

    PubMed

    Aruda, Mary M; Waddicor, Kathleen; Frese, Liesl; Cole, Joanna C M; Burke, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Health care providers are faced with many challenges when working with adolescents. Vague symptoms, unreliable menstrual history, and adolescent reluctance to disclose sexual activity present challenges to early diagnosis. When pregnancy is suspected, clinicians need skills for accurate diagnosis, conducting comprehensive assessments, and providing options counseling. Complexities of providing confidential care while balancing the needs of the adolescent and family may deter some clinicians. A clinical case scenario illustrates important elements of care. Through sharing lessons learned from 10 years of working in a Pregnancy Follow-up Clinic, the authors hope to empower other clinicians as they care for adolescents during this critical time.

  6. [The social representation of pregnancy in adolescence. A Quebec study. ].

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Edith; Dufort, Francine; St-Laurent, Louise

    2004-01-01

    To gather information on the themes underlying social representations of teenage pregnancy among adolescent girls and boys and people working with them (health/social/school workers). A qualitative approach was used. Adolescents and health/social/school workers were gathered separately in focus groups. A content analysis of their discourses was done. This study shows that adolescents and health/social/school workers were not homogeneous groups. Their representations on teenage pregnancy varied and were sometimes contradictory. Several points of view were expressed that gave rise to four distinct positions: negative, positive, ambivalent and dynamic. It is from these four positions that four social representations of teenage pregnancy were defined: pregnancy as a problem, pregnancy as a project, pregnancy as a tension, pregnancy as a gain of power. Within these four representations, the discourses were divided into four dimensions: emotional, introspective, psychobiological and socio-economic. The similarities and divergences between the discourses of adolescents and those of health/social/school workers reveal that the representations of teenage pregnancy are neither preconceived nor unalterable. They have functional properties of adaptation to changing realities, individual conditions, ongoing events, times of crisis and diverse social and cultural grounds. This study presents a new perspective on the topic of teenage pregnancy and questions people's attitude and relationship with teenagers with respect to this issue.

  7. [Pregnancy in adolescence, associated factors, and perinatal results among low-income post-partum women].

    PubMed

    Gama, Silvana Granado Nogueira da; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann; Leal Md, Maria do Carmo

    2002-01-01

    This paper compares socioeconomic characteristics, prenatal care, and life styles of three groups of post-partum women, one consisting of adolescents (< 20 years) and the other two of women 20-34 years old, classified according to their history of pregnancy during adolescence. A sample of 3,508 post-partum women was selected from public hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and interviewed just after childbirth. To verify the hypothesis of homogeneity of proportions, chi-square tests (chi2) were used. Comparing the three groups, the most adverse conditions were found among the 20-34-year-old mothers with a history of pregnancy during adolescence. These women have the least schooling, the highest rates of smoking and use of illegal drugs during pregnancy, and the fewest prenatal appointments. According to this study, prenatal care proved to be an effective compensatory policy for the prevention of prematurity and low birth weight, especially among adolescent mothers.

  8. Pregnancy Intentions, Long-Acting Contraceptive Use, and Rapid Subsequent Pregnancies among Adolescent and Adult First-Time Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Waggoner, Miranda R.; Lanzi, Robin Gaines; Klerman, Lorraine V.

    2012-01-01

    Problem Greater understanding is needed related to qualitatively-assessed pregnancy intentions and rapid subsequent pregnancies among adolescent and adult mothers. Methods 4-site prospective study of 227 adolescent and adult mothers. Data analyzed to understand the relationship between pregnancy intentions, adolescent status, and use of long-acting contraceptives and rapid subsequent pregnancy. Findings The findings from this study provide evidence of the importance of goal-oriented pregnancy intentions, long-acting contraceptive use, and older age in delaying a second pregnancy. Conclusion Findings reveal the need for clinician awareness of the qualitative pregnancy intentions of young women and potential desired use of long-acting contraceptives. PMID:22512527

  9. Pregnancy intentions, long-acting contraceptive use, and rapid subsequent pregnancies among adolescent and adult first-time mothers.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Miranda R; Lanzi, Robin Gaines; Klerman, Lorraine V

    2012-05-01

    Greater understanding is needed related to qualitatively assess pregnancy intentions and rapid subsequent pregnancies among adolescent and adult mothers. Four-site prospective study of 227 adolescent and adult mothers. Data were analyzed to understand the relationship between pregnancy intentions, adolescent status, and use of long-acting contraceptives and rapid subsequent pregnancy. The findings from this study provide evidence of the importance of goal-oriented pregnancy intentions, long-acting contraceptive use, and older age in delaying a second pregnancy. Findings reveal the need for clinician awareness of the qualitative pregnancy intentions of young women and potential desired use of long-acting contraceptives. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Teenage Pregnancy Prevention and Adolescents' Sexual Outcomes: An Experiential Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Cheryl L.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of an experiential approach to teen pregnancy (TP) prevention called "Baby Think It Over," a computerized infant simulator, on adolescents' attitudes and behaviors regarding teen pregnancy and sexuality. Recently, a more realistic model called "Real Care Baby" was developed. The small amount of research on…

  11. Factors Affecting Perception of Pregnancy Risk in the Adolescent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peggy B.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Perception of pregnancy risk, fertility knowledge, and probability-based teaching examples of risk were assessed in 104 primiparous urban adolescents 13-18 years of age in their second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Perception of risk was not associated with age, actual frequency of intercourse, or level of fertility knowledge. (Author/PN)

  12. Teenage Pregnancy Prevention and Adolescents' Sexual Outcomes: An Experiential Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Cheryl L.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of an experiential approach to teen pregnancy (TP) prevention called "Baby Think It Over," a computerized infant simulator, on adolescents' attitudes and behaviors regarding teen pregnancy and sexuality. Recently, a more realistic model called "Real Care Baby" was developed. The small amount of research on…

  13. A Developmental Approach to Pregnancy Prevention with Early Adolescent Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Susan E.

    1986-01-01

    Traditional pregnancy prevention strategies employed with older teens and adults do not recognize significant developmental differences between early adolescents and other age groups. Methods that compliment, reflect, and are consistent with the developmental needs of the young teen provide the best approaches to teen pregnancy prevention.…

  14. Social and Affective Factors Associated with Adolescent Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peggy B.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Study examined perceptions of pregnancy, including life-expectations, desire for pregnancy, and knowledge of menstrual cycle in a sample of pregnant urban adolescents. Results indicate that, although teens were aware of birth control methods, they had little understanding of menstrual cycle and its relationship to intercourse. And while few…

  15. Social and Affective Factors Associated with Adolescent Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peggy B.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Study examined perceptions of pregnancy, including life-expectations, desire for pregnancy, and knowledge of menstrual cycle in a sample of pregnant urban adolescents. Results indicate that, although teens were aware of birth control methods, they had little understanding of menstrual cycle and its relationship to intercourse. And while few…

  16. Adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in adolescent pregnancies: The Global Network's Maternal Newborn Health Registry study.

    PubMed

    Althabe, Fernando; Moore, Janet L; Gibbons, Luz; Berrueta, Mabel; Goudar, Shivaprasad S; Chomba, Elwyn; Derman, Richard J; Patel, Archana; Saleem, Sarah; Pasha, Omrana; Esamai, Fabian; Garces, Ana; Liechty, Edward A; Hambidge, K; Krebs, Nancy F; Hibberd, Patricia L; Goldenberg, Robert L; Koso-Thomas, Marion; Carlo, Waldemar A; Cafferata, Maria L; Buekens, Pierre; McClure, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    associated with worse perinatal outcomes, particularly in younger adolescents. However, this may not be the case in regions like South Asia where there are decreasing rates of adolescent pregnancies, concentrated among older adolescents. The increased risks observed among adolescents seems more likely to be associated with biological immaturity, than with socio-economic factors, inadequate antenatal or delivery care. NCT01073475.

  17. Obstetric and neonatal outcomes of adolescent primiparous singleton pregnancies: a cohort study in the South of Reunion Island, Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Iacobelli, Silvia; Robillard, Pierre-Yves; Gouyon, Jean-Bernard; Hulsey, Thomas C; Barau, Georges; Bonsante, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    To describe the maternal and neonatal outcomes of a large cohort of adolescent pregnancies in a tertiary care hospital at Reunion Island. Retrospective study of all primiparous singleton pregnancies over 10.5 years. Adolescent (<18 years) were compared to 18-29 years pregnancies. The maternal outcomes were obstetric illness, labor complications, and way of delivery. Neonatal outcomes were preterm birth, low birth weight (LBW), small for gestational age, birth asphyxia, need for mechanical ventilation, and mortality. We analyzed 1839 adolescent pregnancies and 11,445 controls. Adolescents had worse prenatal care than older mothers, (4.4 vs. 1.4%; p < 0.0001), higher rates of smoking and alcohol assumption (13 vs. 11% and 0.7 vs. 0.4%, both p < 0.05). They showed less pregnancy-related illness and labor complications and higher rates of normal vaginal delivery (80 vs. 69%; p < 0.0001), without increased risk of episiotomy or postpartum hemorrhage. Offspring mortality, preterm birth, and LBW were higher in adolescent pregnancies (3.3 vs. 2.2%; p = 0.001, 14 vs. 12%; p = 0.0008; 17 vs. 14%; p = 0.002). In this population, adolescents had an obstetrical outcome better than controls, but their offspring short-term outcomes were unfavorable. Furthers studies are needed to better elucidate the link between adolescent pregnancy and impaired neonatal outcome.

  18. An "Epidemic" of Adolescent Pregnancy? Some Historical and Policy Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinovskis, Maris A.

    Adolescent pregnancy (AP) is explored from historical and policy perspectives. The "epidemic" of AP, with 4 out of every 10 teenage girls becoming pregnant, is typically portrayed as a recent and unprecedented problem that requires massive federal intervention, but the problem is not new. Chapter 1 analyzes adolescent sexuality, AP, and…

  19. [Adolescent pregnancy. Biological crisis and moral and sociocultural phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Konate, M K

    1990-08-01

    In sub-Saharan African, biological adolescence corresponds to a social marriage age. In Burundi, Ghana, Mali, and Senegal, respectively, 5.9%, 17%, 72%, and 42% of women aged 15-19 are married or in a union. Early marriage produced early pregnancy. The valorization of procreation pushes women to prove their fertility as soon as they marry. One adolescent pregnancy in marriage does not translate into immaturity or irresponsible accidental pregnancy. Some specialists exaggerate that adolescent fertility poses a biological catastrophe for the young woman and her infant. Yet, others say that the principal cause of complications related to adolescent pregnancy are a result of inadequate prenatal and obstetric care. Since there are few health facilities and medical personnel in sub-Saharan Africa to provide adequate prenatal and obstetric care, adolescent pregnancy is a major source of problems. Changes in African societies are the reason for the decline in social taboos traditionally regulating fertility. The new understanding of social operation affect the management of fertility, especially in urban areas. Rural areas, which still predominate in sub-Saharan Africa, appear to be much less affected. Early maturity, quasi-universality of marriage, and the notion of marriage being sacred in rural areas remain power regulating elements. Rural adolescents often seasonally migrate to urban centers. Since pregnant adolescents first perceive that society will judge them, they have a poor acceptance of their pregnancy. They experience psycho-tragedies that accompany this perception, especially when the unplanned pregnancy occurs outside of marriage. If society would not disapprove of contraceptive use, contraception would help circumscribe the negative fall-outs of sexuality without real preliminary knowledge. In Mali, only 12% of all women knew when the fertile period of the cycle is. 51% had no knowledge at all. Recognition of the importance of adolescent fertility is a step

  20. [Adolescent pregnancy: the drama of the child-mothers].

    PubMed

    Monterosa Castro, A

    1993-12-01

    According to the 1990 Demographic and Health Survey, 21% of fertile-aged women in Colombia are adolescents aged 15-19. Research throughout the world has revealed that young people are initiating their sexual lives at ever earlier ages, due to earlier sexual maturation, constant erotic stimuli, and a mistaken understanding of sexuality. A Colombian survey showed that 49% of males and 11% of females had sex by age 18. Earlier sexual activity is leading to increased incidence of unwanted pregnancy. 78 of each 1000 adolescents become mothers each year. Among adolescents aged 16-18 with positive pregnancy tests at the Profamilia Adolescent Clinic in Bogota, 80% did not use contraception and 85% did not with to be pregnant. Unwanted adolescent pregnancy is usually traumatic, with implications for all areas of life. None of the options open to an adolescent with an undesired pregnancy is desirable. Keeping the baby exposes the mother to ostracism and rejection by the family, expulsion from school, and societal rejection. Forced marriages almost always end in separation. Adoption leads to frustration and feelings of guilt in the future. Abortion in Colombia is illegal and exposes the women to emotional and physical trauma and to risk of death or injury. The unwanted child is at risk of mistreatment, abandonment, or rejection. A demographic survey by Profamilia showed that 25% of Colombian women are mothers by age 19. 62% of uneducated adolescents are mothers by this age. Low educational level is associated with early pregnancy and limited economic opportunity. Adolescents are at higher risk of pregnancy complications due to physiological immaturity, stress, poor adaptability to pregnancy, and inadequate prenatal care. Adolescent pregnancy should be prevented. The prevention should be achieved through integrated sex education beginning at the first contact of the child with the world outside the family. The child should learn basic concepts of self-esteem, values, and

  1. Tertiary care availability and adolescent pregnancy characteristics in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kadri, Hanan M; Madkhali, Azza; Al-Kadi, Mohammed T; Bakhsh, Hanadi; Alruwaili, Nourah N; Tamim, Hani M

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, we aimed to assess the rate of adolescent delivery in a Saudi tertiary health care center and to investigate the association between maternal age and fetal, neonatal, and maternal complications where a professional tertiary medical care service is provided. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed between 2005 and 2010 at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All primigravid Saudi women ≥24 weeks gestation, carrying a singleton pregnancy, aged <35 years, and with no chronic medical problems were eligible. Women were divided into three groups based on their age, ie, group 1 (G1) <16 years, group 2 (G2) ≥16 up to 19 years, and group 3 (G3) ≥19 up to 35 years. Data were collected from maternal and neonatal medical records. We calculated the association between the different age groups and maternal characteristics, as well as events and complications during the antenatal period, labor, and delivery. Results The rates of adolescent delivery were 20.0 and 16.3 per 1,000 births in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Compared with G1 and G2 women, G3 women tended to have a higher body mass index, a longer first and second stage of labor, more blood loss at delivery, and a longer hospital stay. Compared with G1 and G2 women, respectively, G3 women had a 42% and a 67% increased risk of cesarean section, and had a 52% increased risk of instrumental delivery. G3 women were more likely to develop gestational diabetes or anemia, G2 women had a three-fold increased risk of premature delivery (odds ratio 2.81), and G3 neonates had a 50% increased overall risk of neonatal complications (odds ratio 0.51). Conclusion The adolescent birth rate appears to be low in central Saudi Arabia compared with other parts of the world. Excluding preterm delivery, adolescent delivery cared for in a tertiary health care center is not associated with a significantly increased medical risk to the mother, fetus, or neonate. The psychosocial effect of

  2. Adolescent substance use and unplanned pregnancy: strategies for risk reduction

    PubMed Central

    Connery, Hilary S.; Albright, Brittany B.; Rodolico, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Substance use among adolescents increases the risk of unplanned pregnancies, which then increases the risk of fetal exposure to addictive, teratogenic substances. Specific interventions are necessary to target pregnancy planning and contraception among reproductive age substance users. Screening for substance use using the CRAFFT is recommended in all health care settings treating adolescent patients. Screening for tobacco and nicotine use is also recommended along with provision of smoking cessation interventions. Using motivational interviewing style and strategies is recommended to engage adolescents in discussions related to reducing substance use, risky sexual behavior, and probability of unplanned pregnancy or late-detection pregnancy. Earlier interventions that strengthen autonomy and resourcefulness in recognizing and caring for an unplanned conception is a form of advanced directive that may well reduce fetal exposure to tobacco, alcohol, and drugs and simultaneously empower girls and women in self-care. PMID:24845484

  3. Rapid repeat pregnancy among unmarried, African American adolescent parent couples.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Constance Miles

    2013-02-01

    This article describes rapid repeat pregnancy (RRP), getting pregnant or giving birth again within 24 months of giving birth, in a group of unmarried, low-income, African American first-time, adolescent parent couples from the perspectives of their kinship systems, that is, the adolescent parents and their parents or parental figures. RRP has been associated with prematurity, low birth weight, inadequate prenatal care, school dropout, increased potential for poverty, and prolonged welfare dependence. There were 21 RRPs among 24 kinship systems: 9 adolescent males who fathered RRPs with new partners and also reported having been denied access to their study babies; 6 adolescent mothers with new partners, who also reported intimate partner violence with the study adolescent father; and 6 study adolescent parent couples, whose paternal family reported doubts about the paternity of the study babies. Adolescent fathers should be offered the same child care and contraceptive information routinely offered to adolescent mothers.

  4. Beliefs of grade six learners' regarding adolescent pregnancy and sex.

    PubMed

    Grobler, C; Botma, Y; Jacobs, A C; Nel, M

    2007-03-01

    Escalating adolescent pregnancy and risky sexual behaviour is becoming more common amongst young adolescents and especially amongst black adolescents in South Africa. Statistics confirm that South African adolescents as young as fourteen are already sexually active and become pregnant. The decision to become sexually active with resulting adolescent pregnancy whether planned or not, are directly influenced by the teenager's beliefs. A person's beliefs consist of a person' own individual beliefs or attitude as well as what the individual subjective norm which the individual perceive as other people's beliefs regarding the same object of reason. The aim of the study was to describe the attitude of black grade six learners under the age of fourteen, towards adolescent pregnancy and sex. A quantitative descriptive research design was used. Results were clustered according to demographic variables as well as beliefs that consist of attitude and subjective norm. Findings provided insight into the beliefs of grade six learners regarding sex and adulthood, the roll of peer pressure, relationships of adolescent parents, social interaction of teenage parents, ability of adolescent parent's ability to provide in the needs of the baby, the adequacy of a child support grant to raise a baby as well as the levels of education of adolescent parents. This article provide a detailed reflection on these results and propose off a doll parenting intervention strategy as means of modification of attitude and subjective norms of grade six learners in order to alter sexual behaviour.

  5. Adolescent men's attitudes in relation to pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review of the literature from 1980-2009.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Maria; Cruise, Sharon; O'Halloran, Peter; Alderdice, Fiona; Hyde, Abbey

    2010-10-01

    This review article reveals a long-standing gender bias in academic and policy research on adolescent pregnancy, which has led to the neglect of adolescent men's perspectives. The review summarizes the available literature on adolescent men's attitudes in relation to pregnancy occurrence and pregnancy outcomes in the context of addressing three questions: (1) What are adolescent men's attitudes to an adolescent pregnancy? (2) What are adolescent men's attitudes in relation to pregnancy outcomes? (3) What explanations are offered for the identified attitudes to adolescent pregnancy and resolution? The review establishes a foundation for future quantitative and qualitative research on adolescent men's perspectives. It emphasizes that a greater understanding of adolescent men's perspectives could lead to a re-framing of adolescent pregnancy away from being seen solely as a woman's issue. Furthermore, it is argued that the inclusion of adolescent men would lead to more effective adolescent pregnancy prevention and counseling programmes. Copyright © 2010 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Looking back and moving forward: can we accelerate progress on adolescent pregnancy in the Americas?

    PubMed

    Caffe, Sonja; Plesons, Marina; Camacho, Alma Virginia; Brumana, Luisa; Abdool, Shelly N; Huaynoca, Silvia; Mayall, Katherine; Menard-Freeman, Lindsay; de Francisco Serpa, Luis Andres; Gomez Ponce de Leon, Rodolfo; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman

    2017-07-14

    Adolescent fertility rates in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) remain unacceptably high, especially compared to the region's declining total fertility rates. The Region has experienced the slowest progress of all regions in the world, and shows major differences between countries and between subgroups in countries. In 2013, LAC was also noted as the only region with a rising trend in pregnancies in adolescents younger than 15 years. In response to the lack of progress in the LAC region, PAHO/WHO, UNFPA and UNICEF held a technical consultation with global, regional and country-level stakeholders to take stock of the situation and agree on strategic approaches and priority actions to accelerate progress. The meeting concluded that there is no single portrait of an adolescent mother in LAC and that context and determinants of adolescent pregnancy vary across and within countries. However, lack of knowledge about their sexual and reproductive health and rights, poor access to and inadequate use of contraceptives resulting from restrictive laws and policies, weak programs, social and cultural norms, limited education and income, sexual violence and abuse, and unequal gender relations were identified as key factors contributing to adolescent pregnancy in LAC. The meeting participants highlighted the following seven priority actions to accelerate progress: 1. Make adolescent pregnancy, its drivers and impact, and the most affected groups more visible with disaggregated data, qualitative reports, and stories. 2. Design interventions targeting the most vulnerable groups, ensuring the approaches are adapted to their realities and address their specific challenges. 3. Engage and empower youth to contribute to the design, implementation and monitoring of strategic interventions. 4. Abandon ineffective interventions and invest resources in applying proven ones. 5. Strengthen inter-sectoral collaboration to effectively address the drivers of adolescent pregnancy in LAC. 6

  7. PREDICTORS AND CONSEQUENCES OF ADOLESCENTS' NORMS AGAINST TEENAGE PREGNANCY.

    PubMed

    Mollborn, Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    African American and Latino teenagers and communities are frequently assumed to have weaker norms against teenage pregnancy than whites. Despite their importance, adolescents' norms about teenage pregnancy have not been measured or their correlates and consequences documented. This study examines individual-level and contextual variation in adolescents' embarrassment at the prospect of a teenage pregnancy and its relationship with subsequent teenage pregnancy. Descriptive analyses find that norms vary by gender and individual- and neighborhood-level race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES). In multivariate analyses, neighborhood-level racial/ethnic associations with embarrassment are explained by neighborhood-level SES. Embarrassment is associated with a lower likelihood of subsequent teenage pregnancy but does not mediate racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic influences, underscoring the importance of both norms and structural factors for understanding teenage fertility.

  8. The financial impact of a comprehensive adolescent pregnancy program on a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Elster, A B; Roberts, D

    1985-01-01

    This study investigated the financial impact which an adolescent pregnancy program had on one of its sponsoring agencies, the University Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT. Financial data from hospital billings and collections on the 75 teens who delivered during a 12-month period were reviewed. A comparison of the money for salaries supplied to the special program by the hospital with the amount of estimated "new" money generated for the hospital by the program yielded an income to expenditure ratio greater than two. Eighteen teens who were in the lowest self-pay category were matched to self-pay teens delivering at the same hospital who received traditional prenatal care. The hospital collection rate for teens in the special program was not significantly greater than that of the comparison group. The investment in an adolescent pregnancy program was beneficial mainly from the viewpoint of recruitment of patients who were brought into the hospital system as a result of the adolescent pregnancy program.

  9. Parent, Teacher, and School Stakeholder Perspectives on Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Programming for Latino Youth.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Motoyama, Michelle; Moses, Mindi; Kann, Tiffany Koloroutis; Mariscal, E Susana; Levy, Michelle; Navarro, Carolina; Fite, Paula J

    2016-12-01

    Teen pregnancy remains a public health concern particularly among Latinos, whose pregnancy rate of 83.5 per 1000 girls constitutes one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy among all ethnic and racial groups in the United States. To enhance the effectiveness of interventions for diverse Latino populations in the US, it is crucial to assess the community's understanding of the etiology of the problem of adolescent pregnancy and to implement programs that reflect the local community's beliefs and preferences. We present findings from six focus groups held with parents (n = 18), teachers (n = 23) and school stakeholders (n = 8) regarding teen pregnancy prevention among Latino youth at a high school located in a large, Midwestern city. Two investigators analyzed data iteratively using a template organizing approach. A consensus emerged across the groups regarding content that emphasized respect for oneself and one's family, a focus on personal and shared responsibility in reproductive health behavior, information about the "realities" or consequences associated with engaging in sexual activity, and information about contraceptives. The strong request from participants to include a parental education component reflects the community's belief that parents play a crucial, protective role in the socialization and development of adolescent sexual behavior, a view that is supported by empirical research. Findings highlight the importance of involving local school communities in identifying adolescent pregnancy prevention strategies that are responsive to the community's cultural values, beliefs, and preferences, as well as the school's capacity and teacher preferences.

  10. Appalachian Adolescent Health Education Project (AAHEP) Evaluation: A Study of Teen Pregnancy in East Tennessee (1982-1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julie E.; And Others

    The Appalachian Adolescent Health and Education Project (AAHEP), in operation for 3 years, is a program designed to reduce adolescent pregnancy rates (prevention component) and provide care for pregnant teenagers (care component) in East Tennessee. Limitations in funding and service delivery prompted the AAHEP to modify its 15-county scope by…

  11. Appalachian Adolescent Health Education Project (AAHEP) Evaluation: A Study of Teen Pregnancy in East Tennessee (1982-1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julie E.; And Others

    The Appalachian Adolescent Health and Education Project (AAHEP), in operation for 3 years, is a program designed to reduce adolescent pregnancy rates (prevention component) and provide care for pregnant teenagers (care component) in East Tennessee. Limitations in funding and service delivery prompted the AAHEP to modify its 15-county scope by…

  12. A Manual for Promoting Positive Alternatives to Adolescent Pregnancy. Better Beginnings for Virginia's Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poe, Elisabeth S.; And Others

    This guide advocates an alliance among diverse groups for the purpose of decreasing the incidence of adolescent pregnancy and improving the outcome of pregnancies that do occur. It provides useful information for communities interested in developing pregnancy prevention activities. Statistics about adolescent pregnancies are given and the…

  13. A Manual for Promoting Positive Alternatives to Adolescent Pregnancy. Better Beginnings for Virginia's Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poe, Elisabeth S.; And Others

    This guide advocates an alliance among diverse groups for the purpose of decreasing the incidence of adolescent pregnancy and improving the outcome of pregnancies that do occur. It provides useful information for communities interested in developing pregnancy prevention activities. Statistics about adolescent pregnancies are given and the…

  14. [Adolescent pregnancy, a public health problem].

    PubMed

    Viel Vicuna, B

    1986-01-01

    Throughout Western civilization the fundamental unit of society is the family. The union of a couple guarantees their responsibility to future children. Prior to the renaissance, when life expectancy was very low, the preservation of the human species required reproduction at a young age. Since the beginning of the 19th century, life expectancy has increased greatly. The extremes of reproductive age have been noted to be times when pregnancy carries increase risks, and the risks of grand multiparity have been noted. The sexual revolution has resulted in the loss of previous principles of conduct. Youth are incited by pornography in the media, and without the controlling influence of the traditional family, become sexually active at a younger age. In Chile, as elsewhere, there have always been out of wedlock births, but in 1970 these reached 18.5% of all births. By 1980, it had reached 27.6% of all births and 45.7% of births to mothers under age 20. Since the family is the basic unit of society, this number of illegitimate births indicates a grave social problem. This also represents a public health risk due to the increased risks of young mothers. Illegitimate children of adolescent mothers have the added problem that the fathers are usually also young, so both parents are still in school and cannot assume full responsibility for the child. These babies have a much higher infant mortality than those of older mothers. The only solution is education, and legislation requiring paternal responsibility. School teachers often have an inadequate knowledge of reproduction and sexuality, and can not serve as sources of information to the students. Without supportive education and legislation requiring both parents to be responsible for their children, we will not be able to solve this situation.

  15. Early adolescent pregnancy increases risk of incident HIV infection in the Eastern Cape, South Africa: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, Nicola J; Jewkes, Rachel K; Dunkle, Kristin L; Nduna, Mzikazi; Shai, Nwabisa Jama; Sterk, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adolescents having unprotected heterosexual intercourse are at risk of HIV infection and unwanted pregnancy. However, there is little evidence to indicate whether pregnancy in early adolescence increases the risk of subsequent HIV infection. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that adolescent pregnancy (aged 15 or younger) increases the risk of incident HIV infection in young South African women. Methods We assessed 1099 HIV-negative women, aged 15–26 years, who were volunteer participants in a cluster-randomized, controlled HIV prevention trial in the predominantly rural Eastern Cape province of South Africa. All of these young women had at least one additional HIV test over two years of follow-up. Outcomes were HIV incidence rates per 100 person years and HIV incidence rate ratios (IRRs) estimated by Poisson multivariate models. Three pregnancy categories were created for the Poisson model: early adolescent pregnancy (a first pregnancy at age 15 years or younger); later adolescent pregnancy (a first pregnancy at age 16 to 19 years); and women who did not report an adolescent pregnancy. Models were adjusted for study design, age, education, time since first sexual experience, socio-economic status, childhood trauma and herpes simplex virus type 2 infection. Results HIV incidence rates were 6.0 per 100 person years over two years of follow-up. The adjusted IRR was 3.02 (95% CI 1.50–6.09) for a pregnancy occurring at age 15 or younger. Women with pregnancies occurring between 16 and 19 years of age did not have a higher incidence of HIV (IRR 1.08; 95% CI 0.64–1.84). Early adolescent pregnancies were associated with higher partner numbers and a greater age difference with partners. Conclusions Early adolescent pregnancies increase the incidence of HIV among South African women. The higher risk is associated with sexual risk behaviours such as higher partner numbers and a greater age difference with partners rather than a biological explanation

  16. Pregnancy rates among juvenile justice girls in two randomized controlled trials of multidimensional treatment foster care.

    PubMed

    Kerr, David C R; Leve, Leslie D; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2009-06-01

    Preventing adolescent pregnancy is a national research priority that has had limited success. In the present study, the authors examined whether Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) relative to intervention services as usual (group care [GC]) decreased pregnancy rates among juvenile justice girls mandated to out-of-home care. Girls (13-17 years of age) with histories of criminal referrals (Mdn = 10) were randomly assigned to MTFC (n = 81) or GC (n = 85) as part of 2 randomized controlled trials. Pregnancy histories were assessed from baseline through 24 months. Fewer postbaseline pregnancies were reported for MTFC girls (26.9%) than for GC girls (46.9%)--an effect that remained significant after controlling for baseline criminal referrals, pregnancy history, and sexual activity. MTFC has previously been shown to decrease arrest and lock-up rates. The present findings support the long-term preventive effects of MTFC on adolescent girls' pregnancy rates. Findings are consistent with the notion that programs that target delinquency by impacting general risk behavior pathways and contexts may more successfully prevent teen pregnancy than those that directly target sexual behaviors.

  17. Pregnancy Rates Among Juvenile Justice Girls in Two RCTs of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, David C. R.; Leve, Leslie D.; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Preventing adolescent pregnancy is a national research priority that has had limited success. The present study examined whether Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) relative to intervention services as usual (group care [GC]) decreased pregnancy rates among juvenile justice girls mandated to out-of-home care. Girls (ages 13–17) with histories of criminal referrals (Mdn = 10) were randomly assigned to MTFC (n = 81) or GC (n = 85) as part of two randomized controlled trials. Pregnancy histories were assessed from baseline through 24 months. Fewer postbaseline pregnancies were reported for MTFC girls (26.9%) than for GC girls (46.9%), an effect that remained significant after controlling for baseline criminal referrals, pregnancy history, and sexual activity. MTFC has previously been shown to decrease arrest and lock-up rates. The present findings support the long-term preventive effects of MTFC on adolescent girls’ pregnancy rates. Findings are consistent with the notion that programs that target delinquency by impacting general risk behavior pathways and contexts may more successfully prevent teen pregnancy than those that directly target sexual behaviors. PMID:19485598

  18. Prevention and Management of Pregnancy in Adolescents with Endocrine Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hillard, Paula J Adams

    2015-08-01

    Because 83% of adolescent pregnancies among teens 15 to 19 years old are unintended and because adolescents with chronic medical conditions are as likely to be sexually involved as are healthy teens, preventing unintended pregnancies among teens with chronic endocrine conditions, including diabetes mellitus (both types 1 and 2), PCOS, and thyroid dysfunction, is critically important. Evidence-based guidelines are available to assist with assessment of the risks versus the benefits of specific options for contraception in teens with these and other medical conditions. In many teens, including those with chronic medical conditions, the top-tier contraceptive methods--implants and intrauterine devices--represent the most effective, safest, and most successful contraceptive options for adolescents. Prepregnancy counseling can be an important tool for managing chronic endocrine conditions and lowering the risks for both mother and fetus, but it is underutilized among all women, particularly adolescents. The management of pregnancies complicated by DM, PCOS, and thyroid conditions is facilitated by a coordinated effort among obstetricians, endocrinologists, dietitians, and nurse educators. Primary physicians should be aware of their potential role in preventing unplanned pregnancies among all adolescents, but particularly among those with chronic medical conditions.

  19. Teenage pregnancy and exclusive breastfeeding rates.

    PubMed

    Puapompong, Pawin; Raungrongmorakot, Kasem; Manolerdtewan, Wichian; Ketsuwan, Sukwadee; Wongin, Sinutchanan

    2014-09-01

    Teenage pregnancy is an important health issue globally and in Thailand Younger age mothers decide on the breastfeeding practices ofthe first 6-month. To find the rates of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding practices of teenage mothers and compare them with the rates of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding practices in mothers who are 20 years of age or more. Three thousand five hundred sixty three normal, postpartum women, who delivered without complications at the HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Medical Center in the Nakhon Nayok Province between 2010 and2013 were included in this study. At the second daypostpartum, the data of latch scores and the data of the practice of exclusive breastfeeding were collected Telephone follow-ups on the seventh, fourteenth, and forty-fifth postpartum days and at the second, fourth, and sixth month postpartum month were collected and used for exclusive breastfeeding data following discharge. Demographic data included the maternal age, parity, gestational age, marital status, occupation, religion, route ofdelivery, estimated blood loss, body mass index, nipple length, and the childs birth weight. The collected data was analyzed by the t-test, Chi-square, and odds ratio with 95% confidence interval. The percentage of teenage pregnancies was at 14.8% (527 cases). On postpartum day 2, the percentage of latch scores of 8 or less was 66.4%. At the seventh, fourteenth, and forty-fifth day and at the second, fourth, and sixth months postpartum, the exclusive breastfeeding rates were 88.5, 78.5, 57.6, 43.1, 32.9, and27.0%, respectively. Comparison of the 6-month exclusive breastfeeding rates between teenage mothers and mothers 20 years ofage or older were not statistically significant (p<0.05). The 6-month exclusive breastfeeding rate of teenage mothers was at 27.0% and had no significant differences from the rates of mothers 20 years of age or more.

  20. Adolescent pregnancy and depression: is there an association?

    PubMed

    Kamalak, Z; Köşüş, N; Köşüş, A; Hizli, D; Akçal, B; Kafali, H; Canbal, M; Isaoğlu, Ü

    2016-01-01

    The impact of being an adolescent and socio-demographic parameters on depression development during pregnancy were evaluated in this study. Between September 2010 and September 2011, 105 consecutive adolescent women ≤ 17 years of age were defined as the study group and 105 consecutive pregnant women over 18 years of age and matched for gestational age, were defined as the control group. Groups were compared according to depression development. The predictors of depression were analyzed by regression analysis. Median Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) scores in adolescent and control groups were 16 and 6, respectively. The difference was statistically significant. In the adolescent group, 39.0% of patients had mild depression, 37.1% moderate, and 10.5% had severe depression. Only 4.8% of patients in the control group had mild depression while none of the control cases had moderate or severe depression. Multivariate analysis showed that most important factor that was associated with depression development during pregnancy was being an adolescent. Depression risk was increased 18.2-fold in adolescent patients with pregnancy. Therefore psychiatric evaluation should be considered for these patients.

  1. Research on Adolescent Pregnancy. Matrix No. 38, Part Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James F.

    This paper reviews research studies conducted during 1970-1980 in the area of adolescent pregnancy. Research information is presented in a column format: column 1 provides the research findings, column 2 supplies the sources of findings, and column 3 provides interpretations of the findings. In addition, findings are organized around 11 separate…

  2. The Process of Pregnancy Resolution among Adolescent Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farber, Naomi B.

    1991-01-01

    Conducted in-depth interviews with both black and white unmarried adolescent mothers (n=28), from a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds, about their pregnancy resolution. Subjects revealed the importance of family members and other significant adults in the decision process. Analysis also indicated that personal, familial, and religious values…

  3. Gendered norms, sexual exploitation and adolescent pregnancy in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    McCleary-Sills, Jennifer; Douglas, Zayid; Rwehumbiza, Annagrace; Hamisi, Aziza; Mabala, Richard

    2013-05-01

    Adolescent pregnancy places girls at increased risk for poor health and educational outcomes that limit livelihood options, economic independence, and empowerment in adulthood. In Tanzania, adolescent pregnancy remains a significant concern, with over half of all first births occurring before women reach the age of 20. A participatory research and action project (Vitu Newala) conducted formative research in a rural district on the dynamics of sexual risk and agency among 82 girls aged 12-17. Four major risk factors undermined girls' ability to protect their own health and well-being: poverty that pushed them into having sex to meet basic needs, sexual expectations on the part of older men and boys their age, rape and coercive sex (including sexual abuse from an early age), and unintended pregnancy. Transactional sex with older men was one of the few available sources of income that allowed adolescent girls to meet their basic needs, making this a common choice for many girls, even though it increased the risk of unintended (early) pregnancy. Yet parents and adult community members blamed the girls alone for putting themselves at risk. These findings were used to inform a pilot project aimed to engage and empower adolescent girls and boys as agents of change to influence powerful gender norms that perpetuate girls' risk. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Process of Pregnancy Resolution among Adolescent Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farber, Naomi B.

    1991-01-01

    Conducted in-depth interviews with both black and white unmarried adolescent mothers (n=28), from a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds, about their pregnancy resolution. Subjects revealed the importance of family members and other significant adults in the decision process. Analysis also indicated that personal, familial, and religious values…

  5. Adolescent Sexuality: Pregnancy, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santelli, John S.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Special edition discusses adolescent sexuality, focusing on pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and prevention. The articles focus on demographics, risk factors, school-based risk reduction programs, contraception, early intervention, options, school-based prenatal and postpartum care programs, teenage parenting, abortion, HIV and AIDS,…

  6. An Overview of State Policies Affecting Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koshel, Jeffrey J.

    This report provides a brief overview of state policies and programs to address the problems of adolescent pregnancy and parenting. Section 1, a brief introduction, is followed by a section which examines a broad set of state policies and programs affecting at-risk youth, including pregnant teenagers and teenage parents. The state-by-state review…

  7. Family Relationships and Adolescent Pregnancy Risk: A Research Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brent C.; Benson, Brad; Galbraith, Kevin A.

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes research on parental influences on risk of adolescents becoming pregnant or causing a pregnancy. Findings are most consistent that parent-child closeness, parental supervision/regulation of children's activities, and parents' values against teen intercourse decrease risk. Findings about parent-child sexual communication are…

  8. Adolescent Sexuality: Pregnancy, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santelli, John S.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Special edition discusses adolescent sexuality, focusing on pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and prevention. The articles focus on demographics, risk factors, school-based risk reduction programs, contraception, early intervention, options, school-based prenatal and postpartum care programs, teenage parenting, abortion, HIV and AIDS,…

  9. Understanding Adolescents' Motivation To Prevent Pregnancy: A Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugland, Barbara W.; Wilder, Kathleen J.; Chandra, Anita

    Recent efforts targeting teenage pregnancy in the United States have marked a renewed conviction to reduce the level of childbearing among adolescents. Some of the behavioral, psychosocial, and ethnographic studies that explore the underlying motivation to delay sex and to effectively use contraception are the focus of this literature review.…

  10. Adolescent pregnancy outcomes and risk factors in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Omar, Khairani; Hasim, Suriati; Muhammad, Noor Azimah; Jaffar, Aida; Hashim, Syahnaz Mohd; Siraj, Harlina Halizah

    2010-12-01

    To assess the outcomes and risk factors of adolescent pregnancies in 2 major hospitals in Malaysia. We conducted a case-control study of pregnant girls aged 10 through 19 years. The controls were women aged 20 through 35 years who did not become pregnant in their adolescence. Cases and controls were matched for parity and place of delivery. Data were collected from questionnaires and the hospitals' medical records. The study included 102 cases and 102 controls. There were significant associations between adolescent pregnancy and low education level, low socioeconomic status, being raised by a single parent, not engaging in extracurricular school activities, engaging in unsupervised activities with peers after school, and substance abuse (P<0.05 for all); being anemic, being unsure of the expected delivery date, and having few antenatal visits and a late delivery booking; and low Apgar scores and perinatal complications. Adolescent pregnancies are high-risk pregnancies. Better sexual health strategies are required to address the associated complications. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Poor parenting: teenagers' views on adolescent pregnancies in eastern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Sekiwunga, Richard; Whyte, Susan Reynolds

    2009-12-01

    In Uganda teenage pregnancy is considered a problem for moral and social, as well as health, reasons. This qualitative stud,y in Busia District focused on the views of teenagers themselves as expressed in 9 focus group discussions with girls and boys. Their perspectives were contrasted with those of community leaders and mothers of adolescents. The young people blamed teenage pregnancy on failures of the parental generation. They asserted that parents and guardians were both too lenient and too harsh, that they failed to provide for their daughters' needs, and that they pressured them into early marriages instead of giving priority to education. Although poverty and family breakdown were recognized as underlying structural causes of parental failure, the teenagers experienced these factors in their everyday lives as problems with their parents and guardians. The teenagers expressed the 'enlightened' view that adolescent pregnancy was undesireable, even though many girls have few alternatives to marriage and childbearing.

  12. A Clustered Randomized Controlled Trial of the Positive Prevention PLUS Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the impact of Positive Prevention PLUS, a school-based adolescent pregnancy prevention program on delaying sexual intercourse, birth control use, and pregnancy. Methods. I randomly assigned a diverse sample of ninth grade students in 21 suburban public high schools in California into treatment (n = 2483) and control (n = 1784) groups that participated in a clustered randomized controlled trial. Between October 2013 and May 2014, participants completed baseline and 6-month follow-up surveys regarding sexual behavior and pregnancy. Participants in the treatment group were offered Positive Prevention PLUS, an 11-lesson adolescent pregnancy prevention program. Results. The program had statistically significant impacts on delaying sexual intercourse and increasing the use of birth control. However, I detected no program effect on pregnancy rates at 6-month follow-up. Conclusions. The Positive Prevention PLUS program demonstrated positive impacts on adolescent sexual behavior. This suggests that programs that focus on having students practice risk reduction skills may delay sexual activity and increase birth control use. PMID:27689502

  13. An Evaluation of California’s Adolescent Sibling Pregnancy Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    East, Patricia; Kiernan, Elizabeth; Chávez, Gilberto

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT The siblings of adolescents who have been pregnant or are parents have disproportionately high rates of teenage pregnancies and births. California’s Adolescent Sibling Pregnancy Prevention Program is targeted at these high-risk youths. METHODS An evaluation of the program was conducted in 1997–1999 with 1,176 predominantly Hispanic 11–17-year-olds who had at least one sibling who was an adolescent parent or had been pregnant—731 youths who were program clients and 445 youths who received no systematic services. All evaluation participants completed an interview and questionnaire at enrollment and again nine months later. RESULTS Female program clients had a significantly lower pregnancy rate than comparison females over the evaluation period (4% vs. 7%), as well as a lower rate of sexual initiation (7% vs. 16%). They also significantly decreased their frequency of school truancy, whereas this outcome increased among comparison females; program females had significantly more definite intentions of remaining abstinent at posttest than comparison females. Consistency of contraceptive use increased over time among males in the program and decreased among comparison males. Delivery of group services was correlated with delayed onset of intercourse among males, and the receipt of services related to psychosocial skills was correlated with greater contraceptive use at last sex among all sexually experienced youth. CONCLUSIONS This new program, which serves a population known to be at very high risk for early pregnancy, appears to be effective at reducing rates of pregnancy and improving several pregnancy-related risk behaviors. PMID:12729135

  14. Adolescent mothers' attitudes toward contraceptive use before and after pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Celeste A; Cashman, Suzanne B; Elfenbein, Dianne S; Felice, Marianne E

    2007-08-01

    To understand attitudes and beliefs influencing use and nonuse of contraceptive methods pre- and postpartum among a group of adolescent mothers. Qualitative descriptive study utilizing focus groups conducted between May, 2005 and January, 2006 in Central Massachusetts. Adolescent mothers attending a federally funded multi-professional medical program. Inclusion criteria included being at least one year postpartum. Forty-six mothers were eligible; 34 were successfully contacted via telephone. Twenty-two agreed to attend; 15 adolescent mothers attended one of four groups. Emergent themes were identified concerning adolescent mothers' attitudes and beliefs regarding contraception pre and postpartum. Themes pertaining to nonuse of contraception prior to first pregnancy were: denial, not planning to have sex, not considering the consequences of unprotected sex, and wanting to become pregnant. Participants identified barriers to obtaining and utilizing contraception, including embarrassment discussing the topic, confidentiality, inability to obtain contraception without parental knowledge, and lack of knowledge regarding methods. Participants reported that convenience, perceived effectiveness, familiarity, and side effects were the primary reasons for selecting or changing a method of contraception postpartum and recommended several methods of promoting contraceptive use among adolescents. These included persuading health care providers to discuss the issue routinely with every adolescent patient, parental involvement, outreach by young mothers to at-risk teens, and media campaigns. Given the adverse consequences of adolescent pregnancy, understanding the attitudes and beliefs of postpartum adolescents regarding contraceptives is important for developing effective interventions. Focus groups conducted with adolescent mothers, a difficult population to engage, provide a venue for exploring this complex issue.

  15. Pregnancy Resolution and Family Formation: Understanding Gender Differences in Adolescents' Preferences and Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsiglio, William; Menaghan, Elizabeth G.

    1990-01-01

    Examined gender differences in adolescents' personal views about pregnancy resolution and family formation. Surveyed adolescents (n=577) using vignette involving unplanned pregnancy. Findings showed similar percentages of males and females preferred abortion and adoption as strategies for handling pregnancy, but females were more likely to select…

  16. From 'sugar daddies' to 'sugar babies': exploring a pathway among age-disparate sexual relationships, condom use and adolescent pregnancy in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Toska, Elona; Cluver, Lucie D; Boyes, Mark; Pantelic, Marija; Kuo, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    Background Adolescent pregnancy has been linked to adverse outcomes. Most studies proposing risk pathways for adolescent pregnancy in South Africa are qualitative, hypothesising links among age-disparate relationships, reduced condom use and higher pregnancy rates. No known South African studies have quantitatively explored pathways to adolescent pregnancy. This study aimed to: (i) identify the factors associated with adolescent pregnancy and (ii) explore a pathway of risk by assessing whether condom use mediated the relationship between age-disparate sexual relationships and adolescent pregnancy. A cross-sectional survey of 447 sexually active girls aged 10-19 years was undertaken in six health districts of South Africa. Multivariate logistic regressions controlled for confounders. Mediation tests used bootstrapping. Consistent condom use (β=-2.148, odds ratio (OR)=8.566, P≤0.001) and school enrolment (β=-1.600, OR=0.202, P≤0.001) were associated with lower pregnancy rates. Age-disparate sex (β=1.093, OR=2.982, P≤0.001) and long-term school absences (β=1.402, OR=4.061, P≤0.001) were associated with higher pregnancy rates. The indirect effect of age-disparate sex on adolescent pregnancy through condom use was significant, irrespective of age, age at sexual initiation, poverty and residential environment (B=0.4466, s.d.=0.1303, confidence interval: 0.2323-0.7428). This survey supports hypotheses that inability to negotiate condom use in age-disparate sexual relationships may drive adolescent pregnancy. Interventions addressing these relationships, facilitating condom use and increasing access to sexual health services among adolescents might avert unwanted pregnancies.

  17. Pregnancy weight gain in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C S; Christopher, F S; Kandell, L A

    1991-06-01

    We examined whether adolescents required greater prenatal weight gains than nonadolescents to deliver equal weight babies following a low-risk pregnancy. Maternal characteristics and monthly weight gains were collected from medical records obtained from a private health maintenance organization (n = 423). Maternal weight gain, gestational age, parity, and cigarette use during pregnancy were significant predictors of infant birth weight in our regression models. Subjects were nonsmokers with a gestational age greater than 37 weeks and a parity equal to 0 who entered prenatal care during the first trimester of pregnancy. Mean total weight gains for the adolescents (16.2 +/- 4.8 kg; n = 51) and adults (15.2 +/- 5.4 kg; n = 65), and infant birth weights were similar. Mean infant birth weight was 3473 +/- 394 g for the adolescents and 3339 +/- 453 g for the young adults, whereas the optimal weight range for newborns is about 3500-3999 g. Modifiable risks are the important predictors of infant birth weight, and adolescents do not appear to require a greater weight gain than young adults to deliver similar weight babies.

  18. Effect of the exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood on the body mass index until adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, Ana Paula; Gonçalves-Silva, Regina Maria Veras; Ferreira, Márcia Gonçalves; Silva, Gulnar Azevedo e; Sichieri, Rosely

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Investigate the effect of exposure to smoking during pregnancy and early childhood on changes in the body mass index (BMI) from birth to adolescence. METHODS A population-based cohort of children (0-5 years old) from Cuiabá, Midwest Brazil, was assessed in 1999-2000 (n = 2,405). Between 2009 and 2011, the cohort was re-evaluated. Information about birth weight was obtained from medical records, and exposure to smoking during pregnancy and childhood was assessed at the first interview. Linear mixed effects models were used to estimate the association between exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and preschool age, and the body mass index of children at birth, childhood and adolescence. RESULTS Only 11.3% of the mothers reported smoking during pregnancy, but most of them (78.2%) also smoked during early childhood. Among mothers who smoked only during pregnancy (n = 59), 97.7% had smoked only in the first trimester. The changes in body mass index at birth and in childhood were similar for children exposed and those not exposed to maternal smoking. However, from childhood to adolescence the rate of change in the body mass index was higher among those exposed only during pregnancy than among those who were not exposed. CONCLUSIONS Exposure to smoking only during pregnancy, especially in the first trimester, seems to affect changes in the body mass index until adolescence, supporting guidelines that recommend women of childbearing age to stop smoking. PMID:26247384

  19. Psychosocial aspects of unwed adolescent pregnancy in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, K; Likwa, R

    1993-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy in Zambia contributed to 22.5% of the pregnancies seen at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka in 1979/80. Some of the psychosocial factors in teenage pregnancy are examined among 80 teenage unmarried adolescents appearing at the prenatal clinic of the University Teaching Hospital (40) and at a low-income prenatal clinic in Lusaka (40). Participants were matched with controls on the basis of age, education, and socioeconomic status. In-depth interviews were conducted in 1987, when the girls were in their second to fifth month of pregnancy. Analysis was conducted on sex socialization, knowledge of and attitudes toward contraception, socioeconomic factors, and family coherence as preventive aspects of teenage pregnancy. The reaction to the pregnancy and management of the pregnancy were also determined. The mean age of menarche was 13.2 and 13.5 years for the participants and controls, respectively, which is somewhat lower than reports among other African populations. A formal initiation ceremony was conducted for 3% of participants and 8% of controls. Participants had 2.4 sex partners, and controls had 0.5 sex partners. Motives for getting pregnant were: economic support (85%); being in love and hoping for marriage (67%); peer pressure (54%);l and three other reasons. Both groups were similar in their knowledge of, attitudes toward, and use of contraception. 28% of the pregnant girls reported knowing about "counting days," but only 1% knew how to do this. Only 6% had knowledge of contraception. About 75% came from low-income families. The average age of formal education was 6.2 years for participants and 6.8 years for controls. 68% were in school at the time of the pregnancy; 29% dropped out of school before the end of the pregnancy. 52% of the male partners were of low socioeconomic status. 61% of pregnant girls lived with both real parents. 6% reported wanting to become pregnant. 67% of male partners had a negative reaction to the

  20. Associations between multiple pregnancies and health risk behaviors among U.S. adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A; Krauss, Melissa J; Spitznagel, Edward L; Schootman, Mario; Cottler, Linda B; Bierut, Laura Jean

    2010-12-01

    This study examined the associations between health risk behaviors (i.e., substance use behaviors, physical violence, or carried a weapon) and multiple adolescent pregnancies (i.e., experiencing or causing more than one pregnancy). We analyzed 1999-2003 data (3 years: 1999, 2001, and 2003) from the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a nationally representative survey of high school students (N = 14,211 participants). Multinomial logistic regression was used to compare one and multiple pregnancies versus no pregnancies. Logistic regression was used to compare multiple pregnancies versus one pregnancy. A dose-response relationship was observed between multiple adolescent pregnancies and health risk behaviors; the more risk behaviors endorsed, the greater likelihood of experiencing or causing multiple adolescent pregnancies. Participants who engaged in a "high" degree of risk behaviors were significantly more likely to have experienced or caused multiple adolescent pregnancies than no pregnancies (or only one pregnancy) versus youth who endorsed no risk behaviors. Earlier sexual debut and more lifetime sexual partners were also associated with increased risk of endorsing multiple adolescent pregnancies. The health risk behaviors examined in our study can provide warning signs to influential persons who can potentially deliver important prevention messages to at-risk adolescents. Copyright © 2010 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Identifying risk factors for pregnancy amongst Colombian adolescents from urban and rural school populations].

    PubMed

    González-Quiñones, Juan C; Salamanca-Preciado, Jenny P; Quiroz-Rivera, Ruth M; Hernández-Pardo, Angela M; Hernández-Rojas, Astrid D; Quesada-Núñez, Beselink

    2012-06-01

    Assessing risk factors for pregnancy in an adolescent school population. A cross-sectional observational study was carried out on 7,068 adolescents whose ages ranged from 11 to 20 years who were attending 14 public schools in Bogotá and the surrounding municipalities. A self-questionnaire was administered focusing on socio-demographic, family and sentimental factors and the adolescents' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding sexuality. The average age was 15.3 years. 80 % had received family-planning in-formation; 32 % recognised the menstrual cycle. The prevalence of sexual activity was 40 % and 20 % were leading a sexually-active life. The prevalence of pregnancy was 4 % and the declared abortion rate was 1%. The risk factors involved not having received information about family-planning compared to understanding family-planning but with some doubts (OR 0.1: 0.03 to 0.4 95 % CI), previous abortion (OR 7.8: 2.3 to 25.8 95 % CI), not having planned against pregnancy during the first sexual relationship (OR 3.9: 2.2-7 95 % CI). Self-esteem, relationship with parents and perception of the future were not identified as being risk factors. Teenage pregnancy seemed to be an accidental situation due to lack of knowledge rather than occurring because some teenagers were having trouble.

  2. Truancy and teenage pregnancy in English adolescent girls: can we identify those at risk?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yin; Puradiredja, Dewi Ismajani; Abel, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Truancy has been linked to risky sexual behaviours in teenagers. However, no studies in England have examined the association between truancy and teenage pregnancy, and the use of truancy as a marker of teenagers at risk of pregnancy. Using logistic regression, we investigated the association between truancy at age 15 and the likelihood of teenage pregnancy by age 19 among 3837 female teenagers who participated in the Longitudinal Study of Young People of England. We calculated the areas under the ROC curves of four models to determine how useful truancy would be as a marker of future teenage pregnancy. Truancy showed a dose-response association with teenage pregnancy after adjusting for ethnicity, educational intentions at age 16, parental socioeconomic status and family composition ('several days at a time' versus 'none', odds ratio 3.48 95% confidence interval 1.90-6.36, P < 0.001). Inclusion of risk behaviours improved the accuracy of predictive models only marginally (area under the ROC curve 0.76 full model versus 0.71 sociodemographic characteristics only). Truancy is independently associated with teenage pregnancy among English adolescent girls. However, the discriminatory powers of models were low, suggesting that interventions addressing the whole population, rather than targeting high-risk individuals, might be more effective in reducing teenage pregnancy rates. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health.

  3. Truancy and teenage pregnancy in English adolescent girls: can we identify those at risk?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yin; Puradiredja, Dewi Ismajani; Abel, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Background Truancy has been linked to risky sexual behaviours in teenagers. However, no studies in England have examined the association between truancy and teenage pregnancy, and the use of truancy as a marker of teenagers at risk of pregnancy. Methods Using logistic regression, we investigated the association between truancy at age 15 and the likelihood of teenage pregnancy by age 19 among 3837 female teenagers who participated in the Longitudinal Study of Young People of England. We calculated the areas under the ROC curves of four models to determine how useful truancy would be as a marker of future teenage pregnancy. Results Truancy showed a dose–response association with teenage pregnancy after adjusting for ethnicity, educational intentions at age 16, parental socioeconomic status and family composition (‘several days at a time’ versus ‘none’, odds ratio 3.48 95% confidence interval 1.90–6.36, P < 0.001). Inclusion of risk behaviours improved the accuracy of predictive models only marginally (area under the ROC curve 0.76 full model versus 0.71 sociodemographic characteristics only). Conclusions Truancy is independently associated with teenage pregnancy among English adolescent girls. However, the discriminatory powers of models were low, suggesting that interventions addressing the whole population, rather than targeting high-risk individuals, might be more effective in reducing teenage pregnancy rates. PMID:25784667

  4. Factors Associated with Breastfeeding Initiation in Adolescent Pregnancies: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Leclair, Emily; Robert, Nicole; Sprague, Ann E; Fleming, Nathalie

    2015-12-01

    Adolescent mothers have a lower breastfeeding rate than adult women. The objective is to determine the association between multiple high-risk characteristics of pregnant adolescents with intention and initiation of breastfeeding. We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study in Ontario (2006-2012) using the Better Outcomes Registry & Network (BORN) database. Breastfeeding outcomes of adolescent women (younger than 20 years) with a singleton live-born infant at term gestation (37 weeks or greater) were analyzed. The χ(2) and independent-sample t tests were used where appropriate. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was also performed. This study included 22,023 adolescent women with complete breastfeeding information. Almost half (48.8%, n = 10,749) exclusively breastfed their infant at time of hospital discharge. Breastfeeding was significantly more likely in the older adolescents (odds ratio 1.10); other factors significantly associated with breastfeeding included intention to breastfeed, prenatal classes attendance, living in a higher-income neighborhood, having a spontaneous vaginal delivery, being a nonsmoker, not using substances during pregnancy, and not having any preexisting health problems or obstetrical complications (P < .0001). A significant interaction between smoking and intention to breastfeed was identified. Intention to breastfeed was found to be protective against the reduction in breastfeeding seen with smoking. This large-cohort study confirms that high-risk factors are associated with lower breastfeeding in Canadian adolescent term singleton births. Breastfeeding intention is a very important driver of breastfeeding. These findings highlight the importance of early multidisciplinary adolescent pregnancy care targeting these risks factors and education in order to improve breastfeeding rates in this population. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  5. A developmental approach to pregnancy prevention with early adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Proctor, S E

    1986-10-01

    Traditional pregnancy prevention strategies employed with adults and older teens do not recognize significant developmental differences between early adolescents and other age groups. Methods that compliment, reflect, and are consistent with developmental needs of the young teen provide cogent approaches to teen pregnancy prevention. Particular emphasis should be placed on interpersonal relationships and their importance in the young woman's life, especially the relationship between the young teen and her parents. Developing and improving all relationships instrumental in positively affecting teen decision-making represent potent approaches to pregnancy prevention. The axioms of Piaget, Erikson, and Mercer are examined in regard to cognitive, social, emotional, and psychosexual development in the 12-14 year old. Young teens' responses to sex education as well as their use of contraception are reviewed in relation to developmental theory.

  6. Teenage pregnancy in adolescents with an incarcerated household member.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Mathilde Logan; Loper, Ann Booker

    2014-03-01

    This study examines the association between the incarceration of a household member and adolescent pregnancy, and evaluates whether this association extends beyond that of other variables associated with sexual health. We used data from 12 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: Child and Young Adult. After eliminating males and individuals who did not respond to key questions, a sample of 1,229 girls (ages 14-19) was analyzed. Girls who experienced the incarceration of a household member faced more demographic and family environment risk factors than those who did not. Regression analyses demonstrated that the addition of a household incarceration variable afforded superior prediction of teenage pregnancy relative to the prediction based on demographic and family features alone. Programs that are directed toward reducing teen pregnancy will benefit from attention to the home situation of the at-risk girl, particularly the experience of household member incarceration and related family dynamics.

  7. Adolescent pregnancy prevention: An abstinence-centered randomized controlled intervention in a Chilean public high school.

    PubMed

    Cabezón, Carlos; Vigil, Pilar; Rojas, Iván; Leiva, M Eugenia; Riquelme, Rosa; Aranda, Waldo; García, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of an abstinence-centered sex education program in adolescent pregnancy prevention, the TeenSTAR Program was applied in a high school in Santiago, Chile. A total of 1259 girls from a Santiago high school were divided into three cohorts depending on the year they started high school: the 1996 cohort of 425 students, which received no intervention; the 1997 cohort, in which 210 students received an intervention and 213 (control group) did not; and the 1998 cohort, in which 328 students received an intervention and 83 (control group) did not. Students were randomly assigned to control and intervention groups in these cohorts, before starting with the program. We conducted a prospective, randomized study using the application of the TeenSTAR sex education program during the first year of high school to the intervention groups in the 1997 and 1998 cohorts. All cohorts were followed up for 4 years; pregnancy rates were recorded and subsequently contrasted in the intervention and control groups. Pregnancy rates were measured and Risk Ratio with 95% confidence interval were calculated for intervention and control groups in each cohort. Pregnancy rates for the intervention and control groups in the 1997 cohort were 3.3% and 18.9%, respectively (RR: 0.176, CI: 0.076-0.408). Pregnancy rates for the intervention and control groups in the 1998 cohort were 4.4% and 22.6%, respectively (RR 0.195, CI: 0.099-0.384). The abstinence-centered TeenSTAR sex education intervention was effective in the prevention of unintended adolescent pregnancy.

  8. Risk for unintended pregnancy and childbearing among educable mentally handicapped adolescents.

    PubMed

    Levy, S R; Perhats, C; Johnson, M N

    1992-04-01

    A San Diego Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting Program (SANDAPP) evaluation revealed that low intellectual ability was a serious risk factor for adolescent pregnancy. 20% of pregnant teens in the study were enrolled in special education classes, but only 10% of all students in San Diego school district attend such classes (n = 135; mean age = 16). The mean dropout age for special education teens was 14 vs. age 16 for non special-education teens. Chicago's Children and Adolescent Pregnancy Project (CAPP), an ongoing, school-based intervention program, revealed that approximately (EMH) with IQs of 60 -79. CAPP began as a 3 year (1983-1985) demonstration model with an 18-month follow-up developed by the Arts of Living Institute (ALI) that serves between 900 and 1200 females each year. CAPP was established within ALI in response to increasing numbers of elementary school-age (ESA, ages 11-15) and EMH (ages 11-19) pregnant adolescents. Most of these students were black (91%) or Hispanic (7%) teens from families living in poverty. 1/2 of CAPP participants resided in 5 Chicago communities identified as high risk for poor pregnancy outcomes. During 1983-1985 CAPP served 98 EMH and 228 ESA pregnant females, representing approximately 22-25% of all pregnant teens younger than age 15 who gave birth Chicago. Client outcomes were determined by the indicators of low birth weight (2500 gm/5.5 lbs.), infant mortality, repeat pregnancy, and dropping out of school. There were no significant differences between ESA and EMH clients indicating the appropriateness of a combined program. During the 3 year period only 30% of mothers reported they were not attending school. In contrast, the dropout rate for Chicago high schools is 45% of all students and 70% for pregnant teens. School attendance was 15% lower among EMH students when compared with ESA students at the same grade level.

  9. Clusters of Factors Identify A High Prevalence of Pregnancy Involvement Among US Adolescent Males.

    PubMed

    Lau, May; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn

    2015-08-01

    The study purpose was to use recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) to identify factors that, when clustered, are associated with a high prevalence of pregnancy involvement among US adolescent males. The National Survey of Family Growth is a nationally representative survey of individuals 15-44 years old. RPA was done for the 2002 and 2006-2010 cycles to identify factors which, when combined, identify adolescent males with the highest prevalence of pregnancy involvement. Pregnancy-involvement prevalence among adolescent males was 6 %. Two clusters of adolescent males have the highest pregnancy-involvement prevalence, at 84-87 %. In RPA, the highest pregnancy-involvement prevalence (87 %) was seen in adolescent males who ever HIV tested, had >4 lifetime sexual partners, reported less than an almost certain chance of feeling less physical pleasure with condom use, had an educational attainment of <11th grade, and had ≤2 sexual partners in the past 12 months. Adolescent males who ever HIV tested, had >4 lifetime sexual partners, reported less than an almost certain chance of feeling less physical pleasure with condom use, had an educational attainment ≥11th grade, were >17 years old, and had their first contraceptive education ≥10th grade, had a pregnancy-involvement prevalence of 84 %. Pregnancy-prevention efforts among adolescent males who have been involved in a pregnancy may need to target risk factors identified in clusters with the highest pregnancy prevalence to prevent subsequent pregnancies in these adolescent males and improve their future outcomes.

  10. New methods of pregnancy testing in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Saxena, B B

    1981-05-01

    The knowledge and use of newer, more sensitive, and reliable pregnancy tests which are easily accessible and of moderate cost are the 1st steps in the early diagnosis and management of pregnancy, especially in adolescent girls. Accurate diagnosis of pregnancy soon after conception offers the option of abortion by simple, effective, and inexpensive procedures or early initiation of prenatal maternity care. Discussion focuses on the symptoms of pregnancy and the historical development and basis of pregnancy tests as well as the specific types of pregnancy tests. The most familiar sign of pregnancy is the missed period. Other symptoms that provide presumptive evidence of pregnancy include fatigue and lassitude, increased body temperature, and breast fullness or pain. Feelings of nausea, vomiting, and weight gain may appear after 2 weeks. The diagnosis of pregnancy by the detection of the human chorionic gonadotropin was initially described 53 years ago by Selmar Aschheim and Bernhardt Zondek. Improvements in the techniques for the measurement of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) have been directly related to the progress in the purification and isolation of hCG and elucidation of the amino acid sequence of the hormone-nonspecific alpha subunit and hormone-specific beta subunit of hCG. The history, physical examination, and pregnancy tests will generally provide sufficient information for a definite diagnosis of pregnancy. The presence of hCG in the urine or blood is the most accurate of all the indications of pregnancy. During the last century, 4 different techniques for the determination of hCG in blood and/or urine have been developed. These include the following and are reviewed in detail: 1) bioassays in intact laboratory animals; 2) immunologic tube or slide methods with heme- or latex-agglutination inhibition, as well as the more recently developed competitive protein binding method such as 3) radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the use of radioisotope labeled hormone

  11. Perinatal outcomes and risk factors in adolescent and advanced age pregnancies: comparison with normal reproductive age women.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, A; Ozkan, S; Bozkurt, A I; Karahan, T; Kayan, S

    2013-05-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse and compare demographic characteristics and clinical outcomes of pregnancies in adolescent, advanced age and normal reproductive age women. All completed pregnancies in a 6-month period, registered by the family practitioners in Denizli province, were included into the study. A face-to-face questionnaire was used to gather information. Participants were asked for demographic information, pregnancy outcome and obstetric history, obstetric and neonatal problems. Overall 5,882 pregnancies in different age groups: 296 (5%) adolescent (< 20-years-old); 4,957 (84.3%) normal reproductive age (20-35-years-old) and 629 (10.7%) advanced age (> 35-years-old ) (group III), were included into the study. Adolescent women had a lower educational status (p < 0.01), and family played a major role in decision of marriage (p < 0.01). Birth weight of the baby was lower in adolescents (p < 0.01). While adolescents tended to deliver vaginally (OR = 1.9, p < 0.01), elderly women were more prone to operative delivery (OR = 1.2, p < 0.05). Risk of caesarean section rate was higher in elderly nulliparous women (OR = 2.2, p 0.01). The number of spontaneous and induced abortions were increased with age (p < 0.01). Antenatal problems were seen least frequently in normal reproductive age women. Both antenatal (OR = 1.7, p < 0.01) and neonatal problems (OR = 1.5, p < 0.05), were significantly higher in advanced age pregnancy. It was concluded that with sufficient antenatal care, adolescent pregnancy is not associated with an increase in adverse pregnancy outcome, except low birth weights. Advanced maternal age is more likely to be associated with increased obstetric, maternal and neonatal complications.

  12. Adolescent School Experiences and Dropout, Adolescent Pregnancy, and Young Adult Deviant Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasen, Stephanie; Cohen, Patricia; Brook, Judith S.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined predictability of inappropriate behavior in a random sample of 452 adolescents. Behaviors examined included dropping out, teen pregnancy, criminal activities and conviction, antisocial personality disorder, and alcohol abuse. Found that academic achievement and aspirations, and learning-focused school settings related to…

  13. Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention in a Rural Native American Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Janet W.; Skenandore, Alice H.; Scow, Beverly M.; Schanen, Jennifer G.; Clary, Frieda Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Nationally, the United States has a higher rate of teen pregnancy than any other industrialized nation. Native American youth have a higher birth rate than the national rate. A full-year healthy relationship program, based on Native American teachings, traditions, and cultural norms, was delivered to all eighth-grade students at a rural tribal…

  14. Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention in a Rural Native American Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Janet W.; Skenandore, Alice H.; Scow, Beverly M.; Schanen, Jennifer G.; Clary, Frieda Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Nationally, the United States has a higher rate of teen pregnancy than any other industrialized nation. Native American youth have a higher birth rate than the national rate. A full-year healthy relationship program, based on Native American teachings, traditions, and cultural norms, was delivered to all eighth-grade students at a rural tribal…

  15. A prospective study of micronutrient status in adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Baker, Philip N; Wheeler, Simon J; Sanders, Tom A; Thomas, Jane E; Hutchinson, Cindy J; Clarke, Karen; Berry, Jacqueline L; Jones, Rebecca L; Seed, Paul T; Poston, Lucilla

    2009-04-01

    Adolescents are more likely than adults to consume energy-dense, micronutrient-poor diets and to experience adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objectives were to assess micronutrient intake and blood biomarkers prospectively in pregnant adolescents recruited to the About Teenage Eating (ATE) Study and to determine associations with pregnancy outcome. Pregnant adolescents (n = 500) were recruited from 2 UK inner city populations. Dietary intake was assessed with three 24-h dietary recalls, and micronutrient status was assessed by measurement of third trimester blood biomarkers. Pregnancy outcomes included small-for-gestational age (SGA) birth and preterm delivery. Median iron and folate intakes were lower than UK and US recommended amounts. Folate and vitamin B-12 status were lower in smokers, despite no differences in dietary intake. Serum folate was <7.0 nmol/L in 12% of subjects, and serum total homocysteine (tHcy) was elevated (>10 micromol/L) in 20% of subjects. Fifty-two percent of the subjects had iron deficiency anemia, and 30% had serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations <25 nmol/L. The incidence of SGA birth was higher in subjects with poorer folate status (red blood cell folate, P = 0.003; serum folate, P = 0.02; tHcy, P = 0.01; simple regression) and those with low folate intakes, regardless of the inclusion (P = 0.021) or exclusion (P = 0.049) of intake from supplements (simple regression). Adjustment for confounding variables confirmed the independence of these associations. The risk of SGA birth was also higher in subjects with low food iron intake (P = 0.049), but not when intake included iron from supplements (P = 0.21). The risk of SGA birth was lower in subjects with iron deficiency anemia (P = 0.002). Poor micronutrient intake and status increase the risk of SGA births in pregnant adolescents.

  16. [Termination of pregnancy in adolescents in Vaud].

    PubMed

    Michaud, P A; Wermelinger, R

    1979-12-01

    In Switzerland, as in most other countries, the number of adolescents with an active sexual life is on the increase. A statistical analysis of the number of deliveries and of the number of abortions in young women aged less than 19 revealed that out of the total 1413 deliveries in 1978, only 21/1000 involved teenage girls, while the percentage was 45/1000 in 1970. It is obvious that since most teenagers have sexual relations, they either use contraception, or that the number of abortions in that age group, is on the increase. There were, between 1969 and 1978 in the university hospital of Lausanne, 600 requests for abortion among young women aged 12-19, i.e. about 16% of the total requests for abortion; such percentage is about 20-30% in most other countries. Many requests for teenage abortion come from young women residing outside of the Vaud canton, or newly established there. Interviews with patients revealed that girls who had had sex education in schools had sometimes used a contraceptive method. It must be remembered that in Vaud social medical care is very accessible and free to all, and that all schools have been offering well organized sex education programs for 10 years. In the opinion of the author this situation accounts for the low percentage of deliveries and of abortions from Vaud adolescents.

  17. Pew Memorial Trust policy synthesis: 3. Adolescent pregnancy: the responsibilities of policymakers.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, F; Brindis, C

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, adolescent pregnancy and childbearing have emerged as major health and social policy issues, sparking debates in local and national forums. The concern is a response to rates of adolescent sexual activity, pregnancy, and out-of-wedlock childbirth that have risen sharply in the past 20 years. The deleterious effects of early parenthood, especially in poor communities, have been amply documented; education, future employment, and health status are among the areas affected. Efforts at intervention have ranged from preventing pregnancy by encouraging celibacy to trying to enhance the options available to those who are already parents. Many of these efforts have fallen short, proving unequal to the complexity of the issues being tackled. Relatively successful approaches have also been developed, however, and the synthesis describes several. Strategies addressing the needs of adolescents comprehensively and involving a multiplicity of concerned players appear to be most effective in the long term. There is a pressing need for more program documentation to substantiate this and other promising strategies. PMID:3679836

  18. Risk of pregnancy and dropping out of school among special education adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kleinfeld, L A; Young, R L

    1989-10-01

    This study examined the temporal relationship between dropping out of school and teen-age pregnancy, and whether or not teens in special education programs are at greater risk for pregnancy and dropping out than non-special education teens. Cumulative Student Records and case files were reviewed on a random sample of 135 already pregnant girls served by the San Diego Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting (SANDAPP) program. A comparison was made of ages at time of dropping out and conception of the first live birth between special education and non-special education groups. The overall prevalence of special education teens in the program was compared with the prevalence rate of 10% in the San Diego Unified School District. Results indicated 20% of SANDAPP adolescents were in special education compared to 10% for the overall school district. Special education teens dropped out of school significantly earlier than non-special education teens. No significant evidence supported the hypothesis that teens dropped out of school first, then became pregnant. Nor was there significant evidence to suggest special education teens experience their first live birth at younger ages than their non-special education counterparts. No relationship was found between mean grade point average and age at conception. The researchers concluded that special education teens are at higher risk for pregnancy and dropping out of school than non-special education teens.

  19. An Exploratory Study of Life-Change Events, Social Support and Pregnancy Decisions in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Mary L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined influences on decisions regarding pregnancy outcome in 43 adolescents who completed the Adolescent Life Change Event Questionnaire and the Social Support Questionnaire. Those continuing the pregnancy (N=30) had higher life event change scores, lower social support scores, and more personal and family problems. (JAC)

  20. Adolescents' Pregnancy Intentions, Wantedness, and Regret: Cross-Lagged Relations with Mental Health and Harsh Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Patricia L.; Chien, Nina C.; Barber, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    The authors used cross-lagged analyses to examine the across-time influences on and consequences of adolescents' pregnancy intentions, wantedness, and regret. One hundred pregnant Latina adolescents were studied during pregnancy and at 6 and 12 months postpartum. The results revealed 4 main findings: (a) similar to what has been found in adult…

  1. Legislation on Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention. Wisconsin Legislative Council Report No. 13 to the 1991 Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Richard; And Others

    Wisconsin legislation on adolescent pregnancy prevention is discussed in this document. The 1991 Senate Bill 324 and Assembly Bill 630, identical bills which relate to adolescent pregnancy prevention, school district instruction in human growth and development, medical assistance services, and making appropriations, are discussed. Part I notes…

  2. Adolescents' Pregnancy Intentions, Wantedness, and Regret: Cross-Lagged Relations with Mental Health and Harsh Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Patricia L.; Chien, Nina C.; Barber, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    The authors used cross-lagged analyses to examine the across-time influences on and consequences of adolescents' pregnancy intentions, wantedness, and regret. One hundred pregnant Latina adolescents were studied during pregnancy and at 6 and 12 months postpartum. The results revealed 4 main findings: (a) similar to what has been found in adult…

  3. Adolescent Pregnancy and Childbearing in Relation to Infant Adoption in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brent C.; Coyl, Diana D.

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes trends and recent declines in adolescent pregnancy, abortion, and adoption relinquishment. Reviews research regarding adolescent pregnancy resolution decision-making. Discusses contextual factors, such as attitudes and socialization about abortion, parenting, and adoption, and the influence of parents and partners on likelihood of…

  4. Social Contagion, Adolescent Sexual Behavior, and Pregnancy: A Nonlinear Dynamic EMOSA Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joseph Lee; Rowe, David C.; Buster, Maury

    1998-01-01

    Expands an existing nonlinear dynamic epidemic model of onset of social activities (EMOSA), motivated by social contagion theory, to quantify the likelihood of pregnancy for adolescent girls of different sexuality statuses. Compares five sexuality/pregnancy models to explain variance in national prevalence curves. Finds that adolescent girls have…

  5. Social Contagion, Adolescent Sexual Behavior, and Pregnancy: A Nonlinear Dynamic EMOSA Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joseph Lee; Rowe, David C.; Buster, Maury

    1998-01-01

    Expands an existing nonlinear dynamic epidemic model of onset of social activities (EMOSA), motivated by social contagion theory, to quantify the likelihood of pregnancy for adolescent girls of different sexuality statuses. Compares five sexuality/pregnancy models to explain variance in national prevalence curves. Finds that adolescent girls have…

  6. Serving the Future: An Update on Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Programs in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Gary; And Others

    This survey analyzed the nature and level of services in adolescent pregnancy prevention in the developing countries of Latin America, Africa, and Asia. While focusing on programs to prevent adolescent pregnancy, many of the groups surveyed were also responding to the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in their work with youth.…

  7. Adolescent Pregnancy and Childbearing in Relation to Infant Adoption in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brent C.; Coyl, Diana D.

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes trends and recent declines in adolescent pregnancy, abortion, and adoption relinquishment. Reviews research regarding adolescent pregnancy resolution decision-making. Discusses contextual factors, such as attitudes and socialization about abortion, parenting, and adoption, and the influence of parents and partners on likelihood of…

  8. Who's that girl? A qualitative analysis of adolescent girls' views on factors associated with teenage pregnancies in Bolgatanga, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Krugu, J K; Mevissen, F E F; Prinsen, A; Ruiter, R A C

    2016-04-14

    Adolescent pregnancy remains a public health concern, with diverse serious consequences, including increased health risk for mother and child, lost opportunities for personal development, social exclusion, and low socioeconomic attainments. Especially in Africa, teenage pregnancy rates are high. It is important to find out how girls without pregnancy experience differ in their contraceptive decision-making processes as compared with their previously studied peers with pregnancy experience to address the high rate of teenage pregnancies. We conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with never been pregnant girls (N = 20) in Bolgatanga, Ghana, to explore the psychosocial and environmental factors influencing the sexual decision making of adolescents. Themes such as relationships, sex, pregnancy, family planning and psychosocial determinants (knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, norms, risk perceptions) derived from empirical studies and theories related to sexuality behavior guided the development of the interview protocol. Results showed that the girls did talk about sexuality with their mothers at home and did receive some form of sexual and reproductive health education, including the use of condoms discussions in school. Participants reported high awareness of pregnancy risk related to unprotected sex, were positive about using condoms and indicated strong self-efficacy beliefs towards negotiating condom use. The girls also formulated clear future goals, including coping plans such as ways to prevent unwanted pregnancies to reach these targets. On the other hand, their attitudes towards family planning (i.e., contraceptives other than condoms) were negative, and they hold boys responsible for buying condoms. An open parental communication on sexuality issues at home, comprehensive sex education in school and attitude, self-efficacy, risk perception towards contraception, alongside with goal-setting, seem to be protective factors in adolescent girls

  9. Adolescent Pregnancy and Infant Mortality: Isolating the Effects of Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Examined data from state of North Carolina to test assumption that inordinately high Black teenage pregnancy rate accounts for difference between Black and White infant mortality rates. Results suggest that poverty, not race, plays crucial role in infant mortality. (Author/NB)

  10. Risk factors for teenage pregnancy among sexually active black adolescents in Cape Town. A case control study.

    PubMed

    Vundule, C; Maforah, F; Jewkes, R; Jordaan, E

    2001-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy is an important health and social problem in South Africa. So far research on adolescent sexual activity has been almost exclusively descriptive; as a result there is considerable knowledge about practices of adolescents in general and outcomes of their pregnancies, but very limited understanding of factors that place particular adolescents at increased risk of teenage pregnancy. Without this understanding, our ability to intervene effectively to reduce teenage pregnancy rates is limited. To undertake an exploratory study to investigate risk factors for teenage pregnancy among sexually active adolescents in an urban and peri-urban context. The study used a matched case-control design, with 191 cases and 353 age-matched controls from the same school or neighbourhood. Subjects were under 19 years of age and were recruited from township areas of Cape Town. A structured questionnaire was used to obtain information on socio-economic factors, contraceptive knowledge and use, and sexual behaviour. Conditional logistical regression was used to analyse the relationship between teenage pregnancy and the factors investigated. Teenage pregnancy was found to be most strongly associated with having frequent sex (risk ratio (RR) 30.81) without reliable contraceptive protection (RR 24.35), forced sexual initiation (RR 14.42), not owning a television set (RR 10.33), larger household size (RR 2.44), not living in a brick house (RR 5.09), not living with the biological father (RR 3.26), talking openly about sex with a boyfriend (RR 4.72), and perceiving most friends to be pregnant (RR 4.38). The findings suggest associations between the promotion of sexual health among adolescents and broader social development and promotion of gender equality. Although further research is needed, it is likely that important foci for short-term strategies should include developing assertiveness, enhancing decision-making competence, and promoting contraception and condoms as part of

  11. Relational Factors of Vulnerability and Protection for Adolescent Pregnancy: A Cross-Sectional Comparative Study of Portuguese Pregnant and Nonpregnant Adolescents of Low Socioeconomic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Ana I. F.; Canavarro, Maria C.; Cardoso, Margarida F.; Mendonca, Denisa

    2005-01-01

    This study explores multiple relational contexts that promote vulnerability and protection against early pregnancy in a potential risk group of Portuguese adolescents. A comparative analysis was made between two groups of female adolescents of low socioeconomic status: pregnant adolescents (n = 57) and adolescents without a history of pregnancy (n…

  12. From “sugar daddies” to “sugar babies”: exploring a pathway between age-disparate sexual relationships, condom use, and adolescent pregnancy in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Toska, Elona; Cluver, Lucie D; Boyes, Mark; Pantelic, Marija; Kuo, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Background Adolescent pregnancy has been linked to adverse outcomes for mothers and children. Most studies proposing potential risk pathways for adolescent pregnancy in South Africa are qualitative, hypothesizing links among age-disparate relationships, reduced condom use and higher pregnancy rates. No known South African studies have quantitatively explored pathways to adolescent pregnancy. Objectives This study aimed to: (i) identify which literature-hypothesized factors were associated with adolescent pregnancy and (ii) explore a hypothesized pathway of risk by assessing whether condom use mediated the relationship between age-disparate sexual relationships (defined as having ever had a sexual partner more than 5 years older than participants) and adolescent pregnancy. Methods A cross-sectional survey in six urban and rural health districts of three South African provinces. 447 sexually-active girls aged 10–19 were interviewed. Analyses used multivariate logistic regressions controlling for confounders. Mediation tests were conducted using Hayes’ bootstrapping methodology. Results Consistent condom use (B=−2.148, OR=8.566, p ≤ 0.001) and school enrolment (B=−1.600, OR=0.202, p ≤ 0.001) were associated with lower rates of adolescent pregnancy. Engaging in age-disparate sex (B=1.093, OR=2.982, p ≤ 0.001) and long-term school absences (B=1.402, OR=4.061, p ≤ 0.001) were associated with higher rates of adolescent pregnancy. The indirect effect of engaging in age-disparate sex on adolescent pregnancy through condom use was significant, irrespective of age, age at sexual initiation, poverty and residential environment (B=0.4466, SE=0.1303, CI 0.2323–0.7428). Conclusion This multi-site cross-sectional survey supports qualitative hypotheses that girls’ inability to negotiate their partners’ condom use in age-disparate sexual relationships may drive adolescent pregnancy. Interventions addressing these relationships, facilitating condom use and

  13. Hispanic Adolescent Pregnancy Testers: A Comparative Analysis of Negative Testers, Childbearers and Aborters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, David K.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Assessed differences between 20 negative and 36 positive pregnancy testers and evaluated pregnancy resolution decision-making process of positive testers. Subjects were Hispanic adolescents requesting pregnancy determination at outpatient clinic. Results indicated that negative and positive testers were similar, although positives were older and…

  14. Adolescents' Responses to an Unintended Pregnancy in Ghana: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Aziato, Lydia; Hindin, Michelle J; Maya, Ernest Tei; Manu, Abubakar; Amuasi, Susan Ama; Lawerh, Rachel Mahoe; Ankomah, Augustine

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the experiences and perceptions of adolescents who have experienced a recent pregnancy and undergone a termination of pregnancy. A vignette-based focus group approach was used to have adolescents reflect on scenarios that happen to others during an unwanted pregnancy. The study was conducted in public health facilities in the 3 major urban areas of Ghana-Accra, Kumasi, and Tamale. Adolescents, aged 10-19 years, who had a recent termination of pregnancy were recruited from public health facilities in the 3 sites. Fifteen focus groups were conducted and digitally recorded in English, Twi, Ga, and Dagbani. Transcripts were transcribed and translated, and thematic analysis was used for the analysis. Adolescents reported that the characters in the vignettes would feel sadness, depression, and regret from an unintended pregnancy and some male partners would "deny" the pregnancy or suggest an abortion. They suggested some parents would "be angry" and "sack" their children for becoming pregnant while others would "support" them. Parents might send the pregnant girl to a distant friend or grandparents until she delivers to avoid shame and gossip. Health professionals might encourage the pregnant girl or insult/gossip about the girl. Adolescent unintended pregnancies in Ghana are met with a range of reactions and these reactions influence the pregnancy choices young women make for continuation or termination of pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tailoring clinical services to address the unique needs of adolescents from the pregnancy test to parenthood.

    PubMed

    Moriarty Daley, Alison; Sadler, Lois S; Dawn Reynolds, Heather

    2013-04-01

    Clinicians across disciplines and practice settings are likely to encounter adolescents who are at risk for a pregnancy. In 2010, 34.2/1000 15-19-year-old teens had a live birth in the United States, many more will seek care for a pregnancy scare or options counseling. Teen mothers are also at risk for a second or higher-order pregnancy during adolescence. This paper provides clinicians with adolescent-friendly clinical and counseling strategies for pregnancy prevention, pre- and post-pregnancy test counseling, pregnancy-related care, and a review of the developmental challenges encountered by teens in the transition to parenthood. Clinicians are in a better position to approach the developmental, health and mental health needs of adolescents related to pregnancy if they understand and appreciate the obstacles adolescents may face negotiating the healthcare system. In addition, when clinical services are specially tailored to the needs of the adolescent, fewer opportunities will be lost to prevent unintended pregnancies, assist teens into timely prenatal services, and improve outcomes for their pregnancies and the transition to parenthood.

  16. Tailoring Clinical Services to Address the Unique Needs of Adolescents from the Pregnancy Test to Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Alison Moriarty; Sadler, Lois S.; Reynolds, Heather Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians across disciplines and practice settings are likely to encounter adolescents who are at risk for a pregnancy. In 2010, 34.2/1000 15–19 year old teens had a live birth in the United States, many more will seek care for a pregnancy scare or options counseling. Teen mothers are also at risk for a second or higher order pregnancy during adolescence. This paper provides clinicians with adolescent-friendly clinical and counseling strategies for pregnancy prevention, pre- and post-pregnancy test counseling, pregnancy-related care, and a review of the developmental challenges encountered by teens in the transition to parenthood. Clinicians are in a better position to approach the developmental, health and mental health needs of adolescents related to pregnancy if they understand and appreciate the obstacles adolescents may face negotiating the health care system. In addition, when clinical services are specially tailored to the needs of the adolescent, fewer opportunities will be lost to prevent unintended pregnancies, assist teens into timely prenatal services, and improve outcomes for their pregnancies and the transition to parenthood. PMID:23522339

  17. Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Programs: Interventions and Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin A.; And Others

    Widespread concern about teenage childbearing led to the establishment of numerous intervention programs throughout the United States during the 1980s. Nevertheless, between the mid-1980s and the early 1990s, the teen birth rate rose in every state. This volume examines numerous prevention programs and makes recommendations for establishing…

  18. Relational factors of vulnerability and protection for adolescent pregnancy: a cross-sectional comparative study of Portuguese pregnant and nonpregnant adolescents of low socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana I F; Canavarro, Maria C; Cardoso, Margarida F; Mendonça, Denisa

    2005-01-01

    This study explores multiple relational contexts that promote vulnerability and protection against early pregnancy in a potential risk group of Portuguese adolescents. A comparative analysis was made between two groups of female adolescents of low socioeconomic status: pregnant adolescents (n=57) and adolescents without a history of pregnancy (n=81). Results suggest that several variables belonging to different contexts-family and school and peer relations--are important in the characterization of the two groups. Lower levels of mother's overprotection and father's emotional support, presence of early pregnancy in adolescent's mother, lower level of emotional proximity to peer relations, and higher number of school failures are significantly associated with adolescent pregnancy.

  19. Primary care physicians’ perceptions of rates of unintended pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Sara M.; Zikovich, Shannon; Chuang, Cynthia H.; Sobota, Mindy; Nothnagle, Melissa; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary care physicians (PCPs) treat many women of reproductive age who need contraceptive and preconception counseling. Study Design To evaluate perceptions of rates of unintended pregnancy, we distributed an online survey in 2009 to 550 PCPs trained in General Internal Medicine or Family Medicine practicing in Western Pennsylvania, Central Pennsylvania, Rhode Island or Oregon. Results Surveys were completed by 172 PCPs (31%). The majority (54%) of respondents underestimated the prevalence of unintended pregnancy in the United States [on average, by 23±8 (mean±SD) percentage points], and 81% underestimated the risk of pregnancy among women using no contraception [on average, by 35±20 (mean±SD) percentage points]. PCPs also frequently underestimated contraceptive failure rates with typical use: 85% underestimated the failure rate for oral contraceptive pills, 62% for condoms and 16% for contraceptive injections. PCPs more often overestimated the failure rate of intrauterine devices (17%) than other prescription methods. In adjusted models, male PCPs were significantly more likely to underestimate the rate of unintended pregnancy in the United States than female PCPs [adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 2.17 (1.01–4.66)]. Conclusions Many PCPs have inaccurate perceptions of rates of unintended pregnancy, both with and without use of contraception, which may influence the frequency and the content of the contraceptive counseling they provide. PMID:22176791

  20. The pregnancy rate and live birth rate after kidney transplantation: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Fontana, I; Santori, G; Fazio, F; Valente, U

    2012-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation recipients live longer and have better quality of life than patients on dialysis. Hypothalamic gonadal dysfunction in females who have ESRD may be reversed within the first few months after kidney transplantation, such as the ability to have children. Despite thousands of successful pregnancies in transplantation recipients, there is limited information about it. In this study, we evaluated the pregnancy rates and live birth rates in women (n = 133) who underwent kidney transplantation in our center from 1983 to 2010. Recipients of a second kidney transplantation and recipients of multiorgan transplantations were excluded. We observed 33 pregnancies with 11 live births (33.3%), 12 spontaneous abortions (36.36%), and 10 therapeutic abortions (30.3%). The pregnancy rate was 18%. The live birth rate was 33.3%. Therapeutic abortions were 36.3%, and the pregnancies resulting in fetal loss were 30.3%. The pregnancies were identified in 32 women. The majority of women (n = 32; 96.9%) had a single pregnancy, whereas 1 woman (3.1%) had two pregnancies. In our series, the pregnancy rates for kidney transplantation recipients were markedly lower and decreased more rapidly than those reported in the general population.

  1. Adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in adolescent pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kawakita, Tetsuya; Wilson, Kathy; Grantz, Katherine L.; Landy, Helain J.; Huang, Chun-Chih; Gomez-Lobo, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective To investigate the outcomes of adolescent pregnancy. Design Retrospective cohort study from the Consortium on Safe Labor between 2002 and 2008. Setting 12 clinical centers with 19 hospitals in the United States. Participants 43,537 nulliparous women <25 years, including 1,189 younger adolescents (age ≤15.9), 14,703 older adolescents (age 16–19.9)], and 27,645 young adults (age 20–24.9). Interventions aOR with 95%CI were calculated, controlling for maternal characteristics and pregnancy complications (young adults as a reference group). Main outcome Measure Maternal, neonatal outcomes, cesarean indications, and length of labor. Results Younger adolescents had increased risk of maternal anemia (aOR=1.25; 95%CI=1.07–1.45), preterm delivery <37 weeks of gestation (aOR=1.36; 95%CI=1.14–1.62), postpartum hemorrhage (aOR=1.46; 95%CI=1.10–1.95), preeclampsia/HELLP syndrome (aOR=1.44; 95%CI= 1.17–1.77) but had decreased risk of cesarean delivery (aOR=0.49; 95%CI= 0.42–0.59), chorioamnionitis (aOR=0.63; 95%CI=0.47–0.84), and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission (aOR=0.80; 95%CI=0.65–0.98). Older adolescents had increased risk of maternal anemia (aOR=1.15; 95%CI= 1.09–1.22), preterm delivery at <37 weeks of gestation (aOR=1.16; 95%CI=1.08–1.25), and blood transfusion (aOR=1.21; 95%CI=1.02–1.43), but had decreased risk of cesarean delivery (aOR=0.75; 95%CI= 0.71–0.79), chorioamnionitis (aOR=0.83; 95%CI=0.75–0.91), major perineal laceration (aOR=0.82; 95%CI= 0.71–0.95), and NICU admission (aOR=0.89; 95%CI=0.83–0.96). Older adolescents were less likely to have cesarean for failure to progress or cephalopelvic disproportion (aOR=0.89; 95%CI 0.81–0.98). For adolescents who entered spontaneous labor, second stage of labor was shorter (P<.01). Conclusion Adolescents were less likely to have cesarean delivery. Failure to progress or cephalopelvic disproportion were decreased in older adolescents. Adolescents who entered

  2. Pregnancy Test Taking Is a Correlate of Unsafe Sex, Contraceptive Nonadherence, Pregnancy, and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Adolescent and Young Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Berenson, Abbey B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study was conducted to examine the hypotheses that adolescent and young adult pregnancy test takers are at increased risk for unsafe sex, oral contraception (OC) nonadherence, and higher pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates. Methods We conducted secondary analyses using data collected for a study on OC adherence among 1155 women 16–24 years of age. Data collected at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months were used for the analyses. Results At baseline, 33% of women reported having undergone ≥1 pregnancy test at home or a clinic during the past 3 months. Pregnancy test takers were more likely to have ≥3 sexual partners (odds ratio [OR] 2.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.49–3.02) in the past year, report unprotected oral (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.28–1.72) or anal sex (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.32–2.39), be diagnosed with an STI (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.23–2.51), become pregnant (hazards ratio 1.52; 95% CI 1.10–2.10), or not use any birth control method (OR 2.11; 95% CI 1.66–2.60). Moreover, they were less likely to continue using OC that was prescribed at baseline (OR 0.38; 95% CI 0.31–0.47) and to report being ambivalent about pregnancy (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.60–0.90) compared to non–test takers. Conclusions Pregnancy test taking is an important correlate of high-risk sexual behaviors, OC nonadherence, and risk of subsequent pregnancy and STIs among adolescent and young adult women. Future interventions should target these women to decrease the risk of unintended pregnancies and STIs. PMID:23531050

  3. Association between adverse perinatal outcomes and amino acid levels measured with nutrient questionnaire in adolescent pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Guzel, Ali Irfan; Cinar, Mehmet; Erkilinc, Selcuk; Aksoy, Rıfat Taner; Yumusak, Omer Hamid; Celik, Fatma; Celik, Yusuf

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the maternal serum amino acid levels in first trimester adolescent pregnancies by using a new developed dietary questionnaire. A group of 169 pregnant women in the first trimester of their pregnancy were asked to complete the dietary questionnaire. Among all the women, 39 were adolescent pregnancies. The results of the questionnaire were evaluated by a nutrient database program (BeBiS software program) designed to evaluate Turkish traditional foods and commercial processed foods. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of body mass index and educational and socio-economic status. The mean age and gravidity was statistically significantly lower in adolescent pregnancies. The mean isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, threonine, valine, arginine, and proline levels were statistically significantly lower in adolescent pregnancies. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed the cut-off values of these amino acids. Of these amino acids; lower values of histidine, serine, and alanine were associated with lower birth weight, and lower values of histidine and alanine were associated with preterm delivery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the amino acid levels in adolescent pregnancies. According to this study, some amino acid levels were lower in adolescent pregnancies and associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. Further studies with maternal and perinatal outcomes are needed to demonstrate the effects of these amino acids in such pregnancies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  4. Adolescence As Risk Factor for Adverse Pregnancy Outcome in Central Africa – A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Florian; Bélard, Sabine; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Schuster, Katharina; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Bouyou-Akotet, Marielle K.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Ramharter, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest rates of maternal and neonatal mortality worldwide. Young maternal age at delivery has been proposed as risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcome, yet there is insufficient data from Sub-Saharan Africa. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of maternal adolescence on pregnancy outcomes in the Central African country Gabon. Methodology and Principal Findings Data on maternal age, parity, birth weight, gestational age, maternal Plasmodium falciparum infection, use of bednets, and intake of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy were collected in a cross-sectional survey in 775 women giving birth in three mother-child health centers in Gabon. Adolescent women (≤16 years of age) had a significantly increased risk to deliver a baby with low birth weight in univariable analysis (22.8%, 13/57, vs. 9.3%, 67/718, OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.5–5.6) and young maternal age showed a statistically significant association with the risk for low birth weight in multivariable regression analysis after correction for established risk factors (OR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.1–6.5). In further analysis adolescent women were shown to attend significantly less antenatal care visits than adult mothers (3.3±1.9 versus 4.4±1.9 mean visits, p<0.01, n = 356) and this difference accounted at least for part of the excess risk for low birth weight in adolescents. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the importance of adolescent age as risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcome. Antenatal care programs specifically tailored for the needs of adolescents may be necessary to improve the frequency of antenatal care visits and pregnancy outcomes in this risk group in Central Africa. PMID:21188301

  5. [Adolescent pregnancy from a family perspective: sharing projects of life and care].

    PubMed

    Silva, Lucía; Tonete, Vera Lúcia Pamplona

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to apprehend the meaning of adolescents' pregnancy for their families, using semistructured interviews and collective subject discourse. Adolescent pregnancy is represented as a problem to be faced with family support. The families worry and are mobilized to solve adversities. Besides the shock about the news, impotence as to pregnancy prevention, conformism, happiness and improvement in family relationships due to the baby's arrival, participants evidenced frustration due to the interruption/change in the family life project in terms of the adolescent being pregnant without a stable relationship with the child's father. In valuing the family perspective on adolescent pregnancy, professional care to pregnant adolescents and their families can be delivered in partnership with the family and social context, making it easier to cope with conflicts and recognizing the family as an active subject in this process.

  6. Learning from adolescents to prevent HIV and unintended pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Healther D

    2007-09-01

    This In Brief, written by Heather D. Boonstra, summarizes key findings of a multiyear, multi-country study on the scope of young people's sexual and reproductive health needs in Sub-Saharan Africa. Guttmacher staff worked with 10 organizations (nine based in Africa) to gather evidence in four Sub-Saharan African countries--Burkina Faso, Ghana, Malawi and Uganda--where national surveys of 12-19-year-olds, focus groups of 14-19-year olds, in-depth interviews with 12-19-year-olds and in-depth interviews with key adults in adolescents' lives were conducted. The Guttmacher study complements a robust body of evidence on adolescents globally published in the past five years by, among others, the National Research Council, the World Bank and the World Health Organization. It is unique, however, in that it presents information gathered from adolescents themselves and that it addresses, in an integrated fashion, young people's risk of both HIV and unplanned pregnancy.

  7. Highlights of Trends in Pregnancies and Pregnancy Rates by Outcome: Estimates for the United States, 1976-96.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventura, Stephanie J.; Mosher, William D.; Curtin, Sally C.; Abma, Joyce C.; Henshaw, Stanley

    1999-01-01

    This report presents key findings from a comprehensive report on pregnancies and pregnancy rates for U.S. women. The study incorporates birth, abortion, and fetal loss data to compile national estimates of pregnancy rates according to a variety of characteristics, including age, race, Hispanic origin, and marital status. Data from the National…

  8. Helping Pregnant Adolescents: Outcomes and Costs of Service Delivery. The Evaluation of Adolescent Pregnancy Programs Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Martha R.; And Others

    This study evaluates how grantees of the Office of Adolescent Pregnancy Programs (OAPP) implemented their teen pregnancy and parenting programs and how program participation affected the lives of clients. Chapter I outlines the structure and history of the evaluation project. Chapter II highlights the major client outcomes of OAPP-funded projects…

  9. Rating Pregnancy Wheel Applications Using the APPLICATIONS Scoring System.

    PubMed

    Chyjek, Kathy; Farag, Sara; Chen, Katherine T

    2015-06-01

    To identify the top-rated pregnancy wheel applications (apps) using a newly developed APPLICATIONS scoring system. A list of pregnancy wheel apps was identified. Consumer-based and inaccurate apps were excluded. The APPLICATIONS scoring system was developed to rate the remaining apps. Application comprehensiveness was evaluated. Objective rating components included price, paid subscription, literature used, in-app purchases, connectivity to the Internet, advertisements, text search field, interdevice compatibility, and other components such as images or figures, videos, and special features. Subjective rating components were ease of navigation and subjective presentation. A complete list of 55 pregnancy wheel apps was created from three sources. Thirty-nine (71%) were consumer-based, inaccurate, or both, leaving 16 (29%) for analysis using the APPLICATIONS scoring system. More than two thirds of pregnancy wheel apps were excluded from our study secondary to being consumer-based, inaccurate, or both. This highlights the importance of identifying systematically, reviewing critically, and rating the thousands of available apps to health care providers to ensure accuracy and applicability. We propose that our APPLICATIONS scoring system be used to rate apps in all specialties with the goal of improving health care provider performance and thereby patient outcomes. III.

  10. Multi-level factors associated with pregnancy among urban adolescent women seeking psychological services.

    PubMed

    Lang, Delia L; Rieckmann, Traci; Diclemente, Ralph J; Crosby, Richard A; Brown, Larry K; Donenberg, Geri R

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of pregnancy as well as multi-level factors (i.e., individual, family, and environment) associated with history of pregnancy among a sample of urban adolescent women seeking psychological services. Data were collected from a total of 264 sexually active, 13-18-year-old, adolescent women who participated in a larger HIV prevention study. Adolescents and one participating parent completed an audio computer-assisted self-interviewing survey. A total of 17.4% of participants reported a history of pregnancy. A multivariable logistic regression model suggests that after controlling for empirically derived sociodemographic and behavioral covariates, absence of father in the home, family support and cohesion, and neighborhood risk were positively related to pregnancy. This study is among the first to examine multi-level factors associated with pregnancy among adolescent women diagnosed with psychological disorders. Consideration of such factors is crucial both in terms of clinical practice and in the design of pregnancy prevention programs. Collaboration between physicians and mental health providers working with adolescent women is crucial and represents an ideal opportunity to promote parental involvement and access to supportive community resources, including pregnancy prevention programs for this vulnerable population of adolescents.

  11. Repeat pregnancy prevention self-efficacy in adolescents: associations with provider communication, provider type, and depression.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Diana N; Burrell, Lori; Duggan, Anne K; Barnet, Beth

    2012-11-01

    Among adolescent mothers, pregnancy prevention self-efficacy developed during pregnancy may predict the use of contraception following delivery. Communication between patients and their primary care providers (PCPs) is important for adherence to physician recommendations and may be associated with pregnancy prevention self-efficacy. Depression, which is common among adolescent mothers, has been associated with poor self-efficacy. The associations among pregnancy prevention self-efficacy, provider communication, provider type (PCP vs others), and depression are unclear. The objectives of the study were to determine the association of positive provider communication with pregnancy prevention self-efficacy, whether provider type or depression is associated with positive provider communication, and whether the association between provider communication and pregnancy prevention self-efficacy varies by provider type and depression. Cross-sectional study of 164 third trimester Baltimore adolescents measuring pregnancy prevention self-efficacy, perceptions of the quality of provider communication (Ambulatory Care Experiences Survey), provider type, and depressive symptoms. Of 164 pregnant teens, 79% reported pregnancy prevention self-efficacy, 72% had a specific PCP, and 17% scored positive for depression. Positive provider communication was associated with pregnancy prevention self-efficacy (odds ratio 1.25; P = 0.04). Adolescents with PCPs had significantly higher communication scores (β 0.90; P = 0.001). Depressed adolescents had significantly lower communication scores (β -0.74; P = 0.03). The association between positive provider communication and self-efficacy was significant only for adolescents who reported having a PCP (P = 0.04) and those who were not depressed (P = 0.05). Having a PCP and favorable perceptions of provider communication are important for pregnancy prevention self-efficacy among adolescents. Depression negatively affects perceptions of provider

  12. Understanding resilience of female adolescents towards teenage pregnancy: a cross-sectional survey in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Constanze; Ahorlu, Collins K; Alba, Sandra; Obrist, Brigit

    2017-06-26

    In Tanzania, teenage pregnancy rates are still high despite the efforts being made to reduce them. Not enough is known about how adolescents experience and cope with sexuality and teenage pregnancy. Over the past few decades, most studies have focused on vulnerability and risk among youth. The concept of 'reproductive resilience' is a new way of looking at teenage pregnancy. It shifts the perspective from a deficit-based to a strength-based approach. The study presented here aimed to identify factors that could contribute to strengthening the reproductive resilience of girls in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Using a cross-sectional cluster sampling approach, 750 female adolescents aged 15-19 years were interviewed about how they mobilize resources to avoid or deal with teenage pregnancy. The main focus of the study was to examine how social capital (relations with significant others), economic capital (command over economic resources), cultural capital (personal dispositions and habits), and symbolic capital (recognition and prestige) contribute to the development of adolescent competencies for avoiding or dealing with teenage pregnancy and childbirth. A cumulative competence scale was developed to assess reproductive resilience. The cumulative score was computed based on 10 competence indicators that refer to the re- and pro-active mobilization of resources. About half of the women who had never been pregnant fell into the category, 'high competence' (50.9%), meaning they could get the information and support needed to avoid pregnancies. Among pregnant women and young mothers, most were categorized as 'high competence' (70.5%) and stated that they know how to avoid or deal with health problems that might affect them or their babies, and could get the information and support required to do so. Cultural capital, in particular, contributed to the competence of never-pregnant girls [OR = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.06 to 3.07, p = 0.029], pregnant adolescents and young mothers

  13. Creating Consistency and Control Out of Chaos: A Qualitative View of Planned Pregnancy during Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Kristen S.

    2000-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy can have devastating effects for both mother and child. However, little is known about the experience of planned pregnancy among adolescents. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of themes identified in a previous study of the experience of planned adolescent pregnancy. The experience of planning a pregnancy during adolescence consists of typical adolescent behavior in that these girls demonstrated the need for control, invulnerability, and a present focus to their lives. In addition to this typical behavior, a component manifests itself in which adolescent girls make reproductive health choices to gain control. By establishing a level of control over their hectic and stressful lives, they are able to add meaning to their lives. The need for consistency and control seem to be linked, because many of the adolescent girls' statements reflected dimensions of both concepts. This initial, descriptive study can be used to further explore adolescent pregnancy and to develop interventions that might assist these girls to lead healthy lives. PMID:17273226

  14. Geographic and racial variation in teen pregnancy rates in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Layde, Molly M; Remington, Patrick L

    2013-08-01

    Despite recent declines in teen birth rates, teenage pregnancy remains an important public health problem in Wisconsin with significant social, economic, and health-related effects. Compare and contrast teen birth rate trends by race, ethnicity, and county in Wisconsin. Teen (ages 15-19 years) birth rates (per 1000 teenage females) in Wisconsin from 2001-2010 were compared by racelethnicity and county of residence using data from the Wisconsin Interactive Statistics on Health. Teen birth rates in Wisconsin have declined by 20% over the past decade, from 35.5/1000 teens in 2001 to 28.3/1000 teens in 2010-a relative decline of 20.3%. However, trends vary by race, with declines among blacks (-33%) and whites (-26%) and increases among American Indians (+21%) and Hispanics (+30%). Minority teen birth rates continue to be 3 to 5 times greater than birth rates among whites. Rates varied even more by county, with an over 14-fold difference between Ozaukee County (7.8/1000) and Menominee County (114.2). Despite recent declines, teen pregnancy continues to be an important public health problem in Wisconsin. Pregnancy prevention programs should be targeted toward the populations and counties with the highest rates.

  15. The Sociocultural Context of Mexican-Origin Pregnant Adolescents' Attitudes Toward Teen Pregnancy and Links to Future Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Killoren, Sarah E; Zeiders, Katharine H; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2016-05-01

    Given the negative developmental risks associated with adolescent motherhood, it is important to examine the sociocultural context of adolescent mothers' lives to identify those most at risk for poor outcomes. Our goals were to identify profiles of Mexican-origin pregnant adolescents' cultural orientations and their attitudes toward teen pregnancy, and to investigate how these profiles were linked to adolescents' pregnancy intentions, family resources, and short-term family, educational, and parenting outcomes. With a sample of 205 Mexican-origin adolescent mothers, we identified three profiles based on cultural orientations and attitudes toward teen pregnancy: Bicultural-Moderate Attitudes, Acculturated-Moderate Attitudes, and Enculturated-Low Attitudes. The results indicated that enculturated pregnant adolescents had the least favorable attitudes toward teen pregnancy, and the lowest levels of family income, pregnancy intentions, pregnancy support, and educational expectations compared to acculturated and bicultural pregnant adolescents; acculturated adolescents (with the highest family income and high levels of pregnancy support) had the highest levels of parenting efficacy 10 months postpartum. Our findings suggest that enculturated adolescent mothers (with less positive attitudes toward teen pregnancy) may benefit from educational support programs and enculturated and bicultural adolescent mothers (with moderately positive attitudes toward teen pregnancy) may benefit from programs to increase parenting efficacy. Such targeted interventions may, in turn, reduce the likelihood of adolescent mothers experiencing negative educational and parenting outcomes.

  16. [Profile of adolescents with repeated pregnancies attended at a prenatal clinic].

    PubMed

    Persona, Lia; Shimo, Antonieta Keiko Kakuda; Tarallo, Maria Celina

    2004-01-01

    This study identified the biopsychosocial profile of adolescent with repeated pregnancies, who were attended at a prenatal clinic. Data were collected through patient records and interviews and were subject to quantitative analysis. Based on the obtained results and in accordance with literature, factors that are strongly associated with the occurrence of pregnancy repetition were selected in the adolescents' profiles. These are: early menarche; first sexual intercourse shortly after menarche; school repetition; school dropout; non remunerated occupation; low family income; involvement with older partners; living with the partner; consensual union with the partner; one partner; low condom use; family history of adolescent pregnancy; father's absence because of death or abandonment; positive family reaction to previous pregnancy; previous abortion; adolescent's positive concepts about previous delivery; and absence from previous postpartum consultations.

  17. Depressive Symptoms and Violence Exposure: Contributors to Repeat Pregnancies Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cheryl A.; Pierce, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Depressive symptoms and violence exposure (VE) often cooccur and have been recognized to influence childbearing; contribution to repeat pregnancy is unclear and examined in this article. This cross-sectional, descriptive, study screened for depressive symptoms and VE among 193 adolescent mothers at a large county hospital in Southwestern United States. Repeat pregnancy and depressive symptoms characterized one-third and one-quarter of adolescents, respectively. Despite minimal disclosure of VE, repeat pregnancy was significantly influenced by child abuse and past traumatic life experiences. Assessments and interventions with adolescents should focus on frequency of repeat pregnancies and symptoms of depression and VE. Nurses and childbirth educators are poised to offer birth control information and education, support, and resources highlighting depression and VE to adolescents. PMID:26834444

  18. The effects of laser assisted hatching on pregnancy rates

    PubMed Central

    Ghannadi, Alireza; Kazerooni, Marjaneh; Jamalzadeh, Fatemeh; Amiri, Sahar; Rostami, Parifar; Absalan, Forouzan

    2011-01-01

    Background: For infertile women aged over 35 years, failure of the ZP (zona pellucida) to rupture is believed to be associated with a decreased implantation rate in in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Objective: In this research, laser assisted hatching (LAH) was offered to patients with advanced maternal age to evaluate a possible benefit. Materials and Methods: Nine hundred thirty two cycles of IVF/ICSI in females were analyzed. Women included in this study were allocated in 4 groups. In group I and II, embryos were cultured and transferred with and without LAH in women aged ≤35, whereas embryos of group III and IV were examined with and without LAH in women aged ≥ 35. Laser manipulations were performed using a suturn-Tm3 system using 2-3 pulses of 0.8 millisecond with 400 voltage duration. The size of the hole made in the zona was measured to be 5-10 µm, depending on the zona thickness of each individual embryo. Results: The performance of LAH significantly increased clinical pregnancy rates in all patients. In group I and II, the chemical (50.99% and 31.61% respectively), clinical (50% and 30.69% respectively) and multiple pregnancies (22.27% and 5.94% respectively) significantly differ between these groups. In the patients with advanced female age ≥35 the performance of LAH significantly increased chemical (30.12%) and clinical pregnancy (27.71%) rates compared to whom without LAH (18.96% and 16.37% respectively). Conclusion: Our data demonstrate in the patients who were less than 35 years old, multiple pregnancy rates were significantly increased compared to other groups who aged over 35 years old. In addition benefit of LAH in improving pregnancy rates after IVF or ICSI in women of advanced age (≥35) was shown. PMID:25587254

  19. A critique of adolescent pregnancy prevention research: the invisible white male.

    PubMed

    Meyer, V F

    1991-01-01

    This study examined sex and race bias in recently published research on adolescent pregnancy prevention. Descriptive statistics from 71 citations showed that of 33 articles that focused on a single sex, only one was on males (inner city, presumably minority). Of the remaining articles, the majority either did not differentiate between the sexes or provided only minimal data on sex differences. The consequences of research that ignores or minimizes the male contribution to the adolescent pregnancy problem are discussed.

  20. Performing ICSI with commercial microinjection pipettes enhanced pregnancy rates.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Halvaei, Iman; Ghazali, Shahin; Razi, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-06-12

    Many technical factors can affect intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes. The role of the injection micropipette could be of vital importance in ICSI programs. The main goal was to compare ICSI pregnancy outcomes between commercial and home-made injection micropipettes in a large population with male factor infertility. Five-hundred and eleven ICSI cycles with severe male factor were included in this retrospective study. ICSI cycles were divided into two groups: A (home-made micropipettes, n = 267) and B (commercial micropipettes, n = 244). Rates of fertilization, embryo formation, and chemical and clinical pregnancies were compared between the groups. The independent samples t-test, chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test were used, whenever appropriate, for statistical analysis. A total of 3621 MII oocytes were retrieved, of which 2003 were fertilized. The rate of normal fertilization was significantly higher in group A (57.9%) compared to group B (52.5%). However, the rate of embryo formation showed an increase in group B compared to group A (90.4% and 85.9%, respectively, P = 0.002). In addition, the clinical pregnancy outcomes improved in group B. Our findings indicate that clinical pregnancy improves when commercial injection micropipettes are used in ICSI programs.

  1. Comparison of the risk factors for adverse perinatal outcomes in adolescent age pregnancies and advanced age pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Kuyumcuoglu, Umur; Guzel, Ali Irfan; Celik, Yusuf

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes of pregnancies in adolescent, advanced and reproductive women maternal age. A total of 187 pregnant women were included into the study 51 (27.27%) were adolescent pregnancies, mean age 17.7 +/- 3.3 years (range, 14-18 years), 40 (21.29%) advanced maternal age pregnancies, mean age 41.4 +/- 2.6 years (range, 39-50 years) and 96 (51.33%), healthy controls, mean age 28.8 +/- 4.3 years (range, 19-37 years). The majority of the adolescent pregnant women were nulliparous, while all of the advanced age pregnant women were multiparous (mean gravidity 4.5 +/- 2.4; range, 6-12). Mean gravidity of the control group was 3.6 +/- 1.7 (range, 1-12). There was statistically significant difference among the groups regarding demographic characteristics. According to the Bonferroni method, there was statistically significant difference among the three groups. Adverse fetal features were statistically different among the groups and the odd ratios were higher in the advanced maternal age group. The odds ratios (95% CI) for lower Apgar scores (Apgar score 1 and 5) and low birth weight in adolescent maternal age and advanced maternal age group were as follows: 1.88 (1.27-2.78) vs. 2.46 (1.55-3.85), 2.17 (1.18-4.00) vs. 4.79 (3.02-6.69) and 1.39 (1.14-1.68) vs. 3.06 (1.59-5.88), respectively Gestational age at birth showed minimal risk for adolescent age group but no risk was noted in the advanced age group. The present study showed that pregnancies in adolescent maternal age, advanced maternal age and reproductive maternal age are different from each other in terms of clinical characteristics. According to this study advanced maternal age pregnancies are more risky and more likely to have adverse fetal outcome.

  2. Ambivalence about pregnancy and its association with symptoms of depression in adolescent females initiating contraception.

    PubMed

    Francis, Jenny; Malbon, Katherine; Braun-Courville, Debra; Lourdes, Linares Oriana; Santelli, John

    2015-01-01

    To examine the association between symptoms of depression and ambivalence about pregnancy in an inner-city adolescent female population. This study analyzed data from 220 urban minority adolescent females (ages, 15-19 years) presenting for contraceptive initiation in a comprehensive, free-of-cost, adolescent health center in New York City. Cross-sectional baseline data were examined to define the relationship between participants' ambivalence toward pregnancy (defined by responses to items previously used in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health) and symptoms of depression (assessed by the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale). After controlling for covariates, multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the unique contribution of symptoms of depression on the pregnancy ambivalent group. Over one third of adolescent females self-reported ambivalence about pregnancy (n = 73, 33%). In our sample, 20% (n = 45) reported mild and 14% (n = 30) reported moderate-to-severe symptoms of depression. After controlling for potentially confounding factors, adolescent females who reported mild symptoms of depression had increased odds of reporting pregnancy ambivalence (adjusted odds ratio, 3.53; confidence interval, 1.64-7.62; p = .001) compared with those with minimal symptoms of depression. A substantial number of adolescents, despite planning to initiate contraception, were ambivalent about pregnancy; those reporting ambivalence were more likely to report mild symptoms of depression. When counseling adolescents about contraception initiation, clinicians should be aware that mild symptoms of depression may contribute to ambivalence about pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence and characteristics of intended adolescent pregnancy: an analysis of the Canadian maternity experiences survey.

    PubMed

    Sekharan, Vineeth S; Kim, Theresa H M; Oulman, Elizaveta; Tamim, Hala

    2015-11-05

    There is limited research focusing on adolescent women who intended to become pregnant, as majority of research examines unintended adolescent pregnancies. The objective was to examine the prevalence and characteristics of Canadian adolescent women who intended to become pregnant. The analysis was based on the national 2006 Maternity Experiences Survey consisting of women who had a singleton live birth. The sample was restricted to adolescent women between 15 to 19 years of age. The main outcome of this study was the adolescent woman's pregnancy intention. A variety of sociodemographic, maternal, and pregnancy related factors were examined using a multivariable logistic regression. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were reported for all variables. The sample size was 290, weighted to represent 2224 adolescent women. Based on the adjusted model, the odds of experiencing an intended pregnancy were increased if the adolescent woman was between 18-19 years old (OR 2.62, 95 % CI 1.05, 6.57), had a partner (OR 2.37, 95 % CI 1.12, 4.99), experienced no violence/abuse (OR 3.08, 95 % CI 1.38, 6.86), and consumed no alcohol before pregnancy (OR 3.17, 95 % CI 1.56, 6.45). Additionally, adolescent women who reported drug use prior to pregnancy were more likely to have an intended pregnancy (OR 0.39, 95 % CI 0.16, 0.95). The findings from this study can be used as the basis for future research to investigate the characteristics and needs represented by this group of adolescents and to aid in the development of effective policies and programs.

  4. The association between prepregnancy parental support and control and adolescent girls' pregnancy resolution decisions.

    PubMed

    Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Xie, Yiqiong; Harville, Emily W

    2013-09-01

    To examine the influence of prepregnancy parental support and control on adolescent girls' pregnancy resolution decisions. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were analyzed. Girls whose first pregnancy reported in wave IV occurred after wave I and before age 20 were included (n = 1,107). Participants self-reported pregnancy disposition (abortion, ectopic or tubal pregnancy, miscarriage, stillbirth, live birth) for each pregnancy; responses were dichotomized as abortion versus other. Girls' perceptions of parental support and control were measured at wave I. Controls were included for wave I age, age at pregnancy, year at the end of pregnancy, race/ethnicity, and parent characteristics (i.e., education, religious affiliation, age at first marriage, and educational expectations). Weighted multivariable logistic regression models were performed. Approximately 18% of girls reporting a teen pregnancy reported having an abortion. In crude analyses, parental support was marginally negatively related to abortion (odds ratio [OR] = .83, p = .06) and parental control was significantly negatively related to abortion (OR = .78, p = .02). In multivariable analyses, higher parental control was significantly negatively related to abortion versus other pregnancy outcomes (adjusted OR .80, 95% confidence interval .66-.98). Perceived parental support was unassociated with pregnancy resolution decisions. The only other factor associated with abortion decisions was parent education: odds of choosing abortion versus other pregnancy outcomes were significantly higher for adolescent girls whose parents had a bachelor's degree or greater versus those with lower educational attainment. Pregnant adolescents with less educated parents or parents exercising greater control were less likely to have an abortion. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy decreases the rate of adverse pregnancy outcome: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    SANT’ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi; de CAMPOS, Marinele R.; PASSANEZI, Selma Campos; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; PASSANEZI, Euloir

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease during the second trimester of gestation on adverse pregnancy outcomes. Material and Methods Pregnant patients during the 1st and 2nd trimesters at antenatal care in a Public Health Center were divided into 2 groups: NIG – "no intervention" (n=17) or IG- "intervention" (n=16). IG patients were submitted to a non-surgical periodontal treatment performed by a single periodontist consisting of scaling and root planning (SRP), professional prophylaxis (PROPH) and oral hygiene instruction (OHI). NIG received PROPH and OHI during pregnancy and were referred for treatment after delivery. Periodontal evaluation was performed by a single trained examiner, blinded to periodontal treatment, according to probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index (PI) and sulcular bleeding index (SBI) at baseline and 35 gestational weeks-28 days post-partum. Primary adverse pregnancy outcomes were preterm birth (<37 weeks), low birth weight (<2.5 kg), late abortion (14-24 weeks) or abortion (<14 weeks). The results obtained were statistically evaluated according to OR, unpaired t test and paired t test at 5% significance level. Results No significant differences were observed between groups at baseline examination. Periodontal treatment resulted in stabilization of CAL and PI (p>0.05) at IG and worsening of all periodontal parameters at NIG (p<0.0001), except for PI. Significant differences in periodontal conditions of IG and NIG were observed at 2nd examination (p<0.001). The rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes was 47.05% in NIG and 6.25% in IG. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy was associated to a decreased risk of developing adverse pregnancy outcomes [OR=13.50; CI: 1.47-123.45; p=0.02]. Conclusions Periodontal treatment during the second trimester of gestation contributes to decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:21552714

  6. Correlates of Adolescent Pregnancy in La Paz, Bolivia: Findings from a Quantitative-Qualitative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovsek, Varja; Karim, Ali Mehryar; Gutierrez, Emily Zielinski; Magnani, Robert J.; Gomez, Maria del Carmen Castro

    2002-01-01

    Study explores why some female adolescents in La Paz, Bolivia, become pregnant while others in similar circumstances avoid early pregnancy. Results reveal that girls who had experienced a pregnancy were less likely to have reported affectionate and supportive parents, more likely to have reported fighting in their home, and exhibited lower levels…

  7. Family Stress, Perception of Pregnancy, and Age of First Menarche among Pregnant Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravert, April A; Martin, Jennifer

    1997-01-01

    Examines family-of-origin stress, age of first menarche, and the perceptions of pregnancy as a life event in 97 pregnant adolescents. Participants' reported high levels of family stress with only a moderate level of impact or stress attributed to the pregnancy. As a group, the girls' first menarche matched national averages. (RJM)

  8. Partners in Prevention: Whole School Approaches to Prevent Adolescent Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Marcia A., Ed.; Wooley, Susan F., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This resource describes how pregnancy prevention efforts can be integrated into the various components of a school health program (the linkages between classroom instruction to prevent adolescent pregnancy and the school's health and mental health services, the necessary administrative policies, the type and extent of faculty and staff…

  9. Partners in Prevention: Whole School Approaches to Prevent Adolescent Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Marcia A., Ed.; Wooley, Susan F., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This resource describes how pregnancy prevention efforts can be integrated into the various components of a school health program (the linkages between classroom instruction to prevent adolescent pregnancy and the school's health and mental health services, the necessary administrative policies, the type and extent of faculty and staff…

  10. Factors that Adolescent Males Take into Account in Decisions about an Unplanned Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkindale, Carolyn J.; Condon, John T.; Russell, Alan; Quinlivan, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about what factors adolescent males consider important when making decisions concerning the resolution of an unplanned pregnancy with a teenage partner. Young men's influence on pregnancy outcome decisions can play an important part in the subsequent psychological adjustment of the female. The present report draws on data from a…

  11. Family Stress, Perception of Pregnancy, and Age of First Menarche among Pregnant Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravert, April A; Martin, Jennifer

    1997-01-01

    Examines family-of-origin stress, age of first menarche, and the perceptions of pregnancy as a life event in 97 pregnant adolescents. Participants' reported high levels of family stress with only a moderate level of impact or stress attributed to the pregnancy. As a group, the girls' first menarche matched national averages. (RJM)

  12. Correlates of Adolescent Pregnancy in La Paz, Bolivia: Findings from a Quantitative-Qualitative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovsek, Varja; Karim, Ali Mehryar; Gutierrez, Emily Zielinski; Magnani, Robert J.; Gomez, Maria del Carmen Castro

    2002-01-01

    Study explores why some female adolescents in La Paz, Bolivia, become pregnant while others in similar circumstances avoid early pregnancy. Results reveal that girls who had experienced a pregnancy were less likely to have reported affectionate and supportive parents, more likely to have reported fighting in their home, and exhibited lower levels…

  13. Factors that Adolescent Males Take into Account in Decisions about an Unplanned Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkindale, Carolyn J.; Condon, John T.; Russell, Alan; Quinlivan, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about what factors adolescent males consider important when making decisions concerning the resolution of an unplanned pregnancy with a teenage partner. Young men's influence on pregnancy outcome decisions can play an important part in the subsequent psychological adjustment of the female. The present report draws on data from a…

  14. [Adolescents and young subjects facing contraception, pregnancy and abortion].

    PubMed

    Lesa, A M; Zurlo de Mirotti, S M; Barrón de Carbonetti, M; Villiarolo, P

    1995-01-01

    The objective aimed was to obtain information about the sexual behavior of adolescents and youths attending university as regards contraception, pregnancy and abortion and the knowledge of the Papanicolau test as a preventive, method for malignant diseases. An anonymous survey which was especially designed for this investigation was implemented with 438 students - 123 women and 315 men - divided into three groups according to age; between 17 - 20, 21 - 24 and more than 25 years-old. Taking into account the sexually active population. 70% of the men between 17-20 use contraceptive methods (condoms 98,6%) and so do 100% of the women of the same age (menstrual cycle control method 71,4%, contraceptive pills 14,2%, or her partner uses condom 21,4%). In the group of youths between 21-24 years old, 76,8% of the men and 82,7% of the women use contraceptive methods: 70% of the men use condoms and 30% contraceptive methods used by their patner, whereas 58,3% of the women use the menstrual cycle control method, 25% take pills and 8,3% use DIU. In the group of older youths 71,4% of the men use contraception methods (66,6% condoms) and 51,14% of the women (100% the menstrual cycle control method) and 25% add other methods to this one. Only 20,68% of the women stated having had pregnancies (all of the between 21 - 24). As there is the same porcentage of abortion in this age groups, it can be presumed that all the pregnancies ended in abortion. This contradicts the position stated regarding abortion due to the fact that 66% of the population questioned in the survey was against abortion and defended the right to live, whereas 23% was for abortion mainly in the case of rapes and/or maternal diseases. A small porcentage was for abortion in the case of pregnancies which may disturb their life projects. As regards the Papanicolau test, all the groups have a good knowledge about it, but only women over 25 years old practice it responsably.

  15. Influence of practitioner expertise during early pregnancy diagnosis on pregnancy loss rate: A controlled, blinded trial.

    PubMed

    Patron, R; López-Helguera, I; Sebastián, F; Pesantez-Pacheco, J-L; Pérez-Villalobos, N; Vicente González Martín, J; Fargas, O; Astiz, S

    2017-08-11

    A controlled field trial was conducted to assess the potential influence of practitioner inexperience during early pregnancy diagnosis with ultrasound (PD-US) on the risk of pregnancy loss. A veterinarian with more than 10 years' experience in PD-US (Vet-A) and a veterinarian with fewer than 12 months' experience at the start of the study (Vet-B) visited the same dairy farm once a week for 33 and 26 weeks, respectively. The two veterinarians did not interact with each other at any time during the study, nor did they know that their data would later be used in this study. Using the same farm scanner, they performed PD-US at 28-34 day after breeding, together diagnosing 915 pregnancies. All cows were re-checked at 49-56 day after artificial insemination, and cows no longer pregnant were recorded as having suffered pregnancy loss. Although Vet-A and Vet-B diagnosed a similar proportion of pregnancies (58.44 ± 16% vs 56.96 ± 18%, p > .05), the rate of pregnancy loss was significantly higher among cows diagnosed by Vet-B (10.41 ± 11.2% vs 4.87 ± 9.0, p = .029). In addition, among cows diagnosed by Vet-B, the rate of pregnancy loss was significantly higher among cows diagnosed, while he had fewer than 12 months' PD-US experience (11.17 ± 12.14%) than among cows that he diagnosed later (7.14 ± 11.01%, p = .038); in fact, this latter loss rate was comparable to that among cows diagnosed by Vet-A during the same period (3.51 ± 9.83%, p = .620). These results suggest that inexperience with PD-US during the late embryonic period can increase risk of early pregnancy loss, supporting the need for proper training. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Pregnancy rate following bromocriptine treatment in infertile women with galactorrhea.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Nahid; Mohammadalizadeh, Sakineh

    2009-02-01

    Infertility is one of the most common causes of women refer to gynecology clinics. Galactorrhea is defined as one of the causes of infertility caused by luteal phase defect and anovulatory cycles. The study aim was to investigate the effect of bromocriptine on pregnancy rate in infertile women with galactorrhea with or without high prolactin level. In a prospective study, consecutive women with infertility and galactorrhea who referred to Afzalipour Hospital and a private clinic during 5 years from May 2001 to May 2006 were included. The study was conducted on 205 infertile women (18-39 years) with galactorrhea. They were treated with 2.5 mg bromocriptine BID for up to 6 months. The mean duration of sterility was 43.1 +/- 37.1 months (range, 12-16). 76.1% of patients showed positive signs for pregnancy. The pregnancy rate was 81.7% in the patients with high prolactin level (>20 ng/dl) and 74.3% in the patients with normal prolactin level (P = 0.26). There was a significant difference between mean duration of treatment with bromocriptine in women with and without pregnancy, 103.71 and 193.03 days, respectively (P < 0.001). Considering the efficacy of bromocriptine in the treatment of infertile women with galactorrhea, we suggest treatment with bromocriptine in these patients regardless of serum prolactin level.

  17. Heart rate variability in neonates of type 1 diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Noirin E; Higgins, Mary F; Kinsley, Brendan F; Foley, Michael E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common finding in offspring of pre-gestational type 1 diabetic pregnancy. Echocardiographic and biochemical evidence of fetal cardiac dysfunction have also been reported. Studies suggest that offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM) undergo a fetal programming effect due to the hyperglycaemic intrauterine milieu which increases their risk of cardiovascular morbidity in adult life. Decreased neonatal heart rate variability (HRV) has been described in association with in-utero growth restriction, prematurity, sudden infant death syndrome and congenital heart disease. The effect of in-utero exposure to hyperglycaemia in diabetic pregnancy on neonatal HRV is unknown. Our aim was to determine if neonatal HRV differs between normal and diabetic pregnancy. This was a prospective observational study of 38 patients with pregestational type 1 diabetes and 26 controls. HRV assessment was performed using Powerlab (ADI Instruments Ltd). Heart rate variability assessment and cord blood sampling for pH and glucose were performed for all neonates. Maternal glycaemic control was assessed via measurement of glycosylated haemoglobin in each trimester in the diabetic cohort. Neonates of diabetic mothers had evidence of altered heart rate variability, with increased low frequency to high frequency ratio (LF: HF), suggestive of a shift towards sympathetic predominance (p<0.05). This altered HRV was significantly related to fetal acidaemia, cord blood glucose values and maternal glycaemic control during pregnancy (p<0.05). Neonates of pregestational diabetic pregnancy have altered HRV which is related to maternal hyperglycaemia, fetal acidaemia and fetal glycaemia. Exposure of the developing heart to fluctuations in maternal glycaemia with subsequent alterations in HRV may explain why infants of diabetic mothers are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Prevalence of obesity in adolescents with history of pregnancy and associated factors in Korea.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seong-Ik; So, Wi-Young

    2011-01-01

    The pregnancy was a risk factor for excessive weight gain for women. However, there is no information about the prevalence of obesity and its relationship with a history of pregnancy in girls. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate differences in the prevalence of obesity in adolescent females with a history of pregnancy and factors associated with it, in Korea. In 2009, 69 of 34,247 female students revealed that they had experienced pregnancy in response to the 5(th) Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS-V) project by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDCP). The body mass index (BMI) and experienced pregnancy categories of the KYRBWS-V were assessed, and, for data analysis, the independent t-test, chi-square test, and multivariate logistic regression were used. The risk of pregnancy was increased by approximately 47% per unit increase in age, and 331% per unit increase in depression, respectively. Conversely, the risk decreased by 19% per unit increase in BMI and 33% per unit increase (ranged from 1: very rich to 5: very poor) in the family economic state. Obesity in adolescent females is minimally affected by a history of pregnancy, if at all, despite the fact that pregnancy was a risk factor for excessive weight gain in women. However, adolescent females with a history of pregnancy have higher levels of depression than do normal peers in Korea.

  19. Adolescent pregnancy diagnosis and outcomes: a six-year clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Aruda, Mary M; McCabe, Margaret; Litty, Carolyn; Burke, Pamela

    2008-02-01

    To explore pregnancy diagnosis, outcome choice, and time to referral appointment for adolescents. A descriptive study using retrospective chart review and clinical logs of all positive pregnancy tests between January 2000 and December 2005. Adolescent clinic in a hospital-based academic center. 625 pregnant teens were identified. Thirteen teens (2%) were lost to follow-up. Exclusion criteria included teens with advanced pregnancy, 22 weeks gestation or older at initial pregnancy diagnosis (n=11). All pregnant teens participated in a multidisciplinary tracking program. Outcome choice and time interval to prenatal or termination appointment. The 601 pregnant teens had a mean age of 18.2 years with a range of 13 to 23 years. Pregnancy outcomes indicate 48.2% (N=290) opted to continue their pregnancy and entered prenatal care, 45% (N=275) chose to terminate, and 6% (N=36) experienced a miscarriage. Adolescents who continued their pregnancy presented with a mean gestational age of 7.98 weeks versus 7.20 weeks for teens choosing to terminate (P < or = 0.001). They also had a significantly longer time interval to their referral site, averaging 24 days until a prenatal appointment, compared to 17 days for a termination (P < or = 0.05). Over the six-year study period, the number of adolescent pregnancies diagnosed within this clinical site remained constant. Adolescents who chose to continue their pregnancy were more likely to present later for diagnosis and experienced a longer wait time to their referral appointment for prenatal care. Pregnant adolescents may delay entry into timely reproductive health services.

  20. Prevalence and determinants of adolescent pregnancy in urban disadvantaged settings across five cities.

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, Heena; Kågesten, Anna; Emerson, Mark; Decker, Michele R; Olumide, Adesola O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Lou, Chaohua; Sonenstein, Freya L; Blum, Robert W; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead

    2014-12-01

    The impact of pregnancy on the health and livelihood of adolescents aged 15-19 years is substantial. This study explored sociodemographic, behavioral, and environmental-level factors associated with adolescent pregnancy across five urban disadvantaged settings. The Well-Being of Adolescents in Vulnerable Environments study used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) to recruit males and females from Baltimore (456), Johannesburg (496), Ibadan (449), New Delhi (500), and Shanghai (438). RDS-II and poststratification age weights were used to explore the odds associated with "ever had sex" and "ever pregnant"; adjusted odds of pregnancy and 95% confidence interval were developed by site and gender. Among the sexually experienced, pregnancy was most common in Baltimore (females, 53% and males, 25%) and Johannesburg (females, 29% and males 22%). Heterosexual experience and therefore pregnancy were rare in Ibadan, New Delhi, and Shanghai. Current schooling and condom use at the first sex decreased the odds of pregnancy among females in Baltimore and Johannesburg participants. Factors associated with higher odds of pregnancy were early sexual debut (Johannesburg participants and Baltimore females) being raised by someone other than the two parents (Johannesburg females); alcohol use and binge drinking in the past month (Baltimore participants); greater community violence and poor physical environment (Baltimore males and Johannesburg participants). The reported prevalence of adolescent pregnancy varies substantially across similarly economically disadvantaged urban settings. These differences are related to large differences in sexual experience, which may be underreported, and differences in environmental contexts. Pregnancy risk needs to be understood within the specific context that adolescents reside with particular attention to neighborhood-level factors. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. How Families Experience the Phenomenon of Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting: Implications for Family Therapists and Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Glenda J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe how family members experience the phenomenon of adolescent pregnancy and parenting in the family unit, over time, and to examine the meanings family members attach to the experience. The participants were six nuclear families (20 individuals) of six adolescent mothers who had previously…

  2. Methamphetamine Use Is Independently Associated with Recent Risky Sexual Behaviors and Adolescent Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapata, Lauren B.; Hillis, Susan D.; Marchbanks; Polly A.; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Lowry, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background: Lifetime methamphetamine use among adolescents is estimated to be between 5% and 10%. Youth substance use in general is known to be associated with risky sexual behaviors, but the effect of methamphetamine use on recent risky sexual behaviors and adolescent pregnancy has received little attention. The purpose of this analysis was to…

  3. Adolescent Students and Their Experiences of Dealing with Pregnancy: A Mexican Mixed-Method Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atienzo, Erika E.; Campero, Lourdes; Marín, Eréndira; González, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    In impoverished communities in Mexico, most adolescent mothers do not attend school; but typically, they become pregnant once they dropped out. Understanding the experiences of adolescents who have had a pregnancy and continue in school is complicated since few manage to do it. The goal of this study is to describe experiences within the family…

  4. Methamphetamine Use Is Independently Associated with Recent Risky Sexual Behaviors and Adolescent Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapata, Lauren B.; Hillis, Susan D.; Marchbanks; Polly A.; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Lowry, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background: Lifetime methamphetamine use among adolescents is estimated to be between 5% and 10%. Youth substance use in general is known to be associated with risky sexual behaviors, but the effect of methamphetamine use on recent risky sexual behaviors and adolescent pregnancy has received little attention. The purpose of this analysis was to…

  5. Seeking Safety and Empathy: Adolescent Health Seeking Behavior during Pregnancy and Early Motherhood in Central Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atuyambe, Lynn; Mirembe, Florence; Annika, Johansson; Kirumira, Edward K.; Faxelid, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To explore adolescent health seeking behavior during pregnancy and early motherhood in order to contribute to health policy formulation and improved access to health care. This will in long-term have an impact on the reduction of morbidity and mortality among adolescent mothers and their newborns. Methods: This was a qualitative study…

  6. Seeking Safety and Empathy: Adolescent Health Seeking Behavior during Pregnancy and Early Motherhood in Central Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atuyambe, Lynn; Mirembe, Florence; Annika, Johansson; Kirumira, Edward K.; Faxelid, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To explore adolescent health seeking behavior during pregnancy and early motherhood in order to contribute to health policy formulation and improved access to health care. This will in long-term have an impact on the reduction of morbidity and mortality among adolescent mothers and their newborns. Methods: This was a qualitative study…

  7. How Families Experience the Phenomenon of Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting: Implications for Family Therapists and Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Glenda J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe how family members experience the phenomenon of adolescent pregnancy and parenting in the family unit, over time, and to examine the meanings family members attach to the experience. The participants were six nuclear families (20 individuals) of six adolescent mothers who had previously…

  8. Adolescent school experiences and dropout, adolescent pregnancy, and young adult deviant behavior.

    PubMed

    Kasen, S; Cohen, P; Brook, J S

    1998-01-01

    Outside of the family, schools are the most proximal socializing agent available to convey societal norms and prohibitions to young people. In some cases, a positive school experience can compensate for the antisocial influence of family and community. The present study investigated the predictive ability of school-related factors on later deviancy in a random sample of 452 US adolescents 12-18 years of age attending 150 junior or senior high schools in upstate New York and enrolled in a broader prospective study. A measure of conduct problems, obtained 2 years before measurement of school factors, was used to control for the predisposing effects of problematic behavior on later deviance. Academic achievement, academic aspirations, and a learning-focused school environment had deterrent effects on all deviant outcomes assessed--dropping out of school, adolescent pregnancy, engaging in criminal activities, criminal conviction, antisocial personality disorder, and alcohol abuse--independent of age, gender, intelligence quotient, socioeconomic status, childhood conduct problems, and proportion of deviance-oriented friends in adolescence. Given the persistence of deviant behavioral patterns of adolescence into adulthood, the systems-level influences identified in this study should be given careful attention.

  9. One-Year Contraceptive Continuation and Pregnancy in Adolescent Girls and Women Initiating Hormonal Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Tina R.; Foster-Rosales, Anne; Upadhyay, Ushma D.; Boyer, Cherrie B.; Brown, Beth A.; Sokoloff, Abby; Harper, Cynthia C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess contraceptive discontinuation, switching, factors associated with method discontinuation, and pregnancy among women initiating hormonal contraceptives. METHODS This was a 12-month longitudinal cohort study of adolescent girls and women (n=1,387) aged 15 to 24 years attending public family planning clinics who did not desire pregnancy for at least 1 year and selected to initiate the patch, ring, depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, or pills. Participants completed follow-up assessments at 3, 6, and 12 months after baseline. Life table analysis was used to estimate survival rates for contraceptive continuation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate factors associated with method discontinuation. RESULTS The continuation rate (per 100 person-years) at 12 months was low for all methods; however, it was lowest for patch and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate initiators, 10.9 and 12.1 per 100 person years, respectively (P≤.003); continuation among ring initiators was comparable to pill initiators, 29.4 and 32.7 per 100 person-years, respectively (P=.06). Discontinuation was independently associated with method initiated and younger age. The only factors associated with lower risk of discontinuation were greater intent to use the method and being in school or working. The pregnancy rate (per 100 person-years) was highest for patch and ring initiators (30.1 and 30.5) and comparable for pill and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate initiators (16.5 and 16.1; P<.001). CONCLUSION The patch and the ring may not be better options than the pill or depot medroxyprogesterone acetate for women at high risk for unintended pregnancy. This study highlights the need for counseling interventions to improve contraceptive continuation, education about longer-acting methods, and developing new contraceptives that women may be more likely to continue. PMID:21252751

  10. Influence of gestational weight gain and BMI on cesarean delivery risk in adolescent pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Beaudrot, M E; Elchert, J A; DeFranco, E A

    2016-08-01

    Obesity and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) increase cesarean delivery (CD) risk; however, their influence on teen pregnancies is less clear. We describe the influence of GWG and pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) on primary CD (PCD) risk in adolescent compared with adult pregnancies. Population-based cohort study of Ohio births (2006 to 2012), n=1 034 552. Analyses were limited to 251 398 singleton live births in term (37 to 42 weeks) primiparas. Multivariate logistic regression estimated the association between BMI, GWG and CD risk in teens compared with adults (20 to 34 years), adjusting for maternal race, smoking status and labor induction. The primary cesarean rate (PCD) for primiparous women was 25.6%. It was lower for adolescents (17% <15 years, 17% 15 to 17 years, 19% 18 to 19 years) compared with adults (26%, P<0.001). The PCD rate increased with excessive (29%) vs Institute of Medicine (IOM)-recommended GWG (20%). The PCD rate was also increased in mothers who were overweight (29%), and obese (39%) vs those with normal pre-pregnancy BMI (20%, P<0.001). The lowest PCD rate (11.6%) observed in normal weight teens <18 years was with appropriate GWG (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.61; 95% CI 0.54 to 0.69). Compared with adults, teens have 43% lower PCD risk (aOR 0.57; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.60). Excessive GWG increased the risk for PCD in adults by 64% (aOR 1.64; 95% CI 1.59 to 1.68). Excessive GWG increased PCD in the highest risk groups, obese adults (aOR 1.24; 1.17 to 1.32) and obese teens (aOR 1.26; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.46). Excessive GWG increases the risk of PCD. Young maternal age was protective of this effect. However, excessive GWG increased PCD risk in both teen and adult mothers. To reduce the primary cesarean rate, efforts should target interventions to promote optimal GWG, especially in those at highest risk, obese women of all ages.

  11. The Association Between Prepregnancy Parental Support and Control and Adolescent Girls’ Pregnancy Resolution Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Xie, Yiqiong; Harville, Emily W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine the influence of prepregnancy parental support and control on adolescent girls’ pregnancy resolution decisions. Methods Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were analyzed. Girls whose first pregnancy reported in wave IV occurred after wave I and before age 20 were included (n = 1,107). Participants self-reported pregnancy disposition (abortion, ectopic or tubal pregnancy, miscarriage, stillbirth, live birth) for each pregnancy; responses were dichotomized as abortion versus other. Girls’ perceptions of parental support and control were measured at wave I. Controls were included for wave I age, age at pregnancy, year at the end of pregnancy, race/ethnicity, and parent characteristics (i.e., education, religious affiliation, age at first marriage, and educational expectations). Weighted multivariable logistic regression models were performed. Results Approximately 18% of girls reporting a teen pregnancy reported having an abortion. In crude analyses, parental support was marginally negatively related to abortion (odds ratio [OR] =.83, p =.06) and parental control was significantly negatively related to abortion (OR = .78, p = .02). In multivariable analyses, higher parental control was significantly negatively related to abortion versus other pregnancy outcomes (adjusted OR .80, 95% confidence interval .66–.98). Perceived parental support was unassociated with pregnancy resolution decisions. The only other factor associated with abortion decisions was parent education: odds of choosing abortion versus other pregnancy outcomes were significantly higher for adolescent girls whose parents had a bachelor’s degree or greater versus those with lower educational attainment. Conclusions Pregnant adolescents with less educated parents or parents exercising greater control were less likely to have an abortion. PMID:23763966

  12. Adverse perinatal outcomes of adolescent pregnancies in one center in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Eren, E C; Ekiz, A; Mumusoglu, S; Yildirim, D; Aydiner, B; Bestel, M; Ark, H C

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate fetal and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies of adolescents and compare them with adult pregnancies. This retrospective case-control study was carried out at Bakirkoy Maternity and Children's Diseases Education and Research Hospital in Istanbul, Turkey. It enrolled 2,491 pregnancies who delivered between 2005-2010, of which 998 were adolescent pregnancies and 1,493 were adults as controls. The mean age of the adolescent group was 17.10 years and in the control group the mean age was found to be 26.73 years. Intermarriage, vaginal delivery, preterm rupture of membranes, preterm birth, and preeclampsia were significantly higher in adolescent pregnancies than the control group. Gestational diabetes was more common with increasing age. There was no statistically meaningful difference between the groups in terms of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), low birth weight, anemia, 5-minute APGAR score, and intrauterine fetal demise. Young maternal age is a risk factor for preterm birth, preterm rupture of membranes, and preeclampsia. According to this study, adolescent pregnancies are more risky and more likely to have adverse fetal outcomes.

  13. Adolescent Pregnancy and Attained Height among Black South African Girls: Matched-Pair Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lundeen, Elizabeth A.; Norris, Shane A.; Martorell, Reynaldo; Suchdev, Parminder S.; Mehta, Neil K.; Richter, Linda M.; Stein, Aryeh D.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The impact of adolescent pregnancy on offspring birth outcomes has been widely studied, but less is known about its impact on the growth of the young mother herself. Objective To determine the association between adolescent pregnancy and attained height. Design Prospective birth cohort study. Setting Cohort members followed from birth to age 20 y in Soweto, South Africa. Participant From among 840 Black females with sufficient data, we identified 54 matched pairs, in which a girl who became pregnant before the age of 17 years was matched with a girl who did not have a pregnancy by age 20 y. Pairs were matched on age at menarche and height-for-age z scores in the year before the case became pregnant (mean 15.0 y). Main Outcome Measures The two groups were compared with respect to attained height, measured at mean age 18.5 y. Results Mean age at conception was 15.9 years (range: 13.7 to 16.9 y). Mean height at matching was 159.4 cm in the adolescent pregnancy group and 159.3 cm in the comparison group (p = 0.3). Mean attained height was 160.4 cm in the adolescent pregnancy group and 160.3 cm in the comparison group (p = 0.7). Conclusions Among Black females in Soweto, South Africa, adolescent pregnancy was not associated with attained height. PMID:26808552

  14. Report on Adolescent Pregnancy in Fort Worth, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tees, Sandra

    Teenage pregnancy is an overwhelming problem in Fort Worth, Texas. To examine the problem of teenage pregnancy, figures on total live births by age, race, repeat pregnancy, and at-risk infants were gathered from 1981 and 1982 Department of Public Health data. In addition, consequences of teenage pregnancy and motivation factors were examined. An…

  15. Report on Adolescent Pregnancy in Fort Worth, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tees, Sandra

    Teenage pregnancy is an overwhelming problem in Fort Worth, Texas. To examine the problem of teenage pregnancy, figures on total live births by age, race, repeat pregnancy, and at-risk infants were gathered from 1981 and 1982 Department of Public Health data. In addition, consequences of teenage pregnancy and motivation factors were examined. An…

  16. [Skills development: strategy for health promotion and prevention of pregnancy in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Gurgel, Maria Glêdes Ibiapina; Alves, Maria Dalva Santos; Moura, Escolástica Rejane Ferreira; Pinheiro, Patrícia Neyva da Costa; Rego, Rita Maria Viana

    2010-12-01

    Working with the development of skills in sexual and reproductive health of adolescents from the perspective of health promotion for the prevention of the precocious pregnancy is a challenge to the nurse. To attend the group on psychosocial and biological transformation, we must consider their particular demands and growth for the protagonists: nurse and adolescent. The study aims to analyze the practice of the nurse in the prevention of the precocious pregnancy in view of skills development. This is a descriptive and exploratory research, with a qualitative approach, developed in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, using the technique of the focal group, whose analysis was performed by means of discursive practices and maps of association of ideas. The results revealed that the promotion of adolescent health is worked out in the nursing consultation and adolescents groups, being this a creative, appropriate interactive space for the development of skills regarding sexuality and the prevention of precocious pregnancy.

  17. Pregnancy incidence and associated factors among HIV-infected female adolescents in HIV care in urban Côte d'Ivoire, 2009–2013

    PubMed Central

    Arikawa, Shino; Eboua, Tanoh; Kouakou, Kouadio; N'Gbeche, Marie-Sylvie; Amorissani-Folquet, Madeleine; Moh, Corinne; Amoussou-Bouah, Ursula Belinda; Coffie, Patrick Ahuatchi; Becquet, Renaud; Leroy, Valériane

    2016-01-01

    Objective Adolescents living with HIV are sexually active and engaged in risky sexual behaviors. Knowledge on how and to what extent adolescents in HIV care are affected by pregnancy is needed so as to adopt better preventive services. We estimated 4-year pregnancy incidence and correlates among HIV-infected female adolescents in HIV care in urban Côte d'Ivoire. Design We conducted retrospective analysis of a pediatric prospective cohort of the International epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) West Africa Collaboration. Female patients with confirmed HIV infection aged 10–19 years, having at least one clinical visit in 2009 to health facilities participating in the pediatric IeDEA West African cohort in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, were included. Data on incident pregnancies were obtained through medical records and interviews with health professionals. Pregnancy incidence rate was estimated per 100 person-years (PY). Poisson regression models were used to identify factors associated with the first pregnancy and provided incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results In 2009, 266 female adolescents were included, with a median age of 12.8 years (interquartile range, IQR: 10.0–15.0), CD4 cell counts of 506 cells/mm3 (IQR: 302–737), and 80% on antiretroviral treatment. At the 48th month, 17 new pregnancies were reported after 938 PY of follow-up: 13 girls had one pregnancy while 2 had two pregnancies. Overall incidence rate of pregnancy was 1.8/100 PY (95% CI: 1.1–2.9). High incidence was observed among those aged 15–19 years: 3.6/100 PY (95% CI: 2.2–5.9). Role of maternal death in the risk of pregnancy was at the limit of statistical significance (adjusted IRR: 3.1, 95% CI: 0.9–11.0; ref. non-maternal orphans). Conclusions Incidence of pregnancy among HIV-infected adolescents in care aged 15–19 years reached a level observed in adult cohorts in Sub-Saharan Africa. Health personnel in pediatric care have to

  18. Pregnancy incidence and associated factors among HIV-infected female adolescents in HIV care in urban Côte d'Ivoire, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Shino; Eboua, Tanoh; Kouakou, Kouadio; N'Gbeche, Marie-Sylvie; Amorissani-Folquet, Madeleine; Moh, Corinne; Amoussou-Bouah, Ursula Belinda; Coffie, Patrick Ahuatchi; Becquet, Renaud; Leroy, Valériane

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents living with HIV are sexually active and engaged in risky sexual behaviors. Knowledge on how and to what extent adolescents in HIV care are affected by pregnancy is needed so as to adopt better preventive services. We estimated 4-year pregnancy incidence and correlates among HIV-infected female adolescents in HIV care in urban Côte d'Ivoire. We conducted retrospective analysis of a pediatric prospective cohort of the International epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) West Africa Collaboration. Female patients with confirmed HIV infection aged 10-19 years, having at least one clinical visit in 2009 to health facilities participating in the pediatric IeDEA West African cohort in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, were included. Data on incident pregnancies were obtained through medical records and interviews with health professionals. Pregnancy incidence rate was estimated per 100 person-years (PY). Poisson regression models were used to identify factors associated with the first pregnancy and provided incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). In 2009, 266 female adolescents were included, with a median age of 12.8 years (interquartile range, IQR: 10.0-15.0), CD4 cell counts of 506 cells/mm(3) (IQR: 302-737), and 80% on antiretroviral treatment. At the 48th month, 17 new pregnancies were reported after 938 PY of follow-up: 13 girls had one pregnancy while 2 had two pregnancies. Overall incidence rate of pregnancy was 1.8/100 PY (95% CI: 1.1-2.9). High incidence was observed among those aged 15-19 years: 3.6/100 PY (95% CI: 2.2-5.9). Role of maternal death in the risk of pregnancy was at the limit of statistical significance (adjusted IRR: 3.1, 95% CI: 0.9-11.0; ref. non-maternal orphans). Incidence of pregnancy among HIV-infected adolescents in care aged 15-19 years reached a level observed in adult cohorts in Sub-Saharan Africa. Health personnel in pediatric care have to intensify their efforts to provide more realistic and age

  19. Blueprint for Action: Dialogues from Wingspread II. Proceedings of the Conference on Adolescent Pregnancy: State Action on Adolescent Pregnancy (2nd, Racine, Wisconsin, August 10-12, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interstate Conference of Employment Security Agencies, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The purpose of the conference reported in this document was to improve and coordinate state-level efforts to ameliorate the crisis of adolescent pregnancy. The document includes summaries of addresses by Edgar May, vice-president of the American Public Welfare Association's board of directors; Ann Rosewater, staff director of the Select Committee…

  20. Adolescent pregnancy: combating the problem from a multi-systemic health perspective.

    PubMed

    Atwood, J D; Donnelly, J W

    1993-01-01

    Presented is a multi-systemic theoretical model of adolescent pregnancy that incorporates the school-peer-family-community systems and defines a role for health educators. It is noted that teenagers receive conflicting messages from the adolescent socialization community--all the institutions, individuals, and mass media that influence and shape development. To cope with these multiple, inconsistent messages, many adolescents respond with inconsistent behavior given the impossibility of pleasing all sources of influence. Health educators must coordinate the school-peer-family-community systems to achieve more congruence and less competition surrounding inputs into the daily life of young people. The potential to disseminate sex education is greatest in the school context, where information can be provided on a systematic, regular basis to reinforce learning. Since peers are a major reference group during adolescence, per counseling can be used effectively to discuss factors that lead to unwanted pregnancy and help clarify values. Sex education programs are strengthened by the involvement of parents, and interventions aimed at promoting parent-child communication around sexual issues have been demonstrated to delay the onset of sexual activity. The availability of an adolescent health clinic, either in the school or close by, has been shown to reduce adolescent pregnancy. Overall, the most effective adolescent pregnancy prevention programs are those that are comprehensive in substance and duration.

  1. Diagnosis of Pregnancy and Providing Options Counseling for the Adolescent Patient.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Laurie L

    2017-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement "Options Counseling for the Pregnant Adolescent Patient" recommends the basic content of the pediatrician's counseling for an adolescent facing a new diagnosis of pregnancy. However, options counseling is just one aspect of what may be one of the more challenging scenarios in the pediatric office. Pediatricians must remain alert to the possibility of pregnancy among their adolescent female patients. When discovering symptoms suggestive of pregnancy, pediatricians must obtain a relevant history, perform diagnostic testing and properly interpret the results, and understand the significance of the results from the patient perspective and reveal them to the patient in a sensitive manner. If the patient is indeed pregnant, the pediatrician, in addition to providing comprehensive options counseling, may need to help recruit adult support for the patient and should offer continued assistance to the adolescent and her family after the office visit. All pediatricians should be aware of the legal aspects of adolescent reproductive care and the resources for pregnant adolescents in their communities. This clinical report presents a more comprehensive view of the evaluation and management of pregnancy in the adolescent patient and a context for options counseling. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Reduced school dropout rates among adolescent mothers receiving school-based prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Barnet, Beth; Arroyo, Carmen; Devoe, Margo; Duggan, Anne K

    2004-03-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is associated with increased school dropout rates. Dropping out amplifies the probability of persistent social and economic disadvantage. Whether school-based health centers might help reduce school absenteeism and dropout rates in this group has not been well studied. To examine the association of school-based prenatal services on school attendance and dropout rates. In this retrospective cohort study, using school rosters from an alternative school, we identified adolescents aged 18 years or younger who delivered a baby between July 1, 1995, and August 30, 1997, in Baltimore, Md. We linked school records spanning 3 years with medical records and birth certificates. School variables such as attendance and dropout rates were examined in relation to the teen's year of pregnancy and prenatal care setting (school-based vs non-school-based). Hierarchical logistic regression was used to examine effects of school-based prenatal care on dropout and promotion or graduation rates, with adjustment for baseline group differences. We identified 431 predominantly African American, low-income adolescents who attended the alternative school in their pregnancy school year. In the year prior to pregnancy, most performed poorly in school and had significant absenteeism. During their pregnancy school year, teens receiving school-based prenatal care were absent 12 fewer days, as compared with those receiving non-school-based care (P =.001), and their dropout rate was half that of those receiving non-school-based care (6% vs 15%; P =.02). Hierarchical logistic regression analyses, with adjustment for baseline prepregnancy differences, demonstrated that teens receiving school-based prenatal care were less likely to drop out of school during the pregnancy year (adjusted odds ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.99; P =.048). Absenteeism and dropout rates were reduced for pregnant adolescents receiving prenatal care at a school-based health center in an urban

  3. Correlation between Maternal Characteristics during Early Pregnancy, Fetal Growth Rate and Newborn Weight in Healthy Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Caradeux, Javier; Serra, Ramón; Palmeiro, Yasna; Correa, Paula J; Valenzuela, Ignacio; Olguin, Jaime; Montenegro, Lazaro; Nien, Jyh Kae; Osorio, Eduardo; Illanes, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between maternal characteristics in early pregnancy and fetal growth (FG) and birth weight (BW). A prospective cohort study was performed in unselected pregnant women who attended an ultrasound evaluation at 11-14 weeks of pregnancy. Medical history, biochemical blood tests, biophysical variables and fetal weight at 20-25 and 30-36 weeks as well as the BW were assessed. Bivariate and multivariate linear models were constructed. In all, 543 patients with normal pregnancy and labor were selected. The multiple regression analysis showed a statistically significant association between maternal body mass index (BMI) in early pregnancy and the uterine artery pulsatility index (UtAPI) in the first trimester with BW (p < 0.0008) and with the ratio of fetal growth between the second and third trimesters (p < 0.0001). No correlation was found between these variables and first trimester levels of hemoglobin or glycemia. Maternal first trimester BMI and UtAPI correlate with the rate of intrauterine FG and with the BW. This evidence highlights the influence of maternal first trimester variables on fetuses with normal growth and the potential role of these variables in fetal programming. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Knowledge of adolescents regarding sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rebeca Aranha Arrais Santos; Corrêa, Rita da Graça Carvalhal Frazão; Rolim, Isaura Letícia Tavares Palmeira; Hora, Jessica Marques da; Linard, Andrea Gomes; Coutinho, Nair Portela Silva; Oliveira, Priscila da Silva

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the knowledge of adolescents related to sexually transmitted infections (STIs), AIDS, and pregnancy, and understand the role of school in sex education. A qualitative descriptive study, developed through a semi-structured interview and a form for participant characterization, with 22 high school students from a public school aged 16 to 19 years. Data were submitted to content analysis. After analysis, four thematic categories were developed: sexuality and sex education; understanding of risk behaviors; knowledge of STI/AIDS; and knowledge of and practices for prevention. This study showed the need for preventive educational actions for adolescents, because the lack of information contributes to their vulnerability. The adolescents recognize the importance of sex education; therefore it is important to implement strategies to promote and protect health in the school environment to encourage and strengthen self-care in health. investigar o conhecimento de adolescentes relacionado às Infecções Sexualmente Transmissíveis (IST), AIDS e gravidez, além de conhecer a compreensão sobre o papel da escola na educação sexual. estudo qualitativo, descritivo, desenvolvido por meio de entrevista semiestruturada e formulário para caracterização dos participantes, com 22 adolescentes entre 16 e 19 anos de idade, estudantes do Ensino Médio em uma escola pública. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de conteúdo. da análise emergiram quatro categorias temáticas: Sexualidade e educação sexual; Compreensão de comportamentos de risco; Conhecimento de IST/AIDS; Conhecimento e práticas de prevenção. revelou-se a necessidade de ações educativas de prevenção para os adolescentes, pois a falta de informações contribui para a sua vulnerabilidade. Os adolescentes reconhecem a importância da educação sexual; consequentemente, é importante a implementação de estratégias de promoção e de proteção à saúde no ambiente escolar para contribuir e

  5. Influence of imaging on the negative appendectomy rate in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Carmelita A; Petrov, Maxim S; Soybel, David I; Ferzoco, Stephen J; Ashley, Stanley W; Tavakkolizadeh, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Appendectomy is the most common non-gynecologic surgery performed during pregnancy. Little data exist on the accuracy of imaging studies in the diagnosis of appendicitis in pregnancy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the probability of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scan in diagnosing appendicitis in pregnancy, as reflected in the negative appendectomy rate. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 86 pregnant women who underwent an appendectomy between January 1, 1997 and January 1, 2006. Patients were divided into three groups: clinical evaluation, ultrasound, and ultrasound followed by a CT scan. The clinical evaluation group had 13 patients, with a negative appendectomy rate of 54% (7/13). Fifty-five patients underwent an ultrasound alone, with a negative appendectomy rate 36% (20/55). In the ultrasound/CT group (n=13), the negative appendectomy rate was 8% (1/13). There was a significant reduction in the negative appendectomy rate in the ultrasound/CT scan group compared to clinical evaluation group (54 vs 8%, p<0.05). This reduction was not achieved in the ultrasound group when compared to the clinical evaluation group or the ultrasound/CT group (p=0.05). A significant reduction was achieved when the ultrasound/CT group was compared to the patients in the ultrasound only group who had a normal or inconclusive ultrasound (p<0.05). Our data documents a very high negative appendectomy rate in the pregnant patient. We recommend an ultrasound followed by a CT scan in patients with a normal or inconclusive ultrasound.

  6. Does metoclopramide exposure alter endometrial receptivity and decrease pregnancy rates?

    PubMed

    Çekmez, Yasemin; Korkmaz, Vakkas; Çakır, Aslı; Göçmen, Ahmet; Ergün, Yusuf; Gülşen, Serdar; Akpak, Yasam K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of metoclopramide on endometrial receptivity with an immunohistochemical investigation of integrin β3 expression in pregnant rats. In the present study, the pregnant mice administrated by different doses of metoclopramide were used to explore the effect of metoclopramide on embryo implantation, especially on the endometrial receptivity. The statistical results showed that the number of implanted embryos was gradually declining along the increasing dose of metoclopramide. When the administrated dose of metoclopramide was 3 mg/kg per day, great changes were observed in the exposed uterine morphology and down-regulated integrin β3 were also found in high dose metoclopramide-exposed mice. Metoclopramide exposure, especially in high doses may alter endometrial receptivity by effecting integrin expression on decidual tissue which can decrease pregnancy rates. This drug should only be recommended for use during pregnancy when benefit outweighs the risk.

  7. Rate of teenage pregnancy in Jordan and its impact on maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Khader, Yousef S; Batieha, Anwar; Al Fursan, Rana Kareem; Al-Hader, Rami; Hijazi, Sa'ad S

    2017-07-26

    Objective Research regarding the adverse outcomes of adolescent childbearing has suffered from many limitations such as a small sample size and non-representative samples. This study was conducted to determine the rate of teenage pregnancy among Jordanian adolescents and its associated adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Methods The study is a part of a comprehensive national study of perinatal mortality that was conducted between 2011 and 2012 in Jordan. All women who gave birth after 20 weeks of gestation in 18 maternity hospitals in Jordan between 2011 and 2012 were invited to participate in the study. Consenting women were interviewed by the trained midwives in these hospitals using a structured questionnaire prepared for the purpose of this study. Additional information was also collected based on the physical examination by the midwife and the obstetrician at admission and at discharge. Data on the newborn were also collected by the pediatric nurses and the neonatologists in these hospitals. Results The overall rate of teenage pregnancy [95% confidence interval (CI) was 6.2% (5.9%, 6.5%)]. Of the studied maternal and neonatal outcomes, women aged <20 years were more likely to deliver prematurely compared to women aged 20-35 years [odds ratio (OR)=1.5, 95% CI: 1.2, 1.9; p < 0.005)]. However, the two groups of women did not differ significantly in low birth weight delivery (OR = 1.2, 95% CI: 0.9, 1.5; p = 0.167) and neonatal mortality (OR = 1.2, 95% CI: 0.8, 1.3; p = 0.491) in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Teenage pregnancy was associated with increased risk of premature delivery, apart from the effects of socioeconomic factors.

  8. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on pregnancy rates and early pregnancy loss after intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Hajishafiha, Masomeh; Ghasemi-Rad, Mohammad; Memari, Aishe; Naji, Siamak; Mladkova, Nikol; Saeedi, Vida

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to elucidate what affects the implantation and early pregnancy course in pregnancies conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) so that pregnancy rates and outcomes can be improved. Our aim was to determine the role of maternal Helicobacter pylori infection. We did a prospective study of 187 infertile couples undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and segregated those according to underlying infertility etiology. We assessed the status of H. pylori IgG antibodies and anti-CagA IgG antibodies by ELISA assay. All pregnancies were followed for early pregnancy loss (EPL, first 12 weeks). The likelihood of H. pylori infection increased with age (1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0-1.13; P = 0.040) but there was no association with EPL. Women infected with CagA-positive strains were more likely to have EPL (19.39, 95% CI: 1.8-208.4; P = 0.014). Women with tubal factor or ovulatory disorder infertility were more likely to abort early (12.95, 95% CI: 1.28-131.11; P = 0.030, 10.84, 95% CI: 1.47-80.03; P = 0.020, respectively). There was no association between EPL and age, number of embryos formed or transferred, or number of oocytes retrieved. Our findings suggest that infection with CagA-positive H. pylori strains is linked to an increase in women's potential to abort early (possibly through increased release of inflammatory cytokines). In addition, tubal factor and ovulatory disorder infertility are linked to EPL after ICSI due to unknown mechanisms. Proposals to eradicate H. pylori infection prior to ICSI could lead to a decrease in EPL after ART.

  9. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on pregnancy rates and early pregnancy loss after intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    PubMed Central

    Hajishafiha, Masomeh; Ghasemi-rad, Mohammad; Memari, Aishe; Naji, Siamak; Mladkova, Nikol; Saeedi, Vida

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a need to elucidate what affects the implantation and early pregnancy course in pregnancies conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) so that pregnancy rates and outcomes can be improved. Our aim was to determine the role of maternal Helicobacter pylori infection. Material and methods: We did a prospective study of 187 infertile couples undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and segregated those according to underlying infertility etiology. We assessed the status of H. pylori IgG antibodies and anti-CagA IgG antibodies by ELISA assay. All pregnancies were followed for early pregnancy loss (EPL, first 12 weeks). Results: The likelihood of H. pylori infection increased with age (1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0–1.13; P = 0.040) but there was no association with EPL. Women infected with CagA-positive strains were more likely to have EPL (19.39, 95% CI: 1.8–208.4; P = 0.014). Women with tubal factor or ovulatory disorder infertility were more likely to abort early (12.95, 95% CI: 1.28–131.11; P = 0.030, 10.84, 95% CI: 1.47–80.03; P = 0.020, respectively). There was no association between EPL and age, number of embryos formed or transferred, or number of oocytes retrieved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that infection with CagA-positive H. pylori strains is linked to an increase in women’s potential to abort early (possibly through increased release of inflammatory cytokines). In addition, tubal factor and ovulatory disorder infertility are linked to EPL after ICSI due to unknown mechanisms. Proposals to eradicate H. pylori infection prior to ICSI could lead to a decrease in EPL after ART. PMID:22114525

  10. Lower education among low-income Brazilian adolescent females is associated with planned pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Faisal-Cury, Alexandre; Tabb, Karen M; Niciunovas, Guilherme; Cunningham, Carrie; Menezes, Paulo R; Huang, Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy has social, economic, and educational consequences and is also linked to adverse perinatal outcomes. However, studies show a positive relationship between pregnancy and increased social status among low-income adolescents. This study aims to assess the association between planned pregnancy and years of schooling among low-income Brazilian adolescents. This is a secondary analysis of a cohort study conducted from May 2005 to March 2007 in public primary care clinics in São Paulo, Brazil. Participants (n=168) completed a detailed structured questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between years of schooling and planned pregnancy. After adjusting for the covariates income, wealth score, crowding, age, marital status, and race, planned pregnancy was independently associated with lower years of education (odds ratio: 1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-3.23). Although this finding may be related to these adolescents having less access to information and health services, another possible explanation is that they have a greater desire to have children during adolescence.

  11. Lower education among low-income Brazilian adolescent females is associated with planned pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Faisal-Cury, Alexandre; Tabb, Karen M; Niciunovas, Guilherme; Cunningham, Carrie; Menezes, Paulo R; Huang, Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy has social, economic, and educational consequences and is also linked to adverse perinatal outcomes. However, studies show a positive relationship between pregnancy and increased social status among low-income adolescents. This study aims to assess the association between planned pregnancy and years of schooling among low-income Brazilian adolescents. This is a secondary analysis of a cohort study conducted from May 2005 to March 2007 in public primary care clinics in São Paulo, Brazil. Participants (n=168) completed a detailed structured questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between years of schooling and planned pregnancy. After adjusting for the covariates income, wealth score, crowding, age, marital status, and race, planned pregnancy was independently associated with lower years of education (odds ratio: 1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.02–3.23). Although this finding may be related to these adolescents having less access to information and health services, another possible explanation is that they have a greater desire to have children during adolescence. PMID:28176946

  12. Factors that adolescent males take into account in decisions about an unplanned pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Corkindale, Carolyn J; Condon, John T; Russell, Alan; Quinlivan, Julie A

    2009-08-01

    Little is known about what factors adolescent males consider important when making decisions concerning the resolution of an unplanned pregnancy with a teenage partner. Young men's influence on pregnancy outcome decisions can play an important part in the subsequent psychological adjustment of the female. The present report draws on data from a larger study with teenage males [Condon, J. T., Corkindale, C. J., Russell, A., & Quinlivan, J. A. (2006). Processes and factors underlying adolescent males' attitudes and decision-making in relation to an unplanned pregnancy. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 35, 447-458], and extends the findings of that study. Using a 25-item scale embedded in an electronic role-play, data were obtained from 330 male Australian school students on their priorities and concerns in relation to possible outcomes of a partner's pregnancy. Common factors taken into account by almost the entire adolescent sample related to the negative effects of becoming a teenage father. The differences between participants were identified using cluster analysis, which produced three groupings. The majority group was characterised as 'well-balanced' (80.6%), and the two minority groups as 'unwilling/unready' (10.9%) and 'family-centred' (8.5%). Group membership was strongly predictive of the males' final decision regarding the hypothetical pregnancy outcome. Understanding adolescent attitudes and beliefs when faced with this decision may assist practitioners in their guidance of the young couple and help prevent negative psychological sequelae.

  13. Unpredicted trajectories: the relationship between race/ethnicity, pregnancy during adolescence, and young women's outcomes.

    PubMed

    Casares, Whitney N; Lahiff, Maureen; Eskenazi, Brenda; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L

    2010-08-01

    Adolescents who become pregnant in the United States are at higher risk for a myriad of health concerns. One would predict even more adverse health outcomes among pregnant adolescents who are from disadvantaged racial/ethnic groups; however, previous studies indirectly suggest the opposite. This study examines whether adolescents from racial/ethnic minority groups are less affected by adolescent pregnancy compared to white adolescents. We used data from 1,867 adolescents participating in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1995-2001). Our predictor variable was self-reported race/ethnicity. Self-perception of health, educational attainment, and public assistance use in young adulthood were outcome measures. We conducted weighted multivariate logistic regressions and analyzed how adolescent pregnancy modified the relationship between our predictor and outcome variables. Black and American Indian young women had significantly higher odds than white young women of receiving public assistance (OR, 2.6 and 2.7, respectively; p <.01) and even higher odds if ever pregnant in adolescence (OR, 4.2 and 19.0, respectively; p = .03). White young women had significantly lower odds of high educational attainment if they had a live birth in adolescence as compared to those who had not (OR, 0.1; CI = 0.1-0.4). These findings support studies that found adolescent pregnancy increases the risk of public assistance use and low educational attainment. The study shows that, for educational attainment, black young women who become pregnant may not be as disadvantaged as their peers, whereas white young women who become pregnant are more disadvantaged. (c) 2010 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk factors for adolescent pregnancy in Bogotá, Colombia, 2010: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Morón-Duarte, Lina Sofía; Latorre, Catalina; Tovar, José Rafael

    2014-09-01

    To identify risk factors for adolescent pregnancy among female students in Bogotá, Colombia. This was a retrospective study of cases and controls matched by age, identified by means of a survey on the sexual behavior of adolescent students in Bogotá (Encuesta sobre el Comportamiento Sexual de los Adolescentes Escolarizados en Bogotá) conducted in the first semester of 2010. All 272 cases and 544 randomly-selected controls were taken from 39 044 total records. Variables considered were sociodemographics, household structure, and family environment; sexual relationships and pregnancy; and knowledge of sexual and reproductive health. Matching and conditional logistic regression were used to adjust for possible confounding factors. The factors associated with increased risk of adolescent pregnancy based on multivariate analyses were: attending public school (odds ratio [OR]=2.25; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.45-3.51); history of siblings with adolescent pregnancy (OR =1.98; 95% CI: 1.55-2.76); early first sexual intercourse (12 years of age or less) (OR =2.34; 95% CI: 1.01-5.40); having a self-reported low- or average-level of contraceptive knowledge (OR =3.92; 95% CI: 1.96-7.83); previous pregnancy (OR =14.09; 95% CI: 8.74- 22.70); and not living with both parents (OR 3.58; 95% CI: 2.10-6.16). Factors related to individual, family, and social environments that influence the incidence of adolescent pregnancy must be considered and addressed when designing interventions. The existing sex education curriculum is an important component in preventing adolescent pregnancy, however, parent/caregiver participation is required for success.

  15. Small-area analysis: targeting high-risk areas for adolescent pregnancy prevention programs.

    PubMed

    Gould, J B; Herrchen, B; Pham, T; Bera, S; Brindis, C

    1998-01-01

    Traditional methods of identifying areas in need of adolescent pregnancy prevention programs may overlook small localities with high levels of adolescent childbearing in communities and counties where this is not a universal problem. The present study assessed the potential of a "geomapping" approach based on measurement of the number of births occurring to teens 15-17 years old in each California (US) zip code in 1992-94. A total of 415 zip codes with teen birth rates in excess of the state's 75th percentile cut-off point (62.8 births/1000) were identified. 210 of these zip codes, accounting for 96% of all births to 15-17 year olds in the 75th-percentile zip codes, differed significantly (p 0.01) from the state average of 44.5 births/1000 15-17 year olds. 178 (85%) of these 210 "hot spots" also included birth rates exceeding the third quartile among teens 10-14 and/or 18-19 years old. Panels of local experts reviewed these "hot spots" for accuracy and grouped them into 82 potential project areas on the basis of demographics, geography, and political infrastructure. Although there was substantial variation, localities with the highest teen birth rates tended to be characterized by minority overrepresentation, poverty, and poor prenatal care coverage. In addition to identifying areas with unmet need, this approach encourages community participation in program development.

  16. Cumulative Vulnerability: A Case Study on intrafamilial violence, Drug Addiction and Adolescent Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Miura, Paula Orchiucci; Passarini, Gislaine Martins Ricardo; Ferreira, Loraine Seixas; Paixão, Rui Alexandre Paquete; Tardivo, Leila Salomão de La Plata Cury; Barrientos, Dora Mariela Salcedo

    2014-12-01

    A pregnant adolescent's vulnerability increases when she is a victim of intrafamilial violence and drug addiction, which cause physical and biopsychosocial damage to the mother and her baby. Objective Present and analyze the case of an adolescent who is addicted to drugs, pregnant and the victim of lifelong intrafamilial violence. Method A case study based on a semi-structured interview conducted in the Obstetrics Emergency Unit at the Teaching Hospital of the University of São Paulo. The data were interpreted and analyzed using Content Analysis. Results intrafamilial violence experienced at the beginning of the adolescent's early relationships seriously affected her emotional maturity, triggering the development of psychopathologies and leaving her more susceptible to the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs. The adolescent is repeating her history with her daughter, reproducing the cycle of violence. Conclusion Adolescent pregnancy combined with intrafamilial violence and drug addiction and multiplies the adolescent's psychosocial vulnerability increased the adolescent's vulnerability.

  17. Body composition and newborn birthweight in pregnancies of adolescent and mature women.

    PubMed

    Contreras Campos, María Elena; Rodríguez-Cervantes, Nora; Reza-López, Sandra; Ávila-Esparza, Marina; Chávez-Corral, Dora Virginia; Levario-Carrillo, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Teenage pregnancy has been associated with adverse effects for the mother and the newborn (NB). In order to compare body composition (BC) between adolescents (Ad) and mature women (MW) during pregnancy and to determine the difference in birthweight and perinatal morbidity, pregnant Ad (n=40) and MW (n=227) were studied. BC changes between the second and third trimesters were determined by multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis, and birthweight and NB morbidity were evaluated. During the second and third trimesters of the pregnancy, fat mass was lower in the Ad group [16 kg (13-19)] than in the MW group [22 kg (17-27)] (P<0.01; median and quartiles 1-3). Fat-free mass increased by 3.09 kg (2.29-4.20) and 2.20 kg (1.0-3.59) (P≤0.01), and total body water increased by 2.77 L (0.84-4.49) vs. 2.04 L (0.55-3.89) (P=0.36), in the Ad and MW groups, respectively (median and quartiles 1-3). Birthweight was not significantly different between NBs of Ad (3223 ± 399 g) and NBs of MW (3312 ± 427 g, P=0.22). The youngest Ad (<18 year old, n=8) had NB with lower birthweight than MW (3031 ± 503 g, P=0.06). NBs of Ad mothers showed a non-significant trend towards a higher rate of morbidity relative to the NBs of MW. In conclusion, the BC of Ad differs from that of MW during pregnancy. In addition, the NB infants of Ad mothers tended to have a lower birthweight than those from MW, a result that suggests that the Ad should be in strict prenatal control.

  18. Information about Sexual Health on Crisis Pregnancy Center Web Sites: Accurate for Adolescents?

    PubMed

    Bryant-Comstock, Katelyn; Bryant, Amy G; Narasimhan, Subasri; Levi, Erika E

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality and accuracy of sexual health information on crisis pregnancy center Web sites listed in state resource directories for pregnant women, and whether these Web sites specifically target adolescents. A survey of sexual health information presented on the Web sites of crisis pregnancy centers. Internet. Crisis pregnancy center Web sites. Evaluation of the sexual health information presented on crisis pregnancy center Web sites. Themes included statements that condoms are not effective, promotion of abstinence-only education, availability of comprehensive sexual education, appeal to a young audience, provision of comprehensive sexual health information, and information about sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Crisis pregnancy center Web sites provide inaccurate and misleading information about condoms, STIs, and methods to prevent STI transmission. This information might be particularly harmful to adolescents, who might be unable to discern the quality of sexual health information on crisis pregnancy center Web sites. Listing crisis pregnancy centers in state resource directories might lend legitimacy to the information on these Web sites. States should be discouraged from listing Web sites as an accurate source of information in their resource directories. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Systematic Review of Apps using Mobile Criteria for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention (mCAPP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Elizabeth; Mangone, Emily Rose

    2016-11-10

    Adolescents in the United States and globally represent a high-risk population for unintended pregnancy, which leads to high social, economic, and health costs. Access to smartphone apps is rapidly increasing among youth, but little is known about the strategies that apps employ to prevent pregnancy among adolescents and young adults. Further, there are no guidelines on best practices for adolescent and young adult pregnancy prevention through mobile apps. This review developed a preliminary evaluation framework for the assessment of mobile apps for adolescent and young adult pregnancy prevention and used this framework to assess available apps in the Apple App Store and Google Play that targeted adolescents and young adults with family planning and pregnancy prevention support. We developed an assessment rubric called Mobile Criteria for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention (mCAPP) for data extraction using evidence-based and promising best practices from the literature. mCAPP comprises 4 domains: (1) app characteristics, (2) user interface features, (3) adolescent pregnancy prevention best practices, and (4) general sexual and reproductive health (SRH) features. For inclusion in the review, apps that advertised pregnancy prevention services and explicitly mentioned youth, were in English, and were free were systematically identified in the Apple App Store and Google Play in 2015. Screening, data extraction, and 4 interrater reliability checks were conducted by 2 reviewers. Each app was assessed for 92 facets of the mCAPP checklist. Our search returned 4043 app descriptions in the Apple App Store (462) and Google Play (3581). After screening for inclusion criteria, 22 unique apps were included in our analysis. Included apps targeted teens in primarily developed countries, and the most common user interface features were clinic and health service locators. While app strengths included provision of SRH education, description of modern contraceptives, and some use of

  20. A Systematic Review of Apps using Mobile Criteria for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention (mCAPP)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Adolescents in the United States and globally represent a high-risk population for unintended pregnancy, which leads to high social, economic, and health costs. Access to smartphone apps is rapidly increasing among youth, but little is known about the strategies that apps employ to prevent pregnancy among adolescents and young adults. Further, there are no guidelines on best practices for adolescent and young adult pregnancy prevention through mobile apps. Objective This review developed a preliminary evaluation framework for the assessment of mobile apps for adolescent and young adult pregnancy prevention and used this framework to assess available apps in the Apple App Store and Google Play that targeted adolescents and young adults with family planning and pregnancy prevention support. Methods We developed an assessment rubric called Mobile Criteria for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention (mCAPP) for data extraction using evidence-based and promising best practices from the literature. mCAPP comprises 4 domains: (1) app characteristics, (2) user interface features, (3) adolescent pregnancy prevention best practices, and (4) general sexual and reproductive health (SRH) features. For inclusion in the review, apps that advertised pregnancy prevention services and explicitly mentioned youth, were in English, and were free were systematically identified in the Apple App Store and Google Play in 2015. Screening, data extraction, and 4 interrater reliability checks were conducted by 2 reviewers. Each app was assessed for 92 facets of the mCAPP checklist. Results Our search returned 4043 app descriptions in the Apple App Store (462) and Google Play (3581). After screening for inclusion criteria, 22 unique apps were included in our analysis. Included apps targeted teens in primarily developed countries, and the most common user interface features were clinic and health service locators. While app strengths included provision of SRH education, description of modern

  1. A Community Needs Index for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program Planning: Application of Spatial Generalized Linear Mixed Models.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Glen D; Mesler, Kristine; Kacica, Marilyn A

    2017-02-06

    Objective The objective is to estimate community needs with respect to risky adolescent sexual behavior in a way that is risk-adjusted for multiple community factors. Methods Generalized linear mixed modeling was applied for estimating teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease (STD) incidence by postal ZIP code in New York State, in a way that adjusts for other community covariables and residual spatial autocorrelation. A community needs index was then obtained by summing the risk-adjusted estimates of pregnancy and STD cases. Results Poisson regression with a spatial random effect was chosen among competing modeling approaches. Both the risk-adjusted caseloads and rates were computed for ZIP codes, which allowed risk-based prioritization to help guide funding decisions for a comprehensive adolescent pregnancy prevention program. Conclusions This approach provides quantitative evidence of community needs with respect to risky adolescent sexual behavior, while adjusting for other community-level variables and stabilizing estimates in areas with small populations. Therefore, it was well accepted by the affected groups and proved valuable for program planning. This methodology may also prove valuable for follow up program evaluation. Current research is directed towards further improving the statistical modeling approach and applying to different health and behavioral outcomes, along with different predictor variables.

  2. Rates of ectopic pregnancy, sterility follow PID rise.

    PubMed

    1980-05-01

    500,000 cases of PID (pelvic inflammatory disease) are reported annually in the US, with 34,000 to 92,000 women becoming sterile as a consequence of the disease. In addition, the contraceptive methods women use during their exposure to PID-causing agents may directly affect their relative risk of developing PID, at an annual cost of $2.7 billion in health-care expenses. Another sequelae of PID is ectopic pregnancy. The STD epidemic years from 1965 to 1975 are projected to increase the rate of ectopic pregnancies to 50,000 a year, or one for every 60 live births before leveling off. By 1990, 1 out of 32 women will have had an ectopic pregnancy. Tubal occlusion can result in involuntary infertility. The National Survey of Family Growth estimates that the prevalence of infertile women aged 15 to 44 who are married and use no contraceptive method has increased in the past 2-1/2 years from 2.7% to 6.1%. These women number 142,000 annually and resort to nonsurgical sterilization, with PID as a major reason. Gonococcal PID accounts for 34,000 to 92,000 women becoming involuntarily sterile each year. However, over 80% of PID is nongonococcal PID, which is a worst disease. Chronic PID and infertility are found "more often in women who have had nongonococcal PID than in women who have had gonococcal PID." Etiologic organisms of PID include gonorrhea; E. coli, anaerobes and Chlamydia trachomatis.

  3. [Sexual Abuse and Neglect Situations as Risk Factors for Adolescent Pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Restrepo Martínez, Miguel; Trujillo Numa, Laura; Restrepo Bernal, Diana; Torres de Galvis, Yolanda; Sierra, Gloria

    In Colombia, one out of five women between the ages of 15 and 19 years have been pregnant. Almost two-thirds (64%) of these pregnancies were unplanned. To examine the socio-demographic, psychosocial and clinical risk factors associated with adolescent pregnancy. An analytical prevalence study was performed using secondary data from the First Demographic Study of Mental Health in Medellin, Colombia. Female adolescents between 13 and 19 years of age were included in the study. The population was evaluated using the Composite International Diagnosis Interview, a structured interview developed by the World Health Organization, which establishes diagnoses according to the DSM-IV and ICD-10 criteria. A sample of 499 female adolescents was obtained, in which 135 adolescent pregnancies were identified, representing a prevalence of 21.5%. The large majority (84.4%) were between 16 and 19 years old. The median age was 17 years, with an interquartile range of 2 years. Almost two-thirds (61.2%) of female adolescents had initiated sexual activity at the age of 15 or later. Almost one-third (31.9%) reported being physically abused during childhood, and 6.7% sexually abused. Of those who were pregnant, 66.7% reported previous sexual abuse. A bivariate analysis showed that sexual abuse (OR=7.68), childhood negligence (OR=4.33), and having a partner (OR=6.31) were factors associated with an adolescent pregnancy. Negligence and sexual abuse in childhood and adolescence can be prevented, and adolescent pregnancies can be decreased. This finding has important implications for clinical management and prognosis, and requires public preventive policies. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. [Social representation of pregnancy in adolescence: appraisal of dominant attitudes and others of negative impact].

    PubMed

    Dufort, Francine; Boucher, Kathleen; Guilbert, Edith; Saint-Laurent, Louise; Fortin-Pellerin, Laurence

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to gather information on the social representations of teenage pregnancy among adolescents, aged between 15 and 17. Eighteen focus groups were conducted among 150 boys and girls. The data were subjected to a qualitative content analysis. Results show that youths did not form homogeneous groups. The points of view expressed gave rise to 4 dimensions (emotive, reflexive, psychobiological, economic-social) and 4 positions (negative, positive, ambivalent and dynamic). From these dimensions and positions, 4 representations of teenage pregnancy were identified: pregnancy as a problem, pregnancy as a project, pregnancy as a source of tension, and pregnancy as a source of power. This study illustrates the importance of educative strategies such as going beyond alarmist preventive messages, opening dialogue with and between youngsters, and promoting social support and mutual aid.

  5. Adenomyosis reduces pregnancy rates in infertile women undergoing IVF.

    PubMed

    Salim, Rehan; Riris, Solon; Saab, Wael; Abramov, Benjamin; Khadum, Iffat; Serhal, Paul

    2012-09-01

    High-resolution transvaginal ultrasound has facilitated the diagnosis of adenomyosis. This study determined the prevalence of this finding in infertile women and its effect on the outcome of IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). This prospective study evaluated 275 consecutive women, commencing IVF/ICSI for the first time. Inclusion criteria were adequate ovarian reserve. Women with fibroids or a previous myomectomy were excluded. All women were screened for adenomyosis by transvaginal ultrasound on three separate occasions. The control group included 256 women and the adenomyosis group included 19 women. There was no significant difference in the ages of women, FSH, cause of infertility, body mass index, total dose of gonadotrophin used and number of oocytes collected between the two groups. However, women with adenomyosis had a higher mean antral follicle count (P=0.006). The clinical pregnancy rate (22.2% versus 47.2%) and ongoing pregnancy rate (11.1% versus 45.9%) were significantly lower in women with adenomyosis and the miscarriage rate (50.0% versus 2.8%) was significantly higher in women with adenomyosis (all P<0.001). Ultrasound evidence of adenomyosis is found in a significant number of women presenting with infertility and has a negative impact on the outcome of IVF/ICSI. This paper suggests that a common condition known as adenomyosis is associated with a reduced success following fertility treatment such as IVF. The diagnosis of adenomyosis has been greatly facilitated by the advent of high-resolution transvaginal ultrasound. This was a study including 275 consecutive women who were commencing IVF for the first time. Comparing women who did not have adenomyosis and those that did, the clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates were both lower in women with adenomyosis (22.2% versus 47.2% and 11.1% versus 45.9%, respectively). So, fewer women with adenomyosis became pregnant and had an ongoing pregnancy. The miscarriage rate was higher in women with

  6. Incompatibility between Pregnancy and Educational Projects, from the Perspective of Socially Vulnerable Adolescent Women and Men in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campero, Lourdes; Herrera, Cristina; Benítez, Alejandra; Atienzo, Erika; González, Guillermo; Marín, Eréndira

    2014-01-01

    Research focused on adolescent pregnancy reports that this event acquires significance and has different consequences according to the context and social subjects who experience it. In this study, by means of a sample formed by adolescent women and men who are socially vulnerable in Mexico, with and without a history of pregnancy, we can see how…

  7. Incompatibility between Pregnancy and Educational Projects, from the Perspective of Socially Vulnerable Adolescent Women and Men in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campero, Lourdes; Herrera, Cristina; Benítez, Alejandra; Atienzo, Erika; González, Guillermo; Marín, Eréndira

    2014-01-01

    Research focused on adolescent pregnancy reports that this event acquires significance and has different consequences according to the context and social subjects who experience it. In this study, by means of a sample formed by adolescent women and men who are socially vulnerable in Mexico, with and without a history of pregnancy, we can see how…

  8. A randomized trial of motivational interviewing and facilitated contraceptive access to prevent rapid repeat pregnancy among adolescent mothers.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jack; Lutz, Robyn; Osuagwu, Ngozi; Rotz, Dana; Goesling, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Most interventions designed to reduce teen pregnancy rates have not focused on pregnant and/or parenting adolescents. Therefore, a large randomized controlled trial was conducted regarding a motivational interviewing program entitled Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy in a low-income sample of adolescent mothers. This program recommended monthly sessions between a participant and a registered nurse over 18 months. This program also featured facilitated birth control access through transportation assistance and a part-time contraceptive clinic. The impact of this program on rapid repeat pregnancies at 18 months after enrollment was evaluated. Five hundred ninety-eight adolescent females were enrolled from 7 obstetrics-gynecology clinics and 5 postpartum units of a large hospital system in a Midwestern city. Each participant was enrolled at least 28 weeks pregnant or less than 9 weeks postpartum. Each participant was randomized to either the Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy intervention or a usual-care control condition. Intervention participants averaged 4.5 hours of assistance. Participants were contacted by blinded research staff at 6 and 18 months to complete self-report surveys. Differences in outcomes between the intervention and control groups were assessed using ordinary least-squares regression. There was an 18.1% absolute reduction in self-reported repeat pregnancy in the intervention group relative to the control group (20.5% vs 38.6%%; P < .001). There was a 13.7% absolute increase in self-reported long-acting reversible contraception use in the intervention group relative to the control group (40.2% vs 26.5%, P = .002). There was no evidence of harmful effects of the intervention on sexual risk behaviors, such as having sexual intercourse without a condom or greater number of partners. The Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy program represents one of the few evidence-based interventions to reduce rapid repeat teen pregnancy. This relatively brief

  9. Preventing adolescent pregnancy: biological, social, cultural, and political influences on age at first sexual intercourse.

    PubMed

    Pires, Raquel; Araújo-Pedrosa, Anabela; Pereira, Joana; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2014-08-01

    Age at first sexual intercourse (AFSI) is the initial factor related to adolescents' sexual life that may increase the risk of adolescent pregnancy. We explored the biological, social, cultural, and political predictors of AFSI addressing several gaps that prevent us from generalizing the results of past research to adolescent pregnancy prevention. We also explored the moderating effects of cultural variables on the links between social and political predictors and AFSI. Our sample consisted of 889 Portuguese female adolescents aged 12-19. Earlier age at menarche, non-intact family structure, maternal history of adolescent pregnancy, lower maternal emotional warmth, absence of religious involvement, and living in Portugal's mainland and in a legal context penalizing abortion predicted earlier AFSI. School attendance predicted earlier AFSI among adolescents of European ethnic origin; adolescents of non-European ethnic origin presented the opposite, but non-significant, pattern. These findings suggest that, in addition to isolated characteristics, factors from different ecological contexts should be considered when planning interventions designed to foster healthy and informed transitions to sexual initiation and prevent the related risks of unwanted outcomes. We discuss implications for future research and practice.

  10. Family risk factors associated with adolescent pregnancy: study of a group of adolescent girls and their families in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, S; Naranjo, J; Padilla, M; Gutiérez, R; Lammers, C; Blum, R W

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents the study on the family risk factors associated with adolescent pregnancy among adolescent girls and their families in Quito, Ecuador. The study aimed to identify characteristics within the family associated with adolescent pregnancy. A total of 135 female adolescents (aged 12-19 years) and their families were separately interviewed. 47 were pregnant and attending prenatal care at an inner city hospital in Quito, and 88 were nonpregnant students from schools located within the same geographical area. Results showed that when compared to their pregnant peers, more nonpregnant adolescents lived with their biological parents (p 0.002); they showed higher school performance (p 0.001); and more values and religiosity (p 0.0001). Pregnant adolescents reported lower mother-daughter and father-daughter communication (p 0.02), lesser life satisfaction in general, and more school and economic difficulties (p 0.001). Moreover, they were less likely to find support for their problems in or outside the family (p 0.0001) and showed higher levels of depression (68.8%) and sexual abuse (14.9%). Parental education was higher in the families of nonpregnant adolescents and both parents worked to provide financial support for the family.

  11. Race differences in teenage sexuality, pregnancy, and adolescent childbearing.

    PubMed

    Furstenberg, F F

    1987-01-01

    This article has examined the origin and consequences of racial differences in teen sexuality, pregnancy, and childbearing. Black/white differences in rates of early and out-of-wedlock childbearing have been declining in the past several decades though the incidence of nonmartial fertility among younger teens is still about five times as high for blacks as for whites. Early sexual behavior, irregular use of contraception, and a much lower probability of marrying prior to having a birth all contribute to the racial differential. Evidence suggests that both normative and socioeconomic differences may account for these demographic patterns. Black teens show markedly higher tolerance for childbearing before marriage. They also express much greater reservations about the viability of marriage, especially at an early age, than do whites. These views may affect their willingness to risk early pregnancy and initiate intercourse at an early age. Several types of interventions that might reduce black/white differences in teen childbearing were reviewed. The most promising of these involved simultaneously strengthening the community sanctions that discourage early parenthood while expanding social opportunities. Presently, poor, especially poor minority youth, may feel that they have little to lose by entering parenthood prematurely. Unless we are able to persuade these youth that they have a larger stake in the future, we are unlikely to see a dramatic decline in the incidence of early childbearing among blacks. This does not necessarily mean that racial differences are destined to persist. Increasingly, white youth are subject to many of the same conditions that have produced high rates of early and out-of-wedlock childbearing among blacks. Thus, racial differences may decline not because the situation of blacks is improving but because white youth are less willing to defer sexual activity or less able to marry when pregnancy occurs. This may at least change the perception

  12. Methotrexate in the management of adolescents with ectopic pregnancies: a physician survey.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Anjali; Thomas, Martin; Spitzer, Rachel F; Kives, Sari; Allen, Lisa

    2009-03-01

    To assess gynaecologists' management of ectopic pregnancies in adolescents. A survey was sent to Canadian gynaecologists, including pediatric gynaecologists, by mail and email. Pediatric gynaecologists in the United States were surveyed by mail. Variations in preferences and practices in the management of ectopic pregnancy were identified, with specific focus on the use of methotrexate. Some possible determinants of alternative management were described, using both descriptive and inferential statistics. A total of 209 physicians responded. Of these, 89 (42.6%) had treated adolescents with ectopic pregnancies (the "treatment group"). There were no statistically significant differences in demographic characteristics of the treatment group compared with the non-treatment group, except for the proportion of adolescents in the physicians' practices and whether or not they provided care for pregnant adolescents. In the treatment group, 84.3% had used methotrexate in the management of adolescents with an ectopic pregnancy. Most physicians (57/89, 64%) stated that they do not use different criteria for managing adolescent and adult patients, although across all age categories only 21.3% to 25.8% stated that age is not a relevant factor; 43.9% and 28.8% would definitely not or probably not offer methotrexate to patients less than 13 and 14-16 years of age, respectively, and 4.8% and 6.2% would definitely not or probably not offer methotrexate to patients 17-19 and more than 19 years of age, respectively. Physicians would definitely not or probably not offer methotrexate to a patient with a history of non-compliance with contraception (48.4%) or of substance abuse (45.9%), or to a patient living alone (62.7%). Physicians do report using methotrexate in managing adolescents with ectopic pregnancies, but consider age and compliance variables in their decision-making.

  13. Decisionmaking regarding unwanted pregnancy among adolescents in Mexico City: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tatum, Carrie; Rueda, Marcela; Bain, Jennifer; Clyde, Jessie; Carino, Giselle

    2012-03-01

    Adolescents in Latin America and the Caribbean confront difficult decisions when faced with unwanted pregnancies, especially given the region's legal restrictions on and widespread cultural opposition to abortion. Little research has been conducted on pregnancy decisionmaking among young people in this region. This study examines the role of peers, partners, family members, and health-care providers in adolescents' decisionmaking regarding pregnancy continuation or termination in Mexico City shortly after abortion was legalized in 2007. Qualitative in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in 2009 with participants aged 13-17 who experienced an unwanted pregnancy. Although participants were able to formulate preferences regarding pregnancy resolution, parents' wishes usually prevailed when their wishes conflicted. Peers were generally found to be supportive, whereas the role of partners varied. Results indicate the need for comprehensive sexuality education to promote adolescents' autonomy, mechanisms other than legal mandates to encourage constructive parental involvement, and confidential counseling from health professionals offering options and supporting adolescents'ability to act on their decisions.

  14. Perceived access to contraception among adolescents with diabetes: barriers to preventing pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Eleanor B; Sobota, Mindy; Charron-Prochownik, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess beliefs, perceived access to, and practices regarding contraception among adolescent women with type 1 diabetes. Eighty-nine females with type 1 diabetes between the ages of 13 and 19 years, who were recruited from 2 endocrinology practices as part of a larger study, completed a battery of questionnaires designed to assess variables relevant to discussions of sexuality, preconception counseling, contraception, and pregnancy. In addition, items were designed to explore adolescents' relationship with their health care provider and comfort requesting birth control. Baseline data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Half of the sexually active adolescents in this sample reported having had sex without birth control at a time they were trying to avoid pregnancy. A third (36%) of subjects felt that women with diabetes have very limited choices of birth control, and 43% incorrectly believe that all birth control methods are less effective when used by women with diabetes. Less than half (47%) reported that they had discussed birth control with a health care professional, and 29% of subjects reported they had not received formal instruction on birth control in any setting. Perhaps of greatest concern, only 69% stated they would feel comfortable asking a professional for birth control. Many adolescent women with diabetes are at risk of unintended pregnancy and do not feel comfortable asking a health professional for birth control. Diabetes educators who initiate preconception counseling at puberty and discuss contraceptive options with adolescent women with diabetes may improve pregnancy outcomes.

  15. Sexual risk behavior and pregnancy in detained adolescent females: a study in Dutch detention centers

    PubMed Central

    Hamerlynck, Sannie MJJ; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Vermeiren, Robert; Jansen, Lucres MC; Bezemer, Pieter D; Doreleijers, Theo AH

    2007-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the lifetime prevalence of teenage pregnancy in the histories of detained adolescent females and to examine the relationship between teenage pregnancy on the one hand and mental health and sexuality related characteristics on the other. Methods Of 256 admitted detained adolescent females aged 12–18 years, a representative sample (N = 212, 83%) was examined in the first month of detention. Instruments included a semi-structured interview, standardized questionnaires and file information on pregnancy, sexuality related characteristics (sexual risk behavior, multiple sex partners, sexual trauma, lack of assertiveness in sexual issues and early maturity) and mental health characteristics (conduct disorder, alcohol and drug use disorder and suicidality). Results Approximately 20% of the participants reported having been pregnant (before detention), although none had actually given birth. Sexuality related characteristics were more prevalent in the pregnancy group, while this was not so for the mental health characteristics. Age at assessment, early maturity, sexual risk behavior, and suicidality turned out to be the best predictors for pregnancy. Conclusion The lifetime prevalence of pregnancy in detained adolescent females is high and is associated with both sexuality related risk factors and mental health related risk factors. Therefore, prevention and intervention programs targeting sexual risk behavior and mental health are warranted during detention. PMID:17683633

  16. Depressive symptoms and gestational length among pregnant adolescents: Cluster randomized control trial of CenteringPregnancy® plus group prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Felder, Jennifer N; Epel, Elissa; Lewis, Jessica B; Cunningham, Shayna D; Tobin, Jonathan N; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Thomas, Melanie; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2017-06-01

    Depressive symptoms are associated with preterm birth among adults. Pregnant adolescents have high rates of depressive symptoms and low rates of treatment; however, few interventions have targeted this vulnerable group. Objectives are to: (a) examine impact of CenteringPregnancy® Plus group prenatal care on perinatal depressive symptoms compared to individual prenatal care; and (b) determine effects of depressive symptoms on gestational age and preterm birth among pregnant adolescents. This cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in 14 community health centers and hospitals in New York City. Clinical sites were randomized to receive standard individual prenatal care (n = 7) or CenteringPregnancy® Plus group prenatal care (n = 7). Pregnant adolescents (ages 14-21, N = 1,135) completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale during pregnancy (second and third trimesters) and postpartum (6 and 12 months). Gestational age was obtained from medical records, based on ultrasound dating. Intention to treat analyses were used to examine objectives. Adolescents at clinical sites randomized to CenteringPregnancy® Plus experienced greater reductions in perinatal depressive symptoms compared to those at clinical sites randomized to individual care (p = .003). Increased depressive symptoms from second to third pregnancy trimester were associated with shorter gestational age at delivery and preterm birth (<37 weeks gestation). Third trimester depressive symptoms were also associated with shorter gestational age and preterm birth. All p < .05. Pregnant adolescents should be screened for depressive symptoms prior to third trimester. Group prenatal care may be an effective nonpharmacological option for reducing depressive symptoms among perinatal adolescents. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Urban African American adolescent parents: their perceptions of sex, love, intimacy, pregnancy, and parenting.

    PubMed

    Harris, J L

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of twenty-two urban African American adolescent mothers and six adolescent fathers (across seven grade levels and a general education equivalency program) regarding sex, love, intimacy, pregnancy, and parenting. Structured interviews and focus groups were used to gather data. Demographic and personal history information was also obtained. Inductive data analysis using constant comparison methods was employed to identify patterns and themes within and across gender groups.

  18. A computer-based approach to preventing pregnancy, STD, and HIV in rural adolescents.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Anthony J; Zimmerman, Rick S; Carlyle, Kellie E; Abner, Erin L

    2007-01-01

    A computer- and Internet-based intervention was designed to influence several variables related to the prevention of pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in rural adolescents. The intervention was guided by the extended parallel process model and was evaluated using a pretest-post-test control group design with random assignment at the school level. Three hundred and twenty-six tenth-grade males and females enrolled in two rural Appalachian public high schools completed the survey at both points in time. Results indicate the vast majority (88.5%) of students in the experimental school completed at least one activity (M = 3.46 for those doing at least one activity). Further, both the overall program and all but one of the activities were rated positively by participants. Regarding the effects of the intervention, results indicate that students in the experimental school were less likely to initiate sexual activity and had greater general knowledge, greater condom negotiation self-efficacy, more favorable attitudes toward waiting to have sex, and greater situational self-efficacy than in the control school. In tandem, the results suggest that the computer-based programs may be a cost-effective and easily replicable means of providing teens with basic information and skills necessary to prevent pregnancy, STDs, and HIV.

  19. Repeat Pregnancy among Urban Adolescents: Sociodemographic, Family, and Health Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coard, Stephanie Irby; Nitz, Katherine; Felice, Marianne E.

    2000-01-01

    Examines sociodemographic, family, and health factors associated with repeat pregnancy in a clinical sample of urban, first-time mothers. Results indicate that postpartum contraceptive method was associated with repeat pregnancy at year one; contraceptive use, maternal age, history of miscarriages, and postpartum contraceptive method were…

  20. Adolescents' Knowledge and Beliefs about Pregnancy: The Impact of "ENABL."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield; Smith, Thomas Edward; Harrison, Dianne F.; Springer, David W.

    2000-01-01

    Explores which factors predicted changes in knowledge and beliefs among middle school students (N=1450) after exposure to a pregnancy prevention program. Results show that the single most important predictor of improvement in knowledge and beliefs about pregnancy prevention was the program itself, not background variables. (MKA)

  1. Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention: Strategies for the '80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Elizabeth T.; Bassoff, Betty Z.

    Most efforts at combating teenage pregnancy have focused on cognitive/educational levels felt by concerned adults to be of greatest importance. However, recent research has demonstrated the connection between lack of career goals, low self-esteem, perception of narrow options, and risk-taking behavior as factors leading to pregnancy. A 3-year…

  2. [Adolescent pregnancy: maternal characteristics and their association with birth weight of the newborn].

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Mesa, Sandra Lucía; Zapata López, Natalia; Parra Sosa, Beatriz Elena; Escudero Vásquez, Luz Estela; Atalah, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    In Colombia, adolescent pregnancy is a public health problem, with serious implications for the health and nutrition of the binomial mother-child. assess socio-demographic, economic, food security, health and maternal nutritional status characteristics by anthropometric measures in a group of pregnant adolescents in Medellin-Colombia on their third trimester of pregnancy and associate them with the newborns weight. A cross sectional analytical study was made with 294 pregnant women (week 27 to 40), who participating in prenatal control program of the public hospital network in Medellin-Colombia. We sought Association of weight at birth with the explanatory variables. underweight in pregnant women was presented in families that had lower income wages than the Standard Minimum Wage Income--SMWI-, adolescents who were younger than 15 years old and those who had a gynecological age less than five years. In newborns, the highest proportion of small children for pregnancy age was found in mothers who presented infections, low pregnancy weight and low family income less than the minimum wage. For those whose earnings was less than the minimum income the newborn weight decreased 118g (CI 95%: -2.5 a - 234.7), in addition, for each kilogram that increased the pre-pregnancy weight, newborn weight increased in 10,26g (CI 95%: 1.98 a-18.5). low-weight pregnancy and low-weight newborns are associated with low family income. Pre-pregnancy weight, body mass index in the third trimester of pregnancy and mother's presence of urinary tract and vaginal infections were associated with the newborn's weight.

  3. Sexual intercourse, abuse and pregnancy among adolescent women: does sexual orientation make a difference?

    PubMed

    Saewyc, E M; Bearinger, L H; Blum, R W; Resnick, M D

    1999-01-01

    The influence of sexual orientation on adolescents' sexual behaviors and pregnancy histories was investigated in a subsample of 3816 female adolescents, 12-19 years old, who completed the 1987 Minnesota (US) Adolescent Health Survey. 182 identified themselves as bisexual or lesbian, 1753 were unsure of their sexual orientation, and 1881 were heterosexual. Bisexual/lesbian respondents were about as likely as heterosexual respondents ever to have had intercourse (33.0% and 29.3%, respectively), but they had a significantly higher prevalence of childhood physical abuse (19.3% vs. 11.9%) and sexual abuse (22.1% vs. 15.3%) than their heterosexual counterparts. Among sexually experienced respondents, 29.8% of bisexual/lesbian adolescents, 43.5% of those unsure about their identity, and 23.1% of heterosexuals used no contraception and 12.3%, 8.5%, and 14.5%, respectively, of those who used contraception used an ineffective method. 12.3% of bisexual/lesbian women, 6.1% of those unsure about their sexual orientation, and 5.3% of heterosexual adolescents had experienced a pregnancy; 2 or more pregnancies were reported by 23.5%, 15.1%, and 9.8%, respectively, of ever-pregnant teens. Finally, 9.7% of bisexual/lesbian women had engaged in prostitution in the year preceding the survey, compared with 1.9% of heterosexuals and 3.4% of those unsure about their orientation. These findings suggest that adolescents who identify themselves as lesbian or bisexual are at high risk of pregnancy and poor contraceptive practices. Providers of reproductive health care and family planning services should not assume that their pregnant adolescent patients are heterosexual or that lesbian clients or those unsure of their sexual orientation are not in need of contraception.

  4. Adolescent sexual activity.

    PubMed

    Braverman, P K; Strasburger, V C

    1993-11-01

    Adolescents are becoming sexually active at younger ages. One half of the adolescents in the United States are sexually active. This article reviews adolescent sexual activity, including rates of sexual activity, sexual practices, gay and lesbian youth, and factors affecting the initiation of sexual activity. In addition, adolescent pregnancy, with possible outcomes and effects on teen parents and their offspring, is discussed.

  5. Urban African American Adolescent Parents: Their Perceptions of Sex, Love, Intimacy, Pregnancy, and Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Jewel L. Jones

    1998-01-01

    Examines the perception of urban African-American adolescent mothers and fathers regarding sex, love, intimacy, pregnancy, and parenting. Uses structured interviews and focus groups to gather data. Employs inductive data analysis using constant comparison methods to identify themes and patterns within and across gender groups. (Author/GCP)

  6. Selected Resources in the Areas of Adolescent Sexuality and Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glimps, Blanche E.

    This annotated bibliography of resources is suggested for use by school guidance counselors, health educators, teachers, and school nurses who provide supportive counseling and education to teenagers. It includes a general review of some of the problems associated with adolescent pregnancy and childbirth, and presents a list of selected books,…

  7. Adolescent Decision Making: A Broadly Based Theory and Its Application to the Prevention of Early Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Courtney P.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a broadly based theory of adolescent decision making including all the necessary components of the subject: cognitive development, social and psychological factors, and cultural and societal influences. This theory is then applied to the problem of preventing early pregnancy at an inner-city high school. Asserts that similar programs…

  8. Pittsburgh Board of Public Education Task Force on Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting: Minority Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaleida, Phillip; And Others

    This minority report is a rebuttal to the recommendations made by the Task Force on Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting of the Pittsburgh Board of Public Education. It takes issue with the way in which decisions were made and especially with the recommendation to establish school-based clinics (SBCs) in or near high risk schools. This minority…

  9. Addressing Child Marriage and Adolescent Pregnancy as Barriers to Gender Parity and Equality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psaki, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    A girl's success in school--and after leaving school--is determined in part by the characteristics of and factors in her household and community. Many policies and programmes are based on an assumption that early marriage and adolescent pregnancy hamper continued progress toward gender equality in education. While education and age at marriage and…

  10. Reducing Adolescent Pregnancy: The Next Steps for Program, Research and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brindis, Claire

    1990-01-01

    This special issue of the "Family Life Educator" features a planning document on adolescent pregnancy prevention designed to assist communities throughout the United States in translating the National Research Council's recommendations and strategies from the "Risking the Future" study into steps for future action. An introduction provides a…

  11. Sex Differences in Contraception Non-Use among Urban Adolescents: Risk Factors for Unintended Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casola, Allison R.; Nelson, Deborah B.; Patterson, Freda

    2017-01-01

    Background: Contraception non-use among sexually active adolescents is a major cause of unintended pregnancy (UP). Methods: In this cross-sectional study we sought to identify overall and sex-specific correlates of contraception non-use using the 2015 Philadelphia Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) (N = 9540). Multivariate regression models were…

  12. Addressing Child Marriage and Adolescent Pregnancy as Barriers to Gender Parity and Equality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psaki, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    A girl's success in school--and after leaving school--is determined in part by the characteristics of and factors in her household and community. Many policies and programmes are based on an assumption that early marriage and adolescent pregnancy hamper continued progress toward gender equality in education. While education and age at marriage and…

  13. Opportunity, Community, and Early Adolescent Pregnancy: A Replication of Research with Older Teenaged Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Robert; McDonough, Meghan; Williams, Tony

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to broaden the analytic categories for understanding early-adolescent pregnancy, suggesting an antidote to the methodological individualism that emphasizes individual and family characteristics by using broader contextual factors. Seemingly imprudent behaviors can be rendered interpretably rational when placed in social context. Without…

  14. The Northeast Adolescent Project: A Collaborative Effort to Address Teen-Age Pregnancy in Houston, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opuni, Kwame A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The broad impact of teen pregnancy prompted initiation of a collaborative Northeast Adolescent Project in the Houston (Texas) area in 1990. Results of an evaluation of the program indicate that comprehensive community coalitions can effectively motivate health applications to improve prenatal outcomes among sexually active, urban, minority…

  15. Relationship Characteristics and Sexual Practices of African American Adolescent Girls Who Desire Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Susan L.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Wingood, Gina M.; Person, Sharina D.; Crosby, Richard A.; Harrington, Kathleen F.; Dix, Emily S.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined associations between African American adolescent girls' desire to become pregnant and their sexual and relationship practices. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to detect significant associations between pregnancy desire and the assessed correlates. Of 522 participants (14 to 18 years old), 67 (12.8%) were…

  16. Pregnancy Status, Self-Esteem and Ethnicity: Some Relationships in a Sample of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Delores E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Self-esteem measures were administered to 100 pregnant/parenting or never-pregnant adolescents; 41 were African American and 59 European American. Self-esteem was associated with pregnancy for the latter but not the former. Never-pregnant European American girls scored significantly higher than pregnant/parenting European Americans on 10 of 12…

  17. Can the First Pregnancy of a Young Adolescent Be Prevented? A Question Which Must Be Answered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baizerman, Michael

    1977-01-01

    The literature on adolescent cognitive development and issues related to the prevention of teenage pregnancy are briefly discussed. The author outlines relevant questions which should be understood by professionals working in sex education and human services programs, and presents implications for research. (GDC)

  18. Risk-profiles and outcomes of multi-foetal pregnancies in adolescent mothers.

    PubMed

    Alrahmani, Layan; Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Adekola, Henry; Puscheck, Elizabeth; Gonik, Bernard; Awonuga, Awoniyi O

    2016-11-01

    In this retrospective review of 468 mothers with a multi-foetal pregnancy in Detroit, we describe the risk-profiles and the obstetrical, maternal and foetal outcomes of multi-foetal pregnancy in 59 (13%) adolescents. Overall, most mothers were African American, did not have private insurance and all were unmarried. For most mothers, this was their first pregnancy (59.3%) and their first delivery (69.5%). Almost 50% presented to triage at least once during their pregnancy. Anaemia (78%) and hypertensive disorders (18.6%) were common in this age group. The majority of adolescents delivered preterm as 81.4% were <37 weeks and 49% were <34 weeks. Furthermore, the majority of infants (79%) had low birth weights (median: 1975 g, range: 365-3405 g). This contemporary report emphasises the need for multidisciplinary prenatal management and specialist supervision, as multi-foetal pregnancies in adolescents pose real risks and impact obstetrical, maternal and neonatal outcomes.

  19. [Unwanted adolescent pregnancy and post-partum utilization of contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Núñez-Urquiza, Rosa María; Hernández-Prado, Bernardo; García-Barrios, Cecilia; González, Dolores; Walker, Dylis

    2003-01-01

    To describe the proportion of unwanted pregnancies among all pregnant adolescents, its association with sociodemographic characteristics, and the use of post-partum contraceptive methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 220 women between 13 and 19 years of age, in two semi-urban municipalities of the State of Morelos, Mexico, interviewed between 1992 and 1994. Women were interviewed at home, six to twelve weeks after their delivery date. Women were asked whether they had wanted their last pregnancy, and about knowledge and use of contraceptive methods after delivery. Adolescent pregnancies accounted for 17% of all births registered in these two municipalities. Among all adolescent mother 22.73% reported that their pregnancy had not been wanted. A positive association was found between the lack of access to health services provided by public medical insurance systems (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social IMSS and Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado ISSSTE) and unwanted pregnancy (adjusted OR = 3.03, 95% CI (1.31, 7.) An association was also found between living in an urban community (adjusted OR = 2.16, 95% CI (1.08, 4.33) and an unwanted pregnancy. Among all adolescent mothers, 91.3% were familiar with "the pill" as a contraceptive method; 84.72% knew about the IUD, and 63.68% knew about the condom. However, only 35% of them were actually using an effective contraceptive method six weeks after delivery. No difference in frequency of contraceptive use was found among the adolescent mothers, according to whether they wanted their last pregnancy. Only 43.39% of mothers who delivered at hospitals or health centers were using an effective contraceptive method. These findings suggest that there is a great potential for family planning programs to target adolescents, and that the use of contraceptive methods after delivery should be promoted among adolescent mothers, especially those lacking access to public medical

  20. Adolescent pregnancy--a prospective survey of contraceptive knowledge and reproductive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Mahomed, K; Masona, D

    1991-10-01

    Adolescent sexual activity is occurring at younger ages resulting in unplanned and often unwanted pregnancies. The prospective case controlled study of 200 teenagers aged 16 and under and 200 controls aged over 20 was conducted in Harare, Zimbabwe. The study group tended to belong to the low socio-economic group and a large number became pregnant whilst still at school. Although sexually active, the group contained a very small percentage of contraceptive users. A significant number not only claimed having little knowledge of the service but appeared uniformed or misinformed of the risks associated with the use of contraceptive methods. Regarding support during pregnancy, the Zimbabwe teenager is certainly aided by the extended family unit and formal health centres appear to play a minor role. Prevention of teenager pregnancies needs us to focus on adolescent peer pressure as well as towards parents and community leaders.

  1. Checking pregnancy status in adolescent girls before procedures under general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, J F; Napier, S J; Ward-Jones, M; Wheeler, R A; Spargo, P M

    2012-10-01

    Surgery, ionising radiation and anaesthesia in the presence of an undetected pregnancy could be harmful. British guidelines state that female patients of 'childbearing age' should have their pregnancy status established before surgery. Approaching this topic with an adolescent girl can be challenging. The authors conducted an observational study and a survey in their institution and a national survey of Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists (APA) linkmen. Local: Southampton. National: UK. Both surveys demonstrate widespread concerns about inconsistent and informal practices. Only 45% of respondents in the authors' institution stated they ask adolescent girls if they could be pregnant. 40% of APA linkmen were unaware of national guidelines. This work illustrates the need for consistent national guidance. We propose that all girls who have reached menarche should be routinely offered a urine pregnancy test before any procedure under general anaesthesia.

  2. SOCIAL CAPITAL AND ADOLESCENT GIRLS' RESILIENCE TO TEENAGE PREGNANCY IN BEGORO, GHANA.

    PubMed

    Gyan, Sylvia Esther; Ahorlu, Collins; Dzorgbo, Dan-Bright S; Fayorsey, Clara K

    2017-05-01

    This study focuses on how older adolescent girls access and utilize social capital to develop resilience against teenage pregnancy in Begoro, Ghana. A survey of 419 non-pregnant girls aged 15-19 years, selected using a multi-stage cluster sampling technique, was conducted in 2012. Qualitative data were gathered through in-depth interviews with ten girls purposively selected from the survey respondents. Parents, relatives, teachers and religious groups were found to be important sources of social capital for the non-pregnant girls in developing resilience against teenage pregnancy. In addition, resilient girls tended to rely on multiple sources of social capital. It is recommended that stakeholders and policymakers in Ghana ensure that these significant sources of social capital in adolescent girls' sexual experience are equipped with the right information to help girls decrease the risk of teenage pregnancy.

  3. Effects of Exercise During Pregnancy on Maternal Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability.

    PubMed

    May, Linda E; Knowlton, Jennifer; Hanson, Jessica; Suminski, Richard; Paynter, Christopher; Fang, Xiangming; Gustafson, Kathleen M

    2016-07-01

    Pregnancy is associated with an increased sympathetic state, which can be exacerbated by gestational conditions. Research has shown that exercise during pregnancy lowers heart rate (HR) and can attenuate the symptoms of gestational conditions associated with increased sympathetic control. However, changes in maternal heart autonomic function in response to exercise have not been reported across multiple time points during pregnancy. This analysis is designed to address this gap. To determine if exercise throughout gestation improves maternal cardiac autonomic nervous system functioning, as evidenced by decreased HR and increased heart rate variability (HRV) indices. Case control study. Academic medical institution. A total of 56 women with healthy, singleton, low-risk pregnancies. Participants were asked to complete 3 resting 18-minute HRV recordings at 28, 32, and 36 weeks' gestation, along with a physical activity questionnaire. HRV indices were calculated for time (R peak to R peak interval standard deviation and root mean squared of successive differences) and frequency (very low, low, and high frequency) domain measures. The differences between groups were compared for HRV indices at 28, 32, and 36 weeks. Resting HR was significantly lower in the exercise group at 28 weeks (P < .01) compared with the control group. The exercise group had significantly (P < .05) increased measures of resting HRV time domain measures at 28, 32, and 36 weeks' gestation compared with the control group. Resting HRV power was significantly increased (P < .05) in all frequency domain measures at 32 weeks in the exercise group relative to the control group. No differences occurred in sympathovagal balance (low frequency/high frequency ratio) between groups. Exercise throughout pregnancy can significantly improve cardiac autonomic control. More research is needed to determine if this adaptation to exercise may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes associated with gestational conditions

  4. Pregnancy options counseling for adolescents: overcoming barriers to care and preserving preference.

    PubMed

    Dobkin, Loren M; Perrucci, Alissa C; Dehlendorf, Christine

    2013-04-01

    Current clinical guidelines for counseling adolescent patients about their pregnancy options fail to give concrete suggestions for how to begin and hold conversations that support patient autonomy, provide accurate and unbiased information, and address barriers to care. Recent research suggests that relative to adult women, adolescents are at increased risk of being denied abortion because they present beyond facilities' gestational age limits. Counseling that neglects to address the structural and developmental challenges that adolescents face when seeking care may contribute to the risk of abortion denial as well as subsequent delays in prenatal care. The task of providing non-directive, patient-centered, evidence-based pregnancy options counseling to an adolescent while ensuring that she receives her chosen course of care in a timely manner is challenging. This article presents a shared decision-making framework and specific suggestions for healthcare providers to support adolescent patients in coming to their decision about whether to continue or terminate an unplanned pregnancy and access follow-up care within the current sociopolitical environment.

  5. Assessing the prevalence and determinants of adolescents' unintended pregnancy and induced abortion in Owerri, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okereke, Chukwunenye Iheanacho

    2010-09-01

    This study examines the prevalence and determinants of adolescents' unintended pregnancy and induced abortion in Owerri, Nigeria. A pre-coded questionnaire was used to obtain information from 540 female adolescents of mean age 15.8 years. In addition, four FGDs were held with female adolescents in selected localities and in-depth interviews held with fifteen health-care service providers. Almost all the adolescents (99.8%) were Christians, with 70.3% being Catholics and 68.2% living with their parents. Over half (57.2%) of the adolescents had had sex. Contraceptives were rarely used owing to deep-seated cultural values. The data show that 31.6% of those who had ever had sex had an unintended pregnancy. Of these, 78.9% had recurrent pregnancies and 20.2% had an abortion. Of the latter, 41.8% had a recurrent abortion and 72.7% a post-abortion problem, for which 70.2% never sought treatment, increasing the risk of infertility in later life. The abortion seekers mostly went to patent medicine operators. A more acceptable and cost-effective contraceptive campaign involving use of local vernacular and traditional/local opinion leaders should be explored.

  6. The effect of long-acting reversible contraception on rapid repeat pregnancy in adolescents: a review.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Maureen K; Edelman, Alison B

    2013-04-01

    Repeat pregnancy within 2 years of a previous birth or abortion occurs in approximately 35% of recently pregnant female adolescents. The majority of these pregnancies are classified as unintended with about half ending in births and the remainder in abortions. Rapid repeat pregnancy (RRP) is associated with increased maternal and neonatal morbidity and continues a cycle of economic deprivation for young women and their families. Immediately following a pregnancy, most young women report an intention to avoid pregnancy in the near future, but many change their minds or become ambivalent within months. Lack of contraceptive use is more common among those teens that resume sexual intercourse earlier, live with a male partner, had a preterm delivery, or had an intended teen pregnancy. Adolescents who do not initiate a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) method (intrauterine device or contraceptive implant) have up to a 35 times increased risk of RRP compared with their peers using LARC. Risk of RRP is decreased when LARC methods are initiated earlier after an abortion or within the postpartum period. This review will focus on the prevalence of RRP, the risk factors for RRP, and the effectiveness of strategies to reduce unintended RRP including counseling and early initiation of long-acting contraceptive methods.

  7. Pregnancy and lactation affect markers of calcium and bone metabolism differently in adolescent and adult women with low calcium intakes.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Flávia F; Laboissière, Fabrícia P; King, Janet C; Donangelo, Carmen M

    2002-08-01

    Physiologic adaptation to the high calcium demand during pregnancy and lactation may be different in adolescents than in adults, particularly at low calcium intake. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare biochemical markers of calcium and bone metabolism between adolescent (14-19 y) and adult (21-35 y) women with calcium intake approximately 500 mg/d, in three different physiologic states, i.e., control (nonpregnant, nonlactating; NPNL), pregnant and lactating. Markers of calcium metabolism [serum Ca, P and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH); urinary Ca and P] and of bone turnover [urinary deoxypyridinoline (D-Pyr) and plasma bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP)] were measured in NPNL (adolescents, n = 12 and adults, n = 25), pregnant (adolescents, n = 30 and adults, n = 36) and lactating (adolescents, n = 19 and adults, n = 26) women. In the NPNL women, iPTH, D-Pyr and BAP were higher (P < 0.001) and urinary Ca was lower (P < 0.001) in adolescents than in adults. Serum iPTH was higher (P < 0.001) and urinary Ca was lower (P < 0.01) in adolescents than in adults also in pregnancy and lactation. Compared with NPNL women, serum Ca decreased (P < 0.001) with pregnancy in adolescents but not in adults. The increase in D-Pyr with pregnancy and lactation was very pronounced in adults ( approximately 130%, P < 0.001) but less in adolescents (<25%, P < 0.01). BAP increased (P < 0.001) with pregnancy and lactation in adults ( approximately 60%) but decreased (P < 0.001) with pregnancy in adolescents ( approximately 13%). Pregnancy and lactation appear to affect bone turnover in adolescent and adult women with low calcium intake differently.

  8. Adolescent Pregnancy: The Unmet Need for Psychological Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Christiane B.; Freese, Margaret P.

    Adolescents contribute nearly 20% of all births in the United States; half of these are unplanned or unwanted. Negative health and socioeconomic consequences are associated with adolescent childbearing, and teenagers account for nearly one-third of all reported therapeutic abortions. Failure to use other than traditional research methods to study…

  9. Teen pregnancy: an update.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Katherine A; Loveless, Meredith

    2014-10-01

    To provide clinicians with a review of recent research and clinically applicable tools regarding teen pregnancy. Teen pregnancy rates have declined but still remain a significant problem in the USA. Teen pregnancy prevention was identified by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as one of its top six priorities, which is increasing research and intervention data. Long-acting contraceptive methods are acceptable to teens and have been shown to reduce teen birth rates. Pregnant teens need special attention to counseling on pregnancy options and reducing risk during pregnancy with regular prenatal care. Postpartum teens should be encouraged and supported to breastfeed, monitored for depression, and have access to reliable contraception to avoid repeat undesired pregnancy. This review highlights important issues for all providers caring for female adolescents and those who may encounter teen pregnancy. Foremost prevention of teen pregnancy by comprehensive sexual education and access to contraception is the priority. Educating patients and healthcare providers about safety and efficacy of long-acting reversible contraception is a good step to reducing undesired teen pregnancies. Rates of postpartum depression are greater in adolescents than in adults, and adolescent mothers need to be screened and monitored for depression. Strategies to avoid another undesired pregnancy shortly after delivery should be implemented.

  10. Effects of Stretching Exercise on Heart Rate Variability During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Logan, Jeongok G; Yeo, SeonAe

    Little evidence exists for effects of low-intensity exercises such as stretching on cardiovascular health in pregnant women. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of a 20-minute stretching exercise on heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) in healthy pregnant women. In 15 pregnant women with a mean (SD) age of 29.47 (4.07) years and mean (SD) gestational weeks of 26.53 (8.35), HRV, and BP were measured before and after the 20-minute stretching exercise. Compared with before the stretching exercise, standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals, total variability of heart rate, increased by 7.40 milliseconds (t = -2.31, P = .04) and root mean square of successive differences, a surrogate measure of parasympathetic outflow, also increased by 11.68 milliseconds (Z = -2.04, P = .04) after the stretching exercise. Diastolic BP and HR decreased by 2.13 mm Hg (t = 1.93, P = .07) and 3.31 bpm (t = 2.17, P = .05), respectively, but they did not reach statistical significance. These preliminary data suggest that 20 minutes of stretching exercise may promote cardiovascular health by attenuating the loss of parasympathetic tone associated with pregnancy.

  11. Rapid policy change to single-embryo transfer while maintaining pregnancy rates per initiated cycle.

    PubMed

    Vélez, M P; Kadoch, I-J; Phillips, S J; Bissonnette, F

    2013-05-01

    Public financing of IVF aims at increasing access to treatment while decreasing the expenses associated with multiple pregnancies. Critics argue that it is associated with lower pregnancy rates. This study compared cycles performed during 2009 (before implementation of Quebec's public IVF programme; period I) to those performed in the year following implementation (period II) in a single IVF centre. First fresh cycles in period I (499 women) and first fresh cycles (815 women) along with their corresponding first vitrified-warmed transfer (271 women) in period II were evaluated. From period I to period II, single-embryo transfer increased from 17.3% to 85.0% (P<0.001), multiple ongoing pregnancy rate decreased from 25.8% to 1.6% (P<0.001) and ongoing pregnancy rate decreased from 31.9% to 23.3% (P=0.001). During period II, the ongoing pregnancy rate per vitrified-warmed embryo transfer was 19.2%, leading to a cumulative ongoing pregnancy rate per initiated cycle of 29.7%, which was not different to the pregnancy rate per fresh cycle during period I (31.9%). To conclude, Quebec's public IVF programme decreased multiple pregnancy rates while maintaining an acceptable cumulative ongoing pregnancy rate, a more precise outcome to evaluate the impact of public IVF programmes.

  12. Observed Rate of Down Syndrome in Twin Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Teresa N; Norton, Mary E; Flessel, Monica; Goldman, Sara; Currier, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the observed incidence of Down syndrome in twins compared with that expected based on maternal age-matched singletons, which is the current clinical approach. This was a retrospective review of California Prenatal Screening Program participants with expected delivery dates between July 1995 and December 2012. Cases confirmed prenatally or postnatally with a genetic imbalance leading to phenotypic Down syndrome (trisomy 21, mosaic trisomy 21, or translocations) were included. Pregnancies conceived with ovum donation and women older than 45 years were excluded. We compared the observed Down syndrome incidence per pregnancy for twins with expected incidence by extrapolating from singleton data and expected zygosity as is the current clinical approach. This extrapolation assumes that monozygotic pregnancies have equivalent Down syndrome risk per pregnancy relative to maternal age-matched singletons and dizygotic pregnancies have twice the risk of at least one affected fetus. Zygosity for affected cases was presumed to be monozygotic with Down syndrome concordance and dizygotic with Down syndrome discordance. Counts were compared using cumulative Poisson distributions. Of 77,279 twin pregnancies, 182 (0.2%) had at least one fetus with Down syndrome confirmed by karyotype. The ratio of observed-to-expected Down syndrome incidence per pregnancy was 33.6%, 75.2%, and 70.0% for monozygotic, dizygotic, and all twins, respectively (P<.001 for all comparisons). Considering maternal age subgroups and twin zygosity, a significantly lower-than-expected Down syndrome incidence was seen for women aged 25 to 45 years with monozygotic pregnancies and overall for women aged 25 to 45 years with dizygotic pregnancies. The observed incidence of Down syndrome in twin pregnancies is lower than expected, most notably for monozygotic pregnancies and with increasing maternal age. Risk-based counseling can strongly affect women's choices regarding testing and management during

  13. Maternal Glomerular Filtration Rate in Pregnancy and Fetal Size

    PubMed Central

    Morken, Nils-Halvdan; Travlos, Gregory S.; Wilson, Ralph E.; Eggesbø, Merete; Longnecker, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship of maternal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in pregnancy to fetal size needs to be better characterized as it impacts an ongoing debate about confounding effect of maternal GFR in investigations of important environmental contaminants. We aimed to characterize the size of the association between maternal GFR and infant birth weight. Materials and Methods A sub-cohort of 953 selected women (470 women with and 483 women without preeclampsia) in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort (MoBa), recruited during 2003–2007 were analyzed. GFR in the second trimester was estimated based on plasma creatinine. Birth weight was ascertained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Multivariate linear regression was used to evaluate the association between maternal GFR in second trimester (estimated by the Cockroft-Gault [GFR-CG] and the modification of diet in renal disease [GFR-MDRD] formulas) and infant birth weight. Partial correlation coefficients were also calculated. Results Maternal GFR-CG (β: 0.73 g/ml/min, p = 0.04) and GFR-MDRD (β: 0.83 g/ml/min, p = 0.04) were associated with infant birth weight in models adjusted for maternal weight in kilograms, preeclampsia, and gestational age at delivery (days). Partial correlation coefficients for the association between infant birth weight and GFR were 0.07 for both formulas. Although the birth weight-GFR association was stronger among the women with preeclampsia, the difference from women without preeclampsia was not statistically significant. Conclusion These data support an association between GFR during pregnancy and infant birth weight, and indicate that GFR may confound selected epidemiologic associations. PMID:25003331

  14. Ratings of Behavior Problems in Adolescents Hospitalized for Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Carolyn L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined usefulness of Devereux Adolescent Behavior Rating Scale (DAB) for assessing behavior problems in adolescents (n=404) hospitalized in inpatient substance abuse treatment units. From 15 original DAB scales, developed 4 scales measuring acting out behaviors, psychotic behaviors, attention-seeking/expressive behaviors, and inner…

  15. Influence of Temperature and Humidity on Pregnancy Rate of Murrah Buffaloes under Subtropical Climate

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Soumya; Chakravarty, A. K.; Sah, V.; Jamuna, V.; Behera, R.; Kashyap, N.; Deshmukh, B.

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress has adverse effects on fertility of dairy animals. Decline in fertility is linearly associated with an increase in combination of both temperature and humidity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between temperature humidity index (THI) and the pregnancy rate of Murrah buffaloes in a subtropical climate. The effects of genetic and non-genetic factors viz., sire, parity, period of calving and age group at first calving were found non-significant on pregnancy rate. The effect of THI was found significant (p<0.001) on pregnancy rate of Murrah buffaloes calved for first time and overall pregnancy rate. The threshold THI affecting the pregnancy rate was identified as THI 75. The months from October to March showed THI<75 and considered as non heat stress zone (NHSZ), while months from April to September were determined as heat stress zone (HSZ) with THI≥75. The lowest overall pregnancy rate (0.25) was obtained in July with THI 80.9, while the highest overall pregnancy rate (0.59) was found in November with THI 66.1. May and June were identified as critical heat stress zone (CHSZ) within the HSZ with maximum decline (−7%) in pregnancy rate with per unit increase in THI. The highest overall pregnancy rate was estimated as 0.45 in NHSZ with THI value 56.7 to 73.2. The pregnancy rate was found to have declined to 0.28 in HSZ with THI 73.5 to 83.7. However, the lowest pregnancy rate was estimated as 0.27 in CHSZ with THI value 80.3 to 81.6. PMID:26104398

  16. Adolescent men's attitudes and decision-making in relation to an unplanned pregnancy. Responses to an interactive video drama.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Maria; Cruise, Sharon; O'Halloran, Peter; Alderdice, Fiona; Hyde, Abbey

    2011-05-01

    This study confronts a gender bias in research on adolescent pregnancy by exploring adolescent men's decisions relating to a hypothetical unplanned pregnancy. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with adolescent men (N = 360) aged between 14 and 18 years attending schools in the Republic of Ireland. The study, the first of its kind in Europe, extends the small body of evidence on adolescent men and pregnancy decision-making by developing and examining reactions to an interactive video drama used in a comparable study in Australia. In addition, we tested a more comprehensive range of sociological and psychological determinants of adolescent men's decisions regarding an unplanned pregnancy. Results showed that adolescent men were more likely to choose to keep the baby in preference to abortion or adoption. Adolescent men's choice to continue the pregnancy (keep or adopt) in preference to abortion was significantly associated with anticipated feelings of regret in relation to abortion, perceived positive attitudes of own mother to keeping the baby and a feeling that a part of them might want a baby. Religiosity was also shown to underlie adolescent men's views on the perceived consequences of an abortion in their lives. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of a resiliency framework to examine pregnancy and birth outcomes among adolescents: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Solivan, Amber E.; Wallace, Maeve E.; Kaplan, Kathryn C.; Harville, Emily W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adolescent childbearing has been viewed as a social, political, and public health priority since the 1970s. Research has primarily focused on the negative consequences of teen pregnancy; less research has explored factors associated with healthy pregnancy and birth experiences in this population. Methods Using open-ended and qualitative techniques, researchers performed individual interviews with fifteen adolescent mothers (15–19 years of age) recruited from a Women’s and Children’s Clinic in Southern Louisiana, who had experienced a healthy pregnancy and bore a full-term, normal birth weight infant. We used a resiliency framework to identify factors that may have supported positive health outcomes despite risks associated with low-income and/or marginalized minority status. Results A total of 15 mothers of multiple racial/ethnic identities were included in the analysis. Mothers discussed potential protective factors that we classified as either assets (internal factors) or resources (external factors). Mothers demonstrated strong assets including self-efficacy and self-acceptance and important resources including familial support and partner support during pregnancy which may have contributed to their resiliency. Discussion Ensuring access to social and structural supports as well as supporting adolescent-friendly health and social policies may be key to promoting healthy maternal and infant outcomes among young women who become pregnant. PMID:26237055

  18. Family stress, perception of pregnancy, and age of first menarche among pregnant adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ravert, A A; Martin, J

    1997-01-01

    Family-of-origin stress, age of first menarche, and the perception of pregnancy as a life event were examined in 97 pregnant adolescents ages 13 to 18. This study investigated whether family-of-origin stress levels were significantly related to the pregnant adolescent's perception of her pregnancy as a life event. The study also examined whether age of first menarche was related to the subject's level of family stress. Family stress levels were assessed through the Adolescent-Family Inventory of Life-Events and Changes (A-FILE) developed by McCubbin & Thompson (1987). Perception of pregnancy as a life event was measured on a Likert scale developed by the researcher. Age of first menarche was obtained via self-report. Results indicated high levels of family stress among subjects with only a moderate level of impact or stress experienced from the pregnancy. As a group, the subjects experienced first menarche between 12 to 13 years of age, which is the average age supported by other studies within the United States.

  19. The Impact of State Abortion Policies on Teen Pregnancy Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medoff, Marshall

    2010-01-01

    The availability of abortion provides insurance against unwanted pregnancies since abortion is the only birth control method which allows women to avoid an unwanted birth once they are pregnant. Restrictive state abortion policies, which increase the cost of obtaining an abortion, may increase women's incentive to alter their pregnancy avoidance…

  20. The Impact of State Abortion Policies on Teen Pregnancy Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medoff, Marshall

    2010-01-01

    The availability of abortion provides insurance against unwanted pregnancies since abortion is the only birth control method which allows women to avoid an unwanted birth once they are pregnant. Restrictive state abortion policies, which increase the cost of obtaining an abortion, may increase women's incentive to alter their pregnancy avoidance…

  1. Helping Clinicians Prevent Pregnancy among Sexually Active Adolescents: U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use and U.S. Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Emily M

    2015-08-01

    The United States has made substantial progress in reducing teenage birth rates in recent decades, but rates remain high. Teen pregnancy can increase the risk of poor health outcomes and lead to decreased educational attainment, increased poverty, and welfare use, as well as increased cost to taxpayers. One of the most effective ways to prevent teenage pregnancy is through the use of effective birth control methods. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention has made the prevention of teenage pregnancy 1 of its 10 winnable battles. The CDC has released 2 evidence-based clinical guideline documents regarding contraceptive use for adolescents and adults. The first guideline, US Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, 2010, helps clinicians recognize when a contraceptive method may not be safe to use for a particular adolescent but also when not to withhold a contraceptive method that is safe to use. The second document, US Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, 2013, provides guidance for how to use contraceptive methods safely and effectively once they are deemed safe. Health care providers are encouraged to use these documents to provide safe and effective contraceptive care to patients seeking family planning, including adolescents. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. All rights reserved.

  2. Teenage pregnancy: impact of the integral attention given to the pregnant teenager and adolescent mother as a protective factor for repeat pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Maria José Carvalho; Carvalho, Kepler Alencar Mendes; Melhado, Amanda; Coates, Verônica; Omar, Hatim A

    2007-02-09

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the integral attention to the health of pregnant adolescents and adolescent mothers, having follow-up from the Integral Support Program for the Pregnant Teen (ISPPT), with the intention to determine quality of life and prevent repeat pregnancy. A prospective study comprised 85 adolescents attended by the ISPPT between January 2002 and June 2006 who participated in meetings during pregnancy with a multidisciplinary team that provided orientation concerning family planning, self-esteem, pregnancy prevention, motivation to continue education and/or work, and evaluate the postpartum mother-child relationship. The following were analyzed: education level, marital status, contraceptive use, thoughts and attempts at abortion, repeat pregnancy. This study was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee. The Epi-Info v6.0b software was used for data and result evaluation using the means and the chi-squared test. The mean age of the adolescents was 15.7 years, 3.52% had repeat pregnancy within a mean follow-up of 23 months after childbirth, the mean education level was 8.1 years, 30.5% dropped out of school, with 79.4% occurring before pregnancy, 64.6% used no contraceptives, 68.3% were single, and 81.3% had a positive role model. One year after birth, 67.5% studied, 50% worked, 55.1% lived with the partner, 77% correctly used contraceptives, every child lived with their mothers and their vaccinations were up to date. The results demonstrate that the global attention given to the health of adolescent mothers and pregnant adolescents is a protective factor for pregnancy relapse and quality of life.

  3. Ethnic Differences in STD Rates among Female Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzi, Ruth S.; Weinman, Maxine L.; Smith, Peggy B.

    1998-01-01

    Examines ethnic differences in rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in female adolescents (N=205) receiving care at two family-planning clinics; new infection and reinfection rates were also examined. Black teens had a higher rate of past STDs than Hispanics or Whites; however, there were no differences in rates at the time of the clinic…

  4. Examining the links between perceived impact of pregnancy, depressive symptoms, and quality of life during adolescent pregnancy: the buffering role of social support.

    PubMed

    Pires, Raquel; Araújo-Pedrosa, Anabela; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2014-05-01

    The aims of the current study were to examine the indirect effect of the perceived impact of pregnancy on quality of life (QoL) through the severity of depressive symptoms among a sample of pregnant adolescents, and to explore whether adolescents' satisfaction with support from their mothers (SM) or partners (SP) was a buffer of this effect. Demographic and pregnancy-related data were collected for 395 pregnant adolescents age 12-19 and were controlled for testing the proposed indirect effect. SM and SP were tested as moderators of the links between perceived impact of pregnancy and depressive symptoms and between depressive symptoms and QoL. A computational tool for path analysis-based moderation and mediation analysis as well as their combination was used to test indirect and interaction effects (PROCESS). A significant indirect effect of the perceived impact of pregnancy on QoL through the severity of depressive symptoms was found (0.51, CI = 0.29/0.78). There was no significant direct effect of the perceived impact of pregnancy on QoL after controlling for the severity of depressive symptoms. SM and SP buffered the indirect effect by weakening the association between a negative perception of the impact of pregnancy and higher severity of depressive symptoms. Identifying adolescents with a negative perception of the impact of pregnancy, improving the quality of their relations with their mothers and partners, and promoting satisfactory support from these figures may be extremely important to prevent and treat depressive symptoms and, in so doing, improve adolescents' QoL during pregnancy.

  5. Pre-Pregnancy Dating Violence and Birth Outcomes Among Adolescent Mothers in a National Sample.

    PubMed

    Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Xie, Yiqiong; Harville, Emily W

    2014-07-01

    Although infants born to adolescent mothers are at increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, little is known about contributors to birth outcomes in this group. Given past research linking partner abuse to adverse birth outcomes among adult mothers, we explored associations between pre-pregnancy verbal and physical dating violence and the birth weight and gestational age of infants born to adolescent mothers. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health Waves I (1995/1996), II (1996), and IV (2007/2008) were analyzed. Girls whose first singleton live births occurred after Wave II interview and before age 20 (N = 558) self-reported infants' birth weight and gestational age at Wave IV. Dating violence victimization (verbal and physical) in the 18 months prior to Wave II interview was self-reported. Controls included Wave I age, parent education, age at pregnancy, time between reporting abuse and birth, and childhood physical and sexual abuse. Weighted multivariable regression models were performed separately by race (Black/non-Black).On average, births occurred 2 years after Wave II interview. Almost one in four mothers reported verbal dating violence victimization (23.6%), and 10.1% reported physical victimization. Birth weight and prevalence of verbal dating violence victimization were significantly lower in Black compared with non-Black teen mothers. In multivariable analyses, negative associations between physical dating abuse and birth outcomes became stronger as time increased for Black mothers. For example, pre-pregnancy physical dating abuse was associated with 0.79 kilograms lower birth weight (p< .001) and 4.72 fewer weeks gestational age (p< .01) for Black mothers who gave birth 2 years post-reporting abuse. Physical dating abuse was unassociated with birth outcomes among non-Black mothers, and verbal abuse was unassociated with birth outcomes for all mothers. Reducing physical dating violence in adolescent relationships prior to

  6. Adolescent pregnancy and transition to adulthood in young users of the SUS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Elisabeth Meloni; Bousquat, Aylene; Barros, Claudia Renata dos Santos; Alves, Maria Cecilia Goi Porto

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to contextualize adolescent pregnancy from milestones associated with the process of transition from youth to adulthood. METHODS This is a cross-sectional study conducted with 200 adolescents, users of the Brazilian Unified Health System. The sample size for the estimation of proportions has been calculated assuming a population ratio of 0.50 and 95% confidence level. The dependent variables – planned pregnancy, living with a partner, and having left the parents’ house – have been considered as markers of transition from dependence to independence, from youth to adulthood. In the analysis of the associated factors, we have used the Poisson model with robust variance. RESULTS Average age was 17.3 years, and most adolescents lived with a partner; approximately half of the adolescents got pregnant from their first partner and the average age of first sexual intercourse was 14.6 years. Only 19% of the adolescents were studying and most dropped out of school before the beginning of the pregnancy. In the bivariate and multiple analysis, we could see that the relationship with a partner for more than two years was associated with the three dependent variables. CONCLUSIONS The path of transition to adulthood has been the establishment of a link with a partner and consequent pregnancy, suggesting a clear pattern of male guardianship. The changing role of women in society observed in recent decades, which means choosing a professional career, defining the number of children, and choosing their partner(s), has not reached these young persons. PMID:28380206

  7. Adult birth mothers who made open infant adoption placements after adolescent unplanned pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Clutter, Lynn B

    2014-01-01

    To summarize birth mothers' descriptions of how their adolescent or young adult unplanned pregnancies and decision for open infant adoption placement influenced their lives. Naturalistic inquiry using unstructured interviews. One to 2-hour telephone interviews with participants in their home settings were recorded and transcribed. Deidentified transcripts were analyzed for qualitative content themes. Fifteen women who had experienced unplanned adolescent or young adult pregnancy and relinquished their infants through open adoption were interviewed. Birth mothers who had been members of an agency support group were identified by an agency representative as having been typical of open adoption and were purposively recruited for study participation. Participants described the open adoption decision as "one of the most difficult but best" choices of their lives. Themes were summarized using the acronym AFRESH: A--adoption accomplishments, F--fresh start, R--relationship changes, E--emotions, S--support, H--healing. Findings indicated that benefits of open adoption outweighed challenges of pregnancy, birth, and emotional transitions. Birth children were perceived as thriving with adoptive families who were cherished like extended family. Birth mothers perceived themselves as being better people with better lives than before the unintended pregnancy. Growth with improved life direction was seen as a result of personal maturation from the experience. Open adoption is reinforced as a positive resolution of adolescent unintended pregnancy. Birth mothers believed teens who feel "stuck" with a pregnancy should consider open adoption; nurses should provide support and uphold the process. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  8. Risk factors for depressive symptoms in adolescent pregnancy in a late-teen subsample.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Hristina; Stuart, Scott

    2014-04-01

    Depression in adolescent pregnancy is common but underrecognized and can be associated with negative medical outcomes. This brief report examines the relationship between depressive symptoms and various demographic and obstetrical risk factors, as well as the use of antidepressants in pregnant adolescents of late teenage years. Data were derived from a relatively large sample (506 women) recruited from university-based and community mental health centers in Iowa. A cross-sectional analysis did not reveal significant statistical associations between the risk factors and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory). Antidepressant use was very low (3.7 %), and adolescents with higher depression scores were more likely to take medications. In conclusion, screening for depression in pregnant adolescents should be universal, regardless of demographic and obstetrical risk factors, and promptly addressed.

  9. The Effect of Centering Pregnancy versus Traditional Prenatal Care Models on Improved Adolescent Health Behaviors in the Perinatal Period.

    PubMed

    Trotman, Gylynthia; Chhatre, Gayatri; Darolia, Renuka; Tefera, Eshetu; Damle, Lauren; Gomez-Lobo, Veronica

    2015-10-01

    To determine if the CenteringPregnancy model of prenatal care improves maternal health behaviors in adolescent pregnancy. We conducted a retrospective chart review comparing 150 pregnant adolescents who received prenatal care between 2008 to 2012 with CenteringPregnancy to those receiving care in traditional prenatal care models with either multiprovider or single-provider visits. Outcome measures included weight gain during pregnancy, compliance to prenatal care appointments, infant feeding method, postpartum follow up and contraceptive use postpartum. A χ(2) analysis was used to compare outcomes between the 3 groups at a 2-tailed α of .05. Fifty individuals were evaluated in each group. Adolescents in the CenteringPregnancy group were more likely to comply with prenatal and postpartum visits and to meet the 2009 Institute of Medicine gestational weight guidelines for weight gain in pregnancy than were adolescents in either multiprovider (62.0% vs 38.0%, P = .02) or single-provider (62.0% vs 38.0%, P = .02) groups. The CenteringPregnancy group was also more likely to solely breastfeed compared with adolescents in the multiprovider group (40.0% vs 20.0%, P = .03) and include breastfeeding in addition to bottle-feeding compared with both multiprovider (32.0% vs 14.0%, P = .03) and single-provider (32.0% vs 12.0%, P = .03) patient groups. Additionally, the CenteringPregnancy group had increased uptake of long-acting reversible contraception and were less likely to suffer from postpartum depression. CenteringPregnancy Prenatal Care program aids in compliance to prenatal visits, appropriate weight gain, increased uptake of highly effective contraception, and breastfeeding among adolescent mothers. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of diet composition on pregnancy outcome in overnourished rapidly growing adolescent sheep.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jacqueline M; Milne, John S; Redmer, Dale A; Aitken, Raymond P

    2006-12-01

    When pregnant adolescent sheep are overnourished to promote maternal growth during pregnancy, growth of the placenta is impaired and results in the premature delivery of low birth weight lambs relative to control-fed adolescents of equivalent age. These effects have been achieved by feeding two levels of the same complete diet. The present study evaluated the role of protein in pregnancy outcome in our adolescent sheep paradigm. Adolescent ewes were implanted with single embryos on day 4 post-oestrus. Thereafter ewes were offered ad libitum an isoenergetic diet (11.4 MJ metabolisable energy/kg DM) containing either 12% (basic, B) or 17% (extra, E) crude protein. At day 75 of gestation, half the pregnant ewes on each protein level were switched to yield four groups, BB, EE, BE and EB protein. A further optimally nourished control group received a moderate quantity of a ration (14% crude protein) designed to provide 100% of the estimated energy and protein requirement of the adolescent sheep according to stage of pregnancy. Pregnancy outcome was determined at term. Feed intakes were independent of protein level in the four groups of ewes fed ad libitum and were higher (P<0.001) than in the control group throughout. Maternal plasma urea concentrations reflected the current crude protein content of the diet offered and were elevated in the 17% compared with 12% protein groups (P<0.001). Within groups fed ad libitum, maternal plasma insulin, glucose, NEFA and homocysteine concentrations were largely independent of protein level. Gestation length, placental weight, lamb birth weight and initial colostrum yield were reduced (P<0.05) in all groups fed ad libitum relative to the optimally nourished control group. Similarly, total colostrum IgG, butterfat, lactose and crude protein content at parturition were attenuated in the ad libitum compared with the control groups. However, within ad libitum groups pregnancy outcome parameters were largely unaffected by level or timing

  11. What's behind the Good News: The Decline in Teen Pregnancy Rates during the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanigan, Christine

    Noting that rates of teen pregnancies and births have declined over the past decade, this analysis examined how much of the progress is due to fewer teens having sex and how much to lower rates of pregnancy among sexually active teens. The analysis drew on data from the federal government's National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), a large,…

  12. Factors associated with pregnancy among adolescents in low-income and lower middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Rina; Wynter, Karen; Fisher, Jane

    2015-09-01

    Pregnancy-related morbidity and mortality is much more prevalent among adolescents than adults. Adolescent pregnancy is therefore a significant public health problem. Most births to adolescents (95%) occur in resource-constrained countries. The aim was to review the available evidence about the factors associated with adolescent pregnancy in low-income and lower middle-income countries. The review used the PRISMA procedure of identification, screening and eligibility of publications. PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, SCOPUS and CINAHL plus were searched systematically for peer-reviewed English language papers published before December 2013. In total, 2005 articles were identified and 12 met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Despite varied methods, there was substantial consistency in the findings. Limited education, low socioeconomic position, insufficient access to and non-use of contraception were consistently found to be risks for pregnancy among adolescents. There was some evidence that early marriage, living in a rural area, early sexual initiation, belonging to an ethnic and religious minority group also increased the risk of adolescent pregnancy. Higher education, access to income-generating work and family support were found to protect against adolescent pregnancy. In resource-constrained countries, as in well-resourced countries, low socioeconomic position appears to increase the risk of pregnancy among adolescents. Additional risks specific to these contexts include cultural traditions such as early marriage and inaccurate beliefs about contraception. It is unlikely that strategies to reduce pregnancy among women aged less than 20 years will be effective unless these are addressed directly. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Ectopic pregnancy rates and racial disparities in the Medicaid population, 2004-2008.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Debra B; Cain, Loretta R; Dahlquist, Irma; Lauderdale, Diane S

    2014-12-01

    To assess 2004-2008 ectopic pregnancy rates among Medicaid recipients in 14 states and 2000-2008 time trends in three states and to identify differences in rate by race/ethnicity. Secondary analysis of Medicaid administrative claims data. Not applicable. Women ages 15-44 enrolled in Medicaid in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New York, or Texas in 2004-2008 (n = 19,135,106) and in California, Illinois, and New York in 2000-2003. None. Number of ectopic pregnancies divided by the number of total pregnancies (spontaneous abortions, induced abortions, ectopic pregnancies, and all births). The 2004-2008 Medicaid ectopic pregnancy rate for all 14 states combined was 1.40% of all reported pregnancies. Adjusted for age, the rate was 1.47%. Ectopic pregnancy incidence was 2.3 per 1,000 woman-years. In states for which longer term data were available (California, Illinois, and New York), the rate declined significantly in 2000-2008. In all 14 states, black women were more likely to experience an ectopic pregnancy compared with whites (relative risk, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.45-1.47). Ectopic pregnancy remains an important health risk for women enrolled in Medicaid. Black women are at consistently higher risk than whites. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Unplanned pregnancy in adolescents: association with family structure, employed mother, and female friends with health-risk habits and behaviors.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Nava, Francisco; Vázquez-Rodriguez, Carlos F; Saldívar-González, Atenógenes H; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Eliza M; Córdova-Fernández, José A; Felizardo-Ávalos, Jorge; Sánchez-Márquez, Wilberto

    2014-02-01

    Previous publications have suggested that living in a nonintact family household and socializing with girlfriends who smoke or who consume alcoholic beverages favor the development of health-risk habits and customs in adolescents. However, their relationship with unplanned pregnancy in adolescents has not been determined. We investigated the association between family structure, employed mother, and female friends with health-risk habits and behaviors with unplanned pregnancy in adolescents (n = 3,130). After adjusting for low maternal educational level and low family income, logistic regression analyses showed that having an employed mother and socializing with girlfriends who have health-risk habits or behaviors, rather than living in a nonintact family household, appear to be the most important health-risk factors for unplanned pregnancy in adolescents. It is important for health-care programs for adolescents to be revised and for their strategies be strengthened in order to reach the objectives for which they were created.

  15. Adolescent Female Text Messaging Preferences to Prevent Pregnancy After an Emergency Department Visit: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schnall, Rebecca; Stockwell, Melissa S; Castaño, Paula M; Higgins, Tracy; Westhoff, Carolyn; Santelli, John; Dayan, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Background Over 15 million adolescents use the emergency department (ED) each year in the United States. Adolescent females who use the ED for medical care have been found to be at high risk for unintended pregnancy. Given that adolescents represent the largest users of text messaging and are receptive to receiving text messages related to their sexual health, the ED visit represents an opportunity for intervention. Objective The aim of this qualitative study was to explore interest in and preferences for the content, frequency, and timing of an ED-based text message intervention to prevent pregnancy for adolescent females. Methods We conducted semistructured, open-ended interviews in one urban ED in the United States with adolescent females aged 14-19 years. Eligible subjects were adolescents who were sexually active in the past 3 months, presented to the ED for a reproductive health complaint, owned a mobile phone, and did not use effective contraception. Using an interview guide, enrollment continued until saturation of key themes. The investigators designed sample text messages using the Health Beliefs Model and participants viewed these on a mobile phone. The team recorded, transcribed, and coded interviews based on thematic analysis using the qualitative analysis software NVivo and Excel. Results Participants (n=14) were predominantly Hispanic (13/14; 93%), insured (13/14; 93%), ED users in the past year (12/14; 86%), and frequent text users (10/14; 71% had sent or received >30 texts per day). All were interested in receiving text messages from the ED about pregnancy prevention, favoring messages that were “brief,” “professional,” and “nonaccusatory.” Respondents favored texts with links to websites, repeated information regarding places to receive “confidential” care, and focused information on contraception options and misconceptions. Preferences for text message frequency varied from daily to monthly, with random hours of delivery to

  16. Prone position craniotomy in pregnancy without fetal heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Jean; Alexander, Ashish; Philip, Shoba; Thomas, Anoop

    2016-09-01

    A pregnant patient in second trimester scheduled for posterior fossa craniotomy in prone position is a challenge for the anesthesiologist. Things to consider are physiological changes during pregnancy, non-obstetric surgery in pregnant patients, neuroanesthetic principles, effects of prone positioning, and need for fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring. We have described the anesthetic management of this case and discussed intra-operative FHR monitoring including controversies about its role, indications, and various options available as per fetal gestational age. In our case we attempted intermittent intra-operative FHR monitoring to optimize maternal positioning and fetal oxygenation even though the fetus was pre-viable. However the attempt was abandoned due to practical difficulties with prone positioning. Patient made good neurological recovery following the procedure and delivered a healthy term baby 4 months later. Decisions regarding fetal monitoring should be individualized based on viability of the fetus and feasibility of emergency cesarean delivery. Good communication between a multidisciplinary team involving neurosurgeon, anesthesiologist, obstetrician, and neonatologist is important for a successful outcome for mother and fetus. We conclude that prone position neurosurgery can safely be carried out in a pregnant patient with pre-viable fetus without FHR monitoring.

  17. Social support during adolescent pregnancy: piecing together a quilt.

    PubMed

    Logsdon, M Cynthia; Gagne, Patricia; Hughes, Tara; Patterson, Jennifer; Rakestraw, Vivian

    2005-01-01

    To investigate pregnant adolescents' experiences of receiving support, including variations by age. The study was guided by feminist theory. An alternative, public school for pregnant and parenting adolescents in an urban area of the Southern United States. Participants (n = 30) consisted of 6 early (13-14), 19 middle (15-16), and 5 late (17-18) adolescents. Nineteen of the participants were African American, 10 European American, and 1 Asian American. A qualitative research design based on feminist theory with data collected through focus groups. The focus groups were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and checked against the first author's field notes, then analyzed using principles of analytic induction. Group interaction and influence were considered. The metaphor of a patchwork quilt emerged from the data and represented how adolescents "piece together" the support they need from adults, peers, and partners who are often unreliable. Affecting receipt of social support were the adolescents' relationships with their families and their babies' fathers, threats to their safety, and their socioeconomic status. These findings can be used by nurses, educators, and community leaders as they develop programs to meet the needs of these young women.

  18. Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy with Social and Cognitive Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Richard P.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A 15-session sex education program was delivered by teachers to 586 10th graders using techniques based on social learning theory. Knowledge about sex and contraception were increased, and communication with parents about pregnancy prevention were significantly greater at posttest. No differences in the frequency of sexual intercourse, pregnancy…

  19. Factors Associated with Adolescent Pregnancy in Rural Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okonofua, Friday E.

    1995-01-01

    A community-based, case-control study conducted in rural Nigeria with 132 pregnant girls and 131 nonpregnant girls the same age found that pregnancy was largely associated with the completion of formal education at an early age and the lack of knowledge of reproductive health. (SLD)

  20. Risking the Future. Adolescent Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Childbearing. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Cheryl D., Ed.

    This book examines in detail the complex, controversial problem of teenage pregnancy in the United States. Compiled by a panel of distinguished experts, it is a comprehensive review of data on such issues as sex education in the schools, contraception, abortion, adoption, prenatal and pediatric care, child support enforcement, and Aid to Families…

  1. Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy: A Role for Social Work Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelman, Marion Wright

    1988-01-01

    For poor and minority teenagers the lack of adequate life options may increase their desire for early pregnancy. Since teen mothers face probable poverty and single parenthood, it is imperative that schools and school social workers provide counseling, health services, and work preparation as well as academic skills training. (VM)

  2. Risking the Future. Adolescent Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Childbearing. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Cheryl D., Ed.

    This book examines in detail the complex, controversial problem of teenage pregnancy in the United States. Compiled by a panel of distinguished experts, it is a comprehensive review of data on such issues as sex education in the schools, contraception, abortion, adoption, prenatal and pediatric care, child support enforcement, and Aid to Families…

  3. Association between adolescent pregnancy and a family history of teenage births.

    PubMed

    East, Patricia L; Reyes, Barbara T; Horn, Emily J

    2007-06-01

    The extent to which young women's risk of adolescent pregnancy is associated with having a mother who was a teenage parent, a sister who was a teenage parent or both is not known. A sample of 127 Latina and black adolescent females completed in-depth surveys at three time points between 1994 and 2000. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine whether socioeconomic factors, mothers' parenting characteristics and certain sibling relationship qualities explain the association between a family history of teenage births and young women's risk of pregnancy. Compared with young women with no family history of teenage births, young women whose sister had had a teenage birth and those whose sister and mother both had had teenage births were significantly more likely to experience a teenage pregnancy (odds ratios, 4.8 and 5.1, respectively). Young women who had only a sister who had had a teenage birth had greater odds of pregnancy than young women who had only a mother who had had a teenage birth (4.5). Having both a mother and a sister who had had teenage births was independently associated with an elevated risk of pregnancy (3.7), even after controlling for socioeconomic and mothers' parenting characteristics. Frequent companionship with an older sister was associated with increased odds of teenage pregnancy (4.5); frequent conflict with an older sister who had had a teenage birth was marginally associated with decreased odds of the outcome (0.3). Pregnancy prevention interventions targeting young women according to maternal and sibling teenage birth histories may be effective.

  4. Association Between Adolescent Pregnancy And a Family History of Teenage Births

    PubMed Central

    East, Patricia L.; Reyes, Barbara T.; Horn, Emily J.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT The extent to which young women’s risk of adolescent pregnancy is associated with having a mother who was a teenage parent, a sister who was a teenage parent or both is not known. METHODS A sample of 127 Latina and black adolescent females completed in-depth surveys at three time points between 1994 and 2000. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine whether socioeconomic factors, mothers’ parenting characteristics and certain sibling relationship qualities explain the association between a family history of teenage births and young women’s risk of pregnancy. RESULTS Compared with young women with no family history of teenage births, young women whose sister had had a teenage birth and those whose sister and mother both had had teenage births were significantly more likely to experience a teenage pregnancy (odds ratios, 4.8 and 5.1, respectively). Young women who had only a sister who had had a teenage birth had greater odds of pregnancy than young women who had only a mother who had had a teenage birth (4.5). Having both a mother and a sister who had had teenage births was independently associated with an elevated risk of pregnancy (3.7), even after controlling for socioeconomic and mothers’ parenting characteristics. Frequent companionship with an older sister was associated with increased odds of teenage pregnancy (4.5); frequent conflict with an older sister who had had a teenage birth was marginally associated with decreased odds of the outcome (0.3). CONCLUSION Pregnancy prevention interventions targeting young women according to maternal and sibling teenage birth histories may be effective. PMID:17565624

  5. Future Orientation among Caucasian and Arab-American Adolescents: The Role of Realism About Child-Rearing and Perceptions of Others' Acceptance of Adolescent Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirza, Saima A.; Somers, Cheryl L.

    2004-01-01

    Future orientation in adolescents is an important concept to study because of its relations with academic performance and success levels. This study examined adolescents' realism about childrearing and their perceptions of others' approval of teen pregnancy to examine their association with future orientation. Participants were 476 high…

  6. Arginine flux, but not nitric oxide synthesis, decreases in adolescent girls compared with adult women during pregnancy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitric Oxide (NO) has been proposed as a mediator of vascular expansion during pregnancy. Inability to increase NO synthesis and/or production of its precursor, arginine, may contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension. Adolescents have a higher incidence of gestational hypertension. It is not know...

  7. Decreasing Sex Bias through Education for Parenthood or Prevention of Adolescent Pregnancy: A Developmental Model with Integrative Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Estelle; Rosen, Efrem

    1994-01-01

    Identifies need for more research, education, and services for males about adolescent pregnancy and parenthood to augment their social and familial learning experiences. Makes case for more participation by schools in achieving better balance between males and females in preparing for parenthood or prevention of pregnancy. Describes…

  8. Selected Programs in Other States Relating to Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention. Wisconsin Legislative Council Staff Information Memorandum 85-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogar, Anne

    This information memorandum, prepared for the Wisconsin Special Committee on Pregnancy Options, provides a summary of selected programs in five other states relating to adolescent pregnancy prevention. The memorandum notes that the programs selected have state statutory or administrative rule mandates or receive substantial administrative and…

  9. Selected Programs in Other States Relating to Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention. Wisconsin Legislative Council Staff Information Memorandum 85-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogar, Anne

    This information memorandum, prepared for the Wisconsin Special Committee on Pregnancy Options, provides a summary of selected programs in five other states relating to adolescent pregnancy prevention. The memorandum notes that the programs selected have state statutory or administrative rule mandates or receive substantial administrative and…

  10. Resolution of Unwanted Pregnancy during Adolescence through Abortion versus Childbirth: Individual and Family Predictors and Psychological Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Priscilla K.

    2006-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, various demographic, psychological, educational, and family variables were explored as predictors of pregnancy resolution. Only 2 of the 17 variables examined were significantly associated with pregnancy resolution (risk-taking and the desire to leave home). After controlling…

  11. Early Childbearing: Perspectives of Black Adolescents on Pregnancy, Abortion, and Contraception. Sage Library of Social Research 192.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Ellen W.; Rickels, Karl

    This book reports on the Penn Study of Teenage Pregnancy, which examined issues surrounding adolescent pregnancy, abortion, and childbearing. Participants were African-American teenagers between the ages of 13 and 17 from disadvantaged urban backgrounds. Based on individual interviews over 2 years in the early 1980s, the study provided details…

  12. Complete molar pregnancy in adolescents from North and South America: Clinical presentation and risk of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Soares, Renan Rocha; Maestá, Izildinha; Colón, José; Braga, Antonio; Salazar, Aleydah; Charry, Rafael Cortés; Sun, Sue Yazaki; Goldstein, Donald P; Berkowitz, Ross S

    2016-09-01

    To compare complete hydatidiform mole (CHM) clinical presentation and risk factors associated with GTN development between North American and South American adolescents. This non-concurrent cohort study was undertaken including adolescents with CHM referred to centers in North America (New England Trophoblastic Disease Center, Harvard University, USA), and South America (Botucatu Trophoblastic Disease Center-São Paulo State University, Brazil; Trophoblastic Unit of Central University of Venezuela and Maternidad Concepcion Palacios of Caracas, Venezuela) between 1990 and 2012. Data were obtained from medical records and pathology reports. Study participants were allocated into 2 groups: North America (NA) and South America (SA). In NA and SA, 13.1% and 30.9% of patients with hydatidiform mole were adolescents, respectively. Of these, 77.6% in NA and 86.1% in SA had pathologic diagnosis of CHM (p=0.121). Vaginal bleeding (SA=69% vs NA=51%; p=0.020), anemia (SA=48% vs NA=18%; p<0.001), and elevated serum hCG (SA=232,860mIU/mL vs NA=136,412mIU/mL; p=0.039) were more frequent in SA than in NA. Median gestational age at diagnosis (SA=12weeks, NA=11weeks; p=0.030) differed whereas GTN development rate (SA=20%, NA=27%; p=0.282) showed no significant difference between groups. Compared to NA, medical complications and clinical factors associated with post-molar GTN were more frequent among SA adolescents. Medical complications and clinical factors associated with GTN development were more frequent in SA than in NA adolescents with CHM, suggesting that, in South America, awareness about the importance of diagnosing molar pregnancy early and considering CHM in the differential diagnosis in adolescents suspected to be pregnant should be raised. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rate, correlates and outcomes of repeat pregnancy in HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Floridia, M; Tamburrini, E; Masuelli, G; Martinelli, P; Spinillo, A; Liuzzi, G; Vimercati, A; Alberico, S; Maccabruni, A; Pinnetti, C; Frisina, V; Dalzero, S; Ravizza, M

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the rate, determinants, and outcomes of repeat pregnancies in women with HIV infection. Data from a national study of pregnant women with HIV infection were used. Main outcomes were preterm delivery, low birth weight, CD4 cell count and HIV plasma viral load. The rate of repeat pregnancy among 3007 women was 16.2%. Women with a repeat pregnancy were on average younger than those with a single pregnancy (median age 30 vs. 33 years, respectively), more recently diagnosed with HIV infection (median time since diagnosis 25 vs. 51 months, respectively), and more frequently of foreign origin [odds ratio (OR) 1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-1.68], diagnosed with HIV infection in the current pregnancy (OR: 1.69; 95% CI: 1.35-2.11), and at their first pregnancy (OR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.06-1.66). In women with sequential pregnancies, compared with the first pregnancy, several outcomes showed a significant improvement in the second pregnancy, with a higher rate of antiretroviral treatment at conception (39.0 vs. 65.4%, respectively), better median maternal weight at the start of pregnancy (60 vs. 61 kg, respectively), a higher rate of end-of-pregnancy undetectable HIV RNA (60.7 vs. 71.6%, respectively), a higher median birth weight (2815 vs. 2885 g, respectively), lower rates of preterm delivery (23.0 vs. 17.7%, respectively) and of low birth weight (23.4 vs. 15.4%, respectively), and a higher median CD4 cell count (+47 cells/μL), with almost no clinical progression to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stage C (CDC-C) HIV disease (0.3%). The second pregnancy was significantly more likely to end in voluntary termination than the first pregnancy (11.4 vs. 6.1%, respectively). Younger and foreign women were more likely to have a repeat pregnancy; in women with sequential pregnancies, the second pregnancy was characterized by a significant improvement in several outcomes, suggesting that women with HIV infection who desire multiple

  14. Interactions between Adolescent Fathers and Health Care Professionals during Pregnancy, Labor and Early Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, Constance M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined interactions between adolescent fathers and health care professionals (HCPS) from the perspectives of the families of the adolescent fathers during pregnancy and early post partum. Design Data were from the prenatal and 1-month data points of a larger longitudinal qualitative case study design examining paternal involvement. A purposive sample of 25 sets of unmarried, low-income African American adolescent fathers, adolescent mothers and at least one of each of their parents were individually interviewed at 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after birth using a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analyzed using content analysis methods. Setting Approximately 90% were interviewed in their homes. Participants Annual household incomes were between $0 – $28K (M = $14,661). The 111 participants included 25 sets of adolescent parents, 50 grandmothers and 11 grandfathers. Approximately 75% of the adolescent fathers were 17 and 19 years of age. Results Supportive (information, emotional and material support), distancing and neutralizing interactions between HCPs and adolescent fathers were identified. Conclusions Although most interactions were perceived as supportive, distancing and neutralizing interactions could potentially have negative long-term effects for these vulnerable families and contribute to disparities in health care. Nurses may be important resources for these new fathers. PMID:19538617

  15. Developing and maintaining state-wide adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Nezlek, J B; Galano, J

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of state-wide adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions. Key informants in five states throughout the southern United States were given semi-structured interviews regarding the adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions in their states. From these interviews and other documents, conclusions were drawn regarding the nature and importance of the environments within which these coalitions operate, the universe of activities in which coalitions engage, and the stages of development of these coalitions. Katz and Kahn's model of social organizations served as the basis for understanding coalitions in terms of these three considerations. Future research should consider the utility of organizational models that can explain more fully the organization--committee hybrid structure that tends to characterize these coalitions.

  16. Reassessing fecundity in women with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH): normal pregnancy rate but reduced fertility rate.

    PubMed

    Casteràs, Anna; De Silva, Purnami; Rumsby, Gillian; Conway, Gerard S

    2009-06-01

    Fertility in women with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) has been reported low; however, the true pregnancy rate for women trying to conceive with this condition is unknown. Our aim was to calculate pregnancy rate for women with CAH calculated as a proportion of those who had attempted conception. Fertility expressed as live birth rate is also calculated. One hundred and six women with classical CAH followed in a multidisciplinary service [81 salt-losing (SL) and 25 nonsalt-losing (NSL) form]. Twenty-five (23.6%) women with CAH women considered motherhood, 23 had actively tried conception of whom 21 (91.3%) achieved 34 pregnancies. Pregnancy rate is no different from that in the normal population (95%). Pregnancy rates were similar in the SL (88.9%) and NSL (92.9%) subgroups but those with NSL-CAH were more likely to seek motherhood than those with SL-CAH (16/25 vs. 9/81). Optimized glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid regimes during fertility monitoring resulted spontaneous conception in nearly all recent cases. Fertility rate was 0.25 live births per woman compared with 1.8 in the UK population (P < 0.001). We report a normal pregnancy rate (91.3%) for women with classical CAH, similar in SL and NSL subgroups. Fertility rate, however, remains much lower than in general population.

  17. Evidence That Classroom-Based Behavioral Interventions Reduce Pregnancy-Related School Dropout Among Nairobi Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sarnquist, Clea; Sinclair, Jake; Omondi Mboya, Benjamin; Langat, Nickson; Paiva, Lee; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie; Golden, Neville H; Maldonado, Yvonne A; Baiocchi, Michael T

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of behavioral, empowerment-focused interventions on the incidence of pregnancy-related school dropout among girls in Nairobi's informal settlements. Retrospective data on pregnancy-related school dropout from two cohorts were analyzed using a matched-pairs quasi-experimental design. The primary outcome was the change in the number of school dropouts due to pregnancy from 1 year before to 1 year after the interventions. Annual incidence of school dropout due to pregnancy decreased by 46% in the intervention schools (from 3.9% at baseline to 2.1% at follow-up), whereas the comparison schools remained essentially unchanged ( p < .029). Sensitivity analysis shows that the findings are robust to small levels of unobserved bias. Results suggest that these behavioral interventions significantly reduced the number of school dropouts due to pregnancy. As there are limited promising studies on behavioral interventions that decrease adolescent pregnancy in low-income settings, this intervention may be an important addition to this toolkit.

  18. Spatial distribution of pregnancy in adolescence and associations with socioeconomic and social responsibility indicators: State of Minas Gerais, Southeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Roza, Daiane Leite da; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi

    2015-08-01

    To describe associations between pregnancy rates in adolescence and socioeconomic and social responsibility indicators in the municipalities of the State of Minas Gerais, Southeast of Brazil, in the year of 2010. Ecological study using data from the Brazilian Live Birth Information System (SINASC). The percentage of live births to adolescent mothers (LBAM) for each municipality was calculated based on the quotient between number of born alive infants of mothers aged 10-19 years old and total number of live births in the year of 2010. Fully Bayesian models were used to obtain the percentages of LBAM adjusted for spatial effects and to assess possible associations with socioeconomic and social responsibility indicators. The crude percentage of LBAM for the total number of live births in the municipalities of Minas Gerais in 2010 ranged from 0 to 46.4%, with median percentage being 19.6% and the first and third quartiles being 15.6 and 23.1%, respectively. This study has demonstrated a close relationship between adolescent pregnancy and socioeconomic indicators. LBAM percentages were found to be higher in municipalities with low population density, low human development index and other low development indicators. The strong relationship between LBAM percentages and socioeconomic indicators suggests that adolescent pregnancy is more a social than a biological problem. Therefore, programs and actions should go beyond sexual education and information on preventive health methods.

  19. Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy, Child Behavior Problems, and Adolescent Smoking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griesler, Pamela C.; Kandel, Denise B.; Davies, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Used longitudinal sample of 187 mother-child dyads to examine the role of child behavior problems in explaining the effect of maternal prenatal smoking on adolescent daughters' smoking. Found that maternal prenatal smoking retained a unique effect on girls' current smoking with controls for current maternal smoking, child behavior problems, and…

  20. Pregnancy and lactation hinder growth and nutritional status of adolescent girls in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rah, Jee H; Christian, Parul; Shamim, Abu Ahmed; Arju, Ummeh T; Labrique, Alain B; Rashid, Mahbubur

    2008-08-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is associated with adverse birth outcomes. Less is known about its influence on maternal growth and nutritional status. We determined how pregnancy and lactation during adolescence affects postmenarcheal linear and ponderal growth and body composition of 12-19 y olds in rural Bangladesh. In a prospective cohort study, anthropometric measurements were taken among primigravidae (n = 229) in the early first trimester of pregnancy and at 6 mo postpartum. Randomly selected never-pregnant adolescents (n = 458) of the same age and time since menarche were measured within 1 wk of these assessments. Annual changes in anthropometric measurements were compared between the 2 groups adjusting for confounders using mixed effects regression models. The mean +/- SD age and age at menarche of adolescents were 16.3 +/- 1.6 y and 12.7 +/- 1.2 y, respectively. Unlike pregnant girls who did not grow in height (-0.09 +/- 0.08 cm/y), never-pregnant girls increased in stature by 0.35 +/- 0.05 cm/y. The adjusted mean difference between the 2 groups was 0.43 +/- 0.1cm (P < 0.001). Similarly, whereas never-pregnant girls gained BMI, mid-upper arm circumference, and percent body fat, pregnant girls declined in every measurement by 6 mo postpartum, resulting in adjusted mean +/- SD differences in annual changes of 0.62 +/- 0.11 kg/m(2), 0.89 +/- 0.12 cm, and 1.54 +/- 0.25%, respectively (all P < 0.001). Differences in changes in all anthropometric measurements except height were greater among adolescents whose first pregnancy occurred <24 mo vs. > or =24 mo since menarche (BMI, -1.40 +/- 0.18 vs. -0.60 +/- 0.11 kg/m(2); all interaction terms, P < 0.05). Pregnancy and lactation during adolescence ceased linear growth and resulted in weight loss and depletion of fat and lean body mass of young girls.

  1. Measuring Social Support from Mother Figures in the Transition from Pregnancy to Parenthood among Mexican-Origin Adolescent Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toomey, Russell B.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Jahromi, Laudan B.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Social support for adolescent mothers, particularly from mother figures, can buffer risks and promote well-being. To date, no longitudinal research has investigated how the dimensions of social support may change during the transition from pregnancy to parenthood for adolescent mothers. This study examined stability and change in dimensions of…

  2. Measuring Social Support from Mother Figures in the Transition from Pregnancy to Parenthood among Mexican-Origin Adolescent Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toomey, Russell B.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Jahromi, Laudan B.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Social support for adolescent mothers, particularly from mother figures, can buffer risks and promote well-being. To date, no longitudinal research has investigated how the dimensions of social support may change during the transition from pregnancy to parenthood for adolescent mothers. This study examined stability and change in dimensions of…

  3. Communication between Asian American Adolescents and Health Care Providers about Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Infections, and Pregnancy Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Jessie; Lau, May; Vermette, David; Liang, David; Flores, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Asian American adolescents have been reported to have the lowest amount of communication with health care providers regarding sexual health topics (sexual activity, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy prevention). This study identified Asian American adolescents' attitudes/beliefs regarding how health care providers can…

  4. Communication between Asian American Adolescents and Health Care Providers about Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Infections, and Pregnancy Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Jessie; Lau, May; Vermette, David; Liang, David; Flores, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Asian American adolescents have been reported to have the lowest amount of communication with health care providers regarding sexual health topics (sexual activity, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy prevention). This study identified Asian American adolescents' attitudes/beliefs regarding how health care providers can…

  5. The GIG: An Innovative Intervention To Prevent Adolescent Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infection in a Latino Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Anda, Diane

    2002-01-01

    In Los Angeles County, the GIG intervention offers education to adolescents about pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections at a social event geared to the youth culture. Pre- and posttests completed by 609 Latino adolescents indicated an increase in knowledge and attitude changes. Use of peer educators was an important component of program…

  6. Benchmarks and Challenges: Third Report of the Governor's Task Force on Adolescent Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Council on Children and Families, New York.

    In 1985 over 60,000 adolescents ages 10-19 became pregnant in New York State. Of these, almost 26,000 gave birth and over 33,000 terminated their pregnancies. While the majority of those who became pregnant were 18- and 19-year-olds, 1,700 were aged 10 to 14. Of the total, 59 percent were white, and 39 percent were black or from another ethnic…

  7. Perception of teratogenic risk and the rated likelihood of pregnancy termination: association with maternal depression.

    PubMed

    Walfisch, Asnat; Sermer, Corey; Matok, Ilan; Einarson, Adrienne; Koren, Gideon

    2011-12-01

    Women are often exposed to various medications and medical conditions during pregnancy. Unrealistically high maternal teratogenic risk perception, related to these exposures, may lead to abrupt discontinuation of therapy and (or) termination of a wanted pregnancy. The association between maternal depression and the teratogenic risk perception has not been studied, nor were the actions resulting from this perception. Our objectives were to explore the association between maternal depression, teratogenic risk perception, and the rated likelihood to terminate pregnancy. Additionally, we evaluated possible benefits of counselling. We administered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to all women who attended the Motherisk Clinic between October 2007 and April 2010. A visual analogue scale was used to determine maternal risk perception in relation to the specific exposure, and the rated likelihood to terminate the pregnancy, before and after counselling. We analyzed data from 413 women. Maternal teratogenic risk perception and the rated likelihood to terminate the pregnancy were significantly lower following counselling. An EPDS score of 13 or more was significantly associated with a higher rated likelihood to terminate the pregnancy (P = 0.03). In a multivariable regression analysis, an EPDS score of 13 or more was found to be an independent predictor of a higher personal teratogenic risk perception (P = 0.03). Both maternal depression and exposure-directed counselling are associated with maternal risk perception and the rated likelihood to terminate pregnancy. Appropriate counselling may reduce fear of teratogenicity and the likelihood of pregnancy termination.

  8. Correlation of technical difficulty during embryo transfer with rate of clinical pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neeta; Gupta, Prerna; Mittal, Suneeta; Malhotra, Neena

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To correlate the ease or difficulty of embryo transfer and blood at catheter tip with pregnancy rate when embryo transfer (ET) was performed by the same operator using soft catheter. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 342 patients who underwent in vitro fertilization or ICSI cycle from January 2008 to December 2010 in a single centre was done. The type of transfer was divided into two groups: ‘easy’ or ‘difficult’. Transfer was considered difficult when additional instrumentation was required or firmer catheter was used or required changing of catheter. Patients undergoing cryo-preserved ET were excluded from the study. RESULTS: On the day of transfer in 284 (83%) patients, ET was easy and difficulty was encountered in 58 (17%) patients. Blood at catheter was seen in 101 (29.53%) patients. In the group of 58 difficult transfers, 10 pregnancies resulted with a clinical pregnancy rate of 17.2%, while 67 pregnancies resulted in 284 cycles of easy transfer with clinical pregnancy rate of 23.6% (P value = 0.045). While no significant difference was seen in pregnancies with blood on outer catheter and blood less transfer, there was significant reduction in pregnancy rate when blood was present on catheter tip compared to bloodless transfer (13.3% v/s 24.1; P value = 0.032). CONCLUSION: Reduction in clinical pregnancy rate is seen with difficult ETs, more when blood is present at the catheter tip. PMID:23531644

  9. Effect of Pertubation on Pregnancy Rates before Intrauterine Insemination Treatment in Patients with Unexplained Infertility.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Funda; Bozkurt, Nuray; Erdem, Ahmet; Erdem, Mehmet; Oktem, Mesut; Onur Karabacak, Recep

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. In this prospective randomized study, a total of 180 patients were included in the study. Amongst these, pertubation of the uterine cavity was carried out in 79 patients prior to insemination. One patient in the pertubation group was later excluded because insemination could not be performed due to cycle cancellation. There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics between the study and control groups. When the pregnancy rates of both groups were evaluated, 14(17.8%) patients in the study group achieved pregancy. Three (3.8%) had a biochemical pregnancy, 1(1.3%) miscarried and 10(12.7%) had live births. In the control group, a total of 24(23.8%) pregnancies were achieved, amongst which one (1%) had a biochemical pregnancy, 3(3%) miscarried and 20(19.8%) resulted in live births. There was no significant difference between groups in terms of total pregnancy and live birth rates (p>0.05). There was a 21% total pregnancy loss rate. There was no significant difference between the control and study groups in terms of pregnancy loss rates (p>0.05). This study on a homogenous group of unexplained infertile patients determined that the addition of pertubation to a controlled ovarian hyperstimulation plus intrauterine insemination (COH+IUI) treatment protocol did not affect pregnancy rates (Registration Number: NCT01999959).

  10. Adolescent pregnancy and sexual risk-taking among sexually abused girls.

    PubMed

    Stock, J L; Bell, M A; Boyer, D K; Connell, F A

    1997-01-01

    Data on 3,128 girls in grades eight, 10 and 12 who participated in the 1992 Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors were used to analyze the association of a self-reported history of sexual abuse with teenage pregnancy and with sexual behavior that increases the risk of adolescent pregnancy. In analyses adjusting for grade level, respondents who had been sexually abused were 3.1 times as likely as those who had not been abused to say they had ever been pregnant; in multivariate analyses, respondents who had experienced abuse were 2.3 times as likely as others to have had intercourse but were not more likely than other sexually active respondents to have been pregnant. However, those with a history of sexual abuse were more likely to report having had intercourse by age 15 (odds ratio, 2.1), not using birth control at last intercourse (2.0) and having had more than one sexual partner (1.4). Thus, an association between sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy appears to be the result of high-risk behavior exhibited by adolescent girls who have been abused.

  11. Pregnancy Intentions and Teenage Pregnancy Among Latinas: A Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Corinne H.; Doherty, Irene; Padian, Nancy S.; Hubbard, Alan E.; Minnis, Alexandra M.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT The extent to which pregnancy intentions mediate the relationship between individual, familial and cultural characteristics and adolescent pregnancy is not well understood. The role of intentions may be particularly important among Latina teenagers, whose attitudes toward pregnancy are more favorable than those of other groups and whose pregnancy rates are high. METHODS Prospective, time-varying data from 2001–2004 were used to investigate whether two measures of pregnancy intentions, wantedness and happiness, mediated associations between risk factors and pregnancy among 213 Latina adolescents in San Francisco. Participants were tested for pregnancy and interviewed about pregnancy intentions, partnerships, family characteristics and activities every six months for two years. Associations and mediation were examined using logistic regression. RESULTS Neither pregnancy intention variable mediated relationships between participant characteristics and pregnancy. After adjustment for other measures, wantedness was strongly associated with pregnancy (odds ratio, 2.6), while happiness was not. Having a strong family orientation was associated with happiness (3.7) but unrelated to pregnancy. Low sexual relationship power with a main partner was associated with an elevated risk of pregnancy (3.3). If the pregnancy intentions of all participants were changed to definitely not wanting pregnancy, the estimated decline in pregnancy risk would be 16%. CONCLUSIONS Pregnancy intentions were important not as mediators but rather as independent risk factors for pregnancy. Differences in pregnancy rates between groups of Latinas may be less a function of intentional choice than of situational factors. Interventions and research should focus on identifying and targeting factors that hinder effective contraceptive use among teenagers who want to avoid pregnancy. PMID:20887287

  12. Pregnancy intentions and teenage pregnancy among Latinas: a mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Corinne H; Doherty, Irene; Padian, Nancy S; Hubbard, Alan E; Minnis, Alexandra M

    2010-09-01

    The extent to which pregnancy intentions mediate the relationship between individual, familial and cultural characteristics and adolescent pregnancy is not well understood. The role of intentions may be particularly important among Latina teenagers, whose attitudes toward pregnancy are more favorable than those of other groups and whose pregnancy rates are high. Prospective, time-varying data from 2001-2004 were used to investigate whether two measures of pregnancy intentions, wantedness and happiness, mediated associations between risk factors and pregnancy among 213 Latina adolescents in San Francisco. Participants were tested for pregnancy and interviewed about pregnancy intentions, partnerships, family characteristics and activities every six months for two years. Associations and mediation were examined using logistic regression. Neither pregnancy intention variable mediated relationships between participant characteristics and pregnancy. After adjustment for other measures, wantedness was strongly associated with pregnancy (odds ratio, 2.6), while happiness was not. Having a strong family orientation was associated with happiness (3.7) but unrelated to pregnancy. Low power in a sexual relationship with a main partner was associated with an elevated risk of pregnancy (3.3). If the pregnancy intentions of all participants were changed to definitely not wanting pregnancy, the estimated decline in pregnancy risk would be 16%. Pregnancy intentions were important not as mediators but rather as independent risk factors for pregnancy. Differences in pregnancy rates between groups of Latinas may be less a function of intentional choice than of situational factors. Interventions and research should focus on identifying and targeting factors that hinder effective contraceptive use among teenagers who want to avoid pregnancy. Copyright © 2010 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  13. INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AND UNINTENDED PREGNANCY AMONG ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT MARRIED WOMEN IN SOUTH ASIA.

    PubMed

    Anand, Enu; Unisa, Sayeed; Singh, Jayakant

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and unintended pregnancy among young women in South Asia using Demographic and Health Survey data from India (2005-2006), Bangladesh (2007) and Nepal (2011). The respondents were adolescent and young adult married women aged 15-24 years who had at least one childbirth in the five years preceding the survey. Bivariate and stepwise multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between IPV and unintended pregnancy. Thirty-eight per cent of the respondents in India, 52% in Bangladesh and 28% in Nepal reported having experienced physical or sexual IPV. Those who reported physical or sexual IPV had higher odds of unintended pregnancy (1.36 in India and 1.99 in Bangladesh). The findings indicate that IPV is a risk factor for unintended pregnancy among adolescent and young adult married women. Along with violence prevention programmes, a more responsive and youth-friendly health system needs to be in place to provide health care services to young women in these countries.

  14. Ongoing pregnancy rates in intrauterine insemination are affected by late follicular-phase progesterone levels.

    PubMed

    Requena, Antonio; Cruz, María; Pacheco, Alberto; García-Velasco, Juan Antonio

    2015-10-01

    To determine the relationship between serum P levels on the day of hCG administration and ongoing pregnancy rates. Retrospective study. University-affiliated private IVF. A total of 2,458 couples undergoing IUI. Ovarian stimulation with human recombinant FSH. Ongoing pregnancy and miscarriage rates. Progesterone concentrations were significantly higher given that the E2 concentration increased. Ongoing pregnancy rates were significantly decreased in women with P levels higher than 1.1 ng/mL; similar results were obtained in relation to miscarriage rates. Significant differences in ongoing pregnancy rates when P levels were elevated on the day of hCG administration may help clinicians to counsel patients about the reduced success rates with IUI and manage the timing of insemination to optimize implantation. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Between contradictions and risks: Mexican male adolescents' views about teenage pregnancy and its association with sexual behavior].

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Jorge; Atienzo, Erika E; Campero, Lourdes; Suárez-López, Leticia

    2014-04-01

    To explore the opinions of Mexican male adolescents regarding teenage pregnancy and analyze its association with sexual behavior. This is a cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire among a conventional sample of male students (15-19 years old) in eight public schools in Morelos and Mexico City. Analyses include multivariate models to identify the association between opinions and sexual behaviors. Overall, 68% agree that a teenage pregnancy is a negative event. In a hypothetical case, if a girlfriend got pregnant in this moment 56% would continue in the school whereas 18% would definitely abandon it. Those who affirm that a teenage pregnancy is something very bad have greater odds of using condoms (OR=1.8; p<0.05). Male adolescents' views about teenage pregnancy are associated with some sexual behaviors; however their opinions reflect several contradictions. The design of surveys directed exclusively to explore male adolescents' opinions about reproductive health is urgent.

  16. Pregnancy rates after ewes were treated with estradiol-17beta and oxytocin.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cervical dilation may improve transcervical sheep embryo-transfer procedures, if the cervical dilation method does not reduce pregnancy rates. This experiment was conducted to determine whether estradiol-17beta-oxytocin treatment, which dilates the cervix in luteal-phase ewes, affects pregnancy rat...

  17. Mexican American adolescent couples' vulnerability for observed negativity and physical violence: Pregnancy and acculturation mismatch.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lela Rankin; Rueda, Heidi Adams

    2016-10-01

    Stress and vulnerability for dating violence may be heightened among acculturating Mexican American (MA) adolescents, and MA adolescent parents, because of differing cultural values and norms within romantic relationships. We hypothesized, in a sample of MA heterosexual couples (N = 30, 15-17 years), that: 1) within-couple level acculturation discrepancies, and pregnancy/parenting, would predict physical violence perpetration, and 2) that this association would have an indirect effect through couple-level negativity during an observed dyadic video-taped discussion of conflict. Using a path model we found that pregnant/parenting adolescents (B = .37, SE = .16, p = .002), and couples with greater acculturation mismatch resulted in greater couple negativity (B = .16, SE = .06, p = .01), which was associated with self-reported physical violence perpetration (B = .41, SE = .22, p = .02; indirect effect, B = .15, SE = .07, p = .03). Within-couple acculturation discrepancies and pregnancy/parenting may be a pathway to dating violence through poor communication skills around conflict for MA youth. Support services that strengthen communication skills, particularly for pregnant/parenting couples, are recommended. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. School-based interventions for preventing Hiv, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Mason-Jones, Amanda J; Sinclair, David; Mathews, Catherine; Kagee, Ashraf; Hillman, Alex; Lombard, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Background School-based sexual and reproductive health programmes are widely accepted as an approach to reducing high-risk sexual behaviour among adolescents. Many studies and systematic reviews have concentrated on measuring effects on knowledge or self-reported behaviour rather than biological outcomes, such as pregnancy or prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Objectives To evaluate the effects of school-based sexual and reproductive health programmes on sexually transmitted infections (such as HIV, herpes simplex virus, and syphilis), and pregnancy among adolescents. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) for published peer-reviewed journal articles; and ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization's (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for prospective trials; AIDS Educaton and Global Information System (AEGIS) and National Library of Medicine (NLM) gateway for conference presentations; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UNAIDS, the WHO and the National Health Service (NHS) centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) websites from 1990 to 7 April 2016. We handsearched the reference lists of all relevant papers. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), both individually randomized and cluster-randomized, that evaluated school-based programmes aimed at improving the sexual and reproductive health of adolescents. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, evaluated risk of bias, and extracted data. When appropriate, we obtained summary measures of treatment effect through a random-effects meta-analysis and we reported them using risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We assessed the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results We included eight cluster-RCTs that enrolled 55,157 participants. Five trials were conducted in

  19. Tobacco and alcohol use in the context of adolescent pregnancy and postpartum: a scoping review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bottorff, Joan L; Poole, Nancy; Kelly, Mary T; Greaves, Lorraine; Marcellus, Lenora; Jung, Mary

    2014-11-01

    Adolescent girls are more likely than women of other ages to smoke tobacco or drink alcohol during pregnancy. The health impacts of smoking and drinking for girls and the interconnections between alcohol and tobacco use with adolescent pregnancy underscore the urgent need for integrated approaches to prevent and reduce alcohol and tobacco use among pregnant girls/young women. This article reports on the results of a scoping review of the literature focused on adolescents' use of tobacco and alcohol during pregnancy and postpartum. A search of CINAHL, Medline, Social Science Index and Web of Science identified 40 articles published in the two decades between 1990 and 2012 that met our inclusion criteria related to this age group, pregnancy/motherhood status, and use of both alcohol and tobacco. The review points to compelling gaps in our knowledge and our responsiveness to adolescents aged 19 and under who use alcohol and tobacco during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Research has been primarily descriptive, with separate, parallel streams of investigation to identify trends and predictors of alcohol and tobacco use, prior to, during and following pregnancy. There is a marked lack of effective interventions described in the literature that are designed to prevent or reduce alcohol and tobacco use during pregnancy among adolescent girls; and there are few examples of gender-informed prevention or treatment programmes for this population. Research is needed on interventions that attend to the context of adolescent girls' substance use as well as their preferences and developmental needs for support that encourage sustained behaviour change throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period and that effectively address the influence of partners and friends on use. © 2014 The Authors. Health and Social Care in the Community published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Analysis of 572 Cases of Adolescent Pregnancy in Z.H. Maternity Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coskun, Aydin; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared records of 572 adolescents who delivered babies in 1 obstetric service with records of 978 older patients. Found no significant differences between groups regarding spontaneous and operative delivery rates or regarding neonatal risk. Findings support view that obstetric outcomes of adolescents are no worse than outcomes for older…

  1. The association between adverse childhood experiences and adolescent pregnancy, long-term psychosocial consequences, and fetal death.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Susan D; Anda, Robert F; Dube, Shanta R; Felitti, Vincent J; Marchbanks, Polly A; Marks, James S

    2004-02-01

    Few reports address the impact of cumulative exposure to childhood abuse and family dysfunction on teen pregnancy and consequences commonly attributed to teen pregnancy. Therefore, we examined whether adolescent pregnancy increased as types of adverse childhood experiences (ACE score) increased and whether ACEs or adolescent pregnancy was the principal source of elevated risk for long-term psychosocial consequences and fetal death. A retrospective cohort study of 9159 women aged > or = 18 years (mean 56 years) who attended a primary care clinic in San Diego, California in 1995-1997. Adolescent pregnancy, psychosocial consequences, and fetal death, compared by ACE score (emotional, physical, or sexual abuse; exposure to domestic violence, substance abusing, mentally ill, or criminal household member; or separated/divorced parent). Sixty-six percent (n = 6015) of women reported > or = 1 ACE. Teen pregnancy occurred in 16%, 21%, 26%, 29%, 32%, 40%, 43%, and 53% of those with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 to 8 ACEs. As the ACE score rose from zero to 1 to 2, 3 to 4, and > or = 5, odds ratios for each adult consequence increased (family problems: 1.0, 1.5, 2.2, 3.3; financial problems: 1.0, 1.6, 2.3, 2.4; job problems: 1.0, 1.4, 2.3, 2.9; high stress: 1.0, 1.4, 1.9, 2.2; and uncontrollable anger: 1.0, 1.6, 2.8, 4.5, respectively). Adolescent pregnancy was not associated with any of these adult outcomes in the absence of childhood adversity (ACEs: 0). The ACE score was associated with increased fetal death after first pregnancy (odds ratios for 0, 1-2, 3-4, and 5-8 ACEs: 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, and 1.8, respectively); teen pregnancy was not related to fetal death. The relationship between ACEs and adolescent pregnancy is strong and graded. Moreover, the negative psychosocial sequelae and fetal deaths commonly attributed to adolescent pregnancy seem to result from underlying ACEs rather than adolescent pregnancy per se.

  2. [Adolescent pregnancy: its causes and repercussions in the dyad].

    PubMed

    Loredo-Abdalá, Arturo; Vargas-Campuzano, Edgar; Casas-Muñoz, Abigail; González-Corona, Jessica; Gutiérrez-Leyva, César Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Teen pregnancy (TP) is a global public health problem that affects the physical and emotional health, educational and economic status of prospective parents and often also affects the product of gestation. In most cases, the TP is an unplanned event, and often difficult to accept by the couple. But it is more complicated for the future mother who suddenly finds herself without the protection of the couple, her family and her school companions. The risks to which the young mothers are exposed are diverse, but include: submitting to a clandestine abortion, falling into drug addiction, prostitution and crime; Also, it should be noted that with so many adversities, she can develop child maltreatment and frequently, she may be attacked at home, at school or in society giving rise to the twin phenomena of child abuse. To address this problem, it is necessary to develop preventive strategies aimed at risk of early pregnancy or acquiring sexually transmitted diseases by implementing educational programs for personal, family or schools for this age group range. It stresses the need for these programs to be consistent and persistent, as a basic strategy to reduce the consequent risks to unplanned or accepted sex life.

  3. Pregnancy rates among Myanmar migrant workers who pursue employment in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Ekawong, Prapawadee

    2007-01-01

    Urine pregnancy diagnostic test is easily available. It is a requirement of the screening program for Myanmar workers who pursue employment in Thailand. Only a few studies have estimated population pregnancy rates using objective and laboratory-based criteria. Here, the authors performed a study on laboratory-measured pregnancy rates among Myanmar workers who pursue employment in Thailand from an experience in a tertiary hospital in Thailand. The data from medical records of the female Myanmar migrant workers who got a diagnostic urine pregnancy test at Division of Laboratory Medicine, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand, from July 2004 to June 2005 were reviewed. A total of 263 medical records were reviewed in this study. There were 17 positive cases of the overall 263. The diagnostic test results were negative in 246 cases (93.5%) and positive in 17 (6.5%). Screening for the urine pregnancy among these migrant workers can help decrease the improper antenatal care.

  4. The role of education level in the intergenerational pattern of adolescent pregnancy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Maria da Conceição Chagas; Aquino, Estela M L

    2009-09-01

    Adolescent pregnancy has been associated with the early childbearing experience of the mothers of adolescents, and young people's education level is believed to be an important factor in this phenomenon. In 2002, a representative household survey collected data from 3,050 young men and women aged 20-24 in three Brazilian cities. The main measures were mother's age at first birth, daughter's age at first pregnancy and son's age when he first impregnated a partner; ages were dichotomized as younger than 20 and 20 or older. The distribution of respondents by both their own and their mothers' reproductive experience was analyzed in relation to various characteristics, and logistic regressions assessed possible associations between these variables and pregnancy experience. Thirty percent of women reported getting pregnant before age 20, and 21% of men said they were younger than 20 when they first impregnated a partner. Of these groups, 34% of women and 31% of men reported that their mothers had first given birth at the same age. Both women and men were more likely to have had an early pregnancy experience if their mother had had a child before age 20 (odds ratios, 2.0 and 2.3, respectively). Among women, this positive association disappeared in the final model after adjusting for their education level, whereas among men the association remained after similar adjustment (1.8). Daughters' and sons' level of education appears to be an important factor in the repetition of adolescent fertility across generations. Efforts are needed to increase access to education and to encourage young people to remain in school.

  5. Lessons Learned From a Community–Academic Partnership Addressing Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention in Filipino American Families

    PubMed Central

    Javier, Joyce R.; Chamberlain, Lisa J.; Rivera, Kahealani K.; Gonzalez, Sarah E.; Mendoza, Fernando S.; Huffman, Lynne C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Filipino Americans have more adolescent pregnancies than other Asian-Pacific Islanders (APIs). Few community–academic collaborations have addressed adolescent pregnancy prevention in this community. Objectives We sought to describe the lessons learned from and impact of a community-based teen pregnancy prevention program for Filipino Americans implemented by a Filipina pediatrics resident. Methods We formed a community–academic partnership between the Filipino Youth Coalition, a community-based organization (CBO) in San Jose, California, and the Stanford School of Medicine’s Pediatric Advocacy Program. We developed a culturally tailored parent–teen conference addressing adolescent pregnancy prevention in Filipino Americans. We qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated this intervention by collecting both pre- and post-conference data using a convenience sample design. Lessons Learned Engaging particular aspects of Filipino culture (i.e., religion and intergenerational differences) helped to make this community–academic partnership successful. For physicians-in-training who are conducting community-based participatory research (CBPR), project challenges may include difficulties in building and maintaining academic–community relationships, struggles to promote sustainability, and conflicting goals of “community insiders” and “academic outsiders.” Authors offer insights and implications for residents interested in practicing CBPR. Conclusion CBPR is a key tool for exploring health issues in understudied populations. CBPR experiences can provide meaningful educational opportunities for physicians-in-training and can build sustained capacity in CBOs. They can also help residents to develop analytic skills, directly affect the health of the communities they serve, and, for minority physicians, give back to the communities they call home. PMID:21169708

  6. Adolescent suicide in Australia: rates, risk and resilience.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Patricia M

    2013-07-01

    Adolescent suicide rates in Australia have fallen significantly during recent years. The incidence, however, clearly remains a serious concern for young people, parents, professionals and policy makers. Some groups of Australian youth appear to be at heightened risk. Adolescents within the welfare system, indigenous, rural and refugee youth, along with same sex attracted young people often need very careful monitoring and support. Young men continue to take their lives more frequently than young women. Prevention programmes in Australia aim to develop resilience in young people, families and communities that can serve as protection against self harm and suicide. The improvement of mental health literacy, a fostering of adolescent self-efficacy and better access to early intervention strategies are currently privileged in national and state policies related to young people in Australia. More work is needed, however, to achieve a well integrated mental health framework capable of effectively addressing adolescent suicide prevention into the twenty-first century.

  7. [WEIGHT GAIN DURING PREGNANCY AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES IN PREGNANT ADOLESCENTS WITH A HISTORY OF SEXUAL ABUSE].

    PubMed

    Sam-Soto, Selene; Sámano, Reyna; Flores-Ramos, Mónica; Rodríguez-Bosch, Mario; García-Salazar, Danae; Hernández-Mohar, Gabriela; García-Espinosa, Verónica

    2015-09-01

    the purpose of the present study was to describe some perinatal outcomes in two groups of pregnant adolescents: one group with history of sexual abuse and one group without sexual abuse antecedent. we designed an observational, retrolective study. Participants were primigravid adolescents between 10 to 16 years, with a singleton pregnancy, and at least three prenatal medical evaluations. Participants were grouped according to sexual abuse antecedent: 55 adolescents had sexual abuse antecedent, and 110 participants had not sexual abuse antecedent. We obtained the clinical data from medical records: socio-demographic characteristics, sexually transmitted infections, illicit drugs use, pre-gestational body mass index, gestational weight gain, and newborn weight. The data were analyzed using association tests and mean comparisons. the adolescents with sexual abuse history had higher prevalence of human papilloma virus infection. The newborns weight of mothers without sexual abuse antecedent was about 200 grams higher than the newborns of mothers with sexual abuse antecedent (p = 0.002); while the length of the first group was 2 centimeters longer than the length of the newborns on the second group (p = 0.001). Gestational weight increase was 5 kilograms lower in adolescents with sexual abuse antecedent compared to adolescent without the antecedent (p = 0.005). Illicit drug use was similar in the two groups and it was associated to low newborn weight. the sexual abuse antecedent in pregnant adolescents was associated to higher frequency of human papilloma virus infections, lower newborn weight, and lower gestational weight increase on pregnant adolescents. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. Parenting Behaviors, Parent Heart Rate Variability, and Their Associations with Adolescent Heart Rate Variability.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rebecca A; Scott, Brandon G; Weems, Carl F

    2016-11-30

    Adolescence is a potentially important time in the development of emotion regulation and parenting behaviors may play a role. We examined associations among parenting behaviors, parent resting heart rate variability, adolescent resting heart rate variability and parenting behaviors as moderators of the association between parent and adolescent resting heart rate variability. Ninety-seven youth (11-17 years; 49.5 % female; 34 % African American, 37.1 % Euro-American, 22.6 % other/mixed ethnic background, and 7.2 % Hispanic) and their parents (n = 81) completed a physiological assessment and questionnaires assessing parenting behaviors. Inconsistent discipline and corporal punishment were negatively associated with adolescent resting heart rate variability, while positive parenting and parental involvement were positively associated. Inconsistent discipline and parental involvement moderated the relationship between parent and adolescent resting heart rate variability. The findings provide evidence for a role of parenting behaviors in shaping the development of adolescent resting heart rate variability with inconsistent discipline and parental involvement potentially influencing the entrainment of resting heart rate variability in parents and their children.

  9. Family matters: how mothers of adolescent parents experience adolescent pregnancy and parenting.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Constance

    2004-01-01

    Family support has been demonstrated to be essential for successful long-term outcomes of low-income, African American adolescent mothers and their children [Apfel, N., & Seitz, V. (1996). Urban girls: Resisting stereotypes, creating identities. NY: New York University Press]. Family support may also be essential for the continued paternal involvement of unmarried, low-income, African American adolescent fathers. Twenty mothers of unmarried, low-income, African American adolescent parents were individually interviewed for this qualitative study to describe the experiences of paternal grandmothers (mothers of adolescent fathers) and maternal grandmothers (mothers of adolescent mothers) during transition to fatherhood for unmarried, low-income, African American adolescent fathers. Findings are presented according to the six factors of transition conditions from the nursing model of transitions [Schumacher, K., & Meleis, A. I. (1994). Image, 26, 119-127]: meanings, expectations, level of knowledge and skill, the environment, level of planning, and emotional and physical well-being. Findings indicate that transition to parenthood and grandparenthood is often abrupt and complicated for unmarried, low-income, African American adolescent parents and their families. Paternal and maternal grandmothers continue to act as primary parents for their adolescents while compensating for the lack of skills and attributes for the adolescents' children. Findings from this study can be used to design developmentally and culturally appropriate health care interventions that can support these families during this complex process.

  10. Zinc and copper metabolism in pregnancy and lactation of adolescent women.

    PubMed

    Maia, Patricia Afonso; Figueiredo, Renata C B; Anastácio, Alexandra Silva; Porto da Silveira, Carmem Lucia; Donangelo, Carmen Marino

    2007-03-01

    Pregnant and lactating adolescent women are at risk of zinc and copper deficiency but their capacity for metabolic adaptation is poorly known. This study investigated the effect of pregnancy and lactation on zinc and copper metabolism in adolescent women by comparing biochemical indices between groups in different reproductive states. Habitual dietary intake and biochemical indices (zinc, copper, alkaline phosphatase, and ceruloplasmin in plasma; zinc [E-Zn], metallothionein [E-MT], and superoxide dismutase [E-SOD] in erythrocytes) and their relation were compared among non-pregnant non-lactating adolescents (NPNLs; n = 26), third-trimester pregnant adolescents (PAs; n = 26), and lactating adolescents up to 3 mo postpartum (LAs; n = 21). Zinc and copper intakes were not different across groups (on average, 8.7 and 1.0 mg/d, respectively). PAs had lower plasma zinc but higher plasma copper, alkaline phosphatase, and ceruloplasmin levels than did LAs and NPNLs (P < 0.05). E-SOD and E-Zn were similar in all groups but E-MT was higher in the PA and LA groups than in the NPNL group (P < 0.05). Correlations between plasma copper and ceruloplasmin and between E-MT and E-Zn were observed in the LA and NPNL groups (r > or = 0.64, P < 0.01) but not in the PA group. In contrast, correlations between plasma alkaline phosphatase and plasma zinc, between E-MT and plasma zinc, and between E-SOD and E-Zn were observed only in the PA group (r > or = 0.46, P < 0.05). Zinc and copper biochemical responses to pregnancy and lactation in the adolescent women studied appeared qualitatively similar to those described in previous studies in adult women. However, the significant correlations observed between the activity of zinc-dependent enzymes and plasma (or erythrocyte) zinc suggest that a poor maternal zinc status may limit the metabolic adaptation capacity of these adolescent women especially during pregnancy.

  11. Predicting pregnancy rate following multiple embryo transfers using algorithms developed through static image analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yun; Wang, Wei; Yin, Yabo; Wang, Weizhou; Duan, Fuqing; Zhao, Shifeng

    2017-02-16

    Single-embryo image assessment involves a high degree of inaccuracy because of the imprecise labelling of the transferred embryo images. In this study, we considered the entire transfer cycle to predict the implantation potential of embryos, and propose a novel algorithm based on a combination of local binary pattern texture feature and Adaboost classifiers to predict pregnancy rate. The first step of the proposed method was to extract the features of the embryo images using the local binary pattern operator. After this, multiple embryo images in a transfer cycle were considered as one entity, and the pregnancy rate was predicted using three classifiers: the Real Adaboost, Gentle Adaboost, and Modest Adaboost. Finally, the pregnancy rate was determined via the majority vote rule based on classification results of the three Adaboost classifiers. The proposed algorithm was verified to have a good predictive performance and may assist the embryologist and clinician to select embryos to transfer and in turn improve pregnancy rate.

  12. Review of Research Shows, Overall, Acupuncture Did Not Increase Pregnancy Rates with IVF

    MedlinePlus

    ... X Y Z Review of Research Shows, Overall, Acupuncture Did Not Increase Pregnancy Rates With IVF Share: An analysis of research conducted on acupuncture as an adjuvant (booster) treatment to in vitro ...

  13. Associations of Blood Pressure in Pregnancy With Offspring Blood Pressure Trajectories During Childhood and Adolescence: Findings From a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Staley, James R; Bradley, John; Silverwood, Richard J; Howe, Laura D; Tilling, Kate; Lawlor, Debbie A; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are related to higher offspring blood pressure (BP), but it is not known whether this association strengthens or weakens as BP changes across childhood. Our aim was to assess the associations of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and maternal BP changes during pregnancy with trajectories of offspring BP from age 7 to 18 years. Methods and Results In a large UK cohort of maternal–offspring pairs (N=6619), we used routine antenatal BP measurements to derive hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and maternal BP trajectories. These were related to offspring BP trajectories, obtained from research clinic assessments, using linear spline random-effects models. After adjusting for maternal and offspring variables, including body mass index, offspring of women who had existing hypertension, gestational hypertension, or preeclampsia during pregnancy had on average higher BP at age 7 years compared to offspring of normotensive pregnancies (mean difference [95%CI] in systolic BP: 1.67 mm Hg [0.48, 2.86], 1.98 mm Hg [1.32, 2.65], and 1.22 mm Hg [−0.52, 2.97], respectively). These differences were consistent across childhood to age 18 years, as the patterns of BP change did not differ between offspring of hypertensive pregnancies and normotensive pregnancies. Maternal BP at 8 weeks’ gestation was also positively associated with offspring BP in childhood and adolescence, but changes in BP across pregnancy were not strongly associated. Conclusions The differences in BP between offspring of hypertensive pregnancies and offspring of normotensive pregnancies remain consistent across childhood and adolescence. These associations appear to be most contributed to by higher maternal BP in early pregnancy rather than by pregnancy-related BP changes. PMID:25994439

  14. The effect of medical clowning on pregnancy rates after in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Friedler, Shevach; Glasser, Saralee; Azani, Liat; Freedman, Laurence S; Raziel, Arie; Strassburger, Dvora; Ron-El, Raphael; Lerner-Geva, Liat

    2011-05-01

    This experimental prospective quasi-randomized study examining the impact of a medical clowning encounter after embryo transfer (ET) after in vitro fertilization (IVF) found that the pregnancy rate in the intervention group was 36.4%, compared with 20.2% in the control group (adjusted odds ratio, 2.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.36-5.24). Medical clowning as an adjunct to IVF-ET may have a beneficial effect on pregnancy rates and deserves further investigation.

  15. Tobacco and alcohol use in the context of adolescent pregnancy and postpartum: a scoping review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bottorff, Joan L; Poole, Nancy; Kelly, Mary T; Greaves, Lorraine; Marcellus, Lenora; Jung, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent girls are more likely than women of other ages to smoke tobacco or drink alcohol during pregnancy. The health impacts of smoking and drinking for girls and the interconnections between alcohol and tobacco use with adolescent pregnancy underscore the urgent need for integrated approaches to prevent and reduce alcohol and tobacco use among pregnant girls/young women. This article reports on the results of a scoping review of the literature focused on adolescents’ use of tobacco and alcohol during pregnancy and postpartum. A search of CINAHL, Medline, Social Science Index and Web of Science identified 40 articles published in the two decades between 1990 and 2012 that met our inclusion criteria related to this age group, pregnancy/motherhood status, and use of both alcohol and tobacco. The review points to compelling gaps in our knowledge and our responsiveness to adolescents aged 19 and under who use alcohol and tobacco during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Research has been primarily descriptive, with separate, parallel streams of investigation to identify trends and predictors of alcohol and tobacco use, prior to, during and following pregnancy. There is a marked lack of effective interventions described in the literature that are designed to prevent or reduce alcohol and tobacco use during pregnancy among adolescent girls; and there are few examples of gender-informed prevention or treatment programmes for this population. Research is needed on interventions that attend to the context of adolescent girls’ substance use as well as their preferences and developmental needs for support that encourage sustained behaviour change throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period and that effectively address the influence of partners and friends on use. PMID:24405036

  16. Pre-pregnancy Dating Violence and Birth Outcomes among Adolescent Mothers in a National Sample

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Xie, Yiqiong; Harville, Emily W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although infants born to adolescent mothers are at increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, little is known about contributors to birth outcomes in this group. Given past research linking partner abuse to adverse birth outcomes among adult mothers, we explored associations between pre-pregnancy verbal and physical dating violence and the birthweight and gestational age of infants born to adolescent mothers. Methods Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health Waves I (1995/96), II (1996), and IV (2007/08) were analyzed. Girls whose first singleton live births occurred after Wave II interview and before age 20 (n=558) self-reported infants’ birth weight and gestational age at Wave IV. Dating violence victimization (verbal and physical) in the 18 months prior to Wave II interview was self-reported. Controls included Wave I age; parent education; age at pregnancy; time between reporting abuse and birth; and childhood physical and sexual abuse. Weighted multivariable regression models were performed separately by race (Black/non-Black). Results On average, births occurred two years after Wave II interview. Almost one in four mothers reported verbal dating violence victimization (23.6%), and 10.1% reported physical victimization. Birthweight and prevalence of verbal dating violence victimization were significantly lower in Black compared to non-Black teen mothers. In multivariable analyses, negative associations between physical dating abuse and birth outcomes became stronger as time increased for Black mothers. For example, pre-pregnancy physical dating abuse was associated with 0.79 kilograms lower birthweight (p<.001) and 4.72 fewer weeks gestational age (p<0.01) for Black mothers who gave birth two years post-reporting abuse. Physical dating abuse was unassociated with birth outcomes among non-Black mothers, and verbal abuse was unassociated with birth outcomes for all mothers. Conclusions Reducing physical dating violence in

  17. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and calcium intake affect rates of bone calcium deposition during pregnancy and the early postpartum period123

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Kimberly O; Donangelo, Carmen M; Ritchie, Lorrene D; Gildengorin, Ginny; Abrams, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Background: Factors affecting bone calcium deposition across pregnancy and lactation are not well characterized. Objective: The impact of maternal age, calcium intake, race-ethnicity, and vitamin D status on the rate of bone calcium deposition (VO+) was assessed across pregnancy and lactation. Design: Stable calcium isotopes were given to 46 women at pre- or early pregnancy (trimester 1), late pregnancy (trimester 3), and 3–10 wk postpartum. Three cohorts were included: 23 adolescents from Baltimore (MD), aged 16.5 ± 1.4 y (mean ± SD; Baltimore cohort); 13 adults from California, aged 29.5 ± 2.6 y (California cohort); and 10 adults from Brazil, aged 30.4 ± 4.0 y (Brazil cohort). The total exchangeable calcium pool, VO+, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], parathyroid hormone, and calcium intake were evaluated. Results: At trimester 3, inverse associations between 1,25(OH)2D and VO+ were evident in the Baltimore (P = 0.059) and Brazil (P = 0.008) cohorts and in the whole group (P = 0.029); calcium intake was not a significant determinant of VO+ in any group during pregnancy. At postpartum, a significant positive association was evident between VO+ and calcium intake (P ≤ 0.002) and between VO+ and African ethnicity (P ≤ 0.004) in the whole group and within the Baltimore and Brazil cohorts. Conclusions: Elevated 1,25(OH)2D was associated with decreased rates of bone calcium deposition during late pregnancy, a finding that was particularly evident in pregnant adolescents and adult women with low calcium intakes. Higher dietary calcium intakes and African ethnicity were associated with elevated rates of bone calcium deposition in the postpartum period. PMID:22648718

  18. Unlike pregnant adult women, pregnant adolescent girls cannot maintain glycine flux during late pregnancy because of decreased synthesis from serine.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jean W; Thame, Minerva M; Gibson, Raquel; Baker, Tameka M; Tang, Grace J; Chacko, Shaji K; Jackson, Alan A; Jahoor, Farook

    2016-03-14

    During pregnancy, glycine and serine become more important because they are the primary suppliers of methyl groups for the synthesis of fetal DNA, and more glycine is required for fetal collagen synthesis as pregnancy progresses. In an earlier study, we reported that glycine flux decreased by 39% from the first to the third trimester in pregnant adolescent girls. As serine is a primary precursor for glycine synthesis, the objective of this study was to measure and compare glycine and serine fluxes and inter-conversions in pregnant adolescent girls and adult women in the first and third trimesters. Measurements were made after an overnight fast by continuous intravenous infusions of 2H2-glycine and 15N-serine in eleven adolescent girls (17·4 (se 0·1) years of age) and in ten adult women (25·8 (se 0·5) years of age) for 4 h. Adolescent girls had significantly slower glycine flux and they made less glycine from serine in the third (P<0·05) than in the first trimester. Baby birth length was significantly shorter of adolescent girls (P=0·04) and was significantly associated with third trimester glycine flux. These findings suggest that the pregnant adolescent cannot maintain glycine flux in late pregnancy compared with early pregnancy because of decreased synthesis from serine. It is possible that the inability to maintain glycine synthesis makes her fetus vulnerable to impaired cartilage synthesis, and thus linear growth.

  19. Correlation of cystatin-C with glomerular filtration rate by inulin clearance in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A R; Ananth Karumanchi, S; Fan, S-L; Horowitz, G L; Hollenberg, N K; Graves, S W; Seely, E W

    2012-01-01

    To test utility of cystatin-C as a marker of glomerular filtration rate during pregnancy, we performed serial correlations with inulin clearance during pregnancy and postpartum. Twelve subjects received inulin infusions and serum cystatin-C at three time points. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated. Cystatin-C levels ranged 0.66-1.48 mg/L during pregnancy, and 0.72-1.26 mg/L postpartum. Inulin clearance ranged 130-188 mL/min during pregnancy, and 110-167 mL/min postpartum. Cystatin-C did not correlate with inulin clearance at any time point. Serum cystatin-C did not correlate with inulin clearance during pregnancy or postpartum.

  20. Correlation of Cystatin-C with Glomerular Filtration Rate by Inulin Clearance in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Aditi R.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Fan, Shu-Ling; Horowitz, Gary L.; Seely, Ellen W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test utility of cystatin-C as a marker of glomerular filtration rate during pregnancy, we performed serial correlations with inulin clearance during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods Twelve subjects received inulin infusions and serum cystatin-C at three time points. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated. Results Cystatin-C levels ranged 0.66 to 1.48 mg/L during pregnancy, and 0.72 to 1.26 mg/L postpartum. Inulin clearance ranged 130 to 188 ml/min during pregnancy, and 110 to 167 ml/min postpartum. Cystatin-C did not correlate with inulin clearance at any time point. Conclusion Serum cystatin-C did not correlate with inulin clearance during pregnancy or postpartum. PMID:22008011

  1. Risk management considerations and the pregnancy handheld record. An audit of the return rate of the pregnancy handheld record.

    PubMed

    Toohill, Jocelyn; Soong, Barbara; Meldrum, Melissa

    2006-12-01

    Risk management is integral to the provision of contemporary health care. As maternity practices change and with a commitment on women being at the centre of care, one strategy has been for women to retain their records during the antenatal period. This paper explores the return rate of the pregnancy handheld record in a major tertiary facility and discusses the risk management implications when the record is not available upon presentation to the treating practitioner. Four audits were conducted over a 2 year period to determine the return rate of the pregnancy handheld record at time of admission for labour and birth. A total of 1096 records were returned out of a possible 1256 during the study. A 6.6% increase in the return rate was achieved over the 4 audit periods (82-88.5%) with an overall return rate of 85%. Our audit highlights the need for consumers, clinicians and heath care facilities to consider the advantages and disadvantages of the pregnancy handheld record, as well as the medico-legal responsibilities that ultimately fall back on the health facility.

  2. Issues and Actions: Dialogues from Wingspread. Proceedings of the Conference on Adolescent Pregnancy: State Policies and Programs (Racine, Wisconsin, August 19-21, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott (C.S.) Foundation, Flint, MI.

    Proceedings of a conference on adolescent pregnancy are presented in this document. Eunice Kennedy Shriver's opening address, in which she urged the building of "communities of caring" is summarized, as is the address by Gina C. Adams who discussed recent findings on the topic of adolescent pregnancy. Several programs developed to address the…

  3. Adolescent Health, Services, and Pregnancy Prevention and Care Act of 1978; Hearings Before the Committee on Human Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Fifty Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Human Resources.

    The hearings before the Senate Committee on Human Resources regarding the Adolescent Health, Services, and Pregnancy Prevention and Care Act of 1978 are presented in full. The purpose of the bill is stated to be to establish a program for developing networks of community-based services to prevent initial and repeat pregnancies among adolescents,…

  4. Smoking, alcohol, and substance use and rates of quitting during pregnancy: is it hard to quit?

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Ahmet Bulent; Uslu Yuvaci, Hilal; Yazici, Esra; Halimoglu Caliskan, Ebru; Cevrioglu, Arif Serhan; Erol, Atila

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol and substance use is a major health challenge in Turkey, as it is worldwide. Recently, there has been a rapid increase in the number of females using substances and although usage tends to reduce during pregnancy, it is of critical importance to determine its exact level as substance use negatively impacts on the health of both the mother and infant. Aim The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of smoking, alcohol, and substance use, and quitting rates during pregnancy. Method This study was conducted on pregnant females in Sakarya, Turkey. A total of 1,082 consecutively presenting females who agreed to participate in the study were evaluated. The study team prepared a sociodemographic data form and adapted the “Introduction” section, derived from the Addiction Profile Index, to cover substance use during pregnancy. Results The substances most frequently used by pregnant females in their previous pregnancies and current pregnancies were cigarettes/tobacco products (11% and 11.8%, respectively), alcohol (0.6% and 0.4%, respectively), and rarely, synthetic cannabinoids (0.3% and 0.2%, respectively). Daily tobacco smokers continued to smoke during pregnancy, with a rate of 42.5%. Based on research into predictors of smoking (cigarettes) in pregnancy, a correlation was found between lifetime smoking and smoking during a previous pregnancy. A similar link was found with respect to alcohol. Conclusion Cigarettes are the most frequently used substance in pregnancy, and to a lesser extent, alcohol and synthetic cannabinoids, also considered to be risky substances. A high incidence of smoking regularly during pregnancy was found in daily smokers. It is recommended that physicians should sensitively ask pregnant females presenting at clinics about all forms of substance use, including alcohol and synthetic cannabinoids, and to include such questions in their routine enquiries. PMID:27785104

  5. Tobacco and alcohol use in adolescents with unplanned pregnancies: relation with family structure, tobacco and alcohol use at home and by friends.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Vazquez-Nava; Carlos, Vazquez-Rodríguez; Eliza, Vazquez-Rodriguez; Octelina, Castillo-Ruiz; Maria, Iribar Ibabe

    2016-03-01

    Recent publications show that smoking and alcohol use among adolescents with unplanned pregnancy is increasing and the causes need to be further studied. To determine the association between living in a non-intact family household and the presence of smokers and consumers of alcoholic beverages in the adolescents' environment with smoking and consuming alcoholic beverages in adolescents with unplanned pregnancies. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 785 pregnant adolescents, aged 13-19 years. Data was collected by trained interviewers using a self-administered questionnaire. The association was determined using multivariate logistic regression analysis. In adolescents with unplanned pregnancies, the prevalence of active smoking was 21.2% and of alcohol consumption, 41.5%. The percentage of smoking at home was 57.4% and alcohol consumption, 77.5%. Approximately, 80.3% of adolescents with unplanned pregnancies had friends who smoked and 90.6% consumed alcoholic beverages. Multivariate logistic regression analysis shows that having friends who smoke or who consume alcoholic beverages is the most important risk factor for substance use in adolescents with unplanned pregnancies. Smoking and alcohol consumption at home are not associated with smoking in adolescents with unplanned pregnancies. Socializing with friends who smoke and/or consume alcoholic beverages constitutes the most important risk factor for substance use among adolescents with unplanned pregnancies.

  6. Rates and risk factors associated with depressive symptoms during pregnancy and with postpartum onset.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Nancy; Da Costa, Deborah; Marchand, André; Ireland, Kierla; Dritsa, Maria; Khalifé, Samir

    2014-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in the third trimester of pregnancy and at 3 months postpartum and to prospectively identify risk factors associated with elevated depressive symptoms during pregnancy and with postpartum onset. About 364 women attending antenatal clinics or at the time of their ultrasound were recruited and completed questionnaires in pregnancy and 226 returned their questionnaires at 3 months postpartum. Depressed mood was assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; score of ≥ 10). The rate of depressed mood during pregnancy was 28.3% and 16.4% at 3 months postpartum. Among women with postpartum depressed mood, 6.6% were new postpartum cases. In the present study, belonging to a non-Caucasian ethnic group, a history of emotional problems (e.g. anxiety and depression) or of sexual abuse, comorbid anxiety, higher anxiety sensitivity and having experienced stressful events were associated with elevated depressed mood during pregnancy. Four risk factors emerged as predictors of new onset elevated depressed mood at 3 months postpartum: higher depressive symptomatology during pregnancy, a history of emotional problems, lower social support during pregnancy and a delivery that was more difficult than expected. The importance of identifying women at risk of depressed mood early in pregnancy and clinical implications are discussed.

  7. Adolescent and adult first time mothers' health seeking practices during pregnancy and early motherhood in Wakiso district, central Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Atuyambe, Lynn; Mirembe, Florence; Tumwesigye, Nazarius M; Annika, Johansson; Kirumira, Edward K; Faxelid, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Background Maternal health services have a potentially critical role in the improvement of reproductive health. In order to get a better understanding of adolescent mothers'needs we compared health seeking practices of first time adolescent and adult mothers during pregnancy and early motherhood in Wakiso district, Uganda. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted between May and August, 2007 in Wakiso district. A total of 762 women (442 adolescents and 320 adult) were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. We calculated odds ratios with their 95% CI for antenatal and postnatal health care seeking, stigmatisation and violence experienced from parents comparing adolescents to adult first time mothers. STATA V.8 was used for data analysis. Results Adolescent mothers were significantly more disadvantaged in terms of health care seeking for reproductive health services and faced more challenges during pregnancy and early motherhood compared to adult mothers. Adolescent mothers were more likely to have dropped out of school due to pregnancy (OR = 3.61, 95% CI: 2.40–5.44), less likely to earn a salary (OR = 0.43, 95%CI: 0.24–0.76), and more likely to attend antenatal care visits less than four times compared to adult mothers (OR = 1.52, 95%CI: 1.12–2.07). Adolescents were also more likely to experience violence from parents (OR = 2.07, 95%CI: 1.39–3.08) and to be stigmatized by the community (CI = 1.58, 95%CI: 1.09–2.59). In early motherhood, adolescent mothers were less likely to seek for second and third vaccine doses for their infants [Polio2 (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.55–0.98), Polio3 (OR = 0.70: 95% CI: 0.51–0.95), DPT2 (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.53–0.96), DPT3 (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.50–0.92)] compared to adult mothers. These results are compelling and call for urgent adolescent focused interventions. Conclusion Adolescents showed poorer health care seeking behaviour for themselves and their children, and experienced increased community

  8. Articulation Rate in Childhood and Adolescence: Hebrew Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Ofer; Grinfeld, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify articulation rate among Hebrew speaking children and adolescents across a wide age range, and to assess whether age-related differences vary according to metric. One hundred and forty children, in seven age groups, participated in this cross-sectional study. All children were recorded during conversation and a picture…

  9. [Beta thalassemia major and pregnancy during adolescence: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Trigo, Lucas Augusto Monteiro Castro; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani; Parpinelli, Mary Angela; Pereira, Belmiro Gonçalves; Fertrin, Kleber Yotsumoto; Costa, Maria Laura

    2015-06-01

    Beta thalassemia major is a rare hereditary blood disease in which impaired synthesis of beta globin chains causes severe anemia. Medical treatment consists of chronic blood transfusions and iron chelation. We describe two cases of adolescents with beta thalassemia major with unplanned pregnancies and late onset of prenatal care. One had worsening of anemia with increased transfusional requirement, fetal growth restriction, and placental senescence. The other was also diagnosed with hypothyroidism and low maternal weight, and was admitted twice during pregnancy due to dengue shock syndrome and influenza H1N1-associated respiratory infection. She also developed fetal growth restriction and underwent vaginal delivery at term complicated by uterine hypotonia. Both patients required blood transfusions after birth and chose medroxyprogesterone as a contraceptive method afterwards. This report highlights the importance of medical advice on contraceptive methods for these women and the role of a specialized prenatal follow-up in association with a hematologist.

  10. Historical context for the creation of the Office of Adolescent Health and the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Kappeler, Evelyn M; Farb, Amy Feldman

    2014-03-01

    In Fiscal Year 2010, Federal funds were dedicated to support evidence-based approaches to effectively target teen pregnancy prevention and resulted in the establishment of the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) and the Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) Program. Through the tiered TPP Program, OAH supports replication and evaluation of programs using models whose effectiveness has been demonstrated through rigorous evaluation and the development and testing of promising or innovative pregnancy prevention strategies and approaches. This article documents the creation of OAH and the development of the TPP Program, the identification of a TPP evidence base, current program and evaluation efforts at OAH, and government coordination and partnerships related to reducing teen pregnancy. This article is of interest to those working to improve the health and wellbeing of adolescents. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Pregnancy rates and predictors in women with HIV/AIDS in Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Ruth Khalili; Bastos, Francisco I; Leite, Iuri Costa; Veloso, Valdiléa G; Moreira, Ronaldo I; Cardoso, Sandra W; Andrade, Angela C Vasconcelos de; Sampaio, Michelle Cristina; Currier, Judith; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2011-04-01

    To assess incidence and predictors of first pregnancy among women with HIV/AIDS. Prospective cohort study was conducted in Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil, between 1996 and 2003. This study comprised 225 women with HIV/AIDS followed up until their first pregnancy or first censored event (hysterectomy, tubal ligation, menopause, 50 years of age, loss to follow-up, death or the end of December 2003). Pregnancy and abortion rates were estimated, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify baseline characteristics associated with pregnancy risk. The women were followed up for 565 person/years with a median follow-up of 3 years per women. The mean age was 32 years (SD: 7), and 54.7% were white. There were 60 pregnancies in 39 women, and 18 were terminated (induced abortions), accounting for a rate of 6.9% and 2.1% women/year, respectively. Repeated pregnancies occurred in 33.3% of the women (13/39). Higher pregnancy risk was seen among younger women (HR=3.42; 95%CI: 1.69;6.95) and those living with their partners (HR=1.89; 95%CI: 1.00;3.57). Lower pregnancy risk was associated with higher education level (HR=0.43; 95%CI: 0.19;0.99) and use of antiretroviral therapy (HR=061; 95%CI: 0.31;1.17). Lower pregnancy rates were found in our cohort than in the general population. Sociodemographic characteristics should be taken into consideration in the management of reproductive health in HIV-positive childbearing age women. Reproductive and family planning counseling must be incorporated into HIV/AIDS programs for women to help preventing HIV transmission to their partners and offspring.

  12. Adolescent pregnancies in the Amazon Basin of Ecuador: a rights and gender approach to adolescents' sexual and reproductive health

    PubMed Central

    Goicolea, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    In the Andean region of Latin America over one million adolescent girls get pregnant every year. Adolescent pregnancy (AP) has been associated with adverse health and social outcomes, but it has also been favorably viewed as a pathway to adulthood. AP can also be conceptualized as a marker of inequity, since it disproportionately affects girls from the poorest households and those who have not been able to attend school. Using results from a study carried out in the Amazon Basin of Ecuador, this paper explores APs and adolescents' sexual and reproductive health from a rights and gender approach. The paper points out the main features of a rights and gender approach, and how it can be applied to explore APs. Afterward it describes the methodologies (quantitative and qualitative) and main results of the study, framing the findings within the rights and gender approach. Finally, some implications that could be generalizable to global reserach on APs are highlighted. The application of the rights and gender framework to explore APs contributes to a more integral view of the issue. The rights and gender framework stresses the importance of the interaction between rights-holders and duty-bearers on the realization of sexual and reproductive rights, and acknowledges the importance of gender–power relations on sexual and reproductive decisions. A rights and gender approach could lead to more integral and constructive interventions, and it could also be useful when exploring other sexual and reproductive health matters. PMID:20596248

  13. Effect of Pertubation on Pregnancy Rates before Intrauterine Insemination Treatment in Patients with Unexplained Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Funda; Bozkurt, Nuray; Erdem, Ahmet; Erdem, Mehmet; Oktem, Mesut; Onur Karabacak, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: In this prospective randomized study, a total of 180 patients were included in the study. Amongst these, pertubation of the uterine cavity was carried out in 79 patients prior to insemination. One patient in the pertubation group was later excluded because insemination could not be performed due to cycle cancellation. Results: There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics between the study and control groups. When the pregnancy rates of both groups were evaluated, 14(17.8%) patients in the study group achieved pregancy. Three (3.8%) had a biochemical pregnancy, 1(1.3%) miscarried and 10(12.7%) had live births. In the control group, a total of 24(23.8%) pregnancies were achieved, amongst which one (1%) had a biochemical pregnancy, 3(3%) miscarried and 20(19.8%) resulted in live births. There was no significant difference between groups in terms of total pregnancy and live birth rates (p>0.05). There was a 21% total pregnancy loss rate. There was no significant difference between the control and study groups in terms of pregnancy loss rates (p>0.05). Conclusion: This study on a homogenous group of unexplained infertile patients determined that the addition of pertubation to a controlled ovarian hyperstimulation plus intrauterine insemination (COH+IUI) treatment protocol did not affect pregnancy rates (Registration Number: NCT01999959). PMID:24695882

  14. To evaluate the effect of pre-pregnancy body mass index on maternal and perinatal outcomes among adolescent pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Kansu-Celik, Hatice; Kisa Karakaya, Burcu; Guzel, Ali Irfan; Tasci, Yasemin; Erkaya, Salim

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of pre-pregnancy body mass index on maternal and perinatal outcomes among adolescent pregnant women. We conducted this prospective cross-sectional study on 365 singleton adolescent pregnancies (aged between 16 and 20 years) at a Maternity Hospital, between December 2014 and March 2015. We divided participants into two groups based on pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI): overweight and obese adolescent (BMI at or above 25.0 kg/m) and normal weight (BMI between 18.5 and 24.99 kg/m) adolescent. We used multivariate analysis to evaluate the association of the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes and pre-pregnancy BMI. The prevalence of maternal overweight/obesity and normal weight was 34.6% (n = 80) and 65.4% (n = 261) in the study population, respectively. Compared with normal-weight teens (n = 234), overweight/obese teens (n = 71) were at higher risk for cesarean delivery (odds ratio [OR] 0.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4-1.4), preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02-0.9) and small of gestational age (odds ratio [OR] 0.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1-0.9). BMI increased during pre-pregnancy could be an important preventable risk factor for poor obstetric complications in adolescent pregnancies, and for these patients prevention strategies (e.g., nutritional counseling, weight-loss, regular physical activity) for obesity are recommended before getting pregnant.

  15. Agreement between adolescents and parents or caregivers in rating adolescents' quality of life during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Lucas Guimarães; Melgaço, Camilo Aquino; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; Lages, Elizabeth Maria Bastos; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the agreement between Brazilian adolescents and their parents or caregivers regarding the adolescents' oral health-related quality of life during orthodontic treatment. The sample consisted of 102 adolescent-parent/caregiver pairs. Adolescents answered the short form of the child perceptions questionnaire, and the parents or caregivers answered the parental-caregiver perceptions questionnaire. These questionnaires have 14 items in common organized across 4 subscales: oral symptoms, functional limitations, emotional well-being, and social well-being. Agreement on the overall score and the subscales was determined using comparison and correlation analysis. The former was performed through comparison of the mean directional and absolute differences. The latter was analyzed using the intraclass correlation coefficient. The mean directional difference was significant for the oral symptoms subscale, with parents' reports lower than adolescents' reports (P = 0.012). However, it was not significant for the other 3 subscales and the overall score (P >0.05). The mean absolute difference for the overall score was 5.15, representing 9.2% of the maximum possible score. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.66, indicating substantial agreement. There was agreement between adolescents and their parents or caregivers in rating adolescents' oral health-related quality of life during orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Beat-to-beat heart rate and blood pressure variability and hypertensive disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Flood, Pamela; McKinley, Paula; Monk, Catherine; Muntner, Paul; Colantonio, Lisandro D; Goetzl, Laura; Hatch, Maureen; Sloan, Richard P

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between heart rate and/or blood pressure variability, measured at 28 weeks' gestation, and the incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension or preeclampsia. Secondary analysis of data from a prospectively enrolled cohort of 385 active military women in whom spectral analysis of continuous heart rate and variability was measured at 28 weeks' gestation. The primary outcome was the predictive value of spectral analysis of heart rate and blood pressure for hypertensive diseases of pregnancy. High-frequency heart rate variability was reduced and low-frequency variability of systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased in women who would develop pregnancy-induced hypertension but not preeclampsia. Low-frequency variability of diastolic blood pressure remained a significant predictor of pregnancy-induced hypertension but not preeclampsia after adjustment for age, weight, and blood pressure in a multivariate model. Early identification of pregnancy-induced hypertension can facilitate treatment to avoid maternal morbidity. Understanding the physiological underpinnings of the two very different diseases may lead to improved treatment and prevention. If proven effective in a broader population, the ability to differentiate pregnancy-induced hypertension from preeclampsia may reduce unnecessary iatrogenic interventions or inappropriate preterm delivery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. [Adolescent pregnancy in Peru: its current situation and implications for public policies].

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Walter; Subiría, Gracia

    2013-07-01

    This article ellaborates on the relation between peruvian pregnant adolescents of 15 to 19 years of age and poverty, malnutrition and social exclusion, proposing alternatives for their medical care within the frame of social programs and the fight against poverty. Likewise, it describes and analyzes the trends recorded over the past 20 years, emphasizing the multiple and persistent inequalities. Over this period, prevalences have not changed substantially, despite a slight drop recorded in the rural area. First, the article analyzes these trends in the light of their closest determinants, including changes in teenagers'exposure to the risk of an unplanned pregnancy. Then, it describes the impact this situation has on adolescents and their children, as well as the economic and labour impacts. Finally, it examines the experiences of countries with social programs similar to the one in Peru, highlighting those which could be implemented in our country.

  18. Sex Differences in Contraception Non-Use Among Urban Adolescents: Risk Factors for Unintended Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Casola, Allison R; Nelson, Deborah B; Patterson, Freda

    2017-09-01

    Contraception non-use among sexually active adolescents is a major cause of unintended pregnancy (UP). In this cross-sectional study we sought to identify overall and sex-specific correlates of contraception non-use using the 2015 Philadelphia Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) (N = 9540). Multivariate regression models were used to examine mental health, sexual activity, substance use, and violence indicators on reported contraception non-use among sexually active youth. Marijuana use among boys and girls was a statistically significant risk factor for contraception non-use. Availability of illegal drugs on school property in the past year was also significantly related to contraception non-use among boys. These results may inform overall and sex-specific adolescent programs to promote consistent contraception use among urban youth within school-based communities. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  19. Rigorous evaluation of a pregnancy prevention program for American Indian youth and adolescents: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tingey, Lauren; Chambers, Rachel; Goklish, Novalene; Larzelere, Francene; Lee, Angelita; Suttle, Rosemarie; Rosenstock, Summer; Lake, Kristin; Barlow, Allison

    2017-02-27

    American Indian adolescents have one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy and repeat teen births in the US. Substance use is a significant risk factor for unprotected sex, and American Indian adolescents have the highest substance use-related morbidity and mortality of any US racial group. Despite these disparities, there are no existing, evidence-based programs for pregnancy prevention that have been rigorously evaluated among American Indian teens. The proposed study is a randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of a comprehensive sexual and reproductive health program developed in partnership with an American Indian community. Participants will be American Indians ages 11-19 and their parent or trusted adult, randomized to receive the control condition or intervention called Respecting the Circle of Life: Mind, Body and Spirit. The intervention includes eight lessons delivered to self-selected peer groups during a summer basketball camp and one lesson delivered to the youth and parent/trusted adult together within 3 months after camp. All lessons are administered by trained community health workers from the participating American Indian community. Youth and parent/trusted adult participants will complete assessments at baseline, 3, 9, 12, 24 and 36 months post-intervention completion. The primary outcome variables are sexual/reproductive health knowledge, sexual initiation, condom use self-efficacy and intent to use a condom at next sex as changed from baseline to post-intervention between intervention and control participants. Selected primary outcomes are applicable to all study participants. Currently there are no sexual and reproductive health programs designed specifically for American Indian youth that have been rigorously evaluated and found to have an evidence base. Respecting the Circle of Life is highly innovative by incorporating lesson delivery into a summer basketball camp and involving parents or other trusted adults in curriculum

  20. Decreasing sex bias through education for parenthood or prevention of adolescent pregnancy: a developmental model with integrative strategies.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, E; Rosen, E

    1994-01-01

    This paper identifies the need for more research, education, and services for males about adolescent pregnancy and parenthood to augment their social and familial learning experiences. A case is made for more participation by schools in achieving a better balance between males and females in preparing for parenthood or prevention of pregnancy. Developmentally appropriate educational concepts and strategies that are integrated into the curriculum are described.

  1. Maternal anthropometric characteristics in pregnancy and blood pressure among adolescents: 1993 live birth cohort, Pelotas, southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We investigated the association between maternal anthropometric measurements in prepregnancy and at the end of pregnancy and their children's systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure at 11 years of age, in a prospective cohort study. Methods All hospital births which took place in 1993 in the city of Pelotas - Brazil, were identified (5,249 live births). In 2004, the overall proportion of follow-up was 85% and we obtained arterial blood pressure measurements of 4,452 adolescents. Results Independent variables analyzed included maternal prepregnancy weight and body mass index (BMI) and maternal weight, and height at the end of pregnancy. Multiple linear regression analysis controlling for the following confounders were carried out: adolescent's skin color, family income at birth, smoking, alcohol intake during pregnancy, and gestational arterial hypertension. Mean SBP and DBP were 101.9 mmHg (SD 12.3) and 63.4 mmHg (SD 9.9), respectively. Maternal prepregnancy weight and BMI, and weight at the end of pregnancy were positively associated with both SBP and DBP in adolescent subjects of both sexes; maternal height was positively associated with SBP only among males. Conclusions Adequate evaluation of maternal anthropometric characteristics during pregnancy may prevent high levels of blood pressure among adolescent children. PMID:20653949

  2. Construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Adami, Fernando; Schlickmann Frainer, Deivis Elton; de Souza Almeida, Fernando; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E; Piva Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos; Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira de; de Oliveira, Fernando R

    2012-04-13

    Figure rating scales were developed as a tool to determine body dissatisfaction in women, men, and children. However, it lacks in the literature the validation of the scale for body silhouettes previously adapted. We aimed to obtain evidence for construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents. The study was carried out with adolescent students attending three public schools in an urban region of the municipality of Florianopolis in the State of Santa Catarina (SC). The sample comprised 232 10-19-year-old students, 106 of whom are boys and 126 girls, from the 5th "series" (i.e. year) of Primary School to the 3rd year of Secondary School. Data-gathering involved the application of an instrument containing 8 body figure drawings representing a range of children's and adolescents' body shapes, ranging from very slim (contour 1) to obese (contour 8). Weights and heights were also collected, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated later. BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using z-scores, and as a dichotomous categorical variable, representing a diagnosis of nutritional status (normal and overweight including obesity). Results showed that both males and females with larger BMI z-scores chose larger body contours. Girls with higher BMI z-scores also show higher values of body image dissatisfaction. We provided the first evidence of validity for a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents.

  3. Population based study of rates of multiple pregnancies in Denmark, 1980-94.

    PubMed Central

    Westergaard, T.; Wohlfahrt, J.; Aaby, P.; Melbye, M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study trends in multiple pregnancies not explained by changes in maternal age and parity patterns. DESIGN: Trends in population based figures for multiple pregnancies in Denmark studied from complete national records on parity history and vital status. POPULATION: 497,979 Danish women and 803,019 pregnancies, 1980-94. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: National rates of multiple pregnancies, infant mortality, and stillbirths controlled for maternal age and parity. Special emphasis on primiparous women > or = 30 years of age, who are most likely to undergo fertility treatment. RESULTS: The national incidence of multiple pregnancies increased 1.7-fold during 1980-94, the increase primarily in 1989-94 and almost exclusively in primiparous women aged > or = 30 years, for whom the adjusted population based twinning rate increased 2.7-fold and the triplet rate 9.1-fold. During 1989-94, the adjusted yearly increase in multiple pregnancies for these women was 19% (95% confidence interval 16% to 21%) and in dizygotic twin pregnancies 25% (21% to 28%). The proportion of multiple births among infant deaths in primiparous women > or = 30 years increased from 11.5% to 26.9% during the study period. The total infant mortality, however, did not increase for these women because of a simultaneous significant decrease in infant mortality among singletons. CONCLUSIONS: A relatively small group of women has drastically changed the overall national rates of multiple pregnancies. The introduction of new treatments to enhance fertility has probably caused these changes and has also affected the otherwise decreasing trend in infant mortality. Consequently, the resources, both economical and otherwise, associated with these treatments go well beyond those invested in specific fertility enhancing treatments. PMID:9080993

  4. [Comparative analysis of pregnancy rate/captured oocytes in an in vitro fertilization program].

    PubMed

    Kably Ambe, Alberto; Estévez González, Sergio; Carballo Mondragón, Esperanza; Durán Monterrosas, Leonor

    2008-05-01

    Since in vitro fertilization/embryo transfer is used as a common assisted reproductive technique there have been attempts to increase its success rate. One way is to obtain more good quality mature ovules to fertilize them, and two to three good quality embryos to transfer. To determine if the number of retrieved oocytes is related with the pregnancy rate in IVF-ET. Reproductive and descriptive study; 172 patients in the IVF program were included. Whole patients had ovary stimulation with FSHr and antagonist multidose protocol. Five study groups were considered depending on the oocyte number retrieved. Data were analized and correlated with fertilization and pregnancy rate. There were no statistical differences among age, body mass index, percentage of mature oocyte, fertilization rate, embryo cell stage or basal levels of LH and Estradiol. Group three showed the highest pregnancy rate (64.29%) nevertheless group five had major number of embryo transferred (2.97 +/- 0.54 vs 3.17 +/- 0.45, p = 0.21). According to FSH doses given, group one had statistical difference related to group three, with higher dose (54.1 vs 62.1). According to previous studies, related to the number of oocyte retrieved, the possibility of pregnancy is higher with more than 13 oocytes retrieved (OR: 0.9 IC 95%: 0.4 -1.7). Pregnancy rate is higher when ten to fifteen oocytes were retrieved.

  5. Gauging Media Influence on Adolescent Suicide Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Darren; McCabe, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" published by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported that in 2004, suicide was the third leading cause of death among 10- to 24-year olds and accounted for 4,599 deaths. From 2003 to 2004, suicide rates of females age 10-14 years and 15-19 years and males age 15-19 years increased significantly.…

  6. Gauging Media Influence on Adolescent Suicide Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Darren; McCabe, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    The "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" published by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported that in 2004, suicide was the third leading cause of death among 10- to 24-year olds and accounted for 4,599 deaths. From 2003 to 2004, suicide rates of females age 10-14 years and 15-19 years and males age 15-19 years increased significantly.…

  7. Ectopic pregnancies: rising incidence rates in Northern California.

    PubMed Central

    Shiono, P H; Harlap, S; Pellegrin, F

    1982-01-01

    In a population of about 300,000 Northern California women aged 15--44, the age-adjusted incidence of ectopic pregnancy rose from 55.5 to 84.2/100,000 women, 1972--1978. The ratio of ectopics to 1,000 deliveries-plus-spontaneous abortions rose from 9.4 to 14.8. The change occurred mainly in women under age 30, and was observed in seven of the eight hospitals in the area. There was no alteration in the frequency of hospitalized pelvic inflammatory disease (PID); salpingitis decreased over the years studied; and tubal sterilization events remained constant at around 0.9 per cent per year of women aged 15--44. PMID:7055319

  8. [Percentage of births and fertility rates in adolescents in Mexico (2008-2012): stratification and priorization of municipalities with high risk].

    PubMed

    Reyes-Pablo, Adelmo Eloy; Navarrete-Hernández, Eduardo; Canún-Serrano, Sonia; Valdés-Hernández, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Mexico in 2008 was designed as the first place of adolescent pregnancy at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, with specific fertility rate (SFR) for 15-1 9years of age of 64.2/1,000 woman at the same age. Estimate of percentage births and SFR in adolescent population at national, state and municipal level in Mexico in 2008-2012 at the total group of adolescents 10 to 1 9 years old and by subgroups of 10-14 and 15 tol 9 years old, identifying the priority municipalities with adolescence pregnancies. Data bases of certificates of live birth and fetal death with gestational age of 22-45 weeks were joined in 2008-2012. A data base of 1 0'585,032 births in 2008-2012 was obtained, 98.9% were live births and 1.1% was stillbirths. The SFR nationwide for the period 2008-2012 were of the order of 3.l for the group of 10-1 4years, 75.3 for 15-19, 39.6 for the total group of 10-19 years and 66.1 for 20 to 49 years per 1000 women for the same age. In the last decade it has increased teen pregnancy as well as the percentage of births and the fertility rate in this age group, worrying situation for the high risk of biological, psychological and social damage that pregnancy early.

  9. Perceptions of key participants about Botswana adolescents' risks of unplanned pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV: Qualitative findings.

    PubMed

    Magowe, Mabel K M; Seloilwe, Esther; Dithole, Kefalotse; St Lawrence, Janet

    2017-07-13

    The qualitative research findings are reported on the perceptions of key participants in Botswana about adolescent sexuality problems and the feasibility (with suggestions) of an adolescent prevention intervention. Twenty adult key participants who were selected through purposive sampling from schools and youth centers responded to open-ended questions during face-to-face individual in-depth interviews that were conducted between December, 2011 and January, 2012 in Gaborone, Botswana. The data were analyzed by using an inductive content analysis. Five major themes and 12 subthemes emerged from the interviews. The key participants discussed situations that exposed adolescents to HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy. They also discussed unsafe sexual practices, the consequences of unprotected sex, poor parent-adolescent communication on sexuality, and the need for a sexuality education program. Policy changes are needed to improve collaboration between adolescents, parents, teachers, and youth officers in order to address adolescent sexuality problems. Further research is needed to explore the ways in which to improve sexuality communication between these groups. The results of the study provide valuable information on the sexuality risks that expose adolescents to HIV, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections and the strategies for the prevention of these risks, thus informing targeted interventions for risk reduction for adolescents. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  10. Association between maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy and offspring cognitive function during childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Veena, Sargoor R; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Thajna, Kotrangada P; Hegde, Bhavya G; Gale, Catharine R; Fall, Caroline Hd

    2017-05-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated poor cognitive outcomes in offspring in relation to maternal vitamin D deficiency before and/or during pregnancy. Human studies linking maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy with offspring cognitive function are limited. We aimed to test the hypothesis that lower maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy is associated with poor offspring cognitive ability in an Indian population. Cognitive function was assessed in children from the Mysore Parthenon birth cohort during childhood (age 9-10 years; n=468) and adolescence (age 13-14 years; n=472) using 3 core tests from the Kaufman Assessment Battery for children and additional tests measuring learning, long-term retrieval/ storage, short-term memory, reasoning, verbal fluency, visuo-spatial ability, and attention and concentration. Maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was measured at 30±2 weeks of gestation. During pregnancy 320 (68%) women had 'vitamin D deficiency' (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration <50 nmol/L). Girls scored better than boys in tests of short-term memory, reasoning, verbal fluency, and attention (p<0.05 for all). Maternal vitamin D status (low as well as across the entire range) was unrelated to offspring cognitive function at both ages, either unadjusted or after adjustment for the child's current age, sex, maternal age, parity, season at the time of blood sampling, gestational age, the child's birth and current size, socio-economic status, parents' education, maternal intelligence and home environment. In this population, despite a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy, there was no evidence of an association between maternal vitamin D status and offspring cognitive function.

  11. Engaging pregnant and parenting teens: early challenges and lessons learned from the Evaluation of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Approaches.

    PubMed

    Asheer, Subuhi; Berger, Amanda; Meckstroth, Alicia; Kisker, Ellen; Keating, Betsy

    2014-03-01

    This article draws on data from the ongoing federal Evaluation of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Approaches to discuss the early implementation experiences of two new and innovative programs intended to delay rapid repeat pregnancy among teen mothers: (1) AIM 4 Teen Moms, in Los Angeles County, California; and (2) Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy (T.O.P.P.), in Columbus, Ohio. Program staff report common challenges in working with teen mothers, particularly concerning recruitment and retention, staff capacity and training, barriers to participation, and participants' overarching service needs. Lessons learned in addressing these challenges provide useful guidance to program developers, providers, policy makers, and stakeholders working with similar populations.

  12. Rate and pattern of weight gain in Indian women from the upper income group during pregnancy and its effect on pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Raje, L; Ghugre, P

    2012-10-01

    Maternal weight gain and pattern of weight gain during pregnancy influence the ultimate outcome of pregnancy. Pregravid body mass index (BMI), maternal dietary intake, maternal height and age all determine the weight gain during pregnancy. The study was taken up with an objective to observe maternal weight gain and its pattern in pregnancy in women from an upper income group and to find out their association with pregnancy outcome. 180 normal primiparous pregnant Indian women (20-35 years) from an upper income group were recruited between the 10th and 14th weeks of pregnancy and were followed up throughout their pregnancy to record total and trimester-wise weight gain. Neonatal birth weights were recorded. The results showed that mothers with high pregravid BMI gained more weight during pregnancy than the recommended weight gain; in addition, weight gain in the first trimester was significantly correlated with birth weight of the neonates (P = 0.019). Significant correlation was found between weight gain in the third trimester and birth weight of the neonate irrespective of maternal BMI. The rate of weight gain was significantly correlated with neonatal birth weights irrespective of maternal pregravid BMI (P = 0.022) and as per its categories (P = 0.027). Thus, overall it can be concluded that adequate maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy is important for adequate weight gain by the mother and can result in better outcome of pregnancy. The rate of weight gain is also an important contributing factor.

  13. The Relations Between HSG Proven Tubal Occlusion, Stimulated Intrauterine Insemination and Pregnancy Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yetkin Yıldırım, Gonca; Orta Korkut, Ahu; Köroğlu, Nadiye; Susan Türkgeldi, Lale

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tubal factor infertility is one of the main causes of female infertility. Although its sensitivity is low, hysterosalpingography (HSG) is remains the first-line method for evaluating tubal patency. Aims: To compare pregnancy rates in patients with HSG proven proximal or distal unilateral tubal occlusion, and unexplained infertility undergoing both controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and intrauterine insemination (IUI). Study Design: Case control study. Methods: In total, 237 patients undergoing ovulation induction (OI) with gonadotropins and IUI were divided into two groups and evaluated. Study group consisted 59 patients with HSG proven unilateral tubal pathology, and 178 patients with unexplained infertility taken as control subjects. Cumulative pregnancy rate was the primary endpoint. Results: Cumulative pregnancy rates after three cycles of OI and IUI were 15.25% in study group and 20.79% in control group. Pregnancy rates between two groups were not statistically significant. Although, pregnancy rates in patients with proximal tubal occlusion (21.8%) were higher than in those with distal tubal occlusion (7.4%), the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Our study data shows that, regardless of the HCG proven occlusion area, COS and IUI might be a preferred treatment modality in patient with unilateral tubal occlusion. PMID:28251025

  14. Does progesterone supplementation improve pregnancy rates in clomiphene citrate and intrauterine insemination treatment cycles?

    PubMed

    Elguero, Sonia; Wyman, Allison; Hurd, William W; Barker, Nichole; Patel, Bansari; Liu, James H

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effect of empiric use of luteal phase progesterone supplementation to improve endometrial receptivity in women undergoing treatment with clomiphene citrate in combination with intrauterine insemination (CC-IUI). Retrospective cohort analysis. University fertility center. 426 CC-IUI cycles from 292 patients with unexplained infertility. Patients were treated with micronized intravaginal progesterone 100 mg twice daily beginning approximately three days after CC-IUI. Clinical pregnancy per initiated cycle as defined by presence of fetal heart rate on ultrasound. Clinical pregnancy rate was higher in patients receiving luteal phase support compared to patients not receiving luteal phase support (odds ratio: 2.04; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-4.14) after adjusting for all factors in the analysis using a multivariate logistic regression model. Age at the start of the cycle, BMI and CC dose were not shown to have an effect on clinical pregnancy rates. Patients with endometrial lining (EML) thickness 6-8 mm and >8 mm had increased clinical pregnancy rates compared to EML <6 mm independent of luteal phase progesterone use. Patients who appear to receive the greatest benefit of progesterone supplementation are in the 6-8 mm EML cohort. Luteal phase progesterone supplementation in CC-IUI cycles can improve endometrial receptivity as judged by the improved clinical pregnancy rates as the primary outcome.

  15. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand.

  16. Hispanic Teen Pregnancy and Birth Rates: Looking Behind the Numbers. Child Trends Research Brief. Publication #2005-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Suzanne; Franzetta, Kerry; Manlove, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This research brief focuses on the birth, pregnancy, contraceptive, and relationship behaviors of Hispanic teens because they represent an important risk group. Teen pregnancy and birth rates for U.S. teens have declined dramatically in recent years. Yet for Hispanic teens, reductions in teen pregnancy and childbearing have lagged behind that of…

  17. Hispanic Teen Pregnancy and Birth Rates: Looking Behind the Numbers. Child Trends Research Brief. Publication #2005-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Suzanne; Franzetta, Kerry; Manlove, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This research brief focuses on the birth, pregnancy, contraceptive, and relationship behaviors of Hispanic teens because they represent an important risk group. Teen pregnancy and birth rates for U.S. teens have declined dramatically in recent years. Yet for Hispanic teens, reductions in teen pregnancy and childbearing have lagged behind that of…

  18. Parent-Adolescent Relationship Education (PARE): Program Delivery to Reduce Risks for Adolescent Pregnancy and STDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman, Regina P.; Chan, Wenyaw; Roberts-Gray, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    The first author recruited parent-adolescent dyads (N = 192) into after-school prevention education groups at middle schools in southeast Texas. This author placed participants in either (1) an Interactive Program (IP) in which they role-played, practiced resistance skills, and held parent-child discussions or (2) an Attention Control Program…

  19. Asian ethnicity is associated with decreased pregnancy rates following intrauterine insemination.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Julie D; Huddleston, Heather G; Purcell, Karen J; Modan, Aisha; Farsani, Taraneh T; Dingeldein, Margaret A; Vittinghoff, Eric; Fujimoto, Victor Y

    2009-08-01

    Asian ethnicity has been associated with decreased pregnancy outcomes in patients undergoing IVF. The objective of this study was to determine if a difference exists in pregnancy rates between Asian and Caucasian patients undergoing intrauterine insemination (IUI). A retrospective cohort of Asian and Caucasian patients treated with IUI between December 2002 and 2006 was analysed, including 2327 IUI cycles among 814 patients. Baseline characteristics were similar between Asian and Caucasian women. A significantly greater proportion of Asians (43.9%) presented for treatment after more than 2 years of infertility compared with Caucasians (24.6%) (P < 0.0001). Unadjusted analysis showed a trend towards decreased pregnancy rates associated with Asian ethnicity (odds ratio (OR) 0.71, 95% CI 0.50-1.01, not significant). Age, stimulation protocol, differences in gravity and parity, and duration of infertility did not account for this difference (adjusted OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.47-0.98, P = 0.039). Asian ethnicity is associated with lower pregnancy rates in IUI treatment. The increased duration of infertility in Asians does not explain the reduced pregnancy rates.

  20. Pregnancy rates with intrauterine insemination: comparing 1999 and 2010 World Health Organization semen analysis norms.

    PubMed

    Papillon-Smith, J; Baker, S E; Agbo, C; Dahan, M H

    2015-04-01

    Over the past 30 years, The World Health Organization has serially measured norms for human sperm. In this study, 1999 and 2010 semen analysis norms as predictors of pregnancy were compared during intrauterine insemination (IUI). A retrospective cohort study was conducted using data collected from the Stanford Fertility Center, between 2005 and 2007, with 981 couples undergoing 2231 IUI cycles. Collected semen was categorized according to total motile sperm counts (TMSC): 'normal (N.) 1999 TMSC', 'abnormal (AbN.) 1999/N. 2010 TMSC', or 'AbN. 2010 TMSC'. Sample comparison was also based on individual semen parameters: 'N. 1999 WHO', 'AbN. 1999/N. 2010 WHO', or 'AbN. 2010 WHO'. Pregnancy (defined by beta-HCG concentration) rates were calculated. Data were compared using correlation coefficients, t-tests and chi-squared tests, with and without adjusting for confounders. Pregnancy rate comparison based on TMSC ('N. 1999 TMSC', 'AbN. 1999/N. 2010 TMSC' and 'AbN. 2010 TMSC') showed a negative correlation (r = -0.41, P = 0.05). Pregnancy rate did not differ when comparisons were based on the presence of abnormal parameters, even when controlling for confounders. Therefore, TMSC based on the 1999 parameters shows best correlation with pregnancy rate for IUI; updating these norms in 2010 has little clinical implication in infertile populations. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of cortisol on pregnancy rate and corpus luteum function in heifers: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Duong, Hai Thanh; Piotrowska-Tomala, Katarzyna Karolina; Acosta, Tomas Javier; Bah, Mamadou Mousa; Sinderewicz, Emilia; Majewska, Magdalena; Jankowska, Katarzynna; Okuda, Kiyoshi; Skarzynski, Dariusz Jan

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether glucocorticoids affect the function of the bovine corpus luteum (CL) during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy, we examined the effects of exogenous cortisol or reduced endogenous cortisol on the secretion of progesterone (P4) and on pregnancy rate. In preliminary experiments, doses of cortisol and metyrapone (an inhibitor of cortisol synthesis) were established (n=33). Cortisol in effective doses of 10 mg blocked tumor necrosis factor-induced prostaglandin F(2α) secretion as measured by its metabolite (PGFM) concentrations in the blood. Metyrapone in effective doses of 500 mg increased the P4 concentration. Thus, both reagents were then intravaginally applied in the chosen doses daily from Day 15 to 18 after estrus (Day 0) in noninseminated heifers (n=18) or after artificial insemination (n=36). Pregnancy was confirmed by transrectal ultrasonography between Days 28-30 after insemination. Plasma concentrations of P4 were lower in cortisol-treated heifers than in control heifers on Days 17 and 18 of the estrous cycle (P<0.05). However, the interestrus intervals were not different between control and cortisol-treated animals (P>0.05). Moreover, metyrapone increased P4 and prolonged the CL lifespan in comparison to control animals (P<0.05). Interestingly, in inseminated heifers, cortisol increased the pregnancy rate (75%) compared with control animals (58%), whereas metyrapone reduced the pregnancy rate to 16.7% (P<0.05). The overall results suggest that cortisol, depending on the physiological status of heifers (pregnant vs. nonpregnant), modulates CL function by influencing P4 secretion. Cortisol may have a positive influence on CL function during early pregnancy, leading to support of embryo implantation and resulting in higher rates of pregnancy in heifers.

  2. Significantly enhanced pregnancy rates per cycle through cryopreservation and thaw of pronuclear stage oocytes.

    PubMed

    Veeck, L L; Amundson, C H; Brothman, L J; DeScisciolo, C; Maloney, M K; Muasher, S J; Jones, H W

    1993-06-01

    To examine the results of a 5-year trial using cryopreservation to limit multiple pregnancy and optimize overall pregnancy per cycle. Retrospective clinical evaluation of pregnancy rates (PRs) per cycle after freezing pronuclear stage human oocytes. Tertiary care academic center. Six hundred seventeen patients treated in 776 IVF-ET cycles from January 1987 to December 1991 (less oocyte donation cycles). Pregnancy rate per cycle after transfer of pre-embryos developed from thawed pronuclear stage oocytes. Three thousand seven hundred thirty-one oocytes were frozen. Of these, 2,039 were thawed. One thousand three hundred seventy-seven survived thawing (68%), and 1,370 were transferred after passing through syngamy to at least the first cleavage (68%). Of patients with thawing, 359 of 401 (90%) (449 of 505 cycles [89%]) received intrauterine transfer. One hundred thirty-three separate clinical pregnancies were established from 128 different cycles (128/449; 29%); 5 cycles had two thaws, each of which resulted in pregnancy. This PR is less than the overall fresh PR observed in patients who had excess pronucleate oocytes frozen (279/776; 36%) but is remarkably similar when adjusted for the number of pre-embryos transferred per cycle. The age of the patient at the time of cryopreservation and the number of quality of pre-embryos ultimately available for transfer were important factors in the establishment of pregnancy. The mode of ovarian stimulation and duration of cryostorage did not prove meaningful. Cryopreserved pronucleate oocytes that survive freezing, thawing, and progress through syngamy demonstrate a similar potential for implantation and pregnancy when compared with fresh conceptuses, the cumulative effect of which is an enhanced total PR per cycle.

  3. Effect of restricted suckling on pregnancy rates and calf performance in Brahman cows.

    PubMed

    Bastidas, P; Troconiz, J; Verde, O; Silva, O

    1984-02-01

    Seventy-six Brahman cows and first-calf heifers were assigned to one of two groups: 1) normal suckling (34 cows) or 2) twice-daily suckling (45 minutes of suckling each time; 42 cows). Twice-daily suckling was carried out from 30 days postcalving until weaning (seven months). All animals were maintained under artificial insemination for a four-month breeding period. Mean pregnancy rate was 63.06 +/- 0.06% and was influenced by suckling group (P<0.01) and number of parturitions (P<0.05). The pregnancy rates were 33% higher in twice-daily suckled cows. Forty-four percent of the first calf heifers in the twice-daily suckling group became pregnant compared to 9% in the normal suckling group (P<0.01). Twice-daily suckling improved pregnancy rate without depressing preweaning calf performance.

  4. Cumulative clinical pregnancy rates after COH and IUI in subfertile couples.

    PubMed

    Farhi, Jacob; Orvieto, Raoul

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the influence of female age and cause of infertility on the outcome of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) and intrauterine insemination (IUI), we studied 2717 COH cycles in 1035 subfertile couples. The cumulative clinical pregnancy rates were 39% and 58% after three and six COH cycles, respectively. The cumulative pregnancy rate significantly decreased with maternal age and differed by cause of infertility. The cumulative pregnancy rate continued to increase with an increase in COH cycle number up to the third, or forth cycle, in patients with mechanical and combined infertility, respectively, and in up to the second cycle in patients aged 40 years or more. These findings provide treatment guidelines for clinicians in determining the likelihood of treatment success and the point at which to proceed to the next treatment strategy.

  5. Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... each trimester are described below. 1 First Trimester (Week 1 to Week 12) The events that lead to pregnancy begin ... and oxygen to the fetus. 2 Second Trimester (Week 13 to Week 28) At 16 weeks, and ...

  6. Prediction of Maximal Heart Rate in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gelbart, Miri; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Williams, Craig A; Yarom, Yoni; Dubnov-Raz, Gal

    2017-03-01

    To identify a method to predict the maximal heart rate (MHR) in children and adolescents, as available prediction equations developed for adults have a low accuracy in children. We hypothesized that MHR may be influenced by resting heart rate, anthropometric factors, or fitness level. Cross-sectional study. Sports medicine center in primary care. Data from 627 treadmill maximal exercise tests performed by 433 pediatric athletes (age 13.7 ± 2.1 years, 70% males) were analyzed. Age, sex, sport type, stature, body mass, BMI, body fat, fitness level, resting, and MHR were recorded. To develop a prediction equation for MHR in youth, using stepwise multivariate linear regression and linear mixed model. To determine correlations between existing prediction equations and pediatric MHR. Observed MHR was 197 ± 8.6 b·min. Regression analysis revealed that resting heart rate, fitness, body mass, and fat percent were predictors of MHR (R = 0.25, P < 0.001), whereas age was not. Resting heart rate explained 15.6% of MHR variance, body mass added 5.7%, fat percent added 2.4%, and fitness added 1.2%. Existing adult equations had low correlations with observed MHR in children and adolescents (r = -0.03-0.34). A new equation to predict MHR in children and adolescents was developed, but was found to have low predictive ability, a finding similar to adult equations applied to children. Considering the narrow range of MHR in youth, we propose using 197 b·min as the mean MHR in children and adolescents, with 180 b·min the minimal threshold value (-2 standard deviations).

  7. Pregnancy rates in cattle with cryopreserved sexed spermatozoa: effects of laser intensity, staining conditions and catalase.

    PubMed

    Schenk, J L; Seidel, G E

    2007-01-01

    The overall aim of this research was to improve fertility of cattle inseminated with sexed spermatozoa by improving sperm sorting procedures. Six field trials were conducted in which 4,264 heifers were inseminated into the uterine body with cryopreserved sexed or unsexed control spermatozoa. Pregnancy or calving rates with doses of 2 x 10(6) sexed spermatozoa ranged from 32 to 51%; these averaged 69% of the pregnancy rates with 20 x 10(6) unsexed, control spermatozoa (range 53 to 79% of controls). Fertility of sexed spermatozoa was especially low on farms where control fertility was low. Accuracy of sexing ranged from 86 to 91%. Laser power of 150 mW for interrogating spermatozoa did not result in lower pregnancy rates (43%) than when power was decreased as much as possible for a particular sorting batch (50 to 130 mW) to still achieve sexing accuracy (38% pregnant). Addition of catalase to fluids containing spermatozoa was beneficial when thawed spermatozoa were incubated in vitro for 2 h but had no effect on pregnancy rates. There also was no effect on pregnancy rates between two concentrations of Hoechst 33342 for staining spermatozoa. Freezing 2 x 10(6) sexed spermatozoa at 20 x 10(6)/ml resulted in a slightly higher rate of pregnancy (P < 0.05) than at 10 x 10(6)/ml. The information obtained in these trials, along with other improvements, notably lowering pressure in the sorting system from 50 to 40 psi, has been used to improve procedures for sexing spermatozoa commercially.

  8. The role of pregnancy outcomes in the maternal mortality rates of two areas in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mizanur; DaVanzo, Julie; Razzaque, Abdur

    2010-12-01

    The Matlab Maternal Child Health-Family Planning (MCH-FP) project provides maternity care as part of its reproductive health services. It is important to assess whether this project has reduced maternal mortality and, if so, whether this was due to differences between the MCH-FP area (which received project services) and the comparison area (which did not) in pregnancy rates, pregnancy outcomes or case-fatality rates. Data from the Matlab Demographic Surveillance System on 165,894 pregnancies over the period 1982-2005 were used to calculate four measures of maternal mortality for the MCH-FP and comparison areas. Mortality risk was examined by type of pregnancy outcome and by area, and bivariate and logistic regression analyses were used to generate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios, respectively. The maternal mortality rate of 35 deaths per 100,000 women of reproductive age in the MCH-FP area was 37% lower than that in the comparison area (56 deaths per 100,000). In both areas, the maternal mortality risk was considerably higher for pregnancies that ended in induced abortion, miscarriage or stillbirth than for those that resulted in live birth (odds ratios, 4.2, 2.0 and 17.4, respectively). The difference in maternal mortality rates between the two areas was mainly a result of the MCH-FP area's lower pregnancy rate and its lower case-fatality rates for induced abortions, miscarriages and stillbirths. Interventions to increase contraceptive use; to reduce the incidence of induced abortion, miscarriage and stillbirth; to improve the management of such outcomes; and to strengthen antenatal care could substantially reduce maternal mortality in Bangladesh and similar countries.

  9. Comparing the in vivo glycine fluxes of adolescent girls and adult women during early and late pregnancy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During pregnancy, growth of the fetus depends on an adequate glycine supply because it is needed for synthesis of fetal DNA, collagen, and serine. S