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Sample records for adolescent psychiatry clinic

  1. The Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Trials Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, John S.; Silva, Susan G.; Compton, Scott; Anthony, Ginger; DeVeaugh-Geiss, Joseph; Califf, Robert; Krishnan, Ranga

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The current generation of clinical trials in pediatric psychiatry often fails to maximize clinical utility for practicing clinicians, thereby diluting its impact. Method: To attain maximum clinical relevance and acceptability, the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Trials Network (CAPTN) will transport to pediatric psychiatry the practical…

  2. Impact of violence on children and adolescents: report from a community-based child psychiatry clinic.

    PubMed

    Benoit, M

    1993-02-01

    The Children's National Medical Center is located in the inner-city area of Washington, DC. As is nationally now well publicized, the drug-related violence in Washington has earned the area the dubious title of "murder capital of the world." Our outpatient child and adolescent psychiatry clinic at Children's Hospital provides walk-in services during daytime hours, Monday through Friday. Access to services is available at other times through the emergency room. PMID:8488207

  3. Perspectives of clinical medical directors in child and adolescent psychiatry: diagnostic and treatment needs of migrant families.

    PubMed

    Kirkcaldy, Bruce David; Siefen, Rainer Georg

    2014-01-01

    Germany is one of many nations characterized by an increasing number of children originating from families with a migration background. Medical treatment modalities will be required to adjust for diversity of social and cultural background. Initiated by the Federal Society of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (BKJPP), representing mainly those psychiatrists working in private practice, and by the Federal Working Commission of Medical Directors employed in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics (BAG), a questionnaire was constructed to identify mental health professionals' (psychiatrists') evaluation of the needs and quality of diagnosis and treatment for migrant families. The current study focused on medical directors and deputy chief physicians in clinics for child and adolescent psychiatry. Preliminary results of this survey - implementing descriptive statistics as well as univariate and multivariate statistical analyses - permitted an assessment of the current state of identification and treatment of migrant offspring attending child and adolescent psychiatric practices in Germany. Recommendations and concrete steps are offered, which aim to promote "cultural opening", and assist in health and social policy makers' decisions for improved mental health care. PMID:24447986

  4. [Child and adolescent psychiatry its problems and foresight].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kosuke

    2002-01-01

    Accompanying the fall in birth rate, problems pertaining to the child's mind such as school in attendance, bullying, violence in the school, intrafamilial violence, eating disorders, substance abuse, and child abuse have rocketed and diversified, in addition to affecting increasingly lower age groups. The importance of child and adolescent psychiatry has never been more profound, but our country, without a chair in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the medical school framework, and lacking recognition of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry as a clinical department has undoubtedly become an underdeveloped country in terms of child and adolescent psychiatric care. The medical schools have been in the process of review and reorganization these past few years. The range of mental science is wide, and despite being a major discipline constituting one of the two arms of medical science together with somatic medicine, it is regarded as a minor existence in our country. This is the time to re-establish mental science, with areas such as child and adolescent psychiatry, geriatric psychiatry, social psychiatry, and crime psychiatry placed on an equal footing with general psychiatry. Turning our eyes on the world, the children are being robbed of their mental health as refugees, through child labor, starvation, and civil war. The demand of this age is true symbiosis, surpassing differences in race, religion, language, and culture, which is probably the indispensable element in the quest for a happy future for the children of this age. PMID:12607920

  5. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training: A Global Perspective.

    PubMed

    Mian, Ayesha I; Milavić, Gordana; Skokauskas, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    Training programs aim to produce child and adolescent psychiatry professionals who are competent at both clinical work as well as health promotion through teaching and research. Child psychiatry training programs not only offer training in teaching the clinical skills of the discipline of child and adolescent psychiatry but also strive to help with the development of professionalism, ethical behaviors, and leadership skills in their trainees. Ultimately, it is the children of the world who stand to gain by having a skilled work force that adheres to the highest global standards when it comes to the provision of mental health services. PMID:26346384

  6. American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Children and Guns. Be CAPtivated - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry as a Career U.S. House Passes Mental ... More... AACAP Workforce Maps More... Delirium in Children & Adolescents More... Issues to Consider When Engaging Asian American ...

  7. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    The major goal of the 2-year child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship program at the University of Maryland is to provide an integrated but flexible set of learning experiences, with areas of emphasis including child and adolescent development, early intervention and prevention of mental health problems, community child psychiatry, and research.…

  8. [Adolescence: viewpoints from adolescent psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Bürgin, D; von Klitzing, K

    1994-05-01

    Adolescence is a phase of human development which is marked by a high vulnerability due to the ongoing psycho-physiological transformations. The regulation of the self-esteem is especially in danger in youngsters who went into adolescence with a marked burden of conflicts or who lived in families with disturbed intrafamilial dynamics. To be present as a partner and not to find the solutions for the adolescents' conflicts, to accept their questioning of what is established and to recognize their movements of reconciliation are the quite complex demands put on to the world of the adults. Adolescents urge us to a review of our own adolescence, to a balancing of hate and love, openness and rigidity, and to dialectic movements between disintegration and reintegration as well as between the generations. Any help, be it on the physical, the social or the psychic level, should be directed toward a restitution of the intrapsychic, intrafamilial or intergenerational balance; sociocultural factors have also always to be respected. The helpers--especially in a culture with rapid change--are often confronted with their own adolescence, which took place a generation before and mostly under totally different conditions. PMID:8016759

  9. [Cognitive remediation therapy for children: literature data and clinical application in a child and adolescent psychiatry department].

    PubMed

    Doyen, C; Contejean, Y; Risler, V; Asch, M; Amado, I; Launay, C; Redon, P De Bois; Burnouf, I; Kaye, K

    2015-04-01

    remediation, and the program was applied by a clinical nurse with the supervision of a child and adolescent psychiatrist and the department's neuropsychologists. Paper-pencil tasks were adapted from the CRT program for adults; the card and board games used were geometric figures, illusions, Rush Hour(®), Set(®), Jungle Speed(®), Color Addict(®), etc. These games are available in stores and the program can be applied at home, which helps families set aside their preoccupations with their child's academic performance. Diagnostic and neuropsychological evaluations were done before the beginning of the therapy and repeated at the end of the 6-month program. This program does not ignore the metapsychological impact of the therapy, and work on self-esteem is also done. The presence of the therapist is necessary, which seems better than a computer program, which cannot encourage the young subject in the same personalized and empathetic way. We therefore conducted the first clinical feasibility trial of cognitive remediation in young subjects and present a clinical case of a 6-year-old boy with attention deficit disorder and academic disorder. The results of neuropsychological evaluations before and after therapy suggest improvement in executive functions and better self-esteem. Satisfaction for the boy and his family was high. Even if these results need to be replicated, cognitive remediation appears to be a new therapeutic tool, complementary to classical approaches used in childhood psychiatric disorders. The Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry will submit this program to a research program conducted by the National Health Department to study the impact of this approach in a controlled study. PMID:25736104

  10. Adolescents and the Media: Medical and Psychological Impact. Developmental Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasburger, Victor C.

    Aimed at primary care physicians and nurses, educators, and parents, this book reviews media effects on adolescent behavior and psychology. The book notes that television is a powerful medium to which adolescents are uniquely susceptible and how studies have shown television's ability to shape social attitudes. Theories of how television affects…

  11. Increasing Interest in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the Third-Year Clerkship: Results from a Post-Clerkship Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Erin; Hollar, David; Lindsey, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors aimed to determine whether a structured clinical experience in child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) during the third-year psychiatry clerkship would impact interest in pursuing careers in psychiatry and CAP. Methods: The authors constructed and administered a post-rotation survey, the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry…

  12. Fifty Years in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werry, John

    2013-01-01

    John Werry completed training in child and adolescent psychiatry at McGill University in Montreal, and has been a world renowned leader in children's mental health. Drawing on a half century of work in Canada, the United States, and his native New Zealand, he shares his reflections and vision for the future in the interview given for this…

  13. Factors Affecting Recruitment into Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Jon A.; Lewis, John E.; Katyal, Shalini

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied the factors affecting the recruitment into child and adolescent psychiatry training in the United States. Methods: Medical students (n = 154) and general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents (n = 111) completed a questionnaire to evaluate career choice in child psychiatry (n = 265). Results: Compared with…

  14. Models of Integrated Training in Psychiatry and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexson, Sandra B.; Thomas, Christopher R.; Pope, Kayla

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies indicate declining interest in child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) as a career choice during psychiatry residency training. Programs have developed integrated training in psychiatry and CAP as a means to address the workforce shortage in CAP, but little is known about the number or nature of these training tracks.…

  15. Academic Training in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship: A Curriculum Based on Leadership Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivany, Christopher G.; Russell, Robert K.; Vanessa, Venezia A.; Saito, Albert Y.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe how one child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship program responded to emerging trends in clinical practice which increasingly demand that child and adolescent psychiatrists lead their colleagues through instruction and supervision. Methods: Data from surveys of recent graduates of child and adolescent training…

  16. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  17. Overview of integrative medicine in child and adolescent psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Deborah R; Popper, Charles W

    2013-07-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) defies simple definition, because the distinction between CAM and conventional medicine is largely arbitrary and fluid. Despite inconclusive data on the efficacy and safety of many CAM treatments in child and adolescent psychiatry, there are enough data on certain treatments to provide guidance to clinicians and researchers. CAM treatments, as adjunctive therapy or monotherapy, can be clinically beneficial and sensible. The low stigma and cost-competitiveness of many CAM psychiatric treatments are highly attractive to children and parents. Physicians need to be knowledgeable about CAM treatments to provide clinically valid informed consent for some conventional treatments. PMID:23806310

  18. The Future of Psychiatry as Clinical Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Charles F.; Lewis, David A.; Detre, Thomas; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Kupfer, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Psychiatry includes the assessment, treatment, and prevention of complex brain disorders, such as depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, developmental disorders (e.g., autism), and neurodegenerative disorders (e.g., Alzheimer dementia). Its core mission is to prevent and alleviate the distress and impairment caused by these disorders, which account for a substantial part of the global burden of illness-related disability. Psychiatry is grounded in clinical neuroscience. Its core mission, now and in the future, is best served within this context because advances in assessment, treatment, and prevention of brain disorders are likely to originate from studies of etiology and pathophysiology based in clinical and translational neuroscience. To ensure its broad public health relevance in the future, psychiatry must also bridge science and service, ensuring that those who need the benefits of its science are also its beneficiaries. To do so effectively, psychiatry as clinical neuroscience must strengthen its partnerships with the disciplines of public health (including epidemiology), community and behavioral health science, and health economics. The authors present a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis of psychiatry and identify strategies for strengthening its future and increasing its relevance to public health and the rest of medicine. These strategies encompass new approaches to strengthening the relationship between psychiatry and neurology, financing psychiatry’s mission, emphasizing early and sustained multidisciplinary training (research and clinical), bolstering the academic infrastructure, and reorganizing and refinancing mental health services both for preventive intervention and cost-effective chronic disease management. PMID:19318776

  19. How Animal Models Inform Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Hanna E.; Vaccarino, Flora M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Every available approach should be utilized to advance the field of child and adolescent psychiatry. Biological systems are important for the behavioral problems of children. Close examination of non-human animals and the biology and behavior they share with humans is an approach that must be used to advance the clinical work of child psychiatry. Method We review here how model systems are used to contribute to significant insights into childhood psychiatric disorders. Model systems have not only demonstrated causality of risk factors for psychiatric pathophysiology but have also allowed child psychiatrists to think in different ways about risks for psychiatric disorders and multiple levels that might be the basis of recovery and prevention. Results We present examples of how animal systems are utilized to benefit child psychiatry, including through environmental, genetic, and acute biological manipulations. Animal model work has been essential in our current thinking about childhood disorders, including the importance of dose and timing of risk factors, specific features of risk factors that are significant, neurochemistry involved in brain functioning, molecular components of brain development, and the importance of cellular processes previously neglected in psychiatric theories. Conclusion Animal models have clear advantages and disadvantages that must both be considered for these systems to be useful. Coupled with increasingly sophisticated methods for investigating human behavior and biology, animal model systems will continue to make essential contributions to our field. PMID:25901771

  20. Child and adolescent psychiatry and family therapy. An overview.

    PubMed

    Malone, C A

    2001-07-01

    This article has provided an overview of the complex relationship between family therapy and child and adolescent psychiatry. Emphasis has been placed on the fact that the controversy and polarization that earlier characterized the relationship have delayed, but not blocked, the full integration of family therapy into child and adolescent psychiatry. Child psychiatrists and family therapists have been able to move beyond dichotomous polemics to combine the two fields in clinical practice, which has led to meaningful convergence in research and services. Family research has yielded important new directions for clinical practice in the areas of attachment, alcoholism, conduct disorder, and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. It also has led to models of family continuity that have considerable potential for interrelating and possibly integrating different family therapy models. Family research also has uncovered family factors in the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology that can inform clinical practice. Convergence in the clinical domain has led to improved assessment and treatment across a wide range of child, adolescent, and family developmental, emotional, behavioral, and mental disorders. Finally, this article has reviewed the controversy over family systems therapy and the development of new directions in theory and practice to which this controversy has led. Despite the possibility that these new directions might lead to significant disruption and interference in the process of convergence, careful examination of the controversy and the new developments in practice suggests that rather than producing division between the two fields, the new developments, especially narrative therapy, are more likely to bring the two fields closer, particularly in the realm of interventive interviewing in family therapy. PMID:11449803

  1. Training of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellows in Autism and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrus, Natasha; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Hellings, Jessica A.; Stigler, Kimberly A.; Szymanski, Ludwik; King, Bryan H.; Carlisle, L. Lee; Cook, Edwin H., Jr.; Pruett, John R., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disability can be clinically complex and often have limited access to psychiatric care. Because little is known about post-graduate clinical education in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, we surveyed training directors of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship…

  2. Improving Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Education for Medical Students: An Inter-Organizational Collaborative Action Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Geraldine S.; Stock, Saundra; Briscoe, Gregory W.; Beck, Gary L.; Horton, Rita; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Liu, Howard Y.; Rutter, Ashley Partner; Sexson, Sandra; Schlozman, Steven C.; Stubbe, Dorothy E.; Stuber, Margaret L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A new Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Medical Education (CAPME) Task Force, sponsored by the Association for Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry (ADMSEP), has created an inter-organizational partnership between child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) educators and medical student educators in psychiatry. This paper…

  3. [The digital avatar, an assistant in adolescent psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Pommereau, Xavier; Deberdt, Jean-Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The digital universe, from the internet to video games, arouses mixed feelings in parents of adolescents. However, it is possible to use the growing "digitisation" of the relationships between young people to develop care tools. Avatars or virtual characters, for example, make it possible to develop a relationship with adolescents hospitalised in child psychiatry units. PMID:22616462

  4. Model Curriculum for Academic Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbe, Dorothy; Martin, Andres; Bloch, Michael; Belitsky, Richard; Carter, Debbie; Ebert, Michael; Friedman, Alan; Giese, Alexis; Kirwin, Paul; Ross, Randal G.; Leckman, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The United States is facing a severe shortage of academic child and adolescent psychiatrists. This article reviews a model integrated pathway to improve recruitment. Methods: The authors review training portals for research in child and adolescent psychiatry. There is a summary of a focus group discussion of the advantages and…

  5. Is prophylactic psychiatry around the corner? combating adolescent oxidative stress for adult psychosis and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Akira; Seidman, Larry J

    2014-09-01

    Early detection and intervention are key principles in clinical medicine and psychiatry. In this issue of Neuron, Cabungcal et al. (2014) demonstrate that prophylactic treatment with antioxidants in adolescence prevents adult deficits in a rat model relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:25189204

  6. Jung's Contribution to Clinical Psychiatry 1

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Murdo

    1935-01-01

    This attempt to correlate Jung's work with practical psychiatry is concerned mainly with his conception of clinical types. Jung went far away from the provinces of clinical medicine and psychiatry for his evidence, and the possible cause for this is discussed. He expands his view of introversion and extraversion, and so the suggestion is made that for practical purposes his early limitation of these terms should be maintained. The difficulties encountered in type description by comparison and contrast are emphasized. The value of his conception of basic functions is discussed and criticized. A review is made of the personalities he describes, and a simplification of his resulting classification suggested for practical purposes. The notion is put forward that Jung describes one type in psychological adaptation much better than any others, and it is hinted that his psycho-pathological description of this type in nerve disorder constitutes his main contribution to clinical psychiatry. A review of the treatable nerve disorders suggests that this disorder has received more adequate description from Jung than any other, and reveals a unique method of investigation and therapy. This does not apply to his other descriptions. Possibly some of the vagueness attributed to Jung is because he did not give this disorder an adequate diagnosis, and an explanation for this is offered. The correlation between the simplified classification and the classification of treatable nerve disorders is close, and it is suggested that this constitutes Jung's contribution to clinical psychiatry in general. The application of Jung's principles is of daily help to the practising psychiatrist. PMID:19990325

  7. Cultural psychiatry. Theoretical, clinical, and research issues.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, R; Kleinman, A

    1995-09-01

    As a discipline, cultural psychiatry has matured considerably in recent years and the ongoing quality of its theoretical, clinical, and research development holds great promise. The contemporary emphasis on culture as process permits a deeper analysis of the complexities of sociosomatics--the translation of meanings and social relations into bodily experience--and, thus, of the social course of illness. We also are learning a great deal more about cultural processes that affect therapy, including ethnopharmacologic and culturally valid family interventions that are directly relevant to patient care and mental health policy. And an important set of studies is examining the trauma experienced by refugees and immigrants. But at the same time many disquieting findings still point to the limited impact of cultural psychiatry on knowledge creation and clinical application in psychiatry. The failure of the cultural validation of DSM-IV is only the most dismaying. The persistent misdiagnosis of minority patients and the continued presence of racial bias in some treatment recommendations are also disheartening, as is the seeming contempt of many mainstream psychiatrists for culturally defined syndromes and folk healing systems. Widespread inattention to ethnic issues in medical ethics is another source of dismay. It is for these reasons that the culture of psychiatry itself becomes as important as the culture of patients as a topic for research and intervention. Most of the world still suffers from a terrible lack of basic mental health services, including life-saving medications and hospital beds. In the face of these limitations, and because of the increasing multicultural and pluralistic reality of contemporary life, the growing interpretive bridges linking indigenous systems of illness classification and healing to Western nosologies and therapeutic modalities become even more essential and the reluctance of mainstream clinicians to explore folk healing methods more

  8. [Psychiatry at the maternal clinic].

    PubMed

    Ammälä, Antti-Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Various mental disorders are encountered at the maternal clinic. Pregnancy predisposes to some mental disorders, most commonly depressive and anxiety disorders. The recognition of substance use disorders during pregnancy is very important, but difficult owing to the associated disgrace. An eating disorder with an onset preceding the pregnancy may cause problems for growth and development of the fetus and should thus be identified early enough. The rare but severe postpartum psychosis may often break out only after discharge from the maternity hospital. Drug therapy during pregnancy requires careful consideration and clear-cut reasoning. PMID:26237899

  9. Child and adolescent psychiatry in general children's hospitals. A survey of chairs of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Campo, J V; Kingsley, R S; Bridge, J; Mrazek, D

    2000-01-01

    This article characterizes the academic, administrative, clinical service, and fiscal characteristics of departments of psychiatry in traditional children's hospitals to determine the characteristics of fiscally successful programs. A survey of chairs of psychiatry from short-term general children's hospitals was conducted based on 38 questions addressing the descriptive characteristics of their respective departments. The characteristics of psychiatry programs identified as fiscally successful were compared to those of programs that required subsidy. Nine of 45 eligible children's hospitals (20%) did not have a department or section of psychiatry, and surveys were returned by 35 of 36 department chairs (97% response). Considerable variation exists in the academic, administrative, clinical services, and fiscal characteristics of programs, although over half are operating at a deficit. Fiscal success was associated with availability of inpatient and intermediate levels of psychiatric care, better integration of the psychiatry program within the children's hospital, and adequate fiscal information being provided to the psychiatry chair. Additional research regarding the potential of psychiatric services to generate clinical success and cost savings is warranted. Pediatric health care professionals and third-party payers should be educated regarding the relevance of psychiatric services within children's hospitals and in physically ill children. PMID:10749950

  10. [Psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Guex, Patrice; Conus, Philippe; Pomini, Valentino; Kramer, Ueli; Bonsack, Charles; Eap, Chin

    2011-01-19

    The novelties in clinical psychiatry are close to somatic medicine adaptation. The clinical staging concept in psychiatry (as in cancerology) is the result of an early intervention strategy in psychotic disorders. A differentiated mode of understanding of the phases of psychiatric disorders allows a prevention oriented approach. Individualized therapeutic programmes in accordance with specific problematics favors the orientation towards focalised follow-ups, for instance CBT programmes on Internet may be proposed to patients motivated and rather autonomous. Others, on the contrary, less accessible to health care should benefit of the support of a mobile team and specific coaching to return to vocational services. Systematic follow-up of the metabolic syndrome, often induced by atypical antipsychotics, belongs to those basic adjustment processes. PMID:21400949

  11. Primary Supervision: Massachusetts General Hospital's child and adolescent psychiatry seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jellinek, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes "Primary Supervision", a seminar he has led for approximately 20 years, which is designed for the entire class of nine first-year residents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry training at Massachusetts General Hospital. The seminar meets for 1 hour each week throughout the first year. Through 900 hours of…

  12. Biomarkers and clinical staging in psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    McGorry, Patrick; Keshavan, Matcheri; Goldstone, Sherilyn; Amminger, Paul; Allott, Kelly; Berk, Michael; Lavoie, Suzie; Pantelis, Christos; Yung, Alison; Wood, Stephen; Hickie, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine is rapidly becoming a reality in today's physical medicine. However, as yet this is largely an aspirational goal in psychiatry, despite significant advances in our understanding of the biochemical, genetic and neurobiological processes underlying major mental disorders. Preventive medicine relies on the availability of predictive tools; in psychiatry we still largely lack these. Furthermore, our current diagnostic systems, with their focus on well-established, largely chronic illness, do not support a pre-emptive, let alone a preventive, approach, since it is during the early stages of a disorder that interventions have the potential to offer the greatest benefit. Here, we present a clinical staging model for severe mental disorders and discuss examples of biological markers that have already undergone some systematic evaluation and that could be integrated into such a framework. The advantage of this model is that it explicitly considers the evolution of psychopathology during the development of a mental illness and emphasizes that progression of illness is by no means inevitable, but can be altered by providing appropriate interventions that target individual modifiable risk and protective factors. The specific goals of therapeutic intervention are therefore broadened to include the prevention of illness onset or progression, and to minimize the risk of harm associated with more complex treatment regimens. The staging model also facilitates the integration of new data on the biological, social and environmental factors that influence mental illness into our clinical and diagnostic infrastructure, which will provide a major step forward in the development of a truly pre-emptive psychiatry. PMID:25273285

  13. Training of child and adolescent psychiatry fellows in autism and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Marrus, Natasha; Veenstra-Vanderweele, Jeremy; Hellings, Jessica A; Stigler, Kimberly A; Szymanski, Ludwik; King, Bryan H; Carlisle, L Lee; Cook, Edwin H; Pruett, John R

    2014-05-01

    Patients with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disability can be clinically complex and often have limited access to psychiatric care. Because little is known about post-graduate clinical education in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, we surveyed training directors of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. On average, child and adolescent psychiatry directors reported lectures of 3 and 4 h per year in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, respectively. Training directors commonly reported that trainees see 1-5 patients with autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability per year for outpatient pharmacological management and inpatient treatment. Overall, 43% of directors endorsed the need for additional resources for training in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, which, coupled with low didactic and clinical exposure, suggests that current training is inadequate. PMID:24113341

  14. Wilderness Adventure Therapy in Adolescent Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Simon; O'Donnell, Matthew

    The Brief Intervention Program (BIP) is a mental health day program in Melbourne (Australia) for adolescents with severe mental health problems who are at risk for suicide. The 10-week program serves closed groups of 6-8 adolescents aged 13-18 years and has 3 phases: engagement and orientation (week 1), treatment (weeks 2-9), and integration (week…

  15. [The Research Domain Criteria (Rdoc), reductionism and clinical psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Faucher, Luc; Goyer, Simon

    2016-12-01

    The focus of the advocates of the Research Domain Critria (RDoC) on faulty brain circuits has led some to suspect it of being a reductionist enterprise. And because RDoC will eventually impact clinical psychiatry, some have feared that it will transform clinical psychiatry in a mindless and applied neurobehavioral science. We argue that if RDoC is officially endorsing a kind of reductionism, the particular kind of reductionism it endorses is not suffering from the shortcomings of more classical forms of reductionism. Because of that, at least in principle, RDoC could enrich rather than impoverish clinical psychiatry. This paper raises few potential problems of the RDoC for clinical psychiatry caused by its implicit epistemological reductionism. PMID:27550461

  16. Adventure-Based Experiential Therapy with Inpatients in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: An Approach to Practicability and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckstein, Florian; Rüth, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the use of adventure-based experiential therapy (AET) with child and adolescent psychiatry inpatients. AET environments, indications, practicality, therapeutic effects and research are outlined and clinical findings are reported. Activities such as rock-climbing, exploring a creek and caving are discussed and the limitations…

  17. Exposure to Child and Adolescent Psychiatry for Medical Students: Are There Optimal "Teaching Perspectives"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Jeffrey; Barrett, Rowland; Grapentine, W. Lex; Liguori, Gina; Trivedi, Harsh K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The ability to develop quality medical student exposures in child and adolescent psychiatry is critical to the professional development of these future physicians and to the growth of recruitment efforts into the field. This study identifies teaching perspectives among child and adolescent psychiatry faculty to determine whether there…

  18. The child and adolescent psychiatry trials network (CAPTN): infrastructure development and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Mark; Silva, Susan G; Compton, Scott; Chrisman, Allan; DeVeaugh-Geiss, Joseph; Breland-Noble, Alfiee; Kondo, Douglas; Kirchner, Jerry; March, John S

    2009-01-01

    Background In 2003, the National Institute of Mental Health funded the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Trials Network (CAPTN) under the Advanced Center for Services and Intervention Research (ACSIR) mechanism. At the time, CAPTN was believed to be both a highly innovative undertaking and a highly speculative one. One reviewer even suggested that CAPTN was "unlikely to succeed, but would be a valuable learning experience for the field." Objective To describe valuable lessons learned in building a clinical research network in pediatric psychiatry, including innovations intended to decrease barriers to research participation. Methods The CAPTN Team has completed construction of the CAPTN network infrastructure, conducted a large, multi-center psychometric study of a novel adverse event reporting tool, and initiated a large antidepressant safety registry and linked pharmacogenomic study focused on severe adverse events. Specific challenges overcome included establishing structures for network organization and governance; recruiting over 150 active CAPTN participants and 15 child psychiatry training programs; developing and implementing procedures for site contracts, regulatory compliance, indemnification and malpractice coverage, human subjects protection training and IRB approval; and constructing an innovative electronic casa report form (eCRF) running on a web-based electronic data capture system; and, finally, establishing procedures for audit trail oversight requirements put forward by, among others, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Conclusion Given stable funding for network construction and maintenance, our experience demonstrates that judicious use of web-based technologies for profiling investigators, investigator training, and capturing clinical trials data, when coupled to innovative approaches to network governance, data management and site management, can reduce the costs and burden and improve the feasibility of incorporating clinical research into

  19. Ethical perspectives on managed care as it relates to child and adolescent psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Geraty, R D; Hendren, R L; Flaa, C J

    1992-05-01

    Managed health care is providing an increasing influence in the way child and adolescent psychiatry is practiced. The goals of managed care have been to manage price, service, and quality. As external forces are brought to bear on child and adolescent psychiatry, ethical and legal dilemmas are faced. Underlying principles and the impact of society force physicians to reexamine their values and reeducate themselves about legal developments. PMID:1592769

  20. Clinical Excellence in Psychiatry: A Review of the Psychiatric Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chisolm, Margaret S.; Peters, Matthew E.; Burkhart, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The provision of excellent patient care is a goal that physicians would like to achieve in caring for all patients, all of the time. Until recently, clinical excellence had not been defined, and the extent to which this recently published definition applies to the care of patients with psychiatric illness is not known. This article sets out to consider how the paradigm for clinical excellence applies to the field of psychiatry. Data Source: PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, and PsycINFO were searched (1962 through December 2010) combining the keywords psychiatry (or psychiatrist) and clinical excellence, limiting the output to English-language case reports. In subsequent searches, the term clinical excellence was replaced by each of the components of the definition: communication and interpersonal skills, professionalism and humanism, diagnostic acumen, skillful negotiation of the health care system, knowledge, scholarly approach to clinical practice, exhibiting a passion for patient care, explicitly modeling mastery to medical trainees, and collaborating with investigators to advance science and discovery. Study Selection: The search yielded 218 case reports. All of the case reports were reviewed, and a consensus was reached on the 8 exemplars and 1 teaching model to be presented in the article. Careful consideration was given as to whether any aspects of the framework for clinical excellence were missing or not applicable for psychiatry. Results Every case report reviewed touched on 1 or more of the domains of clinical excellence. None of the case reports uncovered new aspects of clinical excellence that were not described in the existing definition. Conclusions: This review of the case reports published in psychiatry reveals that the definition of clinical excellence described in this article may be highly applicable to those caring for patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:22943033

  1. The Differential Impact of Clerk Interest and Participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clerkship Rotation upon Psychiatry and Pediatrics Residency Matches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mark D.; Szatmari, Peter; Eva, Kevin W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated the differential impact of clerk interest and participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) clerkship rotation upon psychiatry and pediatrics residency matches. Method: Authors studied clerks from the McMaster University M.D. program graduating years of 2005-2007. Participants were categorized as 1)…

  2. Management in child and adolescent psychiatry: how does it look in the Balkans?

    PubMed

    Pejovic-Milovancevic, M; Miletic, V; Anagnostopoulos, D; Raleva, M; Stancheva, V; Burgic-Radmanovic, M; Barac-Otasevic, Z; Ispanovic, V

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the situation of child and adolescent psychiatry in the following Balkan countries: Greece, Serbia, Bulgaria, Romania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, FYROM, and Montenegro. With the exception of Greece, these countries are new democracies, with their mental health services in a transitional stage of organization. Overall, they have initiated programmes to move psychiatric care towards deinstitutionalization, developing outpatient infrastructures to handle psychiatric disorders. Child psychiatry as a specialization is still less developed than adult psychiatry at a significant, albeit different degree among these countries. The number of mental health services offered to children and adolescents is deemed insufficient, and the type of services limited and lacking. This situation is also reflected in the small number of child psychiatrists and other mental health specialists for children and adolescents, as well as in the complete lack (Montenegro) or deficiency of special programmes and actions for children and adolescents. The same also applies to mental health legislation. Greece is the exception in the development of the entire spectrum of services, the number of specialists, and the establishment of an adequate legislation framework reinforced by the incorporation of all international treaties on children's rights; although the recent economic crisis has affected the country negatively, threatening with regression to pre-reformational practices. Children and adolescents in need of mental health care have been increasing in all countries. The effect of violent and sudden changes taking place in most countries is a major factor for the emergence of increased and stress-related psychopathology and psychosocial problems in children and families. In all countries, there is a significant development of nongovernmental organizations undertaking a large part of reformation work. There is also the disconcerting phenomenon of professional exhaustion and the

  3. Exposing Medical Students to Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: A Case-Based Seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Jeremy S.; Lake, MaryBeth

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Despite a documented shortage of child and adolescent psychiatrists, few studies have examined whether including child and adolescent psychiatry didactics in a medical school curriculum can stimulate appreciation and interest among students, possibly leading more students to choose careers in this specialty. Methods: The authors…

  4. Computational psychiatry as a bridge from neuroscience to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Huys, Quentin J M; Maia, Tiago V; Frank, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Translating advances in neuroscience into benefits for patients with mental illness presents enormous challenges because it involves both the most complex organ, the brain, and its interaction with a similarly complex environment. Dealing with such complexities demands powerful techniques. Computational psychiatry combines multiple levels and types of computation with multiple types of data in an effort to improve understanding, prediction and treatment of mental illness. Computational psychiatry, broadly defined, encompasses two complementary approaches: data driven and theory driven. Data-driven approaches apply machine-learning methods to high-dimensional data to improve classification of disease, predict treatment outcomes or improve treatment selection. These approaches are generally agnostic as to the underlying mechanisms. Theory-driven approaches, in contrast, use models that instantiate prior knowledge of, or explicit hypotheses about, such mechanisms, possibly at multiple levels of analysis and abstraction. We review recent advances in both approaches, with an emphasis on clinical applications, and highlight the utility of combining them. PMID:26906507

  5. How to assess quality of life in child and adolescent psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Karow, Anne; Barthel, Dana; Klasen, Fionna

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the conceptual foundations of measuring health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children and adolescents in child and adolescent psychiatry, and of the current state of research in this field. The available procedures for determining quality of life are presented according to their areas of use and their psychometric characteristics. The internationally available generic instruments for measuring HRQoL in children are identified and assessed in terms of their strengths and weaknesses with regard to selected criteria. As a result, seven generic HRQoL instruments and two utility procedures have been identified which satísfy the following criteria: (i) psychometric qualíty; (ii) age-appropriate measurement; (iii) versions for self-reporting and external rating; and (iv) cross-cultural measurement. The identified instruments satisfy the individual criteria to different degrees. They are increasingly being used in health services research, treatment studies, and epidemiological research; however, they are not yet widely used as part of the clinical routine in child and adolescent psychiatrics. PMID:25152654

  6. Neural networks and psychiatry: candidate applications in clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Florio, T; Einfeld, S; Levy, F

    1994-12-01

    Neural networks comprise a fundamentally new type of computer system inspired by the functioning of neurons in the brain. Such networks are good at solving problems that involve pattern recognition and categorisation. An important difference between a neural network and a traditional computer system is that in developing an application, a neural network is not programmed; instead, it is trained to solve a particular type of problem. This ability to learn to solve a problem makes neural networks adaptable to solving a wide variety of problems, some of which have proved intractable using a traditional computing approach. Neural networks are particularly suited to tasks involving the categorisation of patterns of information, such as is required in diagnosis and clinical decision making. In the last three years reports of applications involving neural networks have begun to appear in the medical literature, and these are described in this paper. However, a comprehensive search of the literature has shown that there have not as yet been reports of any applications in psychiatry. This paper discusses the nature of clinical decision making, outlines the sorts of problems in psychiatry which neural networks applications might be developed to address, and gives examples of candidate applications in clinical decision making. PMID:7794209

  7. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  8. Inpatient Treatment in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry--A Prospective Study of Health Gain and Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jonathan; Jacobs, Brian; Beecham, Jennifer; Dunn, Graham; Kroll, Leo; Tobias, Catherine; Briskman, Jackie

    2007-01-01

    Background: Inpatient treatment is a complex intervention for the most serious mental health disorders in child and adolescent psychiatry. This is the first large-scale study into its effectiveness and costs. Previous studies have been criticised for methodological weaknesses. Methods: A prospective cohort study, including economic evaluation,…

  9. Prevention in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: The Reduction of Risk for Mental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, David, Ed.; And Others

    The book describes Project Prevention, an interdisciplinary project developed by the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, to identify risk factors for mental disorders and preventive interventions. After an introductory chapter, the following eight chapters cover: the scope of Project Prevention; children at high risk (e.g.,…

  10. Clinical Skills Verification in General Psychiatry: Recommendations of the ABPN Task Force on Rater Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jibson, Michael D.; Broquet, Karen E.; Anzia, Joan Meyer; Beresin, Eugene V.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Kaye, David; Rao, Nyapati Raghu; Rostain, Anthony Leon; Sexson, Sandra B.; Summers, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) announced in 2007 that general psychiatry training programs must conduct Clinical Skills Verification (CSV), consisting of observed clinical interviews and case presentations during residency, as one requirement to establish graduates' eligibility to sit for the written certification…

  11. A Model CSMH Curriculum for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Derenne, Jennifer; Martel, Adele

    2015-10-01

    Child and adolescent psychiatrists (CAP) care for high school students preparing to enter college. They also may continue to see students while on school vacations and may care for college students in various settings (emergency room, inpatient hospital unit, private practice, college student health service, or counseling center). As increasing numbers of students with mental health diagnoses pursue secondary education, CAP need to be knowledgeable about campus systems of care, principles of transition, and privacy and educational laws affecting college students. This article describes an informal needs assessment of general CAP members of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and details the results of a survey of CAP program directors on training opportunities in college student mental health (CSMH). The authors present a sample curriculum for a clinical rotation in CSMH, as well as providing ideas for core didactic lectures, and proposing the development of online resources to reduce the burden of creating new lectures and standardize experiences among training programs. PMID:25895628

  12. A case-based assistant for clinical psychiatry expertise.

    PubMed Central

    Bichindaritz, I.

    1994-01-01

    Case-based reasoning is an artificial intelligence methodology for the processing of empirical knowledge. Recent case-based reasoning systems also use theoretic knowledge about the domain to constrain the case-based reasoning. The organization of the memory is the key issue in case-based reasoning. The case-based assistant presented here has two structures in memory: cases and concepts. These memory structures permit it to be as skilled in problem-solving tasks, such as diagnosis and treatment planning, as in interpretive tasks, such as clinical research. A prototype applied to clinical work about eating disorders in psychiatry, reasoning from the alimentary questionnaires of these patients, is presented as an example of the system abilities. PMID:7950011

  13. [Major obstacles in the development of child and adolescent psychiatry in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Kalmar, Sandor

    2016-06-01

    The author ascertains that healthy personality development faces increasingly serious obstacles and consequently the number of children in need of mental healthcare is on the rise. Child and adolescent psychiatry has drawn increasing appreciation, however, it is only formal and deficient in Hungary today and cannot assure optimal mental care according to the principles of evidence-based medicine. The author emphasizes that 75% of the first manifestation of the psychiatric disorders occurs during adolescence and young adulthood. In spite of legal regulation, several deficiencies hinder the development of children into healthy adults. The author analyses the most important obstacles in the development of child and adolescent Psychiatry. The author emphasizes the role of keypersons, describes the situation of and problems faced by Hungarian child psychiatric care. The author lists in detail the most important contradictions, deficiencies and obstacles and outlines suggestions for resolving the present crisis. The author emphasizes (1) the responsibility of institutions, and people dealing with society and children, and the disinterest of competent authorities. (2) The somatic, mental, cultural and spiritual ignorance/illiteracy among parents, teachers, healthcare workers, and the general population partly related to crises among the pedagogues. (3) The lack of holistic approach to treatment of children suffering from mental disorder. (4) The importance and the lack of knowledge concerning central nervous system function in child psychiatry. (5) Application of evidence-based medicine in child and adolescent psychiatry based on understanding the relationship between central nervous system alterations and mental functions. (6) Respecting keypersons' competence limits. (7) Immediate development of inpatient and outpatient child and adolescent psychiatry in the whole country. (8) Reform of child psychiatry board exam. (9) Development of currently missing textbooks and

  14. Current clinical advances and future perspectives in the psychiatry/mental health field of Latin America.

    PubMed

    Cía, Alfredo H; Rojas, Rodrigo Córdoba; Adad, Miguel Abib

    2010-01-01

    The history of Mental Health in Latin America is relatively young. It dates back to the mid nineteenth century and widely developed during the twentieth century, with formidable scientific, social, political, and ethical challenges. Latin American psychiatry has contributed in the fields of epidemiology, phenomenology, social psychiatry, psychiatric and epistemological research, and clinical genetics as well. More recent advances can also be seen in clinical psychotherapy and psychopharmacology. Now, there is a formal and informal recognition of various areas of expertise, such as children and adolescents, addictions, anxiety disorders, among others. However, we need to solve the health problems resulting from mental illnesses as well as the disorders related to the social, environmental, political, and economic factors of a continent marked by the precariousness of underdevelopment, which have a high impact on population health. Therefore, considering and trying to minimize the impact of those factors, contributing to the destigmatization of mental illnesses and their consequences, together with the growing number of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), human rights defenders, public figures, etc., and collaborating in building a society that guarantees the right to mental health and adequate treatment and rehabilitation are part of our present challenges in Latin America. PMID:20874063

  15. Promoting Scholarship during Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mezzacappa, Enrico; Hamoda, Hesham M.; DeMaso, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2003, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) drew attention to the critical national shortage of psychiatrist-researchers and the need for competency-based curricula to promote research training during psychiatry residency as one way to address this shortage at the institutional level. Here, the authors report on the adaptation,…

  16. Psychotropic drug prescribing in child and adolescent learning disability psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bramble, David

    2007-07-01

    This postal questionnaire study investigated the prescribing practices of a group of senior British psychiatrists who have responsibilities for children and adolescents with learning disabilities (mental retardation). The study revealed that all of the clinicians surveyed (n = 16) were prescribing psychotropic medication; psychostimulants and major tranquillizers represented the most frequently prescribed classes and, respectively, methylphenidate, risperidone, melatonin, sodium valproate and carbamazepine were the most frequently employed specific agents. Most patients were receiving monotherapy. Many (14/16) clinicians reported difficulties in shared-care prescribing arrangements with General Practitioners. The study concludes that psychopharmacology is an established part of the psychiatric management of learning disabled children but acknowledges the need for the elaboration of clinical governance standards to this area of practice. PMID:17446203

  17. Indications for and use of antidepressants in child and adolescent psychiatry--a cross-sectional survey in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Buhl Sørensen, Christine; Bøhm Jepsen, Ea; Thomsen, Per Hove; Dalsgaard, Søren

    2003-06-01

    The prescription of antidepressants for children and adolescents is a controversial subject, and it has been documented that the practice has increased in the past decade in Denmark, the UK, and the USA. The aim of this study was to survey the indications for and use of antidepressants in child and adolescent psychiatry. Questionnaires were sent to all Danish child and adolescent psychiatric hospitals, out-patient clinics and privately practising psychiatrists treating children and adolescents under the age of 19 years (31 units in all). A 93.5 % response rate for the total of 382 questionnaires in the survey. The antidepressant serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were the most prominently used agents in treating children and adolescents. The extent of their use represents 8 % of the total sample of individuals under the age of 19 years receiving any kind of psychiatric treatment - 0.03 % of the reference population in Denmark. It is only a surprisingly minor group of children and adolescents that are being treated with antidepressants despite the fact that 10 % of youth under the age of 19 are afflicted with diseases like depression, OCD, anxiety disorder and eating disorders. PMID:12768458

  18. M. D. Faculty Salaries in Psychiatry and All Clinical Science Departments, 1980-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haviland, Mark G.; Dial, Thomas H.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors compare trends in the salaries of physician faculty in academic departments of psychiatry with those of physician faculty in all academic clinical science departments from 1980-2006. Methods: The authors compared trend lines for psychiatry and all faculty by academic rank, including those for department chairs, by graphing…

  19. Construct Validity of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Psychiatry: Associations with the Clinical Skills Examination and Other Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Robin S.; Chibnall, John T.; Blaskiewicz, Robert J.; Furman, Gail E.; Powell, Jill K.; Mohr, Clinton J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The construct validity of checklist and global process scores for an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in psychiatry was assessed. Multiple regression analysis was used to predict psychiatry OSCE scores from the clinical skills examination, an obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN) OSCE, and the National Board of Medical…

  20. [Financial conflict of interest in clinical psychiatry studies: a review].

    PubMed

    Ulaş, Halis; Binbay, Tolga; Alptekin, Köksal

    2008-01-01

    Pharmaceutical industry revenues from global pharmaceutical sales have increased 7% to $602 billion in 2005. Approximately 15% of these revenues were spent on clinical research and drug development studies. Because of the huge budget allocated to research and development studies the number of studies being conducted by pharmaceutical companies has increased. The impact of the pharmaceutical industry on clinical trials has been affected by financial conflicts of interest between researchers and the industry. Conflict of interest refers to a situation in which it appears that a researcher's personal financial interest could significantly affect the design, conduct, and/or reporting of such research. Financial conflict of interest has been reported to be frequent in clinical trials in general medicine. It is estimated that 89%-98% of comparative drug treatment studies are funded by pharmaceutical companies. It was reported that favorable outcomes for the firms conducting these studies were significantly more common in industry-funded studies than in non-industry funded ones. These biased outcomes were due to conscious or unconscious decisions about the design, data analysis, and publishing of the studies. Biased outcomes of industry-funded studies have diminished the integrity of academic institutions, pharmaceutical companies, researchers, and scientific journals; therefore, various precautions have been taken in order to reduce the effect of conflict of interest on study outcomes. The aim of this review was to evaluate the effect of conflict of interest on outcomes in clinical psychiatry studies. PMID:19110984

  1. [Quality characteristics of freedom-restricting coercive measures in child and adolescent psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Schepker, Renate; Steinert, Tilman; Jungmann, Joachim; Bergmann, Frank; Fegert, Jörg M

    2006-01-01

    Putting into practice legal prescriptions of both children's rights and the personal freedom guaranteed by the German basic constitutional law requires a reflected and sensitive use of freedom-restricting coercive measures. Such measures imply uncertainties and burdens for staff and patients in child and adolescent psychiatry. Using guidelines of psychiatric associations and instructions from three institutions, basic attitudes and quality characteristics of indication, performance, and participation with regard to freedom-restricting coercive measures are described. PMID:17253028

  2. Characteristics of Patients Visiting the Child & Adolescent Psychiatric Clinic: A 26-Year Study from North India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malhotra, Savita; Biswas, Parthasarathy; Sharan, Pratap; Grover, Sandeep

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study the sociodemographic and clinical profile of patients, who presented to the child and adolescent psychiatric services of a tertiary care centre over a 26-year period (1980-2005). Methodology: Data were abstracted retrospectively from detailed work up files of all subjects assessed in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) Clinic…

  3. Pupillary Motility: Bringing Neuroscience to the Psychiatry Clinic of the Future

    PubMed Central

    Graur, Simona

    2013-01-01

    Modern pupillometry has expanded the study and utility of pupil responses in many new domains including psychiatry, particularly for understanding aspects of cognitive and emotional information processing. Here, we review the applications of pupillometry in psychiatry for understanding patients’ information processing styles, predicting treatment, and augmenting function. In the past year pupillometry has been shown to be useful in specifying cognitive/affective occurrences during experimental tasks and informing clinical diagnoses. Such studies demonstrate the potential of pupillary motility to be used in clinical psychiatry much as it has been in neurology for the past century. PMID:23780801

  4. Brain imaging in psychiatry

    SciTech Connect

    Morihisa, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains the following five chapters: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Psychiatry; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) in Psychiatry: Methodological Issues; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Psychiatry: Application to Clinical Research; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Psychiatry: The Resting and Activated Brains of Schizophrenic Patients; and Brain Electrical Activity Mapping (BEAM) in Psychiatry.

  5. Concluding the Series on Evidence-Based Practice: The Spread of Excellence in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The child and adolescent psychiatry community has been using large systems of information and new technologies to improve its performance.Evidence-based approach is used by practitioners to find and implement feasible therapies and medication. The different procedures involved of evidence-based practice, as used in child and adolescent psychology,…

  6. Intellectual quotient of juveniles evaluated in a forensic psychiatry clinic after committing a violent crime.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Leon, Manuel; Rosner, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study is to evaluate if there is a difference between the intelligence quotient (IQ) of 27 adolescent defendants referred to the Bellevue Hospital Center Forensic Psychiatry Clinic after committing violent crimes, and those adolescents in the same age group in the general population of the United States, as defined by the norms of the psychometric testing instrument Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 4th edition (WISC-IV). The IQ scores and sub-scores were compared to IQ scores of the general population (mean = 100, SD = 15) using a Z-test. The mean for the Full Scale IQ was 82.93. The means for the subtests which include Processing Speed Index, Perceptual Reasoning Index, Verbal Comprehension Index, and Working Memory Index, were: 78.48, 87.78, 86.70 (p < 0.05), and 90.78 (p = 0.09) respectively. There is a statistically significant difference in the IQ scores of the violent juveniles studied when compared to the general population. PMID:20015167

  7. Managing Transition with Support: Experiences of Transition from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry to General Adult Psychiatry Narrated by Young Adults and Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Young adults with mental illness who need continuing care when they turn 18 are referred from child and adolescent psychiatry to general adult psychiatry. During this process, young adults are undergoing multiple transitions as they come of age while they transfer to another unit in healthcare. The aim of this study was to explore expectations and experiences of transition from child and adolescent psychiatry to general adult psychiatry as narrated by young adults and relatives. Individual interviews were conducted with three young adults and six relatives and analysed according to grounded theory. The analysis resulted in a core category: managing transition with support, and three categories: being of age but not mature, walking out of security and into uncertainty, and feeling omitted and handling concerns. The young adults' and relatives' main concerns were that they might be left out and feel uncertainty about the new situation during the transition process. To facilitate the transition process, individual care planning is needed. It is essential that young adults and relatives are participating in the process to be prepared for the changes and achieve a successful transition. Knowledge about the simultaneous processes seems to be an important issue for facilitating transition. PMID:24829900

  8. Ethological research in clinical psychiatry: the study of nonverbal behavior during interviews.

    PubMed

    Troisi, A

    1999-11-01

    Ethology is relevant to clinical psychiatry for two different reasons. First, ethology may contribute significantly to the development of more accurate and valid methods for measuring the behavior of persons with mental disorders. Second, ethology, as the evolutionary study of behavior, may provide psychiatry with a theoretical framework for integrating a functional perspective into the definition and clinical assessment of mental disorders. This article describes an ethological method for studying the nonverbal behavior of persons with mental disorders during clinical interviews and reviews the results derived from the application of this method in studies of patients who had a diagnosis of schizophrenia or depression. These findings and others that are emerging from current ethological research in psychiatry indicate that the ethological approach is not limited simply to a mere translation into quantitative and objective data of what clinicians already know on the basis of their judgment or the use of rating scales. Rather, it produces new insights on controversial aspects of psychiatric disorders. Although the impact of ethology on clinical psychiatry is still limited, recent developments in the fields of ethological and Darwinian psychiatry can revitalize the interest of clinical psychiatrists for ethology. PMID:10580305

  9. A Program Module to Supplement the Clinical Psychiatry Rotation for Physician Assistant Students.

    PubMed

    Masters, Kim J

    2015-09-01

    A recent blog article aimed at prospective physician assistants (PAs) identified psychiatry as a series of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, diagnoses supplemented by empathy and medication. It suggested that there were ample opportunities for PAs to practice psychiatry, although a recent survey showed that only 1% of PA graduates were employed in psychiatric clinical practices. While this is only one perspective, it suggests that PAs' understanding of psychiatric practice is limited by the patient population they see during their clinical rotations as students. A broad systematically organized clinical psychiatry module with clinical preceptor direction could provide a more informed knowledge base and more interest in the field. PMID:26309206

  10. Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Jerry M.; Dulcan, Mina K.

    The third edition of this textbook continues its tradition of integrating clinical wisdom and scientific research to improve patient care and advocacy for children and families. Each of the 56 chapters presents a summary of a core topic, blending clinical experience with evidence-based practices in assessment and treatment. Divided into 10 parts,…

  11. Comparison of the number of supervisors on medical student satisfaction during a child and adolescent psychiatry rotation

    PubMed Central

    Mascioli, Kelly J; Robertson, Catharine J; Douglass, Alan B

    2016-01-01

    Background Traditionally, third-year medical students are assigned to one supervisor during their 1-week rotation in child and adolescent psychiatry. However, the majority of supervisory staff in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry opted to switch the supervision schedule to one in which some medical students are assigned to two primary supervisors. Objective The aim of the study was to determine if students assigned to two primary supervisors had greater rotation satisfaction compared with students assigned to one primary supervisor during a 1-week clerkship rotation in child and adolescent psychiatry. Methods A satisfaction questionnaire was sent to 110 third-year medical students who completed their child and adolescent clerkship rotation. Based on the responses, students were divided into groups depending on their number of supervisors. Questionnaire responses were compared between the groups using independent t-tests. Results When students who had one primary supervisor were compared to students who had two primary supervisors, the lone item showing a statistically significant difference was regarding improvement of assessment reports/progress notes. Conclusion The number of supervisors does not significantly affect the satisfaction of students during a 1-week clerkship rotation in child and adolescent psychiatry. Other factors are important in rotation satisfaction. PMID:27110145

  12. Overview of practice management in child and adolescent psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Schreter, Robert K

    2010-01-01

    The manager of a psychiatric practice must create and direct a clinical delivery system, design and oversee the administrative services necessary to support the system, and guide the business operations that contribute to its success. Regardless of the size of the practice, the psychiatrist administrator must handle seven core administrative responsibilities and oversee individual functions and capabilities within each domain. These responsibilities include practice development, clinical services management, medical office operations, clinical management, information management, business management, and risk management. This article provides a roadmap for creating and sustaining successful clinical and administrative endeavors. It can also be used by existing practices as an audit instrument to provide a snapshot of current capabilities so that strengths as well as opportunities for continued growth can be identified. PMID:19951808

  13. Attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In psychiatry, most of the focus on patient aggression has been in adolescent and adult inpatient settings. This behaviour is also common in elderly people with mental illness, but little research has been conducted into this problem in old age psychiatry settings. The attitudes of clinical staff toward aggression may affect the way they manage this behaviour. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient settings. Methods A convenience sample of clinical staff were recruited from three locked acute old age psychiatry inpatient units in Melbourne, Australia. They completed the Management of Aggression and Violence Scale, which assessed the causes and managment of aggression in psychiatric settings. Results Eighty-five staff completed the questionnaire, comprising registered nurses (61.1%, n = 52), enrolled nurses (27.1%, n = 23) and medical and allied health staff (11.8%, n = 10). A range of causative factors contributed to aggression. The respondents had a tendency to disagree that factors directly related to the patient contributed to this behaviour. They agreed patients were aggressive because of the environment they were in, other people contributed to them becoming aggressive, and patients from certain cultural groups were prone to these behaviours. However, there were mixed views about whether patient aggression could be prevented, and this type of behaviour took place because staff did not listen to patients. There was agreement medication was a valuable approach for the management of aggression, negotiation could be used more effectively in such challenging behaviour, and seclusion and physical restraint were sometimes used more than necessary. However, there was disagreement about whether the practice of secluding patients should be discontinued. Conclusions Aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units occurs

  14. Do Clinical Evaluations in a Psychiatry Clerkship Favor Students with Positive Personality Characteristics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chibnall, John T.; Blaskiewicz, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine associations of personality characteristics, National Board of Medical Examiners subject examination performance, and Objective Structured Clinical Examination performance with clinical evaluations of third-year medical students in a psychiatry clerkship. Methods: Students completed the Revised NEO Personality…

  15. Mentoring Increases Connectedness and Knowledge: A Cross-Sectional Evaluation of Two Programs in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Michelle S.; Miller, Susan Milam; Rettew, David C.; Althoff, Robert; Ehmann, Mary; Hudziak, James J.; Martin, Andres

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors assess changes in knowledge and feeling connected to the field of child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) after participation in a brief mentoring program held at two CAP conferences. Methods: Similar mentorship programs were implemented at two CAP conferences, one national (N=119 participants), one international (N=53). The…

  16. Implementation of Problem-Based Learning in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Shared Experiences of a Special-Interest Study Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skokauskas, Norbert; Guerrero, Anthony P. S.; Hanson, Mark D.; Coll, Xavier; Paul, Moli; Szatmari, Peter; Tan, Susan M. K.; Bell, Cathy K.; Hunt, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: Problem-based learning (PBL) represents a major development and change in educational practice that continues to have a large impact across subjects and disciplines worldwide. It would seem that child and adolescent psychiatry, because of its inherently integrative, bio-psycho-social nature and emphasis on teamwork and…

  17. The mental health of asylum-seeking and refugee children and adolescents attending a clinic in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Elizabeth Batista Pinto; Burhorst, Ingrid

    2007-12-01

    We investigated the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of asylum-seeking and refugee children and adolescents referred to a child and adolescent psychiatry service in the Netherlands. Children with families and unaccompanied minors were compared. Unaccompanied minors had significantly higher frequencies of symptoms and psychiatric disorders than the children with families, both considered a high-risk population for mental health problems. PMID:18089641

  18. Informed consent in psychiatry clinical research: A conceptual review of issues, challenges, and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Umesh Chandra; Kharawala, Saifuddin

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining informed consent in psychiatry clinical research involving subjects with diminished mental abilities and impaired consent capacity has been a challenge for researchers, posing many ethical concerns and procedural hurdles due to participants’ cognitive deficits and impaired ability to judge reality. Regulations seem inadequate and provide limited guidance, not sufficient to address all the ethical issues inherent in different situations related to obtaining consent from decisionally impaired persons. Researchers are struggling to find a balance between risk-benefit ratio, research advancement, and autonomy of study subjects. Inspired to improve the consent process in psychiatry clinical research, many studies have been conducted focusing on various informed consent-related ethical concerns, with the aim of developing appropriate strategies and optimizing the informed consent procedure in psychiatry clinical research, overcoming the ethical concerns. This article critically reviews the various ethical issues and consent challenges, their underlying reasons, and investigates the appropriate strategies and practices needed to be adopted while obtaining informed consent from subjects with impaired consent capacity, participating in psychiatry clinical research. PMID:22347696

  19. Diagnoses and Presenting Symptoms in an Infant Psychiatry Clinic: Comparison of Two Diagnostic Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Karen A.; Boyum, Lisa A.; Harmon, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To present data from a general infant psychiatry clinic, including range and frequency of presenting symptoms, relationship between symptoms and diagnoses, and comparison of two diagnostic systems, DSM-IV and Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders of Infancy and Early Childhood (DC: 0-3). Method: A…

  20. Borderline personality disorder in adolescents: the He-who-must-not-be-named of psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Larrivée, Marie-Pier

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the possibility and pertinence of diagnosing borderline personality disorder in adolescents. The etiology and clinical manifestations of this disorder in adolescents are discussed, and its management is addressed in terms of psychotherapy, pharmacology, hospitalization issues, and family involvement considerations. PMID:24174891

  1. [Clinical Implications of Changes in Child Psychiatry in the DSM-5. Strengths and Weaknesses of the Changes].

    PubMed

    Botero-Franco, Diana; Palacio-Ortíz, Juan David; Arroyave-Sierra, Pilar; Piñeros-Ortíz, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and related health problems (ICD) integrate the diagnostic criteria commonly used in psychiatric practice, but the DSM-IV-TR was insufficient for current clinical work. The DSM-5 was first made public in May at the Congress of the American Psychiatric Association, and it includes changes to some aspects of Child Psychiatry, as many of the conditions that were at the beginning in chapter of infancy, childhood and adolescence disorders have been transferred to other chapters and there are new diagnostic criteria or new terms are added. It is therefore important to provide it to Psychiatrists who attend children in order to assess the changes they will be facing in the nomenclature and classification in pursuit of a better classification of the childhood psychopathology. PMID:27569015

  2. Ethical issues associated with genetic counseling in the context of adolescent psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Jane; Virani, Alice; Austin, Jehannine C.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic counseling is a well-established healthcare discipline that provides individuals and families with health information about disorders that have a genetic component in a supportive counseling encounter. It has recently been applied in the context of psychiatric disorders (like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression and anxiety) that typically appear sometime during later childhood through to early adulthood. Psychiatric genetic counseling is emerging as an important service that fills a growing need to reframe understandings of the causes of mental health disorders. In this review, we will define psychiatric genetic counseling, and address important ethical concerns (we will particularly give attention to the principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice) that must be considered in the context of its application in adolescent psychiatry, whilst integrating evidence regarding patient outcomes from the literature. We discuss the developing capacity and autonomy of adolescents as an essential and dynamic component of genetic counseling provision in this population and discuss how traditional viewpoints regarding beneficence and non-maleficence should be considered in the unique situation of adolescents with, or at risk for, psychiatric conditions. We argue that thoughtful and tailored counseling in this setting can be done in a manner that addresses the important health needs of this population while respecting the core principles of biomedical ethics, including the ethic of care. PMID:26937355

  3. [Gender identity disorder and related sexual behavior problems in children and adolescents: from the perspective of development and child psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The present paper reviews the theoretical and empirical literature on children and adolescents with gender identity disorder. The organizational framework underlying this review is one that presents gender behavior in children and adolescents as a continuum rather than as a dichotomy of normal versus abnormal categories. Theories of normative gender development, prevalence, assessment, developmental trajectories, and comorbidity were investigated. There is a greater fluidity and likelihood of change in the pre-pubertal period. It was reported that the majority of affected children had been eventually developing a homosexual orientation. As an approach to determine the prevalence of GID in clinical samples in our child psychiatry clinic, screening instruments that include items on cross-gender or cross-sex identification were used. We applied the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Of the 113 items in the Japanese version of the CBCL, there are two measures of cross-gender identification: "behaves like opposite sex" and "wishes to be opposite sex." Like the other items, they are scored on a 3-point scale of: 0-not true, 1- somewhat true, and 2-very true. Our study of 323 clinically-referred children aged 4-15 years reported that, among the boys, 9.6% assigned a score of 1 (somewhat true) or a score of 2 (very true) to the two items. The corresponding rates for the clinically-referred girls were 24.5%. The item of diagnosis of GID in our clinical sample was significantly higher than in non-referred children, reported as 2-5% using the same method. Two clinical case histories of screened children are also presented. Both of them were diagnosed with PDDNOS. Together with the literature review, most of the gender-related symptoms in autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) could be related to the behavioral and psychological characteristics of autism as shown in case histories. ASD subjects in adolescence can sometimes develop a unique confusion of identity that occasionally

  4. Off-Label Prescription of Psychopharmacological Drugs in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Braüner, Julie Vestergaard; Johansen, Lily Manzello; Roesbjerg, Troels; Pagsberg, Anne Katrine

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to describe the frequency of off-label prescriptions of psychopharmacological drugs in a child and adolescent psychiatric setting. A cross-sectional study was conducted on November 1, 2014, including all inpatients and outpatients at the Mental Health Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Capital Region of Denmark, aged 0 to 17 years receiving medical treatment with antidepressants, antipsychotic agents, benzodiazepines, melatonin and/or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication. We included a total of 5555 prescriptions representing 2932 patients. The main findings were that 32.3% of all prescriptions were off-label, and 41.6% of subjects received at least 1 off-label prescription. The most frequent off-label category was low age, 72.2%, meaning that the drug was not approved for the age group of the patient. The off-label rates for each drug class were as follows: melatonin, 100%; antipsychotic agents, 95.6%; benzodiazepines, 72.5%; antidepressants, 51.1%; and ADHD medication, 2.7%. Prescription of 2 or more psychopharmacological drugs per patient was common (31.5%). The group of subjects with 4 or more prescriptions (n = 36) was characterized by a higher frequency of inpatients, older age, and a different distribution of diagnoses. This study found a frequent use of off-label prescriptions when treating children and adolescents with psychopharmacological drugs other than ADHD medication. In addition, prescription of more than 1 psychotropic drug is common. These findings support the need for extending the evidence base for psychopharmacologic treatment in children and adolescents. PMID:27529772

  5. Brief screening instruments for risky drinking in the outpatient psychiatry clinic.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kevin P; Chang, Grace

    2007-01-01

    In this pilot study, we compared two brief screening instruments, the T-ACE (Tolerance, Annoyed, Cut down, Eye-opener) and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), with a clinician interview and structured clinical interview (SCID) to determine if they improved identification of risky drinking in a psychiatry clinic compared to clinician interviews. Sixteen of 50 subjects satisfied DSM-IV criteria for lifetime alcohol abuse or dependence on the SCID, and four, all T-ACE positive, were listed "correctly" in the chart as having an alcohol problem. With an SCID gold standard, risky drinking was identified with sensitivities and specificities of 0.88 and 0.59 for the T-ACE and 0.63 and 0.85 for the AUDIT. Brief screening instruments improved the identification of risky drinking in a psychiatry clinic. PMID:17612827

  6. Factors Associated with Missed Psychiatry Visits in an Urban HIV Clinic.

    PubMed

    Ho, Christina P; Zinski, Anne; Fogger, Susanne A; Peters, Jonathan D; Westfall, Andrew O; Mugavero, Michael J; Lawrence, Sarah T; Nevin, Christa R; Raper, James L; Saag, Michael S; Willig, James H

    2015-08-01

    Psychiatric co-management is often required in HIV primary care. While rates and clinical impact of linkage and retention in HIV are well explored, fewer investigations focus specifically on linkage to psychiatry. In this investigation, we evaluate factors associated with linkage to psychiatric services using a retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients during a two-year observation period. Descriptive statistics depict patient characteristics, and logistic regression models were fit to evaluate factors associated with failure to establish care at the co-located psychiatry clinic following referral from HIV provider. Of 370 referred, 23 % did not attend a scheduled psychiatry appointment within 6 months of initial referral. In multivariable analysis, Non-white race, younger age, non-suppressed viral load, and increased wait time to appointment (in days) were associated with failure to attend. Further exploration of barriers that contribute to disparate linkage to psychiatric care may inform future interventions to improve HIV outcomes in this population. PMID:25491027

  7. Clinical Skills Verification, Formative Feedback, and Psychiatry Residency Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalack, Gregory W.; Jibson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the implementation of Clinical Skills Verification (CSV) in their program as an in-training assessment intended primarily to provide formative feedback to trainees, strengthen the supervisory experience, identify the need for remediation of interviewing skills, and secondarily to demonstrating resident competence…

  8. The Distinction between Clinical and Research Interviews in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Research interviews require a fact-based, neutral inquiry style that contrasts markedly from the empathic style of clinical interviews in psychiatric practice. In fact, the research interview generally seeks to gather information and specifically avoid any therapeutic benefit. This article describes the purpose of these opposing interview styles and provides some guidelines for beginning clinicians conducting research. PMID:21487545

  9. Is Mandatory Prospective Trial Registration Working to Prevent Publication of Unregistered Trials and Selective Outcome Reporting? An Observational Study of Five Psychiatry Journals That Mandate Prospective Clinical Trial Registration

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Amelia; Rucklidge, Julia J.; Mulder, Roger T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To address the bias occurring in the medical literature associated with selective outcome reporting, in 2005, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) introduced mandatory trial registration guidelines and member journals required prospective registration of trials prior to patient enrolment as a condition of publication. No research has examined whether these guidelines are impacting psychiatry publications. Our objectives were to determine the extent to which articles published in psychiatry journals adhering to ICMJE guidelines were correctly prospectively registered, whether there was evidence of selective outcome reporting and changes to participant numbers, and whether there was a relationship between registration status and source of funding. Materials and Methods Any clinical trial (as defined by ICMJE) published between 1 January 2009 and 31 July 2013 in the top five psychiatry journals adhering to ICMJE guidelines (The American Journal of Psychiatry, Archives of General Psychiatry/JAMA Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry) and conducted after July 2005 (or 2007 for two journals) was included. For each identified trial, where possible we extracted trial registration information, changes to POMs between publication and registry to assess selective outcome reporting, changes to participant numbers, and funding type. Results Out of 3305 articles, 181 studies were identified as clinical trials requiring registration: 21 (11.6%) were deemed unregistered, 61 (33.7%) were retrospectively registered, 37 (20.4%) had unclear POMs either in the article or the registry and 2 (1.1%) were registered in an inaccessible trial registry. Only 60 (33.1%) studies were prospectively registered with clearly defined POMs; 17 of these 60 (28.3%) showed evidence of selective outcome reporting and 16 (26.7%) demonstrated a change in participant

  10. The Impact of Psychopharmacology on Contemporary Clinical Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Gustavo H

    2014-01-01

    Clinical psychiatric evaluations of patients have changed dramatically in recent decades. Both initial assessments and follow-up visits have become brief and superficial, focused on searching for categorical diagnostic criteria from checklists, with limited inquiry into patient-reported symptomatic status and tolerability of treatments. The virtually exclusive therapeutic task has become selecting a plausible psychotropic, usually based on expert consensus guidelines. These guidelines and practice patterns rest mainly on published monotherapy trials that may or may not be applicable to particular patients but are having a profound impact, not only on modern psychiatric practice but also on psychiatric education, research, and theory. PMID:25161065

  11. Understanding the Challenges of Integrating Scientists and Clinical Teachers in Psychiatry Education: Findings from an Innovative Faculty Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martimianakis, Maria Athina; Hodges, Brian D.; Wasylenki, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Medical schools and departments of psychiatry around the world face challenges in integrating science with clinical teaching. This project was designed to identify attitudes toward the integration of science in clinical teaching and address barriers to collaboration between scientists and clinical teachers. Methods: The authors explored…

  12. Digital psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Tang, S; Helmeste, D

    2000-02-01

    The American managed care movement has been viewed as a big experiment and is being watched closely by the rest of the world. In the meanwhile, computer-based information technology (IT) is changing the practice of medicine, much more rapidly than managed care. A New World of digitized knowledge and information has been created. Although literature on IT in psychiatry is largely absent in peer-reviewed psychiatric journals, IT is finding its way into all aspects of medicine, particularly psychiatry. Telepsychiatry programs are becoming very popular. At the same time, medical information sites are flourishing and evolving into a new health-care industry. Patient-physician information asymmetry is decreasing as patients are gaining easy access to medical information hitherto only available to professionals. Thus, psychiatry is facing another paradigm shift, at a time when most attention has been focused on managed care. In this new digital world, knowledge and information are no longer the sole property of professionals. Value will migrate from traditional in-person office-based therapy to digital clinical products, from in-person library search and classroom didactic instruction to interactive on-line searches and distance learning. In this time of value migration, psychiatrists have to determine what their 'distinctive competence' is and where best to add value in the health-care delivery value chain. The authors assess the impact of IT on clinical psychiatry and review how clinical practice, education and research in psychiatry are expected to change in this emerging digital world. PMID:15558872

  13. The Ethics Committees of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and the American Psychiatric Association: history, process, education, and advocacy.

    PubMed

    Sondheimer, Adrian N; Klykylo, William M

    2008-01-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) are the primary organizational embodiments of the specialties of, respectively, general psychiatry and child and adolescent psychiatry in the United States. Professional organizations set guidelines and standards for the expected behaviors of their members. To those ends, ethics committees were established by both the APA and the AACAP. This article describes how each of these organizations, via their committees, produced codes of ethics, and continuously provide relevant educational materials and advocacy efforts. It also reviews the APA ethics committee's responsibility for the evaluation of ethical complaints lodged against members. In closing, the article examines ethical dilemmas lurking on the horizon, beginning to be faced by the specialties and thus likely to be addressed by the committees. PMID:18036488

  14. What is culturally informed psychiatry? Cultural understanding and withdrawal in the clinical encounter

    PubMed Central

    Leseth, Anne Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    What is culturally informed psychiatry? What does it mean, and why is it important? These questions are discussed with a focus on the cultural aspects of the clinical encounter. The DSM-5 Outline for Cultural Formulation was developed as a method of assessing the cultural factors affecting the clinical encounter. It calls for the assessment of the cultural features of the relationship between the patient and the clinician; however, there is a lack of debate about what this means in practice. Clinicians run the risk of withdrawal rather than cultural understanding when facing patients with different cultural backgrounds. Using ethnographic material from anthropological fieldwork, I suggest that the encounter with cultural differences could be a useful point of departure for the clinician to develop cultural understanding. It is argued that recognising the experiences of differences is crucial in strengthening transcultural communication and preventing misdiagnosis in the clinician–patient encounter. PMID:26755952

  15. How Psychiatry Journals Support the Unbiased Translation of Clinical Research. A Cross-Sectional Study of Editorial Policies

    PubMed Central

    Knüppel, Hannes; Metz, Courtney; Meerpohl, Joerg J.; Strech, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Reporting guidelines (e.g. CONSORT) have been developed as tools to improve quality and reduce bias in reporting research findings. Trial registration has been recommended for countering selective publication. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) encourages the implementation of reporting guidelines and trial registration as uniform requirements (URM). For the last two decades, however, biased reporting and insufficient registration of clinical trials has been identified in several literature reviews and other investigations. No study has so far investigated the extent to which author instructions in psychiatry journals encourage following reporting guidelines and trial registration. Method Psychiatry Journals were identified from the 2011 Journal Citation Report. Information given in the author instructions and during the submission procedure of all journals was assessed on whether major reporting guidelines, trial registration and the ICMJE’s URM in general were mentioned and adherence recommended. Results We included 123 psychiatry journals (English and German language) in our analysis. A minority recommend or require 1) following the URM (21%), 2) adherence to reporting guidelines such as CONSORT, PRISMA, STROBE (23%, 7%, 4%), or 3) registration of clinical trials (34%). The subsample of the top-10 psychiatry journals (ranked by impact factor) provided much better but still improvable rates. For example, 70% of the top-10 psychiatry journals do not ask for the specific trial registration number. Discussion Under the assumption that better reported and better registered clinical research that does not lack substantial information will improve the understanding, credibility, and unbiased translation of clinical research findings, several stakeholders including readers (physicians, patients), authors, reviewers, and editors might benefit from improved author instructions in psychiatry journals. A first step of improvement

  16. Child Maltreatment Prevention and the Scope of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Constantino, John N

    2016-04-01

    Child maltreatment is one of the most deleterious known influences on the mental health and development of children. This article briefly reviews a complement of methods that are ready to incorporate into child and adolescent psychiatric practice, by having been validated either with respect to the prevention of child maltreatment or with respect to adverse outcomes associated with maltreatment (and primarily focused on enhancing the caregiving environment); they are feasible for integration into clinical decision making, and most importantly, can be included in the training of the next generation of clinicians. PMID:26980121

  17. Child and adolescent psychiatry: which knowledge and skills do primary care physicians need to have? A survey in general practitioners and paediatricians.

    PubMed

    Lempp, Thomas; Heinzel-Gutenbrunner, Monika; Bachmann, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) play a key role in the initial assessment and management of children and adolescents with mental health problems. However, it is unclear whether current medical education curricula sufficiently equip PCPs for this task. The aim of this study was to investigate, which child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP)-related skills and knowledge PCPs say they require in their daily practice. A questionnaire was generated, employing a modified two-step Delphi approach. Besides socio-demographic items, the questionnaire contained 17 CAP-related knowledge items and 13 CAP-related skills items, which had to be rated by importance in daily practice. The questionnaire was distributed to 348 office-based paediatricians and 500 general practitioners (GPs) in Germany. The overall return rate was 51.3 % (435/848). Regarding CAP-related knowledge, both paediatricians and GPs rated somatoform disorders and obesity as highly important for daily practice. Moreover, paediatricians also deemed regulatory disorders during infancy (e.g. crying, sleep disorders) as important, while GPs assessed knowledge on paediatric depression as relevant. For paediatricians and GPs, the most relevant CAP-related skills were communicating with children and adolescents and their parents. Additionally, paediatricians rated differentiating between non-pathologic and clinically relevant behaviour problems very relevant, while GPs considered basic psychotherapeutic skills essential. The CAP-related knowledge and skills perceived relevant for doctors in primary care differ from the majority of current medical school CAP curricula, which cover mainly typical, epitomic CAP disorders and are predominantly knowledge-oriented. Therefore, medical education in CAP should be amended to reflect the needs of PCPs to improve healthcare for children and adolescents with mental health problems. PMID:26250895

  18. TRAINING IN THERAPEUTIC WORK WITH CHILDREN. CLINICAL APPROACHES TO PROBLEMS OF CHILDHOOD, VOLUME 2. LANGLEY PORTER CHILD PSYCHIATRY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BERLIN, I.N., ED.; SZUREK, S.A., ED.

    THE COLLECTION CONTAINS LECTURES AND PAPERS BY VARIOUS AUTHORS DEALING WITH CHILD PSYCHOLOGY, CONSIDERATION OF CHILD PSYCHIATRY INCLUDES DEFINITION, PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT, FACTORS IN CHILDREN'S PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS, CLINICAL SYNDROMES, CHILDHOOD PSYCHOSES, AND PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOTHERAPY. AN OVERVIEW OF A PHILOSOPHY OF PSYCHOTHERAPY IN CHILD…

  19. Impact of a Metabolic Screening Bundle on Rates of Screening for Metabolic Syndrome in a Psychiatry Resident Outpatient Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiechers, Ilse R.; Viron, Mark; Stoklosa, Joseph; Freudenreich, Oliver; Henderson, David C.; Weiss, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although it is widely acknowledged that second-generation antipsychotics are associated with cardiometabolic side effects, rates of metabolic screening have remained low. The authors created a quality-improvement (QI) intervention in an academic medical center outpatient psychiatry resident clinic with the aim of improving rates of…

  20. Adolescent Psychiatry; Proceedings of a Conference (Douglas Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, June 20, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamsie, S.J., Ed.

    Discussed in a conference report on adolescent psychology are the varieties of behavioral problems and family dynamics by Richard Jenkins, biological growth during adolescence by J.R. Unwin, management of adolescents in a general hospital setting by Henry Kravitz, and educational problems in disturbed adolescents by S.J. Shamsie, Jean-L. Lapointe,…

  1. Foundations of Child Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Emanuel, Ed.; And Others

    Twenty-eight papers examine basic theories and clinical methods in child psychiatry. Theories and methods discussed concern child psychiatry and the World Health Organization, pediatrics, child disturbances, observation, the psychodiagnostic approach, longitudinal research in child development, the comparative approach to early child development,…

  2. Using virtual worlds for role play simulation in child and adolescent psychiatry: an evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Vallance, Aaron K.; Hemani, Ashish; Fernandez, Victoria; Livingstone, Daniel; McCusker, Kerri; Toro-Troconis, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Aims and method To develop and evaluate a novel teaching session on clinical assessment using role play simulation. Teaching and research sessions occurred sequentially in computer laboratories. Ten medical students were divided into two online small-group teaching sessions. Students role-played as clinician avatars and the teacher played a suicidal adolescent avatar. Questionnaire and focus-group methodology evaluated participants’ attitudes to the learning experience. Quantitative data were analysed using SPSS, qualitative data through nominal-group and thematic analyses. Results Participants reported improvements in psychiatric skills/knowledge, expressing less anxiety and more enjoyment than role-playing face to face. Data demonstrated a positive relationship between simulator fidelity and perceived utility. Some participants expressed concern about added value over other learning methods and non-verbal communication. Clinical implications The study shows that virtual worlds can successfully host role play simulation, valued by students as a useful learning method. The potential for distance learning would allow delivery irrespective of geographical distance and boundaries. PMID:25285217

  3. Evaluating the clinical effectiveness of a specialized perinatal psychiatry inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Brandon, Anna R; Pearson, Brenda; Burns, Lynne; Raines, Christena; Bullard, Elizabeth; Rubinow, David

    2014-04-01

    Women experiencing severe perinatal mental illness during pregnancy or postpartum have unique needs when psychiatric hospitalization is indicated. Although many countries have established mother-baby psychiatric units, similar facilities have not been available in the US. In 2011, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill inaugurated the first Perinatal Psychiatry Inpatient Unit in the US. We describe the unique characteristics of the patient population and report clinical outcomes guiding development and refinement of treatment protocols. Ninety-two perinatal patients were admitted between September 2011 and September 2012, and 91 completed self-report measures at admission and discharge. Perinatal unipolar mood disorder was the most frequent primary diagnosis (60.43 %), and 11 patients (12 %) were admitted with psychosis. The data document clinically and statistically significant improvements in symptoms of depression, anxiety, and active suicidal ideation between admission and discharge (p < 0.0001), as assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale. Overall functioning was also improved, demonstrated by a significant mean difference of -10.96 in total scores of the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (p < 0.0001). Data suggest that delivering specialized and targeted interventions for severe maternal mental illness in a safe and supportive setting produces positive patient outcomes. PMID:24201978

  4. Pharmacogenetics informed decision making in adolescent psychiatric treatment: a clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Teri; Sharp, Susan; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2015-01-01

    Advances made in genetic testing and tools applied to pharmacogenetics are increasingly being used to inform clinicians in fields such as oncology, hematology, diabetes (endocrinology), cardiology and expanding into psychiatry by examining the influences of genetics on drug efficacy and metabolism. We present a clinical case example of an adolescent male with anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder who did not tolerate numerous medications and dosages over several years in attempts to manage his symptoms. Pharmacogenetics testing was performed and DNA results on this individual elucidated the potential pitfalls in medication use because of specific pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences specifically involving polymorphisms of genes in the cytochrome p450 enzyme system. Future studies and reports are needed to further illustrate and determine the type of individualized medicine approach required to treat individuals based on their specific gene patterns. Growing evidence supports this biological approach for standard of care in psychiatry. PMID:25710722

  5. Pharmacogenetics Informed Decision Making in Adolescent Psychiatric Treatment: A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Teri; Sharp, Susan; Manzardo, Ann M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2015-01-01

    Advances made in genetic testing and tools applied to pharmacogenetics are increasingly being used to inform clinicians in fields such as oncology, hematology, diabetes (endocrinology), cardiology and expanding into psychiatry by examining the influences of genetics on drug efficacy and metabolism. We present a clinical case example of an adolescent male with anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder who did not tolerate numerous medications and dosages over several years in attempts to manage his symptoms. Pharmacogenetics testing was performed and DNA results on this individual elucidated the potential pitfalls in medication use because of specific pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences specifically involving polymorphisms of genes in the cytochrome p450 enzyme system. Future studies and reports are needed to further illustrate and determine the type of individualized medicine approach required to treat individuals based on their specific gene patterns. Growing evidence supports this biological approach for standard of care in psychiatry. PMID:25710722

  6. Complementary Psychosocial Interventions in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Pet Assisted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chandramouleeswaran, Susmita; Russell, Paul Swamidhas Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    Pet assisted therapy (PAT) is a form of complementary psychosocial intervention used in the field of mental health and disability. The form of therapy has the potential to augment the other forms of psychotherapies and pharmacotherapy. This article is an overview of history and clinical origins of PAT, classification and therapy models, scientific basis, the current use in specific disorders, preventive and diagnostic role as well as the potential risks among children and adolescents with mental health needs with a special focus on the Indian needs. A systematic electronic search strategy was undertaken to identify the intervention effectiveness of PAT in MedLine (PubMed), cochrane database of systematic reviews, high-wire press and Google Scholar. We augmented our electronic search with a search of additional articles in reference lists of retrieved articles, as well as a hand search available journals that were not indexed in any electronic database in consultation with colleagues and experts. To qualify for inclusion, studies were required to meet predetermined criteria regarding study design, study population, interventions evaluated and outcome measured to reduce the publication bias. PMID:24701004

  7. Denoting treatment outcome in child and adolescent psychiatry: a comparison of continuous and categorical outcomes.

    PubMed

    de Beurs, Edwin; Barendregt, Marko; Rogmans, Bente; Robbers, Sylvana; van Geffen, Marieke; van Aggelen-Gerrits, Marleen; Houben, Huub

    2015-05-01

    Various approaches have been proposed to denote treatment outcome, such as the effect size of the pre-to-posttest change, percentage improvement, statistically reliable change, and clinical significant change. The aim of the study is to compare these approaches and evaluate their aptitude to differentiate among child and adolescent mental healthcare providers regarding their treatment outcome. Comparing outcomes according to continuous and categorical outcome indicators using real-life data of seven mental healthcare providers, three using the Child Behavior Checklist and four using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire as primary outcome measure. Within each dataset consistent differences were found between providers and the various methods led to comparable rankings of providers. Statistical considerations designate continuous outcomes as the optimal choice. Change scores have more statistical power and allow for a ranking of providers at first glance. Expressing providers' performance in proportions of recovered, changed, unchanged, or deteriorated patients has supplementary value, as it denotes outcome in a manner more easily interpreted and appreciated by clinicians, managerial staff, and, last but not least, by patients or their parents. PMID:25183369

  8. Development of short message service application for patient-provider communication in clinical psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Kari; Paavola, Teemu; Stenman, Markku

    2010-09-01

    This prospective study is the first one of its kind carried out in Finland, in which a simple technological platform was developed to merge traditional text messaging with an electronic patient information database. The technology has been tested for relaying two-way treatment messages in psychiatry provided by a central hospital offering secondary healthcare. Text messaging was found to be particularly well suited for young people who have to travel to the outpatient clinic over long distances or who face the risk of social exclusion. According to clinicians, the text message reminders sent between the visits, which take place every 1-2 months, can encourage the young people in question to stay in touch more frequently, which will help to improve their relationship with the hospital staff. The project is still in the pilot stage, and so far the most important results concern the development of the operating culture and, surprisingly enough, legal aspects. From the legal point of view, the hospital had to equate text messages with phone communications. For this reason, it was not possible to put the text messages into a separate register and they have not been archived either. The success or failure of the new innovative healthcare solution may, therefore, depend on both technological aspects and legal factors. PMID:20815750

  9. Mass Spectrometry Strategies for Clinical Metabolomics and Lipidomics in Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuro-Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics research has the potential to provide biomarkers for the detection of disease, for subtyping complex disease populations, for monitoring disease progression and therapy, and for defining new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. These potentials are far from being realized because of a number of technical, conceptual, financial, and bioinformatics issues. Mass spectrometry provides analytical platforms that address the technical barriers to success in metabolomics research; however, the limited commercial availability of analytical and stable isotope standards has created a bottleneck for the absolute quantitation of a number of metabolites. Conceptual and financial factors contribute to the generation of statistically under-powered clinical studies, whereas bioinformatics issues result in the publication of a large number of unidentified metabolites. The path forward in this field involves targeted metabolomics analyses of large control and patient populations to define both the normal range of a defined metabolite and the potential heterogeneity (eg, bimodal) in complex patient populations. This approach requires that metabolomics research groups, in addition to developing a number of analytical platforms, build sufficient chemistry resources to supply the analytical standards required for absolute metabolite quantitation. Examples of metabolomics evaluations of sulfur amino-acid metabolism in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology and of lipidomics in neurology will be reviewed. PMID:23842599

  10. [Sleep psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Chiba, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disorders are serious issues in modern society. There has been marked scientific interest in sleep for a century, with the discoveries of the electrical activity of the brain (EEG), sleep-wake system, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and circadian rhythm system. Additionally, the advent of video-polysomnography in clinical research has revealed some of the consequences of disrupted sleep and sleep deprivation in psychiatric disorders. Decades of clinical research have demonstrated that sleep disorders are intimately tied to not only physical disease (e. g., lifestyle-related disease) but psychiatric illness. According to The International Classification of Sleep Disorders (2005), sleep disorders are classified into 8 major categories: 1) insomnia, 2) sleep-related breathing disorders, 3) hypersomnias of central origin, 4) circadian rhythm sleep disorders, 5) parasomnias, 6) sleep-related movement disorders, 7) isolated symptoms, and 8) other sleep disorders. Several sleep disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder, sleepwalking, REM sleep behavior disorder, and narcolepsy, may be comorbid or possibly mimic numerous psychiatric disorders, and can even occur due to psychiatric pharmacotherapy. Moreover, sleep disorders may exacerbate underlying psychiatric disorders when left untreated. Therefore, psychiatrists should pay attention to the intimate relationship between sleep disorders and psychiatric symptoms. Sleep psychiatry is an academic field focusing on interrelations between sleep medicine and psychiatry. This mini-review summarizes recent findings in sleep psychiatry. Future research on the bidirectional relation between sleep disturbance and psychiatric symptoms will shed light on the pathophysiological view of psychiatric disorders and sleep disorders. PMID:24050022

  11. To Use or Not? Evaluating ASPECTS of Smartphone Apps and Mobile Technology for Clinical Care in Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Torous, John B; Chan, Steven R; Yellowlees, Peter M; Boland, Robert

    2016-06-01

    In this commentary, we discuss smartphone apps for psychiatry and the lack of resources to assist clinicians in evaluating the utility, safety, and efficacy of apps. Evaluating an app requires new considerations that are beyond those employed in evaluating a medication or typical clinical intervention. Based on our software engineering, informatics, and clinical knowledge and experiences, we propose an evaluation framework, "ASPECTS," to spark discussion about apps and aid clinicians in determining whether an app is Actionable, Secure, Professional, Evidence-based, Customizable, and TranSparent. Clinicians who use the ASPECTS guide will be more informed and able to make more thorough evaluations of apps. PMID:27136691

  12. Teaching ethics in psychiatry: a one-day workshop for clinical students.

    PubMed Central

    Green, B; Miller, P D; Routh, C P

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we describe the objectives of teaching medical ethics to undergraduates and the teaching methods used. We describe a workshop used in the University of Liverpool Department of Psychiatry, designed to enhance ethical sensitivity in psychiatry. The workshop reviews significant historical and current errors in the ethical practice of psychiatry and doctors' defence mechanisms against accepting responsibility for deficiencies in ethical practice. The workshop explores the student doctors' own group ethos in response to ethical dilemmas, and demonstrates how the individual contributes to and is responsible for the group ethos through participation and also through nonparticipation. The student feedback about the workshop is reviewed. The Toronto Ethical Sensitivity Instrument was used to assess whether or not the workshop altered sensitivity. Compared to a control group the attenders' sensitivity was significantly increased (on Student's t-test p equals or is less than 0.002). PMID:7473644

  13. Clinical assessment of adolescents involved in Satanism.

    PubMed

    Clark, C M

    1994-01-01

    Satanism is a destructive religion that promises power, dominance, and gratification to its practitioners. Unfortunately, some adolescents are seduced by these promises, often because they feel alienated, alone, angry, and desperate. This article explores the psychosocial needs of adolescents that are often met by participation in Satanic worship. Gratification of these needs, when met, may make leaving the cult a difficult and lengthy process. Included is a method for determining the adolescents' level of involvement and an assessment strategy for the therapeutic evaluation process. A brief overview of clinical intervention is also discussed. PMID:8085495

  14. Qualitative Clinical Research with Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mary Lee; Quintana, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of how qualitative research methods (QRMs) can augment the literature in child and adolescent clinical psychology by contributing to theory and hypothesis building. We discuss the utility of qualitative methods in examining the nature of clinical processes and obtaining deeper understandings about quantitative…

  15. The ESSENCE in Child Psychiatry: Early Symptomatic Syndromes Eliciting Neurodevelopmental Clinical Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Co-existence of disorders--including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, tic disorder, developmental coordination disorder, and autism spectrum disorder--and sharing of symptoms across disorders (sometimes referred to as comorbidity) is the rule rather than the exception in child psychiatry and developmental…

  16. The Effect of Clinical Clerkship on Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatry in Karachi, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sajid, Ayesha; Khan, Murad M.; Shakir, Murtaza; Moazam-Zaman, Riffat; Ali, Asad

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Attitudes of medical students toward a specialty is strongly related to their future choice of specialty. In developing countries like Pakistan, where there is a shortage of psychiatrists, there is a need to assess the effect of exposure to psychiatry on medical students. Methods: The authors conducted a survey of fourth-year medical…

  17. Clinical Skills Assessment: The Effects of Moving Certification Requirements Into Neurology, Child Neurology, and Psychiatry Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Dorthea; Brooks, Beth Ann; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Jibson, Michael; Faulkner, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Background A few years ago, when the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology decided to phase out the patient-based oral examinations in its 3 primary specialties, requirements for assessing clinical skills during residency training were instituted. Objective The purpose of this report is to describe the experiences of training program directors and graduates with these new credentialing requirements (labeled CSEs) as well as other effects on the specialties. Methods Surveys were administered electronically in 2012 to all current neurology, child neurology, and psychiatry program directors, and to a convenience sample of graduates who applied for the 2012 certification examinations. Results Response rates for graduates were similar across the 3 specialties but low (28%–33%). Response rates were higher for program directors (53%–62%) and were similar across the 3 specialties. The results indicated that the CSEs were usually administered early in training, were completed toward the end, were often passed on first attempt, generally took place during routine clinical assignments, were used to assess additional competencies, almost always included feedback to the residents, and did not often lead to remediation. Furthermore, the CSEs were perceived to be useful components in the assessment of clinical skills. Conclusions The results obtained from the early implementation of the CSEs suggest that they provide an opportunity to assess clinical skills with the additional benefit of feedback to trainees. Other effects included eventual incorporation into training program requirements, milestones, and related faculty development and research efforts. PMID:26217432

  18. The World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for the treatment of adolescent sexual offenders with paraphilic disorders.

    PubMed

    Thibaut, Florence; Bradford, John M W; Briken, Peer; De La Barra, Flora; Häßler, Frank; Cosyns, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of these guidelines was to evaluate the role of pharmacological agents in the treatment of adolescents with paraphilic disorders who are also sexual offenders or at-risk of sexual offending. Psychotherapeutic and psychosocial treatments were also reviewed. Adolescents with paraphilic disorders specifically present a different therapeutic challenge as compared to adults. In part, the challenge relates to adolescents being in various stages of puberty and development, which may limit the use of certain pharmacological agents due to their potential side effects. In addition, most of the published treatment programmes have used cognitive behavioural interventions, family therapies and psychoeducational interventions. Psychological treatment is predicated in adolescents on the notion that sexually deviant behaviour can be controlled by the offender, and that more adaptive behaviours can be learned. The main purposes of these guidelines are to improve the quality of care and to aid physicians in their clinical decisions. These guidelines brought together different expert views and involved an extensive literature research. Each treatment recommendation was evaluated and discussed with respect to the strength of evidence for efficacy, safety, tolerability and feasibility. An algorithm is proposed for the treatment of paraphilic disorders in adolescent sexual offenders or those who are at risk. PMID:26595752

  19. The World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for the treatment of adolescent sexual offenders with paraphilic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Thibaut, Florence; Bradford, John M. W.; Briken, Peer; De La Barra, Flora; Häßler, Frank; Cosyns, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The primary aim of these guidelines was to evaluate the role of pharmacological agents in the treatment of adolescents with paraphilic disorders who are also sexual offenders or at-risk of sexual offending. Psychotherapeutic and psychosocial treatments were also reviewed. Adolescents with paraphilic disorders specifically present a different therapeutic challenge as compared to adults. In part, the challenge relates to adolescents being in various stages of puberty and development, which may limit the use of certain pharmacological agents due to their potential side effects. In addition, most of the published treatment programmes have used cognitive behavioural interventions, family therapies and psychoeducational interventions. Psychological treatment is predicated in adolescents on the notion that sexually deviant behaviour can be controlled by the offender, and that more adaptive behaviours can be learned. The main purposes of these guidelines are to improve the quality of care and to aid physicians in their clinical decisions. These guidelines brought together different expert views and involved an extensive literature research. Each treatment recommendation was evaluated and discussed with respect to the strength of evidence for efficacy, safety, tolerability and feasibility. An algorithm is proposed for the treatment of paraphilic disorders in adolescent sexual offenders or those who are at risk. PMID:26595752

  20. [The General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy from the perspective of clinical psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    In view of the fact that the suicide rate in Japan has remained high since 1998, the Basic Act on Suicide Prevention was implemented in 2006 with the objective of comprehensively promoting suicide prevention measures on a national scale. Based on this Basic Act, in 2007, the Japanese government formulated the General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy as a guideline for recommended suicide prevention measures. These General Principles were revised in 2012 in accordance with the initial plan of holding a review after five years. The Basic Act places an emphasis on the various social factors that underlie suicides and takes the perspective that suicide prevention measures are also social measures. The slogan of the revised General Principles is "Toward Realization of a Society in which Nobody is Driven to Commit Suicide". The General Principles list various measures that are able to be used universally. These contents would be sufficient if the objective of the General Principles were "realization of a society that is easy to live in"; however, the absence of information on the effectiveness and order of priority for each measure may limit the specific effectiveness of the measures in relation to the actual prevention of suicide. In addition, considering that nearly 90% of suicide victims are in a state at the time of committing suicide in which a psychiatric disorder would be diagnosed, it would appear from a psychiatric standpoint that measures related to mental health, including expansion of psychiatric services, should be the top priority in suicide prevention measures. However, this is not the case in the General Principles, in either its original or revised form. Revisions to the General Principles related to clinical psychiatry provide more detailed descriptions of measures for individuals who unsuccessfully attempt suicide and identify newly targeted mental disorders other than depression; however, the overall proportion of contents relating to

  1. [Gottfried Benn and psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Scherbaum, N

    1994-04-01

    As a young physician the poet Gottfried Benn (1886-1956) gave up a promising career in psychiatry after short period in practice. A psychodynamic analysis of this failure stresses the importance of the relationship of father and son in adolescence for the maturing of ego identity and ego ideal. At the beginning of this century psychiatry was a medical field with strong materialistic and biologistic positions. Benn embraced this position and tried to distance himself from his father, who was a charismatic priest with psychotherapeutic ambition. Benn experienced difficulty in competing with his father and this can be attributed to disturbances in his relationship to his mother in early childhood. The consequence was e.g. a narcissistic vulnerability in adulthood. The contrast of the splendid success in brain research with its inapplicability in routine therapy was characteristic of the state of psychiatry at the time of Benn's failure. PMID:8206462

  2. [Positive psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Timmerby, Nina; Austin, Stephen; Bech, Per

    2016-02-01

    Positive psychiatry (PP) is a field within psychiatry with a particular focus on promoting well-being in people who already have or are at high risk of developing mental or physical illness. PP should be considered a supplement to trad-tional psychiatry and a call for therapists in psychiatry to focus on the person as a whole rather than just as a patient. PP is in line with current national and international health policy focus on promoting positive mental health. PMID:26857411

  3. Focus on Guanfacine Extended-release: A Review of its Use in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Elbe, Dean; Reddy, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review the basic pharmacology and published literature regarding use of guanfacine extended-release (GXR) for the treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents. Methods: A literature review was conducted using the search terms: ‘guanfacine’, with limits set to: Human trials, English Language, and All Child (Age 0–18). Articles pertaining to guanfacine immediate-release or for indications other than attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were not included for analysis. Additional articles were identified from reference information and poster presentation data. Results: Six prospective, randomized controlled trials (RCT) and four open-label trials (including two long-term safety extension trials) were identified for GXR in the treatment of ADHD. All published RCTs showed superiority over placebo on the primary outcome measure. Subgroup analysis of available RCT data showed no efficacy of GXR at any dose in adolescents. Adverse effects in GXR trials were generally mild to moderate. High rates of early discontinuation were observed in long-term open-label extension trials. Conclusion: GXR is an effective option for treatment of ADHD in patients 6–12 years of age as monotherapy, or as adjunctive treatment to psychostimulants. PMID:24516477

  4. Social Skills: Adolf Meyer’s Revision of Clinical Skill for the New Psychiatry of the Twentieth Century

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Adolf Meyer (1866–1950) exercised considerable influence over the development of Anglo-American psychiatry during the first half of the twentieth century. The concepts and techniques he implemented at his prominent Phipps Psychiatric Clinic at Johns Hopkins remain important to psychiatric practice and neuro-scientific research today. In the 1890s, Meyer revised scientific medicine’s traditional notion of clinical skill to serve what he called the ‘New Psychiatry’, a clinical discipline that embodied social and scientific ideals shared with other ‘new’ progressive reform movements in the United States. This revision conformed to his concept of psychobiology – his biological theory of mind and mental disorders – and accorded with his definition of scientific medicine as a unity of clinical–pathological methods and therapeutics. Combining insights from evolutionary biology, neuron theory and American pragmatist philosophy, Meyer concluded that subjective experience and social behaviour were functions of human biology. In addition to the time-honoured techniques devised to exploit the material data of the diseased body – observing and recording in the clinic, dissecting in the morgue and conducting histological experiments in the laboratory – he insisted that psychiatrists must also be skilled at wielding social interaction and interpersonal relationships as investigative and therapeutic tools in order to conceptualise, collect, analyse and apply the ephemeral data of ‘social adaptation’. An examination of his clinical practices and teaching at Johns Hopkins between 1913 and 1917 shows how particular historical and intellectual contexts shaped Meyer’s conceptualisation of social behaviour as a biological function and, subsequently, his new vision of clinical skill for twentieth-century psychiatry. PMID:26090738

  5. [Clinical and therapeutic characteristics of social phobia in French psychiatry (Phoenix study)].

    PubMed

    Pélissolo, A; Huron, C; Fanget, F; Servant, D; Stiti, S; Richard-Berthe, C; Boyer, P

    2006-01-01

    Only few clinical epidemiologic studies have been conducted on social phobia in France to date. It is however a frequent disorder, with often severe alteration of social adaptation and quality of life, and for which effective treatments exist. Thus, it seems really important to further explore how these patients are nowadays identified and treated in psychiatry. It was the objective of the Phoenix study. In this observational multi-center study, 952 psychiatric in- or out-patients, with a primary diagnosis of social phobia according to DSM IV criteria, were included. Numerous diagnostic and psychometric evaluations were carried out, in order to evaluate the comorbidity (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), the intensity of social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale), and various aspects of the functional and emotional impact (Various Impact of Social Anxiety scale, Sheehan Disability Scale, SF-36, Positive and Negative Emotionality scale). The patients were in majority females (57.6%), with a mean age 37.5 years, and with a mean duration of social anxiety disorder 12.5 years. The mean scores of social anxiety on Liebowitz scale was 40.3 +/- 12.6 for the fear factor, and 38.3 +/- 13.6 for the avoidance factor. The generalized social anxiety subtype (anxiety in most social situations) was present in 67.8% of the patients. A major depressive disorder was found in 47.7% of the sample, and the prevalence of agoraphobia was even higher (49.2%). As known in clinical practice and in other studies, the prevalence rates of current alcohol dependence and substances abuse were also important in this population (respectively 10.6% and 12.7%). Mean scores of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) sub-scales were 13.9 +/-3.8 for anxiety and 9.1 +/-4.5 for depression. About 15% of the patients had a history of suicide attempt, and a suicidal risk was present in nearly 40% of the sample. The psychosocial impact and the

  6. [Psychiatry in multiplicity].

    PubMed

    Vijselaar, Joost; Abma, Ruud

    2010-01-01

    According to a widespread interpretation, the history of psychiatry is characterized by a strong opposition between biological and psychological paradigms, which would dominate consecutive periods in history. The image of a swinging pendulum is a popular metaphor to describe this idea. The culture of Dutch psychiatry in the interwar years (1918-1940) seems to gainsay this image. Psychological, biological and socials models of explanation and therapy were used alongside each other without apparent debate and conflict. Influential professors of psychiatry like H.C. Rümke (Utrecht University) even pleaded for a conscious integration of these approaches. Some historians have interpreted this stance as a sign of scientific 'vagueness' and 'anarchy'. Analyzing the work of three major representatives of Dutch psychiatry in the Interbellum (Leendert Bouman, Han Rümke and Lammert van der Horst), the authors (former students of the master Historical and Comparative Studies of the Sciences and the Humanities) shed light on the psychiatric climate of this era, dealing with themes like the openness of psychiatry to other sciences, the interactions of psychiatry and literature, and the relationship between theory and clinical practice. As a result a further qualification of the image of the pendulum is argued for. PMID:22586809

  7. An integrated clinical pharmacology approach for deriving dosing recommendations in a regulatory setting: review of recent cases in psychiatry drugs.

    PubMed

    Younis, Islam R; Rogers, Hobart; Zhang, Huixia; Zhu, Hao; Uppoor, Ramana S; Mehta, Mehul U

    2013-10-01

    Clinical pharmacology as an interdisciplinary science is unique in its capacity and the diversity of the methods and approaches it can provide to derive dosing recommendations in various subpopulations. This article illustrates cases where an integrated clinical pharmacology approach was used to derive dosing recommendations for psychiatry drugs within regulatory settings. The integrated approach is based on the view that once a drug is shown to be effective in the general population, it is reasonable to take into consideration other relevant findings and the use of alternative scientific tools and analysis to derive dosing recommendations in specific populations. The method provides useful means to solve the challenges of the paucity of available data and lead to clear dosing instructions. This in turn expands the benefits of any given drug to all individuals in which the drug is likely to be effective. PMID:23842865

  8. [An inclusive misunderstanding--why noncategorization in special education for people with emotional and social behavior disorders complicates the cooperation with child and adolescent psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Ahrbeck, Bernd; Fickler-Stang, Ulrike

    2015-07-01

    The welcomed coeducation of children and adolescents with and without disabilities is going into dangerous territory since it has become burdened with a number of illusionary expectations. The constraints applied by real-life and meaningful circumstances should be taken into account, especially for children with emotional and social behavior disorders. Practicable prevention and intervention measurements cannot be generated without profound knowledge about disorders among this heterogeneous group of people. Abandoning all previously relevant terminology («noncategorization»), demanded by some radical inclusion advocates, leads to a situation that is helplessly confronted with its duties but lacks the basic skills and the necessary support stemming from an interdisciplinary dialogue. The contact with child and adolescent psychiatry is threatened to the disadvantage of the profession. PMID:26118813

  9. Emerging brain-based interventions for children and adolescents: overview and clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hirshberg, Laurence M; Chiu, Sufen; Frazier, Jean A

    2005-01-01

    Electroencephalogram biofeedback (EBF), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) are emerging interventions that attempt to directly impact brain function through neurostimulation and neurofeedback mechanisms. This article provides a brief overview of each of these techniques, summarizes the relevant research findings, and examines the implications of this research for practice standards based on the guidelines for recommending evidence based treatments as developed by the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). EBF meets the "Clinical Guidelines" standard for ADHD, seizure disorders, anxiety, depression, and traumatic brain injury. VNS meets this same standard for treatment of refractory epilepsy and meets the lower "Options" standard for several other disorders. rTMS meets the standard for "Clinical Guidelines" for bipolar disorder, unipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Several conditions are discussed regarding the use of evidence based thinking related to these emerging interventions and future directions. PMID:15564050

  10. Panic Disorder in Clinically Referred Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerfler, Leonard A.; Connor, Daniel F.; Volungis, Adam M.; Toscano, Peter F., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the frequency and characteristics of panic disorder in children and adolescents who had been referred to a pediatric psychopharmacology clinic. Of the 280 children and adolescents evaluated in this clinic, 35 were diagnosed with panic disorder using a semi-structured clinical interview (K-SADS) and other objective…

  11. Clinical examination, spondylolysis and adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Sundell, C-G; Jonsson, H; Ådin, L; Larsén, K H

    2013-03-01

    Symptomatic spondylolysis is a stress reaction caused by microtrauma during physical exercise, an imaging diagnostic subgroup of Adolescent Low Back Pain (ALBP), found in adolescent athletes. Early diagnosis increases the possibility of healing. Thus, it is important to divide ALBP into subgroups. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical tests that can distinguish symptomatic spondylolysis from other forms of ALBP in order to facilitate early referral for diagnostic imaging. The investigation subjects were a prospective case series with a control group, 25 subjects with ALBP and 13 subjects that had no history of LBP. The 2 groups were examined using the same clinical protocol. MRI of the whole lumbar spine was performed in both the case and control groups and CT investigations of the L4 and L5 vertebrae were performed in the case group. Significant differences between the 2 groups were found in 8 of our clinical tests. No clinical test, alone or in combination, could distinguish between spondylolysis and other forms of ALBP. As 88% of the subjects in the case group had MRI findings and almost 50% had spondylolysis, MRI should be performed at an early age in young athletes with ALBP. PMID:23027361

  12. Child psychiatry in Johannesburg, South Africa. A descriptive account of cases presenting at two clinics in 1997.

    PubMed

    Vogel, W; Holford, L

    1999-09-01

    The records of all new cases presenting to two child psychiatry clinics (at four locations) in Johannesburg during 1997 have been entered into a database and analyzed to assist in the development of services, to improve clinical practice and to facilitate research. Results are presented for demographic data, referral sources, presenting complaints, psychosocial stressors and diagnoses. Initial analysis of the results indicates that further research is necessary into the prevalence of anxiety disorders, the effects of regular exposure to high levels of violence and the effects of multiple substitute parents. The study highlights trends and indicates where strategies are necessary to direct resources and to initiate prevention. The high case load of school-related disorders (including learning disorders and attention deficit disorder) demonstrates the need for the educational authorities to review current educational practices. The absence of a clear referral process from primary to secondary to tertiary results in an overload on the clinics and must be urgently addressed. In addition, intersectoral liaison between health, welfare, education and justice departments must be developed in order for children to receive the best care possible. PMID:10550699

  13. [Placement of children and adolescents following seclusion and restraint actions–a study on family-court approvals of minors in youth welfare, child and adolescent psychiatry and jail according to Para. 1631 German Civil Code].

    PubMed

    Kölch, Michael; Vogel, Harald

    2016-01-01

    According to German law (Para. 1631b German Civil Code), the placement of children and adolescents following seclusion and restraint actions must be approved by a family court. We analyzed the family court data of a court district in Berlin (Tempelhof-Kreuzberg) concerning cases of “placement of minors” between 2008 and 2011. A total of 474 such procedures were discovered. After data clearing and correction of cases (e. g., because of emergency interventions of the youth welfare system taking children into custody according to Para. 42, German Civil Code VIII), 376 cases remained. Of these 376 procedures in the years 2008 to 2011, 127 cases concerned children and adolescents according to Para. 1631b German Civil Code, and 249 procedures were settled either by dismissal, withdrawal or by repealing the initial decision to place the child with restrain or seclusion by means of an interim order or by filing an appeal against the final decision. Of the 127 procedures, 68 concerned girls, who were on average slightly younger than boys (14.5 years vs. 15.1 years). In two thirds of the procedures, the children and adolescents were German citizens. The majority of youths involved were living at home at the time of the procedure, but in 15 % of the case the youths were homeless. Most of the adolescents were treated with restraint in child and adolescent psychiatry. The most frequently quoted reasons for seclusion were substance abuse, suicide risk and running away from home/being homeless. PMID:26864226

  14. Teaching Forensic Psychiatry to General Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that general psychiatry residency training programs provide trainees with exposure to forensic psychiatry. Limited information is available on how to develop a core curriculum in forensic psychiatry for general psychiatry residents and few articles have been…

  15. Factor Structure of the Adolescent Clinical Sexual Behavior Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wherry, Jeffrey N.; Berres, Ashley K.; Sim, Leslie; Friedrich, William N.

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to determine if the Adolescent Clinical Sexual Behavior Inventory-Self-Report conformed to the five-factor scale format that was initially used with a clinical sample that included adolescents referred for sexual abuse evaluations. Participants were 141 teenagers, ages 12-19 (M = 15.11, SD = 1.4), and their…

  16. [Consensus document on the clinical use of melatonin in children and adolescents with sleep-onset insomnia].

    PubMed

    Pin Arboledas, G; Merino Andreu, M; de la Calle Cabrera, T; Hidalgo Vicario, M I; Rodríguez Hernández, P J; Soto Insuga, V; Madrid Pérez, J A

    2014-11-01

    Sleep problems are highly prevalent among our children and adolescents. Its treatment is mainly based on cognitive behavioural therapies and habit modification procedures. However, the use of sleep promoting drugs and substances is widespread without being supported by clinical guidelines. Exogenous melatonin is a neurohormone marketed as a nutritional supplement that is being increasingly used in the management of sleep problems, and with no control over its use. The consensus document is presented on the use of melatonin in sleep-onset insomnia prepared by representatives of the Spanish Paediatric Association, the Spanish Society of Sleep, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Outpatients and Primary Care, the Spanish Society for Adolescent Medicine, the Spanish Society of Child Psychiatry, and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Neurology. PMID:24768501

  17. Training in a Clozapine Clinic for Psychiatry Residents: A Plea and Suggestions for Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenreich, Oliver; Henderson, David C.; Sanders, Kathy M.; Goff, Donald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to develop a model educational clinic and curriculum for psychiatric residents, to increase knowledge and comfort about clozapine prescribing. This matters because clozapine is an important evidence-based treatment for refractory schizophrenia that remains underutilized in clinical practice. Method: This is a…

  18. Translational Epidemiology in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Myrna M.; Brown, Alan S.; Talati, Ardesheer

    2012-01-01

    Translational research generally refers to the application of knowledge generated by advances in basic sciences research translated into new approaches for diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of disease. This direction is called bench-to-bedside. Psychiatry has similarly emphasized the basic sciences as the starting point of translational research. This article introduces the term translational epidemiology for psychiatry research as a bidirectional concept in which the knowledge generated from the bedside or the population can also be translated to the benches of laboratory science. Epidemiologic studies are primarily observational but can generate representative samples, novel designs, and hypotheses that can be translated into more tractable experimental approaches in the clinical and basic sciences. This bedside-to-bench concept has not been explicated in psychiatry, although there are an increasing number of examples in the research literature. This article describes selected epidemiologic designs, providing examples and opportunities for translational research from community surveys and prospective, birth cohort, and family-based designs. Rapid developments in informatics, emphases on large sample collection for genetic and biomarker studies, and interest in personalized medicine—which requires information on relative and absolute risk factors—make this topic timely. The approach described has implications for providing fresh metaphors to communicate complex issues in interdisciplinary collaborations and for training in epidemiology and other sciences in psychiatry. PMID:21646577

  19. Consultation-liaison psychiatry and clinical ethics: a model for consultation and teaching.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J R

    1986-11-01

    The consultation-liaison psychiatrist is often expected to perform the role of clinical ethicist or moral arbiter in the course of responding to psychiatric consultations. This article develops the idea that certain aspects of good consultation-liaison skills make this appropriate and consultation-liaison psychiatrists ought not to shy away from helping with difficult ethical problems. However, a systematic approach to clinical ethics is usually not part of consultation-liaison training. Two simple conceptual models can provide such a systematic approach and can be used in any clinical setting. The two models can also be easily taught and lend themselves to use in structuring teaching or case conferences about clinical ethics. The first model comes from formal philosophy (summarized by Veatch) and is a four-step hierarchy of levels of moral discourse. The other model comes from clinical medicine, based on work by Siegler, and provides another four-point checklist, this time of areas that must be considered in each decision. This article presents each of these four-point frameworks, alludes to the large amount of work that underpins these ostensibly simple models, and offers a case for demonstration/discussion of how the consultation-liaison psychiatrist use the models for structuring clinical ethical decision making and teaching. PMID:3792831

  20. Computational psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Krystal, John H

    2014-11-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia, arise from abnormalities in brain systems that underlie cognitive, emotional, and social functions. The brain is enormously complex and its abundant feedback loops on multiple scales preclude intuitive explication of circuit functions. In close interplay with experiments, theory and computational modeling are essential for understanding how, precisely, neural circuits generate flexible behaviors and their impairments give rise to psychiatric symptoms. This Perspective highlights recent progress in applying computational neuroscience to the study of mental disorders. We outline basic approaches, including identification of core deficits that cut across disease categories, biologically realistic modeling bridging cellular and synaptic mechanisms with behavior, and model-aided diagnosis. The need for new research strategies in psychiatry is urgent. Computational psychiatry potentially provides powerful tools for elucidating pathophysiology that may inform both diagnosis and treatment. To achieve this promise will require investment in cross-disciplinary training and research in this nascent field. PMID:25442941

  1. Computational Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Krystal, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia arise from abnormalities in brain systems that underlie cognitive, emotional and social functions. The brain is enormously complex and its abundant feedback loops on multiple scales preclude intuitive explication of circuit functions. In close interplay with experiments, theory and computational modeling are essential for understanding how, precisely, neural circuits generate flexible behaviors and their impairments give rise to psychiatric symptoms. This Perspective highlights recent progress in applying computational neuroscience to the study of mental disorders. We outline basic approaches, including identification of core deficits that cut across disease categories, biologically-realistic modeling bridging cellular and synaptic mechanisms with behavior, model-aided diagnosis. The need for new research strategies in psychiatry is urgent. Computational psychiatry potentially provides powerful tools for elucidating pathophysiology that may inform both diagnosis and treatment. To achieve this promise will require investment in cross-disciplinary training and research in this nascent field. PMID:25442941

  2. Practice parameters for the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Dulcan, M

    1997-10-01

    These practice parameters review the literature on children, adolescents, and adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). There are three types of ADHD: predominantly inattentive, predominantly hyperactive-impulsive, and combined. Together, they occur in as many as 10% of boys and 5% of girls of elementary school age. Prevalence declines with age, although up to 65% of hyperactive children are still symptomatic as adults. Frequency in adults is estimated to be 2% to 7%. Assessment includes clinical interviews and standardized rating scales from parents and teachers. Testing of intelligence and academic achievement usually are required. Comorbidity is common. The cornerstones of treatment are support and education of parents, appropriate school placement, and pharmacology. The primary medications are psychostimulants, but antidepressants and alpha-adrenergic agonists are used in special circumstances. Other treatments such as behavior modification, school consultation, family therapy, and group therapy address remaining symptoms. PMID:9334567

  3. Satanism among Adolescents: Empirical and Clinical Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steck, Gary M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews literature on adolescent involvement in satanism. Presents results from a pilot study along with a case study to illustrate factors that may alert practitioners to adolescents who are susceptible to satanic influences. Discusses interventions for dealing with this adolescent subpopulation. (Author/NB)

  4. Clinical Assessment of Adolescents Involved in Satanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Cynthia M.

    1994-01-01

    Describes Satanism as destructive religion that promises power, dominance, and gratification and that may seduce adolescents who feel alienated, alone, angry, and desperate. Explores psychosocial needs of adolescents that are met by participation in Satanic worship. Includes method for determining adolescents' level of involvement and assessment…

  5. Satanism among adolescents: empirical and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Steck, G M; Anderson, S A; Boylin, W M

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on adolescent involvement in satanism. Results from a pilot study are presented along with a case study to illustrate factors that may alert practitioners to adolescents who are susceptible to satanic influences. Interventions for dealing with this adolescent subpopulation are discussed. PMID:1471568

  6. [The margin of autonomy of nurses in psychiatry: for a clinical approach in the institution].

    PubMed

    Langellotti, Grégory

    2013-01-01

    In care units, nurses operate in working environments which offer them a margin of autonomy. When they seize upon this opportunity, they invent therapeutics tools. Their creativity as well as the pleasure given in the care contributes to the clinical dynamics within the institution. PMID:24059141

  7. Creating Positive Attitudes: The Effects of Knowledge and Clinical Experience of Psychiatry in Student Nurse Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Sally; Cheng, Bing-shu

    2001-01-01

    Students (n=90) enrolled in mental health nursing in Hong Kong completed the Opinion about Mental Illness Scale before and after the course and clinical placements. Postcourse results showed more positive attitudes toward clients with mental health problems. (Contains 37 references.) (SK)

  8. Childhood Developmental Disorders: An Academic and Clinical Convergence Point for Psychiatry, Neurology, Psychology and Pediatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Significant advances in understanding brain development and behavior have not been accompanied by revisions of traditional academic structure. Disciplinary isolation and a lack of meaningful interdisciplinary opportunities are persistent barriers in academic medicine. To enhance clinical practice, research, and training for the next…

  9. Personality disorders at the interface of psychiatry and the law: legal use and clinical classification

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sally C.; Elbogen, Eric B.

    2013-01-01

    Personality disorders have a complex relationship with the law that in many ways reflects their complexity within the clinical and research communities. This paper addresses expert testimony about personality disorders, outlines how personality disorders are assessed in forensic cases, and describes how personality disorders are viewed in different legal contexts. Reasons are identified why personality disorders are not generally accepted as significant mental illness within the legal system, including high incidence of personality dysfunction in criminal populations, frequent comorbidity of personality disorders making it difficult to determine direct causation, and difficulty determining where on a continuum personality traits should be defined as illness (or not). In summary, the legal system, to a significant degree, mirrors the clinical conception of personality disorders as not severe mental diseases or defects, not likely to change, and most often, under volitional control. PMID:24174894

  10. Comprehensibility of Translated Informed Consent Documents Used in Clinical Research in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Jhanwar, Venu Gopal; Bishnoi, Ram Jeevan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Informed consent forms are required in all clinical trials which are approved by an independent Ethics Committee before practical use in the trials. However, how much the average subject actually understands of the information contained in these informed consent forms is uncertain. Aim: In a cross sectional study, the translated informed consent forms used in psychiatric clinical trials were assessed with respect to their ease of readability. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 30 informed consent forms translated from English to Hindi used in multinational and multicentre psychiatric clinical trials sponsored by different sponsors. We examined consent forms for readability scores and factors that might relate to readability. Results: The mean readability score for the informed consent forms, determined by the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Index (FKGL) was grade levels of 13.66. The ease of readability assessed by the Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES) was 46.08 suggesting significant complexity of the texts. These values carry even more significance when the average years of schooling for India as a whole are 6.2 years. Conclusion: Our results show that the most informed consent forms were too complex to understand by an average adult subject. We suggest reducing this complexity and increasing the ease of readability so those average subjects receive the intended information as exactly as it could be. This can be achieved by few simple measures like improving the deficiencies in translation processes, encouraging the investigators to participate while preparing these forms, and enhanced understanding of the site specific requirements, namely culture, language (dialect), general literacy rate, etc. PMID:21799552

  11. Meta-analysis: a tool for clinical and experimental research in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    González-Castro, Thelma Beatriz; Tovilla-Zárate, Carlos Alfonso

    2014-05-01

    The meta-analysis study is a type of systematic review with strong scientific rigor; it has a number of characteristics that makes it a very useful tool. However, performing and reading meta-analysis could be a challenge-the meta-analysis overcomes the limitation of small sample sizes or rare outcomes by pooling results from individual studies in order to generate a single and better estimate. It also increases statistical power and allows the evaluation of discrepancies among the results of different studies. In this paper, we will present examples to illustrate how psychiatrists can utilize a meta-analysis in clinical and experimental research. PMID:24040998

  12. The current clinical practice of herbal medicine in psychiatry in mainland China: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Saku, M

    1991-12-01

    The current clinical psychiatric practice of herbal medicine in the People's Republic of China was explored by reviewing the literature. The results found in many of the articles were lacking methodological strictness. Some reliable articles reported that certain herbal medicines were effective for psychiatric conditions, and that a combination treatment of modern drugs with herbs was useful for the enhancement of the efficacy and the reduction of both recovery time and side effects. It is suggested that more sophisticated investigations are necessary to corroborate any conclusions concerning the value for herbal medicine in the psychiatric field. PMID:1813678

  13. [Children and adolescents at risk. A Study by the Child Psychiatry Department of Armand Trousseau hospital in Paris].

    PubMed

    Messerschmitt, P; Bohu, D; Charritat, J L

    2004-03-01

    Along the 12 months of 2002, our Child Psychiatry Department received 109 young patients "at risk", under 17 years old. A detailed study of 103 files evaluates the danger they ran in three fields, suicide, abuse and neglect, and psychiatric pathology. With an original "danger scale", the multidisciplinary team completes three assessments: the danger before hospitalisation (background), the present professional action (diagnosis, care, police and justice connections...), estimation of the risk after treatment. In most cases, patients situations are severe, they have lasted for a long time (more than 6 months), and they were already taken on charge. The hospital psychiatric intervention, even for a short time, means to us to interfere whatever the proceedings: medical care, institutions, justice... PMID:14992779

  14. Clinical coaching in forensic psychiatry: an innovative program to recruit and retain nurses.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Gail; Moorhouse, Pamela; Antonello, Carolyn

    2009-05-01

    Ontario is currently experiencing a nursing shortage crisis. Recruitment and retention of nursing staff are critical issues. In response, retention strategies have been developed by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The Late Career Nurse Initiative is one such strategy. This innovative program encourages nurses age 55 and older to remain in the workforce by providing opportunities to use their nursing experience in less physically demanding alternate roles for a portion of their time. The Royal Ottawa Health Care Group has developed a clinical coach program in forensics that matches these veteran nurses with new graduates or nurses new to forensic psychiatric nursing. The program has resulted in retention rates of more than 91% after 1 year. This article provides background about the program and highlights its outcomes. PMID:19489514

  15. Clinical advances in geriatric psychiatry: a focus on prevention of mood and cognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, Harris; Baune, Bernhard; Lavretsky, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The world’s population is ageing in the 21st century at a rate unprecedented in human history, and this will place substantial pressure on health systems across the world along with concurrent rises in chronic diseases. In particular, rates of cognitive disorders and late-life affective disorders are expected to rise. In correlation with ageing, there are robust predictions suggesting rates of age-related cognitive decline and dementia, and geriatric depression, will rise with serious consequences. Clearly innovative prevention and treatment strategies are needed. Here we reviewed the latest promising clinical advances which hold promise for assisting the prevention and treatment of depression and cognitive decline and dementia. PMID:26300035

  16. [Social psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Miéville, C

    1978-01-01

    The author attempts an analysis of some of the socio-cultural elements which have marked the birth of (modern?) psychiatry and which have consequently influenced the education, identity and ethical values of the practitioner who choses to become a psychiatrist. The author draws attention to the problem of the psychiatrist's autonomy by stressing the important relationship between autonomy (or lack of autonomy) and the dominant political ideologies. Such relationship appears more clearly when the psychiatrist uncritically accepts to become "the psychiatric expert" in criminal and civil law, suicide, sex, death, etc., in other words, whenever accepting the role of "managerial technician". It is evident that the psychiatrist cannot renounce the social responsibilities which fall upon him because of his understanding and analysis of human behaviour, but it is also evident that a redefinition of the psychiatrist's role in society is called for. Such a re-definition will be possible only by the permanent exercise of self-criticism, honesty towards oneself, moral integrity and the capacity to differentiate between true autonomy and the illusion of autonomy when operating in the name of an official psychiatry which is often also a vehicle for the enforcement of a political ideology. PMID:694456

  17. Clinical Pharmacology in the Adolescent Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    Veal, Gareth J.; Hartford, Christine M.; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented that adolescents and young adults (AYAs) experience a significant cancer burden as well as significant cancer mortality compared with other age groups. The reasons for the disparate outcomes of AYAs and other age groups are not completely understood and are likely to be multifactorial, including a range of sociodemographic issues unique to these individuals as well as differences between adolescents, younger pediatric patients, and adults in the pharmacology of anticancer agents. Because adolescence is a period of transition from childhood to early adulthood, numerous physical, physiologic, cognitive, and behavioral changes occur during this time. In this review, we provide an overview of the unique developmental physiology of the adolescent and explain how these factors and the behavioral characteristics of adolescents may affect the pharmacology of anticancer agents in this patient population. Finally, we describe examples of studies that have assessed the relation between drug disposition and age, focusing on the AYA age group. PMID:20439647

  18. Computational psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Montague, P. Read; Dolan, Raymond J.; Friston, Karl J.; Dayan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Computational ideas pervade many areas of science and have an integrative explanatory role in neuroscience and cognitive science. However, computational depictions of cognitive function have had surprisingly little impact on the way we assess mental illness because diseases of the mind have not been systematically conceptualized in computational terms. Here, we outline goals and nascent efforts in the new field of computational psychiatry, which seeks to characterize mental dysfunction in terms of aberrant computations over multiple scales. We highlight early efforts in this area that employ reinforcement learning and game theoretic frameworks to elucidate decision-making in health and disease. Looking forwards, we emphasize a need for theory development and large-scale computational phenotyping in human subjects. PMID:22177032

  19. Child Psychiatry: What Are We Teaching Medical Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingle, Arden D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The author describes child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) undergraduate teaching in American and Canadian medical schools. Methods: A survey asking for information on CAP teaching, student interest in CAP, and opinions about the CAP importance was sent to the medical student psychiatry director at 142 accredited medical schools in the…

  20. Clinical experience with adolescent diabetes in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Akanji, A. O.

    1996-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus presenting in adolescents age 10 to 20 years accounts for less than 5% of all diabetes in tropical African countries. Consequently, inadequate attention is paid to the medical and psychosocial problems attendant on adolescent diabetes in those countries. This article highlights our clinical experience in the management of 30 adolescent diabetic subjects who presented consecutively in the diabetic clinic of a major Nigerian teaching hospital. In these patients, adolescent diabetes appeared heterogeneous, comprising classical insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in approximately 80%; the remaining fraction (20%) was contributed variably by malnutrition-related diabetes (MRDM) and an "atypical" form of IDDM. The most common medical complications were recurrent hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis, and infections. About 80% of the patients were poor, and up to two thirds had to withdraw from school or trade because of recurrent illness. One third of the girls had a history of unwanted pregnancies. Almost all (93%) had a history of general rebelliousness and clinic truancy. Therefore, the high prevalence of acute metabolic decompensation may be related to the increased frequency of psychosocial problems, especially poverty, in these patients. It is suggested that agencies in tropical Africa increase welfare facilities for adolescent chronic disease, and also establish and encourage clinics dedicated to adolescent diabetes care. PMID:8776066

  1. Clinical experience with adolescent diabetes in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Akanji, A O

    1996-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus presenting in adolescents age 10 to 20 years accounts for less than 5% of all diabetes in tropical African countries. Consequently, inadequate attention is paid to the medical and psychosocial problems attendant on adolescent diabetes in those countries. This article highlights our clinical experience in the management of 30 adolescent diabetic subjects who presented consecutively in the diabetic clinic of a major Nigerian teaching hospital. In these patients, adolescent diabetes appeared heterogeneous, comprising classical insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in approximately 80%; the remaining fraction (20%) was contributed variably by malnutrition-related diabetes (MRDM) and an "atypical" form of IDDM. The most common medical complications were recurrent hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis, and infections. About 80% of the patients were poor, and up to two thirds had to withdraw from school or trade because of recurrent illness. One third of the girls had a history of unwanted pregnancies. Almost all (93%) had a history of general rebelliousness and clinic truancy. Therefore, the high prevalence of acute metabolic decompensation may be related to the increased frequency of psychosocial problems, especially poverty, in these patients. It is suggested that agencies in tropical Africa increase welfare facilities for adolescent chronic disease, and also establish and encourage clinics dedicated to adolescent diabetes care. PMID:8776066

  2. [Aesthetic/Plastic Surgery in Children as Seen from the Perspective of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kölch, M; Izat, Y

    2015-12-01

    Physical deformities may cause psychological stress and lead to psychological disorders in children and adolescents. On the other hand, the correction of non-pathological conditions is a legal issue in patients unable to consent, a group that is partly made up of minors. This article provides an overview on available evidence on the psychological consequences of physical deformities, psychiatric contraindications for plastic surgery due to psychological disorders, and on the issue of minors' ability to consent. PMID:26562008

  3. Clinical Validity of Prototype Personality Disorder Ratings in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    DeFife, Jared A.; Haggerty, Greg; Smith, Scott W.; Betancourt, Luis; Ahmed, Zain; Ditkowsky, Keith

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research shows that personality pathology in adolescents is clinically distinctive and frequently stable into adulthood. A reliable and useful method for rating personality pathology in adolescent patients has the potential to enhance conceptualization, dissemination, and treatment effectiveness. The aim of this study is to examine the clinical validity of a prototype matching approach (derived from the Shedler Westen Assessment Procedure – Adolescent Version) for quantifying personality pathology in an adolescent inpatient sample. Sixty-six adolescent inpatients and their parents or legal guardians completed forms of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) assessing emotional and behavioral problems. Clinical criterion variables including suicide history, substance use, and fights with peers were also assessed. Patients’ individual and group therapists on the inpatient unit completed personality prototype ratings. Prototype diagnoses demonstrated substantial reliability (median ICC = .75) across independent ratings from individual and group therapists. Personality prototype ratings correlated with the CBCL scales and clinical criterion variables in anticipated and meaningful ways. As seen in prior research with adult samples, prototype personality ratings show clinical validity across independent clinician raters previously unfamiliar with the approach, and they are meaningfully related to clinical symptoms, behavioral problems, and adaptive functioning. PMID:25457971

  4. Intelligence and Birth Order among Children and Adolescents in Psychiatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkcaldy, Bruce; Furnham, Adrian; Siefen, Georg

    2009-01-01

    A sample of around 2,500 adolescents in a child and adolescent psychiatry clinic in the region of Munster, Germany had their intelligence assessed. Family size (total number of siblings within a family) was significantly correlated with intelligence score categories (-0.08 and -0.19 for males and females). First borns and only children displayed…

  5. Correlation between bullying and clinical depression in adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Fröjd, Sari

    2011-01-01

    A literature review of the associations between involvement in bullying and depression is presented. Many studies have demonstrated a concurrent association between involvement in bullying and depression in adolescent population samples. Not only victims but also bullies display increased risk of depression, although not all studies have confirmed this for the bullies. Retrospective studies among adults support the notion that victimization is followed by depression. Prospective follow-up studies have suggested both that victimization from bullying may be a risk factor for depression and that depression may predispose adolescents to bullying. Research among clinically referred adolescents is scarce but suggests that correlations between victimization from bullying and depression are likely to be similar in clinical and population samples. Adolescents who bully present with elevated numbers of psychiatric symptoms and psychiatric and social welfare treatment contacts. PMID:24600274

  6. Strategies for Conducting Adolescent Health Research in the Clinical Setting: The Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center HPV Experience

    PubMed Central

    Braun-Courville, Debra K.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Burk, Robert D.; Strickler, Howard D.; Rojas, Mary; Lorde-Rollins, Elizabeth; Nucci-Sack, Anne; Hollman, Dominic; Linares, L. Oriana; Diaz, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical research with adolescents can be challenging due to issues of informed consent, parental involvement, institutional review board requirements, and adolescent psychosocial development. This presents a dilemma, particularly in the area of sexual health research, as adolescents are disproportionately affected by sexually transmitted infections such as human papillomavirus (HPV). To successfully conduct adolescent research in the clinical setting, one requires an awareness of state statutes regarding adolescent confidentiality and consent for medical care, and a close partnership with the IRB. Case Study In 2007, the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center (MSAHC) in collaboration with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine developed a longitudinal research study to examine the natural history of oral, cervical, and anal HPV in an adolescent female population engaged in high-risk sexual behaviors. We use this research project as a case study to explore the ethical, methodological, and clinical issues related to conducting adolescent health research. Summary and Conclusions Several strategies were identified to promote adolescent study participation, including: (1) building a research team that is motivated to work with adolescents; (2) combining research and patient care visits to avoid duplication of services; and (3) establishing a personalized communication network with participants. Using these methods, adolescent sexual health research can successfully be integrated into the clinical setting. While retaining a prospective cohort of adolescents has its challenges, a persistent and multi-disciplinary approach can help improve recruitment, sustain participation, and acquire critical data that will lead to improved healthcare knowledge applicable to understudied populations of adolescents. PMID:24332677

  7. Obesity management in adolescence: Clinical recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, Roger S; Sacks, Diane

    1998-01-01

    Obesity is recognized by the World Health Organization as an emerging epidemic with significant health risks. This paper outlines the issues for overweight and obese adolescents in Canada, and provides guidelines for providing practical, office-based management in the community. The focus is upon promoting healthy approaches to weight, eating and activity. PMID:20401220

  8. Social, Family and Psychological Predictors of Obsessive-Compulsive Behaviour among Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkcaldy, B. D.; Furnham, A. F.; Siefen, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of "pure" obsessive-compulsive disorders in the clinical population was found to be around 1.2 percent for a clinical sample record--stretching over a 2.5-year period--of around 2500 adolescents in a German child and adolescent psychiatry clinic. Over a 3-month period (time-frame) a sample of 350 new entries to the clinic were given…

  9. Psychiatry Clerkship Students' Preparation, Reflection, and Results on the NBME Psychiatry Subject Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Gregory W.; Fore-Arcand, Lisa; Levine, Ruth E.; Carlson, David L.; Spollen, John J.; Pelic, Christopher; Al-Mateen, Cheryl S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatry clerkship training involves many learning components, one of which is acquisition of scholarly knowledge. The authors investigate the reading materials and learning methods used by clinical clerks in their preparation for the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Psychiatry Subject Exam (PSE). Methods: Clerkship students…

  10. The art of psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    BLOCH, SIDNEY

    2005-01-01

    Psychiatrists would undoubtedly support the notion of promoting such qualities as empathy, sensitivity and caring in the pursuit of good clinical practice. However, cultivating what we may call the "art of psychiatry" is not straightforward, since the qualities that constitute it are elusive. I propose that the means by which we can accomplish the goal of relating empathically and compassionately to our patients and their families is by regarding the humanities and the sciences as of equal relevance and as complementary. The humanities, particularly literature, the visual arts, film and music, are most suited to promoting empathic skills when they are woven into the clinical scenario. Examples are provided to demonstrate how this may be achieved. Were we to succeed in highlighting the art of psychiatry in our educational programs, and as part of continuing professional development, I surmise that our patients and their families would be the beneficiaries. We cannot merely vow to act empathically and sensitively. Instead, we should embark on a lifelong journey through the wonderful world of literature, the visual arts, film and music. The experience will not only prove appealing and engaging, but it will also go far to enrich our personal and professional lives. PMID:16633530

  11. Routine Outcome Monitoring and Clinical Decision-Making in Forensic Psychiatry Based on the Instrument for Forensic Treatment Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    van der Veeken, Frida C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation in forensic psychiatry is achieved gradually with different leave modules, in line with the Risk Need Responsivity model. A forensic routine outcome monitoring tool should measure treatment progress based on the rehabilitation theory, and it should be predictive of important treatment outcomes in order to be usable in decision-making. Therefore, this study assesses the predictive validity for both positive (i.e., leave) and negative (i.e., inpatient incidents) treatment outcomes with the Instrument for Forensic Treatment Evaluation (IFTE). Methods Two-hundred and twenty-four patients were included in this study. ROC analyses were conducted with the IFTE factors and items for three leave modules: guided, unguided and transmural leave for the whole group of patients. Predictive validity of the IFTE for aggression in general, physical aggression specifically, and urine drug screening (UDS) violations was assessed for patients with the main diagnoses in Dutch forensic psychiatry, patients with personality disorders and the most frequently occurring co-morbid disorders: those with combined personality and substance use disorders. Results and Conclusions Results tentatively imply that the IFTE has a reasonable to good predictive validity for inpatient aggression and a marginal to reasonable predictive value for leave approvals and UDS violations. The IFTE can be used for information purposes in treatment decision-making, but reports should be interpreted with care and acknowledge patients’ personal risk factors, strengths and other information sources. PMID:27517721

  12. Clinical usefulness of the screen for cognitive impairment in psychiatry (SCIP-S) scale in patients with type I bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Guilera, Georgina; Pino, Oscar; Gómez-Benito, Juana; Rojo, J Emilio; Vieta, Eduard; Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Segarra, Nuria; Martínez-Arán, Anabel; Franco, Manuel; Cuesta, Manuel J; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Bernardo, Miguel; Purdon, Scot E; Díez, Teresa; Rejas, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background The relevance of persistent cognitive deficits to the pathogenesis and prognosis of bipolar disorders (BD) is understudied, and its translation into clinical practice has been limited by the absence of brief methods assessing cognitive status in Psychiatry. This investigation assessed the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry (SCIP-S) for the detection of cognitive impairment in BD. Methods After short training, psychiatrists at 40 outpatient clinics administered the SCIP three times over two weeks to a total of 76 consecutive type I BD admissions. Experienced psychologists also administered a comprehensive battery of standard neuropsychological instruments to clinical sample and 45 healthy control subjects. Results Feasibility was supported by a brief administration time (approximately 15 minutes) and minimal scoring errors. The reliability of the SCIP was confirmed by good equivalence of forms, acceptable stability (ICC range 0.59 to 0.87) and adequate internal consistency (Chronbach's alpha of 0.74). Construct validity was granted by extraction of a single factor (accounting 52% of the variance), acceptable correlations with conventional neuropsychological instruments, and a clear differentiation between bipolar I and normal samples. Efficiency was also provided by the adequate sensitivity and specificity. Limitations The sample size is not very large. The SCIP and the neurocognitive battery do not cover all potentially relevant cognitive domains. Also, sensitivity to change remains unexplored. Conclusion With minimal training, physicians obtained a reliable and valid estimate of cognitive impairment in approximately 15 minutes from an application of the SCIP to type I BD patients. PMID:19338661

  13. [Inpatient Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents (DBT-A) - 10 years of experience on the psychiatric inpatient unit "wellenreiter"].

    PubMed

    von Auer, Anne Kristin; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Ludewig, Sonia; Soyka, Oliver; Bohus, Martin; Ludäscher, Petra

    2015-09-01

    In April 2004 the inpatient unit "Wellenreiter" at the Vorwerker Clinic for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy in Lubeck (Germany) opened its doors. Despite reservations by the therapeutic community, we implemented a specialized treatment for female adolescents with symptoms of borderline personality disorder - the I;>ialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents (DBT-A). In this article we present the concept, our experiences, and data from the past 10 years of clinical work in this specialized unit. PMID:26373383

  14. Multiple Regression Analyses in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaccard, James; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Johansson, Margaret; Bouris, Alida

    2006-01-01

    A major form of data analysis in clinical child and adolescent psychology is multiple regression. This article reviews issues in the application of such methods in light of the research designs typical of this field. Issues addressed include controlling covariates, evaluation of predictor relevance, comparing predictors, analysis of moderation,…

  15. Internalizing and Externalizing Personality Dimensions and Clinical Problems in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2010-01-01

    Ostensible psychiatric comorbidity can sometimes be explained by shared relations between diagnostic constructs and higher order internalizing and externalizing dimensions. However, this possibility has not been explored with regard to comorbidity between personality pathology and other clinical constructs in adolescents. In this study,…

  16. [How to create a good relationship between a therapist and patient in clinical psychiatry: to know the patient is indispensable for effective treatment].

    PubMed

    Nakao, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    It is essential to create a good relationship between a therapist and patient for effective treatment in clinical psychiatry, while we should focus our attention to know the patient's pathology and develop a proper treatment strategy. For this purpose, I always keep five issues in my mind, as follows. First, a good atmosphere will reduce patients' nervousness and anxiety. Second, listening carefully to patients' descriptions of symptoms. Careful listening will help us to understand the meaning of the symptoms for the patients. Also, we will gain the patients' confidence, as it engenders sincerity. Third, we should clarify the treatment plan and goal. Patients can gain hope and will continue the therapy. Fourth, we should support the patients to receive treatment continuously. Praise their attitude for receiving the treatment, and assigning homework will strengthen their continuousness regarding the treatment. Fifth, the treatment should shift from therapists' leadership to patients' self-direction. PMID:23367842

  17. Psychiatry in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Il; Oh, Keun-Young; Chung, Young-Chul

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports the current status of Korean psychiatry. In 2011, there were 3005 psychiatrists and 75,000 psychiatric beds. There were 84 psychiatric residency-training hospitals in 2011, which produced about 150 psychiatry board-certified doctors annually. As for academic activity, there is the Korean Neuropsychiatric Association, a main association for neuropsychiatry, and 21 other research societies. Psychiatric residency is a 4-year training program, with different objectives for each grade. The Korean health system accepts National Health Insurance. When severely mentally ill patients register as having a mental disorder, they pay only 10% of their total medical costs. Private clinics usually see patients with less severe conditions such as anxiety, mood and eating disorders; general and university hospitals and special mental hospitals often deal with severe conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. One great concern is an increasing trend to depend upon pharmacotherapy and neglect the role of psychotherapy. Additionally, conflicts among medical sectors are becoming fierce as other doctors request abolition of the current law that restricts them from prescribing anti-depressants for more than 60 days. The average hospitalization period of all mental care institutions was 166 days in 2010, substantially longer compared with developed countries. To win the heart of the general public, cutting edge research to improve the quality of treatment for mental diseases, reformation of psychiatric residency training programs, public campaigns to increase awareness of mental health value, and timely reflection on policy decisions should be pursued persistently. PMID:23466121

  18. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addictions treatment. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Methods Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (N = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Results Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Conclusions Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program. PMID:26048457

  19. Psychiatry's contribution to medical ethics education.

    PubMed

    Sider, R C; Clements, C

    1982-04-01

    Two recent trends in medical education, the growth of interest in biomedical ethics and the examination of psychiatry's status in medicine, have important implications for psychiatry. Educators are needed to bring a clinical perspective to bear on ethics instruction, yet psychiatrists risk missing this opportunity. Psychiatrists are uniquely suited to contribute because of their expertise in three areas: an understanding of the affective, nonrational components in ethical thought and behavior, a developmental perspective regarding personal morality, and an appreciation of the rootedness of ethics in the social ethos. Problems with contemporary ethical models of informed consent illustrate the value of psychiatry's contribution. PMID:7065297

  20. Obese and Overweight Children and Adolescents: An Algorithmic Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Shahrzad; Borna, Sima

    2013-01-01

    Obesity in children and adolescents is a hot issue throughout the world. Numerous complications are related to childhood obesity, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, insulin resistance and psychological problems. Therefore, identification and treatment of this problem have an important role in the health system. In this clinical approach, we have provided a general overview of the assessment and management of obesity in children and adolescents, including definitions, history-taking, physical examinations, and laboratory testing for general practitioners and pediatricians. Furthermore, conventional therapies (physical activity, eating habits and behavioral modification) and non-conventional treatments (drugs and surgery options) have been discussed. PMID:24910738

  1. [250 years of English psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Freeman, H

    1996-08-01

    The history of British psychiatry is considered from five main viewpoints: clinical practice, the institutional basis, the legislative basis, lay perspectives of-mental disorder, and European influences. Its philosophical basis can be traced back to the work of the seventeenth-century philosophers. Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. In Scotland, both 'philosophy of mind' and new clinical methods flourished during its Enlightenment; the concept of 'neurosis' was developed by William Cullen. Around 1800, James Prichard's concept of 'moral insanity' became the foundation of modern work on personality disorder and psychopathy. The psychotic illness of King George III, beginning in 1788, led to greater public sympathy for the mentally ill. Attitudes since then have varied, with 'antipsychiatry' becoming very influential in the 1960s. By the mid-eighteenth century, specialised institutions for the mentally ill existed in a number of cities, there were also units attached to charitable general hospitals, but none of these continued after about 1830. The neglect of patients in private madhouses, prisons, and poorhouses led to increasing concern by Parliament, which resulted in the development of public asylums throughout the country. Severe legal restrictions on their activities were modified in 1930 and completely reformed in 1959. From the mid-nineteenth century, French and German influences became increasingly strong, but British universities played no active part in psychiatry until the 1950s. Psycho-analysis did not develop strongly in Britain, where the main contribution was through translation and biography, but some leading analysts came as refugees in the 1930s-as did other psychiatrists from central Europe. Another important influence was that of Adolf Meyer at the Institute of Psychiatry, London, particularly through Sir Aubrey Lewis; physical treatment methods also came to Britain from Europe. In the second half of this century, the most important British

  2. [Clinical forensic examination findings in assault cases among adolescents].

    PubMed

    Bode-Jänisch, Stefanie; Buddeke, Florian; Schulz, Yvonne; Fieguth, Armin

    2010-01-01

    Child and youth criminality has risen markedly over the past 25 years and causes increasing concern to the general public. The clinical forensic examination cases of youth violence victims examined at the Institute of Legal Medicine of the Hanover Medical School and its Oldenburg Branch between 1999 and 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. In all, 55 adolescents (37 females, 18 males; median age 15.5 years) were examined. In most cases the suspect was a close (40.0%) or passing (23.6%) acquaintance. 16 assaults were committed by two or more adolescents jointly. Most of the juveniles were victims of sexual assaults (56.4%). In 15 victims of sexual offences (51.7%) diagnostic findings were obtained on the basis of anogenital injuries and/or the presence of sperm. In summary, the analysis shows that adolescents frequently become victims of sexual assault. In addition, youth violence is often committed in a group. PMID:21254705

  3. Historical aspects of Mexican psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bayardo, Sergio Javier Villaseñor

    2016-04-01

    Mexican psychiatry initiated since pre-Hispanic times. Historically, treatments were a mixture of magic, science and religion. Ancient Nahuas had their own medical concepts with a holistic view of medicine, considering men and cosmos as a whole. The first psychiatric hospital appeared in 1566 and a more modern psychiatric asylum emerged until 1910. International exchanges of theoretical approaches started in the National University with the visit of Pierre Janet. There were other important figures that influenced Mexican psychiatry, such as Erich Fromm, Henri Ey, Jean Garrabé and Yves Thoret. Regarding Mexican psychiatrists, some of the most important contributors to Mexican psychiatry were José Luis Patiño Rojas, Manuel Guevara Oropeza and Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz. This article includes excerpts from "Clinical Psychiatry", a book by Patiño Rojas where he tries to understand and describe the inner world experienced by patients with schizophrenia; also, the thesis conducted by Guevara Oropeza ("Psychoanalisis"), which is a critical comparison between the theories of Janet and Freud. Finally, we include "The study of consciousness: current status" by Ramón de la Fuente, which leads us through the initial investigations concerning consciousness, its evolution, and the contributions made by psychology, philosophy and neurobiology. PMID:27117799

  4. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Online versus Clinic-Based CBT for Adolescent Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Susan H.; Donovan, Caroline L.; March, Sonja; Gamble, Amanda; Anderson, Renee E.; Prosser, Samantha; Kenardy, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The study examined the relative efficacy of online (NET) versus clinic (CLIN) delivery of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in the treatment of anxiety disorders in adolescents. Method: Participants included 115 clinically anxious adolescents aged 12 to 18 years and their parent(s). Adolescents were randomly assigned to NET, CLIN, or…

  5. Practice Parameter for Telepsychiatry with Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Parameter for the usage of telepsychiatry to provide services to children and adolescents is developed using clinical consensus and existing scientific evidence. Telepsychiatry is the result of applying telemedicine, a mode of health care delivery that uses telecommunications, to psychiatry. The parameter's use for determining best practices in…

  6. [(Community) psychiatry, a parenthesis?].

    PubMed

    Bucheron, Bastien

    2015-01-01

    Beyond an a priori antagonism between these two notions, alienism and mental health cultivate analogies as to the place to which they assign mental health. Is community psychiatry not therefore simply a parenthesis in the history of psychiatry? The question is raised therefore regarding the place given to subjectivity and complexity. What must be done to ensure that this parenthesis of community psychiatry does not close? It is perhaps a case of making use of the tools which institutional psychotherapy has developed to keep the community psychiatry spirit alive. PMID:26564487

  7. Only complementary voices tell the truth: a reevaluation of validity in multi-informant approaches of child and adolescent clinical assessments.

    PubMed

    Kaurin, Aleksandra; Egloff, Boris; Stringaris, Argyris; Wessa, Michèle

    2016-08-01

    Multi-informant approaches are thought to be key to clinical assessment. Classical theories of psychological measurements assume that only convergence among different informants' reports allows for an estimate of the true nature and causes of clinical presentations. However, the integration of multiple accounts is fraught with problems because findings in child and adolescent psychiatry do not conform to the fundamental expectation of convergence. Indeed, reports provided by different sources (self, parents, teachers, peers) share little variance. Moreover, in some cases informant divergence may be meaningful and not error variance. In this review, we give an overview of conceptual and theoretical foundations of valid multi-informant assessment and discuss why our common concepts of validity need revaluation. PMID:27118025

  8. Psychiatry and humanism in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Niño Amieva, Alejandra

    2016-04-01

    The authors of the present selection of Latin American Psychiatry texts were characterized by a common deep humanistic attitude. These prolific writers were able to establish or extend the scope of the discipline in which they chose to act, questioning the establishment of rigid boundaries within the framework of a rigorous epistemological reflection. Thus the systematizing spirit of Jose Ingenieros' in the context of positivist evolutionism, resulted in the act of founding a discipline that integrated the biological and the social. In the case of Guillermo Vidal his conception of mental health went beyond the biomedical to consider psychotherapies as an emotional commitment, continence and empathic understanding; with regard to César Cabral his formation and extensive clinical practice resulted in a work defined by the inquiring into the theoretical concepts underlying Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology. This brief selection does not exhaust the issues or the level of ideas and discussions of Psychiatry in Argentina, but constitutes a textual corpus representative of a disciplinary conception understood as scientific and humanistic endeavor. PMID:27102381

  9. [An internist for psychiatry: Carl August Wunderlich (1815 - 1877)].

    PubMed

    Tölle, R

    2012-10-01

    In 19th century Germany C. A. Wunderlich (1815 - 1877) was one of the most important specialists of internal medicine. In addition he was receptive and alive to psychiatry. He translated an important book and held a lecture on psychiatry. He helped his friend Wilhelm Griesinger in the foundation of zhis career and later published his works. Wunderlich brought forward the principal of "clinical method" in medicine in general and particularly in psychiatry. Wunderlich rendered outstanding services to the development of psychiatry in the 19th century. PMID:22890439

  10. Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Other Clinically Significant Body Image Concerns in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyl, Jennifer; Kittler, Jennifer; Phillips, Katharine A.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study assessed prevalence and clinical correlates of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), eating disorders (ED), and other clinically significant body image concerns in 208 consecutively admitted adolescent inpatients. It was hypothesized that adolescents with BDD would have higher levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality.…

  11. Power, change, and 'the culture of psychiatry'

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Sadeq

    2014-12-01

    It is not uncommon to encounter 'the culture of psychiatry' used as a descriptive or even explanatory concept in discussions of psychiatric practices and services, specifically in research addressing cultural aspects of psychiatry. Drawing on data from research on the role of culture in psychiatric services in the Boston area, this paper critically examines the attribution of a 'culture' to psychiatry, which is prevalent not simply in mainstream psychiatric literature, but also in certain lines of cultural psychiatry, specifically those dedicated to political and anti-racist activism. It is argued that the use of such terminology could be misleading as it implicitly attributes a sense of coherence and agency to what may best be described as a set of related discourses and sociopolitical practices. It is further suggested that, given the implications of using such terminology as 'culture' in our discussions of psychiatry as a social institution, a scientific discourse, or a clinical practice, it would be more fruitful to address the analytic concepts of power, meaning, and the sociopolitical functions of psychiatry instead. PMID:25159045

  12. Characteristics of Combined Family Practice-Psychiatry Residency Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, James; Lacy, Timothy J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Whelchel, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate how family practice-psychiatry residency programs meet the challenges of rigorous accreditation demands, clinical supervision, and boundaries of practice. Method: A 54-question survey of program directors of family practice-psychiatry residency programs outlining program demographic data, curricula, coordination, resident…

  13. How Prepared Are Psychiatry Residents for Treating Nicotine Dependence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Fromont, Sebastien C.; Hall, Sharon M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Nicotine dependence is the most prevalent substance abuse disorder among adult psychiatric patients and a leading cause of death and disability. The authors examined the extent to which psychiatry residents are prepared to treat nicotine dependence in clinical practice. Methods: Residents from five psychiatry residency programs in…

  14. Incorporating Active Learning into a Psychiatry Clerkship: Does It Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morreale, Mary; Arfken, Cynthia; Bridge, Patrick; Balon, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medical students' satisfaction with the psychiatry clerkship, sense of preparedness for an institutional Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE), expressed likelihood of choosing psychiatry as a specialty, and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) psychiatry shelf-examination scores were compared after a curriculum based on…

  15. Adolescents with Special Needs: Clinical Challenges in Reproductive Health Care.

    PubMed

    Quint, Elisabeth H

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents with special needs have unique reproductive health care needs related to their physical and cognitive issues. This review discusses some of the most common concerns that are encountered in clinical practice, as the clinician will partner with the adolescent and her family to guide her through the pubertal transition and to help navigate the risks and rights of reproduction. Families often seek anticipatory guidance before menarche on menstrual hygiene, abuse risk and sexuality and can be reassured that most teens with special needs do very well with menstruation. The clinician needs to evaluate the teenager's reproductive knowledge as well her risk for abuse and coercion and her ability to consent to sexual activity, if she requests contraception. Menstrual management is mostly based on the impact of the menstrual cycles on the teenager's life and activities. The adolescents may have a decreased ability to tolerate menses or pain, or experience changes in seizure pattern or altered mood. Hormonal treatment is often used to assist with menstrual hygiene, cyclical mood changes or dysmenorrhea. The goal of treatment can be complete amenorrhea, alleviate pain or regulate and decrease menstrual flow. The unique risks and benefits of hormonal treatment for this special population are highlighted. PMID:26542013

  16. Historicizing Indian psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-04-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically review the emergence of psychiatric knowledge. PMID:20711299

  17. Historicizing Indian psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-01-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically review the emergence of psychiatric knowledge. PMID:20711299

  18. Crime and Psychiatry*

    PubMed Central

    Matcheswalla, Yusuf; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatry and crime are linked in certain ways. On one hand, we have criminal offenders with serious psychopathology; and on the other hand, we have psychiatric patients who may commit criminal offences during the influence of a psychiatric disorder. The psychiatrist in practice has to come in contact with the criminal justice system at some point of time in his career. Forensic psychiatry under whose realm these issues reside is a branch yet underdeveloped in India. The present paper reviews the inter-relationship between crime and psychiatry and the factors involved therein. PMID:25838733

  19. AACAP 2005 Research Forum: Speeding the Adoption of Evidence-Based Practice in Pediatric Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, John S.; Szatmari, Peter; Bukstein, Oscar; Chrisman, Allan; Kondo, Douglas; Hamilton, John D.; Kremer, Charlotte M. E.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: At the 2005 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP), the Academy's Workgroup on Research conducted a Research Forum entitled "Increasing Research Literacy Through the Adoption of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in Pediatric Psychiatry." Method: Forum participants focused on speeding the adoption…

  20. History and current condition of Russian psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Valery N; Gurovich, Isaak

    2012-08-01

    Russian psychiatry has a dramatic history, and until now has been at a transitional stage of development. It is facing problems not only common in world psychiatry, but also specific to eastern Europe, in particular Russia. Starting from the beginning of the 1990s, considerable changes have occurred in psychiatry, especially after 1992 when the law on psychiatric care and guarantees of citizens' rights in its provision was adopted. It became the ideological and legislative basis for reforms. However, there are definite obstacles to structural reforms in psychiatry. They are unfavourable technical conditions in many psychiatric clinics, hypercentralization of psychiatric services, shortage of clinical psychologists and social workers in psychiatry, some difficulties in cooperation between psychiatric and general medical institutions. Economic difficulties in the transition period of Russia's social development prevent the overcoming of these problems. They are being actively discussed and some of them are being gradually solved, e.g. the organization of team work in mental health services, the increasing number of specialists on social work, and the involvement of non-government organizations in psychosocial rehabilitation. PMID:22950772

  1. What Is Psychiatry?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Releases Message from the President Reporting on Mental Health Conditions APA Blogs Advocacy & APAPAC APA Sites APA ... APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents Medical Students International ...

  2. Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Oppositional Defiant Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is a common clinical problem in children and adolescents. Oppositionality and associated types of aggressive behavior are among the most common referral problems in child psychiatry. Grouped among the disruptive behavior disorders, ODD is frequently comorbid with other psychiatric conditions and often precedes…

  3. Genetics in psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Umesh, Shreekantiah; Nizamie, Shamshul Haque

    2014-01-01

    Today, psychiatrists are focusing on genetics aspects of various psychiatric disorders not only for a future classification of psychiatric disorders but also a notion that genetics would aid in the development of new medications to treat these disabling illnesses. This review therefore emphasizes on the basics of genetics in psychiatry as well as focuses on the emerging picture of genetics in psychiatry and their future implications. PMID:25400339

  4. Psychiatry and terrorism.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Frederick J; Gold, Joel; Henderson, Schuyler W; Merlino, Joseph P; Norwood, Ann; Post, Jerrold M; Shanfield, Stephen; Weine, Stevan; Katz, Craig L

    2011-08-01

    Terrorism has dominated the domestic and international landscape since 9/11. Like other fields, psychiatry was not well prepared. With the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attack approaching, it is timely to consider what can be done to prepare before the next event. Much has been learned to provide knowledge and resources. The roles of psychiatrists are challenged by what is known of the causes of, consequences of, and responses to terrorism. Reflecting on knowledge from before and since 9/11 introduces concepts, how individuals become terrorists, how to evaluate the psychiatric and behavioral effects of terrorism, and how to expand treatments, behavioral health interventions, public policy initiatives, and other responses for its victims. New research, clinical approaches, and policy perspectives inform strategies to reduce fear and cope with the aftermath. This article identifies the psychiatric training, skills and services, and ethical considerations necessary to prevent or reduce terrorism and its tragic consequences and to enhance resilience. PMID:21814075

  5. Children's Views Matter Too! A Pilot Project Assessing Children's and Adolescents' Experiences of Clinical Psychology Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael; Russo, Kate

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study explored the experiences and understanding of clinical psychology practices and services of children and adolescents attending clinical psychology outpatient appointments. Fifteen young participants took part in the study. A content analysis indicated that young children and adolescents have an appropriate understanding of the…

  6. [Where is going philosophy of psychiatry ?].

    PubMed

    Basso, Elisabetta

    2016-12-01

    This contribution provides a critical outline of the current trends in the field of "philosophy of psychiatry" by following their developments in the last decade. The first part of the paper focuses on the evolution of this field from a strictly conceptual approach to a perspective more attentive to the social, practical, and clinical dimension of psychiatry. The second part of the paper points out that the need of a mutual commitment of philosophy and psychiatry is perceived according to different ways by the countries involved in this research area. The paper deals especially with the case of France, where the enthusiasm for the "new philosophy of psychiatry" has not had the same impact on the philosophical scene as in the English speaking countries. In conclusion, the paper shows that the field of philosophy of psychiatry stands as a fertile ground for new forms of interaction between the analytic, and the continental philosophical traditions. This interaction takes place, more particularly, as regards such topics as normativity, language, and interpretation. PMID:27550463

  7. Digital applications: the future in psychiatry?

    PubMed Central

    Thibaut, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Digital applications and new mobile technologies can change the nature of the psychiatrist-patient relationship and future clinical practice in terms of diagnosis, follow-up, and treatment, but need to be further studied. This issue explores these new approaches in psychiatry. PMID:27489451

  8. Educating psychiatry residents in neuropsychiatry and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Sheldon

    2013-06-01

    Neuropsychiatry and psychiatric neuroscience should be part of the general psychiatry curriculum so that graduate psychiatrists will be able to allow their patients the benefit of neuroscientifically informed diagnosis and treatment. Current neurology and neuroscience educational requirements for US psychiatry training are reviewed. The draft milestone requirements for clinical neuroscience training as part of the US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System are also provided. Suggestions for the neuropsychiatric and neuroscience content of psychiatry residency training are made, along with a description of pedagogic methods and resources. Survey data are reviewed indicating agreement by programme directors with the importance of neuroscience training and an increase in the amount of time devoted to this area. Faculty staff development in neuropsychiatry and neuroscience literacy will be needed to provide high quality training in these areas. PMID:23859089

  9. Central registry in psychiatry: A structured review

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jyoti; Ramakrishnan, TS; Das, R. C.; Srivastava, K.; Mehta, Suresh; Shashikumar, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Central registry in psychiatry is being practiced in few countries and has been found useful in research and clinical management. Role of central registry has also expanded over the years. Materials and Methods: All accessible internet database Medline, Scopus, Embase were accessed from 1990 till date. Available data were systematically reviewed in structured manner and analyzed. Results: Central registry was found useful in epidemiological analysis, association studies, outcome studies, comorbidity studies, forensic issue, effective of medication, qualitative analysis etc., Conclusion: Central registry proves to be effective tool in quantitative and qualitative understanding of psychiatry practice. Findings of studies from central registry can be useful in modifying best practice and evidence based treatment in psychiatry. PMID:25535438

  10. Pharmacist-Led Medication Reviews to Identify and Collaboratively Resolve Drug-Related Problems in Psychiatry – A Controlled, Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Carolin; Pauly, Anne; Mayr, Andreas; Grömer, Teja; Lenz, Bernd; Kornhuber, Johannes; Friedland, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study This prospective, controlled trial aimed to assess the effect of pharmacist-led medication reviews on the medication safety of psychiatric inpatients by the resolution of Drug-Related Problems (DRP). Both the therapy appropriateness measured with the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) and the number of unsolved DRP per patient were chosen as primary outcome measures. Methods Depending on their time of admission, 269 psychiatric patients that were admitted to a psychiatric university hospital were allocated in control (09/2012-03/2013) or intervention group (05/2013-12/2013). In both groups, DRP were identified by comprehensive medication reviews by clinical pharmacists at admission, during the hospital stay, and at discharge. In the intervention group, recommendations for identified DRP were compiled by the pharmacists and discussed with the therapeutic team. In the control group, recommendations were not provided except for serious or life threatening DRP. As a primary outcome measure, the changes in therapy appropriateness from admission to discharge as well as from admission to three months after discharge (follow-up) assessed with the MAI were compared between both groups. The second primary outcome was the number of unsolved DRP per patient after completing the study protocol. The DRP type, the relevance and the potential of drugs to cause DRP were also evaluated. Results The intervention led to a reduced MAI score by 1.4 points per patient (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.8–2.0) at discharge and 1.3 points (95% CI: 0.7–1.9) at follow-up compared with controls. The number of unsolved DRP in the intervention group was 1.8 (95% CI: 1.5–2.1) less than in control. Conclusion The pharmaceutical medication reviews with interdisciplinary discussion of identified DRP appears to be a worthy strategy to improve medication safety in psychiatry as reflected by less unsolved DRP per patient and an enhanced appropriateness of therapy. The

  11. EPA guidance on improving the image of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Möller-Leimkühler, A M; Möller, H-J; Maier, W; Gaebel, W; Falkai, P

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores causes, explanations and consequences of the negative image of psychiatry and develops recommendations for improvement. It is primarily based on a WPA guidance paper on how to combat the stigmatization of psychiatry and psychiatrists and a Medline search on related publications since 2010. Furthermore, focussing on potential causes and explanations, the authors performed a selective literature search regarding additional image-related issues such as mental health literacy and diagnostic and treatment issues. Underestimation of psychiatry results from both unjustified prejudices of the general public, mass media and healthcare professionals and psychiatry's own unfavourable coping with external and internal concerns. Issues related to unjustified devaluation of psychiatry include overestimation of coercion, associative stigma, lack of public knowledge, need to simplify complex mental issues, problem of the continuum between normality and psychopathology, competition with medical and non-medical disciplines and psychopharmacological treatment. Issues related to psychiatry's own contribution to being underestimated include lack of a clear professional identity, lack of biomarkers supporting clinical diagnoses, limited consensus about best treatment options, lack of collaboration with other medical disciplines and low recruitment rates among medical students. Recommendations are proposed for creating and representing a positive self-concept with different components. The negative image of psychiatry is not only due to unfavourable communication with the media, but is basically a problem of self-conceptualization. Much can be improved. However, psychiatry will remain a profession with an exceptional position among the medical disciplines, which should be seen as its specific strength. PMID:26874959

  12. [Optical Topography as an Auxiliary Laboratory Test for Differential Diagnosis of Depressive State: Clinical Application of Near-infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as the First Trial for Approved Laboratory Tests in Psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Masato

    2015-01-01

    The lack of clinical laboratory tests is a major obstacle in the reliable diagnosis and quantitative treatment assessment and prevention of psychiatric disorders and in the development of patient-centric psychiatric practices. Optical topography has been approved as an insurance-covered auxiliary laboratory test for differential diagnosis of depressive state by Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan since 2014. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), theoretical basis of optical topography, is one of functional neuroimaging techniques that has been increasingly employed in psychology and psychiatry. Because NIRS can detect only cerebral cortex reactivities with low spatial resolution and may suffer from contaminating signals from skin and skull, its data should be interpreted as a global index of cerebral cortex reactivities. Within these limitations, the advantages of NIRS over fMRI such as complete non-invasiveness, small measurement apparatus, high time resolution, and natural examination setting lead it to one of the preferred methods in studies of brain substrates of psychiatric disorders. Two-thirds of the original articles on NIRS application in psychiatry have been published by Japanese researchers. NIRS examination of major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia using a verbal fluency task of only three minutes demonstrated diagnosis-specific characteristics of frontal lobe function. These characteristics have been established as suggesting potential diagnosis of bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in clinically diagnosed major depressive disorder. In order to establish the application of NIRS as clinically useful laboratory tests in psychiatry, auxiliary nature of NIRS examination for differential diagnosis should be properly recognized both by patients and psychiatrists. PMID:26514047

  13. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for ADHD in Adolescents: Clinical Considerations and a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Sprich, Susan E.; Burbridge, Jennifer; Lerner, Jonathan A.; Safren, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Although ADHD in adolescents is an impairing and prevalent condition, with community prevalence estimates between 2% and 6%, psychosocial treatments for adolescents compared to younger children are relatively understudied. Our group has successfully developed an evidence base for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for ADHD in medication-treated adults with ADHD with clinically significant symptoms. In the current paper, we describe an adaptation of this treatment to adolescents, and provide case reports on 3 adolescents who participated in an open pilot trial. The results suggest that the treatment approach was well tolerated by the adolescents and that they experienced clinical benefit. This early report of the approach in adolescents is promising and requires further efficacy testing.

  14. Screening for substance use disorders in neurodevelopmental disorders: a clinical routine?

    PubMed

    Palmqvist, Margita; Edman, Gunnar; Bölte, Sven

    2014-05-01

    Evidence suggests that substance use disorders (SUD) tend to be underdiagnosed in psychiatry. The objective of this study was to investigate whether drug and alcohol screening is a clinical routine in the assessment of two prominent neurodevelopmental disorders, namely ADHD and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We surveyed drug and alcohol screening routines in 34 general child and adolescent (only practice for adolescents, not children, was assessed) and 29 adult psychiatric outpatient departments in Stockholm County, Sweden. Structured telephone interviews mapping SUD screening procedures were conducted with department representatives in charge. Only a minority of child and adolescent departments regularly used SUD screening questionnaires (6 %) in ADHD and ASD assessment, while this was more common in adult psychiatry (55 %). Urine/blood-based toxicology tests were always used in 28 % and sometimes or in case of clinical suspicion in 38 % of the adult units. Such tests were used sometimes or in case of clinical suspicion in 15 % of the child psychiatric departments, but never routinely. Findings reveal that screening for SUD in ADHD and ASD is not an integral part of routine clinical assessments in psychiatry, although increasingly an integral part of many clinical guidelines. Thus, SUD might be underdiagnosed in neurodevelopmental disorders, which could be particularly true for child and adolescent psychiatry settings. PMID:23949101

  15. Anthology of Venezuelan psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Malpica, Carlos; Portilla-Geada, Néstor de la; Téllez Pacheco, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Reception of Psychiatry in Venezuela since the 19th Century to the late 20th Century merits a historical approach. The following work proposes to research some of the very origins of Venezuelan psychiatry and its possible influence on contemporary mental health practice. Through documental research, the early works of local authors from the 19th Century through 20th Century finals: Carlos Arvelo, Lisandro Alvarado, Francisco Herrera Luque, Jose Luis Vethencourt and Jose Solanes, are subjected to study. This journey illustrates a descriptive panoramic view which allows to better comprenhend the current state of our psychiatry. In a brief introduction the most important events are described, since the arrival of Pinel's ideas, followed by the early research paperworks published and the beginnings of the academic teachings of this specialty in Venezuela and displaying the main contemporary research groups thorough the country. PMID:27249236

  16. Challenges to academic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Pardes, H; Pincus, H A

    1983-09-01

    Economic constraints, effects of retrenchments in federal health policy, and increased competition for resources are challenging all sectors of academic medicine. Departments of psychiatry are at particular risk during this era for reasons including the lack of a sound research and research training base in many psychiatry departments; the small number of students entering the field and implications therein for the availability of residency slots in psychiatry; and patterns of allocating resources within academic medical centers which, combined with biases in reimbursement policy toward cognitively based specialties, threaten the economic strength of psychiatric departments. A conceptual model based on marketing principles is proposed to aid in identifying and capitalizing on the unique strengths of the field. PMID:6412571

  17. Molecular psychiatry of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Ullmann, Jeremy F.P.; Norton, William H.J.; Brennan, Caroline H.; Parker, Matthew O.; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their well-characterized neural development and high genetic homology to mammals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a powerful model organism in the field of biological psychiatry. Here, we discuss the molecular psychiatry of zebrafish, and its implications for translational neuroscience research and modeling CNS disorders. In particular, we outline recent genetic and technological developments allowing for in-vivo examinations, high-throughput screening and whole-brain analyses in larval and adult zebrafish. We also summarize the application of these molecular techniques to the understanding of neuropsychiatric disease, outlining the potential of zebrafish for modeling complex brain disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression, post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of larval and adult fish tests, we suggest that zebrafish models become a rapidly emerging new field in modern biological psychiatry research. PMID:25349164

  18. Mental illness: psychiatry's phlogiston.

    PubMed

    Szasz, T

    2001-10-01

    In physics, we use the same laws to explain why airplanes fly, and why they crash. In psychiatry, we use one set of laws to explain sane behaviour, which we attribute to reasons (choices), and another set of laws to explain insane behaviour, which we attribute to causes (diseases). God, man's idea of moral perfection, judges human deeds without distinguishing between sane persons responsible for their behaviour and insane persons deserving to be excused for their evil deeds. It is hubris to pretend that the insanity defence is compassionate, just, or scientific. Mental illness is to psychiatry as phlogiston was to chemistry. Establishing chemistry as a science of the nature of matter required the recognition of the non-existence of phlogiston. Establishing psychiatry as a science of the nature of human behaviour requires the recognition of the non-existence of mental illness. PMID:11579183

  19. Mental illness: psychiatry's phlogiston

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, T

    2001-01-01

    In physics, we use the same laws to explain why airplanes fly, and why they crash. In psychiatry, we use one set of laws to explain sane behaviour, which we attribute to reasons (choices), and another set of laws to explain insane behaviour, which we attribute to causes (diseases). God, man's idea of moral perfection, judges human deeds without distinguishing between sane persons responsible for their behaviour and insane persons deserving to be excused for their evil deeds. It is hubris to pretend that the insanity defence is compassionate, just, or scientific. Mental illness is to psychiatry as phlogiston was to chemistry. Establishing chemistry as a science of the nature of matter required the recognition of the non-existence of phlogiston. Establishing psychiatry as a science of the nature of human behaviour requires the recognition of the non-existence of mental illness. Key Words: Agency • alchemy • behaviour • cause • chemistry • dignity PMID:11579183

  20. Molecular psychiatry of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A M; Ullmann, J F P; Norton, W H J; Parker, M O; Brennan, C H; Gerlai, R; Kalueff, A V

    2015-02-01

    Due to their well-characterized neural development and high genetic homology to mammals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a powerful model organism in the field of biological psychiatry. Here, we discuss the molecular psychiatry of zebrafish, and its implications for translational neuroscience research and modeling central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In particular, we outline recent genetic and technological developments allowing for in vivo examinations, high-throughput screening and whole-brain analyses in larval and adult zebrafish. We also summarize the application of these molecular techniques to the understanding of neuropsychiatric disease, outlining the potential of zebrafish for modeling complex brain disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression, post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of larval and adult fish tests, we suggest that zebrafish models become a rapidly emerging new field in modern molecular psychiatry research. PMID:25349164

  1. Interpersonal Theory and Adolescents with Depression: Clinical Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellin, Elizabeth A.; Beamish, Patricia M.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides mental health counselors with information about the prevalence and course of adolescent depression, other empirically tested treatments for adolescent depression, an explanation of Interpersonal psychotherapy for adolescents (IPT-A) treatment protocol, and results of outcome studies on the effectiveness of IPT-A. Suggestions…

  2. Views of Adolescents and Parents on Pediatric Research Without the Potential for Clinical Benefit

    PubMed Central

    Abdoler, Emily; Wiener, Lori; Grady, Christine

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Critics argue that pediatric research without the potential for clinical benefit is unethical because it treats children as mere means, exposing those who cannot consent to risks for the benefit of others. The present survey was designed to assess whether this claim is consistent with the views of adolescents who actually participate in research, or their parents. METHODS: Interviews were conducted with adolescents participating in research at the NIH Clinical Center or Seattle Children's Hospital, and their parents, from June 2008 through April 2010. RESULTS: Interviews were completed with 177 of 186 adolescent/parent pairs (response rate= 95.2%). Overall, 90% of the adolescents and parents were willing to have the adolescent undergo a few extra blood draws, and 65% were willing to have the adolescent undergo an extra skin biopsy, for research purposes. The vast majority felt that the adolescents were making an important contribution to help others, and 80.8% of the adolescents felt proud to be doing so. Respondents overall were equally willing to have the adolescent face risks to help others in a research study or in a charitable activity. CONCLUSIONS: The views and experiences of these respondents do not support the claim that pediatric research without the potential for clinical benefit treats subjects as mere means. Instead, the findings provide proof of principle for the claim that non-beneficial pediatric research involves a type of charitable activity which offers children the opportunity to contribute to a valuable project to help others. PMID:22966027

  3. [«The child is father of the man» - review of literature on epidemiology in child and adolescent psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Martin; Bösch, Angelika; Hausmann, Armand; Steiner, Hans

    2013-01-01

    One of the goals of epidemiological research is to describe the frequency and patterns in the distribution of diseases among certain groups of a statistical population. According to the literature available, mental disorders in children and adolescents are a common phenomenon worldwide. This article provides a review of the most important and recent international studies on the magnitude, on patterns of distribution, on the course and on gender differences of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. Additional data from scientific textbooks are added to the original articles. PMID:23258437

  4. [Evaluating the current status of anthropologic psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Degenhard, M

    1997-10-01

    Phenomenological psychiatry examines the variety of psychiatric diseases as regular modifications of human feeling tone experience and behaviour, which can be derived approximately from the nature of man as defined philosophically, Interdisciplinary self-conception of phenomenological psychiatry as a science calls for a constant critical dialogue with the philosophy of man and other disciplines of the humanities. The point of departure of phenomenological psychiatry is the mental or affective illness of the individual patient, with which the psychiatrist is acquainted, and reflects in interpersonal encounters in such a way that individual case studies are of central importance in this area of studies. From a methodological point of view two approaches are to be differentiated within the field of research in phenomenological psychiatry: 1. The phenomenological approach is concerned with the analysis of specific patterns of disturbance of the transcendental organisation of psychotic subjectivity. 2. The interpretative approaches are again divided into the so called "Daseinsanalyse" as a hermeneutic access to the inner biography and "Weltanschauung" of the psychiatric patient as well as the attempts of understanding the meaning of psychotic forms of experience. In this context a survey of the current fields of research of phenomenological psychiatry is given which aims at a deeper understanding of the situation of psychiatric patients and which claims to have a strong relevance for therapy. The relevance of such a phenomenological approach for current psychiatry lies in a broadening and sophistication of our experience in clinic and practice. Its main interest lies in the concentration on the patient as an individual and on the existential dimension of forms of mental and emotional diseases. PMID:9445840

  5. Clinical Correlates and Repetition of Self-Harming Behaviors among Female Adolescent Victims of Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyr, Mireille; McDuff, Pierre; Wright, John; Theriault, Chantal; Cinq-Mars, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated self-harming behaviors in 149 female adolescent victims of sexual abuse, first, by determining the rates of nine types of self-mutilating behavior at intake and nine months later and, second, by investigating comorbidity of clinical correlates associated with these behaviors. The adolescents were divided into three groups…

  6. The Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Demographic and Clinical Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    n/a; n/a

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study is a multicenter, randomized clinical trial sponsored by the NIMH. This study is designed to evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of four treatments for adolescents with major depressive disorder: fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, their combination, and, acutely,…

  7. Prevalence and Clinical Correlates of Deliberate Self-Harm among a Community Sample of Italian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerutti, R.; Manca, M.; Presaghi, F.; Gratz, Kim L.

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the rates of deliberate self-harm (DSH) behavior among an Italian adolescent sample, as well as to explore its clinical correlates. On a sample of 234 adolescents in Italian secondary schools (Mean age = 16.47; SD = 1.7) were assessed the DSH as well as externalizing symptoms (including both conduct…

  8. Setting up a Death Row Psychiatry Program

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Death row psychiatry contains a complex set of clinical, ethical, and legal questions. This Forensic Files column makes a case for correctional institutions starting death row programs to address these issues through uniform policies. A list of the relevant issues is provided. Specific issues discussed include death row psychiatric assessment, considering “justifiable” depression, treating for competency to be executed, and balancing boundaries between clinical and forensic work. PMID:21468293

  9. Familial hypercholesterolemia in children and adolescents: A clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    de Ferranti, Sarah D

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disorder of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism leading to high LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated atherosclerosis. The rare homozygous form is associated with physical examination findings and coronary heart disease during childhood. The more common heterozygous form (hetFH) is asymptomatic until adulthood, when those affected develop premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, often in early adulthood. Identification of hetFH is key because of the relatively high prevalence, 1 in 200 to 500, and the opportunity to lower LDL-C and reduce CVD outcomes. Selective screening based on family history can identify affected individuals, but many with hetFH are missed by relying on this strategy and go undiagnosed during childhood, leading to the recommendation by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Expert Panel for universal lipid screening between ages 9 and 11 y and again at ages 17 to 21 y. Diagnosis should lead to treatment with lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy when appropriate because lowering LDL-C in youth has beneficial effects on subclinical atherosclerosis and likely reduces premature CVD events. This article reviews what is known about the epidemiology and pathophysiology of FH as it relates to the care of children and adolescents. Approaches to identification and treatment of FH during childhood are presented, including both recommendations from published guidelines and clinical experience. A clinical case is used to illustrate various points. PMID:26343208

  10. Sex Education for Male Adolescent Sex Offenders in a Group Setting Led by General Psychiatry Residents: A Literature Review and Example in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, R. Gregg; Boyd, Mary S.

    2009-01-01

    Male adolescents have been credited with a significant percentage of sex crimes in recent years. They are a heterogeneous population with offenses spanning the same range found among adult offenders. A lack of interpersonal social skills relevant to intimate relationships and inaccurate knowledge regarding appropriate sexual behaviors contribute…

  11. Child Psychiatry Takes to the Streets: A Developmental Partnership between a University Institute and Children and Adolescents from the Streets of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scivoletto, Sandra; da Silva, Thiago Fernando; Rosenheck, Robert Alan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: High levels of domestic violence, mental illness, and alienation from authorities are associated with high incidence of children/adolescents living on the streets in low and middle income countries. The Equilibrium Project (Programa Equilibrio) was created to facilitate social reintegration through a virtual partnership between an…

  12. Social and Emotional Outcomes of Child Sexual Abuse: A Clinical Sample in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozbaran, Burcu; Erermis, Serpil; Bukusoglu, Nagehan; Bildik, Tezan; Tamar, Muge; Ercan, Eyyup Sabri; Aydin, Cahide; Cetin, Saniye Korkmaz

    2009-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse is a traumatic life event that may cause psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. During 2003-2004, 20 sexually abused children were referred to the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic of Ege University in Izmir, Turkey. Two years later, the psychological adjustment of these children (M…

  13. Psychiatry and the Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainer, John D., Ed.; Altshuler, Kenneth Z., Ed.

    A compilation of presentations from a meeting on psychiatry and the deaf, the text includes the following discussions: background and history of the New York State mental health program for the deaf; an introduction to the program of the New York School for the Deaf; school psychiatric preventive programs; adjustment problems presented by a panel…

  14. Psychiatry in China

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James L.

    1982-01-01

    The author describes his observations of Chinese psychiatry during a three-week medical tour in December 1980. The techniques of treatment in two psychiatric hospitals are discussed, with emphasis upon the utilization of both Western and traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:7143472

  15. [Sophrology and psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Diehr, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A relatively new discipline in the field of human sciences, sophrology seeks, through a physical as well as mental approach, to awaken awareness while energising the patient's resources and capacities. In psychiatry, it favours the development of body awareness and the positive activation of the mental structures, for the greater wellbeing of the patient. PMID:27615699

  16. British psychiatry and its discontents

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Summary Psychiatry in the UK is currently faced with serious difficulties arising from failure in recruiting British doctors and a high rate of early retirement from the specialty. To diagnose the underlying causes, account must be taken of government policies affecting the NHS in general and mental health services in particular. The latter include an excessive run-down of acute hospital beds, as well as projects aimed at changing the clinical role of psychiatrists and promoting mass treatment of milder mental disorders by non-medical personnel. Psychiatrists have reacted to these developments with anger and dismay, but have as yet reached no consensus with regard to either causal factors or appropriate response. Their uncertainty reflects the need for a firmer grasp of the historical background. Modern British psychiatry was effectively created and moulded as an integral part of the NHS. It flourished as long as the public service framework remained intact, but has suffered a decline since the whole structure began to buckle under the pressure of sustained political assaults. A clearer understanding of this vital connection would help to raise psychiatrists' morale and encourage them to establish common ground with medical colleagues and other healthcare professionals. PMID:20929890

  17. Mind-Body Practices and the Adolescent Brain: Clinical Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anup; Newberg, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    Background Mind-Body practices constitute a large and diverse group of practices that can substantially affect neurophysiology in both healthy individuals and those with various psychiatric disorders. In spite of the growing literature on the clinical and physiological effects of mind-body practices, very little is known about their impact on central nervous system (CNS) structure and function in adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Method This overview highlights findings in a select group of mind-body practices including yoga postures, yoga breathing techniques and meditation practices. Results Mind-body practices offer novel therapeutic approaches for adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Findings from these studies provide insights into the design and implementation of neuroimaging studies for adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Conclusions Clinical neuroimaging studies will be critical in understanding how different practices affect disease pathogenesis and symptomatology in adolescents. Neuroimaging of mind-body practices on adolescents with psychiatric disorders will certainly be an open and exciting area of investigation. PMID:27347478

  18. Healthy Minds in Healthy Bodies: Adolescent Clinics and Middle Schools in Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Augustina H.; Fowler, Michelle

    1999-01-01

    Explores the development of a collaboration between a clinic and an urban middle school in a high-poverty, language minority community in Texas. Considers the need for an adolescent clinic and issues of community support, funding, clinic objectives, and problems. (JPB)

  19. Teaching "Global Mental Health:" Psychiatry Residency Directors' Attitudes and Practices regarding International Opportunities for Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkin, Gary S.; Yusim, Anna; Anbarasan, Deepti; Bernstein, Carol Ann

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors surveyed Psychiatry Residency Training Directors' (RTDs') attitudes about the role and feasibility of international rotations during residency training. Method: A 21-question survey was electronically distributed that explored RTDs' beliefs about the value, use, and availability of international clinical and research…

  20. Practice parameter for telepsychiatry with children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kathleen; Cain, Sharon

    2008-12-01

    This practice parameter discusses the use of telepsychiatry to provide services to children and adolescents. The parameter defines terms and reviews the status of telepsychiatry as a mode of health service delivery. Because many of the issues addressed are unique to telepsychiatry, the parameter presents principles for establishing a telepsychiatry service and optimizing clinical practice within that service. The principles presented are based on existing scientific evidence and clinical consensus. Telepsychiatry is still evolving, and this parameter represents a first approach to determining "best practices." The parameter emphasizes the integration of telepsychiatry within other practice parameters of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. PMID:19034191

  1. Neural imaginaries and clinical epistemology: Rhetorically mapping the adolescent brain in the clinical encounter.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Mara

    2015-10-01

    The social work of brain images has taken center stage in recent theorizing of the intersections between neuroscience and society. However, neuroimaging is only one of the discursive modes through which public representations of neurobiology travel. This article adopts an expanded view toward the social implications of neuroscientific thinking to examine how neural imaginaries are constructed in the absence of visual evidence. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted over 18 months (2008-2009) in a United States multidisciplinary pediatric pain clinic, I examine the pragmatic clinical work undertaken to represent ambiguous symptoms in neurobiological form. Focusing on one physician, I illustrate how, by rhetorically mapping the brain as a therapeutic tool, she engaged in a distinctive form of representation that I call neural imagining. In shifting my focus away from the purely material dimensions of brain images, I juxtapose the cultural work of brain scanning technologies with clinical neural imaginaries in which the teenage brain becomes a space of possibility, not to map things as they are, but rather, things as we hope they might be. These neural imaginaries rely upon a distinctive clinical epistemology that privileges the creative work of the imagination over visualization technologies in revealing the truths of the body. By creating a therapeutic space for adolescents to exercise their imaginative faculties and a discursive template for doing so, neural imagining relocates adolescents' agency with respect to epistemologies of bodily knowledge and the role of visualization practices therein. In doing so, it provides a more hopeful alternative to the dominant popular and scientific representations of the teenage brain that view it primarily through the lens of pathology. PMID:24780561

  2. Psychostimulants and psychiatrists: the Trent Adult Psychiatry Psychostimulant Survey.

    PubMed

    Bramble, D

    2000-03-01

    This study reports upon the results of a postal questionnaire survey of 107 adult psychiatrists which investigated their current use of psychostimulant pharmacotherapy and their attitudes towards the diagnostic status of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adulthood. Of the 88 respondents, only a minority of 11 (12.5%) used psychostimulants in their usual practice, albeit very infrequently (one or two prescriptions per year on average). Methylphenidate hydrochloride ('Ritalin') was the prescribers' most popular agent and 'narcolepsy' was the most frequently cited clinical indication for psychostimulants. ADHD appeared to represent only a very small area of current clinical activity and a minority of clinicians expressed the view that it did not exist in adults. It is concluded that psychostimulant therapy is relatively undeveloped in British adult psychiatry and that the clinical speciality generally appears to be unprepared for the growing numbers of adolescents with ADHD who are currently managed by child psychiatrists and who may require ongoing psychiatric care, including psychostimulant therapy. PMID:10757256

  3. The overlapping territories of psychiatry and ethology.

    PubMed

    Kramer, D A; McKinney, W T

    1979-01-01

    There have been numerous attempts since 1965 to stimulate more utilization of ethological methods and concepts in psychiatry. This literature is reviewed and an attempt is made to identify the factors which have inhibited an enhancement of this interaction to date. Most of the previous articles on this subject have appeared in edited collections, rather than in more widely circulated psychiatric or medical journals. Some of the articles focus on ethological theory, others on ethological research findings, and several on clinical analogies between animal and human situations. Regarding the specific way in which to integrate ethological thought into psychiatry, most frequently a phylogenetic approach is emphasized, however a few authors stress methodological considerations. In this paper, it is argued that artifactual differences have been the primary impediment to more interaction between these two rather similar fields. Scientific language difficulties, educational differences, and personal factors are described in this regard. Also, the real differences in approach and methodology, relative interest in normal vs. abnormal behavior, the degree of willingness to accept a phylogenetic approach, and the breadth of behavior being studied by the two fields are described. Examples of current areas of applicability of ethology to psychiatry are given: the attachment systems, early infantile autism, methodology, social psychiatry, and psychiatric education. Of these, the area where the most utilized is that of the occurred and in which the findings of ethology have been the most utilized is that of the attachment systems. Clinically applicable studies based upon the premise that attachment systems exist as understood ethologically are reviewed. These include study of extra physical contact between mothers and infants at birth, the prediction of child abuse and neglect utilizing observations from the immediate postpartum period, the treatment of failure to thrive by

  4. [Diabetes mellitus in childhood and adolescence. Clinical types].

    PubMed

    Sires, J M

    1979-01-01

    It is today's general medical opinion that children's diabetes mellitus was uncommon in the past. It was generally admitted at that time the initail stages were so sudden as to make difficut its early diagnosis. It's increased incidence is at present an alarming truth; however, a parallel increase of diabetic coma or of mulminant types has rather dropped. Diabetes may be diagnosed by just considering the main symptoms at the onset which are polydipsia, polyuria and weight loss. If an early diagnosis is not made, acidosis (abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting) may appear within a few days or weeks followed by coma (Kussamul's acidotic respiration and dehydration). Coma may be avoided by an early diagnosis and a life may be saved. It must be stressed that an important percentage of children and adolescents show a slow and gradual evolution (week or months) of their diabetes: gradual weight loss, sometimes with noticeable polyphagia, occasional enuresis, but without other associated symptoms. Asymptomatic, intermittent glucosurias are also frequent; they vary in magnitude an almost always they appear without ketonuria and with fasting normal glycemia. According to our experience they may precede in weeks or months the clinical manifestations of the disease. Postprandial glycemia is a sure diagnostic resource; it is of greater trustworthines than fasting glycemia; therefore we advise it as a routine diagnostic procedure which we recommend widely. In uncertain situations, the oral glucose tolerance test is advisable. PMID:486258

  5. Managing Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Landry, Bradford W; Fischer, Philip R; Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Koch, Krista M; Harbeck-Weber, Cynthia; Mack, Kenneth J; Wilder, Robert T; Bauer, Brent A; Brandenburg, Joline E

    2015-11-01

    Chronic pain in children and adolescents can be difficult for a single provider to manage in a busy clinical setting. Part of this difficulty is that pediatric chronic pain not only impacts the child but also the families of these children. In this review article, we discuss etiology and pathophysiology of chronic pain, along with variables that impact the severity of chronic pain and functional loss. We review diagnosis and management of selected chronic pain conditions in pediatric patients, including headache, low back pain, hypermobility, chronic fatigue, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, and complex regional pain syndrome. For each condition, we create a road map that contains therapy prescriptions, exercise recommendations, and variables that may influence pain severity. Potential medications for these pain conditions and associated symptoms are reviewed. A multidisciplinary approach for managing children with these conditions, including pediatric pain rehabilitation programs, is emphasized. Lastly, we discuss psychological factors and interventions for pediatric chronic pain and potential complementary and alternative natural products and interventions. PMID:26568508

  6. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE OF LONG-TERM TREATMENT WITH ARIPIPRAZOLE (ABILIFY) IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS AT THE CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC CLINIC 1 IN ROSKILDE, DENMARK.

    PubMed

    Diomšina, Beata; Rasmussen, Pernille Darling; Danilevičiütė, Vita

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to share the clinical experience of the treatment of aripiprazole (Abilify) in children and adolescents. The authors have done a cross-sectional study about Abilify's treatment in children and adolescents with severe conduct problems (high impulsivity, aggression, outward reaction, physical cross-border behavior), high restlessness with ADHD, psychotic and psychosis-like symptoms with autistic disorders, psychosis, and intensive tics with Tourette's syndrome. The authors studied and described patients at the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinic 1 in Roskilde, Denmark, who were treated with Abilify and were patients of the clinic in June 2013. The target group consisted of 33 patients, aged 9-18 years, which were in Abilify treatment during this time. Indications for the treatment and effectiveness of Abilify, Abilify's common doses used in children and adolescents, and the most common adverse effects of Abilify are presented. Abilify was found to be effective, well tolerated and safe for children and adolescents. The dose depends on the complexity of diagnosis (higher doses used in cases of complex diagnosis), on the age (higher doses used in older children, but only in the case of noncomplex diagnoses). Statistical analysis shows that in cases of complex diagnoses, dosage does not depend on age but depends on other factors. It also shows that the effect of treatment is better for those who did not gain weight. PMID:26642668

  7. Clinical Issues in the Assessment of Adolescent Defendants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Dewey G.

    There are many practical difficulties in conducting forensic evaluations of adolescents charged with serious crimes. This paper addresses some of the reasons why adolescent forensic evaluations are problematic and suggests four strategies for establishing and maintaining rapport, based on a practitioner's experience in evaluating adolescents…

  8. Screening and Assessing Adolescent Substance Use Disorders in Clinical Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken C.; Kaminer, Yifrah

    2008-01-01

    The different established screening methodologies and comprehensive assessment techniques used in evaluating adolescents suspected of or known to have substance abuse disorders are discussed. Recommendations and suggestions for establishing standards of training and professional efficiency are also highlighted to treat adolescents with substance…

  9. Some Research and Clinical Perspectives on Adolescent Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilman, Catherine S.

    This paper selects and emphasizes some of the concepts and findings to be found in the author's book, Adolescent Sexuality in a Changing Society. This paper limits itself to various aspects of premarital intercourse among adolescents, including the personality traits of virgins and non-virgins, and the effects of education upon sexual attitudes.…

  10. [Loneliness and adolescence: clinical implications and outlook. Literature review].

    PubMed

    Van Rode, V; Rotsaert, M; Delhaye, M

    2015-01-01

    Loneliness is particularly prevalent during adolescence, a time also associated with the appearance of psychiatric illnesses. Loneliness has been linked to a number of mental health indicators such as depressive symptoms, self-esteem, anxiety, and perceived stress. During adolescence, the individual undergoes major social and personal transformations through redefining their social network thus making them more susceptible to developing mental health problems. Some studies suggest that the risk of mental health problems arises when an adolescent is repeatedly faced with loneliness. Mental health workers should therefore focus on any given adolescent's inability to establish satisfactory interpersonal relationships as a predictive element of loneliness. Thus, it would seem that the development of loneliness prevention and intervention programs aimed at adolescents who are unable to establish satisfactory interpersonal relationships could be of benefit to many. PMID:26749631

  11. Psychiatry in Former Socialist Countries: Implications for North Korean Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Su; Park, Sang Min; Jun, Jin Yong

    2014-01-01

    Very little information is available regarding psychiatry in North Korea, which is based on the legacy of Soviet psychiatry. This paper reviews the characteristics of psychiatry in former socialist countries and discusses its implications for North Korean psychiatry. Under socialism, psychiatric disorders were attributed primarily to neurophysiologic or neurobiological origins. Psychosocial or psychodynamic etiology was denied or distorted in line with the political ideology of the Communist Party. Psychiatry was primarily concerned with psychotic disorders, and this diagnostic category was sometimes applied based on political considerations. Neurotic disorders were ignored by psychiatry or were regarded as the remnants of capitalism. Several neurotic disorders characterized by high levels of somatization were considered to be neurological or physical in nature. The majority of "mental patients" were institutionalized for a long periods in large-scale psychiatric hospitals. Treatment of psychiatric disorders depended largely on a few outdated biological therapies. In former socialist countries, psychodynamic psychotherapy was not common, and psychiatric patients were likely to experience social stigma. According to North Korean doctors living in South Korea, North Korean psychiatry is heavily influenced by the aforementioned traditions of psychiatry. During the post-socialist transition, the suicide rate in many of these countries dramatically increased. Given such mental health crises in post-socialist transitional societies, the field of psychiatry may face major challenges in a future unified Korea. PMID:25395966

  12. Psychiatry in former socialist countries: implications for north korean psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Su; Park, Sang Min; Jun, Jin Yong; Kim, Seog Ju

    2014-10-01

    Very little information is available regarding psychiatry in North Korea, which is based on the legacy of Soviet psychiatry. This paper reviews the characteristics of psychiatry in former socialist countries and discusses its implications for North Korean psychiatry. Under socialism, psychiatric disorders were attributed primarily to neurophysiologic or neurobiological origins. Psychosocial or psychodynamic etiology was denied or distorted in line with the political ideology of the Communist Party. Psychiatry was primarily concerned with psychotic disorders, and this diagnostic category was sometimes applied based on political considerations. Neurotic disorders were ignored by psychiatry or were regarded as the remnants of capitalism. Several neurotic disorders characterized by high levels of somatization were considered to be neurological or physical in nature. The majority of "mental patients" were institutionalized for a long periods in large-scale psychiatric hospitals. Treatment of psychiatric disorders depended largely on a few outdated biological therapies. In former socialist countries, psychodynamic psychotherapy was not common, and psychiatric patients were likely to experience social stigma. According to North Korean doctors living in South Korea, North Korean psychiatry is heavily influenced by the aforementioned traditions of psychiatry. During the post-socialist transition, the suicide rate in many of these countries dramatically increased. Given such mental health crises in post-socialist transitional societies, the field of psychiatry may face major challenges in a future unified Korea. PMID:25395966

  13. [IMPACT OF AGING IN PSYCHIATRY].

    PubMed

    Rubin, Romina; Jauregui, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The changes associated with aging influence the clinical presentation and treatment approach of psychiatric illness. Several psychiatric disorders are common in old age as depression or set of diseases with cognitive impairment requiring geriatric knowledge. In many countries psychiatry of the elderly are called psychogeriatric. Regardless of the name objective of this article is to convey that the psychiatrist who treats patients over 65 years with multiple disorders, with frailty social problems and polypharmacy should have some tools in addition to the thorough understanding of psychiatric illness itself. Teamwork, meet physiological changes of aging and how these affect the response to drugs, atypical presentation of illness and keep in mind the importance of psychosocial and environmental issues both in presentation and in addressing and monitoring of disease. PMID:26650408

  14. Sustainable psychiatry in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Yarlagadda, Sucharita; Maughan, Daniel; Lingwood, Susie; Davison, Phil

    2014-01-01

    Demands on our mental health services are growing as financial pressures increase. In addition, there are regular changes to service design and commissioning. The current political mantra is ‘more and more, of better quality, for less and less, please’. We suggest that mental health services need to actively respond to these constraints and that clinical transformation is needed to move towards a more sustainable system of healthcare. Emphasis on prevention, patient empowerment and leaner, greener services is required alongside more extensive use of technologies. Focusing on these areas will make mental health services more responsive to the challenges we face and serve to future-proof psychiatry in the UK. Services need to be delivered to provide maximum benefit to the health of our patients, but also to our society and the environment. PMID:25505629

  15. Psychiatry and music

    PubMed Central

    Nizamie, Shamsul Haque; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Vocal and/or instrumental sounds combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony and expression of emotion is music. Brain, mind and music are remarkably related to each other and music has got a strong impact on psychiatry. With the advent of music therapy, as an efficient form of alternative therapy in treating major psychiatric conditions, this impact has been further strengthened. In this review, we deliberate upon the historical aspects of the relationship between psychiatry and music, neural processing underlying music, music's relation to classical psychology and psychopathology and scientific evidence base for music therapy in major psychiatric disorders. We highlight the role of Indian forms of music and Indian contribution to music therapy. PMID:24891698

  16. Psychiatry and music.

    PubMed

    Nizamie, Shamsul Haque; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-04-01

    Vocal and/or instrumental sounds combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony and expression of emotion is music. Brain, mind and music are remarkably related to each other and music has got a strong impact on psychiatry. With the advent of music therapy, as an efficient form of alternative therapy in treating major psychiatric conditions, this impact has been further strengthened. In this review, we deliberate upon the historical aspects of the relationship between psychiatry and music, neural processing underlying music, music's relation to classical psychology and psychopathology and scientific evidence base for music therapy in major psychiatric disorders. We highlight the role of Indian forms of music and Indian contribution to music therapy. PMID:24891698

  17. What Psychiatry Means To Us

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, J. K.; Goel, Dishanter

    2006-01-01

    Psychiatry has come up as one of the most dynamic branches of medicine in recent years. There are a lot of controversies regarding concepts, nosology, definitions and treatments in psychiatry, all of which are presently under a strict scanner. Differences are so many that even the meaning of psychiatry varies amongst individual psychiatrists. For us, it is an art to practice psychiatry and give the patient what he needs. Still, it should be practiced with great caution and utmost sincerity towards the patient, based on scientific knowledge and not to be guided by individual conceptions alone. Ethics in psychiatry forms an integral part of its basic concept and meaning, and a tight balance should be maintained between professional advancement and patient benefit. In recent years, the scope of psychiatry has enlarged considerably, with wide ranging influences from Sociology, Anthropology and Philosophy on the one hand, and Neurology and Medicine on the other. PMID:22013340

  18. [Psychiatry as a profession].

    PubMed

    Häfner, H

    2002-01-01

    With reference to Max Weber's timeless analysis of science and politics as a profession, the present paper describes the philosophical background and historical development of the tasks and tools, institutionalization, and socialization of psychiatry as a profession. In the mid twentieth century, psychiatrists' emergence from ideological confinement in asylums, where they were separated from urban culture and medicine in general, finally allowed them to benefit from accumulating knowledge and technological progress in the field of medicine. After its transition from a custodial to a therapeutic discipline, psychiatry has acquired a variety of new fields of action and duties that require a high degree of expertise on psychological and biological levels. At the same time, people have increasingly come to expect relief not only from disease, but also from manifold problems of everyday life. As a consequence, there has been an inflationary growth of professional psychiatric and psychotherapeutic and nonprofessional services. The professional requirements that psychiatrists should meet have also increased quantitatively and qualitatively in the wake of the historical change from a caring, paternalistic attitude towards the mentally ill to a therapeutic partnership. To a greater degree than physicians working in other medical fields, psychiatrists get personally involved with their patients. As a consequence, the mental burden of their profession is at times immense. For this reason, the ethics of a medical profession has special implications for psychiatrists. The fascinating advances in therapeutic methods, neurobiological knowledge, and the increasingly differentiated diagnostic tools, e.g., noninvasive investigation of the morphology and functioning of the brain, have turned psychiatry into one of the most interesting contemporary professions. Psychiatry is now facing an enormous challenge of meeting the standards of expertise. PMID:11975061

  19. Mumbai Psychiatry: Current Obstacles*

    PubMed Central

    Bagadia, Sanjay V.

    2015-01-01

    Mumbai, like any other Metro city, has its own share of contentious issues influencing psychiatric management. These could be old ongoing issues like myths about medications, electroconvulsive therapy and counselling, or newer ones like our stand on homosexuality and crime related to psychosocial factors. A range of these issues is considered in this paper along with some possible solutions. Getting due credit and status for psychiatry as a medical branch is also a challenge we need to address. PMID:25838737

  20. PSYCHIATRY AND THE LAW

    PubMed Central

    Zeifert, Mark

    1957-01-01

    In Rex vs. Arnold (1724) it was held that to avail himself of the defense of insanity “a man must be totally deprived of his understanding and memory, so as not to know what he is doing, no more than an infant, a brute, or a wild beast.” Although there has been some modification of this formula in most jurisdictions, the courts still operate under the McNaghten Rule (1843) which is no more logical and actually is more difficult to apply. That such a situation exists in 1956 is a reflection on the indifference of society—and particularly the courts which it elects—as well as on the failure of modern psychiatry to communicate its viewpoint to society. If we are to correct the sad formulae of the “right and wrong” and “policeman at the elbow” tests, we must have more study and better methods of communication in this area. A similar state of confusion exists in the methods of commitment of mentally ill people to psychiatric hospitals. The methods prescribed by law are archaic and cruel—and again reflect the failure of modern psychiatry to communicate its understanding to the legislatures and courts. There are many other areas of conflict between law (which looks to the past for its insights) and psychiatry (which seeks for its concepts in the current scientific advances). PMID:13383383

  1. Beyond a diagnosis: The experience of depression among clinically-referred adolescents.

    PubMed

    Midgley, Nick; Parkinson, Sally; Holmes, Josh; Stapley, Emily; Eatough, Virginia; Target, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Policy-makers have identified an urgent need to improve our ability to detect and diagnose depression in adolescents. This study aims to explore the lived experience of depression in clinically referred adolescents. 77 adolescents, aged between 11 and 17 with moderate to severe depression, were interviewed as part of a randomised controlled trial, using the Expectations of Therapy Interview. Data were analysed qualitatively using framework analysis, with a focus on how the adolescents spoke about their depression. The study identified five themes: 1) Misery, despair and tears; 2) Anger and violence towards self and others; 3) A bleak view of everything; 4) Isolation and cutting off from the world; and 5) The impact on education. Researchers and policy-makers need to develop an understanding of depression grounded in the experiences of adolescents to improve detection and diagnosis of depression. PMID:26325067

  2. Substance Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: Self-Report, Health Care Providers' Clinical Impressions, and Urine Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Laurent; Pihet, Sandrine; Passini, Christina Moses; Feijo, Isabelle; Camus, Didier; Eap, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of substance use among adolescent psychiatric outpatients using a variety of data sources. Method: Using a questionnaire, 3-month prevalence of substance use data were obtained from 50 adolescents and their health care providers. Adolescents' self-reports and providers' clinical impressions were…

  3. Adult Attachment Interview differentiates adolescents with Childhood Sexual Abuse from those with clinical depression and non-clinical controls.

    PubMed

    van Hoof, Marie-José; van Lang, Natasja D J; Speekenbrink, Sandra; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Vermeiren, Robert R J M

    2015-01-01

    Although attachment representation is considered to be disturbed in traumatized adolescents, it is not known whether this is specific for trauma, as comparative studies with other clinical groups are lacking. Therefore, attachment representation was studied by means of the Adult Attachment Interview in adolescents with Childhood Sexual Abuse (CSA) (N = 21), clinical depression (N = 28) and non-clinical controls (N = 28). Coherence of mind and unresolved loss or trauma, as well as the disorganized attachment classification differentiated the CSA group from the clinical depression group and controls, over and above age, IQ, and psychiatric symptomatology. In the current era of sustained criticism on criteria-based classification, this may well carry substantial clinical relevance. If attachment is a general risk or vulnerability factor underlying specific psychopathology, this may guide diagnostic assessment as well as treatment. PMID:26047034

  4. Health-related quality of life in a clinical sample of obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity affects ethnic minority groups disproportionately, especially in the pediatric population. However, little is known about the impact of obesity on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children and adolescents from mixed-ethnic samples. The purpose of this study was to: 1) measure HRQoL in a mixed-ethnic clinical sample of obese children and adolescents, 2) compare HRQoL assessments in obese participants and healthy controls, and 3) compare HRQoL in obese children and adolescents according to their pubertal status. Methods A clinical sample of children and adolescents with obesity (n = 96) and healthy children and adolescents attending local schools (n = 444) completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL; UK version 4). Age-appropriate versions were self-administered by children and adolescents aged 8-18 years, and interview administered to children aged 5-7 years. Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, gender, pubertal status, and ethnicity were used to compare the PedsQL scores of the two samples. Results The clinical sample of obese children and adolescents had poorer HRQoL scores on all dimensions of the PedsQL compared to the healthy controls (p < 0.005). Subsequent analyses also demonstrated that in this sample of mixed-ethnic children and adolescents, prepubescent obese children achieved the poorest scores in the emotional functioning dimension. Conclusions Obesity significantly impacts on physical, emotional, social and school functioning of mixed-ethnic children and adolescents. Clinicians need to be aware of the significant impact of obesity on all aspects of functioning. More effort is required to target interventions to improve the quality of life of children with obesity. PMID:21078146

  5. [Medical students and psychiatry. A survey of students' opinion].

    PubMed

    Giberti, F; Corsini, G; Rovida, S

    1994-06-01

    In the last years research on the didactics of Psychiatry and opinions of medical students on Psychiatry has gained great interest. The authors think that this research could be useful for the improvement of didactics, for better understanding the meanings of professional choice, the identity of psychiatrist and their relationship with colleagues in other medical field. The goal of this research work was a preliminary survey of Genoese University Medical Student's opinions about psychiatry didactics, and choice of specialization. A questionnaire was submitted to all the students who passed Clinical Psychiatry examination in the period from November 1987 to December 1988. The students were divided in two randomized groups: the first group of students (224) was submitted to the questionnaire immediately after Clinical Psychiatry examination; while to the second group of students (66) the questionnaire was mailed. The aim of the questions was to assess the student's opinions on psychiatry, psychoanalysis, psychotherapy, the career they wanted to take up, and the difficulties of studying psychiatry: 69% of the students of the first group and 42% of the students of the second group answered the questionnaire. Female students answered that they preferred psychiatric specialization more than their male colleagues did, but the difference has no statistical importance. In most cases, the students who answered that they have taken into account psychiatry as a choice of specialisation, are more interested in medical specialties (primary care, etc.) than in surgical specialties. Most of the medical students declare some emotional troubles (anxiety, sleeplessness, problem in social relations).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7934737

  6. “Youth friendly” clinics: Considerations for linking and engaging HIV-infected adolescents into care

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Amanda E.; Philbin, Morgan M.; Duval, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Linkage and engagement in care are critical corollaries to the health of HIV-infected adolescents. The adolescent HIV epidemic and adolescents’ unique barriers to care necessitates innovation in the provision of care, including the consideration of the clinical experience. Little research has addressed how “youth friendly” clinics may influence care retention for HIV-infected youth. We conducted 124 interviews with providers, outreach workers, and case managers, at 15 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network clinics. Photographs of each clinic documented the characteristics of the physical space. Constant comparison and content and visual narrative methods were utilized for data analysis. Three elements of youth friendliness were identified for clinics serving HIV-infected youth, including: (1) role of target population (e.g., pediatric, adolescent, HIV); (2) clinics’ physical environment; and (3) clinics’ social environment. Working to create ‘youth friendly’ clinics through changes in physical (e.g., space, entertainment, and educational materials) and social (e.g., staff training related to development, gender, sexual orientation) environments may help reduce HIV-infected adolescents’ unique barriers to care engagement. The integration of clinic design and staff training within the organization of a clinical program is helpful in meeting the specialized needs of HIV-infected youth. PMID:23782040

  7. An adolescent vampire cult in rural America: clinical issues and case study.

    PubMed

    Miller, T W; Veltkamp, L J; Kraus, R F; Lane, T; Heister, T

    1999-01-01

    The emergence of cult related activities in rural America are examined. Cults and their attraction to adolescents are addressed as are methods of cult indoctrination and a profile of cult members and their leader. Clinical management along with a rationale for the attraction of some adolescents to cults are discussed. A case study of a vampire cult and the psychopathology identified in the leader of the cult are provided. Import for clinicians is offered. PMID:10080963

  8. Financing Academic Departments of Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptzin, Benjamin; Meyer, Roger E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the many financial challenges facing academic departments of psychiatry and the resulting opportunities that may arise. Method: The authors review the history of financial challenges, the current economic situation, and what may lie ahead for academic departments of psychiatry. Results: The current environment has…

  9. [Two Nobel prizes for psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Knezević, Aleksandar; Knezević, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    It was pointed out that both Nobel prizes for medicine in the field of psychiatry have lost their importance in contemporary medicine. Modern achievements in psychiatry have suppresed both psychosurgery of Egas Moniz and malaria treatment of Wagner-Jauregg as methods in the treatment of mental diseases. PMID:19368289

  10. DSM IV, Culture and Child Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Cécile; Measham, Toby; Bathiche-Suidan, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Objective The expanding cultural diversity of children and families with mental health needs raises questions about the cultural appropriateness of diagnostic classifications like the DSM IV. This paper briefly surveys the literature on culture and DSM-IV in child psychiatry, presenting ADHD as an example of the relationship between diagnostic categories and cultural issues, and illustrating some of the clinical dilemmas of differential diagnosis in a migration context. Method a literature review was performed and analysed, and a case vignette was constructed to illustrate key points. Results The literature does not provide a definite answer about the DSM IV cultural validity in child psychiatry. On the one hand it suggests that all diagnostic categories may be found universally. On the other, variations in prevalence rates support the hypothesis of a role for social and cultural factors in the diagnostic process. The clinical formulation may be a useful tool to address the validity issue by modulating the process of diagnosis with a cultural understanding of the symptoms, the patient-therapist alliance and the appropriateness of treatment recommendations. Conclusion Although the DSM IV diagnostic categories may be found cross culturally, clinicians need to be aware of how culture may influence the diagnostic process in child psychiatry. PMID:18516309

  11. [Orthodoxy and schism in psychiatry (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, H

    1981-05-01

    Whereas the numerous psychotherapy schools in the Freud tradition seem slightly ephemeral from the historical point of view, and whereas the intramural and extramural advocates of the philosophical, psychological psychosomatic and purely scientific aspects of psychiatry wage a constant war of competition for the recognition of their special fields and expansion of their power over others, Kraepelin's teaching, whose spirit has already survived two generations of psychiatrists, is even gaining recognition and power of persuasion. It is therefore termed orthodox, the others schismatic. The combination of an empirical phenomenology of psychiatric diseases with their biological roots places Kraepelin's psychiatry on a sure foundation which makes possible convention, uniform assessment of homologous cases, legal security in giving expert opinions and the clinical framework for experimental research. PMID:6785635

  12. [Between neurology and psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Levine, Joseph; Toser, Doron; Zeev, Kaplan

    2014-06-01

    In this review we will discuss the broad spectrum of possible relationships between the fields of neurology and psychiatry alongside weighing the pros and cons of each alternative relationship. This is in the hope that such discussions will allow an informed decision regarding the construction of future relations between these two areas. The possible connections between the areas are discussed in light of possible relationships that exist between the two groups in the mathematical world with reference to the proposed solutions to the psychophysical mind-body problem. PMID:25095609

  13. Meditation and Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    How might meditation promote wellness and healing from psychiatric illness? How might it contribute to the practice of psychiatry? This review of the literature attempts to answer these questions. Meditation is the consciously willed practice of two actions, attending and abstaining, that all people spontaneously perform to a greater or lesser degree. Psychological health may correlate in part with the degree to which we naturally perform these actions. This review analyzes the nature of meditation and its therapeutic benefits. It then concludes with a summary of the issues pertinent to the adjunctive use of meditation in psychiatric care. PMID:19727302

  14. PSYCHIATRY-PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Doongaji, Dinshaw R.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of psychiatry during the last three decades as practised in a general teaching hospital is presented. Psychiatry as an academic subject has matured tremendously during this period. The empirical treatments of the 1950s and the 1960s which evoke nostalgic memories, have been replaced by modern methods of treatment. However, there is a need to exercise caution against the blind acceptance of new and sophisticated research findings in biological psychiatry. Inspite of the bright future facing psychiatry, the identity of psychiatry as a medical discipline must be preserved at all cost. Psychiatrists should also realise the dangers of gradual fractionation and impersonalisation which threatens the speciality, and makes all possible efforts to prevent this. PMID:21584054

  15. History of Family Psychiatry: From the Social Reform Era to the Primate Social Organ System.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Douglas A

    2015-07-01

    From early twentieth century social reform movements emerged the ingredients for both child and family psychiatry. Both psychiatries that involve children, parents, and families began in child guidance clinics. Post-World War II intellectual creativity provided the epistemological framework for treating families. Eleven founders (1950-1969) led the development of family psychiatry. Child and family psychiatrists disagreed over the issues of individual and family group dynamics. Over the past 25 years the emerging sciences of interaction, in the context of the Primate Social Organ System (PSOS), have produced the evidence for the family being the entity of treatment in psychiatry. PMID:26092732

  16. Postpartum Contraception in Adolescents: Data From a Single Tertiary Clinic in Southeast of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kaplanoglu, Mustafa; Kaplanoglu, Dilek; Usman, Mustafa Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to evaluate the postpartum contraception preferences of adolescent women in this study. Material and Method: This descriptive study was prepared after a retrospective analysis of file records of primigravida women who had given birth at the Adiyaman University School of Medicine Training and Research Hospital Department of Obstetric and Gynecology between January 2010 and June 2012. More than 12 months had passed after birth. The adolescents who were included in the study and the control group women were called by phone and invited to our clinic. A total of 506 adolescents and 1,046 control group women came to the clinic and were evaluated. The control group was formed of women between the age of 20-35 years who gave given birth in our clinic during the same period and were randomly selected. Postpartum obstetric history, contraception methods and data of these patients were recorded. Results: The mean age was 18.3±0.4 years and 28.2±4.9 years in the adolescent group and control group respectively. No contraception other than lactation amenorrhea was used by 256 women of the adolescent group (50.6%) and 345 women of the control group (33%). The most commonly used contraceptive method in both groups other than lactation amenorrhea was condoms (160 women (64%) and 230 women (32.8%) respectively). The annual contraceptive failure rate was 3.95% in the adolescent group and 1.72% in the control group. The highest failure rate was with lactation amenorrhea in both groups. Discussion: Adolescent women mostly use contraceptive methods with low reliability such as lactation amenorrhea and the calendar method in the postpartum period. Providing adequate contraceptive education is therefore important. On the other hand, starting such training starting in the early postnatal period will prevent recurring adolescent pregnancies with a short pregnancy interval. PMID:25716393

  17. Psychiatry and the general hospital in an age of uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    LIPSITT, DON R

    2003-01-01

    General hospitals have had an illustrious role in the evolution of psychiatry. They have provided a rich soil for the growth of inpatient psychiatric units, consultation-liaison psychiatry, psychosomatic medicine, med-psych units, outpatient psychiatric clinics, emergency services and a whole spectrum of resources for the communities in which they dwell. In some respects, whether attached to universities or not, they have functioned as small colleges for the education and training of scores of health professionals. In the setting of the general hospital, psychiatry has had opportunities to become remedicalized and integrated into the mainstream of medicine. However, recent trends in health care run the risk of jeopardizing these accomplishments. Managed care has had a profound impact on the way psychiatry is practiced, taught, and reimbursed. Concerns about cost-containment have raised questions about whether the general hospital will remain the best and most economical setting for psychiatric services. If the primacy of the patient is lost, psychiatry's role in the general hospital will be uncertain. The need to safeguard psychiatry's achievements must be a worldwide endeavor. PMID:16946901

  18. The Task before Psychiatry Today Redux: STSPIR*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajai R.

    2014-01-01

    their stories.Science: Shrugging ambivalence and disagreement and searching for commonalities in psychiatric phenomena; An idiographic orientation which stresses individuality cannot, and should not, preclude the nomothetic or norm laying thrust that is the crux of scientific progress.The major contribution of science has been to recognize such commonalities so they can be researched, categorized and used for human welfare.It is a mistake to stress individuality so much that commonalities are obliterated.While the purpose and approach of psychiatry, as of all medicine, has to be humane and caring, therapeutic advancements and aetiologic understandings are going to result only from a scientific methodology.Just caring is not enough, if you have not mastered the methods of care, which only science can supply.Psychotherapy: Psychiatrists continuing to do psychotherapy: Psychotherapy must be clearly defined, its parameters and methods firmly delineated, its proof of effectiveness convincingly demonstrated by evidence based and controlled trials;Psychotherapy research suffers from neglect by the mainstream at present, because of the ascendancy of biological psychiatry;It suffers resource constraints as major sponsors like pharma not interested;Needs funding from some sincere researcher organisations and altruistic sponsors, as also professional societies and governments;Psychotherapy research will have to provide enough irrefutable evidence that it works, with replicable studies that prove it across geographical areas;It will not do for psychiatrists to hand over psychotherapy to clinical psychologists and others.Integrate approaches: Welcoming biological breakthroughs, while supplying psychosocial insights: Experimental breakthroughs, both in aetiology and therapeutics, will come mainly from biology, but the insights and leads can hopefully come from many other fields, especially the psychosocial and philosophical;The biological and the psychological are not exclusive but

  19. The Task before Psychiatry Today Redux: STSPIR*.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajai R

    2014-01-01

    stories.SCIENCE: Shrugging ambivalence and disagreement and searching for commonalities in psychiatric phenomena;An idiographic orientation which stresses individuality cannot, and should not, preclude the nomothetic or norm laying thrust that is the crux of scientific progress.The major contribution of science has been to recognize such commonalities so they can be researched, categorized and used for human welfare.It is a mistake to stress individuality so much that commonalities are obliterated.While the purpose and approach of psychiatry, as of all medicine, has to be humane and caring, therapeutic advancements and aetiologic understandings are going to result only from a scientific methodology.Just caring is not enough, if you have not mastered the methods of care, which only science can supply.PSYCHOTHERAPY: Psychiatrists continuing to do psychotherapy:Psychotherapy must be clearly defined, its parameters and methods firmly delineated, its proof of effectiveness convincingly demonstrated by evidence based and controlled trials;Psychotherapy research suffers from neglect by the mainstream at present, because of the ascendancy of biological psychiatry;It suffers resource constraints as major sponsors like pharma not interested;Needs funding from some sincere researcher organisations and altruistic sponsors, as also professional societies and governments;Psychotherapy research will have to provide enough irrefutable evidence that it works, with replicable studies that prove it across geographical areas;It will not do for psychiatrists to hand over psychotherapy to clinical psychologists and others.INTEGRATE APPROACHES: Welcoming biological breakthroughs, while supplying psychosocial insights:Experimental breakthroughs, both in aetiology and therapeutics, will come mainly from biology, but the insights and leads can hopefully come from many other fields, especially the psychosocial and philosophical;The biological and the psychological are not exclusive but

  20. Position and role of forensic psychiatry in integrative psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Smalc, Vera Folnegović; Varda, Robert; Grosić, Petra Folnegović

    2008-09-01

    The integrative approach to psychiatry has gained more importance in recent years. Is it justified or not, does it improve theory or practice, those are only some of the questions to which we are looking for answers, but in this paper we shall underline the necessity of enrolling forensic psychiatry into integrative, modern psychiatry. The reason and the motive for that integration is the fact that nowadays the content and the activities of contemporary forensic psychiatrists are totally reduced to executing the tasks given by courts. It is therefore entirely right to say that current forensic psychiatry finds itself in the passive role of executing orders of the court. Our aim is to point out how important it is that forensic psychiatry becomes an interdisciplinary profession in interaction with psychiatry but also with other medical branches just as with judiciary, educational institutions, moral-ethical institutions and religious institutions in producing preventive programmes and by participating in individual decision making process likewise. Our primary goal is to present the status and the position of contemporary forensic psychiatry and to specify the necessary improvements and its place in integrative psychiatry. It should be better, more meaningful and more ethical, both for the individual and the society in total. We want forensic psychiatry to include a protective and therapeutic role for each individual forensic examinee, i.e. a person who has already been in forensic examination and for whom one evaluates mental competence because of a mental disorder. We also want it to get a far larger and more active general role in society in terms of preventing criminal acts among the mentally ill and in society in total. PMID:18827777

  1. A Review of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) and the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) with an Emphasis on Juvenile Justice Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Linda J.; Archer, Robert P.; Forbey, Johnathan D.; Handel, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) and Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) are frequently used objective personality self-report measures. Given their widespread use, the purpose of the current study was to examine and compare the literature base for the two instruments. A comprehensive review of the…

  2. Adolescents' Use of School-Based Health Clinics for Reproductive Health Services: Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Richard A.; St. Lawrence, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Describes adolescents' use of school-based health clinics (SBCs) for family planning and sexually transmitted disease (STD)-related services, using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Results indicated that 13 percent received family planning and 8.9 percent received STD-related services from SBCs. Factors affecting the…

  3. Use of Standardized Patients during a Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Aurora J.; Arnold, Lesley M.; Welge, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Standardized patients are used in teaching medical students and evaluating their clinical skills during the psychiatric clerkship. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the addition of a Psychiatry Clinical Standardized Patient Examination (PCX) during the third-year clerkship improved students' performances on the…

  4. Tailoring Clinical Services to Address the Unique Needs of Adolescents from the Pregnancy Test to Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Alison Moriarty; Sadler, Lois S.; Reynolds, Heather Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians across disciplines and practice settings are likely to encounter adolescents who are at risk for a pregnancy. In 2010, 34.2/1000 15–19 year old teens had a live birth in the United States, many more will seek care for a pregnancy scare or options counseling. Teen mothers are also at risk for a second or higher order pregnancy during adolescence. This paper provides clinicians with adolescent-friendly clinical and counseling strategies for pregnancy prevention, pre- and post-pregnancy test counseling, pregnancy-related care, and a review of the developmental challenges encountered by teens in the transition to parenthood. Clinicians are in a better position to approach the developmental, health and mental health needs of adolescents related to pregnancy if they understand and appreciate the obstacles adolescents may face negotiating the health care system. In addition, when clinical services are specially tailored to the needs of the adolescent, fewer opportunities will be lost to prevent unintended pregnancies, assist teens into timely prenatal services, and improve outcomes for their pregnancies and the transition to parenthood. PMID:23522339

  5. A collaborative outreach clinic for pregnant youth and adolescent mothers: Description of a pilot clinic and its patients

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Megan E; Weinstangel, Hannah; Dalziel, Nancy; Moreau, Katherine A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the pregnant youth and adolescent parents seen at an adolescent health outreach clinic in an urban community setting during a two-year pilot project. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all adolescents who presented at the monthly half-day clinics from January 2008 through January 2010 (n=36) was performed. Measures extracted from charts included demographic information, reason for referral, social history, mental health history and outcome of assessment. RESULTS: All participants were female (mean age 17 years). Forty-two percent were pregnant at initial assessment, while the remainder had one or two children, or a recent pregnancy loss. Sixty-one percent had no primary care physician. The primary reason for referral was mental health concerns, most commonly depression. Almost one-half of patients relied on social assistance and almost one-third were living in shelters. At the time of first visit, 42% of patients were not attending school; the highest level of school completed for most patients was grade 8. The majority had a history of mental health issues and previous drug and/or alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents presenting to the clinic had a history of disadvantage in terms of income, educational attainment, living arrangements and mental health background, and are in need of various health services including primary care practitioners. These findings will help to inform future program development for these vulnerable youth, and have implications for practitioners caring for this population. PMID:24855427

  6. Attachment Organization and History of Suicidal Behavior in Clinical Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Kenneth S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Adolescents in psychiatric treatment (N=133) participated in a case-comparison study investigating the association of attachment patterns with a history of suicidal behaviors. Attachment patterns were assessed using the Adult Attachment Interview. In accordance with definitions provided in the scoring system, 86% of case and 78% of comparison…

  7. Clinical Assessment of Child and Adolescent Sleep Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Brett R.; Mayfield, Joan W.; Kuhn, Robert H.

    1999-01-01

    Provides guidelines for counselors interested in developing their own assessment procedure to evaluate child and adolescent sleep disturbance. Guidelines include reviewing the developmental and medical history, screening for parental psychopathology, obtaining a child behavior rating scale and sleep diary, and conducting a semistructured clinical…

  8. Threshold and subthreshold generalized anxiety disorder among US adolescents: prevalence, sociodemographic, and clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, M.; Beesdo-Baum, K.; He, J.-P.; Merikangas, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Threshold and subthreshold forms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are highly prevalent and impairing conditions among adults. However, there are few general population studies that have examined these conditions during the early life course. The primary objectives of this study were to: (1) examine the prevalence, and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of threshold and subthreshold forms of GAD in a nationally representative sample of US youth; and (2) test differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics between threshold and subthreshold forms of the disorder. Method The National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement is a nationally representative face-to-face survey of 10123 adolescents 13 to 18 years of age in the continental USA. Results Approximately 3% of adolescents met criteria for threshold GAD. Reducing the required duration from 6 months to 3 months resulted in a 65.7% increase in prevalence (5.0%); further relaxing the uncontrollability criterion led to an additional 20.7% increase in prevalence (6.1%). Adolescents with all forms of GAD displayed a recurrent clinical course marked by substantial impairment and co-morbidity with other psychiatric disorders. There were few significant differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics between threshold and subthreshold cases of GAD. Results also revealed age-related differences in the associated symptoms and clinical course of GAD. Conclusions Findings demonstrate the clinical significance of subthreshold forms of GAD among adolescent youth, highlighting the continuous nature of the GAD construct. Age-related differences in the associated symptoms and clinical course of GAD provide further support for criteria that capture variation in clinical features across development. PMID:24384401

  9. Balanced intervention for adolescents and adults with language impairment: a clinical framework.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Karen A; Katz, Lauren A; Carlberg, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    Providing effective intervention services for adolescents and adults who struggle with spoken and written language presents a variety of unique challenges. This article discusses the 5S Framework (skills, strategies, school, student buy-in, and stakeholders) for designing and implementing balanced spoken and written language interventions for adolescents and adults. An in-depth case illustration highlights the usefulness of the framework for targeting the language and literacy skills of adolescents and young adults. By describing and illustrating the five key components of the intervention framework, the article provides a useful clinical tool to help guide clinicians and educators who serve the needs of adolescents and adults who struggle with spoken and written language. PMID:25633140

  10. Subspecialty Exposure in a Psychiatry Clerkship Does Not Improve Student Performance in the Subject Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retamero, Carolina; Ramchandani, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the NBME subject examination scores and subspecialty profiles of 3rd-year medical students who were assigned to psychiatry subspecialties during their clerkship with those who were not. Method: The authors collated and analyzed the shelf examination scores, the clinical grades, and the child psychiatry and emergency…

  11. Developing a Structured Teaching Plan for Psychiatry Tutors at Oxford University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Taiar, Hasanen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis was to examine the teaching ways I undertook in teaching medical students and to examine the use of a structured teaching plan for the academic and clinical tutors in psychiatry. The teaching plan was developed for use, initially by Oxford University Academic tutors at the Department of Psychiatry. In addition,…

  12. Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward H; Wilson, James V Kinnier

    2014-09-01

    We here review Babylonian descriptions of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, stroke, psychoses, obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, psychopathic behaviour, depression and anxiety. Most of these accounts date from the first Babylonian dynasty of the first half of the second millennium BC, within a millennium and a half of the origin of writing. The Babylonians were remarkably acute and objective observers of medical disorders and human behaviour. Their detailed descriptions are surprisingly similar to modern 19th and 20th century AD textbook accounts, with the exception of subjective thoughts and feelings which are more modern fields of enquiry. They had no knowledge of brain or psychological function. Some neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. stroke or facial palsy, had a physical basis requiring the attention of a physician or asû, using a plant and mineral based pharmacology; some disorders such as epilepsy, psychoses, depression and anxiety were regarded as supernatural due to evil demons or spirits, or the anger of personal gods, and thus required the intervention of the priest or ašipu; other disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder and psychopathic behaviour were regarded as a mystery. The Babylonians were the first to describe the clinical foundations of neurology and psychiatry. We discuss these accounts in relation to subsequent and more modern clinical descriptions. PMID:25037816

  13. Assessing an Adolescent's Capacity for Autonomous Decision-Making in Clinical Care.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Pierre-André; Blum, Robert Wm; Benaroyo, Lazare; Zermatten, Jean; Baltag, Valentina

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide policy guidance on how to assess the capacity of minor adolescents for autonomous decision-making without a third party authorization, in the field of clinical care. In June 2014, a two-day meeting gathered 20 professionals from all continents, working in the field of adolescent medicine, neurosciences, developmental and clinical psychology, sociology, ethics, and law. Formal presentations and discussions were based on a literature search and the participants' experience. The assessment of adolescent decision-making capacity includes the following: (1) a review of the legal context consistent with the principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child; (2) an empathetic relationship between the adolescent and the health care professional/team; (3) the respect of the adolescent's developmental stage and capacities; (4) the inclusion, if relevant, of relatives, peers, teachers, or social and mental health providers with the adolescent's consent; (5) the control of coercion and other social forces that influence decision-making; and (6) a deliberative stepwise appraisal of the adolescent's decision-making process. This stepwise approach, already used among adults with psychiatric disorders, includes understanding the different facets of the given situation, reasoning on the involved issues, appreciating the outcomes linked with the decision(s), and expressing a choice. Contextual and psychosocial factors play pivotal roles in the assessment of adolescents' decision-making capacity. The evaluation must be guided by a well-established procedure, and health professionals should be trained accordingly. These proposals are the first to have been developed by a multicultural, multidisciplinary expert panel. PMID:26281798

  14. Academic psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Ban, Thomas A

    2006-05-01

    In the second half of the 19th century new drugs introduced by the pharmaceutical industry helped lead to the establishment of academic departments in psychiatry. Causal treatment of cerebral pellagra by nicotinic acid and cerebral syphilis by penicillin in the first half of the 20th century led to major changes in the diagnostic distribution of psychiatric patients. In the second half of the 20th century with the introduction of a rapidly growing number of psychotropic drugs, pharmacotherapy became the primary form of treatment in mental illness. Psychiatrists today perceive neuropharmacology as one of the basic sciences of psychiatry and psychopharmacology as the bridge between the mode of action and the clinical indications of psychotropic drugs. Pharmacotherapy with psychotropic drugs focused attention on the differential responsiveness to the same drug within the same diagnostic category. Yet, instead of re-evaluating psychiatric nosology and conducting research in psychopathology, a statistical methodology was adopted for the demonstration of therapeutic effectiveness in pharmacologically heterogeneous populations. Employment of consensus-based classifications and psychiatric rating scales in the clinical development of psychotropic drugs led to semi-finished products, which are prescribed indiscriminately. Replacement of single-center clinical trials by multi-center centrally coordinated clinical investigations led to the control of education in pharmacotherapy by the pharmaceutical industry. To separate education from marketing, the identification of the treatment-responsive forms of illness and the delineation of the therapeutic profile of psychotropic drugs are proposed with the employment of a new methodology, the "Composite Diagnostic Evaluation System." It is postulated that development of a pharmacologically valid psychiatric nosology with the employment of a "nosologic matrix" would provide the pharmaceutical industry with the necessary feedback to

  15. Clinical characteristics of inpatient adolescents with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Shoval, Gal; Zalsman, Gil; Sher, Leo; Apter, Alan; Weizman, Abraham

    2006-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common disorder in adolescents, usually treated in the outpatient setting. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of adolescents with severe OCD that required hospitalization. A total of 342 patients consecutively admitted to a psychiatric adolescent inpatient unit and 87 healthy volunteers were assessed by a semistructured interview for clinical diagnosis, suicide risk factors, aggression, ego defense mechanisms, and intelligence. Patients with OCD (n=40) were compared to other four diagnostic patient groups with psychotic, affective, conduct, and eating disorders, as well as to normal controls. Adolescent inpatients with OCD experienced less separation anxiety than all the other psychiatric groups (P < .01) and were less impulsive than controls (P < .001). They differed in aggressive/impulsive traits and hospital-related behaviors from other diagnostic groups. Adolescent inpatients with OCD consist of a unique subgroup in the inpatient unit in terms of their clinical characteristics and risk factors for suicide. These characteristics should be taken into account when developing a treatment plan for these difficult-to-treat inpatients. PMID:16400622

  16. YouTube and 'psychiatry'.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Robert; Miller, John; Collins, Noel

    2015-12-01

    YouTube is a video-sharing website that is increasingly used to share and disseminate health-related information, particularly among younger people. There are reports that social media sites, such as YouTube, are being used to communicate an anti-psychiatry message but this has never been confirmed in any published analysis of YouTube clip content. This descriptive study revealed that the representation of 'psychiatry' during summer 2012 was predominantly negative. A subsequent smaller re-analysis suggests that the negative portrayal of 'psychiatry' on YouTube is a stable phenomenon. The significance of this and how it could be addressed are discussed. PMID:26755987

  17. [First stage in identifying traumatic profil inpatients hospitalised in psychiatry in Martinique].

    PubMed

    Evans, M; Vacher, E; Lamy, S; Seridi, H; Jan, M; Debien, C; Sigward, J-M; Jehel, L

    2014-01-01

    The population hospitalised in psychiatry seems more exposed to traumatic events than the French general population, with particularly more sexual aggressions. The aim of this study is to describe the population hospitalised in psychiatry and more precisely the traumatic history of these patients, their comorbidities (mental diseases and addictions), and socio economical level. This descriptive, cross sectional and retrospective study took place in the Crisis Center in the University Hospital in Martinique (French West Indies), from February to July 2013. A socio-demographic information, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview 5.0, the Trauma History Questionnaire and the Impact Events Scale-Revised were realised with 49 of the 143 patients admitted during this period (34.3%). In this population, we found a mean of 6.5 (standart-deviation=4.2) different types of traumatic event, with 38.8% patients reporting a natural disaster, and 38.8% declaring at least one sexual aggression. In the 25 patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, 66.7% underwent a sexual aggression, significatively during childhood (before 10 years old, P=0.01), and during adolescence (between 10 to 18 years old, P=0.01). These results underline the importance of a systematic screening of the traumatic profile: the characteristics of the traumatic events and its clinical impact. PMID:25590554

  18. Attachment-based family therapy for depressed and suicidal adolescents: theory, clinical model and empirical support.

    PubMed

    Ewing, E Stephanie Krauthamer; Diamond, Guy; Levy, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is a manualized family-based intervention designed for working with depressed adolescents, including those at risk for suicide, and their families. It is an empirically informed and supported treatment. ABFT has its theoretical underpinnings in attachment theory and clinical roots in structural family therapy and emotion focused therapies. ABFT relies on a transactional model that aims to transform the quality of adolescent-parent attachment, as a means of providing the adolescent with a more secure relationship that can support them during challenging times generally, and the crises related to suicidal thinking and behavior, specifically. This article reviews: (1) the theoretical foundations of ABFT (attachment theory, models of emotional development); (2) the ABFT clinical model, including training and supervision factors; and (3) empirical support. PMID:25778674

  19. Complex trauma in children and adolescents: evidence-based practice in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Lawson, David M; Quinn, Jamie

    2013-05-01

    Complex trauma (CT) results from exposure to severe stressors that occur within the caregiver system or with another presumably responsible adult, are repetitive, and begin in childhood or adolescence. As a result, many of these children and adolescents experience lifelong difficulties related to self-regulation, relationships, psychological symptoms, alterations in attention and consciousness, self-injury, identity, and cognitive distortions. The aims of this article include the following: (a) to examine several representative approaches identified as treatments for children and adolescents exposed to CT with respect to similarities and differences; (b) to examine representative evidence of model effectiveness; (c) to discuss how these approaches are and/or could be implemented in clinical practice; and (d) to suggest research designs that would facilitate greater translation of effective treatment into clinical settings. PMID:23564579

  20. Adolescent parricide as a clinical and legal problem.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Carl P

    2010-01-01

    Criminologists contribute to the knowledge regarding the continuing problem of parricide by way of macrostudies, utilizing large samples that reveal patterns of how such acts are carried out, gender differences, and other aspects. Clinicians have the opportunity to pursue microinvestigations into the details of how cognitive processes and emotions operate in the adolescent who engages in such behavior. Such investigations entail pursuing specifics in the psychosocial realm, such as earlier maltreatments and ongoing psychological conflicts, and also being alert to the neurobiological differences between adolescents and adults. The use of battered child syndrome as a legal defense is discussed, with contrasts made between relying on a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) approach and a duress defense, based on explanations related to shame and humiliation. PMID:20305078

  1. Relationship between clozapine dose, serum concentration, and clinical outcome in children and adolescents in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wohkittel, Christopher; Gerlach, Manfred; Taurines, Regina; Wewetzer, Christoph; Unterecker, Stefan; Burger, Rainer; Schreck, Diana; Mehler-Wex, Claudia; Romanos, Marcel; Egberts, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Information on dose- and concentration-related clinical effects of clozapine treatment in children and adolescents is scarce. This study aimed to examine the relationship between dose, serum concentration, and clinical outcome as well as the influencing factors thereof in paediatric patients treated with clozapine. Data from a routine Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) service between 2004 and 2014 were studied in 68 patients, aged 11-18 years. Severity of illness, therapeutic effectiveness and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were assessed by standardized means. A relationship between the daily dose (mean 319 mg, 4.9 mg/kg) and serum concentration (mean 387 ng/ml) of clozapine was found with the variation in dose explaining 30 % of the variability in clozapine serum concentrations. Also gender contributed to the variability, however, no influence of age or concomitant medications was detected. Furthermore, a significant association was found between clozapine serum concentration and the occurrence of ADRs. Patients without ADRs had a lower mean serum concentration than those with mild (261.4 vs 407.3 ng/ml, P = 0.018) and moderate ADRs (261.4 vs 416.3 ng/ml, P = 0.028). As clozapine was estimated to be effective in lower blood concentrations, guidance on a possibly lower therapeutic range of clozapine serum levels in paediatric patients is provided. With ADRs increasing under higher concentrations, TDM is strongly recommended in paediatric clozapine therapy for individualized dosing. Dose adjustment in females also might be reasonable according to gender-related differences in serum concentrations. However, regarding the limitations of this study results should be validated in larger studies with more standardized designs. PMID:27221285

  2. [Suicide attempt in the adolescence: a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Finkelsztein, Carlos; Girard, Paula; Job, Alfredo; Matusevich, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to communicate the job in a psychiatric inpatient unit based on the narration and analysis of an adolescent's suicide attempt. We insist on a personalized approach from an individual, familiar, and group point of view and the arrangement of treatment following discharge; all these from a therapeutic community's psychodynamic perspective. The work in the acute hospitalization is focused on the patient's recovery and returning to the community. PMID:21977609

  3. Forensic psychiatry in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Tariq; Nizami, Asad Tamizuddin; Hirji, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews existing forensic psychiatric services in Pakistan highlighting the role played by the judicial and the medical fraternity in managing the legal and forensic issues of the population of patients with mental illnesses. Until 2001, all legal and forensic issues were dealt with the mental health legislation of 1912, the Lunacy Act of 1912. This was inherited from the British rulers in the Sub-Continent at the time. The Mental Health Ordinance of 2001 could not sustain following the 18th constitutional amendment in 2010, whereby psychiatric healthcare was devolved to the provinces from the previous federal authority. The article also highlights the difficulties and the barriers in implementation of the forensic psychiatric services in Pakistan at various levels within the healthcare system. This article also delves into the current framework of training in forensic psychiatry for postgraduates as well as the assessments and management schedules for the mentally ill offenders at tertiary care institutions in Pakistan. PMID:26024984

  4. Mental Health Problems and Symptoms among Male Adolescents Attending a Teen Health Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peggy B.; Buzi, Ruth S.; Weinman, Maxine L.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the frequency and nature of mental health problems and symptoms among a group of 51 inner city male adolescents attending a teen health clinic. Results indicated participants experienced significant mental health problems and symptoms, such as relationship problems, problems with time and money, and symptoms of anger, depression, and…

  5. Suicidal Behaviors among Adolescents in Puerto Rico: Rates and Correlates in Clinical and Community Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jennifer; Ramirez, Rafael Roberto; Davies, Mark; Canino, Glorisa; Goodwin, Renee D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined rates and correlates of suicidal behavior among youth on the island of Puerto Rico. Data were drawn from two probability samples, one clinical (n = 736) and one community-based sample (n = 1,896), of youth ages 12 to 17. Consistent with previous studies in U.S. mainland adolescent populations, our results demonstrate that most…

  6. A Comparative Study of Clinical Correlates in Schizophrenia with Onset in Childhood, Adolescence and Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Parthasarathy; Malhotra, Savita; Malhotra, Anil; Gupta, Nitin

    2006-01-01

    Background: Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is a rare disorder. Comparative data on the effect of differential age of onset on clinical profile in schizophrenia are very few. Method: Subjects with COS (n = 15), adolescence onset schizophrenia (AdOS, n = 20) and adulthood onset schizophrenia (AOS, n = 20) were compared on socio-demographic,…

  7. Maternal Control and Adolescent Depression: Ethnic Differences among Clinically Referred Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Jo-Ann S.; Donenberg, Geri R.; Martinovich, Zoran

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relationship between perceived maternal control and depression for 11 urban adolescent girls seeking psychological services at an outpatient clinic. No relation between control and depression was found for Caucasian and Latina girls, but high control was linked to less depression among African American girls. Findings highlight the…

  8. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for the Treatment of Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biegel, Gina M.; Brown, Kirk Warren; Shapiro, Shauna L.; Schubert, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that mindfulness-based treatment interventions may be effective for a range of mental and physical health disorders in adult populations, but little is known about the effectiveness of such interventions for treating adolescent conditions. The present randomized clinical trial was designed to assess the effect of the…

  9. Quality of Adolescent Mother-Infant Interactions and Clinical Determinations of Risk Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy-Herb, Holly E.; Honig, Alice Sterling

    1999-01-01

    Observed 37 pairs of low-income adolescent mothers and infants over a 6-month period to determine efficacy of clinical determinations of risk. Found that maternal-risk status was significantly associated with more sensitive parenting behaviors including responsiveness to infant cues and to infant distress, and social, emotional, and cognitive…

  10. A Profile of Young Adolescents Attending a Teen Family Planning Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Ingrid Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Reviewed records of 183 adolescents attending family planning clinic. Forty-one percent had first sexual experience between ages 12 and 13. Over 7 percent admitted having been sexually abused or raped; additional 19 percent described situations in home or exhibited symptoms associated with history of sexual abuse. Found evidence of family…

  11. Preliminary Validation of a Screening Tool for Adolescent Panic Disorder in Pediatric Primary Care Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, Alexander H.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Hershorin, Eugene R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the validity of a brief screening tool for adolescent panic disorder (PD) in a primary care setting. A total of 165 participants (ages 12-17 years) seen in two pediatric primary care clinics completed the Autonomic Nervous System Questionnaire (ANS; Stein et al. in Psychosomatic Med 61:359-364, 40). A subset of those screening…

  12. Clinical Profile of Childhood Onset Depression Presenting to Child Adolescent and Family Services in Northampton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majumder, Pallab; Hammad, Hala

    2006-01-01

    Background: The clinical profile of depressive disorder in children and young people in Child Adolescent and Family Services (CAFS), Northampton was studied. Methods: Twenty-five patients who had attended the CAFS over a period of 2 years were analysed retrospectively. Results: The age range of subjects was 8 to 19 years. Majority of patients were…

  13. Screening for Spiritual Struggle in an Adolescent Transgender Clinic: Feasibility and Acceptability.

    PubMed

    Grossoehme, Daniel H; Teeters, Alexis; Jelinek, Sue; Dimitriou, Sophia M; Conard, Lee Ann E

    2016-01-01

    Spiritual struggles are associated with poorer health outcomes, including depression, which has higher prevalence among transgender individuals than the general population. This study's objective was to improve the quality of care in an outpatient transgender clinic by screening patients and caregivers for spiritual struggle and future intervention. The quality improvement questions addressed were whether screening for spiritual struggle was feasible and acceptable; and whether the sensitivity and specificity of the Rush Protocol were acceptable. Revision of the screening was based on cognitive interviews with the 115 adolescents and caregivers who were screened. Prevalence of spiritual struggle was 38-47%. Compared to the Negative R-COPE, the Rush Protocol screener had sensitivities of 44-80% and specificities of 60-74%. The Rush Protocol was acceptable to adolescents seen in a transgender clinic, caregivers, and clinic staff; was feasible to deliver during outpatient clinic visits, and offers a straightforward means of identifying transgender persons and caregivers experiencing spiritual struggle. PMID:26901280

  14. Self-image and eating disorder symptoms in normal and clinical adolescents.

    PubMed

    Forsén Mantilla, Emma; Bergsten, Katja; Birgegård, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders (ED) are psychiatric disorders of multifactorial origin, predominantly appearing in adolescence. Negative self-image is identified as risk factor, but the association between self-image and ED in adolescents or sex differences regarding such associations remains unclear. The study aimed to investigate the relationship between specific self-image aspects and ED symptoms in normal and clinical adolescents, including sex differences. Participants included 855 ED patients (girls=813, boys=42) and 482 normal adolescents (girls=238, boys=244), 13-15 years. Stepwise regression demonstrated strong associations between self-image and ED in normal adolescents (girls: R(2)=.31, boys: R(2)=.08), and stronger associations in patients (girls: R(2)=.64, boys: R(2)=.69). Qualitative sex differences were observed in patients. Connections between specific self-image aspects and ED have implications for clinical management of ED. The strong link between self-image variables and ED symptoms in normal girls, but not boys, is discussed in terms of the continuity-discontinuity hypothesis. PMID:24411765

  15. Outcomes of antiretroviral therapy among younger versus older adolescents and adults in an urban clinic, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Takarinda, K. C.; Owiti, P.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Mugurungi, O.; Buruwe, L.; Reid, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: A non-governmental organisation-supported clinic offering health services including antiretroviral therapy (ART). Objective: To compare ART retention between younger (age 10–14 years) vs. older (age 15–19 years) adolescents and younger (age 20–29 years) vs. older (age ⩾30 years) adults and determine adolescent- and adult-specific attrition-associated factors among those initiated on ART between 2010 and 2011. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 110 (7%) adolescents and 1484 (93%) adults included in the study, no differences in retention were observed between younger vs. older adolescents at 6, 12 and 24 months. More younger adolescents were initiated with body mass index <16 kg/m2 compared with older adolescents (64% vs. 47%; P = 0.04). There were more females (74% vs. 52%, P < 0.001) and fewer patients initiating ART with CD4 count ⩽350 cells/mm3 (77% vs. 81%, P = 0.007) among younger vs. older adults. Younger adults demonstrated more attrition than older adults at all time-points. No attrition risk factors were observed among adolescents. Attrition-associated factors among adults included being younger, having a lower CD4 count and advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease at initiation, and initiation on a stavudine-based regimen. Conclusion: Younger adults demonstrated greater attrition and may require more attention. We were unable to demonstrate differences in attrition among younger vs. older adolescents. Loss to follow-up was the main reason for attrition across all age groups. Overall, earlier presentation for ART care appears important for improved ART retention among adults. PMID:27358802

  16. High-functioning autism spectrum disorder as a basic disorder in adult psychiatry and psychotherapy: psychopathological presentation, clinical relevance and therapeutic concepts.

    PubMed

    Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Pick, Marion; Biscaldi, Monica; Fangmeier, Thomas; Riedel, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by deficits in social cognition and competence, communication, highly circumscribed interests and a strong desire for routines. Besides, there are specific abnormalities in perception and language. Typical symptoms are already present in early childhood. Traditionally autism has been regarded as a severe form of neurodevelopmental disorder which goes along with overtly abnormal language, learning difficulties and low IQ in the majority of cases. However, over the last decades, it has become clear that there are also many patients with high-functioning variants of ASD. These are patients with normal language at a superficial level of description and normal and sometimes above average intelligence. In high-functioning variants of the disease, they may run unrecognized until late in adult life. High-functioning ASD is associated with a very high prevalence of comorbid classical psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, ADHD, tics, psychotic symptoms or emotionally unstable syndromes. In many such cases, there is a causal relationship between ASD and the comorbid psychiatric conditions in that the specific ASD symptoms result in chronic conflicts, misunderstandings and failure in private and vocational relationships. These problems in turn often lead to depression, anxiety and sometimes psychosis-like stress reactions. In this constellation, ASD has to be regarded as a basic disorder with causal relevance for secondary psychiatric syndromes. In this paper, we summarize the classical presentation of high-functioning ASD in adult psychiatry and psychotherapy and suggest a nosological model to classify different ASD conditions instead. To conclude, we outline first treatment concepts in out- and in-patient settings. PMID:24105433

  17. [Psychiatry in Quebec. Then and now].

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This text narrates the evolution, since the 1960s, of different events that marked the history of psychiatry in the French-Canadian province of Quebec. From his personal experience, the author discusses. The evolution of the Départment de psychiatric de l'Université de Montréal fro where were issued more than 1000 psychiatrists who shaped clinical practice and research developments worthy of mention throughout the years. The evolution of diagnostic noselogy from the DSM-ii, very influenced by psychoanalysis, to the DSM-5 that is more atheortical, but that is still not based on objective data, which remains a challenge to the etiology of mental illness. The psychiatric drugs that we have learned to prescribe in the past 50 years in a more rational way thanks to a better understanding of their action mechanisms. In reality, there has been no discovery of new drug categories; rather it is the way we prescribe medication that evolved. The great adventure of the first textbook of Quebec psychiatry, which was first published in 1980, and is forthcoming in its 4th edition in 2015 in an improved and expanded format. The forthcoming version takes into consideration the developments in psychiatry. The creation of the Young Adults Clinic in 1988, providing treatment and rehabilitation to young adults in the early stages of schizophrenia, as well as psychoeducational support and information to heir family members. Through the years, this clinic had a considerable acknowledgement in Quebec and other French-speaking nations. PMID:26559212

  18. Parents who hit and scream: interactive effects of verbal and severe physical aggression on clinic-referred adolescents' adjustment.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, Michelle; Mahoney, Annette; Boxer, Paul; Gullan, Rebecca Lakin; Fang, Qijuan

    2014-05-01

    The goals of this study were first, to delineate the co-occurrence of parental severe physical aggression and verbal aggression toward clinic-referred adolescents, and second, to examine the interactive effects of parental severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. This research involved 239 referrals of 11- to 18-year-old youth and their dual-parent families to a non-profit, private community mental health center in a semi-rural Midwest community. Multiple informants (i.e., adolescents and mothers) were used to assess parental aggression and adolescent behavior problems. More than half of clinic-referred adolescents (51%) experienced severe physical aggression and/or high verbal aggression from one or both parents. A pattern of interactive effects of mother-to-adolescent severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent behavior problems emerged, indicating that when severe physical aggression was present, mother-to-adolescent verbal aggression was positively associated with greater adolescent behavior problems whereas when severe physical aggression was not present, the links between verbal aggression and behavior problems was no longer significant. No interactive effects were found for father-to-adolescent severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent adjustment; however, higher father-to-adolescent verbal aggression was consistently linked to behavior problems above and beyond the influence of severe physical aggression. The results of this study should promote the practice of routinely assessing clinic-referred adolescents and their parents about their experiences of verbal aggression in addition to severe physical aggression and other forms of abuse. PMID:24252744

  19. Clinical Features of Adult/Adolescent Atopic Dermatitis and Chinese Criteria for Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Zhao, Yan; Mu, Zhang-Lei; Lu, Qian-Jin; Zhang, Li; Yao, Xu; Zheng, Min; Tang, Yi-Wen; Lu, Xin-Xiang; Xia, Xiu-Juan; Lin, You-Kun; Li, Yu-Zhen; Tu, Cai-Xia; Yao, Zhi-Rong; Xu, Jin-Hua; Li, Wei; Lai, Wei; Yang, Hui-Min; Xie, Hong-Fu; Han, Xiu-Ping; Xie, Zhi-Qiang; Nong, Xiang; Guo, Zai-Pei; Deng, Dan-Qi; Shi, Tong-Xin; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by chronic recurrent dermatitis with profound itching. Most patients have personal and/or family history of atopic diseases. Several criteria have been proposed for the diagnosis of AD. Although the clinical features of childhood AD have been widely studied, there has been less large-scale study on adult/adolescent AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features of adult/adolescent patients with chronic symmetrical eczema/AD and to propose Chinese diagnostic criteria for adult/adolescent AD. Methods: A hospital-based study was performed. Forty-two dermatological centers participated in this study. Adult and adolescent patients (12 years and over) with chronic symmetrical eczema or AD were included in this study. Questionnaires were completed by both patients and investigators. The valid questionnaires were analyzed using EpiData 3.1 and SPSS 17.0 software. Results: A total of 2662 valid questionnaires were collected (1369 male and 1293 female). Of all 2662 patients, 2062 (77.5%) patients had the disease after 12 years old, while only 600 (22.5%) patients had the disease before 12 years old, suggesting late-onset eczema/AD is common. Two thousand one hundred and thirty-nine (80.4%) patients had the disease for more than 6 months. One thousand one hundred and forty-four (43.0%) patients had a personal and/or family history of atopic diseases. One thousand five hundred and forty-eight (58.2%) patients had an elevated total serum IgE and/or eosinophilia and/or positive allergen-specific IgE. Based on these clinical and laboratory features, we proposed Chinese criteria for adult/adolescent AD. Of all 2662 patients, 60.3% were satisfied with our criteria, while only 48.2% satisfied with Hanifin Rajka criteria and 32.7% satisfied with Williams criteria, suggesting a good sensitivity of our criteria in adult/adolescent AD patients. Conclusion: Late-onset of eczema or AD is

  20. Initiatives in biological research in Indian psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Shrivatava, Amresh

    2010-01-01

    currently being investigated by the younger generation with great enthusiasm. What we have achieved so far is the foundation work in last 60 years. Our main challenge in development of biological psychiatry research in India remains resources in terms of manpower, funding and dedicated time for research psychiatrists. Developing basic sciences laboratories, discrete research questions, high quality methodology, and logistical support are some of the essentials. In the present time the culture of research has changed. It is specific and evidence-based. We have time-tested examples of International collaborative research. We need to get more resources, develop education, collaboration and effective leadership. In times to come, India will provide international leadership in basic and clinical biological psychiatry. There is hope. PMID:21836666

  1. [Perspectives on researches in disaster psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    After experiencing the catastrophic Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami disaster in 2011, Tohoku University founded the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS) in April, 2012. IRIDeS, comprising 7 divisions and 36 laboratories with broad areas of specialization, from the humanities to natural sciences, aims to become a global center for the study of disasters and disaster mitigation, learning from and building upon past lessons in disaster management from Japan and around the world. In IRIDeS, the Department of Disaster Psychiatry is in charge of dealing with issues related to disaster psychiatry, including the psychosocial impact of disasters. Now, at more than 2 and a half years after the catastrophic disaster, the psychological impact actually seems to be getting stronger and wider, whereas the memory of the disaster seems to be waning in other areas of the country. In such a situation, where a number of problems need to be resolved, what can/should we do as psychiatrists? On the other hand, other natural disasters, such as storms and floods, have kept hitting Japan, and catastrophes seem to strike somewhere in the world every year. In addition, we need to prepare for the possibility of a Nankai Trough Quake and an earthquake directly hitting the Tokyo area, which may occur sometime in the future. Considering the situation, we need to establish an education system for disaster psychiatry, and proceed with research to collect useful information to prepare for coming disasters. The aim of our department is to integrate multi-faceted basic and clinical research approaches to investigate the following topics: 1) to identify social, psychological, and biological factors involved in the pathophysiology of and recovery from disaster-related mental health problems; 2) to develop systems for disaster prevention, disaster response, and recovery, considering disaster-related psychiatric and psychological issues; 3) to develop useful tools for the

  2. Big data are coming to psychiatry: a general introduction.

    PubMed

    Monteith, Scott; Glenn, Tasha; Geddes, John; Bauer, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Big data are coming to the study of bipolar disorder and all of psychiatry. Data are coming from providers and payers (including EMR, imaging, insurance claims and pharmacy data), from omics (genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data), and from patients and non-providers (data from smart phone and Internet activities, sensors and monitoring tools). Analysis of the big data will provide unprecedented opportunities for exploration, descriptive observation, hypothesis generation, and prediction, and the results of big data studies will be incorporated into clinical practice. Technical challenges remain in the quality, analysis and management of big data. This paper discusses some of the fundamental opportunities and challenges of big data for psychiatry. PMID:26440506

  3. Adolescents' physical aggression toward parents in a clinic-referred sample.

    PubMed

    Boxer, Paul; Gullan, Rebecca Lakin; Mahoney, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Physical aggression directed toward parents by their adolescents is a serious issue both practically and scientifically. In contrast to the extensive literature on other forms of aggression within families (e.g., marital violence, child physical abuse) as well as youth aggression construed broadly, a major gap exists in our knowledge of youth-to-parent physical aggression (YPA). In this study, we analyzed data on three forms of physical aggression (YPA, interparental, and parent-to-youth) from 232 mother-adolescent dyads drawn from a database of families referred for the clinical treatment of emotional and behavioral problems in their adolescent children. Analyses indicated that YPA is prevalent (57% by sons and 49% by daughters in 1 year) and significantly likely to co-occur with interparental and parent-to-youth aggression in the family. Follow-up analyses suggested important sex differences in these relations. PMID:19130361

  4. What is psychiatry? Co-producing complexity in mental health

    PubMed Central

    Pickersgill, Martyn

    2012-01-01

    What is psychiatry? Such a question is increasingly important to engage with in light of the development of new diagnostic frameworks that have wide-ranging and international clinical and societal implications. I suggest in this reflective essay that ‘psychiatry' is not a singular entity that enjoins consistent forms of critique along familiar axes; rather, it is a heterogeneous assemblage of interacting material and symbolic elements (some of which endure, and some of which are subject to innovation). In underscoring the diversity of psychiatry, I seek to move towards further sociological purchase on what remains a contested and influential set of discourses and practices. This approach foregrounds the relationships between scientific knowledge, biomedical institutions, social action and subjective experience; these articulations co-produce both psychiatry and each other. One corollary of this emphasis on multiplicity and incoherence within psychiatric theory, research and practice, is that critiques which elide this complexity are rendered problematic. Engagements with psychiatry are, I argue, best furthered by recognising its multifaceted nature. PMID:23226975

  5. Student Experiences with Competency Domains during a Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donald A.; Nierenberg, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors reviewed medical student encounters during 3 years of a required psychiatry clerkship that were recorded on a web-based system of six broad competency domains (similar to ACGME-recommended domains). These were used to determine diagnoses of patients seen, clinical skills practiced, and experiences in interpersonal and…

  6. Space Psychology and Psychiatry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanas, N.; Manzey, D.

    2003-09-01

    This book deals with psychological, psychiatric, and psychosocial issues that affect people who live and work in space. Unlike other books that focus on anecdotal reports and ground-based simulation studies, this book emphasizes the findings from psychological research conducted during actual space missions. Both authors have been active in such research. What is presented in this readable text has previously been found only in scientific journal articles. Topics that are discussed include: behavioral adaptation to space; human performance and cognitive effects; crewmember interactions; psychiatric responses; psychological counter-measures related to habitability factors, work-design, selection, training, and in-flight monitoring and support; and the impact of expeditionary missions to Mars and beyond. People finding this book of interest will include: psychology and social science students and professors in universities; medical students and residents in psychiatry and aerospace medicine; human factors workers in space and aviation professions; individuals involved with isolated environments on Earth (e.g., the Antarctic, submarines); aerospace workers in businesses and space agencies such as NASA and ESA; and anyone who is interested in learning the facts about the human side of long-duration space missions. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1341-8

  7. Forensic psychiatry in Chile.

    PubMed

    St Denis, Emily E; Sepúlveda, Enrique; Téllez, Carlos; Arboleda-Flórez, Julio; Stuart, Heather; Lam, Miu

    2012-01-01

    Mental disorders are among the most prevalent of chronic disorders, and a high prevalence of these disorders has been consistently found in jails and prisons. This study was a retrospective case series that described the population of adults charged with a criminal offense who were court ordered to undergo a psychiatric assessment within the Medical Legal Service in Santiago, Chile from 2005 to 2006. Characteristics were explored in order to better understand this population in light of the recent reforms in the judicial and health systems of Chile. Ninety percent of sampled individuals were male, primarily between the ages of 18-39 years. Seventy percent of the evaluations came from the pre-reformed judicial system and 30% were from the reformed system. Approximately 63% of evaluated offenders were considered to have a psychiatric pathology, the most common being the personality disorders. Of the evaluated offenders, approximately 84% were considered by a psychiatrist to be criminally responsible for their crime, 7% were regarded as having diminished criminal responsibility, 4% were considered to be not criminally responsible for their crime, and 4% were cases where criminal responsibility was not applicable. Profession status, municipality of residence, type of residence, ICD-10 diagnosis, treatment recommendation, and criminal responsibility were found to be significantly different between male and female evaluated offenders. Results from this investigation will contribute to knowledge about forensic psychiatry and mental health in Latin America, and will hopefully pave the way for more research and international comparisons. PMID:23102739

  8. Psychiatry and movies.

    PubMed

    Damjanović, Aleksandar; Vuković, Olivera; Jovanović, Aleksandar A; Jasović-Gasić, Miroslava

    2009-06-01

    As one of the most potent and substantial form of mass communication, film exercises a very significant influence upon the perceptions of the audience, especially in relation to mental illness issues, and that perception is very much blurred with populists' misinterpretation and lack of awareness regarding problems faced by persons suffering from mental disorders. Movies such as "Psycho", "One Flew Over Cuckoo's Nest", "Exorcist", despite being valuable in an artistic sense, corroborated and encouraged confusion and undermined the clarity and certainty concerning the fine line separating mental health from mental illness. Modern film makers and movie theoreticians try to overcome these limitations which are often generated by exploitation of stereotypes and myths referring to mentally ill people. This paper defines and discusses the most frequent thematic stereotypes seen in movies which are perpetuating stigmatization of mentally ill people. They are: free-spirited rebel, maniac on a killing spree, seducer, enlightened member of society, narcissistic parasite, beastly person (stereotype of animal sort). Psychiatry and cinematography are linked inseparably not only because they creatively complement each other, but also as an opportunity of mutual influences blending into didactical categories and professional driving forces, benefiting both the filmmakers' and the psychiatrists' professions. PMID:19556954

  9. [Problem based learning (PBL)--possible adaptation in psychiatry (debate)].

    PubMed

    Adamowski, Tomasz; Frydecka, Dorota; Kiejna, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    Teaching psychiatry concerns mainly education of students studying medicine and clinical psychology, but it also concerns professional training the people specializing in psychiatry and in other fields of medicine. Since the requirements that medical professionals are obliged to meet are ever higher, it is essential to provide highest possible quality of teaching and to do so to use the best possible teaching models. One of the modern educational models is Problem Based Learning (PBL). Barrows' and Dreyfus' research as well as development of andragogy had major impact on the introduction of this model of teaching. There are favourable experiences of using PBL in teaching psychiatry reported, especially in the field of psychosomatics. Problem Based Learning gradually becomes a part of modern curricula in Western Europe. For this reason it is worth keeping in mind PBL's principles and knowingly apply them into practice, all the more the reported educational effects of using this method are very promising. PMID:17598426

  10. Automatic Evaluations in Clinically Anxious and Nonanxious Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vervoort, Leentje; Wolters, Lidewij H.; Hogendoorn, Sanne M.; Prins, Pier J. M.; de Haan, Else; Nauta, Maaike H.; Boer, Frits

    2010-01-01

    Automatic evaluations of clinically anxious and nonanxious children (n = 40, aged 8-16, 18 girls) were compared using a pictorial performance-based measure of automatic affective associations. Results showed a threat-related evaluation bias in clinically anxious but not in nonanxious children. In anxious participants, automatic evaluations of…

  11. Attachment Representations in Mothers, Fathers, Adolescents, and Clinical Groups: A Meta-analytic Search for Normative Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    1996-01-01

    This meta-analysis on 33 studies, including more than 2,000 Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) classifications, presents distributions of AAI classifications in samples of nonclinical fathers and mothers, in adolescents, in samples from different cultures, and in clinical groups. Fathers, adolescents, and participants from different countries show…

  12. Clinical Presentation and Course of Depression in Youth: Does Onset in Childhood Differ from Onset in Adolescence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birmaher, Boris; Williamson, Douglas E.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Axelson, David A.; Kaufman, Joan; Dorn, Lorah D.; Ryan, Neal D.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To simultaneously and prospectively compare the clinical presentation, course, and parental psychiatric history between children and adolescents with major depressive disorder. Method: A group of prepubertal children (n = 46) and postpubertal adolescents (n = 22) were assessed with structured interviews for psychopathology and parental…

  13. Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale Perfectionism: A Predictor and Partial Mediator of Acute Treatment Outcome among Clinically Depressed Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rachel H.; Silva, Susan G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Curry, John F.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of perfectionism on acute treatment outcomes was explored in a randomized controlled trial of 439 clinically depressed adolescents (12-17 years of age) enrolled in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) who received cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine, a combination of CBT and FLX, or pill placebo. Measures…

  14. Randomized Clinical Trial of Motivational Enhancement of Substance Use Treatment among Incarcerated Adolescents: Post-Release Condom Non-Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosengard, Cynthia; Stein, L. A. R.; Barnett, Nancy P.; Monti, Peter M.; Golembeske, Charles; Lebeau-Craven, Rebecca; Miranda, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Evaluated impact of motivational enhancement (ME) of substance abuse treatment compared to relaxation training (RT) on sex without condoms (overall and involving substance use) 3 months following release among incarcerated adolescents. This randomized clinical trial involved 114 incarcerated adolescents from the Northeast. Regression analyses…

  15. Linking Early Brain and Biological Development to Psychiatry: Introduction and Symposia Review

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Mark; Ghali, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This paper introduces the special issue of the Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry on the theme of how multiple factors in early brain and biological development can influence a variety of outcomes in mental health and addictions in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Method: In Part 1, we preview three papers in this issue. In Part 2, we highlight two recent innovative knowledge-transfer symposia featuring the application of the science in early development and addictions. Results: The papers focus on the subtopics of brain plasticity, mood disorders, and comparative research with monkeys on gene-environment interactions and parent-child attachment. In addition, the research presented at the Early Brain and Biological Development Symposium and the Recovery from Addiction Symposium is also reviewed. Held in 2010 in Banff, Alberta, each five-day program was intended to bridge the gap between scientific and clinical experts and those in the province responsible for policy, programs, and services. Conclusions: The science now links common neurobiological maturation processes, adverse early childhood experiences, and key aspects of the social environment with risks for mental health disorders and addictions later in life. The final paper in this issue examines the clinical and policy implications of this research knowledge. PMID:22114607

  16. Comments on "cyclical swings" by Professor Hannah Decker: The underappreciated "solid center" of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Pies, Ronald W

    2016-02-01

    The history of psychiatry is characterized by some deep ideological and conceptual divisions, as adumbrated in Professor Hannah Decker's essay. However, the schism between "biological" and "psychosocial" models of mental illness and its treatment represents extreme positions among some psychiatrists-not the model propounded by academic psychiatry or its affiliated professional organizations. Indeed, the "biopsycho-social model" (BPSM) developed by Dr. George L. Engel has been, and remains, the foundational model for academic psychiatry, notwithstanding malign market forces that have undermined the BPSM's use in clinical practice. The BPSM is integrally related to "centralizing" and integrative trends in American psychiatry that may be traced to Franz Alexander, Karl Jaspers, and Engel himself, among others. This "Alexandrian-Jaspersian-Engelian" tradition is explored in relation to Professor Decker's "cyclical swing" model of psychiatry's history. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26844653

  17. Why medical students choose psychiatry - a 20 country cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recruitment to psychiatry is insufficient to meet projected mental health service needs world-wide. We report on the career plans of final year medical students from 20 countries, investigating factors identified from the literature which influence psychiatric career choice. Methods Cross sectional electronic or paper survey. Subjects were final year medical students at 46 medical schools in participating countries. We assessed students’ career intentions, motivations, medical school teaching and exposure to psychiatry. We assessed students’ attitudes and personality factors. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatry. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the joint effect of factors upon the main outcome. Results 2198 of 9135 (24%) of students responded (range 4 to 91%) across the countries. Internationally 4.5% of students definitely considered psychiatry as a career (range 1 to 12%). 19% of students (range 0 to 33%) were “quite likely”, and 25% were “definitely not” considering psychiatry. Female gender, experience of mental/physical illness, media portrayal of doctors, and positive attitudes to psychiatry, but not personality factors, were associated with choosing psychiatry. Quality of psychiatric placement (correlation coefficient = 0.22, p < 0.001) and number of placements (correlation coefficient =0.21, p < 0.001) were associated with higher ATP scores. During medical school, experience of psychiatric enrichment activities (special studies modules and university psychiatry clubs), experience of acutely unwell patients and perceived clinical responsibility were all associated with choice of psychiatry. Multilevel logistic regression revealed six factors associated with students choosing psychiatry: importance of own vocation, odds ratio (OR) 3.01, 95% CI 1.61 to 5.91, p < 0.001); interest in psychiatry before medical school, OR 10.8 (5.38 to 21.8, p < 0.001); undertaking a

  18. Child Maltreatment and the Adolescent Patient With Severe Obesity: Implications for Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Jennie G.; Sarwer, David B.; Reiter-Purtill, Jennifer; Rofey, Dana L.; Baughcum, Amy E.; Peugh, James; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Michalsky, Marc P.; Jenkins, Todd M; Becnel, Jennifer N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize prevalence and correlates of child maltreatment (CM) in a clinical sample of adolescents with severe obesity. Method Multicenter baseline data from 139 adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery (Mage = 16.9; 79.9% female, 66.2% White; Mbody mass index [BMI] = 51.5 kg/m2) and 83 nonsurgical comparisons (Mage = 16.1; 81.9% female, 54.2% White; MBMI = 46.9 kg/m2) documented self-reported CM (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire) and associations with psychopathology, quality of life, self-esteem and body image, high-risk behaviors, and family dysfunction. Results CM prevalence (females: 29%; males: 12%) was similar to national adolescent base rates. Emotional abuse was most prevalent. One in 10 females reported sexual abuse. For females, CM rates were higher in comparisons, yet correlates were similar for both cohorts: greater psychopathology, substance use, and family dysfunction, and lower quality of life. Conclusion While a minority of adolescents with severe obesity reported a CM history, they carry greater psychosocial burden into the clinical setting. PMID:25774054

  19. [Psychiatry at Leipzig University. A 200 year old tradition].

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Holger

    2004-01-01

    The University of Leipzig boasts a long tradition in the field of psychiatry. In 1811 Johann Christian August Heinroth was appointed as the first professor of mental health ("psychic therapy") in Europe. He conceived mental illness as based on a person's own guilt, as the consequence of turning away from God and living a life untrue to Christian ethics. After Heinroth retired in 1843 the Leipzig chair remained vacant until 1878 brain researcher Paul Flechsig succeeded him as professor of psychiatry, although not significantly contributing to the progress of this subject. His first assistant was Emil Kraepelin. Flechsig's successors, Oswald Bumke and Paul Schroder, included psychological as well as sociogenetic topics in their research. The latter did pioneering work for the institutionalization of child and adolescent psychiatry. The history of Leipzig psychiatry during the Nazi years has not yet been researched in depth. So far, however, no evidence has been found to prove the university hospital's involvement in German psychiatry's excruciating crimes on patients. It is true, however, that as elsewhere doctors of the Leipzig hospital were members of the Courts of Hereditary Health (Erbgesundheitsgericht) and that e.g. August Bostroem knew of the homicides. In 1943, during the directorship of Werner Wagner, the hospital was totally destroyed. Its reconstruction was mainly the work of Richard Arwed Pfeifer, who also made remarkable contributions to the study of the angiostructure of the brain. With Dietfried Muller-Hegemann, who had a major influence of East-German psychotherapy, the social psychiatric era began, and it was successfully continued under Berhard Schwarz, Klaus Weise and the hospital's present head, Matthias C. Angermeyer, Weise's theoretical and philosophical achievements in the foundation and his demand for an empirical verification of social psychiatric ideas in the whole of Germany are acknowledged until the present day. Last but no least it was

  20. Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Other Clinically Significant Body Image Concerns in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Dyl, Jennifer; Kittler, Jennifer; Phillips, Katharine A.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Background This study assessed prevalence and clinical correlates of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), eating disorders (ED), and other clinically significant body image concerns in 208 consecutively admitted adolescent inpatients. It was hypothesized that adolescents with BDD would have higher levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality. Adolescents with eating disorders were expected to have higher levels of depression, anxiety, and trauma-related symptoms. Trauma-related symptoms were also examined in relation to BDD, in the absence of specific hypotheses. Method Participants completed the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ) and reliable and valid self-report measures of suicidality, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), dissociation, and sexual preoccupation/distress. Prevalence of BDD, eating disorders, and other clinically significant body image concerns was determined, and clinical correlates were examined. Results 6.7% (n = 14) of participants met DSM-IV criteria for definite (n = 10) or probable (n = 4) DSM-IV BDD, 3.8% (n = 8) met criteria for an eating disorder, and 22.1% (n = 46) had clinically significant shape/weight concerns (SWC) that did not clearly meet criteria for BDD or an eating disorder. Both the BDD and SWC groups scored significantly higher than the group with no significant body image concerns (no BDD/ED/SWC group) on measures of anxiety and suicidality. The BDD, SWC, and ED groups all had significantly higher levels of depression than the no BDD/ED/SWC group. Only the SWC group scored significantly higher than the no BDD/ED/SWC group on measures of PTSD, dissociation, and sexual preoccupation/distress. Conclusions A high proportion of participants had clinically significant body image concerns or a body image disorder. These concerns/disorders were associated with higher levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality. In addition, the group concerned with body shape or weight had significantly greater

  1. Factors affecting linkage to care and engagement in care for newly diagnosed HIV-positive adolescents within fifteen adolescent medicine clinics in the United States.

    PubMed

    Philbin, Morgan M; Tanner, Amanda E; DuVal, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan M; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill; Bethel, Jim; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2014-08-01

    Early linkage to care and engagement in care are critical for initiation of medical interventions. However, over 50 % of newly diagnosed persons do not receive HIV-related care within 6 months of diagnosis. We evaluated a linkage to care and engagement in care initiative for HIV-positive adolescents in 15 U.S.-based clinics. Structural and client-level factors (e.g. demographic and behavioral characteristics, clinic staff and location) were evaluated as predictors of successful linkage and engagement. Within 32 months, 1,172/1,679 (69.8 %) of adolescents were linked to care of which 1,043/1,172 (89 %) were engaged in care. Only 62.1 % (1,043/1,679) of adolescents were linked and engaged in care. Linkage to care failure was attributed to adolescent, provider, and clinic-specific factors. Many adolescents provided incomplete data during the linkage process or failed to attend appointments, both associated with failure to linkage to care. Additional improvements in HIV care will require creative approaches to coordinated data sharing, as well as continued outreach services to support newly diagnosed adolescents. PMID:24682848

  2. Reasons for choosing to specialise in psychiatry: differences between core psychiatry trainees and consultant psychiatrists

    PubMed Central

    Denman, Melissa; Oyebode, Femi; Greening, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method This questionnaire study aimed to investigate the reasons for choosing to specialise in psychiatry in a sample of consultant psychiatrists and core trainee psychiatrists from within the West Midlands. Results Five reasons were significantly different between the core trainees and consultant psychiatrists. ‘Emphasis on the patient as a whole’ was identified as the most important reason for choosing to specialise for both core trainees and consultants. Six additional reasons were shared within the top ten ‘very important’ reasons, although their actual ranking varies. Clinical implications Some of the reasons for choosing to specialise in psychiatry were shown to significantly differ between core trainees and consultants. Numerous key driving factors have remained important over time for both groups, whereas other reasons have been replaced with a shift of importance towards lifestyle and humanitarian factors for core trainees. Consequently, it may be advisable not to use the reasons that consultants gave for choosing psychiatry when thinking about how to attract today's prospective psychiatrists. PMID:26958354

  3. Healthcare Reform and Preparing the Future Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology Workforce.

    PubMed

    Janicke, David M; Fritz, Alyssa M; Rozensky, Ronald H

    2015-01-01

    The healthcare environment is undergoing important changes for both patients and providers, in part due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Ultimately the healthcare delivery system will function very differently by the end of this decade. These changes will have important implications for the education, training, scientific inquiry, and practice of clinical child and adolescent psychologists. In this article we provide a brief description of the fundamental features of the ACA, with a specific focus on critical components of the act that have important, specific implications for clinical child and adolescents psychologists. We then provide recommendations to help position our field to thrive in the evolving healthcare environment to help facilitate further awareness and promote discussion of both challenges and opportunities that face our field in this evolving health care environment. PMID:26158589

  4. The Influence of Clinical, Treatment, and Healthcare System Characteristics on Psychiatric Readmission of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Fontanella, Cynthia A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined predictors of readmission for a sample of 522 adolescents enrolled in Medicaid and admitted to three inpatient psychiatric hospitals in Maryland. Comprehensive data on clinical, treatment, and health care system characteristics were collected from archival sources (medical records, Medicaid claims, and Area Resource File). Predictors of readmission were examined with bivariate (Kaplan Meier) and multivariate (Cox Regression) survival techniques. One year readmission rates were 38% with the majority occurring within 3 months after discharge. Adolescent demographic (age and gender), clinical (severity of symptoms, comorbidity, suicidality) and family characteristics (level of family risk) were associated with readmission. However, treatment factors including type of aftercare, post-discharge living environment, medication noncompliance, and hospital provider were among the strongest predictors of readmission. Study findings underscore the importance of careful discharge planning and linkage to appropriate aftercare. The differing rates of readmission across hospitals also suggest that organizational level factors may play a vital role in determining treatment outcomes. PMID:18954182

  5. Clinical practices in the pharmacological treatment of comorbid psychopathology in adolescents with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Clark, Duncan B; Wood, D Scott; Cornelius, Jack R; Bukstein, Oscar G; Martin, Christopher S

    2003-12-01

    This study examined the use of psychiatric medications in 277 adolescents in treatment for alcohol use disorders. Subjects were recruited from addictions treatment sites, psychiatric programs, and juvenile justice settings. Characteristics studied included the use of and indications for specific medications, changes in clinical practices from 1991 through 2000, and continuation of psychopharmacological treatment over a 1-year followup period. Among adolescents taking psychiatric medications at baseline (n = 51), indicated DSM-IV mental disorders were typically present, use of antidepressants was most common (n = 41), benzodiazepine prescription was rare, and about one third reported continuing pharmacological treatment at one-year followup. In those with comorbid major depressive disorder and alcohol use disorders (n = 110), antidepressant medication use increased significantly from 18% to 55% over the decade studied. The treatment setting did not significantly influence antidepressant prescribing practices. The common and increasing use of psychiatric medications in this population emphasizes the urgent need for empirically based clinical guidelines. PMID:14693259

  6. Development of AACAP practice parameters for gender nonconformity and gender discordance in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Adelson, Stewart L

    2011-10-01

    The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) is preparing a publication, Practice Parameter on Gay, Lesbian or Bisexual Sexual Orientation, Gender-Nonconformity, and Gender Discordance in Children and Adolescents. This article discusses the development of the part of the parameter related to gender nonconformity and gender discordance and describes the practice parameter preparation process,rationale, key scientific evidence, and methodology. Also discussed are terminology considerations, related clinical issues and practice skills, and overall organization of information including influences on gender development, gender role behavior, gender nonconformity and gender discordance, and their relationship to the development of sexual orientation. PMID:22051003

  7. [Utilization of expert systems in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Ohayon, M M

    1993-04-01

    Are expert systems liable to be used as consultants in psychiatry? Most expert systems deal with an over-restricted part of psychiatry and cannot be a real help in everyday care. Moreover, most of them are not actually validated (the comparison between the system's and the expert's conclusions in a few cases is not enough). Another problem is that they reflect the uncertainties of nosographic problems. Validation of such systems needs the careful checking of the logical structure of the underlying nosography, the fitness of the structure's knowledge base and the fitness of the inference engine. Moreover, the naïve use of the system by untrained clinicians is the best means of validation since it provides real life proof of the ability of expert systems to make diagnoses in unselected cases where the need for a common diagnostic reference is clear (for example, epidemiologic, psychopharmacological ornosographic research). Some of the best known expert systems in the field of psychiatry are reviewed and another expert system, Adinfer, is presented. Developed since 1982, Adinfer is a forward-tracking level O system (in its simplified version for micro-computers). The knowledge base is a translation of the DSM-III-R into production rules. The program has been included in several software packages and used in many clinical studies, both among psychiatrists and physicians. The program has been validated with 1,141 unselected cases, and with 47 physicians: an 83% agreement rate was found between the system's and the physician's diagnoses, taking into account that the clinicians were asked to give their conclusions according to their usual nosography.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8500073

  8. Menstrual disorders in a Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic: patient presentations and longitudinal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chung, P W; Chan, Symphorosa S C; Yiu, K W; Lao, Terence T H; Chung, Tony K H

    2011-10-01

    OBJECTIVE. To study the presentations, diagnoses, and outcomes in adolescents with menstrual disorders. DESIGN. Prospective cohort study. SETTING. Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic, Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS. A total of 577 adolescents aged 14 to 19 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. The presentations and diagnoses of adolescents with menstrual disorders were reviewed and their menstrual outcomes determined by a telephone survey. RESULTS. In all, 47% presented with menorrhagia, prolonged menstruation, and short menstrual cycles; 27% had secondary amenorrhoea, 12% had dysmenorrhoea, 11% had oligomenorrhoea, and 3% had primary amenorrhoea. Significant diagnoses included congenital genital tract anomalies, premature ovarian failure, anorexia nervosa, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Polycystic ovarian syndrome was diagnosed in 16% of the cohort. In all, 24% of these 577 patients had abnormal menstrual cycles 4 years later. Direct logistic regression analysis indicated a cycle length of more than 35 days at presentation (adjusted odds ratio=2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-4.5), previous diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (adjusted odds ratio=2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.4), and current body mass index of 23 kg/m(2) or higher (adjusted odds ratio=1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.0) were risk factors for persistently long menstrual cycle exceeding 35 days. Adolescents who were screened out with a definitive diagnosis after initial assessment were at low risk of persistently long menstrual cycles at follow-up (adjusted odds ratio=0.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.8). CONCLUSIONS. Adolescent menstrual disorders should not be ignored. Long cycle, diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome at first consultation, and a current body mass index of 23 kg/m(2) or higher were statistically associated with persistent problems. PMID:21979477

  9. School-Located Vaccination Clinics for Adolescents: Correlates of Acceptance Among Parents.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Lisa M; Weiss, Paul; Underwood, Natasha L; Seib, Katherine; Sales, Jessica M; Vogt, Tara M; Rask, Kimberly; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis L; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M

    2015-08-01

    Four vaccines are recommended by The Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices for adolescents: tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap), meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4), human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV), and annual seasonal influenza vaccine. However, coverage among adolescents is suboptimal. School-located vaccination clinics (SLVCs) offer vaccines to students at school, increasing access. This study seeks to determine the relationship between attitudes of parents of middle- and high-school students and acceptance of SLVCs for all four adolescent recommended vaccines. We conducted a telephone and web-based survey among parents of students enrolled in six middle and five high schools in Georgia. Analyses were conducted to examine associations between parental attitudes and willingness to allow their child to be vaccinated at school. Tdap and influenza vaccine had the highest rates of parental SLVC acceptance while HPV vaccine had the lowest. Parents who accepted SLVCs had higher perceived severity of influenza, meningococcal, and HPV illnesses compared to parents who did not accept SLVC. Intention to vaccinate was associated with SLVC acceptance for Tdap [Adjusted OR (AOR) 7.38; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.44-22.31], MCV4 (AOR 2.97; 95% CI 1.67-5.28), and HPV vaccines (AOR 7.61; 95% CI 3.43-16.89). Social norms were associated with acceptance of SLVCs for influenza vaccine (AOR 1.44; 95% CI 1.12-1.84). These findings suggest parents of adolescents are generally supportive of SLVCs for recommended adolescent vaccines. Perceived severity of illness and intention to get their adolescent vaccinated were the most consistent correlates of parental SLVC acceptance for all vaccines. Future SLVC planning should focus on perceptions of disease severity and benefits of vaccination. PMID:25528325

  10. The Adolescent Substance Abuse Goal Commitment (ASAGC) Questionnaire: An Examination of Clinical Utility and Psychometric Properties.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Yifrah; Ohannessian, Christine McCauley; McKay, James R; Burke, Rebecca H

    2016-02-01

    Commitment to change is an innovative potential mediator or mechanism of behavior change that has not been examined in adolescents with substance use disorders (SUD). The Adolescent Substance Abuse Goal Commitment (ASAGC) questionnaire is a 16-item measure developed to assess an individual's commitment to his/her stated treatment goal. The objectives of this study are to explore the research and clinical utility of the commitment construct as measured by the ASAGC. During sessions 3 and 9 of a 10-week SUD treatment, therapists completed the ASAGC for 170 13-18 year-old adolescents. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the ATAGC items. Concurrent validity with related constructs, self-efficacy and motivation for change, was examined as well. At both sessions, the factor analysis resulted in two scales--Commitment to Recovery and Commitment to Harm Reduction. The ASAGC scales were found to demonstrate a high level of internal consistency (alpha coefficients ranged from .92 to .96 over time). In contrast to the Commitment to Harm Reduction scale, the Commitment to Recovery scale consistently correlated with scales from the Situational Confidence Questionnaire assessing self-efficacy, evidencing concurrent validity. Similarly, the Commitment to Recovery scale was related to the Problem Recognition Questionnaire, providing further evidence of the validity of the ASAGC. The ASAGC is a reliable and valid clinical research instrument for the assessment of adolescents' commitment to their substance abuse treatment goal. Clinical researchers may take advantage of the clinical utility of the ASAGC including its ability to differentiate between commitment to abstinence versus commitment to harm reduction. PMID:26531893

  11. [Hereditary epidermolysis bullosa in school children and adolescents : Clinical picture and interdisciplinary management].

    PubMed

    Ott, H; Eich, C; Schriek, K; Ludwikowski, B

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary epidermolysis bullosa (EB) represents a clinically heterogeneous group of congenital blistering disorders requiring multiprofessional care. EB is associated with a broad spectrum of potentially severe complications often reaching their full extent during school age and adolescence. This review aims at summarizing cutaneous manifestations of EB as well as extracutaneous complications of this complex disease and their interdisciplinary management. PMID:26943360

  12. History of psychiatry in India

    PubMed Central

    Nizamie, S. Haque; Goyal, Nishant

    2010-01-01

    History is a screen through which the past lightens the present and the present brightens the future. Psychiatry by virtue of its ability to deal with human thoughts and emotions and provide a pathway for healthy minds provides an important platform towards being a mentally sound human being and largely the society. This review takes a sneak peek into the foundations of modern psychiatry in India. The description is largely based on the time frame, which provides a better understanding of the factual information in each period starting from the Vedic era and culminating in the post independence period. PMID:21836719

  13. Clinical Profile of Children and Adolescents Attending the Behavioural Paediatrics Unit OPD in a Tertiary Care Set up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaprakash, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are limited studies on the clinical profile of children attending child guidance clinic under Paediatric background. Aims: To study clinical profile of Children & adolescents attending the Behavioural Paediatrics Unit (BPU) OPD under department of Paediatrics in a tertiary care set up. Methods: Monthly average turnover in the OPD…

  14. Preliminary Examination of the Interpersonal Psychological Theory of Suicide in an Adolescent Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Horton, Sarah E; Hughes, Jennifer L; King, Jessica D; Kennard, Betsy D; Westers, Nicholas J; Mayes, Taryn L; Stewart, Sunita M

    2016-08-01

    This study offers a preliminary examination of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS; Joiner 2005) in an adolescent clinical sample. The IPTS offers a nuanced framework that has many conceptual and practical merits. Although this theory has a growing base of evidence among adults, it has yet to be tested in adolescents using direct measures of its central constructs. Participants were 147 adolescents (76.2 % girls) on an inpatient psychiatric unit, who completed measures of key IPTS constructs of thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, acquired capability for suicide, as well as depression severity, hopelessness, and severity of suicidal symptoms. Our findings were largely consistent with hypotheses derived from the IPTS: perceived burdensomeness, and at a marginal level, thwarted belongingness, were independently associated with current suicidal ideation. The thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness interaction marginally distinguished between adolescents with passive and active suicidal ideation. Acquired capability for suicide was associated with recent suicidal intent. Examination of all three IPTS constructs simultaneously revealed main effects of each construct (with a marginal effect of thwarted belongingness), and interaction effects for thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness, and thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness by acquired capability for suicide in association with suicidal symptom severity. Sex, age, depression severity, and hopelessness were controlled in all analyses. This study offers strong, albeit preliminary, support of the IPTS in a clinical adolescent sample. Assessment of IPTS constructs may be useful in determining persistent risk for suicide attempt. Prospective tests of the theory, and extensions to intervention and prevention should be considered in future IPTS research. PMID:26667025

  15. Social Construction: Vistas in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gergen, Kenneth J.; Lightfoot, Cynthia; Sydow, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    We explore here the potentials of a social constructionist orientation to knowledge for research and clinical practice. Dialogues on social construction emphasize the communal origins of knowledge. They stress the cultural basis of knowledge claims, the significance of language, the value saturation of all knowledge, and the significance of…

  16. [Hundred years' psychiatry in Korea (1899-1999)].

    PubMed

    Rhi, B Y

    1999-01-01

    The western medical knowledges of the human anatomy and physiology including knowledges of central nervous system have probably been introduced into Korea by Prince Sohyŏn Seja in 1645. The authentic education for the western medicine at the governmental and private medical schools, however, originated from 1899 and the education of mental disease was included in curriculum of Tai-Han-uiwon, the governmental medical school before 1910. In 1913 the first department of psychiatry (Department of Mental Disease) was established at the Chongdokbu-uiwon, the clinic of the Japanese colonial government, the former Korean governmental hospital which has later developed to the Kyŏngs ŏng Imperial University Hospital. On the other hand, there was in Severance Hospital Medical College, one Australian missionary psychiatrist McLaren, who has served at Paton Memorial Hospital in Jinju, Korea from 1911, taught neurology and psychiatry from 1913 at Severance Hospital Medical College, established psychiatry ward in 1923 at the Hospital, conducted the ward in humanistic way until 1940. It was the German psychiatry which the Japanese psychiatrists have brought to the Korean peninsula and it remained as major trends of psychiatry in Korea during the Japanese occupation between 1911 and 1945. The academic levels of Kyŏngsŏng Imperial University in psychiatry as well as the quality of mental care seemed to be almost equivocal to the psychiatry in Japan. However, psychiatrists scope of social psychiatric issues and of the research interests seemed to be somewhat narrow. Due to the political discrimination for the Korean students, the Koreans had less opportunity for the promotion at the university than Japanese residents in Korea. In 1945, after the end of the Pacific War only about 11 Korean psychiatrists were left in Korea, who organized Korean Neuropsychiatric Association. The Department of Neuropsychiatry of Seoul National University (former Department of Neurology and

  17. Suicidal behaviors among adolescents in puerto rico: rates and correlates in clinical and community samples.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jennifer; Ramirez, Rafael Roberto; Davies, Mark; Canino, Glorisa; Goodwin, Renee D

    2008-04-01

    This study examined rates and correlates of suicidal behavior among youth on the island of Puerto Rico. Data were drawn from two probability samples, one clinical (n = 736) and one community-based sample (n = 1,896), of youth ages 12 to 17. Consistent with previous studies in U.S. mainland adolescent populations, our results demonstrate that most psychiatric disorders are associated with significantly increased likelihood of suicidal behaviors. These findings provide critical new information by demonstrating specificity in the link between psychiatric disorders and suicidal behaviors. These data also suggest consistency in the links in both clinical and community samples, and by gender. PMID:18470780

  18. Neurology and psychiatry: waking up to opportunities of sleep. : State of the art and clinical/research priorities for the next decade.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, C L; Ferini-Strambi, L; Brown, S; Adamantidis, A; Benedetti, F; Bruni, O; Cajochen, C; Dolenc-Groselj, L; Ferri, R; Gais, S; Huber, R; Khatami, R; Lammers, G J; Luppi, P H; Manconi, M; Nissen, C; Nobili, L; Peigneux, P; Pollmächer, T; Randerath, W; Riemann, D; Santamaria, J; Schindler, K; Tafti, M; Van Someren, E; Wetter, T C

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, evidence has emerged for a bidirectional relationship between sleep and neurological and psychiatric disorders. First, sleep-wake disorders (SWDs) are very common and may be the first/main manifestation of underlying neurological and psychiatric disorders. Secondly, SWDs may represent an independent risk factor for neuropsychiatric morbidities. Thirdly, sleep-wake function (SWF) may influence the course and outcome of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review summarizes the most important research and clinical findings in the fields of neuropsychiatric sleep and circadian research and medicine, and discusses the promise they bear for the next decade. The findings herein summarize discussions conducted in a workshop with 26 European experts in these fields, and formulate specific future priorities for clinical practice and translational research. More generally, the conclusion emerging from this workshop is the recognition of a tremendous opportunity offered by our knowledge of SWF and SWDs that has unfortunately not yet entered as an important key factor in clinical practice, particularly in Europe. Strengthening pre-graduate and postgraduate teaching, creating academic multidisciplinary sleep-wake centres and simplifying diagnostic approaches of SWDs coupled with targeted treatment strategies yield enormous clinical benefits for these diseases. PMID:26255640

  19. Limitations of the biopsychosocial model in psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Benning, Tony B

    2015-01-01

    A commitment to an integrative, non-reductionist clinical and theoretical perspective in medicine that honors the importance of all relevant domains of knowledge, not just “the biological,” is clearly evident in Engel’s original writings on the biopsychosocial model. And though this model’s influence on modern psychiatry (in clinical as well as educational settings) has been significant, a growing body of recent literature is critical of it – charging it with lacking philosophical coherence, insensitivity to patients’ subjective experience, being unfaithful to the general systems theory that Engel claimed it be rooted in, and engendering an undisciplined eclecticism that provides no safeguards against either the dominance or the under-representation of any one of the three domains of bio, psycho, or social. PMID:25999775

  20. An Introduction to Child Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chess, Stella

    The role of child psychiatry is discussed, and the child is described as a developing organism. Genetic factors in behavior are considered as are the presenting problems. Methods treated involve taking the history, conducting the diagnostic interview, using special diagnostic procedures, and applying diagnostic classification. Problem areas dealt…

  1. Some origins of cross-cultural psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Raimundo Oda, Ana Maria G; Banzato, Claudio Eduardo M; Dalgalarrondo, Paulo

    2005-06-01

    The interface between insanity, race and culture was a challenging subject for some of the most influential nineteenth-century alienists. Our paper reviews some of the theoretical and clinical investigations of comparative psychiatry of this period. The idea that insanity was supposedly rare among 'primitive' people, e.g., Africans, American Natives and some Eastern populations, was repeatedly defended by prominent alienists. Associated with this notion, many authors believed that insanity tends to become more prevalent as civilization evolves. According to them, civilization had an unfavourable effect on insanity rates because it demanded a much higher degree of organization and mental production. Moreover, a greater degree of mental excitation would explain why insanity occurs more frequently in Europe than in the East, Africa or South America. Eventually, at the end of the nineteenth century, the coalition of cross-cultural and neuropsychiatry produced a notion that the brain of the 'native' is more simple and crude than that of the civilized, and more vulnerable to the evil effects of civilized life. In conclusion, some ethnocentric bias and racial stereotypes still pervasive in contemporary psychiatry are identified and traced back to their historical origins. PMID:16013118

  2. What attracts medical students towards psychiatry? A review of factors before and during medical school.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Kitty; Lydall, Gregory J; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2013-08-01

    Potential psychiatrists decide on their careers before, during or after medical school. This article summarises the literature focusing on the first two groups. Pre-medical school factors associated with choosing psychiatry include gender, academic aptitude, ethnicity and migration, exposure to mental illness, economic considerations and medical school route and selection. Factors involved in influencing career choice at medical school level include attitudes towards psychiatry, teaching methods, quality and length of clinical exposure, electives and enrichment activities, and personality factors. Considering these factors may improve recruitment to psychiatry and address shortages in the speciality. PMID:24032490

  3. Forced into treatment. The role of coercion in clinical practice. Formulated by the Committee on Government Policy. Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry. Report no. 137.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    It is clear to students of child development that setting limits and using parental power are necessary in promoting the maturational process. In fact, family systems theory addresses the issues of power and power coalitions as paramount. Forcing a child into treatment initially is a legitimate role for parents or guardians and is validated by mental health professionals, who feel that this must be accepted as part of their regular clinical work--especially in the case of school-age children, who only rarely can initiate requests for help. Further, the clinical use of power and persuasion has been addressed by a number of authors at both theoretical and pragmatic levels. Child psychiatrists deal with issues of coercion systematically and successfully in clinical practice. Although children often come into treatment against their will--sometimes because of physical pressures or threats and sometimes because of economic or emotional threats--they often can make use of a therapeutic relationship that is negotiated over time and gives careful attention to the child's identified needs and wishes. This experience leads one to recognize that many seemingly overtly coercive treatment contexts may be turned into effective treatment interventions. Exploration of the use of power and coercion as they relate to children--whether in normal development or in treatment--is helpful in the study of the psychopathology of adults who require limit setting, persuasion, or coercion in their treatment, often quite possibly because their childhood developmental experience regarding issues of power was dysfunctional. PMID:8121993

  4. [New developments in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Conus, Philippe; Herrera, Fabrice; Berney, Sylvie; Gailland, Bénédicte; Beretta, Véronique; Vandenberghe, Frederik; Eap, Chin B

    2016-01-13

    Three issues are discussed: i) While number of psychiatric beds has been reduced in most countries and although treatments proposed in psychiatric hospitals have evolved, they continue to be viewed as asylums implementing constraints. Considering this prevents their adequate use and leads to patients' stigmatisation, promotion of a better knowledge of contemporary hospital treatments is needed. 2) In addition, most psychiatric disorders emerging during adolescence and early adulthood, it is important to develop accessible care on university campuses. 3) While risk of weight gain and metabolic syndrome under neuroleptics or mood stabilisers is known, there is a need for the development of that are easy to identify. A 5% increase in weight during the first month of treatment indicates the risk for important later weight gain. PMID:26946712

  5. Training in psychiatry throughout Europe.

    PubMed

    Brittlebank, Andrew; Hermans, Marc; Bhugra, Dinesh; Pinto da Costa, Mariana; Rojnic-Kuzman, Martina; Fiorillo, Andrea; Kurimay, Tamas; Hanon, Cecile; Wasserman, Danuta; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatry is the largest medical specialty in Europe. Despite efforts to bring harmonisation, training in psychiatry in Europe continues to be very diverse. The Union Européenne des Médecins Spécialistes (UEMS) has issued as from 2000 a charter of requirements for the training in psychiatry with an additional European Framework for Competencies in Psychiatry in 2009. Yet these have not been implemented throughout Europe. In this paper, the diversity in training throughout Europe is approached from different angles: the cultural differences between countries with regards to how mental health care is considered and founded on, the cultural differences between people throughout Europe in all states. The position of psychotherapy is emphasised. What once was the cornerstone of psychiatry as medical specialty seems to have become a neglected area. Seeing the patient with mental health problems within his cultural context is important, but considering him within his family context. The purpose of any training is enabling the trainee to gain the knowledge and acquire the competencies necessary to become a well-equipped professional is the subject of the last paragraph in which trainees consider their position and early career psychiatrists look back to see whether what they were trained in matches with what they need in the working situation. Common standard for training and certification are a necessity within Europe, for the benefit of the profession of psychiatrist but also for patient safety. UEMS is advised to join forces with the Council of National Psychiatric Associations (NPAs) within the EPA and trainings and early career psychiatrist, to discuss with the users what standards should be implemented in all European countries and how a European board examination could ensure professional quality of psychiatrists throughout the continent. PMID:26880078

  6. Repetitive Concussions in Adolescent Athletes – Translating Clinical and Experimental Research into Perspectives on Rehabilitation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Bridgette D.; Lee, Sangmi; Sadjadi, Raha; Fritz, Nora; Carlson, Jaclyn; Griep, Carrie; Ho, Vanessa; Jang, Patrice; Lamb, Annick; Popolizio, Beth; Saini, Sonia; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.; Prins, Mayumi L.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Basso, D. Michele; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are particularly common during adolescence, a time when even mild brain injuries may disrupt ongoing brain maturation and result in long-term complications. A recent focus on the consequences of repetitive concussions among professional athletes has prompted the development of several new experimental models in rodents, as well as the revision of guidelines for best management of sports concussions. Here, we consider the utility of rodent models to understand the functional consequences and pathobiology of concussions in the developing brain, identifying the unique behavioral and pathological signatures of concussive brain injuries. The impact of repetitive concussions on behavioral consequences and injury progression is also addressed. In particular, we focus on the epidemiological, clinical, and experimental evidence underlying current recommendations for physical and cognitive rest after concussion, and highlight key areas in which further research is needed. Lastly, we consider how best to promote recovery after injury, recognizing that optimally timed, activity-based rehabilitative strategies may hold promise for the adolescent athlete who has sustained single or repetitive concussions. The purpose of this review is to inform the clinical research community as it strives to develop and optimize evidence-based guidelines for the concussed adolescent, in terms of both acute and long-term management. PMID:25883586

  7. Distinctive clinical course and pattern of relapse in adolescents with medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tabori, Uri . E-mail: uri.tabori@sickkids.ca; Sung, Lillian; Laperriere, Normand; Crooks, Bruce; Wilson, Beverly

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical course of adolescents with medulloblastoma, with specific emphasis on prognosis and pattern of relapse. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied the clinical course and outcomes of children aged 10-20 years with medulloblastoma, treated at centers throughout Canada between 1986 and 2003. To better assess time to relapse, a cohort of patients aged 3-20 years at diagnosis was generated. Results: A total of 72 adolescents were analyzed. Five-year overall survival and event-free survival rates were 78.3% {+-} 5.4% and 68.0% {+-} 6.2%, respectively. Late relapses occurred at a median of 3.0 years (range, 0.3-6.8 years). In univariate analysis, conventional risk stratification and the addition of chemotherapy to craniospinal radiation did not have prognostic significance. Female patients had improved overall survival (p = 0.007). Time to relapse increased with age in a linear fashion. After relapse, patients faired poorly regardless of treatment modality. Patients who did not receive chemotherapy initially had improved progression-free survival at relapse (p 0.05). Conclusions: Our study suggests that adolescents with medulloblastoma might have a unique prognosis and pattern of relapse, dissimilar to those in younger children. They might benefit from different risk stratifications and prolonged follow-up. These issues should be addressed in future prospective trials.

  8. Empirical evidence on the use and effectiveness of telepsychiatry via videoconferencing: implications for forensic and correctional psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Antonacci, Diana J; Bloch, Richard M; Saeed, Sy Atezaz; Yildirim, Yilmaz; Talley, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    A growing body of literature now suggests that use of telepsychiatry to provide mental health services has the potential to solve the workforce shortage problem that directly affects access to care, especially in remote and underserved areas. Live interactive two-way audio-video communication-videoconferencing-is the modality most applicable to psychiatry and has become synonymous with telepsychiatry involving patient care, distance education, and administration. This article reviews empirical evidence on the use and effectiveness of videoconferencing in providing diagnostic and treatment services in mental health settings that serve child, adolescent, and adult populations. Descriptive reports, case studies, research articles, and randomized controlled trials related to clinical outcomes were identified and reviewed independently by two authors. Articles related to cost-effectiveness, technological issues, or legal or ethical aspects of telepsychiatry were excluded. The review of the evidence broadly covers mental health service provision in all settings, including forensic settings. Given the sparse literature on telepsychiatry in forensic settings, we discuss implications for mental health care across settings and populations and comment on future directions and potential uses in forensic or correctional psychiatry. PMID:18548519

  9. [What place is there for psychotherapy in public psychiatry?].

    PubMed

    Kramer, U; Ambresin, G; de Roten, Y; Fassassi, S; Hedjal, A; Herrera, F; Kolly, S; Pomini, V; Preisig, M; Despland, J-N

    2010-09-22

    The question of the place of psychotherapy in psychiatric public care is posed in this article. We will address this question first by presenting two clinical and research programmes which were implemented in a clinical psychiatric unit, section Karl Jaspers (Service of General Psychiatry) of the Department of Psychiatry CHUV, in Lausanne with the collaboration of the University Institute of Psychotherapy. The first one puts forward psychodynamic psychotherapy of depressed inpatients; the clinical programme and the research questions on efficacy of this treatment are discussed. The second focuses on the early treatment of patients with Borderline Personality Disorder, in particular in its research question on the effect of the motive-oriented therapeutic relationship in this process. We conclude by underlining the convergences of the two programmes. PMID:20963958

  10. MR urography in children and adolescents: techniques and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Trout, Andrew T; Smith, Ethan A

    2016-06-01

    Renal and urinary tract imaging is commonly performed in the pediatric population, particularly in the setting of suspected or known congenital anomalies. In most cases, adequate anatomic assessment can be achieved using ultrasound and fluoroscopic techniques, and evaluation of differential renal function and urinary tract drainage can be accomplished with renal scintigraphy. However, in a subset of children, anatomic or functional questions may remain after this routine evaluation. In this setting, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tailored to evaluate the kidneys and urinary tract, known as MR urography (MRU), can be used to depict the kidneys, ureters, and urinary bladder in detail and to determine differential renal function and assess urinary tract drainage. The objectives of this review article are to (1) describe pediatric-specific MRI techniques for assessment of the kidneys and urinary tract and (2) present common clinical applications for pediatric MRU where imaging can "add value" in terms of diagnosis and patient management. PMID:26915088

  11. Utilization of mental health services among adolescents in community-based substance abuse outpatient clinics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ya-Fen; Godley, Mark D; Godley, Susan H; Dennis, Michael L

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the rates and correlates of self-reported receipt for mental health services among 1,190 adolescents, aged 12-19, who were admitted to community-based substance abuse outpatient clinics and had a co-occurring mental health problem. Utilization of mental health service was ascertained 3 months post-intake. About one third (35%) of adolescents with a co-occurring mental health problem identified at intake received mental health service in the 3 months after treatment entry. After holding other correlates constant, history of mental health treatment, suicidal behavior, family history of mental disorder and insurance coverage at intake were associated with mental health service utilization at the 3-month follow up. Predictors of service utilization varied by gender and racial/ethnic status. Implications for integrated substance use and mental health services are discussed. PMID:18157641

  12. The State of Inpatient Psychiatry for Youth in Ontario: Results of the ONCAIPS Benchmarking Survey

    PubMed Central

    Greenham, Stephanie L.; Persi, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about inpatient psychiatry settings and the services they provide for children and adolescents in Ontario. This paper provides the first broad description of unit characteristics, services provided, and patient characteristics in these settings. Method: Nominated representatives from Ontario hospitals with generic mental health beds (i.e., providing inpatient care across diagnostic groups) for children and adolescents were surveyed regarding data from April 2009 to March 2010. Response rate was 93%. Additional data were extracted from the Ontario Network of Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatry Services (ONCAIPS) Directory and Ministry of Health and Long Term Care (MOHLTC) website. Results: Settings provided primarily crisis services with some planned elective admissions. Higher rates of involuntary admissions, briefer stays, lower interdisciplinary diversity, and lower occupancy were typical of settings with higher proportions of crisis admissions. Services most commonly provided included stabilization, assessment, pharmacotherapy, and mental health education. Bed numbers provincially, beds per staff, and prominence of suicide risk, mood disorders, and utilization of cognitive and behavioural approaches were comparable to trends internationally. Inter-setting disparities were observed in access to inpatient services for different age and diagnostic groups, and availability of psychiatry and different professions. Conclusions: Lack of consistent performance and outcome evaluation, common measures, availability of psychiatry and interdisciplinary supports, and dissimilar treatments provincially, suggest the need to consider potential improvements through systematic monitoring of setting performance and outcomes, and development of provincial best practice standards for staffing and treatment. PMID:24516475

  13. Inpatient Treatment for Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: Clinical Significance and Predictors of Treatment Outcome.

    PubMed

    Schlegl, Sandra; Diedrich, Alice; Neumayr, Christina; Fumi, Markus; Naab, Silke; Voderholzer, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the clinical significance as well as predictors of outcome for adolescents with severe anorexia nervosa (AN) treated in an inpatient setting. Body mass index (BMI), eating disorder (ED) symptoms [Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2)], general psychopathology and depression were assessed in 238 patients at admission and discharge. BMI increased from 14.8 + 1.2 to 17.3 + 1.4 kg/m(2). Almost a fourth (23.6%) of the patients showed reliable changes, and 44.7% showed clinically significant changes (EDI-2). BMI change did not significantly differ between those with reliable or clinically significant change or no reliable change in EDI-2. Length of stay, depression and body dissatisfaction were negative predictors of a clinically significant change. Inpatient treatment is effective in about two thirds of adolescents with AN and should be considered when outpatient treatment fails. About one third of patients showed significant weight gain, but did not improve regarding overall ED symptomatology. Future studies should focus on treatment strategies for non-responders. PMID:26603278

  14. Contributions of a specialty clinic for children and adolescents with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skotko, Brian G; Davidson, Emily Jean; Weintraub, Gil S

    2013-03-01

    We investigated what added value, if any, a Down syndrome specialty clinic brings to the healthcare needs of children and adolescents with Down syndrome. For this quality improvement study, we performed a retrospective chart review of 105 new patients with Down syndrome, ages 3 and older, seen during the inaugural year of our specialty clinic. We asked how many of our patients were already up-to-date on the healthcare screenings recommended for people with Down syndrome. We further analyzed what tests we ordered, which referrals we suggested, and, ultimately, what new diagnoses of co-occurring medical conditions were made. Only 9.8% of our patients were current on all of the recommended Down syndrome healthcare screenings. Parents came to clinic with a variety of concerns, and after laboratory tests, radiologic studies, and subspecialty referrals, we made many new diagnoses of gastrointestinal conditions (e.g., constipation and celiac disease), seasonal allergies, dermatologic conditions (e.g., xerosis), behavioral diagnoses (e.g., autism spectrum disorder and disruptive behavior not otherwise specified), and clarifications of neurologic conditions. A Down syndrome specialty clinic can identify and address many healthcare needs of children and adolescents with Down syndrome beyond that which is provided in primary care settings. PMID:23401090

  15. Latent Class Analysis of Substance Use among Adolescents Presenting to Urban Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Bohnert, Kipling M.; Walton, Maureen A.; Resko, Stella; Barry, Kristen T.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Zucker, Robert A.; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Booth, Brenda M.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Polysubstance use during adolescence is a significant public health concern; however, few studies have investigated patterns of use during this developmental window within the primary care setting. Objectives This study uses an empirical method to classify adolescents into polysubstance use groups, and examines correlates of the empirically-defined groups. Methods Data come from patients, ages 12-18 years, presenting to urban, primary care community health clinics (Federally Qualified Health Centers) in two cities in the Midwestern United States (n=1664). Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify classes of substance users. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine variables associated with class membership. Results LCA identified three classes: Class 1 (64.5%) exhibited low probabilities of all types of substance use; Class 2 (24.6%) was characterized by high probabilities of cannabis use and consequences; Class 3 (10.9%) had the highest probabilities of polysubstance use, including heavy episodic drinking and misuse of prescription drugs. Those in Class 2 and Class 3 were more likely to be older, and have poorer grades, poorer health, higher levels of psychological distress, and more sexual partners than those in Class 1. Individuals in Class 3 were also less likely to be African-American than those in Class 1. Conclusion Findings provide novel insight into the patterns of polysubstance use among adolescents presenting to low-income urban primary care clinics. Future research should examine the efficacy of interventions that address the complex patterns of substance use and concomitant health concerns among adolescents. PMID:24219231

  16. Altered relationships between age and functional brain activation in adolescents at clinical high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Karlsgodt, Katherine H; van Erp, Theo G M; Bearden, Carrie E; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2014-01-30

    Schizophrenia is considered a neurodevelopmental disorder, but whether the adolescent period, proximal to onset, is associated with aberrant development in individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis is incompletely understood. While abnormal gray and white matter development has been observed, alterations in functional neuroimaging (fMRI) parameters during adolescence as related to conversion to psychosis have not yet been investigated. Twenty CHR individuals and 19 typically developing controls (TDC), (ages 14-21), were recruited from the Center for Assessment and Prevention of Prodromal States (CAPPS) at UCLA. Participants performed a Sternberg-style verbal working memory (WMem) task during fMRI and data were analyzed using a cross-sectional design to test the hypothesis that there is a deviant developmental trajectory in WMem associated neural circuitry in those at risk for psychosis. Eight of the CHR adolescents converted to psychosis within 2 years of initial assessment. A voxel-wise regression examining the relationship between age and activation revealed a significant group-by-age interaction. TDC showed a negative association between age and functional activation in the WMem circuitry while CHR adolescents showed a positive association. Moreover, CHR patients who later converted to overt psychosis showed a distinct pattern of abnormal age-associated activation in the frontal cortex relative to controls, while non-converters showed a more diffuse posterior pattern. Finding that age related variation in baseline patterns of neural activity differentiate individuals who subsequently convert to psychosis from healthy subjects suggests that these differences are likely to be clinically relevant. PMID:24144510

  17. Counselling sessions increased duration of exclusive breastfeeding: a randomized clinical trial with adolescent mothers and grandmothers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Considering that adolescent mothers may be more vulnerable to discontinuing exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) before 6 months and that their mothers may exert a negative influence on this practice, this study was conducted with the objective of evaluating the efficacy of breastfeeding counselling for adolescent mothers and their mothers in increasing EBF duration. Methods A clinical trial was performed in 323 adolescent mothers with newborns and their mothers randomized in four groups: (1) not living with mother, without intervention; (2) not living with mother, with intervention; (3) living with mother, without intervention, (4) living with mother, with intervention. The intervention consisted of five counselling sessions directed to mother and grandmother, in the maternity hospital and on follow-up. Information about feeding practices during the newborn’s first six months of life was collected monthly by telephone. Intervention’s efficacy was measured through Cox regression and comparison of exclusive breastfeeding medians and survival curves for the different groups. Results The intervention increased the duration of EBF by67 days for the group which included grandmothers (HR = 0.64; CI 95% = 0.46-0.90) and 46 days for the group which did not include grandmothers (HR = 0.52; CI 95% = 0.36-0.76). Conclusions Counselling sessions in the first four months of children’s lives proved to be effective in increasing EBF duration among adolescent mothers. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00910377. PMID:25033743

  18. Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists' Practices in Assisting Their Adolescent Patients Who Smoke to Quit Smoking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.; Sidani, Jaime E.; Price, Joy A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This national study examined the practices and perceptions of smoking cessation activities among child and adolescent psychiatrists. Method: A random sample of child and adolescent psychiatrists was identified from the membership list of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and was mailed a valid and reliable 34-item…

  19. [Characteristics of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria referred to the Hamburg Gender Identity Clinic].

    PubMed

    Becker, Inga; Gjergji-Lama, Voltisa; Romer, Georg; Möller, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Given the increasing demand for counselling in gender dysphoria in childhood in Germany, there is a definite need for empirical data on characteristics and developmental trajectories of this clinical group. This study aimed to provide a first overview by assessing demographic characteristics and developmental trajectories of a group of gender variant boys and girls referred to the specialised Gender Identity Clinic in Hamburg. Data were extracted from medical charts, transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis methods. Categories were set up by inductive-deductive reasoning based on the patients' parents' and clinicians' information in the files. Between 2006 and 2010, 45 gender variant children and adolescents were seen by clinicians; 88.9% (n = 40) of these were diagnosed with gender identity disorder (ICD-10). Within this group, the referral rates for girls were higher than for boys (1:1.5). Gender dysphoric girls were on average older than the boys and a higher percentage of girls was referred to the clinic at the beginning of adolescence (> 12 years of age). At the same time, more girls reported an early onset age. More girls made statements about their (same-sex) sexual orientation during adolescence and wishes for gender confirming medical interventions. More girls than boys revealed self-mutilation in the past or present as well as suicidal thoughts and/or attempts. Results indicate that the presentation of clinically referred gender dysphoric girls differs from the characteristics boys present in Germany; especially with respect to the most salient age differences. Therefore, these two groups require different awareness and individual treatment approaches. PMID:25296510

  20. The Impact of Perceived Interpersonal Functioning on Treatment for Adolescent Depression: IPT-A versus Treatment as Usual in School-Based Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunlicks-Stoessel, Meredith; Mufson, Laura; Jekal, Angela; Turner, J. Blake

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Aspects of depressed adolescents' perceived interpersonal functioning were examined as moderators of response to treatment among adolescents treated with interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A; Mufson, Dorta, Moreau, & Weissman, 2004) or treatment as usual (TAU) in school-based health clinics. Method: Sixty-three…

  1. Recommendations for switching antipsychotics. A position statement of the Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Miquel; Vieta, Eduard; Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Alamo, Cecilio; Bobes, Julio

    2011-07-01

    Switching antipsychotics is common in the clinical practice setting and is associated with potential clinically relevant complications. An expert group selected by Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry has reviewed the evidence provided by randomized clinical trials and other relevant information to reach consensus recommendations for switching antipsychotics. In this article, we will review all the information that has led to those recommendations and which includes: indications and contraindications for switching antipsychotics, pharmacological issues, switching strategies, switching antipsychotics due to efficacy problems, switching antispychotics due to tolerability issues (including extrapyramidal symptoms and tardive dyskinesia, weight gain, metabolic disorders, hyperprolactinemia, sexual dysfunction, persistent sedation, and QT prolongation), switching antypsychotics due to lack of treatment compliance, and switching antipsychotics in patients with bipolar disorders. PMID:23446195

  2. Psychiatry movie club: A novel way to teach psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Gurvinder

    2011-07-01

    For decades, films across the world have entertained people and affected their attitudes regarding certain issues and conditions. Documentary films have been used by governments in different parts of the world to educate the general public and promote health and prevent the spread of disease as part of public health programs. Psychiatry as a branch of medicine like the rest of medicine continues to develop. With an increasing awareness among the general population and popularity of films showing various aspects of mental illnesses on the rise, educators and teachers are turning their attention to using films for education of medical students and psychiatric trainees. Although films may be stereotypical and prejudiced, they can be used successfully in teaching psychiatry trainees. In this paper, development of a movie club and its use are described and suggestions made to improve the use of films in this process. PMID:22135447

  3. Ethical dilemmas in forensic psychiatry: two illustrative cases

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Piyal; Gordon, Harvey; Adshead, Gwen; Irons, Ashley

    2007-01-01

    One approach to the analysis of ethical dilemmas in medical practice uses the “four principles plus scope” approach. These principles are: respect for autonomy, beneficence, non‐maleficence and justice, along with concern for their scope of application. However, conflicts between the different principles are commonplace in psychiatric practice, especially in forensic psychiatry, where duties to patients often conflict with duties to third parties such as the public. This article seeks to highlight some of the specific ethical dilemmas encountered in forensic psychiatry: the excessive use of segregation for the protection of others, the ethics of using mechanical restraint when clinically beneficial and the use of physical treatment without consent. We argue that justice, as a principle, should be paramount in forensic psychiatry, and that there is a need for a more specific code of ethics to cover specialised areas of medicine like forensic psychiatry. This code should specify that in cases of conflict between different principles, justice should gain precedence over the other principles. PMID:17526683

  4. A cultural critique of community psychiatry in India.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sumeet; Jadhav, Sushrut

    2008-01-01

    This article is the first comprehensive cultural critique of India's official community mental health policy and program. Data are based on a literature review of published papers, conference proceedings, analyses of official policy and popular media, interviews with key Indian mental health professionals, and fieldwork in Kanpur district, Uttar Pradesh (2004-2006). The authors demonstrate how three influences have shaped community psychiatry in India: a cultural asymmetry between health professionals and the wider society, psychiatry's search for both professional and social legitimacy, and WHO policies that have provided the overall direction to the development of services. Taken together, the consequences are that rural community voices have been edited out. The authors hypothesize that community psychiatry in India is a bureaucratic and culturally incongruent endeavor that increases the divide between psychiatry and local rural communities. Such a claim requires sustained ethnographic fieldwork to reveal the dynamics of the gap between community and professional experiences. The development of culturally sensitive psychiatric theory and clinical services is essential to improve the mental health of rural citizens who place their trust in India's biomedical network. PMID:18724582

  5. Effectiveness of Shared Medical Appointments Versus Traditional Clinic Visits for Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Everest, Erica; Akhtar, Sara; Sumego, Marianne; Zeizoun, Alaa; Worley, Sarah; Tang, Anne S; Dorsey, Allison; Smith, Ann; Schweiger, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Shared medical appointments began in the United States in 1996 to advance quality of care and enhance patients' ability to self-manage. Group visits gather patients with the same diagnosis for individual examinations followed by group education sessions taught by the provider. This leads to the opportunity to learn from the experiences of others. The Cleveland Clinic Department of Pediatric Endocrinology offers a shared medical appointment group for pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes called the ESCALAIT clinic (Enrichment Services and Care for Adolescents Living with Autoimmune Insulin Dependent Type 1 Diabetes). The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of traditional clinic visits with shared medical appointments for adolescents with type 1 diabetes in terms of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) improvement. Eighty ESCALAIT patients, aged 11 to 19 years were compared with 516 clinic controls of the same age. Visits were approximately 3 months apart for both patient groups. Changes in HbA1c between groups were calculated from the first to fourth visits. There was a statistically significant difference between the ESCALAIT clinic patients and the control patients. Our results revealed that the group visit patients had less improvement in HbA1c values at the last visit approximately 1 year later, but we would argue that the difference is not clinically significant. However, there were many benefits to shared medical appointment visits including increased access to care as well as peer support. Shared medical appointments are therefore a valid alternative to traditional clinic visits in this patient population. PMID:27367219

  6. Validation of the Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3Di) Among Chinese Children in a Child Psychiatry Clinic in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kelly Y C; Leung, Patrick W L; Mo, Flora Y M; Lee, Marshall M C; Shea, Caroline K S; Chan, Grace F C; Che, Kiti K I; Luk, Ernest S L; Mak, Arthur D P; Warrington, Richard; Skuse, David

    2015-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a disorder with high levels of co-morbidities. The Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3 Di) is a relatively new instrument designed to provide dimensional as well as categorical assessment of autistic behaviours among children with normal intelligence. Its sound psychometric properties and relatively short administration time make it a versatile instrument. The 3 Di was translated into Chinese (Cantonese) and its applicability among 194 clinic children was examined. Results found excellent reliability and validity, and achieved a sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 77%. It was able to capture the diagnosis of ASD among children presenting with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, although the disorder of ASD is considered universal, the use of a western instrument in a Chinese context should also take note of cultural influences that may impact on the manifestation of its symptoms. PMID:25326822

  7. Patterns and predictors of health service utilization in adolescents with pain: comparison between a community and a clinical pain sample

    PubMed Central

    Toliver-Sokol, Marisol; Murray, Caitlin B.; Wilson, Anna C.; Lewandowski, Amy; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2011-01-01

    There is limited research describing the patterns of healthcare utilization in adolescents with chronic pain. This study describes healthcare utilization in a clinical chronic pain sample, and compares the patterns of service use of this group to a community sample with intermittent pain complaints. We also investigated demographic and clinical factors that predicted healthcare visits and medication use in the clinical sample. Data on 117 adolescents (aged 12-18; n=59 clinical pain sample, n=58 community) were collected. Caregivers and adolescents reported on sociodemographics, medical visits, current medications, pain, activity limitations, and depression. As hypothesized, the clinical pain sample had higher rates of healthcare consultation on all types of medical visits (general, specialty care, complementary medicine, mental health, OT/PT), and higher medication use compared to the community sample. Regression analyses revealed that higher annual income, greater pain frequency, and higher levels of caregiver reported activity limitations were associated with a greater number of healthcare visits for the total sample. Within the clinical pain sample, higher pain frequency and greater activity limitations (caregiver-report) predicted more specialty care visits. Additionally, higher income and greater levels of depressive symptoms predicted a higher number of prescribed medications. Perspective This study contributes to the limited available data on health service and medication use in a clinical chronic pain sample versus a community sample of adolescents. We also identify clinical factors (pain frequency, parent-reported activity limitations, depressive symptoms) and demographic factors (gender, income) associated with healthcare utilization. PMID:21481647

  8. One Size Does Not Fit All: Improving Clinical Practice in Older Children and Adolescents with Language and Learning Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Cheryl M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the lead article for this clinical forum, Kamhi (2014) suggests ways that current knowledge on instructional practices in learning and language can be applied to clinical practice in language disorders. I propose that Kamhi's suggestions are in need of fine-tuning for older children and adolescents with language disorders. A…

  9. Biological clocks and the practice of psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Endogenous biological clocks enable living species to acquire some independence in relation to time. They improve the efficiency of biological systems, by allowing them to anticipate future constraints on major physyological systems and cell energy metabolism. The temporal organization of a giwen biological function can be impaired in its coordination with astronomical time or with other biological function. There are also external conditions that influence biological clocks. This temporal organization is complex, and it is possible that a series of psychiatric disorders and syndromes involve primary or secondary changes in biological clocks: seasonal and other mood disorders, premenstrual syndromes, social jet lag, free-running rhythms, and several sleep disorders are among them. In this review, we describe the main concepts relevant to chronobiology and explore the relevance of knowledge about biological clocks to the clinical practice of psychiatry PMID:17969862

  10. Descartes' dogma and damage to Western psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Ventriglio, A; Bhugra, D

    2015-10-01

    René Descartes described the concept of mind-body dualism in the 16th century. This concept has been called his error but we prefer to call it his dogma because the error was recognised much later. We studied the original writings translated by various scholars. We believe that his dogma has caused tremendous amount of damage to Western psychiatry. This dualism has created boundaries between mind and body but as we know they are inextricably interlinked and influence each other. This has affected clinical practice and has increased the dichotomy between psychiatric services and the physical health care services in the West at least. This dualism has also contributed to stigma against mental illness, the mentally ill and the psychiatric services. We propose that it is time to abandon this mind-body dualism and to look at the whole patient and their illness experiences as is done in some other health care systems such as Ayurveda. PMID:26333032

  11. [Research and Post-graduate in Psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Carlos, A Palacio A

    2012-01-01

    The research component and the acquisition of skills related to the generation of knowledge in the training of medical and surgical specialists in the country is an issue that has recently begun to be discussed. For over 50 years this training has included only the area of professionalism as a copy of an educational model from the mid-twentieth century. Currently the country requires specialists with critical and analytical skills to question their actions and knowledge and generate alternative clinical care to apply to the general population in the search of bettering their own welfare. This article is a review in which the current situation of the teaching of psychiatry and the inclusion of research in the academic processes of our medical specialties in the country are analyzed. PMID:26572565

  12. Clinical Experience with Daptomycin for the Treatment of Gram-positive Infections in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Syriopoulou, Vassiliki; Dailiana, Zoe; Dmitriy, Nisichenko; Utili, Riccardo; Pathan, Rashidkhan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This subgroup analysis of the European Cubicin Outcomes Registry Experience evaluated the safety and effectiveness of daptomycin in children and adolescent patients (<18 years). Methods: Clinical outcomes at the end of therapy were assessed as success (cured or improved), failure or nonevaluable. Safety was assessed for up to 30 days post treatment. Results: Eighty-one children and adolescent patients were included in this study. The most common primary infections were bacteremia (19.8%), complicated skin and soft-tissue infection (18.5%), osteomyelitis (13.6%), endocarditis (12.3%), foreign body/prosthetic infection (12.3%), uncomplicated skin and soft-tissue infection (9.9%) and other (13.6%). Daptomycin doses ranged from 4 to >10 mg/kg/day. Median duration of therapy was 12.5 (interquartile range, 7–25; mean, 16.7; standard deviation, 12.8) days. Staphylococcus aureus (46.7%) was the most commonly isolated pathogen (23.8% methicillin-resistant S. aureus). Forty-nine (60.5%) patients completed daptomycin therapy without further antibiotics, 27 (33.3%) switched to another antibiotic, 4 (4.9%) discontinued because of adverse events (AEs) and 1 (1.2%) discontinued because of other reason. Overall, 75 (92.6%; 95% confidence interval: 95.2–100.0%) patients achieved clinical success; 39 of 41 (95.1%) patients receiving daptomycin monotherapy and 36 of 40 (90.0%) patients receiving concomitant antibiotics. Six (7.4%) patients reported AEs, including 1 patient with increased blood creatine phosphokinase. Three (3.7%) patients had serious AEs; 1 (1.2%) had a serious AE possibly related to daptomycin. Conclusion: Daptomycin, alone or combined with other antibiotics and/or surgery, demonstrated high clinical success rates against a wide variety of infections and was well tolerated in children and adolescents. PMID:26849158

  13. Images of psychiatry and psychiatrists

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, H; Sartorius, N; Liinamaa, T

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study surveyed medical teaching faculty to determine their attitudes toward psychiatry and psychiatrists. Method We conducted a multisite survey of a probability sample of 1057 teaching medical faculty members from 15 academic teaching centers in the United Kingdom, Europe, and Asia stratified by early, middle, and late career stage. The average response rate across countries was 65%. Results The outstanding findings were that 90% of respondents considered that psychiatrists were not good role models for medical students, 84% thought psychiatric patients were unsuitable to be treated outside of specialized facilities, and 73% thought psychiatric patients were emotionally draining. We noted statistically significant differences by country, gender, career stage, and specialty. Conclusion These results highlight why recruitment into psychiatry is problematic in many countries and suggest that greater attention should be given to improving the perception of psychiatrists as good role models and the efficacy of psychiatric treatments. PMID:25495023

  14. Secular humanism and "scientific psychiatry"

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The Council for Secular Humanism identifies Secular Humanism as a "way of thinking and living" committed to rejecting authoritarian beliefs and embracing "individual freedom and responsibility ... and cooperation." The paradigmatic practices of psychiatry are civil commitment and insanity defense, that is, depriving innocent persons of liberty and excusing guilty persons of their crimes: the consequences of both are confinement in institutions ostensibly devoted to the treatment of mental diseases. Black's Law Dictionary states: "Every confinement of the person is an 'imprisonment,' whether it be in a common prison, or in private house, or in the stocks, or even by forcibly detaining one in the public streets." Accordingly, I maintain that Secular Humanism is incompatible with the principles and practices of psychiatry. PMID:16759353

  15. Secular humanism and "scientific psychiatry".

    PubMed

    Szasz, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The Council for Secular Humanism identifies Secular Humanism as a "way of thinking and living" committed to rejecting authoritarian beliefs and embracing "individual freedom and responsibility ... and cooperation." The paradigmatic practices of psychiatry are civil commitment and insanity defense, that is, depriving innocent persons of liberty and excusing guilty persons of their crimes: the consequences of both are confinement in institutions ostensibly devoted to the treatment of mental diseases. Black's Law Dictionary states: "Every confinement of the person is an 'imprisonment,' whether it be in a common prison, or in private house, or in the stocks, or even by forcibly detaining one in the public streets." Accordingly, I maintain that Secular Humanism is incompatible with the principles and practices of psychiatry. PMID:16759353

  16. The Two Cultures in Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Cleghorn, R A

    1965-07-10

    The division between the two cultures of the literary and scientific worlds is considered, as is the division between the two cultures of humanism and somaticism. The development of psychiatric thought important to this latter dichotomy is described through the Age of Enlightenment, the Romantic Movement and the New Enlightenment. The two cultures of our present literary and scientific milieux are equated with the romanticism and somaticism of the past. The development of two cultures in psychiatry is traced, beginning with Freud's attempt to combine science and romanticism, to the present day where one finds some degree of convergence between the somatic and psychoanalytic approaches. Criteria are presented for a greater union of the two cultures in psychiatry. PMID:20328284

  17. The Two Cultures in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Cleghorn, R. A.

    1965-01-01

    The division between the two cultures of the literary and scientific worlds is considered, as is the division between the two cultures of humanism and somaticism. The development of psychiatric thought important to this latter dichotomy is described through the Age of Enlightenment, the Romantic Movement and the New Enlightenment. The two cultures of our present literary and scientific milieux are equated with the romanticism and somaticism of the past. The development of two cultures in psychiatry is traced, beginning with Freud's attempt to combine science and romanticism, to the present day where one finds some degree of convergence between the somatic and psychoanalytic approaches. Criteria are presented for a greater union of the two cultures in psychiatry. PMID:20328284

  18. Adolescent Sociopaths. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapple, Eliot D.

    Presented is the final report of a research project on the programed training and placement of nonpsychotic disturbed adolescents. Eleven chapters cover topics which include the following: psychiatry and the sociopaths and psychopaths; boys dealt with in the project; development of the programed interaction diagnostic interview; disturbances to…

  19. Community-Based Participatory Clinical Research in Obesity by Adolescents: Pipeline for Researchers of the Future

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Robert; Chester, Ann

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel, untapped opportunity, challenging cultural and man-power barriers to transferring advances in biomedical science knowledge that will improve community health care (Type II Clinical Translational Research) in a medically underserved community. We describe a pilot model in which adolescents apply principles of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) at the epicenter of the obesity diabetes epidemic in rural Appalachia in West Virginia. The model invites minority, financially disadvantaged, and educationally disadvantaged adolescents to become educated on ethics, then provides infrastructure to support study design and conduct of CBPR. This experience demonstrates that these adolescents can efficiently, with quality and integrity, reach into the most vulnerable of communities and their own families to show that the prevalence of obesity is at 50% and diabetes 10.4% (n = 989). Our experience illustrates the infrastructure requirements for this strategy to be successful and emphasizes the substantial benefit that could accrue if the model is successfully sustained. The benefit includes not only the translation of knowledge to influence community lifestyle behavior but also the creation of a pipeline of new biomedical scientists for the future. PMID:20443918

  20. Psychiatry: the battered child of medicine.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, M

    1975-01-30

    Psychiatry has had a troubled history. After the French Revolution "moral treatment" brought to America a period of effective and humane hospital treatment, but this progress was corrupted by the Industrial Revolution, and psychiatry was rejected by society as well as by medicine. Although the Freudian enlightenment and the introduction of social psychiatry have led to greater acceptance, today's criticisms are strident. Psychiatry is criticized for imprecise diagnosis, conceptual vagaries, jargon, therapeutic impotence and class bias. The American system of mental-health care is seen by many as a disaster. The federal comprehensive Community Mental Health Act has been aborted at an early stage. Skills involved in the practice of psychotherapy are not unique to the profession. Social ills, over which psychiatry has little control, play a large part in causing mental disability and retardation. Nevertheless, though embattled, psychiatry has contributed to medical practice and to the humane consciousness of society. PMID:1089193

  1. Relationships of the WISC-R and K-BIT for an adolescent clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Slate, J R; Graham, L S; Bower, J

    1996-01-01

    Correlations between the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised IQs and the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test were determined for a clinical sample of 44 adolescents (35 with learning disabilities, 9 with mental retardation) who underwent routine three-year reevaluations. Even though three years had elapsed between the WISC-R and K-BIT scores, the correlations among the total and subscale scores of these measures were high and were all statistically significant. A significant mean difference was found between the WISC-R Verbal IQ and its K-Bit counterpart, the Vocabulary subscales. Implications of findings for assessment specialists are discussed. PMID:8970652

  2. REM sleep abnormalities and psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, J A

    1994-01-01

    Since the 1950s, with the discovery of REM sleep and its relationship to dreaming, psychiatric sleep researchers have been interested in uncovering the complex relationship between disturbed sleep and psychiatric disorders. This paper reviews the alterations in REM sleep of relevance to psychiatry and indicates that continued developments in sleep research may assist in further understanding the neuropathophysiology of affective and other psychiatric illnesses. PMID:7803367

  3. Commercial pharmacogenetic-based decision-support tools in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bousman, Chad A; Hopwood, Malcolm

    2016-06-01

    Despite a compendium of pharmacotherapies available for treating psychiatric illnesses, suboptimal response to these therapies is typical and thought to be in part a result of genetic variation. This notion has sparked a personalised psychiatry movement, which has in turn led to the development of several commercial pharmacogenetic-based decision support tools marketed to psychiatrists as an alternative to typical, trial-and-error, prescribing. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the validity and usefulness of these tools and whether there is sufficient evidence to support their adoption. In this Personal View, we provide an introduction to these tools and assess their potential usefulness in psychiatry practice. We conclude with clinical considerations and development strategies for improving future pharmacogenetic-based decision support tools for clinical use. PMID:27133546

  4. Admissions to acute adolescent psychiatric units: a prospective study of clinical severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several countries have established or are planning acute psychiatric in-patient services that accept around-the-clock emergency admission of adolescents. Our aim was to investigate the characteristics and clinical outcomes of a cohort of patients at four Norwegian units. Methods We used a prospective pre-post observational design. Four units implemented a clinician-rated outcome measure, the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA), which measures mental health problems and their severity. We collected also data about the diagnoses, suicidal problems, family situations, and the involvement of the Child Protection Service. Predictions of outcome (change in HoNOSCA total score) were analysed with a regression model. Results The sample comprised 192 adolescents admitted during one year (response rate 87%). Mean age was 15.7 years (range 10-18) and 70% were girls. Fifty-eight per cent had suicidal problems at intake and the mean intake HoNOSCA total score was 18.5 (SD 6.4). The largest groups of main diagnostic conditions were affective (28%) and externalizing (26%) disorders. Diagnoses and other patient characteristics at intake did not differ between units. Clinical psychiatric disorders and developmental disorders were associated with severity (on HoNOSCA) at intake but not with outcome. Of adolescents ≥ 16 years, 33% were compulsorily admitted. Median length of stay was 8.5 days and 75% of patients stayed less than a month. Compulsory admissions and length of stay varied between units. Mean change (improvement) in the HoNOSCA total score was 5.1 (SD 6.2), with considerable variation between units. Mean discharge score was close to the often-reported outpatient level, and self-injury and emotional symptoms were the most reduced symptoms during the stay. In a regression model, unit, high HoNOSCA total score at intake, or involvement of the Child Protection Service predicted improvement during admission. Conclusions Acute

  5. Psychiatry and ethics: what cuckoo's nest next?

    PubMed

    Rich, V

    The resignations of the Soviet, Bulgarian, Czechoslovak, and Cuban psychiatric associations from the World Psychiatric Association, occasioned by charges of political abuse of psychiatry to repress dissent in the Soviet Union, cast somewhat of a pall over the Seventh World Congress on Psychiatry last week. Other Socialist bloc nations did, however, attend the Congress, at which papers on a number of ethical issues in psychiatry were presented. PMID:6866119

  6. Textual Data in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Suzanne; Mulvey, Edward P.; Falissard, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Personal meaning in subjective experience is a key element in the treatment of persons with mental disorders. Open-response speech samples would appear to be suitable for studying this type of subjective experience, but there are still important challenges in using language as data. Scientific principles involved in sample size calculation, validity, and reliability may be applicable, by analogy, to data collected in the form of words. We describe a rationale for including computer-assisted techniques as one step of a qualitative analysis procedure that includes manual reading. Clarification of a framework for including language as data in psychiatric research may allow us to more effectively bridge biological and psychometric research with clinical practice, a setting where the patient’s clinical “data” are, in large part, conveyed in words. PMID:22850301

  7. Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry and Psychiatry as a Career: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Zaza

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The discipline of psychiatry, and psychiatry as a career option, have been negatively regarded by medical students for decades. There is a large amount of literature on attitudes of students and the factors that attract them to and detract from psychiatry. The aim of this article is to systematically review this literature from 1990 to…

  8. Positive psychiatry: its time has come.

    PubMed

    Jeste, Dilip V; Palmer, Barton W; Rettew, David C; Boardman, Samantha

    2015-06-01

    Traditionally, psychiatry has been defined and practiced as a branch of medicine focused on the diagnosis and treatment of mental illnesses. Based on growing empirical evidence, we believe that this definition warrants expansion to include the concept of positive psychiatry. In the present article, we provide a critical overview of this emerging field and a select review of relevant scientific literature. Positive psychiatry may be defined as the science and practice of psychiatry that seeks to understand and promote well-being through assessment and interventions involving positive psychosocial characteristics (PPCs) in people who suffer from or are at high risk of developing mental or physical illnesses. It can also benefit nonclinical populations. Positive psychiatry has 4 main components: (1) positive mental health outcomes (eg, well-being), (2) PPCs that comprise psychological traits (resilience, optimism, personal mastery and coping self-efficacy, social engagement, spirituality and religiosity, and wisdom-including compassion) and environmental factors (family dynamics, social support, and other environmental determinants of overall health), (3) biology of positive psychiatry constructs, and (4) positive psychiatry interventions including preventive ones. There are promising empirical data to suggest that positive traits may be improved through psychosocial and biological interventions. As a branch of medicine rooted in biology, psychiatry, especially with the proposed conceptualization of positive psychiatry, is well poised to provide major contributions to the positive mental health movement, thereby impacting the overall health care of the population. PMID:26132670

  9. "I always viewed this as the real psychiatry": provider perspectives on community psychiatry as a career of first choice.

    PubMed

    Carpenter-Song, Elizabeth; Torrey, William C

    2015-04-01

    The US needs engaged and skilled psychiatrists to support the recovery of people with severe mental illnesses and we are currently facing a shortage. This paper examines what attracts providers to community psychiatry and what sustains them in their work. Focus groups and interviews were used to elicit the perspectives of prescribing clinicians in three community mental health clinics in the US. Community psychiatry has inherent challenges, including facing high-risk decisions, encountering intense affects, and occasionally witnessing bad outcomes. Psychiatrists are motivated and sustained in this work by (1) cultivating relationships with patients and colleagues, (2) focusing on the mission of promoting recovery, and (3) engaging with clinical practice as intellectually stimulating work. Administrators support the engagement and morale of psychiatrists by creating workflows that allow psychiatrists to meaningfully apply their expertise to support patients' recovery. These findings hold implications for recruiting and retaining a new generation of physicians. PMID:24989962

  10. Intelligent outcome measures in liaison psychiatry: essential even if not desirable: Commentary on … a multidimensional Framework for Routine Outcome Measurement in Liaison Psychiatry (FROM-LP).

    PubMed

    Tadros, George

    2016-08-01

    Service development is guided by outcome measures that inform service commissioners and providers. Those in liaison psychiatry should be encouraged to develop a positive approach that integrates the collection of outcome measures into everyday clinical practice. The Framework for Routine Outcome Measurement in Liaison Psychiatry (FROM-LP) is a very useful tool to measure service quality and clinical effectiveness, using a combination of clinician-rated and patient-rated outcome measures and patient-rated experience measures. However, it does not include measures of cost-effectiveness or training activities. The FROM-LP is a significant step towards developing nationally unified outcome measures. PMID:27512588

  11. Comorbid psychopathology and clinical symptomatology in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, D C; Korlou, S; Sakellariou, K; Kondyli, V; Sarafidou, J; Tsakanikos, E; Giannakopoulos, G; Liakopoulou, M

    2016-01-01

    Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS). In the OCD group, 48% had contamination obsessions, 42% aggressive obsessions and 52% had washing and cleaning compulsions. Moreover, 32% had one additional disorder and 16.1% had two additional disorders. In comparison, only 17.2% of the control group children had one comorbid disorder. The OCD proband group had higher Total Problems score, as well as higher Anxiety/Depression, Thought Problems and Externalizing scores on the CBCL. When proband parents and control parents (29 mothers and 21 fathers) were compared, the percentage of fathers in the clinical range was significantly higher in the study group (Fisher's exact test: p=0.011, two tailed), whereas for mothers the difference did not attain significance (Fisher's exact test: p=0.106, two tailed). The fathers and mothers of children with OCD were more clinically affected than those of controls. Mothers of probands differed from controls in compulsions, compared to fathers, who differed in both obsessions and compulsions. Comorbidity rate was higher to children and adolescents with OCD. A considerable number of children and adolescents with OCD had higher symptomatology of anxiety and depression than controls, as well as higher rates of thought problems. Children and adolescents with OCD also exhibited higher rates of externalizing problems. This latter finding is considered as important and needs to be highlighted in terms of case management and treatment. Moreover, the parents of children and adolescents with OCD had more OCD symptomatology than the parents of children and adolescents with learning disorders. The symptomatology of the parents may create difficulties in interactions within the family and become burdensome for a vulnerable child. In turn, the child's symptomatology may create or increase some of the symptoms in the parents i.e. anxiety and depression. These findings suggest that at least for a percentage of children and adolescents with OCD, parental

  12. Antipsychotics use in children and adolescents: An on-going challenge in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Carolina; Taylor, David; Zalsman, Gil; Frangou, Sophia; Kyriakopoulos, Marinos

    2014-06-01

    Antipsychotic medications (APs) are a well-established pharmacological treatment in adults with serious mental health problems. However, many adult mental health disorders have their origins and onset in childhood or adolescence. The understanding that neuropsychiatric conditions of childhood are in part biologically determined, led to an increase in the number of clinical trials supporting evidence on the efficacy of antipsychotic agents as first-line treatment for childhood psychotic disorders and therapeutic augmentation of nonpsychotic conditions. In recent years the use of antipsychotics in children and adolescents for neurodevelopmental, behavioural and psychiatric disorders has significantly increased while the age of prescription has decreased. These trends have not been matched by advances in the understanding of APs' safety profile in this group of patients. It is therefore crucial that current and future practice is informed by up-to-date synthesis of the evidence and clinical guidelines about the use and monitoring of these treatments in paediatric populations, since the effectiveness of early therapeutic interventions in children can affect positively the long-term outcome. PMID:24902872

  13. Diagnosis of depression in children and adolescents. Clinical pointers to a difficult diagnosis.

    PubMed

    2010-04-01

    It is now accepted that depression can also affect children and adolescents, but its diagnosis is not straightforward. We examined review articles published on this subject over the last 15 years by large specialist groups and multidisciplinary teams. Most studies of symptoms of psychological distress and depression in children are mainly based on clinical experience of specialists and therefore provide only modest evidence. Isolated, transient unhappiness is not in itself a symptom of depression, but recurrent and persistent mood disorders constitute important warning signs. A French consensus jury recommended attentive listening to potentially depressed children, and those closest to them, focusing on phrases that might reflect a loss of interest, enjoyment, self-esteem and self-confidence; feelings of guilt, shame, loss of affection and hope; and morbid or suicidal ideas. British clinical practice guidelines recommend evaluating the severity of a depressive episode on the basis of the type and number of symptoms, and the family context. Scores designed to diagnose depression and assess its severity are controversial. In practice, diagnosis of depression in children and adolescents with persistent psychological distress is not based on a simple list of symptoms. In difficult cases, it is better to adopt a multidisciplinary approach in order to gauge severity and to determine the most appropriate treatment, which, in most cases, does not involve the use of drugs. PMID:20568496

  14. Clinical validity of a dimensional assessment of self- and interpersonal functioning in adolescent inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Greg; Blanchard, Mark; Baity, Matthew R.; Defife, Jared A; Stein, Michelle B.; Siefert, Caleb J.; Sinclair, Samuel J.; Zodan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale-Global Rating Method (SCORS-G) is a clinical rating system assessing eight domains of self and interpersonal relational experience which can be applied to narrative response data (e.g., Thematic Apperception Test [TAT; Murray, 1943]; early memories narratives) or oral data (e.g., psychotherapy narratives, Relationship Anecdotal Paradigms). In the current study, seventy-two psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents consented and were rated by their individual and group therapist using the SCORS-G. Clinicians also rated therapy engagement, personality functioning, quality of peer relationships, school functioning, global assessment of functioning (GAF), history of eating disordered behavior and history of nonsuicidal self-injury. SCORS-G composite ratings achieved an acceptable level of inter-rater reliability and were associated with theoretically predicted variables (e.g., engagement in therapy; history of nonsuicidal self-injury). SCORS-G ratings also incrementally improved the prediction of therapy engagement and global functioning beyond what was accounted for by GAF scores. This study further demonstrates the clinical utility of the SCORS-G with adolescents. PMID:25010080

  15. Adolescent and Adult Children of Parents with Parkinson's Disease: Incorporating Their Needs in Clinical Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Morley, David; Selai, Caroline; Schrag, Anette; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Thompson, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the quality of life (QoL) and emotional well-being of the offspring of parents with Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) and to consider results in light of current UK clinical guidelines. Methods. 143 adolescent and adult children of parents with PD and MS were postally administered the Parental Illness Impact Scale and a measure of emotional well-being. Results. Minimal differences were observed between the two groups in both QoL and emotional well-being. Levels of mild to moderate depression were substantially greater than those of the general population. Conclusions. The nonsignificant differences reported indicate a similar degree of impact across the two conditions assessed. A significant body of evidence demonstrates the considerable impact of parental MS, with the needs of children being acknowledged in current clinical guidelines. There is a need to similarly acknowledge the potential impact of parental Parkinson's in UK guidelines for PD. PMID:21766002

  16. Autonomous thyroid nodules in adolescents: clinical characteristics and results of TRH testing

    SciTech Connect

    Osburne, R.C.; Goren, E.N.; Bybee, D.E.; Johnsonbaugh, R.E.

    1982-03-01

    Seven adolescents with autonomous thyroid nodules were evaluated over a three-year period. They had hyperfunctioning nodules on radionuclide scan which failed to suppress with exogenous administration of thyroid hormone. They were clinically euthyroid and had normal T4, free T4, and basal TSH values. However, as a group they had elevated total serum T3 concentrations, blunted TSH response to TRH, and accelerated closure of cranial sutures, all of which suggested subtle hyperthyroidism. These patients have been followed for one to five years. Four have undergone partial thyroidectomy because of persistent elevation in the serum T3 concentration or enlargement of the nodule. The clinical presentation and laboratory findings in this group are similar to those found in adults with autonomous nodules.

  17. Impact of a youth-friendly HIV clinic: 10 years of adolescent outcomes in Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Reif, Lindsey K; Bertrand, Rachel; Benedict, Charles; Lamb, Matthew R; Rouzier, Vanessa; Verdier, Rose; Johnson, Warren D; Pape, Jean W; Fitzgerald, Daniel W; Kuhn, Louise; McNairy, Margaret L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adolescents account for over 40% of new HIV infections in Haiti. This analysis compares outcomes among HIV-positive adolescents before and after implementation of an adolescent HIV clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Methods We conducted a cohort study using programmatic data among HIV-positive adolescents aged 13 to 19. Data from 41,218 adolescents who were HIV tested from January 2003 to December 2012 were included. Outcomes across the HIV care cascade were assessed before and after implementation of an adolescent clinic (2009), including HIV testing, enrolment in care, assessment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility, ART initiation and 12-month retention. Pre-ART outcomes were assessed 12 months after HIV testing. Factors associated with pre-ART and ART attrition were identified through multivariable competing risk and Cox proportional hazards regression modelling. Results Cumulatively, 1672 (4.1%) adolescents tested HIV positive (80% female, median age 16 years). Retention by cascade step comparing pre- and post-clinic included the following: 86% versus 87% of patients enrolled in care, 61% versus 79% were assessed for ART eligibility, 85% versus 92% initiated ART and 68% versus 66% were retained 12 months after ART initiation. Pre-ART attrition decreased from 61% pre-clinic to 50% post-clinic (p<0.001). Pre-ART attrition was associated with being female (sub-distributional hazard ratio (sHR): 1.59; CI: 1.31–1.93), syphilis diagnosis (sHR: 1.47; CI: 1.16–1.85) and slum residence (sHR: 0.84; CI: 0.72–0.97). ART attrition was associated with syphilis diagnosis (hazard ratio (HR): 2.23; CI: 1.35–3.68) and CD4 <50 cells/µL (HR: 1.88; CI: 1.15–3.06). Conclusions Implementation of a youth-friendly adolescent clinic improved retention in HIV care among adolescents, particularly in the assessment of ART eligibility and ART initiation. Additional interventions are needed to improve retention among pre-ART patients and support long

  18. Kraepelin and modern psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, M

    1995-01-01

    A summarised account is given of Emil Kraepelin's research in the field of mental disorder, underlining his emphasis on objectivity and natural science and the need for a multi-disciplinary approach. At the same time attention is drawn to the limitations of his general outlook and to his political views, which in their historical context carry disturbing overtones of proto-fascism. It does not detract from the value of his work as a clinical scientist to conclude that his philosophical amblyopia, allied to an ineradicable chauvinism that was shared by many Germans of his class and status, resulted in a failure to demarcate the boundaries of his professional expertise and distorted his judgment on the wider implications of his own achievements. The lessons for the theory and practice of psychological medicine are briefly discussed. PMID:7578280

  19. Sleep and psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Vivien C.; Guilleminault, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders constitute 15.4% of the disease burden in established market economies. Many psychiatric disorders are associated with sleep disturbances, and the relationship is often bidirectional. This paper reviews the prevalence of various psychiatric disorders, their clinical presentation, and their association with sleep disorders. Among the psychiatric disorders reviewed are affective disorders, psychosis, anxiety disorders (including post-traumatic stress disorder), substance abuse disorders, eating disorders, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders. The spectrum of associated sleep disorders includes insomnia, hypersomnia, nocturnal panic, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, restless legs/periodic limb movements of sleep, obstructive sleep apnea, and parasomnias. The effects on sleep of various psychotropic medications utilized to treat the above psychiatric disorders are summarized. PMID:16416705

  20. Neurobiological Formulations: Integrating Clinical and Biological Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Jonathan; Stewart, Jonathan; Rieder, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe a pilot program allowing psychiatric residents to participate in neurobiological evaluations of patients with Axis I disorders. The program aimed to familiarize residents with available tools for assessing cognitive and neuroanatomical abnormalities in psychiatric patients and to foster greater interest among…

  1. Cytogenetic abnormalities and monosomal karyotypes in children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia: correlations with clinical characteristics and outcome.

    PubMed

    Manola, Kalliopi N; Panitsas, Fotios; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Daraki, Aggeliki; Karakosta, Maria; Stavropoulou, Cryssa; Avgerinou, Georgia; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Pantelias, Gabriel; Sambani, Constantina; Pagoni, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The whole spectrum of chromosomal abnormalities and their prognostic significance in children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been fully elucidated yet, although a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained recently. Moreover, the incidence and prognostic impact of monosomal karyotypes (MKs), which are new cytogenetic categories reported recently in adults with AML, are currently unknown for childhood and adolescent AML. In this study, we investigated the cytogenetic and clinical characteristics of 140 children and adolescents (≤21 y) with AML, and correlated their cytogenetic features with both the clinical characteristics and outcomes of our patient cohort. The most frequent cytogenetic abnormality found in our study was the t(15;17), followed by the t(8;21). Striking differences in the genetic abnormalities and French-American-British subtypes were found among infants, children, and adolescents. Of 124 cases, 15 (12.1%) met the criteria of the MK definition, and 12 of the 15 MKs (80%) were complex karyotypes. Of 124 cases, 27 (21.8%) had cytogenetic abnormalities sufficient to be diagnosed as AML with myelodyspastic sydrome-related features. As expected, patients with the t(15;17) had the most favorable outcomes, whereas patients with 11q23 rearrangements and monosomy 7 had the worst outcomes. These data expand our knowledge by providing novel insights into the cytogenetic features and their correlations with clinical characteristics and outcomes in childhood and adolescent AML. PMID:23411131

  2. Sikhism, spirituality and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Bhui, Kamaldeep S; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2012-12-01

    Sikhism has millions of followers in India and among the Indian diaspora. As a religion it is relatively young but carries with it unique perspectives which are often not well known. The holy book of Sikhism, Guru Granth Sahib, is not only the last Guru, but also remained a key text for this religion. Using descriptions of the religion and its followers we attempt to understand the context of spirituality within this religion and attempt to apply it to clinical settings. We explored various texts to understand the notions of spirituality and ethics and directions for living one's life. We studied both the Gurumukhi version as well as the English translation of the Sikh holy text. In the context of history of the Sikhs, various descriptions related to mental well being were identified. In this paper we describe the history, development and the core values of the religion and we also review their role on psychiatric and mental health settings for managing Sikh patients. Guru Granth Sahib offers a very useful insight into what is understood by the term equivalent to depression and its phenomenology. The notions of dukh (loosely translated as pain, but can also mean sadness or suffering) and maya (illusion) and their role in daily living are also discussed. In this paper these descriptions are explored further and their importance explained. PMID:23174442

  3. Putting "Rural" into Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, William A.; Pomerantz, Andrew; Schwartz, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evidence indicates disparities in the number of psychiatrists practicing in rural America compared to urban areas suggesting the need for a greater emphasis on rural psychiatry in residency training programs. The authors offer suggestions for integrating a rural focus in psychiatry residency training to foster greater competency and…

  4. Teaching Psychiatry to Family Practice Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huzij, Teodor J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Lacy, Timothy; Rachal, James

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article outlines a psychiatry curriculum developed for family practice residents by family practice-psychiatry residents. Methods: A literature review, needs assessment, planning, implementation, and initial assessment were conducted. Conclusion: Early results demonstrated improved general psychiatric knowledge and a high level of…

  5. Child Psychiatry Curricula in Undergraduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Michael Gifford; Giesen, Femke; Walter, Garry

    2008-01-01

    A study to review the amount of time devoted to child psychiatry in undergraduate medical education is conducted. Results conclude that relatively low priority is given to child psychiatry in medical education with suggestions for international teaching standards on the subject.

  6. Psychiatry Residency Training around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisook, Sidney; Balon, Richard; Bjorksten, Karin S.; Everall, Ian; Dunn, Laura; Ganadjian, Krauz; Jin, Hua; Parikh, Sagar; Sciolla, Andres; Sidhartha, Tanuj; Yoo, Tai

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors compare and contrast psychiatry residency training in the United States to that in Canada and selected countries in South America, Europe, and Asia. Method: Nine individuals who are intimately familiar with psychiatry residency training in the United States (primarily chairs, training directors, associate training directors,…

  7. Does Interpersonal Psychotherapy improve clinical care for adolescents with depression attending a rural child and adolescent mental health service? Study protocol for a cluster randomised feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Bearsley-Smith, Cate; Browne, Mark Oakley; Sellick, Ken; Villanueva, Elmer V; Chesters, Janice; Francis, Karen; Reddy, Prasuna

    2007-01-01

    Background Depression amongst adolescents is a costly societal problem. Little research documents the effectiveness of public mental health services in mapping this problem. Further, it is not clear whether usual care in such services can be improved via clinician training in a relevant evidence based intervention. One such intervention, found to be effective and easily learned amongst novice clinicians, is Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT). The study described in the current paper has two main objectives. First, it aims to investigate the impact on clinical care of implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescents for the treatment of adolescent depression within a rural mental health service compared with Treatment as Usual (TAU). The second objective is to record the process and challenges (i.e. feasibility, acceptability, sustainability) associated with implementing and evaluating an evidence-based intervention within a community service. This paper outlines the study rationale and design for this community based research trial. Methods/design The study involves a cluster randomisation trial to be conducted within a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service in rural Australia. All clinicians in the service will be invited to participate. Participating clinicians will be randomised via block design at each of four sites to (a) training and delivery of IPT, or (b) TAU. The primary measure of impact on care will be a clinically significant change in depressive symptomatology, with secondary outcomes involving treatment satisfaction and changes in other symptomatology. Participating adolescents with significant depressive symptomatology, aged 12 to 18 years, will complete assessment measures at Weeks 0, 12 and 24 of treatment. They will also complete a depression inventory once a month during that period. This study aims to recruit 60 adolescent participants and their parent/guardian/s. A power analysis is not indicated as an intra-class correlation

  8. Deep pharma: psychiatry, anthropology, and pharmaceutical detox.

    PubMed

    Oldani, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Psychiatric medication, or psychotropics, are increasingly prescribed for people of all ages by both psychiatry and primary care doctors for a multitude of mental health and/or behavioral disorders, creating a sharp rise in polypharmacy (i.e., multiple medications). This paper explores the clinical reality of modern psychotropy at the level of the prescribing doctor and clinical exchanges with patients. Part I, Geographies of High Prescribing, documents the types of factors (pharmaceutical-promotional, historical, cultural, etc.) that can shape specific psychotropic landscapes. Ethnographic attention is focused on high prescribing in Japan in the 1990s and more recently in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, in the US. These examples help to identify factors that have converged over time to produce specific kinds of branded psychotropic profiles in specific locales. Part II, Pharmaceutical Detox, explores a new kind of clinical work being carried out by pharmaceutically conscious doctors, which reduces the number of medications being prescribed to patients while re-diagnosing their mental illnesses. A high-prescribing psychiatrist in southeast Wisconsin is highlighted to illustrate a kind of med-checking taking place at the level of individual patients. These various examples and cases call for a renewed emphasis by anthropology to critically examine the "total efficacies" of modern pharmaceuticals and to continue to disaggregate mental illness categories in the Boasian tradition. This type of detox will require a holistic approach, incorporating emergent fields such as neuroanthropology and other kinds of creative collaborations. PMID:24700144

  9. The Holy Grail of Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Nemeroff, Charles B

    2015-01-01

    "Holy Grail" is a well-known metaphor for the eternal spiritual pursuit for truth and wisdom. It suggests that in order for us to find what no one has found, we must search where few have looked. In 2013, a group led by Helen Mayberg published a groundbreaking paper that sought an answer to one of the most discussed conundrums in psychiatry and neuroscience: Can specific patterns of brain activity indicate how a depressed person will respond to treatment with medication or psychotherapy? Our author examines the findings and discusses their potential impact on treatment for a public health problem that affects millions of people worldwide. PMID:27358663

  10. A Short-Term, Prospective Test of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Ideation in an Adolescent Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Miller, Adam Bryant; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Leichtweis, Richard N

    2016-06-01

    The present prospective study tested a portion of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS) in an adolescent clinical sample. Participants were 143 adolescents consecutively admitted to a partial hospitalization program who completed assessments at intake and discharge from the program. Results partially supported the IPTS and suggest that (1) perceived burdensomeness may be an important socially based cognition for understanding concurrent risk for suicidal ideation (SI); (2) thwarted belongingness affects depression symptom severity over time, which indirectly predicts SI over a short follow-up time frame; and (3) the IPTS constructs may function differently in a high-risk clinical adolescent sample, compared to adults, although findings are preliminary. PMID:26456085

  11. Forensic psychiatry: contemporary scope, challenges and controversies

    PubMed Central

    ARBOLEDA-FLÓREZ, JULIO

    2006-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry is the branch of psychiatry that deals with issues arising in the interface between psychiatry and the law, and with the flow of mentally disordered offenders along a continuum of social systems. Modern forensic psychiatry has benefited from four key developments: the evolution in the understanding and appreciation of the relationship between mental illness and criminality; the evolution of the legal tests to define legal insanity; the new methodologies for the treatment of mental conditions providing alternatives to custodial care; and the changes in attitudes and perceptions of mental illness among the public. This paper reviews the current scope of forensic psychiatry and the ethical dilemmas that this subspecialty is facing worldwide. PMID:16946941

  12. Movies in education of psychiatry residents.

    PubMed

    Jukić, Vlado; Brecić, Petrana; Savić, Aleksandar

    2010-06-01

    Movies are a complex entity representing simultaneously an art form, a powerful industry, and a social phenomenon. The movie industry has always shown keen interest in physicians and medicine in general, and psychiatry in particular has often been in the spotlight. While there can be positive aspects of interaction of the movies and the psychiatry, stigmatization and negative public perception are also the results we often have to consider. Movies exploit psychiatric topics, at the same time portrayal of mental conditions, psychiatrists, and psychiatry on big screen could be used in different kinds of education in psychiatry. We present our initial experience with introducing movies in education of psychiatry residents in Psychiatric Hospital Vrapce. PMID:20562770

  13. Clinical characteristics of children and adolescents with severe therapy-resistant asthma in Brazil *

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Andrea Mendonça; Roncada, Cristian; Santos, Giovana; Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; de Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Vargas, Mauro Henrique Moraes; Pinto, Leonardo Araújo; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Stein, Renato Tetelbom; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics, lung function, radiological findings, and the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum in children and adolescents with severe therapy-resistant asthma (STRA) treated at a referral center in southern Brazil. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed children and adolescents (3-18 years of age) with uncontrolled STRA treated with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting ß2 agonists. We prospectively collected data on disease control, lung function, skin test reactivity to allergens, the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum, chest CT findings, and esophageal pH monitoring results. Results: We analyzed 21 patients (mean age, 9.2 ± 2.98 years). Of those, 18 (86%) were atopic. Most had uncontrolled asthma and near-normal baseline lung function. In 4 and 7, induced sputum was found to be eosinophilic and neutrophilic, respectively; the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum having changed in 67% of those in whom induced sputum analysis was repeated. Of the 8 patients receiving treatment with omalizumab (an anti-IgE antibody), 7 (87.5%) showed significant improvement in quality of life, as well as significant reductions in the numbers of exacerbations and hospitalizations. Conclusions: Children with STRA present with near-normal lung function and a variable airway inflammatory pattern during clinical follow-up, showing a significant clinical response to omalizumab. In children, STRA differs from that seen in adults, further studies being required in order to gain a better understanding of the disease mechanisms. PMID:26398754

  14. Clinical and biological correlates of adolescent anorexia nervosa with impaired cognitive profile.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Perpiña, Susana; Lozano-Serra, Estefania; Puig, Olga; Lera-Miguel, Sara; Lázaro, Luisa; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2011-12-01

    Some neuropsychological studies of anorexia nervosa (AN) have yielded conflicting results, and it has been established that not all adult patients with AN are cognitively impaired. The objective of this study is to determine the percentage of adolescents with AN who present worse cognitive functioning according to neuropsychological criteria of cognitive impairment, and to study their clinical characteristics. Thirty-seven adolescents (11-18 years) with a diagnosis of AN in an acute state of the illness and with low body mass index (BMI) were compared with 41 healthy subjects of the same sex and similar age and intelligence using a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Overall, AN patients took longer to copy Rey's Figure than the control group (p = 0.001). Thirty per cent of patients showed impaired neuropsychological functioning (defined as scoring two standard deviations lower than the average or lower than their intelligence level in two tasks) with worse performance on visuo-spatial tasks. This subgroup of patients presented lower BMI (p = 0.023) and higher trait anxiety (p = 0.028). The performance of adolescents in an acute state of AN was similar to that of the healthy control group, with the exception of lower time to completion in copying a complex figure. However, cognitive performance varied in these patients, being clearly impaired in one-third of the sample. The cognitive impairment subgroup showed lower BMI and higher anxiety. Longitudinal follow-up studies are necessary to assess the stability of this profile after longer treatment periods. PMID:21984403

  15. Eating disorder examination questionnaire: Norms and clinical reference data from adolescent boys and girls in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Mantilla, Emma Forsén; Birgegård, Andreas

    2016-05-30

    The study investigated norms and clinical reference values for the 14-day time frame version of the Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) specifically developed to suit adolescent populations. The EDE-Q is a self-report instrument measuring problematic eating behaviors and attitudes. A general population sample (N=487, 239 girls and 248 boys) and a clinical sample (N=1051, 989 girls and 62 boys) aged 12-14 years were analyzed. Descriptive statistics for EDE-Q subscales and Global scale, as well as key behaviors, are presented, along with sex differences and diagnostic differences (clinical sample). General population sample sex differences were consistent and medium to large, with some evidence of floor effects for boys. In the clinical sample there was a main effect of gender, with girls scoring higher overall. The covariate age accounted for more variance in EDE-Q subscale scores than did diagnostic group. Results are discussed in terms of the appropriateness of the EDE-Q for boys, and possible denial of illness among patients. PMID:27137979

  16. Rett syndrome in adolescent and adult females: clinical and molecular genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Smeets, E; Schollen, E; Moog, U; Matthijs, G; Herbergs, J; Smeets, H; Curfs, L; Schrander-Stumpel, C; Fryns, J P

    2003-10-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder which is diagnosed clinically. We report on 30 adolescent and adult females with classical or atypical RTT of whom 24 have a MECP2 mutation. In these 24 females, the clinical manifestations, degree of severity, and disorder profiles are discussed as well as the genotype phenotype correlation. After X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) study in these cases, we found no correlation between skewing and milder phenotype. Three large deletions were found after additional Southern blot analysis in three classical RTT cases. We confirm that early truncating mutations in MECP2 are responsible for a more severe course of the disorder. Three disorder profiles related to the missense mutations R133C and R306C, and to deletions in the C terminal segment are described and are of interest for further clinical study on larger numbers of cases. The R133C genotype has a predominantly autistic presentation while the R306C genotype is associated with a slower disease progression. The phenotype of the "hotspot" deletions in the C terminal segment is predominantly characterized by rapid progressive neurogenic scoliosis. Older women with RTT are underdiagnosed: seven adults were first diagnosed as having RTT between 29 and 60 years of age, and confirmed on finding a MECP2 mutation. Knowledge of the clinical phenotype of RTT at an adult age is important for all involved in the care of these individuals. The involvement of the parent support group is very important in this matter. PMID:12966523

  17. Adolescence and the reorganization of infant development: a neuro-psychoanalytic model.

    PubMed

    Stortelder, Frans; Ploegmakers-Burg, Marian

    2010-01-01

    The psychoanalytic view of adolescence as a phase of turbulence and reorganization occupied a central position in child and adolescent psychiatry until about 1980. The view of adolescence as a silent-transition phase then prevailed and diverged from the psychoanalytic perspective. This article reviews infant and adolescent development using an interdisciplinary, neuro-psychoanalytic model in which psychoanalytic, neurobiological, and developmental perspectives converge and complement each other. Recent empirical research focuses attention on adolescence as a phase in which a far-reaching neurobiological and psychological reorganization takes place. According to the ontogenetic principle of psychoanalysis, the development and organization of the basic psychic functions occur in the first five years of life, while a reorganization takes place in adolescence. Neurobiological research confirms that the basic growth and maturation of the brain occurs in the first five years of life, and that a substantial reorganization in brain development transpires in adolescence. Research also verifies the clinical psychoanalytic concept that neurobiological and psychological maturation in adolescence remain unfinished till approximately age 23. The long-term and late biopsychosocial maturation in adolescence implies that adequate monitoring by parents and school remains necessary. The view that adolescents need to separate, and discover their individuality and independence alone, is unsupported by recent findings. The adolescent must acquire his independence, personal identity, and self-agency ("scaffolding") step by step. It is important that the adolescent knows that his parents are in the background monitoring and intervening as necessary; that he is not entirely alone, adrift and at risk for potential fragmentation. The long-term plasticity of the brain in adolescence implies greater vulnerability for the development of psychopathology, but offers opportunity for

  18. Parental emotion socialization in clinically depressed adolescents: Enhancing, and dampening positive affect

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Shortt, Joann Wu; Allen, Nicholas B.; Davis, Betsy; Hunter, Erin; Leve, Craig; Sheeber, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This study compared parental socialization of adolescent positive affect in families of depressed and healthy adolescents. Participants were 107 adolescents (42 boys) aged 14 - 18 years and their parents. Half of the participants met criteria for major depressive disorder and the others were demographically matched adolescents without emotional or behavioral disorders. Results based on multi-source questionnaire and interview data indicated that mothers and fathers of depressed adolescents were less accepting of adolescents’ positive affect and more likely to use strategies that dampen adolescents’ positive affect than were parents of healthy adolescents. Additionally, fathers of depressed adolescents exhibited fewer responses likely to enhance the adolescents’ positive affect than were fathers of healthy adolescents. These findings build on those of previous work in examining parental responses to adolescent emotions, focusing on positive emotions and including both mothers and fathers. PMID:23942826

  19. Psychopathic-like traits in detained adolescents: clinical usefulness of self-report.

    PubMed

    Vahl, Pauline; Colins, Olivier F; Lodewijks, Henny P B; Markus, Monica T; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Vermeiren, Robert R J M

    2014-08-01

    Studies have demonstrated that self-report tools can be used to reliably and validly examine psychopathic-like traits in adolescents. However, it is unclear if self-report instruments are still reliable and valid when confidentiality cannot be guaranteed, such as during routine assessments in juvenile detention centres. To address this issue, the current study used data from the routine mental health screening of 365 detained male adolescents (12-18 years) in two juvenile detention centres. With the intention of gaining insight in the clinical usefulness of self-reported psychopathic-like traits, we examined relations known from literature with emotional and behavioural features. Self-reported psychopathic-like traits, measured by the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Short version (YPI-S), were uniquely associated with substance abuse, anger/irritability, conduct problems and hyperactivity, but not with internalizing problems. YPI-S-dimensions showed several specific relationships with variables of interest. For example, only the callous unemotional dimension was negatively related with prosocial behaviour and only the behavioural dimension was positively related with hyperactivity. In conclusion, self-reported psychopathic-like traits showed expected relations with relevant variables. These findings suggest that self-report can be used to identify detained youths with high levels of psychopathic-like traits outside a research context, thus, even when anonymity and confidentiality are not guaranteed. PMID:24327266

  20. Training international medical graduate clinical fellows: the challenges and opportunities for adolescent medicine programs.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Eudice

    2016-08-01

    Adolescent medicine achieved accreditation status first in the United States in 1994 and then in Canada in 2008 and even if it is not an accredited subspecialty in most other Western nations, it has still become firmly established as a distinct discipline. This has not necessarily been the case in some developing countries, where even the recognition of adolescence as a unique stage of human development is not always acknowledged. The program at SickKids in Toronto has prided itself in treating its international medical graduates (IMG) clinical fellows the same as their Canadian subspecialty residents by integrating them seamlessly into the training program. Although this approach has been laudable to a great extent, it may have fallen short in formally acknowledging and addressing the challenges that the IMG trainees have had to overcome. Moving forward, faculty must be trained and supports instituted that are geared specifically towards these challenges. This must be done on a formal basis to ensure both the success of the trainees as well as the overall enrichment of the fellowship training programs. PMID:26115499

  1. Informed Consent and Clinical Research Involving Children and Adolescents: Implications of the Revised APA Ethics Code and HIPAA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Celia B.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, 2 new sets of rules and regulations affecting the conduct of clinical research involving children and adolescents went into effect: the revised American Psychological Association's (APA) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA, 2002; effective June 1, 2003) and the Privacy Rule (45 CFR Part 160 and A and E of Part…

  2. Treatment of Adolescent Marijuana Abuse: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Presentation 1: Structure of the Cannabis Youth Treatment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Janet C.; Dennis, Michael L.; Diamond, Guy; Godley, Susan H.; Babor, Thomas; Donaldson, Jean; Herrell, James; Tims, Frank; Webb, Charles

    The Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) study is a multi-site randomized field experiment examining five outpatient treatment protocols for adolescents who abuse or are dependent on marijuana. The purpose of the CYT project is twofold: (a) to test the relative clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of five promising interventions targeted at…

  3. Group-Based Preference Assessment for Children and Adolescents in a Residential Setting: Examining Developmental, Clinical, Gender, and Ethnic Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volz, Jennifer L. Resetar; Cook, Clayton R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines developmental, clinical, gender, and ethnic group differences in preference in residentially placed children and adolescents. In addition, this study considers whether residentially placed youth prefer stimuli currently being used as rewards as part of a campuswide token economy system and whether youth would identify preferred…

  4. Conceptual Application of the Discrimination Model of Clinical Supervision for Direct Care Workers in Adolescent Residential Treatment Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Andrew M.; Sias, Shari M.

    2010-01-01

    This article applies the tenets of Bernard's in "Counselor Edu Supervision" 19:60-68, (1979) discrimination model of clinical supervision to the supervision needs of those who provide direct care to adolescents in residential treatment due to abuse, neglect, behavioral, or emotional problems. The article focuses on three areas (intentionality,…

  5. Effectiveness Research: Transporting Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A) From the Lab to School-Based Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mufson, Laura H.; Dorta, Kristen Pollack; Olfson, Mark; Weissman, Myrna M.; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the process of modifying and transporting an evidence-based treatment, Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A), from a university setting to school-based health clinics. It addresses conceptual issues involved in the shift from efficacy to effectiveness research as well as operational issues specific to…

  6. Against Explanatory Minimalism in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The idea that psychiatry contains, in principle, a series of levels of explanation has been criticized not only as empirically false but also, by Campbell, as unintelligible because it presupposes a discredited pre-Humean view of causation. Campbell’s criticism is based on an interventionist-inspired denial that mechanisms and rational connections underpin physical and mental causation, respectively, and hence underpin levels of explanation. These claims echo some superficially similar remarks in Wittgenstein’s Zettel. But attention to the context of Wittgenstein’s remarks suggests a reason to reject explanatory minimalism in psychiatry and reinstate a Wittgensteinian notion of levels of explanation. Only in a context broader than the one provided by interventionism is that the ascription of propositional attitudes, even in the puzzling case of delusions, justified. Such a view, informed by Wittgenstein, can reconcile the idea that the ascription mental phenomena presupposes a particular level of explanation with the rejection of an a priori claim about its connection to a neurological level of explanation. PMID:26696908

  7. Against Explanatory Minimalism in Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The idea that psychiatry contains, in principle, a series of levels of explanation has been criticized not only as empirically false but also, by Campbell, as unintelligible because it presupposes a discredited pre-Humean view of causation. Campbell's criticism is based on an interventionist-inspired denial that mechanisms and rational connections underpin physical and mental causation, respectively, and hence underpin levels of explanation. These claims echo some superficially similar remarks in Wittgenstein's Zettel. But attention to the context of Wittgenstein's remarks suggests a reason to reject explanatory minimalism in psychiatry and reinstate a Wittgensteinian notion of levels of explanation. Only in a context broader than the one provided by interventionism is that the ascription of propositional attitudes, even in the puzzling case of delusions, justified. Such a view, informed by Wittgenstein, can reconcile the idea that the ascription mental phenomena presupposes a particular level of explanation with the rejection of an a priori claim about its connection to a neurological level of explanation. PMID:26696908

  8. Working around a contested diagnosis: borderline personality disorder in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Koehne, Kristy; Hamilton, Bridget; Sands, Natisha; Humphreys, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    This discourse analytic study sits at the intersection of everyday communications with young people in mental health settings and the enduring sociological critique of diagnoses in psychiatry. The diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is both contested and stigmatized, in mental health and general health settings. Its legitimacy is further contested within the specialist adolescent mental health setting. In this setting, clinicians face a quandary regarding the application of adult diagnostic criteria to an adolescent population, aged less than 18 years. This article presents an analysis of interviews undertaken with Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) clinicians in two publicly funded Australian services, about their use of the BPD diagnosis. In contrast with notions of primacy of diagnosis or of transparency in communications, doctors, nurses and allied health clinicians resisted and subverted a diagnosis of BPD in their work with adolescents. We delineate specific social and discursive strategies that clinicians displayed and reflected on, including: team rules which discouraged diagnostic disclosure; the lexical strategy of hedging when using the diagnosis; the prohibition and utility of informal 'borderline talk' among clinicians; and reframing the diagnosis with young people. For clinicians, these strategies legitimated their scepticism and enabled them to work with diagnostic uncertainty, in a population identified as vulnerable. For adolescent identities, these strategies served to forestall a BPD trajectory, allowing room for troubled adolescents to move and grow. These findings illuminate how the contest surrounding this diagnosis in principle is expressed in everyday clinical practice. PMID:22674745

  9. Cervical, Anal and Oral HPV in an Adolescent Inner-City Health Clinic Providing Free Vaccinations

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Burk, Robert D.; Nucci-Sack, Anne; Shankar, Viswanathan; Peake, Ken; Lorde-Rollins, Elizabeth; Porter, Richard; Linares, Lourdes Oriana; Rojas, Mary; Strickler, Howard D.; Diaz, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Published human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine trials indicate efficacy is strongest for those naive to the vaccine-types. However, few high-risk young women have been followed and cervical HPV has been the predominant outcome measure. Methods We collected cervical and anal swabs, as well as oral rinse specimens from 645 sexually active inner-city young females attending a large adolescent health-clinic in New York City that offers free care and HPV vaccination. Specimens were tested for HPV-DNA using a MY09/MY11-PCR system. Type-specific prevalence of HPV at each anatomic site was compared for individuals by vaccination dose using generalized estimating equation logistic regression models. Results The majority of subjects reported being of non-Caucasian (92%) and/or Hispanic ethnicity (61%). Median age was 18 years (range:14–20). All had practiced vaginal sex, a third (33%) practiced anal sex, and most (77%) had also engaged in oral sex. At enrollment, 21% had not received the vaccine and 51% had received three doses. Prevalent HPV infection at enrollment was detected in 54% of cervical, 42% of anal and 20% of oral specimens, with vaccine types present in 7%, 6% and 1% of specimens, respectively. Comparing prevalence for vaccine types, the detection of HPV in the cervix of vaccinated compared to unvaccinated adolescents was significantly reduced: HPV6/11 (odds ratio [OR] = 0.19, 95%CI:0.06–0.75), HPV16 (OR = 0.31, 95%CI:0.11–0.88) and HPV18 (OR = 0.14, 95%CI:0.03–0.75). For anal HPV, the risk of detecting vaccine types HPV6/11 (OR = 0.27, 95%CI:0.10–0.72) and HPV18(OR = 0.12, 95%CI:0.01–1.16) were significantly reduced for vaccinated adolescents however, the risk for HPV16 was not significantly decreased (OR = 0.63, 95%CI:0.18–2.20). Conclusion HPV Prevalence is extremely high in inner-city female adolescents. Administration of the HPV vaccine reduced the risk for cervical HPV; however continued follow-up is required

  10. Workplace-Based Assessments in Psychiatry: Evaluation of a Whole Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittlebank, Andrew; Archer, Julian; Longson, Damien; Malik, Amit; Bhugra, Dinesh K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Work Place-Based Assessments (WPBAs) were introduced into psychiatry along with the new curriculum in 2005. The Royal College of Psychiatrists decided to pilot several WPBAs to ascertain their suitability. Method: Eight types of assessments (Case-Based Discussion, Assessment of Clinical Expertise, Mini-Assessed Clinical Encounter,…

  11. Defensive psychiatry and the disruption of treatment boundaries.

    PubMed

    Simon, R I

    2000-01-01

    Defensive psychiatry refers to any act or omission that is performed not for the benefit of the patient but to avoid malpractice liability or to provide a legal defense against a malpractice claim. Defensive practices that produce deviant treatment boundaries usually take the form of clinically unnecessary prohibitions that disturb the therapist's position of neutrality. A distinction is drawn between boundary violations, boundary crossings and boundary issues. Typical clinical issues that provoke defensive treatment boundaries include managing patients with sexual transferences and potentially violent patients that may require the therapist to warn and protect endangered third parties. Defensive boundaries are usually created by unrecognized or uncorrected therapists' countertransferences. PMID:10994296

  12. Sensitivity of clinically hospitalized adolescents' self-report measures to change over time.

    PubMed

    Nelson, W M; Renzenbrink, G; Kapp, C J

    1995-11-01

    Twenty-five psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents were assessed on three separate occasions (approximately 2 weeks apart) using the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (R-CMAS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Children's Attributional Styles Questionnaire Revised (KASTAN) within 1 week of hospitalization. Attending clinicians also rated each subject concurrently on the Anxiety and Depression factors of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale for Children (BPRS-C). Results indicated only modest agreement between self-report measures and clinician ratings over time. Clinician ratings on both BPRS-C factors changed significantly over time, while, of the self-report measures, only the R-CMAS evidenced significant change. Results were discussed in terms of the construct of "negative affectivity," method variance in assessment, and clinical implications. PMID:8778122

  13. Feasibility of using text messaging for unhealthy behaviors screening in a clinical setting: a case study on adolescent hazardous alcohol use

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Underage alcohol use is the leading cause of preventable mortality among adolescents in the USA. Moreover, the average age of onset of underage drinking is 13 years. This study examined the feasibility of using a text messaging survey (TMS) to assess adolescent alcohol use. A sample of 29 adolescents, aged 13–17 years, was recruited from two primary care clinics. They completed a 16 question TMS while in the waiting room and a two-question exit TMS. The participation rate was 87%. Two out of 25 (8%) adolescents met the criteria for hazardous drinking and 28% reported alcohol use. It was found that 38% and 25% of adolescents who completed the exit TMS were asked or advised about drinking, respectively. Text messaging to assess adolescent alcohol use in this setting seems feasible, does not disrupt patient workflow, and can assess many health behaviors before a clinical encounter. PMID:22759622

  14. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

    PubMed Central

    Mörelius, Evalotte; Gustafsson, Per A.; Ekberg, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (n = 33) and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP) (n = 14) using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person). Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health. PMID:23878734

  15. Evaluation of an Intervention among Adolescents to Reduce Preventive Misconception in HIV Vaccine Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lally, Michelle; Goldsworthy, Richard; Sarr, Moussa; Kahn, Jessica; Brown, Larry; Peralta, Ligia; Zimet, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Placebo and randomization are important concepts that must be understood before youth can safely participate in HIV vaccine studies or other biomedical trials for HIV prevention. These concepts are central to the phenomenon of preventive misconception which may be associated with an increase in risk behavior among study participants related to mistaken beliefs. Persuasive messaging, traditionally used in the field of marketing, could enhance educational efforts associated with randomized clinical trials. Methods Two educational brochures were designed to increase knowledge about HIV vaccine clinical trials via 1 and 2-sided persuasive messaging. Through the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network, 120 youth were enrolled, administered a mock HIV vaccine trial consent, and then randomized to receive either no supplemental information or one of the two brochures. Results The 2-sided brochure group in which common clinical trial misconceptions were acknowledgedand then refuted had significantly higher scores on knowledge of randomization and interpretation of side effects than the consent-only control group, and willingness to participate in an HIV vaccine trial was not decreased with the use of this brochure. Conclusion Two sided persuasive messaging improves understanding of the concepts of randomization and placebo among youth who would consider participating in an HIV vaccine trial. Further evaluation of this approach should be considered for at-risk youth participating in an actual trial of a biomedical intervention for HIV prevention. PMID:24613097

  16. Intimate Partner Violence and Partner STI Notification Among Adolescent and Young Adult Family Planning Clinic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Michele R.; Miller, Elizabeth; McCauley, Heather L.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Levenson, Rebecca R.; Waldman, Jeffrey; Schoenwald, Phyllis; Silverman, Jay G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Patient-initiated partner STI notification, i.e., patients informing their sexual partners of diagnosis, is a cornerstone of STI prevention. Growing evidence suggests that women exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) may fear such notification, or face negative consequences in response to STI disclosure. The current study assessed associations of IPV with fear of partner STI notification, and experiences of partner STI notification, among adolescent and young adult female family planning clinic patients. Methods Females patients ages 16–29 years in five family planning clinics in Northern California (n=1282) participated in a cross-sectional survey. Results History of physical or sexual IPV was associated with fear of partner STI notification. Moreover, participants exposed to IPV were more likely to have partners say it was not from them or otherwise accuse them of cheating in response to STI notification. Such partners were less likely to seek indicated STI treatment or testing. Conclusions Current findings suggest that STI partner notification may be compromised by IPV. Clinical practices and policies to support effective partner STI notification should include IPV assessment, and provide mechanisms to address related fears concerning partner notification. PMID:21680673

  17. [The psychiatric revolution in Quebec, 1950-1962. From asylum to community psychiatry and the open door].

    PubMed

    Duprey, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatry opens to the world at a time when the very basis of psychiatric practice, namely the asylum, is called into question. Studies appear in Quebec and Canadian journals concurrent to the introduction of new formulas for care, such as the delivery of psychiatric services in general hospitals and clinics, that allow patients to be treated outside the walls of psychiatric hospitals. In addition, postwar psychiatry takes an optimistic view toward the future of children with impairments through the creation of specialized schools and workshops. From the mid-20th century onward, the thinking in psychiatry centres on the open door. PMID:22518889

  18. Managing Medicare reimbursement on medical-psychiatry units.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Simundson, S

    1991-09-01

    Many general hospitals are confronting issues of financial strain precipitated to a large extent by Medicare payment reductions. The viability of psychiatry programs within general hospitals more than ever depends upon some demonstration of their financial as well as clinical contribution. The aim of this study is to review some of the basic parameters governing Part A (hospital) Medicare reimbursement of DRG-exempt general hospital psychiatry units and to provide options for improving their financial viability. There are a number of specific mechanisms involved in managing Medicare cost and reimbursement. Establishing a system for gatekeeping is important because significant control of payor mix and length of stay resides with the unit gatekeeper. Establishing liaison for short-stay patients with nursing home papers is important because Medicare pays on a target cost per discharge. The identification of short-stay patients is financially very favorable, and often critical to balance the unavoidable longer-stay patients. This paper also discusses how medical-psychiatric units can interface most effectively with medical-surgical units. Finally, there is some discussion of the need to develop pre- and postadmission outpatient medical-psychiatric programs. The financial aspects of medical-psychiatry care, if not the increasing scrutiny of managed care, will force further development of such outpatient programs. PMID:1743500

  19. [Philosophy of psychiatry and phenomenology of everyday life: The disruptions of ordinary experience in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Troubé, Sarah

    2016-12-01

    The paper considers the philosophy of psychiatry from the perspective of everyday life, as a particular structure of experience. We outline some questions raised by disturbances typical of psychotic disorders with regard to a phenomenology of the everyday and common sense. As a link between philosophy and clinical psychopathology, this phenomenology implies a transcendental point of view, embedded in concrete and practical forms of ordinary experience, along with social norms. This opens the possibility of a mutual questioning between philosophy and psychiatry, drawing on its clinical, epistemological, and ethical dimensions. PMID:27550459

  20. Intelligent outcome measures in liaison psychiatry: essential even if not desirable

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, George

    2016-01-01

    Service development is guided by outcome measures that inform service commissioners and providers. Those in liaison psychiatry should be encouraged to develop a positive approach that integrates the collection of outcome measures into everyday clinical practice. The Framework for Routine Outcome Measurement in Liaison Psychiatry (FROM-LP) is a very useful tool to measure service quality and clinical effectiveness, using a combination of clinician-rated and patient-rated outcome measures and patient-rated experience measures. However, it does not include measures of cost-effectiveness or training activities. The FROM-LP is a significant step towards developing nationally unified outcome measures. PMID:27512588

  1. Law and psychiatry. Doing forensic work, II: fees, billing, and collections.

    PubMed

    Reid, William H

    2012-05-01

    Forensic practice fees, billing, and collection procedures are quite different from those in general psychiatry. Most forensic practices have far fewer "clients," and individual bills are usually larger. Collections are usually better (and less frequently discounted) in forensic practice, and resolving billing disputes is far more straightforward. Medicare, Medicaid, other insurance coverage, provider networks and agreements, procedure codes, and diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) are all largely irrelevant in forensic work (although sometimes important to direct clinical services in correctional psychiatry or forensic treatment clinics). An understanding of the practicalities and ethics of charging and billing for forensic services greatly simplifies practice management. PMID:22617086

  2. fMRI investigation of response inhibition, emotion, impulsivity, and clinical high-risk behavior in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew R. G.; Benoit, James R. A.; Juhás, Michal; Dametto, Ericson; Tse, Tiffanie T.; MacKay, Marnie; Sen, Bhaskar; Carroll, Alan M.; Hodlevskyy, Oleksandr; Silverstone, Peter H.; Dolcos, Florin; Dursun, Serdar M.; Greenshaw, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    High-risk behavior in adolescents is associated with injury, mental health problems, and poor outcomes in later life. Improved understanding of the neurobiology of high-risk behavior and impulsivity shows promise for informing clinical treatment and prevention as well as policy to better address high-risk behavior. We recruited 21 adolescents (age 14–17) with a wide range of high-risk behavior tendencies, including medically high-risk participants recruited from psychiatric clinics. Risk tendencies were assessed using the Adolescent Risk Behavior Screen (ARBS). ARBS risk scores correlated highly (0.78) with impulsivity scores from the Barratt Impulsivity scale (BIS). Participants underwent 4.7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an emotional Go/NoGo task. This task presented an aversive or neutral distractor image simultaneously with each Go or NoGo stimulus. Risk behavior and impulsivity tendencies exhibited similar but not identical associations with fMRI activation patterns in prefrontal brain regions. We interpret these results as reflecting differences in response inhibition, emotional stimulus processing, and emotion regulation in relation to participant risk behavior tendencies and impulsivity levels. The results are consistent with high impulsivity playing an important role in determining high risk tendencies in this sample containing clinically high-risk adolescents. PMID:26483645

  3. Cognitive behavioral therapy for early adolescents with autism spectrum disorders and clinical anxiety: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jeffrey J; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Alessandri, Michael; Fujii, Cori; Renno, Patricia; Laugeson, Elizabeth; Piacentini, John C; De Nadai, Alessandro S; Arnold, Elysse; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Clinically elevated anxiety is a common, impairing feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A modular CBT program designed for preteens with ASD, Behavioral Interventions for Anxiety in Children with Autism (BIACA; Wood et al., 2009) was enhanced and modified to address the developmental needs of early adolescents with ASD and clinical anxiety. Thirty-three adolescents (11-15 years old) were randomly assigned to 16 sessions of CBT or an equivalent waitlist period. The CBT model emphasized exposure, challenging irrational beliefs, and behavioral supports provided by caregivers, as well as numerous ASD-specific treatment elements. Independent evaluators, parents, and adolescents rated symptom severity at baseline and posttreatment/postwaitlist. In intent-to-treat analyses, the CBT group outperformed the waitlist group on independent evaluators' ratings of anxiety severity on the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) and 79% of the CBT group met Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale criteria for positive treatment response at posttreatment, as compared to only 28.6% of the waitlist group. Group differences were not found for diagnostic remission or questionnaire measures of anxiety. However, parent-report data indicated that there was a positive treatment effect of CBT on autism symptom severity. The CBT manual under investigation, enhanced for early adolescents with ASD, yielded meaningful treatment effects on the primary outcome measure (PARS), although additional developmental modifications to the manual are likely warranted. Future studies examining this protocol relative to an active control are needed. PMID:25526831

  4. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Early Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Clinical Anxiety: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jeffrey J.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Alessandri, Michael; Fujii, Cori; Renno, Patricia; Laugeson, Elizabeth; Piacentini, John C.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Arnold, Elysse; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinically elevated anxiety is a common, impairing feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A modular CBT program designed for preteens with ASD, Behavioral Interventions for Anxiety in Children with Autism (BIACA; Wood et al., 2009), was enhanced and modified to address the developmental needs of early adolescents with ASD and clinical anxiety. Method Thirty-three adolescents (11–15 years old) were randomly assigned to 16 sessions of CBT or an equivalent waitlist period. The CBT model emphasized exposure, challenging irrational beliefs, and behavioral supports provided by caregivers, as well as numerous ASD-specific treatment elements. Independent evaluators, parents, and adolescents rated symptom severity at baseline and post-treatment/post-waitlist. Results In intent-to-treat analyses, the CBT group outperformed the waitlist group on independent evaluators’ ratings of anxiety severity on the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) and 79% of the CBT group met Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale criteria for positive treatment response at posttreatment, as compared to only 28.6% of the waitlist group. Group differences were not found for diagnostic remission or questionnaire measures of anxiety. However, parent-report data indicated that there was a positive treatment effect of CBT on autism symptom severity. Conclusions The CBT manual under investigation, enhanced for early adolescents with ASD, yielded meaningful treatment effects on the primary outcome measure (PARS), although additional developmental modifications to the manual are likely warranted. Future studies examining this protocol relative to an active control are needed. PMID:25526831

  5. Treating Adolescents. A Volume in the Jossey-Bass Library of Current Clinical Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Hans, Ed.

    Adolescence is a time of unparalleled threat, change, challenge, and opportunity. Rates of psychopathology increase dramatically during adolescence, yet many therapists find it hard to engage with adolescents. The organization of this book follows the typical emergence of specific syndromes in the course of development. Chapters are: (1) "General…

  6. Empirically Derived Subtypes of Lifetime Anxiety Disorders: Developmental and Clinical Correlates in U.S. Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Marcy; Georgiades, Katholiki; Lamers, Femke; Swanson, Sonja A.; Cui, Lihong; He, Jian-Ping; Avenevoli, Shelli; Merikangas, Kathleen R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined the sex- and age-specific structure and comorbidity of lifetime anxiety disorders among U.S. adolescents. Method: The sample consisted of 2,539 adolescents (1,505 females and 1,034 males) from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement who met criteria for "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  7. Mapping the Clinical Complexities of Adolescents with Substance Use Disorders: A Typological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Kathleen; McDermott, Paul A.; Webb, Alicia; Hagan, Teresa Ann

    2006-01-01

    Because of the vast improvements in adolescent substance use assessment, it is widely recognized that adolescent substance use disorders (SUD) encompasses diverse drugs, patterns and etiologies and are characterized by extensive heterogeneity in other life domains. The next step in advancing adolescent SUD assessment is to classify adolescents…

  8. A Marxist approach to psychology and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Nahem, J

    1982-01-01

    Marxism considers psychology and psychiatry to be young and complex sciences which are powerfully affected by the nature of society. Marxism contributes to these sciences by applying dialectical and historical materialism to their study and development. The Marxist critique of psychology and psychiatry under capitalism identifies the immense harmful effect on them of capitalist class ideology in a number of areas: anti-working class theories, racism, national chauvinism, sexism, theories of fixed evil human nature, and false or one-sided theories. Socialism is held to provide a healthy environment for individual psychological development and to utilize psychology and psychiatry for scientific and humane ends. PMID:7076375

  9. Implementing Psychophysiology in Clinical Assessments of Adolescent Social Anxiety: Use of Rater Judgments Based on Graphical Representations of Psychophysiology

    PubMed Central

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Augenstein, Tara M.; Aldao, Amelia; Thomas, Sarah A.; Daruwala, Samantha; Kline, Kathryn; Regan, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Social stressor tasks induce adolescents’ social distress as indexed by low-cost psychophysiological methods. Unknown is how to incorporate these methods within clinical assessments. Having assessors judge graphical depictions of psychophysiological data may facilitate detections of data patterns that may be difficult to identify using judgments about numerical depictions of psychophysiological data. Specifically, the Chernoff Face method involves graphically representing data using features on the human face (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape). This method capitalizes on humans’ abilities to discern subtle variations in facial features. Using adolescent heart rate norms and Chernoff Faces, we illustrated a method for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety. METHOD Twenty-two clinic-referred adolescents completed a social anxiety self-report and provided psychophysiological data using wireless heart rate monitors during a social stressor task. We graphically represented participants’ psychophysiological data and normative adolescent heart rates. For each participant, two undergraduate coders made comparative judgments between the dimensions (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape) of two Chernoff Faces. One Chernoff Face represented a participant’s heart rate within a context (baseline, speech preparation, or speech-giving). The second Chernoff Face represented normative heart rate data matched to the participant’s age. RESULTS Using Chernoff faces, coders reliably and accurately identified contextual variation in participants’ heart rate responses to social stress. Further, adolescents’ self-reported social anxiety symptoms predicted Chernoff Face judgments, and judgments could be differentiated by social stress context. CONCLUSIONS Our findings have important implications for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety. PMID:24320027

  10. Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale Perfectionism: A Predictor and Partial Mediator of Acute Treatment Outcome among Clinically Depressed Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Rachel H.; Silva, Susan G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Curry, John F.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of perfectionism on acute treatment outcomes was explored in a randomized controlled trial of 439 clinically depressed adolescents (12–17 years of age) enrolled in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) who received cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine, a combination of CBT and FLX, or pill placebo. Measures included the Children’s Depression Rating Scale–Revised, the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire–Grades 7–9, and the perfectionism subscale from the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (DAS). Predictor results indicate that adolescents with higher versus lower DAS perfectionism scores at baseline, regardless of treatment, continued to demonstrate elevated depression scores across the acute treatment period. In the case of suicidality, DAS perfectionism impeded improvement. Treatment outcomes were partially mediated by the change in DAS perfectionism across the 12-week period. PMID:20183664

  11. Sacred psychiatry in ancient Greece

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    From the ancient times, there are three basic approaches for the interpretation of the different psychic phenomena: the organic, the psychological, and the sacred approach. The sacred approach forms the primordial foundation for any psychopathological development, innate to the prelogical human mind. Until the second millennium B.C., the Great Mother ruled the Universe and shamans cured the different mental disorders. But, around 1500 B.C., the predominance of the Hellenic civilization over the Pelasgic brought great changes in the theological and psychopathological fields. The Hellenes eliminated the cult of the Great Mother and worshiped Dias, a male deity, the father of gods and humans. With the Father's help and divinatory powers, the warrior-hero made diagnoses and found the right therapies for mental illness; in this way, sacerdotal psychiatry was born. PMID:24725988

  12. [Explaining and understanding in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Wölk, W

    1998-05-01

    The philosophical debate on explanation and understanding also led to basic methodological reflections in psychiatry. Subsuming one fact under a general law is the characteristic feature of scientific explanations. In this way, deductive conclusions can be achieved with a high degree of objectivity. Hermeneutical understanding makes way for interpretations in front of a given theoretical matrix. On the other hand, sympathetic understanding is a matter of conceiving single-part items as a consequence of other singular aspects (e.g., tracing back an action to an intention). If one understands the growth of knowledge as a rational and critical process, it seems no more justified to insist on exclusive methodologically based positions. PMID:9629554

  13. Neuroimaging, culture, and forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neil K

    2009-01-01

    The spread of neuroimaging technologies around the world has led to diverse practices of forensic psychiatry and the emergence of neuroethics and neurolaw. This article surveys the neuroethics and neurolegal literature on the use of forensic neuroimaging within the courtroom. Next, the related literature within medical anthropology and science and technology studies is reviewed to show how debates about forensic neuroimaging reflect cultural tensions about attitudes regarding the self, mental illness, and medical expertise. Finally, recommendations are offered on how forensic psychiatrists can add to this research, given their professional interface between law and medicine. At stake are the fundamental concerns that surround changing conceptions of the self, sickness, and expectations of medicine. PMID:19535562

  14. [Disaster psychiatry in late life].

    PubMed

    Awata, Shuichi

    2013-10-01

    Disaster preparedness in geriatric psychiatry was proposed on the basis of experience of the Great East Japan Earthquake. 1) Frail or demented elderly should be considered as a special population at risk for disaster victims and addressed in local disaster prevention programs. 2) To response to various psychiatric symptoms(delirium, BPSD, depression, anxiety, insomnia, and posttraumatic stress disorder) caused by medical conditions and rapid environmental changes due to disaster, linkage and coordination systems between psychiatric and medical sections should be established. 3) As a medium- and long-term support for the elderly who lost the community familiar to them, creation of a new community should be promoted in order to prevent depression, alcohol dependence, BPSD, and suicide. PMID:24261221

  15. An ethical framework for psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Sidney; Green, Stephen A

    2006-01-01

    Psychiatry has not reached a consensus hitherto concerning an optimal theoretical framework for ethical decision-making and corresponding action. Various theories have been considered, but found wanting. Moreover, classic theories may contradict one another, contribute to confusion and immobilise the clinician. We have examined major theories commonly applied in bioethics, conferred with moral philosophers and psychiatrists and striven to apply more recent insights drawn from moral philosophy. We report that instead of pursuing a single theoretical framework, we should garner the strengths of compatible approaches in a synergistic way. We propose a particular complementarity of principlism--with its pragmatic focus on respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice--and care ethics, a variant of virtue theory, which highlights character traits pertinent to caring for vulnerable psychiatric patients. PMID:16388063

  16. Psychiatry during the Nazi era: ethical lessons for the modern professional

    PubMed Central

    Strous, Rael D

    2007-01-01

    For the first time in history, psychiatrists during the Nazi era sought to systematically exterminate their patients. However, little has been published from this dark period analyzing what may be learned for clinical and research psychiatry. At each stage in the murderous process lay a series of unethical and heinous practices, with many psychiatrists demonstrating a profound commitment to the atrocities, playing central, pivotal roles critical to the success of Nazi policy. Several misconceptions led to this misconduct, including allowing philosophical constructs to define clinical practice, focusing exclusively on preventative medicine, allowing political pressures to influence practice, blurring the roles of clinicians and researchers, and falsely believing that good science and good ethics always co-exist. Psychiatry during this period provides a most horrifying example of how science may be perverted by external forces. It thus becomes crucial to include the Nazi era psychiatry experience in ethics training as an example of proper practice gone awry. PMID:17326822

  17. Gender, human rights and cultural diversity: reflections on a career in transcultural psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kastrup, Marianne C

    2011-04-01

    The three issues of gender equality, human rights and cultural diversity have dominated my organizational commitments, research, and clinical practice in transcultural psychiatry. These issues are intertwined in many ways and have broad implications for transcultural psychiatry. With increasing globalization, psychiatrists in many countries are likely to be treating patients who have migrated from different cultures and who may have been exposed to a variety of traumatic experiences that have a profound impact on their mental health. Of particular concern is the group of torture survivors and the elucidation of their symptom manifestations, as well as effective therapeutic interventions, which clearly show how human rights issues are linked to research and clinical psychiatry. The analyses of how different ethnic groups use psychiatric services, epitomize how important it is to pay attention to gender aspects in the interpretation of the findings and their therapeutic, as well as policy, implications. PMID:21511847

  18. Realizing the Potential of Mobile Mental Health: New Methods for New Data in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Patrick; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Smartphones are now ubiquitous and can be harnessed to offer psychiatry a wealth of real-time data regarding patient behavior, self-reported symptoms, and even physiology. The data collected from smartphones meet the three criteria of big data: velocity, volume, and variety. Although these data have tremendous potential, transforming them into clinically valid and useful information requires using new tools and methods as a part of assessment in psychiatry. In this paper, we introduce and explore numerous analytical methods and tools from the computational and statistical sciences that appear readily applicable to psychiatric data collected using smartphones. By matching smartphone data with appropriate statistical methods, psychiatry can better realize the potential of mobile mental health and empower both patients and providers with novel clinical tools. PMID:26073363

  19. The Best of Both Worlds: Psychiatry Training at Combined Civilian-Military Programs.

    PubMed

    Welton, Randon S; Hamaoka, Derrick A; Broderick, Pamela J; Schillerstrom, Jason E

    2015-08-01

    Air Force psychiatry faces the task of training competent military psychiatrists in an era of continuing reductions. Beginning in the 1980s, the Air Force started collaborating with University partners to create hybrid training programs, civilian-military psychiatry residencies. These mergers provide stability for Air Force psychiatry training in the face of increased operational missions and uncertain military recruiting. As a result of these combined programs, Air Force psychiatry residents gain access to a broader range of civilian clinical experience and expertise while maintaining a focus on distinctive military requirements. The combining of programs opens up options for academic activities which may not have otherwise existed. Both military and civilian residents benefit from the occupational psychiatry experiences available within military clinical sites. These programs give civilian residents a chance to assist active duty members and their families and provide insight into the military "lifecycle." These collaborations benefit the universities by providing access to a larger pool of residents and faculty. The synthesis of the military and civilian programs raises some ongoing obstacles such as civilian residents' ability to gain access to military resources. The programs must also accommodate separate mechanisms for selecting residents (the National Residency Matching Program versus the Joint Selection Board for Graduate Medical Education). Military residents must also comply with military standards and requirements while maintaining the universities' standards of conduct and professionalism. Merging military training programs into university programs creates a vibrant opportunity to create exceptional military and civilian psychiatrists. PMID:25772128

  20. Alterations in left ventricular, left atrial, and right ventricular structure and function to cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents with type 2 diabetes participating in the TODAY clinical trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are limited. Echocardiography was performed in the last year of the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) clinical trial (median 4.5 yr from diagnosis of T2D, average age 18 yr), incl...

  1. A Comparison of the Concurrent and Predictive Validity of Three Measures of Readiness to Change Alcohol Use in a Clinical Sample of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisto, Stephen A.; Krenek, Marketa; Chung, Tammy; Martin, Christopher S.; Clark, Duncan; Cornelius, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The authors compared 3 measures of readiness to change alcohol use commonly used in clinical research and practice with adolescents: the Readiness Ruler, the SOCRATES (subscales of Recognition and Taking Steps), and a Staging Algorithm. The analysis sample consisted of 161 male and female adolescents presenting for intensive outpatient…

  2. A Manual-Based Intervention to Address Clinical Crises and Retain Patients in the Treatment of Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Diane E.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Puumala, Susan E.; Silva, Susan G.; Rezac, Amy J.; Hallin, Mary J.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Weller, Elizabeth B.; Pathak, Sanjeev; Simons, Anne D.; March, John S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe a manual-based intervention to address clinical crises and retain participants in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method: The use of adjunct services for attrition prevention (ASAP) is described for adolescents (ages 12-17 years) during the 12-week acute treatment in TADS, from 2000 to 2003.…

  3. Poor peer relations predict parent- and self-reported behavioral and emotional problems of adolescents with gender dysphoria: a cross-national, cross-clinic comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Annelou L C; Steensma, Thomas D; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; VanderLaan, Doug P; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2016-06-01

    This study is the third in a series to examine behavioral and emotional problems in children and adolescents with gender dysphoria in a comparative analysis between two clinics in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and Amsterdam, the Netherlands. In the present study, we report Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Youth Self-Report (YSR) data on adolescents assessed in the Toronto clinic (n = 177) and the Amsterdam clinic (n = 139). On the CBCL and the YSR, we found that the percentage of adolescents with clinical range behavioral and emotional problems was higher when compared to the non-referred standardization samples but similar to the referred adolescents. On both the CBCL and the YSR, the Toronto adolescents had a significantly higher Total Problem score than the Amsterdam adolescents. Like our earlier studies of CBCL data of children and Teacher's Report Form data of children and adolescents, a measure of poor peer relations was the strongest predictor of CBCL and YSR behavioral and emotional problems in gender dysphoric adolescents. PMID:26373289

  4. Research in Psychiatry: Concepts and Conceptual Analysis.

    PubMed

    Marková, Ivana S; Berrios, German E

    2016-01-01

    Current research in psychiatry is increasingly focused on empirical studies with methods and technologies adopted from medicine. This paper argues that psychiatry has a different epistemological basis from medicine, and it is on account of this that research in psychiatry demands a different approach, one that perforce focuses on the clarification of concepts central to psychiatric practice. This means undertaking conceptual analysis and conceptual history and only then moving on to empirical study. This paper highlights the crucial epistemological differences between the practice of medicine and psychiatry, showing that the latter is enacted at the level of language and communication. Consequently, the structures of psychiatric objects, namely, mental disorders and mental symptoms, are complexes of meaning derived from heterogeneous sources - both organic and semantic. Conceptual analysis of such structures is essential as ultimately the validity of empirical research is directly dependent on the conceptual clarification of its objects of inquiry. PMID:27463619

  5. [Aeromedical Decision-Making in Psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Weber, F

    2016-09-01

    This paper reviews aeromedical decision-making in psychiatry. It explains the "one-percent rule", the general medical criteria for fitness for flying and how they are applied to psychiatric disorders. PMID:27607071

  6. Toward a philosophical structure for psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2005-03-01

    This article, which seeks to sketch a coherent conceptual and philosophical framework for psychiatry, confronts two major questions: how do mind and brain interrelate, and how can we integrate the multiple explanatory perspectives of psychiatric illness? Eight propositions are proposed and defended: 1) psychiatry is irrevocably grounded in mental, first-person experiences; 2) Cartesian substance dualism is false; 3) epiphenomenalism is false; 4) both brain-->mind and mind-->brain causality are real; 5) psychiatric disorders are etiologically complex, and no more "spirochete-like" discoveries will be made that explain their origins in simple terms; 6) explanatory pluralism is preferable to monistic explanatory approaches, especially biological reductionism; 7) psychiatry must move beyond a prescientific "battle of paradigms" to embrace complexity and support empirically rigorous and pluralistic explanatory models; 8) psychiatry should strive for "patchy reductionism" with the goal of "piecemeal integration" in trying to explain complex etiological pathways to illness bit by bit. PMID:15741457

  7. [The most important obstacles of the development of Hungarian psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Sándor

    2015-06-01

    A quarter of a century ago the change of the political system in Hungary precipitated a serious value-crisis and caused a lot of harmful effects in nurturing and the development of psychiatry. The author establishes that the attack against psychiatry is more intensive than previously but neither the education and health management nor the psychiatric leadership could cope with these difficulties. It can't be denied that the foundation of lifelong mental health begins in the early life years and about 75% of the first Mental Disorder manifests in adolescence and youth. We are not able to ensure the special rights of every child according to the Hungarian Constitution and the Declaration of the Rights of the Child by the United Nations. The large inequalities within the country, the lack of paramount mental education and nurturing, the lack of essential, consistent eternal values, the lack of required psychiatric care system are huge obstacles of the development of healthy individual and leads to self-destructive behaviour and several, serious physical and mental disorders. The purpose of the author is to call psychiatrists' attention to the main obstacles of the development of Hungarian Psychiatric Care System. The main obstacles of the present psychiatric care system: 1. Unclarified notions, confusion of ideas. 2. Somatic, neurologic, mental, cultural-social and spiritual ignorance. 3. Lack of organization in Mental Education and Psychiatric Care System. 4. Value-crisis in our society despite the fact that the "Council of Wise Men" created a "Scale of the Essential Consistent Eternal Values" for the Hungarian Education System in 2008. 5. Lack of mental health prevention both in education system and health care system. There is no teaching of hygiene lessons in the Hungarian schools. 6. Negligence and selfishness among the population. 7. Disinterest among competent authorities. 8. Leaving the most important possibilities out of consideration. The author establishes

  8. What can philosophy do for psychiatry?

    PubMed Central

    Fulford, Kenneth WM; Stanghellini, Giovanni; Broome, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    This article illustrates the practical impact of recent developments in the philosophy of psychiatry in five key areas: patient-centred practice, new models of service delivery, neuroscience research, psychiatric education, and the organisation of psychiatry as an international science-led discipline focused on patient care. We conclude with a note on the role of philosophy in countering the stigmatisation of mental disorder. PMID:16633476

  9. [Psychiatry, the field of all risks].

    PubMed

    Gilioli, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mental disorders lead patients along paths of irrationality. Insanity is perceived as excessiveness, often associated with violence. Risk in psychiatry is omnipresent and nursing practice is performed within a narrow safety zone. The media coverage of sensitive situations does not help. Ensuring the patient's recovery, respecting the fundamental principles of individual freedom while assuring the utmost safety of others is the constant challenge facing caregivers in psychiatry. PMID:26143214

  10. Consultation-liaison psychiatry in China

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jianlin; Ye, Chenyu

    2012-01-01

    Consultation-liaison psychiatry (CLP) was first established in China after liberation in 1949. It has developed more rapidly over the last two decades but, despite major regional differences in the level of CLP, the overall practice of CLP in the country remains quite basic, largely limited to case-based consultation with other medical departments. There is little ongoing collaboration between departments of psychiatry and other departments, and medical students and non-psychiatric clinicians rarely get training in CLP. PMID:25324616

  11. Postgraduate training in psychiatry in India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shridhar

    2010-01-01

    This review traces the evolution of modern medical education in India on the one hand and the formation of the Indian Psychiatric Society and the progress of postgraduate psychiatric education on the other hand, all in the context of Indian psychiatry. The topic is covered under the headings standard of psychiatric education, the goals, competencies required, impact of psychiatric disorders, relation of medicine to psychiatry, and the directions for the future of postgraduate psychiatric training. PMID:21836724

  12. Psychiatry and the military: an update.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Elspeth Cameron; Benedek, David; Malone, Ricky; Carr-Malone, Rosemary

    2006-09-01

    The United States has historically been concerned about the successful adjustment of its military members returning from war. These concerns are based on the recognition that war-zone exposures may have considerable negative emotional or behavior consequences. As the global war on terror continues, the United States military medical system will be required to address issues at the interface of psychiatry and the law. Despite clinical advances within the theater of war and at tertiary facilities in the United States, some military members will develop chronic and disabling mental illness as a result of traumatic exposure and exacerbated by the demands of the austere and dangerous operational environment. The extent to which violent and aggressive behavior in the aftermath of deployment can be attributed to combat experience remains an area of debate and ongoing investigation. However, experience suggests that a very small subgroup of the hundreds of thousands of war veterans deployed in conjunction with the current conflict in Iraq has already been involved in violent crimes. For this group, military forensic psychiatrists will be called on to make determinations of competency and criminal responsibility and to inform the courts about the potential contributions of war-related distress or disorder to criminal behavior. Though the overwhelming majority of war veterans will not be involved in criminal proceedings, a minority will develop career-ending (and in rare instances, life-ending) disabilities as a result of mental illness. For those who are no longer fit for duty, the military Physical Disability Evaluation System must make determinations of the extent to which future military performance and future civilian social and occupational function have been compromised. For a small yet highly visible minority of returning veterans, questions about the cause, precipitants, and manner of death will necessitate psychological autopsies. This article highlighted recent

  13. HIV serostatus disclosure and lived experiences of adolescents at the Transition Clinic of the Infectious Diseases Clinic in Kampala, Uganda: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Siu, Godfrey E; Bakeera-Kitaka, Sabrina; Kennedy, Caitlin E; Dhabangi, Aggrey; Kambugu, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Most studies on HIV serostatus disclosure and adolescents focus on whether, how and when to disclose to adolescents their HIV diagnosis. Fewer studies have examined HIV serostatus disclosure by adolescents who know they are infected with HIV. This study presents qualitative data examining HIV serostatus and treatment disclosure practices and concerns of young people living with HIV in Uganda and the extent to which they are satisfied with current norms around HIV serostatus and treatment disclosure. We conducted two focus groups and interviewed 20 HIV-infected young people aged 15-23 receiving HIV care and treatment at the Transition Clinic in Kampala. Respondents perceived disclosure as a relationship encompassing both communication and self-conduct. Adolescents employed unique strategies to disclose their HIV status, notably joking to "test the waters" and emotionally prepare the other person before later disclosing in a more serious manner. Findings reinforce the idea that HIV disclosure is a process, not a one-time event. Interviewees anticipated both positive and negative outcomes of disclosure, including financial and emotional support, stigma, discrimination and rejection. They described a sense of violation of their autonomy when confidentiality was breached by third party disclosure, and also expressed fear of emotional distress for their loved ones. Although adolescents yearned to be in control of information about their HIV status and treatment, they have little space to call their own, and privacy is often compromised, especially because in traditional African settings, young people are considered to be dependents under the full responsibility of caregivers. Further exploration of disclosure outcomes and strategies specific to adolescents can help better tailor interventions towards youth. Antiretroviral therapy programmes should consider counselling for caretakers to appreciate and respect the privacy and disclosure concerns of their HIV

  14. Cultural psychiatry: research strategies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Ban, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews some key aspects of current research in cultural psychiatry and explores future prospects. The first section discusses the multiple meanings of culture in the contemporary world and their relevance for understanding mental health and illness. The next section considers methodological strategies for unpacking the concept of culture and studying the impact of cultural variables, processes and contexts. Multiple methods are needed to address the many different components or dimensions of cultural identity and experience that constitute local worlds, ways of life or systems of knowledge. Quantitative and observational methods of clinical epidemiology and experimental science as well as qualitative ethnographic methods are needed to capture crucial aspects of culture as systems of meaning and practice. Emerging issues in cultural psychiatric research include: cultural variations in illness experience and expression; the situated nature of cognition and emotion; cultural configurations of self and personhood; concepts of mental disorder and mental health literacy; and the prospect of ecosocial models of health and culturally based interventions. The conclusion considers the implications of the emerging perspectives from cultural neuroscience for psychiatric theory and practice. PMID:23816867

  15. Predicting dangerousness with two Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory psychopathy scales: the importance of egocentric and callous traits.

    PubMed

    Salekin, Randall T; Ziegler, Tracey A; Larrea, Maria A; Anthony, Virginia Lee; Bennett, Allyson D

    2003-04-01

    Psychopathy in youth has received increased recognition as a critical clinical construct for the evaluation and management of adolescents who have come into contact with the law (e.g., Forth, Hare, & Hart, 1990; Frick, 1998; Lynam, 1996, 1998). Although considerable attention has been devoted to the adult construct of psychopathy and its relation to recidivism, psychopathy in adolescents has been less thoroughly researched. Recently, a psychopathy scale (Murrie and Cornell Psychopathy Scale; Murrie & Cornell, 2000) was developed from items of the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI; Millon, 1993). This scale was found to be highly related to the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (Hare, 1991) and was judged to have demonstrated good criterion validity. A necessary step in the validation process of any psychopathy scale is establishing its predictive validity. With this in mind, we investigated the ability of the MACI Psychopathy Scale to predict recidivism with 55 adolescent offenders 2 years after they had been evaluated at a juvenile court evaluation unit. In addition, we devised a psychopathy scale from MACI items that aligned more closely with Cooke and Michie (2001) and Frick, Bodin, and Barry's (2001) recommendations for the refinement of psychopathy and tested its predictive validity. Results indicate that both scales had predictive utility. Interpersonal and affective components of the revised scale were particularly important in the prediction of both general and violent reoffending. PMID:12700018

  16. Clinical Correlates of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale in a Sample of Obese Adolescents Seeking Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Christina A.; Sysko, Robyn; Bush, Jennifer; Pearl, Rebecca; Puhl, Rebecca M.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Dovidio, John F.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate psychometric properties and clinical correlates of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS) in a sample of obese adolescents seeking bariatric surgery. Sixty five adolescents enrolled in a bariatric surgery program at a large, urban medical center completed psychiatric evaluations, self-report questionnaires including the WBIS and other measures of psychopathology and physical assessments. The WBIS had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = .92). As in previous research with adults, the one underlying factor structure was replicated and 10 of the original 11 items were retained. The scale had significant partial correlations with depression (r = .519), anxiety (r = .465), social and behavioral problems (r = .364), quality of life (r = −.480), and eating (r = .579), shape (r = .815), and weight concerns (r = .545), controlling for body mass index. However, WBIS scores did not predict current or past psychiatric diagnosis or treatment or past suicidal ideation. Overall, the WBIS had excellent psychometric properties in a sample of obese treatment-seeking adolescents and correlated significantly with levels of psychopathology. These findings suggest that the WBIS could be a useful tool for healthcare providers to assess internalized weight bias among treatment-seeking obese youth. Assessment of internalized weight bias among this clinical population has the potential to identify adolescents who may benefit from information on coping with weight stigma which in turn can augment weight loss efforts. PMID:21593805

  17. [Use of informatics technology in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Margariti, M; Papadimitriou, G N

    2012-01-01

    Computer technology dominates our daily lives and has become an integral professional tool in medical practice and by extension, in psychiatry as well. The widespread use of internet technology has taken place with unprecedented speed in the history of human civilization, spreading in a few decades to all countries of the world, offering novel possibilities for transmitting information, and leading to the globalization of knowledge. However, the speed with which computer technology is becoming a part of our lives is accompanied by difficulties in integration. The continued evolution of applications often leads to the impression that to be modern and efficient we have to run continuously after developments, dedicating time and effort that we cannot often afford. At the same time, its widespread use alters the needs of our patients, and our efficiency is constantly judged in a globalized environment which, while offering new possibilities, also has new demands. The initial impression that computer technology is simply a tool that can facilitate the work of those who are willing and able to use it has been replaced by the perception that the practice of medicine, in both clinical and academic level, requires sufficient knowledge of modern technology and the development of relevant skills for ongoing training and following innovative applications. The result of this assumption is the introduction of technology courses in the curricula of medical schools in the country. This article offers a brief description of the uses of information technology in psychiatry. In particular, e-mail is one of the most popular Internet services and there is internationally an increasing pressure from the public to be able to contact their doctor by e-mail. Furthermore, almost all psychiatric journals now have a digital electronic edition, thus increasing the volume of articles published, the ease of accessing the required information, and ultimately the reduction of the time it takes a

  18. The Importance of Statistics in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Penrose, L. S.

    1947-01-01

    The paper gives an outline, with examples, of various statistical methods which may be of special use in psychiatry. (1) Actuarial data.—The simple accumulation of accurate figures on the ages of patients, their diagnoses and length of stay in hospital or under treatment for mental illness is of great value in understanding the scope of psychiatric problems. The age and sex incidences which correspond to different disease groups are very characteristic. Such material has value in the estimation of the results of therapeutic experiments but special methods have to be devised, as there is no exact prototype in standard vital statistics or in work on therapeutic trials. (2) Biometric techniques.—Knowledge of ordinary statistical practice guards against elementary errors and aids in establishing significance or otherwise of metrical deviations from the normal found in mentally ill subjects. Also the range of variations may be much more marked in abnormal than in normal groups. Furthermore, abnormal reactions in themselves may be characterized by either too much or too little variety, i.e. by scatter or by stereotypy. Discrimination between normal and abnormal reaction can be based on a single quantitative measurement, on difference in variance or on a compound measurement, i.e. pattern or profile. The discriminative approach has advantages over other methods because in this approach the initial factors are concrete and based on known classes such as males and females, children and adults, special clinical types, &c. (3) Genetical analysis.—Actuarial data can be useful in genetic studies by leading to estimation of population frequency of genes and consanguinity rates. Moreover, combined clinical and genetical observations can reveal the existence of new clinical entities. PMID:18919283

  19. Financial management challenges for general hospital psychiatry 2001.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatry programs are facing significant business and financial challenges. This paper provides an overview of these management challenges in five areas: departmental, hospital, payment system, general finance, and policy. Psychiatric leaders will require skills in a variety of business management areas to ensure their program success. Many programs will need to develop new compensation models with more of an emphasis on revenue collection and overhead management. Programs which cannot master these areas are likely to go out of business. For academic programs, incentive systems must address not only clinical productivity, but academic and teaching output as well. General hospital programs will need to develop increased sophistication in differential cost accounting in order to be able to advocate for their patients and program in the current management climate. Clinical leaders will need the skills (ranging from actuarial to negotiations) to be at the table with contract development, since those decisions are inseparable from clinical care issues. Strategic planning needs to consider the value of improving integration with primary care, along with the ability to understand the advantages and disadvantages of risk-sharing models. Psychiatry leaders need to define and develop useful reports shared with clinical division leadership to track progress and identify problems and opportunities. Leaders should be responsible for a strategy for developing appropriate information system architecture and infrastructure. Finally, it is hoped that some leaders will emerge who can further our needs to address inequities in mental health fee schedules and parity issues which affect our program viability. PMID:11313073

  20. Therapeutic Misconception in Psychiatry Research: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Thong, Ivan Sk; Foo, Meng Yee; Sum, Min Yi; Capps, Benjamin; Lee, Tih-Shih; Ho, Calvin; Sim, Kang

    2016-02-29

    Therapeutic misconception (TM) denotes the phenomenon in which research subjects conflate research purpose, protocols and procedures with clinical treatment. We examined the prevalence, contributory factors, clinical associations, impact, and collated solutions on TM within psychiatric research, and made suggestions going ahead. Literature search for relevant empirical research papers was conducted until February 2015. Eighty-eight reports were extracted, of which 31 were selected, summarised into different headings for discussion of implications and collated solutions of TM. We found variable and high rates of TM (ranging from 12.5% to 86%) in some psychiatry research populations. Contributory factors to TM included perceived medical roles of researchers, media, research setting and subject factors. Greater TM in affective, neurodevelopmental and psychotic spectrum conditions were associated with demographic variables (such as lower education, increased age), clinical factors (such as poor insight, cognitive deficits, increased symptoms, poorer self-rated quality of health), and social functioning (such as decreased independence). Inattention to TM may lead to frustration, negative impression and abandonment of participation in psychiatry research. Strategies such as the employment of a neutral educator during the informed consent process and education modules may be effective in addressing TM. Further research is warranted to examine the different TM facets, specific clinical correlates and more effective management strategies. PMID:26792036