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Sample records for adolescent sex education

  1. Sex education for emotionally disturbed adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schoenholtz, S W; Horowitz, H A; Shtarkshall, R

    1989-02-01

    Under investigation were effects of a course in sex education on a population of emotionally disturbed adolescents who were enrolled as day patients in a school program that is part of the Adolescent Treatment Program of the Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital. Subjects included 7 females, and 8 males, aged 15-18, with severe socio-emotional and educational problems. Pre-and posttesting were used to measure changes. Measures included a short form questionnaire assessing sexual knowledge and attitudes, the Draw-a-Person test, and behavioral observations by teachers, faculty, and Adolescent Treatment Program staff. The results of the study indicated that patients responded age appropriately and gained knowledge and an increased openness about sexuality issues. On the knowledge section of the questionnaire areas addressed in class, such as contraception, were the areas that students showed improvement in student response. The attitudes section revealed an increase in uncertainty about their own values, or conversely, an increase in establishing their values more firmly. In the Draw-a-Person test there was a greater degree of openness and less defensiveness in the posttest drawings. Most postcourse drawings also included more sexual signs and showed nudity. Behavioral changes were noted in the student's increased class contributions and participation, as well as in a more frequent focus of issues relating to sexuality and maturation. In addition, there was no regression or dysfunction as a result of the materials presented, and therapeutic and educational processes were not disrupted by the patient's involvement in the course. It was concluded that a sex education course is clinically and educationally useful on many levels within a therapeutic setting. PMID:12342338

  2. Risking a Relation: Sex Education and Adolescent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jen

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers how issues of adolescent development might be brought into conversation with dilemmas in sex education. Here, sex education is larger than information, affirmation or prohibition. In its address to the most intimate aspects of life--love, loss, vulnerability, power, friendship, aggression--sex education is necessarily…

  3. Adolescents' Preferences regarding Sex Education and Relationship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Triece; van Schaik, Paul; van Wersch, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to examine adolescents' perceptions of the quality of a Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) intervention, their preferences for sources of SRE and how these vary as a function of gender, school's faith and school type. Design: A non-experimental design was used. Setting: The participants (N = 759…

  4. Adolescents' Preferences for Source of Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Cheryl L.; Surmann, Amy T.

    2004-01-01

    The primary purposes of this study were to examine what adolescents' identify as their preferred sources of sexual education (e.g., peers, family, school, media, professionals, etc.) about various topics, and whether patterns varied for each gender, race, grade, and economic group. Participants were 672 adolescents of both genders, three…

  5. Inadequacy of Sex Knowledge of Adolescents: Implications for Counseling and Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyehalu, Anthony S.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews evidence relating to the paucity of sex-oriented knowledge by adolescents across cultures. Such sex learning is obtained almost entirely from peers since cultural inhibitions and puritan attitudes often prevent open discussions with teachers and parents. A comprehensive program of sex education and sex counseling is needed. (JAC)

  6. Gender and Sex Education: A Study of Adolescent Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Measor, Lynda; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Responses of English adolescents to single-sex sex education classes were studied, focusing on about 20 females and about 20 males. There were clear gender differences in student reactions, with boys responding more openly, disruptively, and negatively. The role of cultural prescriptions in their responses is explored. (SLD)

  7. Where Do Chinese Adolescents Obtain Knowledge of Sex? Implications for Sex Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Liying; Li, Xiaoming; Shah, Iqbal H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Sex education in China has been promoted for many years, but limited data are available regarding the sources from which adolescents receive sex-related knowledge. The present study was designed to examine the sources from which Chinese adolescents obtain their information on puberty, sexuality and STI/HIV/AIDS, and whether there are any…

  8. Sex Education Justice: A Call for Comprehensive Sex Education and the Inclusion of Latino Early Adolescent Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouyoumdjian, Claudia; Guzman, Bianca L.

    2013-01-01

    Many sex education programs do not conceptualize adolescent sexuality as a normative process of development, thus sexuality is not part of a holistic picture of health education.The current project examines the multiple determinants of adolescent boys' sexual behaviors in the context of developing sex education. Limited research has examined…

  9. [School nursing and sex education for adolescents].

    PubMed

    Felizari, G M

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to organize and testify the teaching of Sexual Education for Adolescents. Two groups of first level School adolescents were selected to be submitted to a diagnostic test; after being worked, they were submitted to a post-test about their knowledge of subject matter. It was concluded that the teenagers are very little informed about sexuality, although they are highly motivated and able to discuss and to receive information about the subject. The results of the research points to the necessity of a multidisciplinary approach, with the active participation of scholar nursing in its development. It is recommended that the Program of Sexual Education should also include some bio-psychosocial aspects and must be based on the diagnosis of students' needs. PMID:2130384

  10. Does Sex Education Affect Adolescent Sexual Behaviors and Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabia, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether offering sex education to young teenagers affects several measures of adolescent sexual behavior and health: virginity status, contraceptive use, frequency of intercourse, likelihood of pregnancy, and probability of contracting a sexually transmitted disease. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent…

  11. [Sex education of children and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Montenegro, H

    2000-06-01

    There is a remarkable ignorance about sexuality among Chilean teenagers, as underscored by the paper by Fernández et al, published in this issue. The authors analyze the biological, psychological and social consequences of the lack of parental and school sexual education. Among them, there is an increasing incidence of unwanted pregnancies, abortions and sexually transmitted diseases in teenagers. Child abuse, neglect, battering, mortality and maternal deprivation are more frequent among the offspring of teenage parents. School desertion caused by unwanted pregnancies will seriously jeopardize the education and training of these teenagers, perpetuating the cycle of poverty. PMID:11016054

  12. Impact of sex education on knowledge and attitude of adolescent school children of Loni village.

    PubMed

    Avachat, Shubhada Sunil; Phalke, Deepak Baburao; Phalke, Vaishali Deepak

    2011-11-01

    Reproductive capability is now established at earlier age. But the subject of adolescent sexuality is taboo in most societies. There is widespread ignorance about risks of unprotected sex, problems among adolescents. Unfortunately need of sex education is not perceived and fulfilled in India especially in rural areas. The present study was conducted to assess the need and demonstrate the impact of sex education among adolescent school children. The impact of sex education workshop was tested by analysing pre- and postintervention questionnaire. The felt need of sex education increased considerably and the knowledge regarding contraceptives increased from manifolds after the intervention. There was significant increase in knowledge about menstrual hygiene, sexually transmitted diseases, etc, after sex education workshop. This study concludes that there is intense need of sex education and it has significant impact on knowledge of adolescent school children. PMID:22666937

  13. Attitudes of Parents and Health Promoters in Greece Concerning Sex Education of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirana, Paraskevi-Sofia; Nakopoulou, Evangelia; Akrita, Ioanna; Papaharitou, Stamatis

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the attitudes and views of Greek parents concerning the provision of sex education to adolescents, as well as the opinion and the involvement of school health promoters in sex education. A questionnaire containing 20 items was constructed and administered to 93 parents of adolescents who participated in parents'…

  14. Research on Adolescent Pregnancy-Risk: Implications for Sex Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Stephen R.; Alexander, Sharon J.

    1983-01-01

    A complex set of issues plague the efforts of public school sex education programs to reduce the level of pregnancy risk among adolescents. Issues include: (1) uncertain status of sex education; (2) training the teacher; (3) support among school leaders; (4) other influences on adolescent development; (5) developmental characteristics of…

  15. Family Homework and School-Based Sex Education: Delaying Early Adolescents' Sexual Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Jennifer M.; Frye, Alice; Charmaraman, Linda; Erkut, Sumru

    2013-01-01

    Background: Early sexual activity can undermine adolescents' future school success and health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of a family homework component of a comprehensive sex education intervention in delaying sexual initiation for early adolescents and to explore what social and contextual factors prevent…

  16. [Significance of sex education in the parents-adolescents relationship].

    PubMed

    de Jesus, M C

    1999-01-01

    This study had as reference the phenomenological sociology of Alfred Schütz. This author had as purpose understanding parents and adolescents' behavior towards sexual education. The phenomenological interview, used to gather data from parents and youngsters, allowed the understanding of the types: "parents who educate adolescents for sexual life" and "adolescents who are educated for sexual life". The comparative analyses of these two types showed the need of implementing a dialog about sexual life among parents and teenagers enabling the youngster to have a satisfying and safe sexual initiation. The comprehensive social action theory by Schütz was presented, in this study, as an educational health strategy. According to the author, there is a need of considering the person's inner existential preoccupations in order to understand his/her social behavior towards sexual matters. PMID:12138641

  17. [Sex education, sex behavior, contraception].

    PubMed

    Borkenstein, M; Schwingshandl, J; Kuttnig, M; Limbert, C

    1991-01-01

    Sexual behavior has changed during the last decades. Teenage fertility rate, and the number of gonococcal infections are both extremely high; the incidence of HIV-infections is increasing. Preventive measures include sex education. Sex education may help the adolescents to identify their own goals for sexual behavior, to avoid unintended and unwanted pregnancy, and to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:1945474

  18. Puberty/Adolescence. Growing Pains: Sex Education for Parents. A Newsletter Series. Letter III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polulech, Joan Burgess; Nuttall, Paul

    This document presents the third of five newsletters on sex education for parents. The newsletters were designed to help parents increase their ability to communicate with their adolescents about sexual issues. They explore the origins of the parents' feelings about sex; teach the importance of a healthy self-concept and how to build it in the…

  19. Sources and Timing of Sex Education: Relations with American Adolescent Sexual Attitudes and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Cheryl L.; Surmann, Amy T.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the comparative contribution that (a) multiple sources of education about sexual topics (peers, media, school and other adults), and (b) the timing of this sex education, make on American adolescent sexual attitudes and behavior. Participants were 672 ethnically and economically diverse male and female,…

  20. Development of a Sex Education Programme for 12-Year-Old to 14-Year-Old Turkish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cok, Figen; Gray, Lizbeth Ann

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has documented a need for the development of a sex education programme in Turkish schools in terms of adolescence readiness and the presence of misconceptions regarding critical aspects of sexual issues. Currently no school-based sex education is available for Turkish adolescents. This paper presents the development of a…

  1. Childhood and Adolescent Sexuality, Islam, and Problematics of Sex Education: A Call for Re-Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabatabaie, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a critical examination of the problematics of childhood and adolescent sexuality and sex education in an Islamic context. By exploring conceptions of (pre-marital) sexuality, childhood, and maturity/adulthood, it is suggested that: (i) "childhood" and "sexuality" do not coexist harmoniously in Islamic…

  2. An exploratory study of Muslim adolescents' views on sexuality: Implications for sex education and prevention

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This paper describes the results of an exploratory qualitative study on Muslim adolescents' views on sexuality in the Netherlands. Methods Data were gathered from an Internet forum on which 44 Muslim and 33 non-Muslim adolescents discussed sexuality as it relates to Islam. These discussions were subsequently analyzed for content using Nvivo 2.0. Results Our analysis revealed several issues that are relevant for the design of future sex education programs targeting Muslim youth. Apart from some expected outcomes regarding, for example, taboos on sexuality, sex outside marriage, abortion, homosexuality and conservative gender roles, our analyses showed that in cases of disputes 1) discussions were polarized, 2) opponents used the same Qur'anic passages to support their views, and 3) the authority of an Imam was questioned when his interpretation of Qur'anic passages was not in line with the views of participants. Conclusions Our findings show that current approaches to sex education among Muslim youth are likely to be unsuccessful given the rigidity of sexual norms in Muslim society. In addition, we also identified new barriers to sex education among Muslim youth (e.g. lack of respect for an Imam who opposes a youth's views on sexuality). PMID:20815921

  3. Community-Level Successes and Challenges to Implementing Adolescent Sex Education Programs

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Maura; Resseguie, Jamie; Smith, Hannah; Woodcox, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Best practices for adolescent sex education recommend science-based approaches. However, little is known about the capacity and needs of organizations who implement sex education programs on the local level. The purpose of this research was to describe successes and challenges of community organizations in implementing science-based sex education. Using qualitative methods, we interviewed program directors and educators in 17 state-funded adolescent pregnancy prevention/sex education programs as part of a larger mixed methods evaluation. Semi-structured interviews focused on success and challenges faced in implementing science-based approaches to program design, implementation and evaluation. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed using a thematic approach. Grantees included a range of programs, from short programs on puberty and HIV for late elementary students, to skills-based curricular sex education programs for high schools, to year-long youth development programs. Key aspects of curricular choice included meeting the needs of the population, and working within time constraints of schools and other community partners. Populations presenting specific challenges included rural youth, youth in juvenile justice facilities, and working with Indiana's growing Latino population. Programs self-developing curricula described challenges related to assessment and evaluation of impact. Programs using commercial curricula described challenges related to curricular selection and adaptation, in particularly shortening curricula, and adapting to different cultural or social groups. A remarkable degree of innovation was observed. The use of qualitative methods permitted the identification of key challenges and successes in a state-sponsored small grants program. Information can be used to enhance program capacity and quality. PMID:20180004

  4. [Sex education and the problem of early sexual relations among adolescents].

    PubMed

    Castellanous Simons, B; Gonzalez Hernandez, A

    1981-01-01

    until the completion of ever more time-consuming educations, is a factor in increased premarital sex although it is not a determinant of it. An adequate sex education program would help adolescents develop responsible attitudes and good foundations for their future sexual adjustments. It would also help prevent adolescent pregnancy, with its frequent negative consequences. PMID:12280815

  5. Adolescents, sex, and the media.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2012-04-01

    In the absence of effective sex education in the United States, the media have arguably become the leading sex educator for children and teenagers. Considerable research now exists that attests to the ability of the media to influence adolescents' attitudes and beliefs about sex and sexuality. In addition, new research has found a significant link between exposure to sexual content in the media and earlier onset of sexual intercourse. Although there is little research on the behavioral effects of "new" media, they are discussed as well. Suggestions for clinicians, parents, the federal government, and the entertainment industry are provided. PMID:22764553

  6. Mediation of Anti-Social Adolescent Behavior by Single-Sex and Co-Educational Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony

    Many societies institute coeducational and single-sex schools to mediate adolescents' antisocial behavior. This paper details a study comparing antisocial behavior of adolescent boys and girls in coeducational schools with that of a matching group in single-sex schools in Jamaica. The study identified the 10 most common types of antisocial…

  7. Young people in Europe. Adolescent health -- sex education.

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    Young people in Eastern Europe and the Newly Independent States have either witnessed, participated in, or been victims of abrupt changes which led to the collapse of the value systems by which they and their parents had learned to live. Their parents' position in society changed, with many struggling to support their families in conditions of widespread resource scarcity, including shortages of food, electricity, heating, and water supplies. Increased family tension has driven many parents to drink more alcohol, thereby increasing the risk of violence in the family. Almost everywhere in the region, young people expressed their desire to be better informed about reproductive health issues. A survey found that the overwhelming majority of more than 700 sampled youths had learned what they knew about reproductive health from friends, television, newspapers, and magazines. In Romania, lack of proper education and social discrimination mean that many people infected with STDs seek medical care only when their diseases have reached an advanced stage, while studies in Bulgaria show a declining mean age at first intercourse and a low level of condom use. In Turkey, an IEC (information, education, and communication) project was launched in 26 cities and towns to improve and extend family planning services. Elsewhere, the Orthodox Church in the Russian Federation has called abortion murder, young people can get good quality counseling in a range of institutions in Estonia, and abortion has become the main means of birth control in Ukraine. PMID:12222290

  8. The Impact of a Community-Based Comprehensive Sex Education Program on Chinese Adolescents' Sex-Related Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Bo; Meier, Ann; Shah, Iqbal; Li, Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a community-based comprehensive sex education program among unmarried youth in China. The impact of the intervention on sexual knowledge, attitudes, and sexual initiation were assessed, using a pre-test post-test quasi-experimental research design. The program used six methods for providing sex-related…

  9. Mixed-Sex or Single-Sex Education: How Would Young People Like Their Sex Education and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strange, Vicki; Forrest, Simon; Oakley, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Examined adolescents views about sex education, specifically their views about interaction in single- and mixed-sex groups. Surveys of English secondary school students indicated that most girls, and one-third of boys, want some or all of their sex education to be delivered in single-sex groups. Girls' experiences of sex education with boys…

  10. Understanding Parental Views of Adolescent Sexuality and Sex Education in Ecuador: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerves, Elena; López, Silvia; Castro, Cecilia; Ortiz, William; Palacios, María; Rober, Peter; Enzlin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Parents' contribution to sex education is increasingly receiving research attention. This growing interest stems from recognition of the influence that parental attitudes may have both on young people's sexual attitudes and behaviour, and on school-based sex education. Studies regarding parental attitudes towards sexuality are, however,…

  11. Let's Talk about Sex: Recommendations for Educating Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minch, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with developmental disabilities are vulnerable to sexual abuse, and are often denied access to sexuality education. Public schools have vague curricula regarding sexuality education for general education students, curricula to which adolescents with developmental disabilities do not have access. The current study sought to determine…

  12. The Comparative Research on Sex Education for Adolescents of China and the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu-feng, Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Sex education refers to people's comprehension about sex, which involves not only sexual structure (anatomy, physiology, birth control, pregnancy, etc.), but also sexual relationships concerning human and moral problems. It includes at least sexual physiology, sexual psychology, sexual ethic, sexual law, etc., which aims to help people form the…

  13. School-Based Sex Education and Neuroscience: What We Know about Sex, Romance, Marriage, and Adolescent Brain Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballonoff Suleiman, Ahna; Johnson, Megan; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Galván, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many school-based abstinence-only sex education curricula state that sexual activity outside of marriage is likely to have harmful psychological effects. Recent advances in neuroscience have expanded our understanding of the neural underpinnings of romantic love, marriage, sexual desire, and sexual behavior and improved our…

  14. Sex education? Population education? A new school programme for China's adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fraser, S E

    1983-06-01

    Population education, including family life responsibility and some discrete sexual education, has been introduced for the 1st time in China to selected senior high school students in the 1981-82 academic year. The course covers units on Marxist population theory and the dynamics of population growth from a national and international perspective. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationship of China's 4 modernization programs and the basics of birth control. Particular emphasis is on the promotion of the 1-child family concept and the improvement of population quality through eugenic control. The new course is designed specifically for adolescents and is intended to lay the groundwork for acceptable social sexual behavior for senior high school students (16-17 years of age). The UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) has contributed significantly during the past 2 years to the development of population studies and demographic research within China. It has assisted with research, computer studies, and personnel training for the 1982 census. It also has trained demographers and assisted in the establishment of new population institutes at 10 key universities in various parts of China. The UNFPA program for high schools has earmarked funds for the training of some 8000 teachers in a series of month long workshops, 10 day orientation courses for administrators, the development of modern audiovisual facilities, and reference materials for 10 teacher training institutes, the production of instructional materials for 10 key or pilot middle school programs, and the development of a revised middle school curriculum in such fields as biology, geography, hygiene, physiology, and political study. The new text book, "Population Education," explores openly the many familial problems which will confront China's children in the future. The text rigorously promotes the 1 child family concept as the social and national ideal. The book includes straightforward information on human

  15. Sex Education Knowledge Differences between Freshmen and Senior College Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ruth M.; Dotger, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Abstinence sexuality education (sex ed) is the only federally funded sex ed in the United States. The strict curriculum of this education does not educate American adolescents about safer sex practices and leaves a knowledge gap in these adolescents that follows them into college. The Problem: This project aimed to identify sex knowledge…

  16. Sex, Sexuality, Sexting, and SexEd: Adolescents and the Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jane D.; Keller, Sarah; Stern, Susannah

    2009-01-01

    The traditional media (television, radio, movies, magazines) and new, digital media (the Internet, Social Networking Sites such as Facebook and Myspace, and cell phones) have become important sex educators for adolescents. Adolescents in the United States spend six to seven hours a day with some form of media, often using more than one kind…

  17. A Review of Parent-Based Barriers to Parent-Adolescent Communication about Sex and Sexuality: Implications for Sex and Family Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malacane, Mona; Beckmeyer, Jonathon J.

    2016-01-01

    Although adolescents' sexual health is generally better when parents and adolescents communicate about sex and sexuality, researchers have found parents can be reluctant to engage adolescents in conversations about those topics. To better understand why, we reviewed prior literature and identified four types of parent-based barriers to…

  18. Adolescent Ambiguities in "American Pie": Popular Culture as a Resource for Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashcraft, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Proposes the need to critically incorporate popular culture into sex education efforts in order to develop programs that resonate with teens' experiences while allowing them to construct more equitable social relations. Illustrates how this might be done through an analysis of the recent teen film, "American Pie," identifying specific implications…

  19. Sex Education For Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renshaw, Domeena C.

    1973-01-01

    Currently, sex education covers the mechanics of reproduction; details of venereal disease, and birth control information. This paper argues that this field should be augmented by the inclusion of the emotionally enriching, interpersonal, and sociocultural elements of human sexuality. A fundamentally Freudian sketch of sexual development is…

  20. Impact of the Family on the Sex Lives of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pick, Susan; Palos, Patricia Andrade

    1995-01-01

    Presents results of three studies as they relate to family influence on adolescents' sex lives. The studies' results support the hypothesis that the family has a substantial influence on adolescents' sexual and contraceptive behavior, justifying the incorporation of such issues as parent-child communication into sex education programs. (RJM)

  1. Sex Education in Multicultural Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartz, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Scandinavia has long been admired by American liberals and sex education advocates who cite comparable rates of adolescent sexuality, yet lower rates of teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and abortion in Scandinavia. The United States has, however, two variables with which Scandinavia in general, and Norway in particular, has not…

  2. Learning about Sex: Resource Guide for Sex Educators. Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberman, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Whether you are someone new to the field of sex education, trying to start a library or resource center on adolescent sexual health, or an old pro, this guide should give you a basic orientation to what's available to support your work. These resources are important to advancing positive attitudes toward adolescent sexual health and the author…

  3. Sex Education. Chapter Seventeen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caster, Jerry A.

    Information and a framework that permits teachers to plan and initiate a successful sex education program for students with mental disabilities is provided. A major aspect of sex education should be its focus on social relationships, emotions, choice-making, and responsibilities to self and others. Sex education should not be viewed as a…

  4. [Scientific sex education].

    PubMed

    1977-01-01

    Sex education should help men and women to realize themselves to the complete fullness of their personality; it should teach respect and comprehension toward life, women, and the family. Sex education can modify those traditional attitudes related to family and society which too often result in irresponsible paternity; sex education should be integrated into the teaching of other scientific disciplines. PMID:12309624

  5. Pursuing Perfection: Distress and Interpersonal Functioning Among Adolescent Boys in Single-Sex and Co-Educational Independent Schools.

    PubMed

    Coren, Sidney A; Luthar, Suniya S

    2014-11-01

    This study extends past findings of heightened problems among affluent youth by examining adjustment patterns among boys in two academically elite, independent high schools: one for boys only and the other coeducational. Both samples manifested disproportionately high rates of internalizing and externalizing symptoms, but only the co-educational boys showed elevations in substance use. Boys in both schools showed elevations in a new outcome domain examined: exhibitionistic narcissism. Multivariate analyses of predictors showed that parent criticism -- a defining feature of youths' maladaptive perfectionism -- and perceived maternal depression emerged as major vulnerability factors for both samples in relation to symptom levels. On other parenting dimensions, boys in the single-sex school seemed to be particularly sensitive to feelings of alienation from their fathers and perceived paternal depression. Envy of peers' attractiveness was associated with adolescent distress in both samples, but appeared to be especially critical for co-educational boys. Results are discussed, focusing on the costs and benefits of boys' attendance at a single-sex versus co-educational school, along with implications for practice and future research. PMID:25395693

  6. Pursuing Perfection: Distress and Interpersonal Functioning Among Adolescent Boys in Single-Sex and Co-Educational Independent Schools

    PubMed Central

    Coren, Sidney A.; Luthar, Suniya S.

    2014-01-01

    This study extends past findings of heightened problems among affluent youth by examining adjustment patterns among boys in two academically elite, independent high schools: one for boys only and the other coeducational. Both samples manifested disproportionately high rates of internalizing and externalizing symptoms, but only the co-educational boys showed elevations in substance use. Boys in both schools showed elevations in a new outcome domain examined: exhibitionistic narcissism. Multivariate analyses of predictors showed that parent criticism -- a defining feature of youths' maladaptive perfectionism -- and perceived maternal depression emerged as major vulnerability factors for both samples in relation to symptom levels. On other parenting dimensions, boys in the single-sex school seemed to be particularly sensitive to feelings of alienation from their fathers and perceived paternal depression. Envy of peers' attractiveness was associated with adolescent distress in both samples, but appeared to be especially critical for co-educational boys. Results are discussed, focusing on the costs and benefits of boys' attendance at a single-sex versus co-educational school, along with implications for practice and future research. PMID:25395693

  7. Can Sex Education Delay Early Sexual Debut?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erkut, Sumru; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Frye, Alice A.; Ceder, Ineke; Charmaraman, Linda; Tracy, Allison J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examine whether a nine-lesson sex education intervention, "Get Real: Comprehensive Sex Education That Works," implemented in sixth grade, can reduce the number of adolescents who might otherwise become "early starters" of sexual activity (defined as heterosexual intercourse) by seventh grade. Participants were…

  8. Sex Education: Another View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Jennifer

    1977-01-01

    The mother of a 14-year-old mentally retarded boy comments on the viewpoints of Dr. Sol Gordon (a sex education columnist) regarding masturbation, questions on sex, marriage, and the parents' role. (SBH)

  9. Sex Differences in Adolescent Reactions Toward Newcomers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Norma; Sones, Gittelle

    Reactions of male and female adolescent pairs to a same sex newcomer were observed as a means of assessing sex differences in indirect aggressive behaviors. Following a problem solving session, the group members rated each other's personality. Adolescent girls made less favorable judgments of the newcomer than did adolescent boys. In addition, on…

  10. Family Sex Communication and the Sexual Desire, Attitudes, and Behavior of Late Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamboni, Brian D.; Silver, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Parental sex education might promote healthy sexual behavior among adolescents, but some parents assume that family communication about sex will lead to sexual activity. Family sex communication has been studied with a limited range of adolescent sexual behaviors but not sexual fantasy or desire. Two measures of family sex communication were…

  11. Sex Education for Male Adolescent Sex Offenders in a Group Setting Led by General Psychiatry Residents: A Literature Review and Example in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, R. Gregg; Boyd, Mary S.

    2009-01-01

    Male adolescents have been credited with a significant percentage of sex crimes in recent years. They are a heterogeneous population with offenses spanning the same range found among adult offenders. A lack of interpersonal social skills relevant to intimate relationships and inaccurate knowledge regarding appropriate sexual behaviors contribute…

  12. Sex education in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Frade, A; Vilar, D

    1991-05-01

    The article on sex education in Portugal covers background, the educational system, the clashes of the 1960's over sex education, the Committee for the Study of Sexuality and Education (CSSE), the policies, politics and social movements during the period 1974 - 1984, the discussions in Parliament, the 1988 Reform of the Educational System, the Family Planning Association (FPA) and sex education, and the future role of the FPA. It was not until the institution of the multiparity parliamentary system in 1974 that discussing social and political changes was possible, culminating in 1984 with new legislation on abortion, family planning, and sex education. School reform came in 1987/8 with the Ministry of Education primarily responsible for curricula. The 1960's brought with it the influence of the Catholic Church. Change came in the form of progressivism among Catholics who replaced dogma with dialogue and listening. Sex education was considered as preparation for marriage, but masturbation, contraception, and prostitution were also discussed. In addition, the founder of FPA chaired the CSSE in 1971 and opened up debate on sex issues and drafted a bill to establish co-education in Portuguese schools. The revolution of 1974 brought an end to censorship and brought forth a policy of developing family planning. Changed in the Family Code gave women greater equality. UNFPA supported teacher training in non-sexist education. With human reproduction included in the natural sciences, there was still no school sex education policy and contraception was only sometimes represented in the biology curriculum. The focus of FPA was on contraception and abortion. Finally in the 1980's, the first sex education programs were developed for out-of-school youth. Even though in the 1970's there were leftists groups promoting sex education, it took leftist parliamentary power to get legislation on sex education in the schools adopted. The Ministry of Education however was pressured by the

  13. Education protects health, delays sex.

    PubMed

    Barnett, B

    1997-01-01

    Sex education can help prevent the risk of unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) by providing information to young people about reproductive issues and encouraging the consistent use of contraception or STD protection. In Jamaica a study surveyed about 500 students 11-14 years old and found that only 27% of girls and 32% of boys knew that getting pregnant during the first intercourse was possible. Similar lack of accurate information was found in other regions among young people. In India 80% of 100 girls seeking abortion did not know that sexual intercourse could lead to pregnancy or STDs and 90% did not know about contraception. Among 370 Russian high school students surveyed only 25% of the girls and 35% of the boys knew that condoms were intended for only a single occasion of use. A survey in 17 high schools in Bucharest showed that lack of information on reproductive health was one of the main reasons for unplanned pregnancies and abortion among Rumanian youth. Lack of vital information is one of the reasons for the low use of family planning among adolescents. The evaluation of sex education among young adults shows that formal sex education programs can increase the knowledge of reproductive health. In Tanzania a school-based program for students 13-15 years old showed an increase in knowledge about AIDS and decrease in those wanting to have sex. Attaining behavior change is the focus of these programs, but few studies deal with the results of sex education. Several family planning programs have incorporated elements of behavior change into sex education programs for young people, e.g., the Planning your Life program in Mexico, with information about pregnancy, disease prevention and STDs, relationships, decision-making, communication, and assertiveness. The Sexuality Information and Education Council lists concepts in a comprehensive sex education program: human development, relationships, personal skills, sexual behavior, sexual

  14. Advocating Elementary Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNab, Warren L.

    1981-01-01

    Sex education is an important asset to personal growth during the elementary years. Though many parents are opposed to sex education during these early years, sexual knowledge acts as an antidote to fear and does not contribute to promiscuity. New programs in sexuality and family life are presently being developed. (JN)

  15. Differences between Anti-Social Adolescent Behaviour in Single Sex Schools and Co-Educational Schools in Jamaica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony

    Anti-social behavior is reported to be a growing problem in school systems of different countries. A comparison was made about anti-social adolescent behaviors between students who attend single-sex schools and coeducational schools in Jamaica. Students (N=112) were interviewed to determine the most prevalent school discipline problems. A sample…

  16. Sex education for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Camagüey province, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Granela, Kesia; Cardoso, Yohannis; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Carvajal, Matilde

    2013-07-01

    Education at the community level is indispensable for control of chronic non-communicable diseases and comprehensive patient care, with diabetes mellitus a case in point. The need is even more pronounced for type 1 diabetes, affecting children and adolescents. Families of diabetic adolescents naturally worry about vulnerability to sexually transmitted diseases, which create risks for glycemic control and the adolescent's health. We felt compelled to explore the issue of sexuality in diabetes education for adolescents, because education can do more than help maintain metabolic control; it can contribute to keeping diabetic children and adolescents on a healthy developmental curve, when combined with the other pillars of diabetes management. Accordingly, we carried out an educational intervention to increase type 1 diabetic adolescents' knowledge of sexuality and sexually transmitted infections. Participants were 20 adolescents in Camagüey Province's central clinic for type 1 diabetes patients. A six-session educational program was developed and implemented. Responses to a questionnaire before and after the program revealed that prior to the intervention only 3 of 20 participants (15%) demonstrated satisfactory knowledge of the material covered (≥ 70%), increasing to 20 (100%) after completion of the program. PMID:23934425

  17. [Thoughts and experiences concerning sex education].

    PubMed

    Cardona Arango, F

    1978-01-01

    The Colombian Ministry of Education has included in its secondary school programs 2 courses of sex education. The first course explores such subjects as prenatal and natal period, lactation, preschool children, behavior inside the family and in school. The 2nd. course is specifically directed to adolescents, investigating physical and emotional changes, eroticism, social pressure, and human relations. Moreover Colombia has had since 1955 special courses of 4-11 hours in sex education directed to young people engaged to be married, courses which have become obligatory in 1965 for those who desire a Catholic wedding. This article presents the findings and impressions of a sex education teacher who gave courses to adolescents of both sexes in a junior high school, and also premarital courses for a period of over 8 years. The author stresses the importance of such courses from an educational and a psychological point of view. PMID:752179

  18. Sexuality and Sex Education of Adolescents with Intellectual Disability: Mothers' Attitudes, Experiences, and Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pownall, Jaycee Dawn; Jahoda, Andrew; Hastings, Richard Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have considered families' views about adolescents' sexual development. The authors compared attitudes and behaviors of mothers of young people with (n = 30) and without intellectual disability (n = 30). Both groups placed similar importance on dealing with their children's developing sexuality and were similarly confident in doing so.…

  19. Sex Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer-Magdoff, Laura

    1969-01-01

    After briefly discussing the philosophy of sex education and appraising generally the nature of the instructional methods and materials currently in use in the schools, the author provides brief but incisive reviews of a number of films, filmstrips, and other instructional materials dealing with sex. The reviews are continued in the succeeding…

  20. Sex Education. Kaleidoscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boderick, Carlfred; And Others

    This publication attempts to keep a portion of the educational community in touch with current topics and trends. The present focus is on sex education, a topic of growing concern in educational circles. The texts of three addresses are presented, with audience questions and speaker responses. Dr. Carlfred Broderick gives an overview of sex…

  1. Adolescence Education: Physical Aspect, Module One; Social Aspects, Module Two; Sex Roles, Module Three; Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Module Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    Adolescence Education is a family life education training program designed to assist young people in their physical, social, emotional, and moral development as they prepare for adulthood, marriage, parenthood, aging, and social relationships in the context of family and society. This package consists of four individually bound modules: (1)…

  2. Sex education in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Patsalides, N

    1991-05-01

    The objective of educating people on family planning and sexuality issues has been carried forth by the Family Planning Association of Cyprus (FPAC) since 1971. The promotion of sex education in schools has generated respect for their expertise. Sex education has reached the agenda of the General Assembly of Parliament only to be postponed due to the April 1991 end of term dismissal. A newly elected Parliament are not expected to act immediately. The Ministry of Education Committee on Health Education has been actively counseled since 1974, and most recently in their examination of the possibilities of school sex education and training of high school teachers. The Ministry of Education has authority over primary and secondary education, which is compulsory up to 3 years of secondary education. The approach of FPAC has been to work with parents first in education lectures at various well publicized locations. The agenda was to inform about FPAC, explain the purpose and meaning of sex education, and show the Merry-Go-Round educational film followed by a question and answer session. Eventually, presentations involved children with parent observation. In 1977, authorization from the Ministry of Education gave official approval to FPAC, but not on school premises. FPAC went directly to headmasters and gained support in primary schools to organize sessions on school premises, which successfully involved many primary schools even in the much needed rural areas. Home Economics and Child Care, offered in the 5th and 6th grades was the only vehicle for gaining permission to enter secondary schools. In Larnaca, secondary school headmasters at the 3rd and 6th grade levels permitted invitations which requested parental permission. Lecture topics on human reproduction, sex roles, and disease and contraception were also provided in a follow-up letter. Higher education levels were involved through youth clubs and evening lectures. In 1988, FPAC urged the Director General of the

  3. Does early adolescent sex cause depressive symptoms?

    PubMed

    Sabia, Joseph J

    2006-01-01

    A recent study by the Heritage Foundation (Rector, Johnson, & Noyes, 2003) found evidence of a positive relationship between early sexual intercourse and depressive symptoms. This finding has been used to bolster support for funding abstinence only sex education. However, promoting abstinence will only yield mental health benefits if there is a causal link between sexual intercourse and depression. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), I carefully examine the relationship between early teen sex and several measures of depression. Controlling for a wide set of individual level and family level observable characteristics, cross section estimates consistently show a significant positive relationship between early sexual activity for females and three measures of adverse mental health: self reported depression, a belief that one's life is not worth living, and serious thoughts of suicide. However, difference-in-difference estimates reflect no evidence of a significant relationship between early teen sex and depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that the positive association observed by Rector et al. (2003) can be explained by unmeasured heterogeneity. Thus, promoting abstinence among adolescents is unlikely to alleviate depressive symptoms PMID:16989034

  4. Peer Relations among Adolescents with Female Same-Sex Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainright, Jennifer L.; Patterson, Charlotte J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined associations among family type (same-sex vs. opposite-sex parents), adolescent gender, family and relationship variables, and the peer relations of adolescents. Participants included 44 adolescents parented by same-sex female couples and 44 adolescents parented by opposite-sex couples, matched on demographic characteristics …

  5. Decreasing sex bias through education for parenthood or prevention of adolescent pregnancy: a developmental model with integrative strategies.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, E; Rosen, E

    1994-01-01

    This paper identifies the need for more research, education, and services for males about adolescent pregnancy and parenthood to augment their social and familial learning experiences. A case is made for more participation by schools in achieving a better balance between males and females in preparing for parenthood or prevention of pregnancy. Developmentally appropriate educational concepts and strategies that are integrated into the curriculum are described. PMID:7832036

  6. Some Guides for Sex Education and Marriage Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Church of Canada, Toronto (Ontario). Committee on Christian Family Life.

    The bibliographical guide presents printed and reading material on sex education and marriage preparation from a Christian point of view. Resource and reading material are presented for preschool children, pre-adolescents, adolescents and young people, married couples, parents, and for those planning, and leading, study courses in sex education…

  7. Single Sex Education. WEEA Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Diane S.

    Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational institutions that receive federal financial assistance. This digest focuses on the theme of single-sex education. Articles featured in this issue include: (1) "Single-Sex Education" (Diane S. Pollard); (2) "A Legal Framework for Single-Sex…

  8. Sex trafficking and the exploitation of adolescents.

    PubMed

    McClain, Natalie M; Garrity, Stacy E

    2011-01-01

    Human trafficking affects a surprisingly large number of adolescents around the globe. Women and girls make up the majority of sex trafficking victims. Nurses must be aware of sex trafficking as a form of sexual violence in the adolescent population. Nurses can play a role in identifying, intervening, and advocating for victims of human trafficking as they currently do for patients that are the victims of other types of violent crimes. PMID:21284727

  9. The Multiple Choices of Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Rashea; Sanders, Megan; Anderman, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Sex education in middle and high school health classes is critically important because it frequently comprises the primary mechanism for conveying information about sexual health to adolescents. Deliver evidence-based information on HIV and pregnancy prevention practices and they will be less likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors, the theory…

  10. Sex Education and Ideals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruyter, Doret J.; Spiecker, Ben

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that sex education should include sexual ideals. Sexual ideals are divided into sexual ideals in the strict sense and sexual ideals in the broad sense. It is argued that ideals that refer to the context that is deemed to be most ideal for the gratification of sexual ideals in the strict sense are rightfully called sexual…

  11. Adolescents and parents’ perceptions of best time for sex and sexual communications from two communities in the Eastern and Volta Regions of Ghana: implications for HIV and AIDS education

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adolescents and parents’ differ in their perceptions regarding engaging in sexual activity and protecting themselves from pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The views of adolescents and parents from two south-eastern communities in Ghana regarding best time for sex and sexual communications were examined. Methods Focus Group interviews were conducted with parents and adolescents (both In-school and Out-of school) from two communities (Somanya and Adidome) in the Eastern and Volta regions of Ghana with epidemiological differentials in HIV infection. Results Findings showed parents and adolescents agree that the best timing for sexual activity amongst adolescents is determined by socioeconomic viability. In practice however, there were tensions between adolescents and parents crystallized by spoilt generation and physiological drive ideologies. Whilst one community relied on a more communal approach in controlling their children; the other relied on a confrontational approach. Sex-talk is examined as a measure to reduce these tensions, and children in both communities were ambivalent over sexual communication between their parents and themselves. Parents from the two communities however differed in their perceptions. Whilst parents in one community attributed reduced teenage pregnancies to sex education, those in the other community indicated a generalized adolescents’ sexual activeness manifested in the perceived widespread delinquency in the community. Conclusion Parents in both communities reported significant barriers to parents-adolescents sexual communication. Parents in both communities should be educated to discuss the broader issues on sexuality that affects adolescents and their reproductive health needs. PMID:24070548

  12. Sex Differences in the Adolescent Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Giedd, Jay N.

    2010-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of increased divergence between males and females in physical characteristics, behavior, and risk for psychopathology. Here we will review data regarding sex differences in brain structure and function during this period of the lifespan. The most consistent sex difference in brain morphometry is the 9-12% larger brain size…

  13. Sex and Sibling Structure: Interaction Effects upon the Accuracy of Adolescent Perceptions of Parental Orientations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Thomas Ewin

    1984-01-01

    Surveyed 291 mother-child and 221 father-child dyads to examine adolescent perceptions of parental educational goals. Results showed family size and student's age had no effect, but birth order and sibling sex composition interact with sex of the parent and the adolescent in effects on accuracy of perception. (JAC)

  14. Teaching Sex Education in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Noy S.; Jones, Megan R.; Jantaraweragul, Sudgasame

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the current situation pertaining to the teaching of sex education and identify barriers to teaching sex education among Thai health education teachers. A survey questionnaire was administered to 193 health education teachers who participated in this study. The questionnaire was comprised of three parts:…

  15. Sex Education with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koblinsky, Sally; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses guidelines (developed by the Oregon State University Early Childhood Sex Education Project) for developing teacher-parent cooperation in providing sex education to young children. The guidelines concern how to talk about body differences and body functions; how to deal with masturbation, sex play and obscene language; and how to involve…

  16. Sex Differences in the Determination of Adolescent Aspirations: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Margaret Mooney

    1978-01-01

    Factors influencing levels of adolescent aspiration are reviewed, including socioeconomic background, academic ability, number of siblings, parental encouragement, mother's employment, academic performance, peer aspirations, dating, and participation in school activities. Although sex differences affect the formation of both educational and…

  17. Young People's Views of Sex Education: Gender, Information and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Measor, Lynda

    2004-01-01

    This paper derives from research that had the aim of understanding more about adolescents' views of sex education and adolescent sexuality. The data are taken from three separate pieces of research conducted in 1984, 1998 and 2003. This paper presents data about gender, information and knowledge relating to sexuality. It seeks to demonstrate that…

  18. American Indian adolescent girls: vulnerability to sex trafficking, intervention strategies.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Alexandra Sandi

    2012-01-01

    The Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center offers harm reduction programming to at-risk adolescent American Indian girls, including outreach, case management, advocacy, healthy sexuality education, and support groups. To evaluate program impact, participants are assessed at intake and every 6 months afterward for current vulnerability to commercial sexual exploitation, violence, and addiction. Evaluation results indicate frequent exposure to sex traffickers and suggest that harm reduction methods can help girls reduce risk of commercial sexual exploitation. PMID:22569724

  19. Adolescent Sexual Education: Designing Curriculum That Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quincy, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review paper, "Adolescent Sexual Education: Designing Curriculum That Works", is to present some basic curriculum necessities for developing an in-school sexual education program that results in decreasing the number of teenagers initiating sex, thus reducing the number of teen pregnancies and cases of sexually transmitted…

  20. Moral Pluralism and Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corngold, Josh

    2013-01-01

    How should common schools in a liberal pluralist society approach sex education in the face of deep disagreement about sexual morality? Should they eschew sex education altogether? Should they narrow its focus to facts about biology, reproduction, and disease prevention? Should they, in addition to providing a broad palette of information about…

  1. Sex differences in educational encouragement and academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aqeel

    2012-08-01

    Sex differences in educational encouragement and their predictiveness of academic achievement were examined among 442 secondary school students (M age = 13.2 yr., SD = 1.9). Education-related encouragement received from mothers, fathers, friends, and teachers was assessed. Academic achievement was based on student self-reports and grades. Female adolescents reported receiving statistically significantly more educational encouragement from their mothers, fathers, friends, and teachers than did male adolescents. In regression, sex and educational encouragement from parents, friends, and teachers were found to be significant predictors of academic achievement. PMID:23045856

  2. Adolescence Education Newsletter, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villanueva, Carmelita L., Ed.; Padilla, Teresita M., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document comprises the two 2000 issues of a UNESCO newsletter addressing topics related to adolescent well-being in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly reproductive and sexual health. Each issue contains news from the region on various initiatives related to adolescent health and education, as well as Web links and publications on the…

  3. Adolescence Education Newsletter, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villanueva, Carmelita L., Ed.; Espada-Carlos, Lichelle Dara, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document consists of the two 2002 issues of a UNESCO newsletter addressing topics related to adolescent well-being in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly reproductive and sexual health. Each issue includes news from the region on various initiatives related to adolescent health and education, as well as Web links and publications on the…

  4. Adolescence Education Newsletter, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villanueva, Carmelita L., Ed.; Espada-Carlos, Lichelle Dara, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document comprises the two 2001 issues of a UNESCO newsletter addressing topics related to adolescent well-being in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly reproductive and sexual health. Each issue contains news from the region on various initiatives related to adolescent health and education, as well as Web links and publications on the…

  5. Adolescence Education Newsletter, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villanueva, Carmelita L., Ed.; Padilla, Teresita M., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document comprises the two 1999 issues of a UNESCO newsletter addressing topics related to adolescent well-being in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly reproductive and sexual health. Each issue contains news from the region on various initiatives related to adolescent heath and education, as well as Web links and publications on the…

  6. Family Life Education Needs of Mentally Disabled Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Jerelyn B.; Adams, Donna U.

    1987-01-01

    Administered 50 needs statements to 134 minimally and mildly mentally disabled adolescent students to identify their family life education needs as a basis for curriculum development. Identified six clusters or groups of family life education needs: Basic Nutrition, Teenage Pregnancy, Sex Education, Developmental Tasks of Adolescents, Marriage and…

  7. Adolescent Boys’ Experiences of First Sex

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Nadia; McKenzie, Fatima; Rosenberger, Joshua G.; Bell, David L.

    2012-01-01

    There are limited contextual data regarding first sexual experiences of younger adolescent men. Yet these data that are needed to inform STI and early fatherhood prevention efforts, particularly in lower income communities. Using qualitative methods, 14 adolescent men (ages 14–16, all low income, most African American) from a mid-sized U.S. city were asked about relationships and sexual experiences in a one hour face-to-face semi-structured interview, with two follow-up interviews at 6–9 month intervals. Story-telling was encouraged. Descriptions of first sex were identified, and then analysed for narrative structure and shared concepts. The dominant narrative of first sex proceeded through three steps: (1) Preparation, which involved identification of a sexualised space, mentoring by an older man, and pre-planning; (2) the event, which involved looking for cues indicating sexual interest and consent from a female partner, feelings of fear/nervousness, and first sex itself; and (3) afterwards, which involved a return to prior activities, minimal verbal exchange and a general positive feeling, sometimes accompanied by later disappointment. Mentorship, initiation by the female, and idealising sex as a romantic experience, played important roles in constructing the context of first sex. These factors should be incorporated in harm-reduction interventions for young men in similar contexts. PMID:22762432

  8. Performance Levels in Science and Other Subjects for Jamaican Adolescents Attending Single-Sex and Co-Educational High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Marlene A.

    1985-01-01

    Examination results from 1146 Jamaican high school students in single-sex and coeducational schools indicated students from coeducational schools had lower performance on all measures. A subsample provided more information on sex differences, performance in individual subjects, and students receiving grades of A or B. (DH)

  9. Disestablishing Sex: The Case for Released-Time Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanzer, Perry L.

    2011-01-01

    Allowing nonschool organizations to provide sex education in a released-time format would disestablish state-funded sex education and give families a choice in the sex education that would be provided for their children. Released-time programs, as originally conceived and currently practiced, allow students to be released for a period of time…

  10. Adolescents, sex, and the media: ooooo, baby, baby-a Q & A.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2005-06-01

    The media arguably have become the leading sex educator for American children and adolescents. More than 80% of the top teen shows contain sexual content, and the average teen views nearly 14,000 sexual references on television alone. The gap between suggestive and responsible content on primetime television is narrowing, but only slowly. Parents and teachers need to recognize the power of the media to educate and begin incorporating principles of media literacy into existing sex education programs. PMID:16111618

  11. Adolescent Sexuality, Masculinity-Femininity, and Educational Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harry, Joseph

    The role of adolescent sexual behavior in educational attainment has been overlooked. Homosexual and heterosexual men were interviewed to test for a correlation between adolescent sexual activeness and educational attainment, as well as any link between childhood masculine sex roles and early sexual activity. Approximately 1,000 volunteers,…

  12. Protective Effects of Middle School Comprehensive Sex Education with Family Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Jennifer M.; Tracy, Allison J.; Charmaraman, Linda; Ceder, Ineke; Erkut, Sumru

    2014-01-01

    Background: School-based comprehensive sex education programs can reduce early adolescents' risky sexual behavior. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 3-year comprehensive sex education program in delaying vaginal sex for middle school students and whether the family component of the intervention contributes to its…

  13. Sex Education for Alcohol Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Robert O., Jr.

    This paper begins with a discussion of need, followed by a description of two types of sex education programs for alcohol counselors. The first program described is a single two-hour lecture and discussion which is offered as part of a series of presentations in a basic educational program. The second is a 10-session, 20-hour workshop for…

  14. Changes in Adolescents’ Receipt of Sex Education, 2006–2013

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Laura Duberstein; Maddow-Zimet, Isaac; Boonstra, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Updated estimates of adolescents’ receipt of sex education are needed to monitor changing access to information. Methods Using nationally representative data from the 2006–2010 and 2011–2013 National Survey of Family Growth, we estimated changes over time in adolescents’ receipt of sex education from formal sources and from parents and differentials in these trends by adolescents’ gender, race/ethnicity, age, and place of residence. Results Between 2006–2010 and 2011–2013, there were significant declines in adolescent females’ receipt of formal instruction about birth control (70% to 60%), saying no to sex (89% to 82%), sexually transmitted disease (94% to 90%), and HIV/AIDS (89% to 86%). There was a significant decline in males’ receipt of instruction about birth control (61% to 55%). Declines were concentrated among adolescents living in nonmetropolitan areas. The proportion of adolescents talking with their parents about sex education topics did not change significantly. Twenty-one percent of females and 35% of males did not receive instruction about methods of birth control from either formal sources or a parent. Conclusions Declines in receipt of formal sex education and low rates of parental communication may leave adolescents without instruction, particularly in nonmetropolitan areas. More effort is needed to understand this decline and to explore adolescents’ potential other sources of reproductive health information. PMID:27032487

  15. Switzerland's videotex computer sex education programme.

    PubMed

    Barbey, M A

    1991-05-01

    Switzerland's videotex computer sex education program in French is a telematic service set up in youth centers, schools and post offices, or for a monthly home rental charge of 9 swiss francs. German and Italian versions will be available by the end of 1991. CIAO receives 100 calls a month, or 20,000 screen page consultations. Anonymity is assured for caller and specialist through identification by pseudonym. This article discusses the experience of 2 trained specialists, a social worker and a sex education teacher, who answer questions. 70% of callers are boys, perhaps due to greater familiarity with computers, and to public location and freer attitude talking about sex in a group. Girls may use family planning centers for their questions. The typical boys 13-15 years questions concern anatomy and the size of the penis, breast stimulation, masturbation. Guilt and fear of consequences are communicated. Adolescents tend to focus on relationships, with shyness a typical pattern. There is expressed concern for whether it's OK to sexually explore certain sex zones, and what tells me she's happy. Communication between partners about sex is the difficulty and specialists emphasize asking the girl herself how she feels. With increasing age, the focus is very specific; i.e., premature ejaculation, STD's, homosexuality, but also with concern for knowledge about normal love-making and worry about not wanting it enough. In general, questions tend to be bound by traditional roles and questions on contraception are rare. Condom questions are usually related to AIDs. Questions express self-doubt and honesty, which sometimes focuses on the tragedy of sexual abuse, rape, AIDS, and suicide. Specialists find the work rewarding and helpful in sex education discussions in the classroom; great respect for young people is generated. PMID:12343175

  16. Does Early Adolescent Sex Cause Depressive Symptoms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabia, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    A recent study by the Heritage Foundation (Rector, Johnson, & Noyes, 2003) found evidence of a positive relationship between early sexual intercourse and depressive symptoms. This finding has been used to bolster support for funding abstinence only sex education. However, promoting abstinence will only yield mental health benefits if there is a…

  17. Antecedents of Adolescent Initiation of Sex, Contraceptive Use, and Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the literature to identify the most important antecedents associated with adolescent initiation of sex, contraception use, and pregnancy. Results indicate that over 100 antecedents create a complex, detailed picture of the correlates of adolescent sexual behaviors. They describe characteristics of adolescents themselves, their partners,…

  18. Where Sex Education Went Wrong.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lickona, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    Growing up in a highly eroticized environment, children are preoccupied with sex in developmentally distorted ways and increasingly likely to act out their sexual impulses. Abstinence is the only totally effective way to avoid pregnancy, AIDS, and other sexually transmitted diseases. Chastity education promises great success through promotion of…

  19. Sex Education. Grades K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    This collection of fifty objectives, related sample items, and directions for administering and scoring, is divided into three sections. The first, growth and development, deals with basic factual information relating to sex education; both animal and human biology are included. The second section, social and emotional growth, deals with the…

  20. Pursuing Perfection: Distress and Interpersonal Functioning among Adolescent Boys in Single-Sex and Co-Educational Independent Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coren, Sidney A.; Luthar, Suniya S.

    2014-01-01

    This study extends past findings of heightened problems among affluent youth by examining adjustment patterns among boys in two academically elite, independent high schools: one for boys only and the other co-educational. Both samples manifested disproportionately high rates of internalizing and externalizing symptoms, but only the co-educational…

  1. Sense about Sex: Media, Sex Advice, Education and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attwood, Feona; Barker, Meg John; Boynton, Petra; Hancock, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The media are widely acknowledged as important in sex and relationship education, but they are usually associated with "bad" effects on young people in contrast to the "good" knowledge represented by more informational and educational formats. In this paper we look at sex advice giving in newspapers, magazines and television in…

  2. THE INDIVIDUAL, SOCIETY AND SEX. BACKGROUND READINGS FOR SEX EDUCATORS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRODERICK, CARLFRED B.; AND OTHERS

    THIS BOOK IS DESIGNED AS A TEXT PRIMARILY FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS PREPARING TO TEACH SEX EDUCATION OR "EDUCATION IN THE NATURE OF HUMAN SEXUALITY AND THE RELATIONS BETWEEN THE SEXES" IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS. AN ATTEMPT IS MADE BY THE 13 WRITERS, MOST OF THEM SOCIOLOGISTS OR PSYCHOLOGISTS, TO DISTINGUISH BETWEEN THE KNOWLEDGE WHICH THE…

  3. Teenage relationships and sex education.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, H A; Tripp, J H; Lawrence, C; Clarke, W L

    1988-01-01

    Most of the consequences of early intercourse affect the woman and much research has focused upon her. As part of a study on teenage pregnancy, where 137 women were interviewed, 46 men were also interviewed. They were less likely to have had teaching about sex from parents and were subject to less parental supervision than the women. Both sexes had had similar experience of school sex education. Just under half of the men started having intercourse before 16 years. Over half of both sexes were initiated by an experienced partner and for 15/25 (60%) of the men this was within the first month of a relationship. Most men had had several partners and 27/99 (27%) of teenage women at least three, most in the context of stable relationships. 'Serial monogamy' exposes each partner indirectly to their partners previous partners (with the associated medical risks). Education must help teenagers make decisions about sexual involvement that take account of these facts and the implications for their own future health and happiness. PMID:3415330

  4. Testing a Risky Sex Behavior Intervention Pilot Website for Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Starling, Randall; Helme, Don; Nodulman, Jessica A.; Bryan, Angela D.; Buller, David B.; Donohew, Robert Lewis; Woodall, W. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Each year, teenagers account for about one-fifth of all unintended pregnancies in the United States. As such, delivering sexual risk reduction educational materials to teens in a timely fashion is of critical importance. Web-based delivery of these materials shows promise for reaching and persuading teens away from risky sexual and substance abuse behaviors. The purpose of this study was to pilot test a web-based program aimed at reducing risky sexual behavior and related outcomes among adolescents in a high school setting. Methods A beta-test of the website was conducted in three public schools in New Mexico, USA with 173 students in 9th and 10th grades recruited from existing health education classes. Participants spent approximately three hours over a period of two days completing the online program in school computer labs. Results Pretest to posttest results indicated that self-efficacy for condom use and condom use intentions, two theoretical mediators of changes in condom use behavior, were significantly changed. Adolescents also reported high satisfaction with the website content. Conclusion BReady4it provided an innovative sex and substance abuse education to teenagers that revealed promising positive changes in cognitive constructs that are inversely related to risky sexual behavior among users. PMID:26167134

  5. What's "Verbil" Sex? An Analysis of Adolescents' Questions about Sex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Toni A.; Campbell, David E.

    Although many studies have described adolescents' sexual behavior and attitudes, there are little data available on the nature of the questions that occur to adolescents as they move toward maturity. A study was conducted to determine whether the questions children and adolescents ask reflect developmental differences in cognitive abilities and…

  6. Communicating about sex: adolescents and parents in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kiragu, K; Obwaka, E; Odallo, D; Van Hulzen, C

    1996-01-01

    To guide the development of adolescent reproductive health programs in Kenya, a national IEC survey was conducted with 1476 adolescents 15-19 years of age and 2894 of their parents. The survey was conducted in 1994 by the Johns Hopkins University Population Communication Services, in collaboration with the Kenyan National Council for Population Development and the Central Bureau of Statistics. Both parents and children were most likely to report having discussed school, future careers, and alcohol/drug use during the year preceding the survey; topics least likely to be discussed included boy-girl relationships, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), sexual relations, abortion, contraception, and puberty. Mothers were more likely to discuss reproductive health issues with their children than fathers. Both male and female adolescents indicated they would be most comfortable discussing sexual matters with their same-sex siblings, friends, and health care workers. Over 75% of children and adults were supportive of school-based family life education programs. In many cases, parents lacked correct information about reproductive health issues. Interventions designed to facilitate parent-child communication include a weekly call-in radio program, a comic book that encourages teens to talk to their parents, and a booklet for parents suggesting ways of initiating discussions on sexual issues. PMID:12291986

  7. Lessons Learnt from a Secondary School Sex Education Program in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, Ana Paula; Soares, Isabel; Vilar, Duarte

    2007-01-01

    Based on a developmental framework, a study was conducted in Portugal in two groups of youth in terms of relevant aspects related to adolescent psychosexual development: one group participated in an Experimental Project of Sex Education and Health Promotion during high school, whereas the other did not receive any formal sex education in school.…

  8. Adolescent Sex Offenders: Issues in Research and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otey, Emeline M., Ed.; Ryan, Gail D., Ed.

    This document contains an introduction by Richard D. Krugman and five papers from the Adolescent Sex Offender Work Group meeting, which provide an overview of the present status of treatment programs for adolescent sexual offenders, methodological and ethical issues in research on etiology and treatment, and perspectives on research from those…

  9. Adjustment and Sex-Role Orientation in Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamke, Leanne K.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between sex-role orientation and self-esteem in adolescence was reexamined. The results revealed that androgynous individuals had higher levels of self-esteem than masculine, feminine, and undifferentiated adolescents. When the independent contributions of masculinity and femininity were assessed, both significantly predicted…

  10. Sex-Role Influences on Turkish Adolescents' Self-Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim, Ali

    This study was undertaken to investigate sex role influences on Turkish adolescents' self-identity process as part of an international self-identity research project. Specifically, the purpose of this study was to examine the role gender plays in the value systems of Turkish adolescents through a questionnaire. A total of 154 male and 119 female…

  11. The Roles of Sex, Gender, and Coping in Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Cindy Ellen; DiGiuseppe, Raymond; Froh, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the roles of coping and masculinity in higher rates of depressive symptoms among adolescent girls, as compared to boys. A model was designed and tested through path analysis, which involved the variables of sex, gender, problem-focused coping, rumination, and distraction. The Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale and the Bem…

  12. Same-Sex Attraction and Successful Adolescent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael A.; Willoughby, Teena; Chalmers, Heather; Bogaert, Anthony R.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relation of adolescent same-sex attraction to "successful development" (Baltes, P. B., "Am. Psychol." 32:366-380, 1997). Based on a survey of high-school adolescents, four groups were defined according to the nature of self-reported sexual attraction: exclusively heterosexual (EHA; n=3594); mostly heterosexual (MHA;…

  13. Female Adolescent Sex Offenders--An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendriks, J.; Bijleveld, C. C. J. H.

    2006-01-01

    A sample of 10 female adolescent sex offenders, aged between 11 and 18 years, is studied. They constitute about one-sixth of all young women who were registered at the prosecutor's office in the Netherlands during the past 10 years. Information was gathered from psychological screenings carried out in relation to the sex offence. Most young women…

  14. Adolescents' Transition to First Intercourse, Religiosity, and Attitudes about Sex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Ann M.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of longitudinal data on 4,948 adolescents, who were virgins aged 15-18 at first interview, found that the probability of having sex for the first time was lowered by religiosity, but only for females; was related to personal and relational attitudes regarding sex; and was only indirectly related to parental attitudes. Having sex…

  15. Treatment of Adolescent Sex Offenders with Intellectual Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.; Olley, Susan; Baillie, Nicola; Smith, Anne H. W.

    1999-01-01

    This article presents four case studies of male adolescent sex offenders with intellectual disabilities. All were successfully treated in a group program that focused on specific techniques for cognitive change for thinking errors related to sex offending, problem-solving in offending situations, and analysis of behavior and routines consistent…

  16. The Role Healthy Sexuality Plays in Modifying Abusive Behaviours of Adolescent Sex Offenders: Practical Considerations for Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Garry P.; Ohm, Phyllis

    1999-01-01

    Highlights an approach that guides adolescents who have committed sexual offenses to learn healthy/prosocial ways to meet their sexual needs. Article is divided into an overview of literature, review of the sex education component of an intervention program for these adolescents, and discussion of practical considerations for professionals.…

  17. Same-Sex versus Other-Sex Best Friendship in Early Adolescence: Longitudinal Predictors of Antisocial Behavior throughout Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arndorfer, Cara Lee; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between having other-sex versus same-sex best friends and antisocial behavior throughout early adolescence. Participants (N = 955) were recruited in 6th grade and followed longitudinally through 7th, 8th, and 11th grades. Participants were 58% ethnically diverse youth and 48% girls. Results indicate that the…

  18. Risk Assessment with Adolescent Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christodoulides, T. E.; Richardson, G.; Graham, F.; Kennedy, P. J.; Kelly, T. P.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes an evaluation of a risk assessment tool's effectiveness in distinguishing adolescent sexual offenders who had committed further sexual offences from those who had not. The sample consisted of 50 male adolescent sexual offenders referred to a forensic outpatient service within a healthcare setting. The adolescents within the…

  19. Adjustment and sex-role orientation in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Lamke, L K

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to reexamine the relationship between sex-role orientation and self-esteem in adolescence. One hundred and six senior high school students completed the Rosenberg self-esteem measure (Rosenberg, 1965) and two measures of sex-role orientation, the Bem Sex Role Inventory, Short Form (BSRI; Bem, 1981), and the Personal Attributes Questionnaire Short Form (PAQ; Spence et al., 1975). The relationship between sex-role orientation and self-esteem was found to vary depending on the sex-role measure employed. Results of the BSRI revealed that androgynous individuals had higher levels of self-esteem than masculine, feminine, and undifferentiated adolescents. PAQ results indicated that androgynous individuals had higher levels of self-esteem than feminine and undifferentiated individuals. When the independent contributions of masculinity and femininity were assessed, both BSRI and PAQ masculinity and femininity significantly predicted self-esteem. Analyses also revealed that the effects of sex-role orientation on self-esteem varied by sex across both the BSRI and PAQ. Implications of the present findings for previous work on sex-role development in adolescence are discussed. PMID:24310777

  20. Unintended pregnancy and sex education in Chile: a behavioural model.

    PubMed

    Herold, J M; Thompson, N J; Valenzuela, M S; Morris, L

    1994-10-01

    This study analysed factors associated with unintended pregnancy among adolescent and young adult women in Santiago, Chile. Three variations of a behavioural model were developed. Logistic regression showed that the effect of sex education on unintended pregnancy works through the use of contraception. Other significant effects were found for variables reflecting socioeconomic status and a woman's acceptance of her sexuality. The results also suggested that labelling affects measurement of 'unintended' pregnancy. PMID:7983095

  1. The Advantages of Single-Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Teresa A.

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, single-sex education has been provided in the form of private schooling. Title IX regulations have loosened as a result of the No Child Left Behind Legislation; therefore, public school districts now have the legal right to create single-sex classes or single-sex schools if they deem it to be in the best interest of their students.…

  2. A Sex-Positive Framework for Research on Adolescent Sexuality.

    PubMed

    Harden, K Paige

    2014-09-01

    In this article, I propose a sex-positive framework for research on adolescent sexuality in which I consider consensual sexual activities in adolescence as developmentally normative and potentially healthy. The sex-positive framework is contrasted with the predominant "risk" perspective that presumes that abstinence from sexual activity is the ideal behavioral outcome for teenagers. Evidence from longitudinal and behavioral genetic studies indicates that engaging in sexual intercourse in adolescence does not typically cause worse psychological functioning. The relationship context of sexual experience may be a critical moderator of its psychological impact. Moreover, cross-cultural data on adolescents' contraception usage, unintended pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections suggest that, despite the unacceptably high rate of negative health consequences among U.S. teenagers, adolescents can have the developmental capacity to regulate the health risks inherent in sexual activity. Understanding adolescent sexuality can be fostered by considering sexual well-being, a multidimensional construct that incorporates an adolescent's sexual self-efficacy, sexual self-esteem, feelings of sexual pleasure and satisfaction, and freedom from pain and negative affect regarding sexuality. New research is necessary to understand the development of adolescent sexual well-being, including its normative age trends, its reciprocal links with sexual behavior, and its impact on psychological and physical health. PMID:26186753

  3. Elusive Sex Acts: Pleasure and Politics in Norwegian Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svendsen, Stine H. Bang

    2012-01-01

    While there is little political opposition towards sex education as such in Norway, recent attempts at reforming the subject reveal underlying heteronormative presumptions that seem resistant to reform. While a focus on homosexuality is included in the national curriculum at all levels of compulsory education, the sexual practices involved in…

  4. Sex Education: Let's Get on with It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Lloyd P.

    1973-01-01

    Suggests that there is plenty of evidence that the needs of youth for realistic sex education are not being met. Urges that professional educators convince the public that this ignorance is dangerous and destructive. (Author)

  5. Sex and secrecy: How HIV-status disclosure affects safe sex among HIV-positive adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Toska, Elona; Cluver, Lucie D.; Hodes, Rebecca; Kidia, Khameer K.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-positive adolescents who engage in unsafe sex are at heightened risk for transmitting or re-acquiring HIV. Disclosure of HIV-status to sexual partners may impact on condom use, but no study has explored the effects of (i) adolescent knowledge of one's HIV-status, (ii) knowledge of partner status and (iii) disclosure to partners, on safer sex behaviour. This study aimed to identify whether knowledge of HIV-status by HIV-positive adolescents and partners was associated with safer sex. Eight fifty eight HIV-positive adolescents (10–19 years old, 52% female, 68.1% vertically infected) who had ever initiated antiretroviral treatment in 41 health facilities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, were interviewed using standardised questionnaires. Quantitative analyses used multivariate logistic regressions, controlling for confounders. Qualitative research included interviews, focus group discussions and observations with 43 HIV-positive teenagers and their healthcare workers. N = 128 (14.9%) of the total sample had ever had sex, while N = 109 (85.1%) of sexually active adolescents had boy/girlfriend. In total, 68.1% of the sample knew their status, 41.5% of those who were sexually active and in relationships knew their partner's status, and 35.5% had disclosed to their partners. For adolescents, knowing one's status was associated with safer sex (OR = 4.355, CI 1.085–17.474, p = .038). Neither knowing their partner's status, nor disclosing one's HIV-status to a partner, were associated with safer sex. HIV-positive adolescents feared rejection, stigma and public exposure if disclosing to sexual and romantic partners. Counselling by healthcare workers for HIV-positive adolescents focused on benefits of disclosure, but did not address the fears and risks associated with disclosure. These findings challenge assumptions that disclosure is automatically protective in sexual and romantic relationships for HIV-positive adolescents, who may be ill-equipped to

  6. Sex and secrecy: How HIV-status disclosure affects safe sex among HIV-positive adolescents.

    PubMed

    Toska, Elona; Cluver, Lucie D; Hodes, Rebecca; Kidia, Khameer K

    2015-01-01

    HIV-positive adolescents who engage in unsafe sex are at heightened risk for transmitting or re-acquiring HIV. Disclosure of HIV-status to sexual partners may impact on condom use, but no study has explored the effects of (i) adolescent knowledge of one's HIV-status, (ii) knowledge of partner status and (iii) disclosure to partners, on safer sex behaviour. This study aimed to identify whether knowledge of HIV-status by HIV-positive adolescents and partners was associated with safer sex. Eight fifty eight HIV-positive adolescents (10-19 years old, 52% female, 68.1% vertically infected) who had ever initiated antiretroviral treatment in 41 health facilities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, were interviewed using standardised questionnaires. Quantitative analyses used multivariate logistic regressions, controlling for confounders. Qualitative research included interviews, focus group discussions and observations with 43 HIV-positive teenagers and their healthcare workers. N = 128 (14.9%) of the total sample had ever had sex, while N = 109 (85.1%) of sexually active adolescents had boy/girlfriend. In total, 68.1% of the sample knew their status, 41.5% of those who were sexually active and in relationships knew their partner's status, and 35.5% had disclosed to their partners. For adolescents, knowing one's status was associated with safer sex (OR = 4.355, CI 1.085-17.474, p = .038). Neither knowing their partner's status, nor disclosing one's HIV-status to a partner, were associated with safer sex. HIV-positive adolescents feared rejection, stigma and public exposure if disclosing to sexual and romantic partners. Counselling by healthcare workers for HIV-positive adolescents focused on benefits of disclosure, but did not address the fears and risks associated with disclosure. These findings challenge assumptions that disclosure is automatically protective in sexual and romantic relationships for HIV-positive adolescents, who may be ill-equipped to

  7. [Sex education in practice and science in Germany].

    PubMed

    Sielert, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Sex education in Germany has a history full of conflict and ideological change between emancipatory, reforming, and repressive tendencies. As a science, sex education has only recently gained independence from its mother disciplines theology, medicine, psychology, and sociology and at the same time has taken a critically constructive position towards sexual science. Its topics range from dissemination of knowledge about biological processes and contraception to relationship concerns, sexual orientation, gender issues, sexual transgression, moral, and ethical questions. Sexual socialization happens nearly everywhere. Sexual education takes place mainly in families, elementary education, and school, but increasingly also in all other areas of education, social work, and health service. Its clientèle are no longer exclusively children and adolescents but increasingly adults of every age group. Subjects such as AIDS, sexual abuse, and teenage pregnancy have contributed to governmental funding of projects and training in sex education. Thus, sex education still reaches from mere protection from dangers to fostering or maintaining psychological health. PMID:17177101

  8. Adolescent growth events in eight decades of Japanese cohort data: sex differences.

    PubMed

    Ali, M A; Lestrel, P E; Ohtsuki, F

    2001-01-01

    The presence of secular trends in sex differences for the onset or takeoff of the adolescent growth spurt and subsequent (adolescent) growth of Japanese boys and girls were investigated using data published in "The Statistical Report of the School Health Survey" of the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, Japan. An optimum kernel regression method was used to derive the biological parameters of the adolescent growth curve. The six parameters derived from the regression analysis were age at takeoff (ATO), height at takeoff (HTO), velocity at takeoff (VTO), peak height velocity (PHV), age at PHV (APHV), and height at PHV (HPHV). The sex difference in age at PHV is about 2.1 years. The sex difference in age at takeoff was about 2.1 years starting with the birth year of 1943, but has become almost insignificant with the birth year of 1980. After 1960, the sex difference in mean HPHV varied within 12-13 cm, but the difference in HTO showed a decreasing trend. After the birth year of 1911, the rate of growth at HTO for girls has become markedly greater than for boys. In contrast, the rate of growth at HPHV for girls has become significantly smaller than for boys (P < 0.05). Sex differences in ATO, HTO and VTO were significantly and negatively correlated with differences in APHV and HPHV, but positively correlated with the difference in PHV. The sex difference in PHV had no relationship with the differences in APHV and HPHV. PMID:11460905

  9. Educating Teenagers about Sex in the United States. NCHS Data Brief. Number 44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Gladys; Abma, Joyce; Copen, Casey

    2010-01-01

    Sex education in schools and other places, as well as received from parents, provides adolescents with information to make informed choices about sex at a crucial period of their development. Using data from the 2006-2008 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), this report examines the percentage of male and female teenagers 15-19 years who…

  10. Sexuality. Growing Pains: Sex Education for Parents. A Newsletter Series. Letter I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polulech, Joan Burgess; Nuttall, Paul

    This document presents the first of five newsletters on sex education for parents. The newsletters were designed to help parents increase their ability to communicate with their adolescents about sexual issues. They explore the origins of the parents' feelings about sex; teach the importance of a healthy self-concept and how to build it in the…

  11. Sex Education for the Neglected Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lickona, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The dissolution of sexual restraint has led to premature sexuality in children and youth, which poses not only the risks of pregnancy and disease but also serious emotional damage. Suggests character-based sex education as an alternative to earlier value-neutral models of sex education. Describes principles of and reviews such programs.…

  12. Lickona Promotes False Claims about Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennetta, William J.

    1994-01-01

    In articles on sex and character education in the November 1993 "Educational Leadership," Thomas Lickona parrots slogans and fake history and statistics contrived by the Religious Right. Lickona blames Darwin's evolution theory for variable morality and repeats fabricated success claims for Teen-Aid and Sex Respect, right-wing programs funded…

  13. Sex Education: What We Teach Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Dennis N.; Doll, Lynda

    Inadequate teacher training and the lack of consensus on what constitutes sex education are often cited to explain why few sex education programs are offered in the public schools. A survey of administrative officials at 777 teacher preparation institutions was conducted to examine the number and type of university-level programs designed to…

  14. Adolescents' Cues and Signals: Sex and Assault.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giarrusso, Roseann; And Others

    Acquaintance rape has been found to occur with disturbing frequency in an adolescents' social world. Unlike stranger rape, acquaintance rape, particularly dating rape, takes place in the context of normal social activity. In 1978, 432 adolescents, ages 14-18, were interviewed in the Los Angeles area: half male, and half female, and one-third drawn…

  15. Sex Stereotypes and School Adolescents' Sexual Behaviour in Osun State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popoola, Bayode Isaiah

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the association between sex stereotypes and the sexual behaviour of Nigerian school-going adolescents. It also ascertained the effects of age and sex on adolescents' beliefs about sex stereotypes. The study sample consisted of 658 (male = 287, female = 371) adolescents from nine randomly selected secondary schools in three…

  16. Putting sex education in its place.

    PubMed

    Cassell, C

    1981-04-01

    In order to help reduce fears and anxieties regarding the influence of sex education in a public school setting, school and community sexuality educators need to better articulate the difference between formal and structured sex education and non-formal, informal and incidental sex learning. Sex education is only 1 aspect of the sexual learning process. 2 main points have to be clarified for parents and the general public to set the stage for a new way to view the school and community involvement in the sexual learning process: the schools' sexuality education courses constitute only a small portion of the sexual learning process; and sexual learning is not an event for youth only, but a process spanning life. Sex education (the process) connotates an academic setting with a specific curricula taught by a trained instructor, but sexual learning relates to environmental, non-formal incidental learning from a multitude of sources. Studies indicate that teenagers receive about 90% of their contraceptive and sexuality informaation from peers and mass media and that these sources of information are becoming their preferred sources of sex education. What is needed is a way to address and improve the conditions of sexual learning in the community. As home is the ideal environment for primary and positive sexual learning, parents need support in their role as sex educators. Classroom sexuality education curricula in all school settings have a solid place in the process of sexual learning. PMID:6908927

  17. An Investigation of Successfully Treated Adolescent Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franey, Kristina Crumpton; Viglione, Donald J.; Wayson, Peter; Clipson, Clark; Brager, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the characteristics of adolescent sex offenders who do not reoffend. Most studies emphasize reoffense rates, recidivism and those who reoffend. Moreover, these studies provide quantitative summaries without describing the individual, his behavior, and challenges after treatment. The present study seeks to provide novel…

  18. Sexual Learning, Sexual Experience, and Healthy Adolescent Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2014-01-01

    This chapter is organized around the question "How do adolescents learn to have healthy sex?" The chapter assumes that sexual learning derives from a broad range of both informal and formal sources that contribute to learning within the context of neurocognitive brain systems that modulate sexual motivations and self-regulation. The…

  19. The effects of single-sex versus coeducational schools on adolescent peer victimization and perpetration.

    PubMed

    Gee, Kevin A; Cho, Rosa Minhyo

    2014-12-01

    Bullying is a growing public health concern for South Korean adolescents. In our quantitative investigation, we analyze the frequency with which Korean adolescents in single-sex versus coeducational schools are targets of or engage in three peer aggressive behaviors (verbal, relational (social exclusion), and physical (including theft)). We use two nationally representative datasets, the 2011 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and the 2005 Korea Education Longitudinal Study (KELS), and rely on propensity score matching (PSM). For adolescent girls, we find that being in all-girls schools mitigates both their exposure to and engagement in peer victimization. For adolescent boys, we find that boys in all-boys schools have significantly higher odds of experiencing more frequent verbal and physical attacks versus their counterparts in coeducational schools. Our findings strongly suggest that interventions to mitigate peer victimization and aggression in Korea should consider the gendered schooling contexts in which they are implemented. PMID:25240191

  20. Adolescent sexuality education and sources of information.

    PubMed

    Maitra, N; Baxi, R K; Hazra, M

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 959 young females (ages 10-21 years) from India highlighted the importance of educational attainment to fertility-related behaviors. Respondents represented a spectrum of educational levels: school drop-outs (32%), primary and secondary school attendees (41%), and college students (27%). The mean age at menarche was 13.6 years. School drop-outs were most likely to have obtained information about sexuality from films and other mass media, while students cited friends and neighbors as primary sources. There was an positive association between educational level and both preferred age at marriage and intended interval from marriage to first birth. 42% of adolescents with a secondary or college education planned to marry after 23 years of age and 84% wanted to defer childbearing for at least two years after marriage. The desire for formal sex education was strong in all educational subgroups (about 62%), however. It has been estimated that postponement of the marriage age from 16 years to 20-21 years would result in a 20-30% decrease in the annual number of births in India. School-based sex education represents a feasible mechanism for helping to achieve this goal. PMID:12290542

  1. Music Education in Young Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    Advocates an expanded role for music education in the middle school curriculum. Explores music as a way to provide students with opportunities to demonstrate success. Discusses integrating music instruction with the larger curriculum, reaching at-risk adolescents, and the unseen effects of music education, including character building, academic…

  2. Family Life Education for Young Adolescents. A Quasi-Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herz, Elicia J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The impact of the Family Life Education Program for disadvantaged inner-city minority students (grades seven and eight) was investigated. Compared to the control group, program participants displayed improved knowledge about contraception, reproductive physiology, and adolescent pregnancy outcomes. Implications for school-based sex education…

  3. Sex Equity and Sexuality in College Level Sex Education Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myerson, Marilyn

    1987-01-01

    This article examines two relevant features in the historical development of sexology, the body of knowledge upon which sex education is based: its depoliticization of sexuality and its attempts to ground itself as scientific. Also examined are the sexual politics of sexology, via a content analysis of several college texts. (IAH)

  4. Dating violence and self-efficacy for delayed sex among adolescents in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Boafo, Isaac M; Dagbanu, Emmanuel A; Asante, Kwaku Oppong

    2014-06-01

    In South Africa, dating violence is known to be widespread among adolescents, and is therefore a major public health issue because of its association with sexual risk behaviours. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between dating violence and self-efficacy for delayed sex among school-going adolescents in Cape Town, South Africa. The study is based on analyses of data from a school-based health education programme targeting sexual and reproductive health issues.The study involved 3,655 school-going adolescents aged between 12 and 17 in Cape Town, South Africa. The data was collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire composed of 153 items on sexual and reproductive health, dating violence as well as sociodemographic characteristics. The results indicated that males showed a higher percentage of both dating violence victimization and perpetration, as compared to females. It was also found that adolescents from lower socio-economic backgrounds were more likely to be the victims of dating violence as compared to those from a higher socio-economic background. Female learners showed higher levels of self-efficacy for delayed sex than their male counterparts. Although the result revealed that there was a significant association between self-efficacy for delayed sex and socio-economic status, this link decreased with age. It is concluded that educational programmes aimed solely at improving self-efficacy for delayed sex is insufficient. Such programmes must also aim at preventing dating violence and equipping adolescents with the skills to negotiate their way out of dating violence. PMID:25022141

  5. Sex, competitiveness, and intimacy in same-sex friendship in Hong Kong adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S T; Chan, A C

    1999-02-01

    One of the alleged reasons that males report lower intimacy in same-sex friendships than females is that males tend to be more competitive than females, but this assumption has not been empirically tested. In the current study, 121 Hong Kong adolescents filled out Chinese versions of the Intimate Friendship Scale and the Competitiveness Index. As predicted, females reported having more intimate same-sex relationships than males, and they scored lower on competitiveness than males. However, the correlations between scores on the Competitiveness Index and the Intimate Friendship subscales were small and nonsignificant, suggesting that the sex difference in intimacy was not a function of competitiveness. PMID:10203927

  6. Parents' Role in Adolescents' Educational Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimkute, Laura; Hirvonen, Riikka; Tolvanen, Asko; Aunola, Kaisa; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the extent to which mothers' and fathers' expectations for their offspring's future education, their level of education, and adolescents' academic achievement predict adolescents' educational expectations. To investigate this, 230 adolescents were examined twice while they were in comprehensive school (in the 7th and 9th…

  7. Midwestern Rural Adolescents' Oral Sex Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.; Ward, Britney L.; Welch, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examined the prevalence of oral sexual activity in rural Midwestern adolescents. We also examined the correlates of a series of risk behaviors with oral sexual activity. Methods: A questionnaire based on the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System was distributed to 2121 rural middle and high school students in grades 6-12…

  8. It Isn't Sex Education unless...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacker, Sylvia S.

    1981-01-01

    An effective sex education curriculum deals with both feelings and behaviors. It must address decision making and problem solving in regard to relationship formation, readiness for intercourse, use of contraception, child rearing, and social responsibility and should be incorporated into education throughout the educational process. (JN)

  9. Directive Sex Education Is Our Best Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lickona, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    When criticizing the author's character-education article in the November 1993 "Educational Leadership," William Bennetta fails to acknowledge that nondirective sex education has failed. Abstinence is not the Religious Right's invention, but is the only medically safe, morally responsible choice for unmarried teenagers. The Teen-Aid and Sex…

  10. Adolescent Same-Sex Attraction and Academic Outcomes: The Role of School Attachment and Engagement.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jennifer; Muller, Chandra; Wilkinson, Lindsey

    2007-11-01

    Schools create environments in which some sexual feelings, behaviors, and relationships are stigmatized, and this may have negative consequences for adolescents with nonheterosexual romantic attractions. This stigma can lead them to withdraw and disengage from school at a critical time of preparation for adulthood, which can compromise opportunities for future success. Previous research has demonstrated that sexual minority youth report greater levels of school-related problems, including a weaker sense of attachment to school and more trouble with teachers and peers. This lack of social integration is likely to affect their educational success. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and the newly collected Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement study provide the first opportunity to fully explore whether and to what extent same-sex attracted youth enter adulthood with an educational disadvantage. In this study, we examine (1) whether same-sex attracted adolescents have lower levels of academic success, (2) if their lower academic success is explained by a lack of social integration at school, and (3) whether these relationships differ for boys and girls. Results suggest that same-sex attracted students, particularly boys, do suffer academically, and that this is in part a result of school-related problems and risk factors such as emotional distress and substance use; however, a great deal of the disadvantage fails to be explained by these factors. Additionally, while same-sex attracted boys show poorer academic performance, same-sex attracted girls do not, suggesting that gender may shape how sexual minority youth experience and respond to marginalizing school environments. PMID:20221417

  11. Adolescent Same-Sex Attraction and Academic Outcomes: The Role of School Attachment and Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jennifer; Muller, Chandra; Wilkinson, Lindsey

    2010-01-01

    Schools create environments in which some sexual feelings, behaviors, and relationships are stigmatized, and this may have negative consequences for adolescents with nonheterosexual romantic attractions. This stigma can lead them to withdraw and disengage from school at a critical time of preparation for adulthood, which can compromise opportunities for future success. Previous research has demonstrated that sexual minority youth report greater levels of school-related problems, including a weaker sense of attachment to school and more trouble with teachers and peers. This lack of social integration is likely to affect their educational success. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and the newly collected Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement study provide the first opportunity to fully explore whether and to what extent same-sex attracted youth enter adulthood with an educational disadvantage. In this study, we examine (1) whether same-sex attracted adolescents have lower levels of academic success, (2) if their lower academic success is explained by a lack of social integration at school, and (3) whether these relationships differ for boys and girls. Results suggest that same-sex attracted students, particularly boys, do suffer academically, and that this is in part a result of school-related problems and risk factors such as emotional distress and substance use; however, a great deal of the disadvantage fails to be explained by these factors. Additionally, while same-sex attracted boys show poorer academic performance, same-sex attracted girls do not, suggesting that gender may shape how sexual minority youth experience and respond to marginalizing school environments PMID:20221417

  12. Sex Trafficking Related Knowledge, Awareness, and Attitudes among Adolescent Female Students in Nepal: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    having a positive attitudes towards the victims of sex trafficking and/or anti-sex trafficking campaigns. Conclusion Findings presented have important implications for anti-trafficking programs, in particular those designed to educate the adolescent females who are at most-risk of sex trafficking. Educational programs need to include specific interventions to improve knowledge and attitudes towards sex trafficking among adolescent females in Nepal. PMID:26177534

  13. Impact of Sex Education Programs on Sexual Knowledge and Feelings of Men with a Mild Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garwood, Monique; McCabe, Marita P.

    2000-01-01

    After participating in 6 to 10 sex education sessions, six adolescent and adult men with mild mental retardation showed minimal increases in their knowledge of friendship, contraception, pregnancy, sexual interaction, and social skills. Following sex education, negative feelings developed about marriage, having children, and being present during…

  14. Determinants of Heterosexual Adolescents Having Sex with Female Sex Workers in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Junice Y. S.; Wong, Mee-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We assessed the proportion of and socio-ecological factors associated with ever having had sex with female sex workers (FSWs) among heterosexual adolescents. We also described the characteristics of the adolescents who reported inconsistent condom use with FSWs. Methods This is a cross-sectional study (response rate: 73%) of 300 heterosexually active male adolescents of 16 to 19 years attending a national STI clinic in Singapore between 2009 and 2014. We assessed the ecological factors (individual, parental, peer, school and medial influences) and sexual risk behaviors using a self-reported questionnaire. Poisson regression was used to obtain the adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and confidence intervals (CI). Results The proportion of heterosexual male adolescents who had ever had sex with FSWs was 39%. Multivariate analysis showed that significant factors associated with ever having had sex with FSWs were sex initiation before 16 years old (aPR 1.79 CI: 1.30–2.46), never had a sexually active girlfriend (aPR 1.75 CI 1.28–2.38), reported lower self-esteem score (aPR 0.96 CI: 0.93–0.98), higher rebelliousness score (aPR 1.03 CI: 1.00–1.07) and more frequent viewing of pornography (aPR 1.47 CI: 1.04–2.09). Lifetime inconsistent condom use with FSWs was 30%. Conclusions A significant proportion of heterosexual male adolescents attending the public STI clinic had ever had sex with FSWs. A targeted intervention that addresses different levels of influence to this behavior is needed. This is even more so because a considerable proportion of adolescents reported inconsistent condom use with FSWs, who may serve as a bridge of STI transmission to the community. National surveys on adolescent health should include the assessment of frequency of commercial sex visits and condom use with FSWs for long-term monitoring and surveillance. PMID:26808561

  15. The Evolution of Sex Education and Students' Sexual Knowledge in Finland in the 2000s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontula, Osmo

    2010-01-01

    Finland is probably the only country where sex education has been studied in two consecutive national surveys, in 1996 and 2006 directed at biology and health education teachers, and in 2000 and 2006 by measuring adolescents' sexual knowledge. In 2006, responses from teachers and students could be combined for 339 schools. The most important…

  16. Schools, Sex Education, and Support for Sexual Minorities: Exploring Historic Marginalization and Future Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty-Caplan, David Milo

    2013-01-01

    School-based adolescent sexual health education in the United States has long served as a means of combating emotional and physical threats to the well-being of youth. However, this sex education has since its inception marginalized the experiences and health concerns of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) students and contributed to school…

  17. Do Thai parents discuss sex and AIDS with young adolescents? A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Meechamnan, Chutima; Fongkaew, Warunee; Chotibang, Jutamas; McGrath, Barbara Burns

    2014-03-01

    This qualitative study explored parents' and young adolescents' perceptions of communication related to sex and HIV/AIDS. Focus group discussions and group discussion were conducted among 67 adolescents and 30 parents. For the adolescents, group discussion using participatory activities was conducted, followed by five focus group discussions. Group discussions using participatory activities were conducted among parents. Thematic analysis indicated that the adolescents received inadequate information about sex and AIDS from their parents, whom they feared as providing negative judgment, and this represented a key barrier to such discussions. Their parents, on the other hand, reported that they believed their children were still too young to learn about and engage in sexual activities. The parents perceived barriers to communication included a lack of confidence and feelings of embarrassment. Nevertheless, they also recognized their important role in their child's sexual education. Collectively, these results draw attention to the need for a culturally appropriate program to strengthen parent-child communication skills for the topics of sex and HIV/AIDS. PMID:23692292

  18. Sex education among Asian American college females: who is teaching them and what is being taught.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christine; Tran, Denise Yen; Thoi, Deanna; Chang, Melissa; Wu, Lisa; Trieu, Sang Leng

    2013-04-01

    Many parents are reluctant to educate their Asian American adolescents on sexual health topics because sexuality is taboo in most Asian cultures. A survey was conducted with Chinese, Filipina, Korean, and Vietnamese college females ages 18-25 to assess sources of abstinence and birth control education and age of sexual debut. Parents were the least reported source of sex education for all four ethnic groups, with the majority of respondents reporting school as their source of sex education. Respondents who reported family as their source of abstinence education had a sexual debut of 6 months later than those who did not. Females who reported family as their source of birth control education began having sex more than 7 months later than those who reported other sources. Disaggregation of data by Asian ethnic groups and examining differences in delivery of sex education among ethnic groups may improve school curricula and sexual health. PMID:22763460

  19. Sex Differences in the Forms of Aggression among Adolescent Students in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amedahe, Francis K.; Owusu-Banahene, Nana Opoku

    2007-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated sex differences in the forms of aggression exhibited by adolescent students, particularly in the Western world. No such study has been done among sub-Saharan Africa students. The aim was to examine the sex differences in forms of aggression among adolescent students in Ghana. A total of 800 adolescent students…

  20. Parent-Adolescent Discussions about Sex and Condoms: Impact on Peer Influences of Sexual Risk Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Daniel J.; Miller, Kim S.

    2000-01-01

    Examined how parent-adolescent communication about initiating sex and using condoms influenced the relationship between peer norms and behavior among African American and Hispanic adolescents. Found that peer norms were more strongly related to behavior among adolescents who had not discussed sex or condoms. Communication was also related to teens…

  1. Media influences on children and adolescents: violence and sex.

    PubMed

    Earles, K A; Alexander, Randell; Johnson, Melba; Liverpool, Joan; McGhee, Melissa

    2002-09-01

    The portrayal of violence, sex, and drugs/alcohol in the media has been known to adversely affect the behavior of children and adolescents. There is a strong association between perceptions of media messages and observed behavior, especially with children. Lately, there has been more of a focus in the public health/medical field on media influences of youth and the role of the pediatrician and/or healthcare worker in addressing this area of growing concern. There is a need to explicitly explore the influences of media violence, sex, and drugs/alcohol on youth within the context of the Social Learning Theory. Implications of these influences are discussed, and recommendations for pediatricians and/or health care workers who interact with children and adolescents are described. Pediatricians and health care workers should incorporate media exposure probes into the developmental history of their patients and become knowledgeable about the effects of medial influences on youth. PMID:12392043

  2. Media influences on children and adolescents: violence and sex.

    PubMed Central

    Earles, K. A.; Alexander, Randell; Johnson, Melba; Liverpool, Joan; McGhee, Melissa

    2002-01-01

    The portrayal of violence, sex, and drugs/alcohol in the media has been known to adversely affect the behavior of children and adolescents. There is a strong association between perceptions of media messages and observed behavior, especially with children. Lately, there has been more of a focus in the public health/medical field on media influences of youth and the role of the pediatrician and/or healthcare worker in addressing this area of growing concern. There is a need to explicitly explore the influences of media violence, sex, and drugs/alcohol on youth within the context of the Social Learning Theory. Implications of these influences are discussed, and recommendations for pediatricians and/or health care workers who interact with children and adolescents are described. Pediatricians and health care workers should incorporate media exposure probes into the developmental history of their patients and become knowledgeable about the effects of medial influences on youth. PMID:12392043

  3. Psychosocial Adjustment, School Outcomes, and Romantic Relationships of Adolescents With Same-Sex Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainright, Jennifer L.; Russell, Stephen T.; Patterson, Charlotte J.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined associations among family type (same-sex vs. opposite-sex parents); family and relationship variables; and the psychosocial adjustment, school outcomes, and romantic attractions and behaviors of adolescents. Participants included 44 12- to 18-year-old adolescents parented by same-sex couples and 44 same-aged adolescents…

  4. Sex-Role Development and Parental Expectations among Disturbed Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Arnold; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the sex-linked personality traits of adolescents referred to out-patient clinics for a variety of psychological problems, the sex-linked personality traits of their parents, and the sex-linked personality characteristics that the parents of these adolescents would ideally like for their sons. (Author/RK)

  5. Adolescent Sex Offenders' Rankings of Therapeutic Factors Using the Yalom Card Sort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sribney, Christine L.; Reddon, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Following 11-98 weeks of inpatient residential treatment, 69 male adolescent sex offenders completed the 60-item, 12-factor Yalom Card Sort. The rank orders were compared to adult sex offenders and a psychiatric adult outpatient group. Relative to adult psychiatric outpatients, the adolescent sex offenders had rated Instillation of Hope three…

  6. The case for a moral sex education in the schools.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S

    1981-04-01

    The potential benefits of sex education cannot be realistically discussed without initially rooting out the fears and myths which prevent the active promotion of good programs. The truth of the situation is that knowledgeable and informed adolescents are more likely to postpone sexual relations until they feel emotionally ready and are able to take the necessary precautions against pregnancy and venereal disease. It is essential that sexuality programs be taught with values. When teaching contraception, the instructor needs to convey some basic guidelines. Sex education should be taught from the perspective that it is wrong to take advantage of another individual. The function of a "moral" education is to encourage people to strive toward the universally accepted ideals of this democratic and pluralistic society and to offer facts which facilitate responsible decision making. The value of equality of the sexes, dignity and respect for all human being must be taught. A great difference exists between being moral and being moralistic. In moralistic presentations the attempt is made a impose a personal point of view in a dogmatic way. Sex education programs are best taught from a moral perspective which encourages the accepted aspirations of this society while preserving individual liberty. Given these guidelines, even the most controversial subjects may be discussed in school within a moral framework. A quality sex education program must include the following principles: enhancing the self-concept; preparation for marriage and parenthood; understanding love; preparation for making responsible decisions; helping people understand the need for equal opportunities for males and for females; and contributing to knowledge and understanding of the sexual dimension of life. PMID:6908928

  7. "Saving Sex for Later": Developing a Parent-Child Communication Intervention to Delay Sexual Initiation among Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Lydia; Wilson-Simmons, Renee; Dash, Kim; Jeanbaptiste, Varzi; Myint-U, Athi; Moss, Jesse; Stueve, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Young adolescents in communities with high rates of early sexual initiation are at risk of multiple negative health outcomes. Although sex education programs for this age group are often controversial, surveys document that many mothers and fathers would appreciate guidance about how to discuss sexuality with their children. This paper presents an…

  8. Sex Bias: Education Legislation and Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mastalli, Grace L.

    This is one of five papers the National Advisory Council on Women's Educational Programs has commissioned to identify key problems, describe exemplary efforts to promote sex fairness, and recommend practical changes in Education Division policy and practice that would improve equity for women. This report focuses on seven major programs--each…

  9. Major Legal Aspects of Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartoo, Jean

    The legal status of sex education in the public schools in the United States as it existed at the close of the 1971-72 school year was investigated. The investigation included surveys, analyses, and interpretations of statutes, significant rules and regulations of state departments of education, and court holdings as they applied specifically to…

  10. Maternal and Adolescent Expectations and Aspirations as Related to Sex, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Judith S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Examines the interrelationship of demographic variables (socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and sex) and maternal orientations, and its effect on adolescent expectations and aspirations. Subjects were 190 Black and White adolescents. (CM)

  11. The ABCs of Sex Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroka, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Cites statistics on extent of sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancies among adolescents; describes ideological dispute over how to teach sex education; advocates teaching the ABCs of sex education: Abstinence, Be Monogamous, and Condoms. (PKP)

  12. Having and Being an Other-Sex Crush during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowker, Julie C.; Spencer, Sarah V.; Thomas, Katelyn K.; Gyoerkoe, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined other-sex crush experiences (both having and being perceived as an other-sex crush) among 544 young adolescents (mean age = 12.74 years). Results indicated that 56% had at least one current other-sex crush, with little overlap between crushes, friends, and boyfriends/girlfriends. Significant associations between other-sex crush…

  13. American Indian Adolescent Girls: Vulnerability to Sex Trafficking, Intervention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center offers harm reduction programming to at-risk adolescent American Indian girls, including outreach, case management, advocacy, healthy sexuality education, and support groups. To evaluate program impact, participants are assessed at intake and every 6 months afterward for current vulnerability to…

  14. School Administrators, Parents, and Sex Education: A Resolvable Paradox?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Janet; Seidl, Ann

    1989-01-01

    Polled 42 secondary school administrators regarding educational priorities, perceived barriers to expansion of sex education, and preferred methods of introducing sex education. Administrators perceived parents as major barrier to introduction of more formalized sex education in schools. Administrators also felt that parents were generally…

  15. Single-Sex Schools and Classrooms. The Informed Educator Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    In October 2006, the U.S. Department of Education introduced the so-called "single-sex regulations," which brought the issue of single-sex education to the forefront of discussion among educators, policymakers, and parents. Anecdotal evidence suggests that single-sex education can have a positive impact on student achievement. However, opponents…

  16. Sex role strain among kibbutz adolescents and adults: A developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Snarey, J; Friedman, K; Blasi, J

    1986-06-01

    In spite of a commitment to equality, the kibbutz is a male-dominated society with highly differentiated sex roles. Has this gap between ideals and reality created sex role strain for kibbutz-born adolescents and adults? Previous kibbutz studies have suggested that sex role strain may be the most intense among adult kibbutz women. Based on Erik Erikson's developmental model, however, we hypothesized that adolescent females would experience significantly greater sex role strain than other kibbutz members, including adult women. Adolescent and adult males and females were tested using Loevinger's ego development test. The sex role items of the test were used to construct a new measure of sex role strain. The global index included the following submeasures: avoidance of sex role issues; expression of intellectual, emotional, or behavioral sex role conflict; and evaluative attitudes toward male roles and female roles. Significant cohort or sex differences were found on the global index and on all submeasures of sex role strain. The findings indicate that sex role strain is greatest among adolescent females, followed by adolescent males. Adult kibbutz women, however, are significantly more likely to focus their dissatisfaction in the area of actual role behavior rather than in terms of how they intellectually conceptualize kibbutz sex roles, as is the case for adolescents and adult males. PMID:24301699

  17. From Calvin Klein to Paris Hilton and MySpace: adolescents, sex, and the media.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jane D; Strasburger, Victor C

    2007-12-01

    In the absence of effective sex education at home or school, the media have become important sources of sexual information for adolescents in the United States. Mainstream media inundate teenagers with sexual images and innuendoes. In the most recent content analysis of American primetime TV, more than three-fourths of the shows had sexual content; yet less than 15% contained any references to responsible sexuality, abstinence, the risk of pregnancy, or the risk of sexually transmitted infections. Dozens of studies attest to the power of the media to influence teenagers' beliefs and attitudes about sex. Three longitudinal studies have all found that adolescents exposed to more sexual content are more likely to begin having sexual intercourse earlier than their peers who see or hear less about sex in the media. The media could become part of the solution as well as part of the problem - if there were more responsible portrayals of human sex and more widespread advertising of birth control products. PMID:18453229

  18. Secrets and Lies: Sex Education and Gendered Memories of Childhood's End in an Australian Provincial City, 1930s-1950s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Josephine

    2006-01-01

    There are few historical studies about the sex education of Australian youth. Drawing on a range of sources, including the oral histories of 40 women and men who attended two single-sex, selective high schools in a provincial Australian city (Newcastle, New South Wales) in the 1930s-1950s, this paper explores the adolescent experience of sex…

  19. Impact Evaluation of FACTS & Feelings: A Home-Based Video Sex Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brent C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Families (n=548) with seventh- or eighth-grade adolescents were randomly assigned to receive videotape sex education curriculum including videos with mailed newsletters, videos without newsletters, or neither (control group). Found no significant effect of the program on key outcome variables of teenagers' sexual intentions or behaviors.…

  20. School-Based Sex Education: A New Millennium Update. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, J. Terry

    This digest addresses the need for school-based sex education (SBSE), identifying recent curricula that have made a positive difference in the lives of U.S. youth. Many sexual behaviors place U.S. youth at great risk for a multitude of negative health outcomes. Every year, approximately 3 million adolescents acquire a sexually transmitted disease,…

  1. Free Association in Sex Education: Understanding Sexuality as the Flow of Thought in Conversation and Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casemore, Brian

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on the theory and method of free association in psychoanalysis to frame an investigation of the content, structure, and function of the thinking expressed in conversations about sexuality and sexual health. The investigation emerges from an ongoing three-year study of the way adolescents, teachers, and peer sex educators negotiate…

  2. The child's right to sex education.

    PubMed

    Shaw, S

    1995-01-01

    Parents need to recognize that children have a right to sex education and, if not properly educated at home, will receive misleading information from the mass media. Sex education should help young people to develop the ability to handle their sexual feelings, establish personal guidelines and standards for responsible sexual behavior, and form healthy interpersonal relationships. Educational content should be geared to the child's age. For example, very young children should be taught the correct words for the sexual and excretory organs. Although small children should not be overwhelmed with factual information, the provision of fanciful stories will lead to eventual mistrust in parents' honesty. Preadolescents need to be informed about changes that will occur in their bodies and reassured these changes are normal. In general, the manner in which the information is presented (e.g., body language, tone) is more important than what is actually said. PMID:12319361

  3. [Sex education: a retrospective review].

    PubMed

    Souza y Machorro, Mario

    2003-04-01

    A monographic revision of international literature regarding education form sexual health is presented, through a historical, programmatic, educational, and clinical point of view of various contents and methods registered in the specialized literature of the 20th. century. The knowledge of the status regarding the subject is focused to favor the presented planning and performance of public sexual education. Some of the socio-sexual problems derives from the establishment of "neo-sexuality", and the educational work done in the child and younger populations are exposed, in order to invigorate preventive actions, preparation form sexual initiation, and if it is the case, the treatment of pathology in that stage of life. Finally, the main characteristics of adult sexuality are mentioned in favor of the equity of all recipient population, within the recommendations of the WHO, regarding to healthy sexuality and mental health. PMID:12866221

  4. Frequently but Naturally: William Michael Duane, Kenneth Charles Barnes and Teachers as Innovators in Sex(uality) Education in English Adolescent Schooling--c. 1945-1965

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limond, David

    2005-01-01

    This piece considers a pivotal period in British social, political, cultural and educational history, the decades from 1945 to 1965. It reviews key policy documents (issued by the Board of Education in 1943 and 1944 and the Department of Education and Science in 1968) which can be said to "frame" the period and proceeds to examine the practices…

  5. Review of Comprehensive Sex Education Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This evaluation was undertaken by the Administration for Children and Families within the Department of Health and Human Services to inform federal policymakers of the content, medical accuracy, and effectiveness of comprehensive sex education (CSE) curricula currently in use. Nine curricula were chosen based on the frequency and strength of…

  6. New Standards Aim to Guide Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on national standards about sexuality, sexual health, and relationships that outline topics students should learn, starting in kindergarten, and that they can build on as they grow older. The standards--an initiative by groups concerned with student health and sex education--are intended to mimic content standards for other…

  7. Sex Education Films: A Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslinoff, Louis

    1973-01-01

    This paper analyzes selected films and filmstrips (according to five broad classifications: biology, family life, social development, personality, and social issues) as part of a larger study defining the specific subject matter of sex education. The amount of attention given to the topics of reproduction, fertilization and birth processes,…

  8. Sex Education as a Transversal Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabelo, Amanda Oliveira; Pereira, Graziela Raupp; Reis, Maria Amélia; Ferreira, António G.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, sex education is in many countries a transversal subject, in which the school becomes a privileged place for the implementation of policies that aim at promoting "public health." Its design as a cross-cutting subject envisages fostering the dissemination of these subjects in all pedagogical and curricular fields; however, we…

  9. Promoting Sex Education for a Healthy Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaitsev, G. K.; Zaitsev, A. G.

    2006-01-01

    The increased rates of deviations in sexual behavior among young people and the number of divorces among young married families provide evidence of the urgent relevance of valeological/health-promoting sex education for the young people of Russia. This article discusses scientific and practical experience from the implementation of program…

  10. AIDS and sex education for young people in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y; Lu, Z Z; Shi, R; Sun, X Y; Cai, Y

    2001-01-01

    Although China has had a rich sexual culture for thousands of years, Chinese people are usually unwilling to openly discuss issues of sex. Some parents are quite ignorant of the change in their children's sexual attitude and behaviour. In China today, adolescents are becoming much more sexually liberated. Premarital sex and unplanned pregnancies among teenagers are increasing. Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) including HIV/AIDS are also spreading rapidly. However, young people lack basic information on AIDS/STD and do not know how to protect themselves from these diseases or how to avoid unintended pregnancies. Several major youth peer education programmes in China are mentioned in this paper. Among them, a four-year programme entitled the Australian-Chinese AIDS/STD/Safer Sex Peer Education Programme for Youth, is discussed in some detail. The programme has so far reached over 40000 university and school students. Evaluation results show that the programme is effective in both significantly increasing students' knowledge about AIDS/STDs and changing their attitude towards AIDS patients. In addition, the programme is highly praised by the students. PMID:11999327

  11. Correlates of Oral Sex and Vaginal Intercourse in Early and Middle Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bersamin, Melina M.; Walker, Samantha; Fisher, Deborah A.; Grube, Joel W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether a comprehensive set of psychosocial factors was equally predictive of both adolescent vaginal intercourse and oral sex among 1,105 adolescents aged 12-16. Logistic regressions were used to examine the relationships between parental communication, religiosity, bonding to school, heavy drinking, sex expectancies,…

  12. Other-Sex Friendships in Late Adolescence: Risky Associations for Substance Use and Sexual Debut?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mrug, Sylvie; Borch, Casey; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents' friendships with other-sex peers serve important developmental functions, but they may also facilitate engagement in problem behavior. This study examines the unique contributions of other-sex friendships and friends' behavior to alcohol use, smoking, and initiation of sexual intercourse among late adolescent girls and boys. A total…

  13. Sex Differences in Internalizing Problems during Adolescence in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, Tasha M.; Winter-Messiers, Mary Ann; Gibson, Brandon; Schmidt, Alexandra M.; Herr, Cynthia M.; Solomon, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that the double hit conferred by sex and diagnosis increases the risk for internalizing disorders in adolescent females with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In a sample of 32 adolescents with ASD and 32 controls, we examined the effects of sex, diagnostic factors, and developmental stages on depression and anxiety. A 3-way…

  14. Understanding the Sex Difference in Vulnerability to Adolescent Depression: An Examination of Child and Parent Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhart, Nicole K.; Shih, Josephine H.; Hammen, Constance L.; Brennan, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined sex differences in risk factors associated with adolescent depression in a large sample of boys and girls. Moderation and mediation explanatory models of the sex difference in likelihood of depression were examined. Findings indicate that the factors associated with depression in adolescent boys and girls are quite similar. All…

  15. The Impact of Risk Factors on the Treatment of Adolescent Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Sharon M.; Lewis, Kathy; Sigal, Janet

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated the impact that 5 selected risk factors have on the treatment outcome of adolescent male sex offenders. The results indicated that the greatest risk factor among sex offenders was having a mother who had a substance abuse problem. Study participants were 35 adolescent boys in a New Jersey residential facility for…

  16. The Profile and Treatment of Male Adolescent Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakey, Joyce F.

    1994-01-01

    Outlines characteristics of sex offenders, including family and school histories, sexual attitudes, social skills and relationships, delinquent behaviors, psychiatric diagnoses, and cognitive distortions based on mythical beliefs. Treatment requires correction of thinking errors and promotion of accountability, empathy, education, morality,…

  17. Colombia's "National Project for Sex Education".

    PubMed

    Martinez Mendez, Z

    1996-01-01

    Colombia's National Project for Sex Education, established in 1993, seeks to change negative views of sexuality, further social justice through a redefinition of traditional gender roles, promote reproductive health and sexual responsibility, and encourage respect and self-determination within families. Given the racial and cultural diversity within Colombian society, as well as a trend toward school decentralization and autonomy, there is no single curriculum. To date, more than 2000 teachers have attended 180 workshops on human sexuality. To ensure a future supply of trained teachers, universities are being asked to implement sex education studies. In addition, 36 regional teams have been formed and 145 people have been trained in program development. 12 sexuality education booklets have been prepared, as well as poster displays, media advertisements, and videotapes. Program evaluation will be an important component of this strategy. PMID:12320001

  18. Sex Education on Film. A Guide to Visual Aids & Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Laura J.; Buskin, Judith

    This is an annotated guide to visual aids and programs in sex education covering the topics of family relationships, physical and emotional development, the creation of life, masculinity and feminity, attitudes and values, marriage, social problems, philosophy and implementation of sex education, together with a sample program in sex education for…

  19. What Should Be the Moral Aims of Compulsory Sex Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steutel, Jan; de Ruyter, Doret J.

    2011-01-01

    With reference to the unsuccessful attempt of the Labour Government to make sex education a statutory part of the National Curriculum, this paper argues in favour of making liberal sex education compulsory at all state schools. First, the main characteristics of a liberal sex education are briefly explained. Promoting the virtue of respect for…

  20. Curricular Decision-Making among Public Sex Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrion, Melissa L.; Jensen, Robin E.

    2014-01-01

    The content of sex education in government-funded schools in the USA varies dramatically and reflects its contested nature and goals. Drawing from 50 interviews with sex educators working in the public, government-funded school system in a Midwestern US state, this study explores the processes through which sex educators decide what and how to…

  1. Sex Education Attitudes and Outcomes among North American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Monnica T.; Bonner, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Attitudes and outcomes of sex education received by North American women are examined via an Internet survey (N = 1,400). Mean age was 19.5, with 24% reporting one or more unplanned pregnancies. Women were more satisfied with sex education from informal sources than from parents, schools, and physicians. Those receiving sex education from parents…

  2. Should We Be Teaching Sex Education or Sexual Abstinence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Del

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the controversial issue whether to teach sex education or sexual abstinence. Sex education has always been fraught with controversy. The discord in Westbrook, Maine, school district is noteworthy because of the vocal support for an abstinence-only curriculum approach to sex education that has reshaped the…

  3. Sex, race/ethnicity, and romantic attractions: multiple minority status adolescents and mental health.

    PubMed

    Consolacion, Theodora B; Russell, Stephen T; Sue, Stanley

    2004-08-01

    This study examined the association between multiple minority statuses and reports of suicidal thoughts, depression, and self-esteem among adolescents. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were used to examine mental health outcomes across racial/ethnic groups for same-sex-attracted youths and female youths. Hispanic/Latino, African American, and White female adolescents reported more suicidal thoughts, higher depression, and lower self-esteem compared with male adolescents in their racial/ethnic group. Same-sex-attracted youths did not consistently demonstrate compromised mental health across racial/ethnic groups. Follow-up analyses show that White same-sex-attracted female adolescents reported the most compromised mental health compared with other White adolescents. However, similar trends were not found for racial/ethnic minority female youths with same-sex attractions. PMID:15311974

  4. Stability of Self-Reported Same-Sex and Both-Sex Attraction from Adolescence to Young Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueqin; Xu, Yishan; Tornello, Samantha L

    2016-04-01

    This study examined how sexual attraction varied across age, gender of participant, and gender of romantic partner, from adolescence to early adulthood. Comparisons between same-sex and both-sex attracted individuals were of particular interest. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth), we examined the responses of participants who reported experiencing same-sex attractions or both-sex attractions at least once within four waves (n = 1889). Results indicated that same-sex attractions became more stable over time, whereas both-sex attraction remained unstable even into adulthood. Compared with males, females were less stable in same-sex attraction, but more stable in both-sex attraction. The majority of people who reported same-sex attraction did not report having a same-sex romantic partner before they entered adulthood, and those who reported a same-sex romantic partner were more likely to maintain their same-sex attraction than those who did not. As males got older, the gender of their romantic partner tended to become more consistent with their sexual attraction. However, for females, the consistency between the gender of their romantic partner and sexual attraction did not change over time. PMID:26048483

  5. Development of an object relation-based typology of adolescent sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Gamache, Dominick; Diguer, Louis; Laverdière, Olivier; Rousseau, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a typology of adolescent sex offenders based on object relations theory and Otto F. Kernberg's model of personality organizations (PO). A secondary objective was to compare the identified subtypes on offense characteristics as well as some psychological variables of adolescent sex offenders. Clinical files from 40 male adolescent sex offenders in treatment were examined. Cluster analysis based on PO and object relations variables identified six subtypes of offenders, in line with Kernberg's PO model. These subtypes differed from one another on various variables pertaining to characteristics of sex offenses, general delinquency, relational/sexual history, and trauma history. PMID:23244526

  6. Dating, Sex, and Substance Use Predict Increases in Adolescents' Subjective Age across Two Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Nancy L.; Albrecht, Arne K.; Jansson, S. Mikael

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the nature of the relationship between adolescents' subjective age (how old they feel) and chronological age, and explored whether dating, sex, and substance use predicted increases in adolescents' subjective age across a two-year period. The participants were 570 adolescents who were interviewed when they were first ages 12-19…

  7. Appropriate Physical Education Practices for Pregnant Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahan, David; Barnett, David W.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses medical and pedagogical issues of concern to physical educators as they confront and respond to adolescent pregnancy in their schools, making recommendations for the role higher education can play in facilitating exercise programs for pregnant students and discussing an exercise program for pregnant adolescents that has served students…

  8. Sex education and young people.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Young people comprise up to 60% of Belize's total population of more than 200,000. Many of them have dropped out of school and simply loiter on the streets with little or nothing to do. The only nongovernmental organization in Belize providing family planning and sexual and reproductive health care services, the Belize Family Life Association (BFLA) is well aware of the many problems facing youth, such as AIDS, teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease, poverty, and gangs. In an effort to improve conditions for youth and to address their problems, the BFLA established a successful teen center in the Mesopotamia Area and the Belizean Youths with an Aim for Prosperity (BYAP), a project designed to foster and support entrepreneurship among a group comprised mainly of out-of-school at-risk youths. Population Concern is helping to fund reproductive health projects for youth in South Africa with the goal of reducing the prevalence of unwanted pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and unsafe abortion through reproductive health services and education. Young people are helping design the project by explaining their perceived needs to the project team. In Trinidad and Tobago, controversy followed the Family Planning Association of Trinidad and Tobago's (FPATT) recent launch of its annual Family Life Education Training program for teachers, while 2 recent hurricanes, unemployment, and illicit drug sales and use are some of the problems facing the Dominica Planned Parenthood Federation and Dominica's youth. PMID:12321260

  9. Assessment of identity during adolescence using daily diary methods: Measurement invariance across time and sex.

    PubMed

    Becht, Andrik I; Branje, Susan J T; Vollebergh, Wilma A M; Maciejewski, Dominique F; van Lier, Pol A C; Koot, Hans M; Denissen, Jaap J A; Meeus, Wim H J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess measurement invariance of adolescents' daily reports on identity across time and sex. Adolescents (N = 497; mean age = 13.32 years at Time 1, 56.7% boys) from the general population reported on their identity commitments, exploration in depth and reconsideration on a daily basis for 3 weeks within 1 year across 5 years. We used the single-item version of the Utrecht Management of Identity Commitments Scale (UMICS; Klimstra et al., 2010), a broad measure of identity-formation processes covering both interpersonal and educational identity domains. This study tested configural, metric, scalar, and strict measurement invariance across days within weeks, across sex, across weeks within years, and across years. Results indicated that daily diary reports show strict measurement invariance across days, across weeks within years, across years, and across boys and girls. These results support the use of daily diary methods to assess identity at various time intervals ranging from days to years and across sex. Results are discussed with regard to future implications to study identity processes, both on smaller and larger time intervals. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26375428

  10. Pubertal Timing and Vulnerabilities to Depression in Early Adolescence: Differential Pathways to Depressive Symptoms by Sex

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jessica L.; Hamlat, Elissa J.; Stange, Jonathan P.; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2014-01-01

    Although research implicates pubertal processes in the emergence of the sex difference in depression during adolescence, few studies have examined how cognitive and affective vulnerabilities influence the effect of pubertal timing on depressive symptoms. The current study prospectively examined whether early pubertal timing predicted increases in depressive symptoms among adolescents with more negative cognitive styles and lower emotional clarity, and whether this risk was specific to adolescent girls. In a diverse sample of 318 adolescents, early pubertal timing predicted increases in depressive symptoms among adolescent boys and girls with more negative cognitive styles and adolescent girls with poor emotional clarity. These findings suggest that earlier pubertal maturation may heighten the risk of depression for adolescents with pre-existing vulnerabilities to depression, and that early-maturing adolescent girls with lower levels of emotional clarity may be particularly vulnerable to depressive symptoms, representing one pathway through which the sex difference in depression may emerge. PMID:24439622

  11. Adolescent Peer Group Communication, Sex-Role Norms and Decisions about Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jane Delano

    Interviews with 588 college students found support for the proposition that sex role norms and interpersonal communication norms and patterns had influenced their occupational decision making as adolescents. Specifically, the findings showed that the adoption of the traditionally masculine sex role norm (as measured by the Bem Sex Role Inventory)…

  12. Adolescents' Sex-Typed Friendship Experiences: Does Having a Sister versus a Brother Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2000-01-01

    Examined connections between having a sister versus a brother and coming from a same-sex versus an opposite-sex sibling dyad, and sex-typing in adolescents' friendships. Findings suggested that sisters may learn control tactics from brothers that they apply in friendships. Boys were less likely to model emotional intimacy. Coming from opposite-sex…

  13. Sleep spindling and fluid intelligence across adolescent development: sex matters.

    PubMed

    Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Ujma, Péter P; Kovács, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Evidence supports the intricate relationship between sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) spindling and cognitive abilities in children and adults. Although sleep EEG changes during adolescence index fundamental brain reorganization, a detailed analysis of sleep spindling and the spindle-intelligence relationship was not yet provided for adolescents. Therefore, adolescent development of sleep spindle oscillations were studied in a home polysomnographic study focusing on the effects of chronological age and developmentally acquired overall mental efficiency (fluid IQ) with sex as a potential modulating factor. Subjects were 24 healthy adolescents (12 males) with an age range of 15-22 years (mean: 18 years) and fluid IQ of 91-126 (mean: 104.12, Raven Progressive Matrices Test). Slow spindles (SSs) and fast spindles (FSs) were analyzed in 21 EEG derivations by using the individual adjustment method (IAM). A significant age-dependent increase in average FS density (r = 0.57; p = 0.005) was found. Moreover, fluid IQ correlated with FS density (r = 0.43; p = 0.04) and amplitude (r = 0.41; p = 0.049). The latter effects were entirely driven by particularly reliable FS-IQ correlations in females [r = 0.80 (p = 0.002) and r = 0.67 (p = 0.012), for density and amplitude, respectively]. Region-specific analyses revealed that these correlations peak in the fronto-central regions. The control of the age-dependence of FS measures and IQ scores did not considerably reduce the spindle-IQ correlations with respect to FS density. The only positive spindle-index of fluid IQ in males turned out to be the frequency of FSs (r = 0.60, p = 0.04). Increases in FS density during adolescence may index reshaped structural connectivity related to white matter maturation in the late developing human brain. The continued development over this age range of cognitive functions is indexed by specific measures of sleep spindling unraveling gender differences in adolescent brain maturation and perhaps

  14. Sex Squad: Engaging Humour to Reinvigorate Sexual Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Robert; Gere, David

    2016-01-01

    The Sex Squad is a collective of US-based college students, who create and perform monologues, scenes and musical parodies for ninth graders (ranging in age from 13 to 15). The Sex Squad is the central element in the "AMP!" programme for adolescent sexual health, developed at the University of California-Los Angeles in collaboration with…

  15. Sex and Pregnancy: A Perinatal Educator's Guide

    PubMed Central

    Polomeno, Viola

    2000-01-01

    This article is a continuation in the author's growing series of articles on intimacy and sexuality in the transition to parenthood and its relationship with perinatal education. So many couples in the author's perinatal education practice feel that health professionals are uncomfortable discussing sex and pregnancy. Indeed, the couples have so many questions and concerns regarding this subject; they are seeking answers so that they may better understand and cope with the changes in this aspect of their relationship. Perinatal education group encounters or special sessions are the ideal setting to discuss intimacy and sexuality during pregnancy. The objectives of this article are to provide the perinatal educator with content for the group sessions and tools for teaching strategies and activities. PMID:17273227

  16. Adolescent Sibling-Incest Offenders: Differences in Family and Individual Functioning When Compared to Adolescent Nonsibling Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worling, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Adolescent male sex offenders who assaulted younger siblings (n=32) were compared to those who offended against nonsibling children (n=28). Adolescent sibling-incest offenders reported significantly more marital discord, parental rejection, physical discipline, negative family atmosphere, and general dissatisfaction with family relationships and…

  17. Sex Education in Perspective: Guidelines for Program Development and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is designed to assist schools and communities in: (1) exploring the subject of sex education; (2) developing an awareness of the student as a frame of reference for analyzing sex education and constructing appropriate educational programs; (3) developing an awareness of behavior and educational principles as a logical basis for…

  18. Sex Education Outreach from a Family Planning Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Efrem; Weinstein, Stellye

    1982-01-01

    A sex education outreach program emphasizing values, moral reasoning, and approaches to problem solving was developed in response to the rise in teenage pregnancies. Aspects of the sex education program structure included: (1) decision making regarding sex; (2) contraception; (3) parental involvement; (4) outreach volunteer training; and (5)…

  19. A Brunswikian evolutionary-developmental theory of adolescent sex offending.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, A J; Sales, B D; Russell, K P; Becker, J V; Kaplan, M

    2000-01-01

    A Brunswikian Evolutionary-Developmental model was developed to relate the sex offending behavior of adolescents to other forms of social deviance, tracing a history of repeated frustration and failure in various competitive sexual strategies and escalation to more extreme means of obtaining sexual gratification. Four hypothetical constructs were proposed as stages in the development of sexual criminality: (1) Psycho-Social Deficiency (PSD); (2) Non-Criminal Sexuality (NCS); (3) Non-Sexual Criminality (NSC); and (4) Sexual Criminality (SC). Significant direct and indirect pathways led from PSD to SC through both NCS and NSC, each time facilitated by an interaction with PSD. Although the causal orders between stages remain equivocal, the current results are consistent with our theory and establish the heuristic value of our theoretical approach, providing empirical support for otherwise counterintuitive predictions. This interpretation also offers hope for focusing preventative intervention at one major root cause of this unfortunate cascade of consequences, Psycho-Social Deficiency. PMID:10874291

  20. School-based sex education in Western Nepal: uncomfortable for both teachers and students.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, Shreejana; Kulczycki, Andrzej; Shakya, Sujeeta

    2006-11-01

    The National Adolescent Health and Development Strategy (2000) of Nepal considers adolescents a key target group for information and services. The extent to which sex education is being provided in schools has received little attention, however. At higher secondary level, students are supposed to be taught basic sex education using a chapter in a textbook called Health, Population and Environment. Little is known about how or how well this material is covered. In a study in 2002 among adolescents in eight schools in the Nawalparasi District in the Western Region of Nepal, we interviewed eight teachers responsible for teaching this subject. We also collected survey data from 451 students and held four focus group discussions with 26 of them. We found that adolescents in these schools did not appear to be getting the information they needed. Most of the teachers did not want to deal with sensitive topics and feared censure by their colleagues and society. Some lacked the skills to give such instruction. Many students also felt uncomfortable with the topics. The challenge is to strengthen sex education, make it more appropriate for the students and ensure that teachers are more comfortable and able to give instruction on the topic. PMID:17101434

  1. Inculcating safe sex attitudes in South African adolescents: a directive for the government's anti-HIV/AIDS policy.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Jayesh

    2010-01-01

    South Africa has one of the highest rates of HIV/AIDS in the world. Much blame for this has been laid on the apathy of the South African government and the cultural traits of South Africans. AIDS prevention research calls for early childhood education to raise awareness of the causes, dangers, and prevention of HIV/AIDS. This study involved surveys among a select sample of South African adolescents to determine their sexual attitudes before and after a cognitive-behavioral intervention. Overall, the results did not make a significant difference in their attitudes, suggesting pre-adolescent sex education might prove to be a more useful tool in anti-HIV/AIDS education. Risky sexual behavior, under the influence of alcohol, also serves as a warning to educate young consumers of alcohol. PMID:22192941

  2. What is talked about when parents discuss sex with children: family based sex education in Windhoek, Namibia.

    PubMed

    Nambambi, Ndishishi M; Mufune, Pempelani

    2011-12-01

    Among limits to school based sex education in Namibia are teachers that sexually harass children, unqualified Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) teachers and lack of teaching materials. Moreover out of school youths cannot access school based SRH education. Given these shortcomings, and in the context of HIV/AIDS, promoting parental-child communication about sex is an important measure to prevent HIV infections in Namibia. Parents are important because they support the emotional and physical development of children and greater parent-adolescent communication delays sexual initiation and reduces the number of sexual partners. The rationale for the paper is that there is need to know more about what parents and children discuss if the development of more effective communication about sexual issues between parents and their children as a tool for fighting HIV/AIDS is to be accomplished. Using qualitative data from Windhoek this study explored parents' communication with their children about sex. Findings indicate such discussions are traditionally seen as a taboo but nowadays they do take place (especially with mothers) around menstruation, pregnancy and HIV/AIDS. There is resistance to more specific discussions around sexual intercourse and relationships. We conclude that there is a need for parents to be taught how to educate their children on sex. PMID:22571114

  3. Sex and Urban-Rural Differences in Self-Concepts among Nigerian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezeilo, Bernice N.

    1983-01-01

    The Tennessee Self-concept Scale was administered to 200 Igbo male and female adolescents from rural and urban secondary schools in Anambra State, Nigeria. Sex differences among rural residents and rural-urban differences were found. (Author/RH)

  4. The gamesmanship of sex: a model based on African American adolescent accounts.

    PubMed

    Eyre, S L; Hoffman, V; Millstein, S G

    1998-12-01

    This article examines adolescent understanding of the social context of sexual behavior. Using grounded theory to interpret interviews with 39 African American male and female adolescents, the article builds a model of sex-related behavior as a set of interrelated games. A courtship game involves communication of sexual or romantic interest and, over time, formation of a romantic relationship. A duplicity game draws on conventions of a courtship game to trick a partner into having sex. A disclosure game spreads stories about one's own and other's sex-related activities to peers in a gossip network. Finally, a prestige game builds social reputation in the eyes of peers, typically based on gender-specific standards. The article concludes by examining the meanings that sex-related behavior may have for adolescents and the potential use of social knowledge for facilitating adolescent health. PMID:9884994

  5. [Sex education : representations of 13- to 15-year-old junior high school children and slow learners].

    PubMed

    Berger, Dominique; Rochigneux, Jean-Claude; Bernard, Sandie; Morand, Josette; Mougniotte, Alain

    2015-01-01

    In France, the National Education system has attributed an important health and sex education role to its teachers, based on a global and positive vision of sexuality Parents, teachers, public services and specialized resources each have a role to play in sex education for children and adolescents so that each young person can receive an education allowing him or her to enjoy a healthy sexuality. This study investigated the individual representations of sexuality, declared practices and knowledge of junior high schoolchildren and Section d'Enseignement G6n6ral et Professionnel Adapt6 (SEGPA) students, a structure for children with serious learning difficulties. The study methodology was based on administration of questionnaires (n = 524) to the two cohorts concerned. The secondary objective was to compare these two populations and identify the specificities of SEGPA pupils. The conclusions of this study should allow adults in charge of sex education in junior high schools and SEGPA to adapt sex education tools. PMID:26164952

  6. Sex Education in South Australia: The Past and the Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talukdar, Joy; Aspland, Tania; Datta, Poulomee

    2013-01-01

    In South Australia, sex education has been controversial since its inception. The Australasian White Cross league and the Family Planning Association of South Australia were the pioneers of sex education in South Australia. The framing of a national framework and the implementation of the SHARE (Sexual Health and Relationships Education) project…

  7. The Use and Misuse of Pleasure in Sex Education Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Sharon; Lustig, Kara; Graling, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Since Michelle Fine's writing on the missing discourse of desire in sex education, there has been considerable prompting among sexuality educators and feminist scholars to incorporate talk of pleasure into sex education curricula. While the calls for inclusion continue, few have actually examined the curricula for a pleasure discourse or…

  8. Thinking in Sex Education: Reading Prohibition through the Film "Desire"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jen

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that sex education must move beyond a focus on compliance so that we may risk the uncertain work of thinking. How might we understand the work of thinking in sex education if we begin from the assumptions that learning is conflicted, that sexuality resists being educated even as it inspires curiosity, and that the subject of sex…

  9. Single-Sex Education in Public School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford-Ferre, Heather Glynn; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2013-01-01

    Although researchers have studied the effectiveness of single-sex education (SSE), the findings have been mixed. This exploratory study reports the perceived goals and effectiveness of single-sex education based on interviews with a small group of educators involved with SSE in various ways. Research participants included a school principal and…

  10. Adolescent Sexual Health Education: Does It Work? Can It Work Better? An Analysis of Recent Research and Media Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay Alexander; Fisher, William; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Barrett, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Examines and critiques a recent research report, "Interventions to Reduce Unintended Pregnancies among Adolescents: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials" (DeCenso, Guyatt, Willan, & Griffith, 2002) and subsequent media coverage suggesting that adolescent sex education programs do not work. The paper describes evidence supporting the…

  11. The Individual Society, and Sex-Background Readings for Sex Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Carlfred B.; And Others

    This book is designed as a text primarily for college students preparing to teach sex education or "education in the nature of human sexuality and the relations between the sexes" in elementary and secondary schools. An attempt is made by the 13 writers, most of them sociologists or psychologists, to distinguish between the knowledge which the…

  12. Longitudinal Associations between Other-Sex Friendships and Substance Use in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulin, Francois; Denault, Anne-Sophie; Pedersen, Sara

    2011-01-01

    The impact of the changes in the gender composition of friendship networks during early adolescence on substance use in late adolescence was examined. The hypothesis was that initial level and increase in the proportion of other-sex friends in the network would be associated with higher levels of substance use among girls, but not among boys.…

  13. Developmental and Individual Differences in Girls' Sex-Typed Activities in Middle Childhood and Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Susan M.; Shanahan, Lilly; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Crouter, Ann C.; Booth, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Girls' time in sex-typed leisure activities was studied across 2 years in middle childhood (n=98, M=8.2 years in Year 1), early adolescence (n=106, M=11.7 years), and middle adolescence (n=86, M=14.9 years). In annual home interviews, White middle-class girls, mothers, and fathers rated their gendered attitudes, interests, and personality…

  14. Factors Associated with Sex under the Influence of Alcohol among Adolescents with Divorced Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgiles, Mireia; Carratala, Elena; Carballo, Jose L.; Piqueras, Jose A.; Espada, Jose P.

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses the association of diverse individual variables, traditionally associated with sexual risk practices in the general population, with sex under the influence of alcohol in adolescents with divorced parents. A sample of 132 adolescents provided information about their knowledge and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS and sexual risk…

  15. Sex Differences in Self-Estimation of Multiple Intelligences among Portuguese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neto, Felix; Ruiz, Fatima; Furnham, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship among sex, attitude toward intelligence, and self-estimation of multiple intelligences for self and parents among Portuguese adolescents in secondary schools. Two hundred and forty-two adolescents estimated their own and their parents' IQ scores on each of Gardner's 10 multiple intelligences: verbal…

  16. Differences in Offending Patterns between Adolescent Sex Offenders High or Low in Callous--Unemotional Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawing, Kathryn; Frick, Paul J.; Cruise, Keith R.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated whether callous and unemotional (CU) traits designated a distinct and important group of adolescent sex offender. A sample of 150 detained adolescents (mean age = 15.89, SD = 1.53) with a current sexual offense disposition was assessed with a self-report measure of CU traits and through extensive…

  17. Adolescent Callous-Unemotional Traits and Parental Knowledge as Predictors of Unprotected Sex Among Youth.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Katherine Long; Shadur, Julia Madeline; Hoffman, Elana Michelle; MacPherson, Laura; Lejuez, C W

    2016-01-01

    Risky sexual behavior among adolescents is common and results in many negative consequences. The present study investigated longitudinal predictors of adolescents' likelihood of engaging in unprotected sexual intercourse. Parental knowledge, or the extent to which parents know about their children's activities, whereabouts, and friendships, is a robust predictor of youth risk behavior, including risky sexual behavior. However, parenting practices are typically less potent as predictors of subsequent behavior among youth with high levels of callous-unemotional (CU) traits. We conducted three logistic regression models, each of which examined parental knowledge in a different way (through child report, parent report, and a discrepancy score), allowing us to examine parental knowledge, CU traits, and their interaction as predictors of adolescents' subsequent engagement in sex without a condom. Results indicated that adolescents who perceived their parents to possess greater knowledge were less likely to engage in unprotected sex. Higher parent report of parental knowledge was also related to decreased likelihood of engaging in unprotected sex, but only for adolescents with high levels of CU traits. In addition, greater discrepancy between parent and adolescent reports of parental knowledge was related to increased likelihood of engaging in unprotected sex, but only for adolescents with low levels of CU traits. Results highlight the importance of considering both parent and adolescent perceptions of parental knowledge and have important implications for prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:26584610

  18. Effect of Single-Sex Education on Progress in GCSE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malacova, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Multilevel modeling was carried out on national value-added data to study the effects of single-sex education on the progress of pupils from 2002 Key Stage 3 to 2004 GCSE. The analysis suggests that pupils in a selective environment achieve higher progress in single-sex schools; however, the advantage of single-sex schooling seems to decrease with…

  19. The role of sexually explicit material in the sexual development of same-sex-attracted Black adolescent males.

    PubMed

    Arrington-Sanders, Renata; Harper, Gary W; Morgan, Anthony; Ogunbajo, Adedotun; Trent, Maria; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2015-04-01

    Sexually explicit material (SEM) (including Internet, video, and print) may play a key role in the lives of Black same-sex sexually active youth by providing the only information to learn about sexual development. There is limited school- and/or family-based sex education to serve as models for sexual behaviors for Black youth. We describe the role SEM plays in the sexual development of a sample of Black same-sex attracted (SSA) young adolescent males ages 15-19. Adolescents recruited from clinics, social networking sites, and through snowball sampling were invited to participate in a 90-min, semi-structured qualitative interview. Most participants described using SEM prior to their first same-sex sexual experience. Participants described using SEM primarily for sexual development, including learning about sexual organs and function, the mechanics of same-gender sex, and to negotiate one's sexual identity. Secondary functions were to determine readiness for sex; to learn about sexual performance, including understanding sexual roles and responsibilities (e.g., "top" or "bottom"); to introduce sexual performance scripts; and to develop models for how sex should feel (e.g., pleasure and pain). Youth also described engaging in sexual behaviors (including condom non-use and/or swallowing ejaculate) that were modeled on SEM. Comprehensive sexuality education programs should be designed to address the unmet needs of young, Black SSA men, with explicit focus on sexual roles and behaviors that may be inaccurately portrayed and/or involve sexual risk-taking (such as unprotected anal intercourse and swallowing ejaculate) in SEM. This work also calls for development of Internet-based HIV/STI prevention strategies targeting young Black SSA men who may be accessing SEM. PMID:25677334

  20. Adolescence and Education: General Issues in the Education of Adolescents. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urdan, Tim, Ed.; Pajares, Frank, Ed.

    Noting that the period of adolescence, and the expectations of society for adolescents, have grown and changed dramatically over the last century, this book compiles chapters from leading scholars in a variety of fields related to education to provide a broad overview of several of the most pressing concerns regarding the education of adolescent…

  1. Socializing influences and the value of sex: the experience of adolescent school girls in rural Masaka, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kinsman, J; Nyanzi, S; Pool, R

    2000-01-01

    To explore the socializing influences which have shaped rural adolescent schoolgirls' views and values about sex in a high HIV prevalence area of Uganda, detailed qualitative data were obtained over a 1-year period from 15 schoolgirls aged 14-17 years. The girls were chosen for their willingness to participate actively in a series of role plays, focus group discussions, and one-to-one interviews. Results indicated that the girls have been subjected to a wide range of influences, including parents, social functions, other young children, nature, their paternal aunt, peers, school, and various media, such as pornography. Moreover, there was disagreement about the relative values of sex and virginity. Some were determined to retain their virginity but the majority felt that sex benefits them socially and personally. Notably, peer pressure was a major factor influencing the opinions of many girls, while traditional influences are in decline. Given the small sample size of the study, care should be taken in generalizing from the results. However, the data suggest that sex has a high value for at least a substantial minority of adolescent girls in rural Misaka, Uganda. Policy makers and health educators should therefore consider how best to devise safe messages about sex that are relevant and applicable to this vulnerable segment of the population. PMID:12295880

  2. Adolescents' fear of social consequences of academic success as a function of age and sex.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, F I; Chabassol, D J

    1985-02-01

    The Fear of Success Consequence Scale (FOSC) was used to assess adolescents' fears of potential social consequences of academic success in three dimensions, i.e., negative social reaction, positive peer reaction, and increased pressure and responsibility for continuous success. Subjects were 360 students in early adolescence (grades 7-9) and mid-adolescence (grades 10-12) in three urban British Columbia areas. Two hypotheses were supported: (1) that fear of academic success is higher among early adolescents than among mid-adolescents; (2) that girls generally have higher fear of academic success than do boys. Significant sex differences were found among early adolescents but not among mid-adolescents. While general sex differences were consistent with Horner's prediction, the findings of lower fear of success consequences among older adolescents than among younger ones, and the absence of significant sex difference among mid-adolescents, were contrary to Horner's prediction. Possible explanations for these findings are considered. Suggestions for further research are mentioned. PMID:24301042

  3. Variations in Patterns of Attraction to Same- and Other-Sex Peers during Early Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowski, William M.; Sippola, Lorrie K.; Newcomb, Andrew F.

    2000-01-01

    Examined differences in attraction to same- and other-sex peers as a function of sex, age, individual characteristics, and context in adolescents studied longitudinally from elementary to middle school. Found attraction to aggressive peers and to peers standing out in observable ways increased with age and upon entry to middle school, whereas…

  4. Adolescents' Lifetime Experience of Selling Sex: Development over Five Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredlund, Cecilia; Svensson, Frida; Svedin, Carl Goran; Priebe, Gisela; Wadsby, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Lifetime experience of selling sex among adolescents was investigated together with sociodemographic correlates, parent-child relationship, and the existence of people to confide in. Changes over time regarding the selling of sex were investigated through a comparison of data from 2004 and 2009. This study was carried out using 3,498 adolescents…

  5. Gender and Body Concerns in Adolescent Females: Single Sex and Coeducational School Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mensinger, Janell

    This paper involves focus group research with adolescent women from coeducational and single sex independent schools. First, it discusses research that finds girls who attend single sex institutions to be at a distinct advantage with respect to gender issues and academics. In order to obtain a better understanding of these differences, a study is…

  6. Sex Differences in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence from a Large Sample of Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandy, William; Chilvers, Rebecca; Chowdhury, Uttom; Salter, Gemma; Seigal, Anna; Skuse, David

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences have been found amongst toddlers and young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated the presence and stability of these ASD sex differences throughout childhood and adolescence. Participants (N = 325, 52 females; aged 3-18 years) consecutively received an ASD diagnosis at a clinic for assessing high-functioning…

  7. Adolescent Girls' Sex Role Development: Relationship with Sports Participation, Self-Esteem, and Age at Menarche.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Janice E.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates development of sex role orientation among adolescent girls, and explores its relationship with sports participation, self-esteem, and age at menarche. Concludes that relationship of sex role orientation with sports participation and self-esteem was not an interactive one, but was reflective of individual differences beginning in late…

  8. Associations between Sexually Experienced Adolescents' Sources of Information about Sex and Sexual Risk Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secor-Turner, Molly; Sieving, Renee E.; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Skay, Carol

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe prevalent informal sources of information about sex and examine associations between informal sources of information about sex and sexual risk outcomes among sexually experienced adolescents. Work involved the secondary analysis of data from the Minnesota Student Survey, a statewide survey to monitor…

  9. The Content and Process of Mother-Adolescent Communication about Sex in Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Dittus, Patricia; Jaccard, James; Goldberg, Vincent; Casillas, Eileen; Bouris, Alida

    2006-01-01

    Research has shown that Latino parents discuss sexual topics with their children less often than do parents from other ethnic groups; however, communication about sex in Latino families is not well understood. The present study explored the content and process of mother-adolescent communication about sex to better understand how to facilitate…

  10. A Sex-Based Examination of Violence and Aggression Perceptions among Adolescents: An Interactive Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tammy Jordan

    2010-01-01

    In this study I examine the critical factors and themes that are identified as salient influencers of overt and relational aggression among youth. Sex differences and similarities associated with such adolescent perceptions are assessed. Forty-eight ethnically diverse youth between the ages of 14 and 16 years participated in sex-specific focus…

  11. Sex Differences in the Play Configurations of Pre-Adolescents: A Replication and Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Allison Hadley

    Erikson found sex differences in the play configurations of pre-adolescents who were given a variety of toys and blocks. Wamback, Cramer and Hogan's replications of Erikson's work revealed that sex differences of this type lack sensitivity to inter-school variation among subjects, time or locality. Two possible alternatives to Erikson's hypothesis…

  12. Introduction of sex education into Nigerian schools: the parents', teachers' and students' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Orji, E O; Esimai, O A

    2003-03-01

    To assess parents', teachers' and students' knowledge of sex education and their level of acceptance of its introduction into the school curriculum in Nigeria, questionnaires were sent to teachers, students and parents of eight secondary schools located within Ile-Ife town. The responses of individual groups were collated, analysed and compared. A total of 1000 respondents (400 students, 400 parents and 200 teachers) returned the completed questionnaires. All the teachers and parents and 60% of the students had heard of sex education. A majority of the parents (92%), teachers (90%) and students (78%) supported its introduction into the school curriculum and believed that it would prevent unwanted pregnancies, enhance healthy relationships between opposite sex, prevent transmission of HIV infections and STDs, provide the knowledge of sexual interactions, consequences and responsibilities and to educate the students on the basic processes of human reproduction. One hundred and fifty-four (15.4%) of the respondents opposed the introduction of sex education because they believed that it would corrupt the students, it might lead to experimentation and that it should be the responsibility of the parents at home. Adolescent sex education should be incorporated into Nigerian schools. It is probably the most cost-effective intervention that could be made to ensure the future reproductive health of the Nigerian community. PMID:12745568

  13. Should the Sexes Be Separated for Secondary Education--Comparisons of Single-Sex and Co-Educational Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Pamela; Smithers, Alan

    1999-01-01

    English researchers compared the academic and social benefits of single sex and coeducational schools, examining test scores and interviewing 100 college students (balanced for sex and type of school) about their experiences and their ease of adjustment to higher education. Results indicated that segregating the sexes did not increase…

  14. The Law of Sex Discrimination in British Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Anwar N.

    1994-01-01

    In Great Britain, education authorities are duty-bound to ensure that facilities, benefits, and services for education are provided without sex discrimination. Explains and examines the law, particularly in relation to recent judicial developments. (41 footnotes) (MLF)

  15. Sex Education and Student Rights: Including the Missing Actor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    In the West, sex education has always been a taboo subject that continues to challenge the public schools. Drawing on recent developments in some Canadian provinces, I argue that we cannot begin to address the issue of responsible sex education until we first acknowledge that students themselves have a moral and constitutional right to this kind…

  16. The Aims of Sex Education: Demoting Autonomy and Promoting Mutuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAvoy, Paula

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, Paula McAvoy critiques a commonly held view that teaching young people to be good choice makers should be a central aim of sex education. Specifically, she argues against David Archard's recommendation that sex educators ought to focus on the development of autonomy and teaching young people that "choice should be accorded…

  17. "Sex Respect": Abstinence Education and Other Deployments for Sexual "Freedom"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Liz

    2006-01-01

    Those who view the right to a religiously neutral, empirically-based public education as fundamental have been able to do little more than watch in terror as abstinence-only sex education, which excludes information on either safe sex or birth control, has come to prevail in United States (US) schools. Among causes for concern are abstinence…

  18. Exercising Your Rights: Eliminating Sex Bias in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Patricia B.; Katrin, Susan E.

    A module on sex stereotyping and its effect on physical education is described. This unit is a part of a series of instructional modules on sex-role stereotyping in education. Designed to be used independently or to supplement an existing instructional unit, the module is composed of a 25-minute tape, five transparency masters, three handouts, and…

  19. Sex Education: New Resources Help Parents Talk with Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Virginia

    2002-01-01

    To help parents talk with children about sexual health, the Kaiser Family Foundation and National PTA developed a series of free resources for parents (e.g., the booklet "Talking with Kids: A Parent's Guide to Sex Education") to increase parent involvement and communication around sex education. This paper notes the importance of parents becoming…

  20. Sex Education in the United States: Policy and Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Health Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Examines the federal, state, and local policies that guide approaches to sex education in the United States today (comprehensive curricula versus abstinence only), examining recent research into community-level experiences and practices as well as emerging evidence about the effectiveness of different types of sex education curricula. (SM)

  1. Sex Education in Northern Ireland Schools: A Critical Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolston, Bill; Schubotz, Dirk; Simpson, Audrey

    2005-01-01

    To date there has been little research on young people and sexuality in Northern Ireland. This paper draws on the first major study in this area to analyse the delivery of formal sex education in schools. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to access young people's opinions about the quality of the sex education they had received…

  2. Abstinence-Only Sex Education: College Students' Evaluations and Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the abstinence-only sex education experiences of a small group of young adults in the southeastern USA. Most participants felt that their abstinence-only sex education had mixed value and low overall impact in their lives. Perceptions about abstinence, virginity, and marriage varied significantly from those stressed…

  3. What's Missing? Anti-Racist Sex Education!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitten, Amanda; Sethna, Christabelle

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary sexual health curricula in Canada include information about sexual diversity and queer identities, but what remains missing is any explicit discussion of anti-racist sex education. Although there exists federal and provincial support for multiculturalism and anti-racism in schools, contemporary Canadian sex education omits crucial…

  4. Sources of Sex Discrimination in Educational Systems: A Conceptual Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutner, Nancy G.; Brogan, Donna

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual model is presented relating numerous variables contributing to sexism in American education. Discrimination is viewed as intervening between two sets of interrelated independent variables and the dependent variable of sex inequalities in educational attainment. Sex-role orientation changes are the key to significant change in the…

  5. Sexuality Education for Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Breuner, Cora C; Mattson, Gerri

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this clinical report is to provide pediatricians updated research on evidence-based sexual and reproductive health education conducted since the original clinical report on the subject was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2001. Sexuality education is defined as teaching about human sexuality, including intimate relationships, human sexual anatomy, sexual reproduction, sexually transmitted infections, sexual activity, sexual orientation, gender identity, abstinence, contraception, and reproductive rights and responsibilities. Developmentally appropriate and evidence-based education about human sexuality and sexual reproduction over time provided by pediatricians, schools, other professionals, and parents is important to help children and adolescents make informed, positive, and safe choices about healthy relationships, responsible sexual activity, and their reproductive health. Sexuality education has been shown to help to prevent and reduce the risks of adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infections for children and adolescents with and without chronic health conditions and disabilities in the United States. PMID:27432844

  6. Sex Differences in Internalizing Problems During Adolescence in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Tasha M; Winter-Messiers, Mary Ann; Gibson, Brandon; Schmidt, Alexandra M; Herr, Cynthia M; Solomon, Marjorie

    2016-02-01

    We hypothesized that the double hit conferred by sex and diagnosis increases the risk for internalizing disorders in adolescent females with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In a sample of 32 adolescents with ASD and 32 controls, we examined the effects of sex, diagnostic factors, and developmental stages on depression and anxiety. A 3-way interaction revealed that females with ASD exhibited greater depressive symptoms than males with ASD and female controls particularly during early adolescence; therefore, females with ASD might have a unique combination of genetic, hormonal, and psychosocial vulnerabilities that heighten their risk for depression during early adolescence. Additionally, the ASD group reported high levels of separation anxiety and panic in late adolescence, possibly indicating atypical development of independence. PMID:26438640

  7. Adolescent Sex and Mass Media: A Developmental Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Media critics point to adolescents' exposure to "sexy" television and popular music. Developmental transitions lead to increased information seeking, and developmental tasks force adolescents to find information sources other than their parents, implying a link between sexy media and adolescent development. Media research informed by knowledge of…

  8. Queering Sex Education: Young Adult Literature with LGBT Content as Complementary Sources of Sex and Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the nature of young adult texts as complementary sources of informal queer sex and sexuality education, along with a close reading of a sample of this young adult (YA) literature. LGBT teens are often left out of discussions in sex education classrooms in the United States because of discriminatory curricula, ignorance on the…

  9. Dimensions of Mothers' and Fathers' Differential Treatment of Siblings: Links with Adolescents' Sex-Typed Personal Qualities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Corinna Jenkins; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2003-01-01

    Explores mothers' and fathers' differential treatment (PDT) of their adolescent offspring and examines how siblings' personal qualities were associated with PDT. Sex was associated with parents' differential temporal involvement. Sex-typed personal qualities were related to parents' differential discipline. Both sex and sex-typed personal…

  10. Formal and informal sex education as determinants of premarital sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Spanier, G B

    1976-01-01

    Controversies exist regarding the effects of sex education in the schools and informal sex education obtained from parents, peers, the mass media, and other sources. Similarly, there is widespread interest in premarital sexual behavior, especially its determinants. This study presents several issues reflecting these concerns which have been the subject of much speculation but which have received little attention by researchers. The purpose of this study was to investigate--through the use of respondent reports--how formal and informal sex education influences premarital sexual behavior during college. A national probability sample of 1177 college students was studied using face-to-face interviews with approximately equal numbers of males and females. These interviews, which were conducted for the Institute for Sex Research, included questions about past and present sexual involvement and other attitudinal, behavioral and background variables. Accordingly, the data about sexual behavior and attitudes are based on the interviewees' self-reports. Indices were created which operationalized independent variables such as familial sexual conservatism, exposure to eroticism, perceived sex knowledge, and sexual exposure and assault during childhood and adolescence. Individual items reflecting childhood sex play, masturbation, current religiosity, religiosity while growing up, social class, sources of sex information, sex education in classrooms, and high school and college dating were used. The dependent variable, premarital sociosexual involvement, is a composite measure of incidence and prevalence of premarital heterosexual involvement which meets Guttman scaling criteria. An Automatic Interaction Detector analysis was used to determine the relative influences of reported sexualization variables on premarital sexual behavior. Major findings can be summarized as follows: Heterosexual behavior progresses in stepwise fashion from elementary to advanced levels of involvement

  11. Prevalence and Correlates of Sex Exchange Among a Nationally Representative Sample of Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Emilio; Salazar, Marissa; Monjaras, Lidia

    2016-07-01

    The present study examines prevalence and correlates of exchanging sex for drugs, money, food shelter, or other favors (sex exchange) among a nationally representative sample of youth and young adults. Adolescents and young adults (n = 11,620, 53% female, 47% male) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were used for the current sample. Participants completed in-home interviews at both waves. Results revealed that sex exchange was reported by 4.9% (n = 569) of the population in wave 2 or wave 3, and 4.6% (n = 26) of those who exchanged sex did so at both waves. More males reported exchanging sex than females (n = 332 versus n = 237). Respondents who reported child sexual abuse were more likely to exchange sex (95% CI 2.51-4.28, p < .05) than respondents who reported any other form of child abuse. Both males and females who engaged in sex exchange were at greater risk for sexually transmitted infections; however, the odds of ever exchanging sex were highest among males who ever had gonorrhea (OR = 6.2; 95% CI 3.75-10.3). Although sex exchange has been studied extensively among homeless and runaway youth, the current study reveals sex exchange also occurs in the general population. PMID:27266400

  12. Sex differences in behavior and neural development and their role in adolescent vulnerability to substance use.

    PubMed

    Hammerslag, Lindsey R; Gulley, Joshua M

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents are especially prone to risky behavior and to the emergence of psychological disorders like substance abuse, anxiety and depression. However, there is a sex (or gender) difference in this vulnerability, with females being more prone to developing internalizing disorders and males being more likely to engage in risky behavior and drug use. While several researchers have proposed that there is a relationship between corticolimbic circuit development and adolescent vulnerability, the current proposed models do not take sex differences into account. In this review, we explore recent findings from both human and rodent studies of sex differences during adolescence. In particular, we consider epidemiological studies on the factors that contribute to the development of substance abuse and internalizing disorders, laboratory studies on reward-related and decision-making behavior, and neuroanatomical studies on the development of several structures in the corticolimbic circuit (i.e., prefrontal cortex [PFC], amygdala and striatum). We then integrate these recent findings into models of adolescent vulnerability to substance use that have previously not addressed sex differences. Lastly, we discuss methodological considerations for the interpretation and design of studies on sex (or gender) differences during adolescence while highlighting some opportunities for future investigations. PMID:25882721

  13. Parent-child Relationships, Parental Attitudes towards Sex, and Birth Outcomes among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Harville, Emily W.; Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Xie, Yiqiong

    2014-01-01

    Study objective To examine how parent-child relationships, parental control, and parental attitudes towards sex were related to pregnancy outcomes among adolescent mothers. Design Prospective cohort study. Parental report of relationship satisfaction, disapproval of adolescent having sex, discussion around sexual health, and sexual communication attitudes, and adolescent report of relationship satisfaction, parental control, and parental disapproval of sex were examined as predictors of self-reported birth outcomes. Weighted multivariable linear regression models were run incorporating interactions by race. Setting United States Participants 632 females who participated in Waves I and IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a nationally-representative sample of students enrolled in grades 7–12 in 1994–95 and followed up in 2007–2008 Main Outcome Measures birthweight and gestational age Results For Black adolescents, better parent-child relationship was associated with higher birthweight (0.14 kg, p<0.05) and gestational age (0.75 weeks, p<0.01), while higher parental disapproval of having sex (adjusted beta 0.15 kg, p<0.05) were associated with higher birthweight. For non-Black adolescents, a moderate amount of discussion of birth control was associated with higher birthweight (0.19 kg, p<0.01 and lower child-perceived parental disapproval of having sex was associated with higher birthweight (0.08 kg, p<0.05) and gestational age (0.37 weeks, p<0.05). Higher parental control was associated with a reduced likelihood of smoking during pregnancy and a greater likelihood of early prenatal care. Conclusion Parent-child relationships and attitudes about sex affect outcomes of pregnant adolescents. PMID:25023982

  14. Sex Stereotyping in Math Doesn't Add Up. Project on Sex Stereotyping in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta.

    This instructional module on sex stereotyping and its effect on mathematics education is composed of four transparency masters, two handouts, and a bibliography and is designed to accompany a 25-minute tape. The four transparencies are stereotyping sample mathematics problems, sex differences in mathematical skills, and mathematics courses and job…

  15. Teacher/Student Classroom Interaction in Vocational Education. A Sex Bias/Sex Stereotyping Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omvig, Clayton P.

    A study examined teacher-student interaction in Kentucky's secondary and postsecondary vocational education classrooms. It investigated whether sex bias or inequities were present and what might explain such differences. A literature review focused on studies conducted at different grade levels with relation to sex bias and classroom interactions.…

  16. Sex Differences in Adult Cognitive Deficits after Adolescent Nicotine Exposure in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Laura R. G.; Rowan, James D.; Bevins, Rick A.; Fountain, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether deficits in adult serial pattern learning caused by adolescent nicotine exposure persist as impairments in asymptotic performance, whether adolescent nicotine exposure differentially retards learning about pattern elements that are inconsistent with “perfect” pattern structure, and whether there are sex differences in rats’ response to adolescent nicotine exposure as assessed by a serial multiple choice task. The current study replicated the results of our initial report (Fountain, Rowan, Kelley, Willey, & Nolley, 2008) using this task by showing that adolescent nicotine exposure (1.0 mg/kg/day nicotine for 35 days) produced a specific cognitive impairment in male rats that persisted into adulthood at least a month after adolescent nicotine exposure ended. In addition, sex differences were observed even in controls, with additional evidence that adolescent nicotine exposure significantly impaired learning relative to same-sex controls for chunk boundary elements in males and for violation elements in females. All nicotine-induced impairments were overcome by additional training so that groups did not differ at asymptote. An examination of the types of errors rats made indicated that adolescent nicotine exposure slowed learning without affecting rats’ cognitive strategy in the task. This data pattern suggests that exposure to nicotine in adolescence may have impaired different aspects of adult stimulus-response discrimination learning processes in males and females, but left abstract rule learning processes relatively spared in both sexes. These effects converge with other findings in the field and reinforce the concern that adolescent nicotine exposure poses an important threat to cognitive capacity in adulthood. PMID:23673345

  17. Sex Education Representations in Spanish Combined Biology and Geology Textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Cabeza, Belén; Sánchez-Bello, Ana

    2013-07-01

    Sex education is principally dealt with as part of the combined subject of Biology and Geology in the Spanish school curriculum. Teachers of this subject are not specifically trained to teach sex education, and thus the contents of their assigned textbooks are the main source of information available to them in this field. The main goal of this study was to determine what information Biology and Geology textbooks provide with regard to sex education and the vision of sexuality they give, but above all to reveal which perspectives of sex education they legitimise and which they silence. We analysed the textbooks in question by interpreting both visual and text representations, as a means of enabling us to investigate the nature of the discourse on sex education. With this aim, we have used a qualitative methodology, based on the content analysis. The main analytical tool was an in-house grid constructed to allow us to analyse the visual and textual representations. Our analysis of the combined Biology and Geology textbooks for Secondary Year 3 revealed that there is a tendency to reproduce models of sex education that take place within a framework of the more traditional discourses. Besides, the results suggested that the most of the sample chosen for this study makes a superficial, incomplete, incorrect or biased approach to sex education.

  18. Adolescent Work, Vocational Development, and Education

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Mortimer, Jeylan T.

    2006-01-01

    This review examines contemporary issues in vocational development with emphasis on adolescents’ work experiences in social context. Attention is directed to the changing social and cultural context for vocational development, the influence of work experience on adolescent development and educational achievement, and theoretical approaches that guide contemporary studies of vocational development and career maturity. In light of the utility of current theories, new directions are suggested to enhance understanding of adolescent employment, vocational development, and educational pursuits. Social policy initiatives to promote adolescents’ exercise of agency and their vocational development are considered. PMID:17387375

  19. Neurophysiological Mechanisms of Auditory Information Processing in Adolescence: A Study on Sex Differences.

    PubMed

    Bakos, Sarolta; Töllner, Thomas; Trinkl, Monika; Landes, Iris; Bartling, Jürgen; Grossheinrich, Nicola; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Greimel, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    To date, little is known about sex differences in the neurophysiological correlates underlying auditory information processing. In the present study, auditory evoked potentials were evoked in typically developing male (n = 15) and female (n = 14) adolescents (13-18 years) during an auditory oddball task. Girls compared to boys displayed lower N100 and P300 amplitudes to targets. Larger N100 amplitudes in adolescent boys might indicate higher neural sensitivity to changes of incoming auditory information. The P300 findings point toward sex differences in auditory working memory and might suggest that adolescent boys might allocate more attentional resources when processing relevant auditory stimuli than adolescent girls. PMID:27379950

  20. Ideology and Personality: Aspects of Identity Formation in Adolescents with Strong Attitudes Toward Sex-Role Equalitarianism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Patricia Ann; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Adolescents with strong attitudes for and against the sex role ideology of the Women's Movement were administered a Q-sort to study flexibility-rigidity and independence-dependence. The results showed that beliefs in equalitarian sex role behaviors are significantly related to aspects of identity formation in white middle class adolescent boys and…

  1. Same-Sex Peer Relations and Romantic Relationships during Early Adolescence: Interactive Links to Emotional, Behavioral, and Academic Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Doyle, Anna Beth; Markiewicz, Dorothy; Bukowski, William M.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between early adolescents' involvement in romantic relationships and their emotional, behavioral, and academic adjustment, depending on same-sex peer relationships. Found a negative relationship between romantic involvement and emotional and behavioral adjustment for adolescents who were unpopular with same-sex peers.…

  2. The Effects of Pubertal Changes on Body Image and Relations with Peers of the Opposite Sex in Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Tome, H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined impact of pubertal maturation on body image and on perceived quality of relations with opposite sex peers in adolescence. Findings from 157 French adolescents aged 11 to 16 years confirmed that boys evaluated themselves on attractiveness more positively than girls. Found no sex difference on perceived physical condition. (Author/NB)

  3. Effects of a peer-led media literacy curriculum on adolescents' knowledge and attitudes toward sexual behavior and media portrayals of sex.

    PubMed

    Pinkleton, Bruce E; Austin, Erica Weintraub; Cohen, Marilyn; Chen, Yi-Chun Yvonnes; Fitzgerald, Erin

    2008-09-01

    The United States has the highest rates of teenage pregnancy and birth in the Western industrialized world, and research indicates that television and other mass media are important sources of sexual information for young people. The purpose of this study was to determine if a teen-led, media literacy curriculum focused on sexual portrayals in the media would increase adolescents' awareness of media myths concerning sex, decrease the allure of sexualized portrayals, and decrease positive expectancies for sexual activity. A posttest-only quasi-experiment with control groups was conducted at 22 school and community sites in Washington state (N = 532). The intervention, a 5-lesson media literacy curriculum targeted primarily to middle school students, encouraged sexual abstinence because of federal government funding requirements. Adolescents evaluated the program positively, with 85% rating it as better than other sex education programs. Compared to control-group participants, students were less likely to overestimate sexual activity among teens, more likely to think they could delay sexual activity, less likely to expect social benefits from sexual activity, more aware of myths about sex, and less likely to consider sexual media imagery desirable. The results showed that media literacy has promise as part of a sex education program by providing adolescents with a cognitive framework necessary to understand and resist the influence of media on their decision making concerning sex. PMID:18850393

  4. Diagnosing the Problem: Sex Stereotyping in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project on Sex Stereotyping in Education, Red Bank, NJ.

    The module described in this document is part of a series of instructional modules on sex-role stereotyping in education. This document (including all but the cassette tape) is the module that explores how sex-role stereotyping influences the referral process, testing procedures, classroom materials, and other procedures providing help for…

  5. A New Beginning: Eliminating Sex Stereotyping in Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project on Sex Stereotyping in Education, Red Bank, NJ.

    The module described in this document is part of a series of instructional modules on sex-role stereotyping in education. This document (including all but the cassette tape) is the module that examines how sex-role expectations and stereotypes can limit the development of girls and boys. Suggestions are provided for analyzing books, teaching…

  6. Pedagogic Discourse and Sex Education: Myths, Science and Subversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivinson, Gabrielle

    2007-01-01

    This paper elaborates possibilities and limitations for sex education in schools by mapping the consequence of introducing the topic "sex" within a range of scientific and informal discursive settings. The organising and regulating structures of the school maintain the boundaries between common-sense and scientific discourses. Bernstein made a…

  7. Talking with Kids: A Parent's Guide to Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National PTA, Chicago, IL.

    This guide is designed to help parents determine what is being taught to their children about sex education in school, offering tips on how to talk to children about these issues. The first section presents pointers from the "Talking with Kids" campaign: start early; initiate conversations; talk about sex and relationships; create an open…

  8. Isolation and normlessness: attitudinal comparisons of adolescent sex offenders, juvenile offenders, and nondelinquents.

    PubMed

    Miner, Michael H; Munns, Rosemary

    2005-10-01

    The authors explored attitudinal differences among adolescent male sex offenders, juvenile delinquents, and nondelinquent youth based on three variables drawn from integrated delinquency theory: conventional attitudes, normlessness, and social isolation. Consistent with previous juvenile delinquency studies, the results indicate no differences among the three groups on conventional attitudes. With respect to normlessness, both the sex offenders and juvenile delinquent groups demonstrated more school normlessness than did nondelinquent youths, and adolescent sex offenders showed greater peer normlessness than did either nondelinquent youths or juvenile delinquents. Examination of perceived social isolation among the three groups indicates that sex offenders consistently perceived themselves as more isolated than other youths with their families, in their school, and among their peers. These results suggest that interpersonal factors, in addition to a lack of social controls and normlessness, are associated with sexually inappropriate behavior. PMID:16260479

  9. An analysis of racial and sex differences for smoking among adolescents in a juvenile correctional center.

    PubMed

    Cropsey, Karen L; Linker, Julie A; Waite, Dennis E

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate racial and sex differences on the risk factors for smoking initiation and daily smoking among juvenile justice adolescents, a population that is traditionally ignored in school-based epidemiological samples. This study used archival data collected by juvenile justice authorities for a large sample of juvenile justice adolescents (N=4381), examining interaction terms to determine race and sex differences for risk factors. About 70% of juvenile justice adolescents reported ever having smoked cigarettes while almost half reported daily smoking. Overall predictors of ever and daily smoking included older age, being female, White, use of alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine in the past year, affiliation with smoking peers, not living with at least one parent, and a diagnosis of ADHD. While differences were seen between individual predictor models for both race and sex, the interaction terms did not add significantly to the overall model. These important racial and gender differences in this study suggest that tailored prevention messages and interventions may be needed to be most effective with adolescents in the juvenile justice system. While this study provides a basic foundation of risk factors for smoking among juvenile justice adolescents, future research is needed to assess the efficacy of treatment and prevention interventions with this high risk group of adolescent smokers. PMID:17869028

  10. Federal Legislation and Sex Fairness in Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieder, Corinne H.

    1978-01-01

    Passage of the Career Education Incentive Act of 1977 requires reexamination of education and training policies and programs to eliminate sex bias and stereotyping in education and occupations. Steps toward implementing the provisions of the act include improving guidance practices, changing recruitment practices and curriculum, and expanding…

  11. Adolescents' Views regarding Uses of Social Networking Websites and Text Messaging for Adolescent Sexual Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selkie, Ellen M.; Benson, Meghan; Moreno, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adolescents frequently report barriers to obtaining sexual health education. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine adolescents' views regarding how new technologies could be used for sexual health education. Methods: Focus group interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of adolescents between 14 and 19 years old.…

  12. Adolescent Perceptions of Educators with Physical Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, Marie

    2007-01-01

    This study was exploratory, addressing a topic that has not been investigated previously: the perceptions of adolescents toward educators with physical disabilities. To do so, the researcher administered a self-developed survey to a sample of 200 public high school students in Texas. Results were reported by grade level and gender. Overall the…

  13. An Innovative Approach to Sex Education in Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaisdell, Nancy L.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews a rural Washington State teacher's experience in approaching the sensitive topic of sex education. Includes advice on dealing with opposing parents, church, and school officials. The reported lesson considered the biology and reproduction of a pet boa constrictor. (TES)

  14. Sex-Affirmative Career Development Interventions in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLouglin, Mary Ellen; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The article describes two systematic college career development programs into which sex-free materials could be incorporated, two intervention strategies on career socialization issues, and three additional resources specifically focusing on women's issues in career education. (MF)

  15. Sex Differences in the Multidimensional Self-Concepts of African American Adolescents: The Mediating Role of Gender Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Nicole Renick; Zand, Debra H.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates whether the gender identities of African American adolescents mediate sex differences found in their multidimensional self-concepts. The sample included 174 African American adolescents who completed the 21-item Children's Personal Attributes Questionnaire and the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents. Results…

  16. Association of perceived parental attitudes towards premarital sex with initiation of sexual intercourse in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mónica; Ross, Inés

    2002-12-01

    To assess the association between perceived parental disapproval of premarital sex, quality of the parent-daughter relationship, and initiation of sexual intercourse, a sample of 614 economically deprived female students in Chile were tested. The perception of disapproval of premarital sex by the mother along with a good mother-daughter relationship appears to constitute a buffer against early initiation of sexual activity in adolescence. Results are consistent with findings reported in studies conducted in the USA. PMID:12530724

  17. Exploring the Context of Trafficking and Adolescent Sex Industry Involvement in Tijuana, Mexico: Consequences for HIV Risk and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Shira M.; Silverman, Jay G.; Engstrom, David; Bojorquez-Chapela, Ietza; Usita, Paula; Rolón, María Luisa; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Coerced and adolescent sex industry involvement are linked to serious health and social consequences, including enhanced risk of HIV infection. Using ethnographic fieldwork, including interviews with 30 female sex workers with a history of coerced or adolescent sex industry involvement, we describe contextual factors influencing vulnerability to coerced and adolescent sex industry entry and their impacts on HIV risk and prevention. Early gender-based violence and economic vulnerabilities perpetuated subsequent vulnerability to coercion and adolescent sex exchange, while HIV risk mitigation capacities improved with increased age, control over working conditions, and experience. Structural interventions addressing gender-based violence, economic factors, and HIV prevention among all females who exchange sex are needed. PMID:25648946

  18. Exploring the context of trafficking and adolescent sex industry involvement in Tijuana, Mexico: consequences for HIV risk and prevention.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Shira M; Silverman, Jay G; Engstrom, David; Bojorquez-Chapela, Ietza; Usita, Paula; Rolón, María Luisa; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2015-04-01

    Coerced and adolescent sex industry involvement are linked to serious health and social consequences, including enhanced risk of HIV infection. Using ethnographic fieldwork, including interviews with 30 female sex workers with a history of coerced or adolescent sex industry involvement, we describe contextual factors influencing vulnerability to coerced and adolescent sex industry entry and their impacts on HIV risk and prevention. Early gender-based violence and economic vulnerability perpetuated vulnerability to coercion and adolescent sex exchange, while HIV risk mitigation capacities improved with increased age, control over working conditions, and experience. Structural interventions addressing gender-based violence, economic factors, and HIV prevention among all females who exchange sex are needed. PMID:25648946

  19. Single-Sex Schooling and Women's Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauch, Patricia A.

    Rarely when single-sex Catholic secondary schools convert to coed school organization is the potential loss of gender-specific benefits addressed. Since the movement to coeducation is seldom accompanied by the return of a "converted" school to single-sex status, the incalculable loss to the traditional gender diversity of school organization is…

  20. Socio-cultural challenges to sexual health education for female adolescents in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Javadnoori, Mojgan; Hasanpour, Marzieh; Hazavehei, Seyyed Mohammad Mehdi; Taghipour, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite clear reasons for necessity of sexual health education for adolescents, it is a contested issue and has faced challenges in most cultures. Providing sexual education for non-married adolescents is culturally unacceptable in most Muslim societies. Objective: This qualitative study addressed socio-cultural challenges to sexual health education for female adolescents in Iran. Materials and Methods: Qualitative data from female adolescents (14-18 yr), mothers, teachers, authorities in health and education organizations, health care providers and clergies were collected in two large cities of Iran including Mashhad and Ahvaz through focus group discussions and individual in-depth interviews. Data were analyzed using conventional qualitative content analysis with MAXqda software. Results: Our results revealed that the main socio-cultural challenges to sexual health education for adolescents in Iran are affected by taboos surrounding sexuality. The emergent categories were: denial of premarital sex, social concern about negative impacts of sexual education, perceived stigma and embarrassment, reluctance to discuss sexual issues in public, sexual discussion as a socio-cultural taboo, lack of advocacy and legal support, intergenerational gap, religious uncertainties, and imitating non-Islamic patterns of education. Conclusion: It seems that cultural resistances are more important than religious prohibitions, and affect more the nature and content of sexual health education. However, despite existence of salient socio-cultural doubtful issues about sexual health education for adolescents, the emerging challenges are manageable to some extent. It is hoped that the acceptability of sexual health education for adolescents could be promoted through overcoming the cultural taboos and barriers as major obstacles. PMID:24639734

  1. Adolescent Suicide: An Educator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.

    Intended for use as part of an inservice program, this guide was designed to provide insight into adolescent suicide and to serve as a reference tool. It begins with an overview of suicide, citing society's desensitization to death, rapid changes in society, success codes, and the disappearance of the extended family as factors in the increase of…

  2. Separated by Sex: A Critical Look at Single-Sex Education for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Naval Research, Washington, DC. Naval Applications and Analysis Div.

    This report summarizes the discussion and conclusions of an educational roundtable examining the collected research on K-12 single-sex education produced over more than two decades. The one day roundtable generated many points of disagreement and several profound unanswered questions. Nonetheless, there was consensus on a series of statements.…

  3. The bumpy road to socialise nature: sex education in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huiyan

    2011-09-01

    This study was prompted by an empirical puzzle: why is sex education in schools so underdeveloped in Japan compared to many other industrialised societies? On the one hand, formal pedagogy under state policy is conservative, emphasising reproductive and prophylactic purposes rather than a comprehensive understanding of sexuality. On the other hand, however, Japan has a highly visible sexual environment where a variety of commercial sex activities are tolerated and even encouraged. The aim of the paper is to provide an integrated picture of these apparently contradictory trends by examining the nexus of political, economic and sociocultural factors that affect sex education in contemporary Japan. PMID:21787254

  4. Emergence of mixed-sex friendship groups during adolescence: Developmental associations with substance use and delinquency.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Lauren E; Gest, Scott D; Feinberg, Mark E; Osgood, D Wayne

    2014-11-01

    Prospective longitudinal data from over 14,000 youth residing in 28 communities in the rural United States were analyzed to examine the emergence of mixed-sex friendship groups in early adolescence. Youth were surveyed on 5 occasions between fall of 6th grade and spring of 9th grade. At each assessment, youth reported the names of up to 7 same-grade friends and described patterns of alcohol use, cigarette use, and delinquency. Approximately 800-900 friendship groups (M = 10.5 members) were identified at each assessment and categorized in terms of gender composition (all-girl, mostly-girl, mixed-sex, mostly-boy, all-boy). The proportion of groups categorized as mixed-sex increased with grade level (10% in 6th grade, 22% in 9th grade), but gender-homogenous groups predominated at all grade levels (76% in 6th grade, 51% in 9th grade). Mixed-sex groups were slightly larger than all-girl groups but the same size as all-boy groups. All-girl groups had the highest levels of tight-knittedness (i.e., density, reciprocity, and transitivity), with mixed-sex groups having the lowest levels and all-boy groups having intermediate levels. After controlling for demographic factors, future mixed-sex group membership was predicted by lower popularity, higher levels of delinquency, and lower levels of alcohol use; mixed-sex friendship group membership was associated with increased likelihood of cigarette use. Results are partially consistent with Dunphy's (1969) classic account of the emergence of mixed-sex groups in adolescence, but suggest that in early adolescence, mixed-sex group affiliation is significantly associated with deviant behavior and peripheral social status, not with popularity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25221839

  5. Emergence of Mixed-Sex Friendship Groups during Adolescence: Developmental Associations with Substance Use & Delinquency

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Lauren E.; Gest, Scott D.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Osgood, D. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Prospective longitudinal data from over 14,000 youth residing in 28 communities in the rural U.S. were analyzed to examine the emergence of mixed-sex friendship groups in early adolescence. Youth were surveyed on five occasions between fall of 6th grade and spring of 9th grade. At each assessment, youth reported the names of up to seven same-grade friends and described patterns of alcohol use, cigarette use and delinquency. Approximately 800 – 900 friendship groups (Mean = 10.5 members) were identified at each assessment and categorized in terms of gender composition (all-girl, mostly-girl, mixed-sex, mostly-boy, all-boy). The proportion of groups categorized as mixed-sex increased with grade level (10% in 6th grade, 22% in 9th grade), but gender-homogenous groups predominated at all grade levels (76% in 6th grade, 51% in 9th grade). Mixed-sex groups were slightly larger than all-girl groups but the same size as all-boy groups. All-girl groups had the highest levels of tightknittedness (i.e., density, reciprocity and transitivity), with mixed-sex groups having the lowest levels and all-boy groups having intermediate levels. After controlling for demographic factors, future mixed-sex group membership was predicted by lower popularity, higher levels of delinquency and lower levels of alcohol use; and mixed-sex friendship group membership was associated with increased likelihood of cigarette use. Results are partially consistent with Dunphy’s classic account of the emergence of mixed-sex groups in adolescence, but suggest that in early adolescence, mixed-sex group affiliation is significantly associated with deviant behavior and peripheral social status, not with popularity. PMID:25221839

  6. Sociocultural Contexts of Time to First Sex among Hispanic Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Dawn M.; Aneshensel, Carol S.; Mudgal, Jyoti; McNeely, Clea Sucoff

    2001-01-01

    Examines the sociocultural influences on risk of first sex among Hispanic teens living in Los Angeles County. Hispanic teens living in low-density Hispanic neighborhoods have significantly higher risk of sex than do teens living in neighborhoods with higher levels of ambient hazards. Results highlight the importance of characterizing sociocultural…

  7. Sex in Adolescence: Its Meaning and Its Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddock, James W.

    1973-01-01

    This paper proposes to examine some considerations for a revised theory of adolescent sexual expression - not to construct such a theory, but to reflect on the rationales, some available data, and some methodological considerations for such a theory. (Author)

  8. Sex Differences in the Causes of Adolescent Suicide Ideation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Ronald L.; Murphy, Phyllis I.

    1985-01-01

    A model that incorporates both socioenvironmental and psychological factors was developed in an attempt to explain adolescent suicide ideation. A sample of 407 high school students was used to test the model. (Author/LMO)

  9. Assessment of adolescents' motivation for educational attainment.

    PubMed

    Cham, Heining; Hughes, Jan N; West, Stephen G; Im, Myung Hee

    2014-06-01

    The Adolescent Motivation for Educational Attainment Questionnaire is a 32-item questionnaire (we drew 20 items from 3 subscales of the Educational Motivation Questionnaire; Murdock, 1999) that was developed to measure multiple potential dimensions of adolescents' motivation to complete high school and enroll in post-secondary education, including competence and effort beliefs; perceived value of education; and peer, teacher, and parent support for educational attainment. We assessed a multiethnic sample (N = 569) of low-achieving students who started 1st grade together in 1 urban and 2 small city school districts. Participants were assessed over 2 consecutive years (Grades 8 and 9 given prior grade retention, or Grades 9 and 10 if not retained). Exploratory factor analyses identified 4 correlated dimensions underlying the questionnaire responses. Subsequent confirmatory factor analyses provided support for a bifactor model, which includes a general factor of students' basic educational motivation, and specific factors of (a) teacher educational expectations, (b) peer aspirations, and (c) value of education. Measurement invariance of the bifactor model was established across students' gender and ethnicity (Caucasian, African American, and Hispanic) and year of testing. Criterion-related validity of the general and specific factors with students' school belonging, student-teacher warmth and conflict, disciplinary practices, letter grade, conduct problems, and behavioral engagement was examined. Practical implications of the measure are discussed. PMID:24588748

  10. Intimate Relationships among Adolescent Romantic Partners and Same-Sex Friends: Individual and Systemic Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Shmuel; Levy-Shiff, Rachel; Kedem, Peri; Alon, Eiton

    1997-01-01

    Examined adolescent intimacy in close friendships and romantic relationships from a systemic perspective. Found qualitative sex-related differences in how partners balance closeness and individuality in the two types of close friendships. Development of an intimate romantic relationship was also found to require greater commitment for males than…

  11. Antisocial Behavior, Psychopathology and Functional Impairment: Association with Sex and Age in Clinical Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Juan; Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Granero, Roser; de la Osa, Nuria

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence, degree of association and differential effect, by sex and age, of conduct disorder symptoms on psychopathology and functioning. Participants included 680 Spanish children and adolescents between 8 and 17 years and their parents, attending to psychiatric outpatient consultation. Data were obtained through…

  12. Same-Sex Attraction, Social Relationships, Psychosocial Functioning, and School Performance in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bos, Henny M. W.; Sandfort, Theo G. M.; de Bruyn, Eddy H.; Hakvoort, Esther M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined whether 13- to 15-year-old adolescents who experience feelings of same-sex attraction (SSA) differ from those without such feelings in the quality of relationships with parents, peers, and class mentors and in psychosocial functioning (health status and school performance). The authors also assessed whether differences in …

  13. Parenting Predictors of Early-Adolescents' Health Behaviors: Simultaneous Group Comparisons across Sex and Ethnic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windle, Michael; Brener, Nancy; Cuccaro, Paula; Dittus, Patricia; Kanouse, David E.; Murray, Nancy; Wallander, Jan; Schuster, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the invariance of predictive relations across early-adolescent sex and ethnic groups regarding parenting factors and externalizing and internalizing problems and victimization. Data (n = 598; 54% female) from a triethnic (Hispanic, non-Hispanic white, and non-Hispanic black) probability sample of fifth…

  14. Sex Differences in Self-Concept and Self-Esteem for Mathematically Precocious Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Carol J.

    Mathematically precocious adolescents were studied in order to identify sex differences in self-concept/self-esteem which exist at a stage when intellectual differences are emerging. Subjects were 166 males and 68 females, ages 12-15 years, enrolled in a summer residential program for talented youth. Mean SATM scores for the experimental…

  15. Single-Sex versus Coeducational Environment and Achievement in Adolescent Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaco, Nanci M.; Gaier, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that, if high school environment reduces discrepancy between conflicting roles, adolescent females may place greater emphasis on achievement. Within this context, explores differential benefits of single-sex and coeducational schooling. Issue explored is not whether one is preferable for females; rather, the concern is how each of these…

  16. Parenting, Peers, and Perceived Norms: What Predicts Attitudes toward Sex among Early Adolescents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Ronald B., Jr.; Shreffler, Karina M.; Merten, Michael J.; Schwerdtfeger Gallus, Kami L.; Dowdy, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    Although attitudes strongly predict later sexual behaviors, few studies have investigated the factors that influence early adolescent attitudes toward sex. Using a general population sample of urban seventh-grade students (N = 1,736), we examined how supportive parenting, television viewing, perceived social norms, and having a friend and/or…

  17. The Role of the Juvenile Probation Officer regarding the Adolescent Sex Offender and Related Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Herbert R.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the ethical role of the juvenile probabtion officer regarding the adolescent sex offender. Demonstrates the need for role consonant treatment models. Explores the applicability of the proffered model to other offender populations and stresses the appropriate role of the juvenile probation officer. Examines appropriate assessment of…

  18. The Effect of Adolescent Sex Offender Abuse History on Counselor Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carone, Stacia S.; LaFleur, N. Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    Examines judgment of counseling students, with history of sexual or physical abuse, about their attitudes towards counseling adolescent sex offenders. Reports sexually abused counselors desired to see physically abused offenders as clients over sexually abused offenders. Presents implications for counseling, including ways in which nonabused…

  19. Peer Victimisation and Conflict Resolution among Adolescent Girls in a Single-Sex South Australian School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Vennessa H.; Owens, Laurence D.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the peer victimisation and conflict resolution experiences of adolescent girls attending a single-sex school. A modified version of the Direct and Indirect Aggression Scales (DIAS, Bjorkqvist, Osterman, and Kaukiainen, 1992) and conflict resolution scales, drawn particularly from the work of Feldman and Gowen (1998), were…

  20. Sex Role Strain Among Kibbutz Adolescents and Adults: A Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snarey, John; And Others

    1986-01-01

    It was hypothesized that adolescent females experience greater sex role strain than other kibbutz members. Loevinger's ego development test was administered to 40 kibbutz members. The findings supported the hypothesis and showed that adult women are significantly more likely to focus their dissatisfaction in the area of actual role behavior. (JAZ)

  1. Sex Role Orientation and Dimensions of Self-Esteem Among Middle Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cate, Rodney; Sugawara, Alan

    1986-01-01

    Examines the relationship between sex role orientation and self-esteem among adolescents, using Harters (1982) Perceived Competence Scale for Children (PCSC) and the Personal Attributes Questionnaire Short Form (PAQ). Results support the masculinity model of Psychological well-being and suggest that this model is applicable to both global and…

  2. Adolescent and Young Adult Male Sex Offenders: Understanding the Role of Recidivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riser, Diana K.; Pegram, Sheri E.; Farley, Julee P.

    2013-01-01

    The current review explores the complex paths that can lead to adolescent and young adult males becoming sexually abusive. Because sexual abuse is an ongoing issue in our society that is often oversimplified, this article distinguishes between the various risk factors that predict sexually abusive behavior and types of sex offenders, particularly…

  3. Emergence of Mixed-Sex Friendship Groups during Adolescence: Developmental Associations with Substance Use and Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molloy, Lauren E.; Gest, Scott D.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Osgood, D. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Prospective longitudinal data from over 14,000 youth residing in 28 communities in the rural United States were analyzed to examine the emergence of mixed-sex friendship groups in early adolescence. Youth were surveyed on 5 occasions between fall of 6th grade and spring of 9th grade. At each assessment, youth reported the names of up to 7…

  4. Child/Adolescent Abuse and Suicidal Behavior: Are They Sex Related?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gal, Gilad; Levav, Itzhak; Gross, Raz

    2012-01-01

    The association between childhood and adolescent abuse and suicidal behavior, and the possible contribution of abuse to sex differences in non lethal suicidal behavior, was investigated. Data were extracted from the Israel-based component of the WHO World Mental Health Survey (Kessler & Utsun, 2008a). Increased risk for ideation, plan, and…

  5. When Families Present with Concerns about an Adolescent's Experience of Same-Sex Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarhouse, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the American Association for Marital and Family Therapy's Code of Ethics to explore ways in which marriage and family therapists can provide services within the framework of existing ethical principles and standards for accountability and professionalism to families with an adolescent child experiencing same-sex attraction. (Author/MKA)

  6. Adolescents' Self-Efficacy to Communicate about Sex: Its Role in Condom Attitudes, Commitment, and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L.; Kropp, Rhonda Y.; Boyer, Cherrie B.; Tschann, Jeanne M.; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined whether and how self-efficacy to communicate with parents and peers about sex relate to sexually experienced adolescent males' and females' (N = 144, 112) condom attitudes, intentions, and use. Results showed that males who reported greater self-efficacy to communicate with parents used condoms more frequently; and both males…

  7. Triple jeopardy: adolescent experiences of sex work and migration in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Busza, Joanna; Mtetwa, Sibongile; Chirawu, Petronella; Cowan, Frances

    2014-07-01

    Adolescence, migration and sex work are independent risk factors for HIV and other poor health outcomes. They are usually targeted separately with little consideration on how their intersection can enhance vulnerability. We interviewed ten women in Zimbabwe who experienced sex work and migration during adolescence, exploring implications for their health and for services to meet their needs. For most, mobility was routine throughout childhood due to family instability and political upheaval. The determinants of mobility, e.g. inability to pay school fees or desire for independence from difficult circumstances, also catalysed entry into sex work, which then led to further migration to maximise income. Respondents described their adolescence as a time of both vulnerability and opportunity, during which they developed survival skills. While these women did not fit neatly into separate risk profiles of "sex worker" "migrant" or "adolescent", the overlap of these experiences shaped their health and access to services. To address the needs of marginalised populations we must understand the intersection of multiple risks, avoiding simplified assumptions about each category. PMID:24791742

  8. Chinese Adolescents' Attitudes toward Sexual Relationships and Premarital Sex: Implications for Promoting Sexual Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Hayter, Mark; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to explore Taiwanese school students' attitudes toward sexual relationships and premarital sex. This was an exploratory descriptive, qualitative study. Focus groups (N = 8) were conducted with 47 adolescents from three high schools in Taiwan. Transcripts were transcribed and thematically analyzed using Atlas V 5.0.…

  9. Adolescents' Acceptance of Same-Sex Peers Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Staccy S.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated tenth- and twelfth-grade adolescents' (N less than or equal to 264) judgments about the acceptability of same-sex peers who varied in terms of their sexual orientation (straight, gay or lesbian) and their conformity to gender conventions or norms in regard to appearance and mannerisms or activity. Overall, the results of…

  10. The Educational Effectiveness of a Simulation/Game in Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashibuchi, Megumi; Sakamoto, Akira

    2001-01-01

    Examines the educational effectiveness of a game named POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE for sex education in a Japanese high school. Compares the effectiveness of educational videos with game conditions and discusses results that show the value of playing the game in the role of the opposite sex. (Author/LRW)

  11. Sex Matters during Adolescence: Testosterone-Related Cortical Thickness Maturation Differs between Boys and Girls

    PubMed Central

    Bramen, Jennifer E.; Hranilovich, Jennifer A.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Chen, Jessie; Rosso, Carly; Forbes, Erika E.; Dinov, Ivo D.; Worthman, Carol M.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related changes in cortical thickness have been observed during adolescence, including thinning in frontal and parietal cortices, and thickening in the lateral temporal lobes. Studies have shown sex differences in hormone-related brain maturation when boys and girls are age-matched, however, because girls mature 1–2 years earlier than boys, these sex differences could be confounded by pubertal maturation. To address puberty effects directly, this study assessed sex differences in testosterone-related cortical maturation by studying 85 boys and girls in a narrow age range and matched on sexual maturity. We expected that testosterone-by-sex interactions on cortical thickness would be observed in brain regions known from the animal literature to be high in androgen receptors. We found sex differences in associations between circulating testosterone and thickness in left inferior parietal lobule, middle temporal gyrus, calcarine sulcus, and right lingual gyrus, all regions known to be high in androgen receptors. Visual areas increased with testosterone in boys, but decreased in girls. All other regions were more impacted by testosterone levels in girls than boys. The regional pattern of sex-by-testosterone interactions may have implications for understanding sex differences in behavior and adolescent-onset neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:22479458

  12. The role of sex, self-perception, and school bonding in predicting academic achievement among middle class African American early adolescents.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Heather; Zand, Debra H; Thomson, Nicole Renick

    2009-01-01

    To date, little research has addressed within-group variables as predictors of academic achievement among middle-class African American youth. The present study helped fill this gap by investigating the role of sex, self-perceptions, and school bonding as predictors of academic success among 174 middle class early adolescent boys (n = 91) and girls residing in a large Midwestern city. Results of a path analysis indicated that gender identity fully mediated the relationship between biological sex and adolescents' perceptions of peer acceptance. Perceptions of peer acceptance were positively related to perceptions of behavior, which, in turn, were related to school bonding. School bonding was then related to academic achievement. The findings are discussed within the context of helping educators to better meet students' educational needs. PMID:20432600

  13. Boys do it the right way: sex-dependent amygdala lateralization during face processing in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S; Peters, J; Bromberg, U; Brassen, S; Menz, M M; Miedl, S F; Loth, E; Banaschewski, T; Barbot, A; Barker, G; Conrod, P J; Dalley, J W; Flor, H; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Heinz, A; Itterman, B; Mallik, C; Mann, K; Artiges, Eric; Paus, T; Poline, J-B; Rietschel, M; Reed, L; Smolka, M N; Spanagel, R; Speiser, C; Ströhle, A; Struve, M; Schumann, G; Büchel, C

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have observed a sex-dependent lateralization of amygdala activation related to emotional memory. Specifically, it was shown that the activity of the right amygdala correlates significantly stronger with memory for images judged as arousing in men than in women, and that there is a significantly stronger relationship in women than in men between activity of the left amygdala and memory for arousing images. Using a large sample of 235 male adolescents and 235 females matched for age and handedness, we investigated the sex-specific lateralization of amygdala activation during an emotional face perception fMRI task. Performing a formal sex by hemisphere analysis, we observed in males a significantly stronger right amygdala activation as compared to females. Our results indicate that adolescents display a sex-dependent lateralization of amygdala activation that is also present in basic processes of emotional perception. This finding suggests a sex-dependent development of human emotion processing and may further implicate possible etiological pathways for mental disorders most frequent in adolescent males (i.e., conduct disorder). PMID:21316467

  14. Does the Effect of Exposure to TV Sex on Adolescent Sexual Behavior Vary by Genre?

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Jeffrey A; Vaala, Sarah E; Bleakley, Amy; Hennessy, Michael; Jordan, Amy

    2013-02-01

    Using the Integrated Model of Behavioral Prediction, this study examines the effects of exposure to sexual content on television by genre, specifically looking at comedy, drama, cartoon, and reality programs, on adolescents' sex-related cognitions and behaviors. Additionally, we compared the amount and explicitness of sexual content as well as the frequency of risk and responsibility messages in these four genres. Findings show that overall exposure to sexual content on television was not related to teens' engagement in sexual intercourse the following year. When examined by genre, exposure to sexual content in comedies was positively associated while exposure to sexual content in dramas was negatively associated with attitudes regarding sex, perceived normative pressure, intentions, and engaging in sex one year later. Implications of adolescent exposure to various types of content and for using genre categories to examine exposure and effects are discussed. PMID:24187395

  15. YA Sex Guiding: A Library Imperative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Patty

    1986-01-01

    Presents excerpt from introductory chapters of author's forthcoming comprehensive sourcebook on young adult sexuality materials, "Sex Guides: Books and Films about Sexuality for Young Adults." History of sex education, social trends contributing to ambivalence in sexual attitudes, patterns of adolescent sexual activity, and sex education manuals…

  16. Open Letter to Religious Leaders about Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Sexuality Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Open Letter to Religious Leaders about Sex Education" reinforces scriptural and theological commitments to truth-telling in calling for "full and honest education about sexual and reproductive health." This "Open Letter" was published in 2002, at about the midpoint of a decade-long federal government commitment to…

  17. Queer Breeding: Historicising Popular Culture, Homosexuality and Informal Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Through an analysis of gay protest music (1975) and an educational kit for students (1978), both sponsored by the Campaign for Homosexual Equality in the UK, this paper brings into focus a history of gay rights activists' efforts to marshal popular culture in the development of informal sex education for young people in the second half of the…

  18. Use of Sexuality-Focused Entertainment Media in Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neustifter, Ruth; Blumer, Markie L. C.; O'Reilly, Jessica; Ramirez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The literature on the impact of entertainment media on sex education is typically pathology-focused, unclear regarding the effects of such usage, and void of dialogue between those who actually work in the areas of sexuality education and entertainment. To address this gap, this paper is the product of joint authorship between media figures from…

  19. How Sex Education Research Methodologies Frame GLBTIQ Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    The "bullied" gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex and otherwise Queer (GLBTIQ) student is a fairly recent figure in the sexuality education research literature. GLBTIQ students have previously been problematised by sex education research in a range of different ways and have been the subjects of varying methodological…

  20. Single-Sex Education. A Public Policy Issue. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Abbe; And Others

    This article reports a study of the public policy implications of publicly supported primary and secondary single-sex education in the United States. Twenty-two public intellectuals concerned with educational issues were interviewed. Subjects were either academic researchers, government officials and legislators, directors of public interest…

  1. Adolescents and Young Women's Use of a Microbicide Surrogate Product When Receiving Oral Sex

    PubMed Central

    Auslander, Beth; Catallozzi, Marina; Davis, Gray; Succop, Paul A.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Rosenthal, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective Genital herpes, which can be spread through oral sex, is an important target for microbicides. We examined episode-specific predictors of young women's receptive oral sex and of microbicide surrogate use. Design Longitudinal study Setting Participants were recruited to participate in a microbicide acceptability study from adolescent clinics and local colleges and through snowballing. Participants Young women (ages 14 to 21 years) who reported sexual contact on at least one weekly phone interview (n = 181) were included from the larger sample of 208 young women. Main Outcome Measures On weekly diary phone interviews, participants reported whether or not their last sexual contact included receptive oral sex and whether or not their last sexual contact included use of a microbicide surrogate. Results and Conclusions Participants reported a total of 1042 episodes of sexual contact; 311 included receptive oral sex and 354 included microbicide surrogate use. Being older, having sex for the first time with a partner, and having given oral sex were associated with having received oral sex during a sexual episode. Being older, being African American, and having discussed the microbicide surrogate with their partner were associated with having used the microbicide surrogate use during a sexual episode. These results indicate that oral sex should be considered in the design of clinical trials. Future studies need to evaluate ways to promote consistent microbicide use in the context of receiving oral sex as well as those factors (e.g., taste, pleasure) which may serve as a barrier. PMID:24315715

  2. Life Education as a Meaningful Approach to Drug Abuse Education, Sex Education, and Human Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, Douglas P.; Vick, Barbara A.

    1975-01-01

    The article describes a one-semester course divided into five major areas: communications, decision making, relationships, drug abuse, and sex education and human sexuality. Eighth grade is a crucial year in terms of students' physical and emotional growth; Life Education specifically deals with these changes, helping students cope with them.…

  3. Media and technology in adolescent sexual education and safety.

    PubMed

    Harris, Allyssa L

    2011-01-01

    Media play an important role in the lives of adolescents, providing them with opportunities for education and socialization. Media content is increasingly permeated with violence and sexual references that can be highly influential as adolescents continue the developmental process. Providing patient education is one of the cornerstones of nursing practice, and nurses are ideally suited to affect adolescent and parental education about the sexual and violent content of media. PMID:21284726

  4. Adolescent Sexual Health Education: Parents Benefit Too!

    PubMed

    Dinaj-Koci, Veronica; Deveaux, Lynette; Wang, Bo; Lunn, Sonya; Marshall, Sharon; Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-10-01

    The inclusion of parents in adolescent-targeted interventions is intended to benefit the adolescent. Limited research has explored whether parents participating in these programs also benefit directly. We examined the impact of Caribbean Informed Parents and Children Together, the parenting portion of an adolescent-targeted HIV prevention intervention, on parent-reported measures. Bahamian parent-youth dyads (N = 1,833) participating in the randomized control trial were assigned to receive one of four conditions. Parents were assessed longitudinally at baseline and 6 and 12 months later. Through 12 months follow-up, parents exposed to Caribbean Informed Parents and Children Together showed higher knowledge of condom use skills, perceptions of improved condom use competence on the part of their youth, and perceived improved parent-child communication about sex-related information. Although youth were the targeted beneficiary, parents also benefited directly from the sexual risk reduction parenting program. Parents demonstrated improved perceptions and knowledge that would enable them to more effectively guide their child and also protect themselves from sexual risk. PMID:25636315

  5. The use of the Internet by gay and bisexual male escorts: sex workers as sex educators.

    PubMed

    Parsons, J T; Koken, J A; Bimbi, D S

    2004-11-01

    While prior studies have targeted street-based male sex workers as potential vectors of disease transmission, the number of men who work independently through Internet chat-rooms and other online endeavors has steadily increased. It is likely that these men differ substantially from their street-based counterparts in terms of sexual risk behaviors with their clients. The purpose of this study was to explore the ways in which the Internet has impacted the work of male escorts and their sexual practices with clients. Semi-structured qualitative interviews and quantitative surveys were administered to 46 such men. Less than half the men reported unprotected anal sex with clients. The qualitative data lend support to this finding, in that the majority talked about refusing any unsafe sex with clients, and many reported taking the extra step of educating their clients about the dangers of risky sex. Some of the escorts described the methods used to incorporate safer sex practices into sessions with their clients. Internet-based male escorts can play an important role as potential sex educators on the front lines of the fight against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. PMID:15511734

  6. Casual Sex in Adolescence: Outcomes and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liace, Lisa K.; Nunez, Jessica B.; Luckner, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Teenage sexual activity has arguably received more attention in the national media as of late than ever before. One is inundated with information concerning everything from alarming rises in the incidence and prevalence rates of sexually transmitted infections in adolescents and young adults to the latest round of suspensions (or even arrests)…

  7. Sex Differences in the Expression of Depression in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Pierre; Joly, Elisabeth

    1988-01-01

    Examination of 249 Quebec adolescents on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) revealed in 67.8 percent of the cases that depressed males show a symptomatology characterized by irritability, work inhibition, social withdrawal and sleep disturbance. Depressed females present symptoms characterized by body image distortion, weight loss, loss of…

  8. Television and Adolescents: Sex, Drugs, Rock 'n' Roll.

    PubMed

    Strasburger

    1990-02-01

    Television and other media represent an important and widely unrecognized influence on adolescent behavior in American society. This article is a review of the major media to which teenagers are heavily exposed-television, movies, radio, print media, and pornography. The potential concerns of practitioners and parents and society as a whole are emphasized and some solutions suggested. PMID:10350708

  9. Variables Associated with Treatment Failure among Adolescent Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Brenda J.

    2005-01-01

    While an adolescent sexual offender's response to treatment is thought to be impacted by both static and dynamic factors, there is no objective method of assessing the likelihood of success or failure in treatment. The assessment of amenability to treatment is generally a subjective process completed by clinicians in the field. Using descriptive…

  10. Safety and Sex Practices among Nebraska Adolescents. Technical Report 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Ian M.; Perry-Hunnicutt, Christina

    This report describes a range of adolescent behaviors related to their safety and the safety of others. The behaviors reported here range from ordinary safety precautions such as only swimming in supervised areas and wearing helmets when riding a motorcycle to less talked about behaviors such as using condoms during sexual intercourse and carrying…

  11. Sex Differences in Adolescent Depression: Stress Exposure and Reactivity Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankin, Benjamin L.; Mermelstein, Robin; Roesch, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Stress exposure and reactivity models were examined as explanations for why girls exhibit greater levels of depressive symptoms than boys. In a multiwave, longitudinal design, adolescents' depressive symptoms, alcohol usage, and occurrence of stressors were assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months later (N=538; 54.5% female; ages 13-18, average…

  12. Student evaluation of sex education programs advocating abstinence.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J; Weed, S; Nielsen, A; Jensen, L

    1992-01-01

    This research examined the attitudes of students who were enrolled in three different sex education programs that emphasize abstinence. Data were examined to determine whether secondary school students responded positively to the programs. The programs examined were Values and Choices, Teen Aid, and Sex Respect. Results of the study indicated that all three programs were rated positively, with female, younger (junior high school age), and virgin-naive students rating the programs more highly. PMID:1621567

  13. Comprehensive Sex Education: Research and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advocates for Youth, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Since 1997 the federal government has invested more than $1.5 billion dollars in abstinence-only programs--proven ineffective programs which censor or exclude important information that could help young people protect their health. In fact, until recently, programs which met a strict abstinence-only definition were the only type of sex education…

  14. The Peer Education Approach in Adolescents- Narrative Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Fatemeh; Simbar, Masoumeh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Adolescence is an important stage of human life span, which crucial developmental processes occur. Since peers play a critical role in the psychosocial development of most adolescents, peer education is currently considered as a health promotion strategy in adolescents. Peer education is defined as a system of delivering knowledge that improves social learning and provides psychosocial support. As identifying the outcomes of different educational approaches will be beneficial in choosing the most effective programs for training adolescents, the present article reviewed the impact of the peer education approach on adolescents. In this review, databases such as PubMed, EMBASE, ISI, and Iranian databases, from 1999 to 2013, were searched using a number of keywords. Peer education is an effective tool for promoting healthy behaviors among adolescents. The development of this social process depends on the settings, context, and the values and expectations of the participants. Therefore, designing such programs requires proper preparation, training, supervision, and evaluation. PMID:26171331

  15. Sex (Education) in the City: Singapore's Sexuality Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liew, Warren Mark

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the Singapore Ministry of Education's sexuality education curriculum in relation to two leading approaches to sex education, namely, abstinence-only-until-marriage education (AOUME) and comprehensive sexuality education (CSE). Based on competing cultural, political, and religious beliefs, the arguments between the…

  16. Queers, Education Schools, and Sex Panic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rofes, Eric

    This paper examines education's role in addressing lesbian, gay, and bisexual issues, focusing on the role of graduate schools of education. It discusses the mission of schools of education and reviews points of conflict concerning the purpose of such schools. It then provides evidence of the vast array of contemporary lesbian and gay issues which…

  17. Sex differences in spatial navigation and perception in human adolescents and emerging adults

    PubMed Central

    Sneider, Jennifer Tropp; Hamilton, Derek A.; Cohen-Gilbert, Julia E.; Crowley, David J.; Rosso, Isabelle M.; Silveri, Marisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Males typically outperform females on spatial tasks, beginning early in life and continuing into adulthood. This study aimed to characterize age and sex differences in human spatial ability using a virtual Water Maze Task (vWMT), which is based on the classic Morris water maze spatial navigation task used in rodents. Performance on the vWMT and on a task assessing visuospatial perception, Mental Rotations Test (MRT), was examined in 33 adolescents and 39 emerging adults. For the vWMT, significant effects of age and sex were observed for path length in the target region (narrower spatial sampling), and heading error, with emerging adults performing better than adolescents, and an overall male advantage. For the MRT, males scored higher than females, but only in emerging adulthood. Overall, sex differences in visuospatial perception (MRT) emerge differently from those observed on a classic navigation task, with age and sex-specific superior vWMT performance likely related to the use of more efficient strategies. Importantly, these results extend the developmental timeline of spatial ability characterization to include adolescent males and females performing a virtual version of the classic vWMT. PMID:25464337

  18. Evaluating the Psychological Concomitants of Other-Sex Crush Experiences During Early Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Bowker, Julie C; Etkin, Rebecca G

    2016-05-01

    Very little empirical attention has been paid to other-sex crush experiences during adolescence. As a result, it is not known whether such experiences, which appear to be relatively common, impact psychological adjustment outcomes. This two-wave (3 month interval) longitudinal study of 268 young adolescents (48 % girls; M age at Time 1 = 11.84 years) examined the psychological concomitants of other-sex crush experiences (having and being viewed by others as a crush). Anxious-withdrawal and gender were evaluated as moderators. Peer nomination measures at Time 1 assessed both types of crush experiences and mutual friendship involvement, and participants completed self-report measures of loneliness and depressive symptoms at Times 1 and 2. The results from regression analyses revealed significant associations between having an other-sex crush and depressive symptoms at Time 1 and loneliness at Time 2, after accounting for the effects of mutual friendship. Two interaction effects also revealed that crush status was a risk factor for depressive symptoms at low levels of anxious-withdrawal but a protective factor at high levels. The findings provide the first empirical evidence that other-sex crush experiences are developmentally significant during early adolescence. PMID:26984754

  19. Sex differences in spatial navigation and perception in human adolescents and emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Sneider, Jennifer T; Hamilton, Derek A; Cohen-Gilbert, Julia E; Crowley, David J; Rosso, Isabelle M; Silveri, Marisa M

    2015-02-01

    Males typically outperform females on spatial tasks, beginning early in life and continuing into adulthood. This study aimed to characterize age and sex differences in human spatial ability using a virtual Water Maze Task (vWMT), which is based on the classic Morris water maze spatial navigation task used in rodents. Performance on the vWMT and on a task assessing visuospatial perception, Mental Rotations Test (MRT), was examined in 33 adolescents and 39 emerging adults. For the vWMT, significant effects of age and sex were observed for path length in the target region (narrower spatial sampling), and heading error, with emerging adults performing better than adolescents, and an overall male advantage. For the MRT, males scored higher than females, but only in emerging adulthood. Overall, sex differences in visuospatial perception (MRT) emerge differently from those observed on a classic navigation task, with age and sex-specific superior vWMT performance likely related to the use of more efficient strategies. Importantly, these results extend the developmental timeline of spatial ability characterization to include adolescent males and females performing a virtual version of the classic vWMT. PMID:25464337

  20. Notions of Sex, Sexuality and Relationships among Adolescent Boys in Rural Southeastern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izugbara, C. Otutubikey

    2004-01-01

    Although young people in Nigeria become sexually active at a very early age, little is known about how they view sex, sexuality, and relationships with the opposite sex. Yet knowledge of their notions and expectations regarding these issues has the potential to improve care and inform the development of sexuality education programmes. This paper…

  1. Emergence of Sex Differences in the Development of Substance Use and Abuse during Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Dr. Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Substance use and abuse begins during adolescence. Male and female adolescent humans initiate use at comparable rates, but males increase use faster. In adulthood, more men than women use and abuse addictive drugs. However, some women progress more rapidly from initiation of use to entry into treatment. In animal models, adolescent males and females consume addictive drugs similarly. However, reproductively mature females acquire self-administration faster, and in some models, escalate use more. Sex/gender differences exist in neurobiologic factors mediating both reinforcement (dopamine, opioids) and aversiveness (CRF, dynorphin), as well as intrinsic factors (personality, psychiatric co-morbidities) and extrinsic factors (history of abuse, environment especially peers and family) which influence the progression from initial use to abuse., Many of these important differences emerge during adolescence, and are moderated by sexual differentiation of the brain. Estradiol effects which enhance both dopaminergic and CRF-mediated processes contribute to the female vulnerability to substance use and abuse. Testosterone enhances impulsivity and sensation seeking in both males and females. Several protective factors in females also influence initiation and progression of substance use including hormonal changes of pregnancy as well as greater capacity for self-regulation and lower peak levels of impulsivity/sensation seeking. Same sex peers represent a risk factor more for males than females during adolescence, while romantic partners increase risk for women during this developmental epoch. In summary, biologic factors, psychiatric co-morbidities as well as personality and environment present sex/gender-specific risks as adolescents begin to initiate substance use. PMID:26049025

  2. Emergence of sex differences in the development of substance use and abuse during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Cynthia

    2015-09-01

    Substance use and abuse begin during adolescence. Male and female adolescent humans initiate use at comparable rates, but males increase use faster. In adulthood, more men than women use and abuse addictive drugs. However, some women progress more rapidly from initiation of use to entry into treatment. In animal models, adolescent males and females consume addictive drugs similarly. However, reproductively mature females acquire self-administration faster, and in some models, escalate use more. Sex/gender differences exist in neurobiologic factors mediating both reinforcement (dopamine, opioids) and aversiveness (CRF, dynorphin), as well as intrinsic factors (personality, psychiatric co-morbidities) and extrinsic factors (history of abuse, environment especially peers and family) which influence the progression from initial use to abuse. Many of these important differences emerge during adolescence, and are moderated by sexual differentiation of the brain. Estradiol effects which enhance both dopaminergic and CRF-mediated processes contribute to the female vulnerability to substance use and abuse. Testosterone enhances impulsivity and sensation seeking in both males and females. Several protective factors in females also influence initiation and progression of substance use including hormonal changes of pregnancy as well as greater capacity for self-regulation and lower peak levels of impulsivity/sensation seeking. Same sex peers represent a risk factor more for males than females during adolescence, while romantic partners increase risk for women during this developmental epoch. In summary, biologic factors, psychiatric co-morbidities as well as personality and environment present sex/gender-specific risks as adolescents begin to initiate substance use. PMID:26049025

  3. Equality in Science: Formula for Changing Sex Bias. Project on Sex Stereotyping in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta.

    This module consists of 4 handouts and 4 transparency masters to be used with a 35-minute tape on sex stereotyping and its effect on science and science education. The handouts are a list of women in modern science, a list of activities, an activity called the grading game in which students pretend they are teachers and list the names and grades…

  4. Sex Is Like Jelly Beans: Educating Students on the Risks of Oral Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Erin; Harris, Terrance

    2014-01-01

    This study provides a description of an innovative workshop that educated college students about the risks of unprotected sexual behavior, particularly oral sex, and methods of risk reduction using a metaphor of "sharing and eating jelly beans." Intervention development was guided by the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model.…

  5. Sex Ed...And the Reds? Reconsidering the Anaheim Battle over Sex Education, 1962-1969

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehlman, Natalia

    2007-01-01

    By December 1968, the Anaheim Family Life and Sex Education (FLSE) program, celebrated since its formal introduction in 1965 as one of the most progressive in the nation, was being smeared as communistic and perverse. Local activists in this Orange County city had been congregating in hotel rooms and homes, screening cautionary films for the…

  6. "Use Condoms for Safe Sex!" Youth-Led Video Making and Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Kyung-Hwa; MacEntee, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Situated at the intersection between child-led visual methods and sex education, this paper focuses on the potential of youth-led video making to enable young people to develop guiding principles to inform their own sexual behaviour. It draws on findings from a video-making project carried out with a group of South African young people, which…

  7. Sexual and Reproductive Health Knowledge, Contraception Uptake, and Factors Associated with Unmet Need for Modern Contraception among Adolescent Female Sex Workers in China

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Megan S. C.; Zhang, Xu-Dong; Kennedy, Elissa; Li, Yan; Yang, Yin; Li, Lin; Li, Yun-Xia; Temmerman, Marleen; Luchters, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Objective In China, policy and social taboo prevent unmarried adolescents from accessing sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services. Research is needed to determine the SRH needs of highly disadvantaged groups, such as adolescent female sex workers (FSWs). This study describes SRH knowledge, contraception use, pregnancy, and factors associated with unmet need for modern contraception among adolescent FSWs in Kunming, China. Methods A cross-sectional study using a one-stage cluster sampling method was employed to recruit adolescents aged 15 to 20 years, and who self-reported having received money or gifts in exchange for sex in the past 6 months. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered by trained peer educators or health workers. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to determine correlates of low knowledge and unmet need for modern contraception. Results SRH knowledge was poor among the 310 adolescents surveyed; only 39% had heard of any long-acting reversible contraception (implant, injection or IUD). Despite 98% reporting not wanting to get pregnant, just 43% reported consistent condom use and 28% currently used another form of modern contraception. Unmet need for modern contraception was found in 35% of adolescents, and was associated with having a current non-paying partner, regular alcohol use, and having poorer SRH knowledge. Past abortion was common (136, 44%). In the past year, 76% had reported a contraception consultation but only 27% reported ever receiving SRH information from a health service. Conclusions This study demonstrated a low level of SRH knowledge, a high unmet need for modern contraception and a high prevalence of unintended pregnancy among adolescent FSWs in Kunming. Most girls relied on condoms, emergency contraception, or traditional methods, putting them at risk of unwanted pregnancy. This study identifies an urgent need for Chinese adolescent FSWs to be able to access quality SRH information and effective modern

  8. Sexual selection and sex differences in the prevalence of childhood externalizing and adolescent internalizing disorders.

    PubMed

    Martel, Michelle M

    2013-11-01

    Despite the well-established sex difference in prevalence of many childhood and adolescent psychopathological conditions, no integrative metatheory of sex differences in psychopathology exists. This review attempts to provide a metatheoretical framework to guide empirical examination of sex differences in prevalence of childhood-onset "externalizing" and adolescent-onset "internalizing" disorders, based on sexual selection evolutionary theory. Sexual selection theory suggests important between-sex differences in markers, mechanisms, etiology, and developmental timing of risk and resilience relevant to psychopathology. Namely, sexual selection theory hypothesizes that disinhibition and sensation-seeking may be important proximate risk markers for childhood-onset externalizing disorders in males. The theory suggests that these male-biased markers may be a product of their higher exposure to prenatal testosterone, which makes them more susceptible to prenatal stressors with downstream effects on dopaminergic neurotransmission, especially for those with genetic alleles associated with lower dopaminergic function. In contrast, sexual selection theory hypothesizes that negative emotionality, empathy, and cognitive rumination may be important proximate risk markers for adolescent-onset internalizing disorders in females. The theory suggests that these markers are propagated by rapidly rising levels of estradiol at puberty that interact with cortisol and oxytocin. These hormones exert downstream effects on the serotonergic system in such a way as to increase females' sensitivity to interpersonal stressors particularly at puberty and especially for those with lower functional serotonergic activity. Such a metatheory can help integrate prior ideas about sex differences and can also generate new predictions of sex differences in markers, etiology, mechanisms, and developmental timing of common forms of psychopathology. PMID:23627633

  9. Sex, violence, & rock n' roll: Longitudinal effects of music on aggression, sex, and prosocial behavior during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Sarah M; Padilla-Walker, Laura M

    2015-06-01

    The current study examined longitudinal associations between listening to aggression, sex, and prosocial behavior in music on a number of behavioral outcomes across a one-year period during adolescence. Adolescents (N = 548, M age = 15.32, 52% female) completed a number of questionnaires on musical preferences, general media use, aggression, sexual outcomes, and prosocial behavior at two different time points separated by about one year. Using structural equation modeling to analyze the data, results revealed that listening to aggression in music was associated with increased aggression and decreased prosocial behavior over time, even when controlling for initial levels of these behaviors. Listening to sexual content in music was associated with earlier initiation of sexual intercourse and a trend for a higher number of sexual partners (reported at Time 2). Prosocial behavior in music was not associated with any behavioral outcome longitudinally. Collectively, these results suggest that listening to certain types of content in music can have a longitudinal effect on behavior during adolescence. PMID:25828552

  10. Social Phobia and Educational and Interpersonal Impairments in Adolescence: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Ranta, Klaus; La Greca, Annette M; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Marttunen, Mauri

    2016-08-01

    We examined longitudinal associations between social phobia (SP) and educational and interpersonal impairments among Finnish adolescents. Participants were 3278 adolescents (9th grade; M age = 15.5 years) who completed measures of SP and depressive symptoms; 2070 participated in follow-up two years later. Indicators for educational and interpersonal functioning were assessed for each sex separately. Multivariate analyses, controlling for depression and relevant socioeconomic covariates, indicated that for boys, age 15 SP predicted slow academic progression, being without a close friend or not having a romantic relationship, and poor support from friends and significant others at age 17. However, for girls, age 15 SP only predicted not having been involved in a romantic relationship by age 17. In conclusion, we found striking sex differences for adolescent SP as a predictor for subsequent educational and interpersonal impairments in late adolescence. SP may have a more devastating effect on boys' social and academic functioning relative to that of girls. PMID:26514560

  11. Welfare, Liberty, and Security for All? U.S. Sex Education Policy and the 1996 Title V Section 510 of the Social Security Act.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Justin E; Hawkins, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    When adolescents delay (meaning they wait until after middle school) engaging in sexual intercourse, they use condoms at higher rates and have fewer sexual partners than those who have sex earlier, thus resulting in a lower risk for unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. The 1996 Section 510 of Title V of the Social Security Act (often referred to as A-H) is a policy that promotes abstinence-only-until-marriage education (AOE) within public schools. Using Stone's (2012) policy analysis framework, this article explores how A-H limits welfare, liberty, and security among adolescents due to the poor empirical outcomes of AOE policy. We recommend incorporating theory-informed comprehensive sex education in addition to theory-informed abstinence education that utilizes Fishbein and Ajzen's (2010) reasoned action model within schools in order to begin to address adolescent welfare, liberty, and security. PMID:27098762

  12. Cultural, religious and socio-economic factors affecting sex education in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Koral, S

    1991-05-01

    Although professional pressure groups attempted to address the need for formal sex education in the 1970's, the Family Planning Association of Turkey (FPAT) has successfully introduced sex education subjects into school programs. It has also been endorsed as a major resource by the Ministry of Health; however, the Ministry of Education has been backsliding recently on sex education and in general has not generated zealous supporters of sex education. Different attitudes and practices prevail. Sex education is not usually discussed in the home, but there is support for sex education in schools. Its importance is recognized. Turkish society tends to be conservative particularly among middle socioeconomic stratum. Upper classes tend to be more liberal, and lower classes perceive sexuality as the normal way of life. The term sex is associated with eroticism, sex education as sex techniques; so sexuality must fall within the confines of health education. Within the Muslim faith, views on sex support discussion of sexual issues with couples, for example, or among students of Islamic jurisprudence. According to Quaranic teachings, women have a right to a sex life, including divorce options if sexuality is not fulfilled. Misinterpretations of Quaranic teachings have hindered the effort to plan an appropriate sex education program. Islamic values are liberal in their support for family planning. The FPAT's objective is to change the image of sex education and eliminate the fear that established values will be challenged by sex education. PMID:12343170

  13. Sex Differences in Educational Aspirations and Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Margaret Mooney; Greenberger, Ellen

    1978-01-01

    Goals for educational attainment were studied in eleventh grade students. The males aspired to and expected higher levels of attainment. At higher aspiration levels, the discrepancy between aspiration and expectation was greater for females. Both socioeconomic background and academic ability had a greater effect on educational ambition for males.…

  14. Drinking, smoking, and educational achievement: Cross-lagged associations from adolescence to adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Latvala, Antti; Rose, Richard J.; Pulkkinen, Lea; Dick, Danielle M.; Korhonen, Tellervo; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Background Adolescent substance use is associated with lower educational achievement but the directionality of the association remains uncertain. We analyzed data on drinking, smoking and educational achievement to study the associations between substance use and education from early adolescence to young adulthood. Methods Longitudinal data from four time points (ages 12, 14, 17, and 19-27 years) from a population-based cohort study of Finnish twin individuals were used to estimate bivariate cross-lagged path models for substance use and educational achievement, adjusting for sex, parental covariates, and adolescent externalizing behavior. A total of 4,761 individuals (49.4% females) were included in the analyses. Educational achievement was assessed with teacher-reported grade point average at ages 12 and 14, and with self-reported student status and completed education at age 17 and in young adulthood. From self-reported questionnaire items, frequency of any drinking, frequency of drinking to intoxication, any smoking and daily smoking were analyzed. Results Alcohol use and smoking behaviors at ages 12 and 14 predicted lower educational achievement at later time points even after previous achievement and confounding factors were taken into account. Lower school achievement in adolescence predicted a higher likelihood of engaging in smoking behaviors but did not predict later alcohol use. Higher educational attainment at age 17 predicted more frequent drinking in young adulthood. Conclusions Adolescent drinking behaviors are associated with lower future educational achievement independently of prior achievement, whereas smoking both predicts and is predicted by lower achievement. Early substance use indexes elevated risk for poor educational outcomes. PMID:24548801

  15. Sex education is key to combatting AIDS in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Csillag, C

    1999-06-26

    About 60,000 children in Brazil were born from an AIDS-affected mother, and 16,000 were orphaned by AIDS. These stark figures were released by the Global Orphan Project and the Instituto Promundo at the EducAids conference. About 90% of childhood AIDS cases were a result of perinatal exposure, and the other 10% from unknown exposure. In response to these prevalences, the EducAids initiative, which aims to promote AIDS education in schools, was considering sex education for preschool children. The coordinator of the government's AIDS prevention program, Pedro Chequer, believes sex education for children as young as 4 years old would reduce AIDS among teenagers and help avoid unwanted pregnancies. The Minister of Health supported this concept. Jose Serra, the Minister of Health declared that it was not the aim of the ministry to avoid teenage pregnancy but to prevent early sexual intercourse. In 1997 the number of deliveries by girls aged 15-19 years had risen to 25.27%, from 21.41% in 1993. However, the number of deliveries for women over age 20 are falling. Pedro Chequer, EducAids coordinator, stated that despite these facts, campaigns for sex education would be opposed by the Roman Catholic Church. PMID:10392998

  16. Adolescent perceptions of indirect forms of relational aggression: sex of perpetrator effects.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Sarah M; Archer, John; Eslea, Mike; Liechty, Toni

    2008-01-01

    Different types of aggressive behavior (both physical and relational) by boys and girls have been shown to be perceived differently by observers. However, most research has focused on adult perceptions of very young children, with little research examining other ages. The aim of this study is to establish any sex differences in adolescent perceptions of indirect forms of relational aggression enacted by boys and girls. One hundred and sixty adolescents were shown one of the two videos involving relational aggression and completed a questionnaire that assessed their perceptions of the aggression. The videos were identical except for the sex of the aggressor and the victim; one condition portrayed boy-to-boy aggression, the other showed girl-to-girl aggression. Results indicated that participants viewed boy-to-boy relational aggression as more justified. This study revealed that stereotypes about aggressive boys are perpetuated even when the aggression is a type that is not commonly associated with boys. PMID:18481272

  17. Relationship Education with Adolescent Parents: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toews, Michelle; Yazedjian, Ani

    2009-01-01

    In 1988, the Texas Legislature established a pilot program for pregnant and parenting adolescents (Texas Education Agency, n.d.). This program was developed with the goal of enabling adolescent parents to become self-sufficient, responsible, job-oriented citizens. Although the program is not mandated by the state, Pregnancy, Education, and…

  18. Evaluation of an Educational Program for Adolescents with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Jill; Tichacek, Mary J.; Theodorakis, Renee

    2004-01-01

    In addition to challenges of adolescence itself, teens with asthma face demands of asthma management and risks of asthma sequelae, including fatalities. Few asthma educational programs specifically address their needs. In response to school nurse concern, this pilot study evaluated an adolescent asthma education program, the "Power Breathing[TM]…

  19. Relationships between Adolescent Sexual Outcomes and Exposure to Sex in Media: Robustness to Propensity-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Rebecca L.; Martino, Steven C.; Elliott, Marc N.; Miu, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent sexual health is a substantial problem in the United States, and two recent studies have linked adolescent sexual behavior and/or outcomes to youths' exposure to sex in the media. Both studies had longitudinal survey designs and used covariate-adjusted regression analysis. Steinberg and Monahan (2011) reanalyzed data from one of these…

  20. Why Can't We Just Talk about It?: An Observational Study of Parents' and Adolescents' Conversations about Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afifi, Tamara D.; Joseph, Andrea; Aldeis, Desiree

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how parents and adolescents talk about sex with each other and how that influences their anxiety and avoidance tendencies. When parents were receptive, informal, and composed during the conversations, their adolescents were less anxious and, in turn, were less avoidant. The child's perception of the parent's communication…

  1. Perceived Support from Adults, Interactions with Police, and Adolescents' Depressive Symptomology: An Examination of Sex, Race, and Social Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tummala-Narra, Pratyusha; Sathasivam-Rueckert, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Several risk factors, including female sex, racial minority status, and family poverty, have been implicated in adolescents' depression. The present study focused on the role of one specific aspect of adolescents' ecological context, interactions with adults, in depressive symptomology. We examined the relationship between perceived support from…

  2. Change in Adolescents' Internalizing Symptomatology as a Function of Sex and the Timing of Maternal Depressive Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jennifer M.; Curwen, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    The change in internalizing symptoms from late childhood or age of 10 into mid-adolescence or age of 15 was studied taking into consideration the role of a child's sex, maternal depressive symptoms in late childhood and their interactions. Results indicate that internalizing symptoms in girls increased from childhood to adolescence whereas those…

  3. Practice of martial arts and bone mineral density in adolescents of both sexes

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Igor Hideki; Mantovani, Alessandra Madia; Agostinete, Ricardo Ribeiro; Costa, Paulo; Zanuto, Edner Fernando; Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; Ribeiro, Luis Pedro; Fernandes, Rômulo Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between martial arts practice (judo, karate and kung-fu) and bone mineral density in adolescents. Methods: The study was composed of 138 (48 martial arts practitioners and 90 non-practitioners) adolescents of both sexes, with an average age of 12.6 years. Bone mineral density was measured using Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry in arms, legs, spine, trunk, pelvis and total. Weekly training load and previous time of engagement in the sport modality were reported by the coach. Partial correlation tested the association between weekly training load and bone mineral density, controlled by sex, chronological age, previous practice and somatic maturation. Analysis of covariance was used to compare bone mineral density values according to control and martial arts groups, controlled by sex, chronological age, previous practice and somatic maturation. Significant relationships between bone mineral density and muscle mass were inserted into a multivariate model and the slopes of the models were compared using the Student t test (control versus martial art). Results: Adolescents engaged in judo practice presented higher values of bone mineral density than the control individuals (p-value=0.042; Medium Effect size [Eta-squared=0.063]), while the relationship between quantity of weekly training and bone mineral density was significant among adolescents engaged in judo (arms [r=0.308] and legs [r=0.223]) and kung-fu (arms [r=0.248] and spine [r=0.228]). Conclusions: Different modalities of martial arts are related to higher bone mineral density in different body regions among adolescents. PMID:27017002

  4. Resisting the "Condom Every Time for Anal Sex" Health Education Message

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jeffery; Neville, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ensuring men who have sex with men (MSM) adopt and maintain condom use for anal sex is a challenging health education goal. In order to inform the development of social marketing practices to encourage safe-sex practices, the views of MSM about a key HIV health education message ("using a condom every time for anal sex") were sought.…

  5. The Condom Works in All Situations? Paradoxical Messages in Mainstream Sex Education in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolander, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The condom plays a vital part in safe sex, the ideal outcome of mainstream Swedish sex education. As researchers have pointed out, however, the condom is not a neutral object; rather, it plays a part in shaping, in different ways, both sexual practices and the idea of what sex is. This paper focuses on sex education television programmes produced…

  6. Gender and ethnic differences in body image and opposite sex figure preferences of rural adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jones, LaShanda R; Fries, Elizabeth; Danish, Steven J

    2007-03-01

    This study examined whether rural adolescents would report gender and ethnic differences in body image similar to those that have been observed in urban samples. Data were analyzed for 384 rural adolescents (57% African American, 43% Caucasian, mean age 13 years) to determine gender and ethnic differences in body dissatisfaction, body size discrepancy, and current and ideal figure ratings. Females wanted to be smaller and reported more body dissatisfaction than did males. Caucasian females reported the most body dissatisfaction. African Americans reported larger current and ideal figure ratings than did Caucasians. African Americans preferred larger opposite sex figures than did Caucasians. Both African American and Caucasian males selected a larger female figure as ideal than was selected by females. Results demonstrated that gender and ethnic differences exist in body image for rural adolescents. This frequently overlooked population may benefit from further study. Implications of findings and limitations of the study are also discussed. PMID:18089257

  7. Sex education mandates: are they the answer?

    PubMed

    Muraskin, L D

    1986-01-01

    This article examines the question of mandating family life education in schools. Findings are presented of a recent study on the implementation of New Jersey's family life education requirement, (proposed by the State Board of Education and Education Department) which, in its original form in 1979, required that 31 specific topics be addressed by the end of high school; (e.g. human reproduction, child abuse and assault, and others). Intense pressure from conservative activist groups, education associations fearing a threat to local control of curricula, and important elements of the press, caused a change in the language of the draft regulation to be much less specific. In 5 school districts selected, the norm was conformity to the very broad mandates simply by verifying that certain topics were touched on in courses already offered in the curriculum. Teachers did not seem motivated to give out more than simple correct information on human reproduction, and family life education is commonly discussed in a limited way as part of health education. Beyond more emphasis being placed on the topic of child abuse in elementary schools, little structural change took place in curricula, and there was little actual training of staff. In a 6th district (chosen on the basis of prior knowledge about its program), specific teacher training and curriculum development were evident. It is proposed that information connected with reproduction be regared as something students have a right to know, and that family life education be designed with this goal in mind, and not with the idea of making a political staement, or with the strategy of politically dangerous mandates. PMID:3792530

  8. Sex Education in Spain: Teachers' Views of Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Jose L.; Carcedo, Rodrigo J.; Fuertes, Antonio; Vicario-Molina, Isabel; Fernandez-Fuertes, Andres A.; Orgaz, Begona

    2012-01-01

    This paper offers an overview of the current state, difficulties, limitations and future possibilities for sex education in Spain. On the basis of a study involving 3760 teachers from all provinces in Spain, a detailed analysis of the obstacles at legislative, school and teacher levels was developed. Significant weaknesses were found at each of…

  9. Picturing Sex Education: Notes on the Politics of Visual Stratification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Diederik F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the scarcity of research on depictions and layout in sex education materials. It is argued that pictures and layout can inform an analysis of social stratification based on visual access. This process of social organization is located using four theoretical models. However these models do not lend themselves to a close reading…

  10. Teaching Skills and Personal Characteristics of Sex Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmerman, Greetje

    2009-01-01

    This article examines relationships between various dimensions of teachers' professionalism, that is, pedagogical content knowledge and personal characteristics. Using Shulman's notion of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) we explored the practical knowledge of twenty sex education teachers using in-depth interviews. It appeared that both core…

  11. Sex Education in Bermuda: Curriculum Development and Community Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, June Dobbs

    1976-01-01

    Deal with one instance in which the Government of Bermuda sought to effect social change. Discusses the author's experiences in introducing a sex education program there as well as the implications of that program's development for five social problems, which Bermuda faces in its struggle to maintain economic survival. (RK)

  12. Business as Usual: Sex Stereotyping in Business Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project on Sex Stereotyping in Education, Red Bank, NJ.

    The module described in this document is part of a series of instructional modules on sex-role stereotyping in education. This document (including all but the cassette tape) is the module that explores the myths and stereotypes that have limited women in the world of work. The material provides suggestions for helping students expand occupational…

  13. Sex Education for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingraham, Cynthia L.; Vernon, McCay; Clemente, Brenda; Olney, Linda

    2000-01-01

    This article describes a model sex education program developed for youths and adults who are deafblind by the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults. In addition, it also discusses major related issues and presents general recommendations and a resource for further information. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/CR)

  14. Impact of Sex Education in Kogi State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sule, H. A.; Akor, J. A.; Toluhi, O. J.; Suleiman, R. O.; Akpihi, L.; Ali, O. U.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate the impact of family sex education in secondary schools on students in Kogi State, Nigeria. The descriptive survey design was used for the study. A total of 1,960 secondary school students were drawn by stratified random sampling from 40 schools within Kogi State, Nigeria. Three research questions were…

  15. Sex, Science and Educational Research: The Unholy Trinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronach, Ian; Frankham, Jo; Stark, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the state's contemporary construction of "sex" as an educational problem in England. It does so by interrogating the notion of the "pregnant teenager" as it is semantically and statistically constructed in accountability discourses, as well as research constrained within them. It then examines certain features of an exemplary…

  16. Life Science Teachers' Decision Making on Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Puneet Singh

    2013-01-01

    The desires of young people and especially young bodies are constructed at the intersections of policies that set the parameters of sex education policies, the embodied experiences of students in classrooms, and the way bodies are discussed in the complex language of science. Moreover, more research points to the lack of scientifically and…

  17. Introduction of Sex Education: An American School in Tunisia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Elisabeth E.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction of a sex education course into a private American school in Tunisia. The steps involved in the development of the project and curriculum are recorded. The impact of the project on receptive Tunisian authorities and its influence on change are discussed. (Author)

  18. BDSM Disclosure and Stigma Management: Identifying Opportunities for Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezreh, Tanya; Weinberg, Thomas S.; Edgar, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    While participation in the activities like bondage, domination, submission/sadism, masochism that fall under the umbrella term BDSM is widespread, stigma surrounding BDSM poses risks to practitioners who wish to disclose their interest. We examined risk factors involved with disclosure to posit how sex education might diffuse stigma and warn of…

  19. A Sex Education Program in a Therapeutic Pre-School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Lucile M.; And Others

    Described is a sex education program for preschool children with emotional and learning problems in a therapeutic center. It is explained that the "Baby Week" method combines experimental and didactic learninq sequences geared to the developmental needs of this age group. The setting, planning, and organization of the program are discussed, and…

  20. Context and "Contextualisation" in Sex and Relationships Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Claire

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to contribute to growing efforts to "contextualise" young people's experiences of sexual and intimate relationships in research and sex and relationships education (SRE). The study reports on which explored factors young people identified as influencing their relationships--in the past, present and future.…

  1. Sex differences in yohimbine-induced increases in the reinforcing efficacy of nicotine in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Sophia; Zou, Sheng; Coen, Kathleen; Funk, Douglas; Shram, Megan J; Lê, A D

    2014-03-01

    Stress is an important factor in the initiation and maintenance of smoking in adolescents. Women are more vulnerable to the development of addiction to smoking and have more difficulty quitting than men. Women also showe enhanced responses to stress. Despite these differences, no work has been done examining the effects of stress on the reinforcing efficacy of self-administered nicotine in adolescent rats, or if there are sex differences. Male and female adolescent Long Evans rats were trained to self-administer one of three different intravenous doses of nicotine (7.5, 15, 30 μg/kg/infusion) first on fixed ratio, and then on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule beginning on postnatal day 33. The effect of the pharmacological stressor yohimbine (0.3, 0.6 mg/kg, i.p.) on the reinforcing efficacy of nicotine was then determined using the PR schedule. Yohimbine stimulated nicotine intake and increased PR breakpoints and numbers of infusions received in both male and female adolescent rats. The infusion dose of nicotine was positively associated with yohimbine-induced increases in responding. Female rats showed significantly increased breakpoints at yohimbine doses and nicotine infusion doses at which males did not. The effects of the pharmacological stressor, yohimbine on the reinforcing efficacy of nicotine are therefore linked to sex and nicotine infusion dose. Female rats are more sensitive to stress-induced potentiation of nicotine self-administration. PMID:22784103

  2. Age- and sex-related variations in vocal-tract morphology and voice acoustics during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Markova, Diana; Richer, Louis; Pangelinan, Melissa; Schwartz, Deborah H; Leonard, Gabriel; Perron, Michel; Pike, G Bruce; Veillette, Suzanne; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    Distinct differences in the human voice emerge during adolescence, with males producing deeper and more resonant voices than females by the end of sexual maturation. Using magnetic resonance images of heads and voice recordings obtained in 532 typically developing adolescents, we investigate what might be the drivers of this change in voice, and the subjective judgment of the voice "maleness" and "femaleness". We show clear sex differences in the morphology of voice-related structures during adolescence, with males displaying strong associations between age (and puberty) and both vocal-fold and vocal-tract length; this was not the case in female adolescents. At the same time, males (compared with females) display stronger associations between age (and puberty) with both fundamental frequency and formant position. In males, vocal morphology was a mediator in the relationship between bioavailable testosterone and acoustic indices. Subjective judgment of the voice sex could be predicted by the morphological and acoustic parameters in males only: the length of vocal folds and its acoustic counterpart, fundamental frequency, is a larger predictor of subjective "maleness" of a voice than vocal-tract length and formant position. PMID:27062936

  3. Parent–Adolescent Relationship Education (PARE): Program Delivery to Reduce Risks for Adolescent Pregnancy and STDs

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Regina P.; Chan, Wenyaw; Roberts-Gray, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    The first author recruited parent–adolescent dyads (N = 192) into after-school prevention education groups at middle schools in southeast Texas. This author placed participants in either (1) an Interactive Program (IP) in which they role-played, practiced resistance skills, and held parent–child discussions or (2) an Attention Control Program (ACP) that used the same curriculum but was delivered in a traditional, didactic format. Questionnaires administered at the beginning and end of the 4-session program and again after booster sessions in 3 subsequent semesters provided measures of social controls (eg, communication with parents) and self controls (eg, protection against risk) on the youths' sexual health behaviors. Linear mixed models adjusted for gender, age, and ethnicity showed that the IP, in comparison with the ACP, achieved significant gains in social control by increasing parental rules about having sex and other risky behaviors and also enhanced students' self-control by increasing their knowledge about prevention and enhancing resistance responses when pressured to have sex. PMID:18316271

  4. Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Banu; Winters, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a circulating glycoprotein that transports testosterone and other steroids in the blood. Interest in SHBG has escalated in recent years because of its inverse association with obesity and insulin resistance, and because many studies have linked lower circulating levels of SHBG to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, and early puberty. The purpose of this review is to summarize molecular, clinical, endocrine, and epidemiological findings to illustrate how measurement of plasma SHBG may be useful in clinical medicine in children. PMID:26761949

  5. Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Banu; Winters, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a circulating glycoprotein that transports testosterone and other steroids in the blood. Interest in SHBG has escalated in recent years because of its inverse association with obesity and insulin resistance, and because many studies have linked lower circulating levels of SHBG to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, and early puberty. The purpose of this review is to summarize molecular, clinical, endocrine, and epidemiological findings to illustrate how measurement of plasma SHBG may be useful in clinical medicine in children. PMID:26761949

  6. Ethnic Identity, Neighborhood Risk, and Adolescent Drug and Sex Attitudes and Refusal Efficacy: The Urban African American Girls' Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corneille, Maya A.; Belgrave, Faye Z.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of ethnic identity and neighborhood risk on drug and sex attitudes and refusal efficacy among early adolescent urban African American females (n = 175). The model also predicted a moderating relationship of ethnic identity on neighborhood risk for drug and sex attitudes and refusal efficacy. Data were collected as…

  7. The Influence of Sex on the Course and Psychiatric Correlates of ADHD from Childhood to Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monuteaux, Michael C.; Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the influence of sex on the course of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its comorbid psychiatric conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of sex on the course and psychiatric correlates of ADHD from childhood into adolescence. Methods: Two identically designed,…

  8. Sex differences in intelligence. Implications for education.

    PubMed

    Halpern, D F

    1997-10-01

    Sex differences in intelligence is among the most politically volatile topics in contemporary psychology. Although no single finding has unanimous support, conclusions from multiple studies suggest that females, on average, score higher on tasks that require rapid access to and use of phonological and semantic information in long-term memory, production and comprehension of complex prose, fine motor skills, and perceptual speed. Males, on average, score higher on tasks that require transformations in visual-spatial working memory, motor skills involved in aiming, spatiotemporal responding, and fluid reasoning, especially in abstract mathematical and scientific domains. Males, however, are also over-represented in the low-ability end of several distributions, including mental retardation, attention disorders, dyslexia, stuttering, and delayed speech. A psychobiosocial model that is based on the inextricable links between the biological bases of intelligence and environmental events is proposed as an alternative to nature-nurture dichotomies. Societal implications and applications to teaching and learning are suggested. PMID:9329293

  9. The Transition to Adulthood: Sex Differences in Educational Attainment and Age at Marriage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Margaret Mooney

    1978-01-01

    Educational attainment is the most important variable mediating the transition to adulthood for both sexes. However, the relationship between educational attainment and the timing of entry into family roles differs for the two sexes. (Author/AM)

  10. Understanding links between adolescent health and educational attainment.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Margot I

    2009-11-01

    The educational and economic consequences of poor health during childhood and adolescence have become increasingly clear, with a resurgence of evidence leading researchers to reconsider the potentially significant contribution of early-life health to population welfare both within and across generations. Meaningful relationships between early-life health and educational attainment raise important questions about how health may influence educational success in young adulthood and beyond, as well as for whom its influence is strongest. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, I examine how adolescents'health and social status act together to create educational disparities in young adulthood, focusing on two questions in particular. First, does the link between adolescent health and educational attainment vary across socioeconomic and racial/ethnic groups? Second, what academic factors explain the connection between adolescent health and educational attainment? The findings suggest that poorer health in adolescence is strongly negatively related to educational attainment, net of both observed confounders and unobserved, time-invariant characteristics within households. The reduction in attainment is particularly large for non-Hispanic white adolescents, suggesting that the negative educational consequences of poor health are not limited to only the most socially disadvantaged adolescents. Finally, I find that the link between adolescent health and educational attainment is explained by academic factors related to educational participation and, most importantly, academic performance, rather than by reduced educational expectations. These findings add complexity to our understanding of how the educational consequences of poor health apply across the social hierarchy, as well as why poor health may lead adolescents to complete less schooling. PMID:20084824

  11. Beyond Same-Sex Attraction: Gender-Variant-Based Victimization Is Associated with Suicidal Behavior and Substance Use for Other-Sex Attracted Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ioerger, Michael; Henry, Kimberly L; Chen, Peter Y; Cigularov, Konstantin P; Tomazic, Rocco G

    2015-01-01

    Gender-variant-based victimization is victimization based on the way others perceive an individual to convey masculine, feminine, and androgynous characteristics through their appearance, mannerisms, and behaviors. Previous work identifies gender-variant-based victimization as a risk factor for health-risking outcomes among same-sex attracted youths. The current study seeks to examine this relationship among other-sex attracted youths and same-sex attracted youth, and determine if gender-variant-based victimization is similarly or differentially associated with poor outcomes between these two groups. Anonymous data from a school-based survey of 2,438 racially diverse middle and high school students in the Eastern U.S. was examined. For other-sex attracted adolescents, gender-variant-based victimization was associated with a higher odds of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, regular use of cigarettes, and drug use. When compared to same-sex attracted adolescents, the harmful relationship between gender-variant-based victimization and each of these outcomes was similar in nature. These findings suggest that gender-variant-based victimization has potentially serious implications for the psychological wellbeing and substance use of other-sex attracted adolescents, not just same-sex attracted adolescents, supporting the need to address gender expression as a basis for victimization separate from sexuality- or gender-minority status. The impact that gender-variant-based victimization has on all adolescents should not be overlooked in research and interventions aimed at addressing sexual orientation-based and gender-variant-based victimization, substance use, and suicide prevention. PMID:26068796

  12. Beyond Same-Sex Attraction: Gender-Variant-Based Victimization Is Associated with Suicidal Behavior and Substance Use for Other-Sex Attracted Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peter Y.; Cigularov, Konstantin P.; Tomazic, Rocco G.

    2015-01-01

    Gender-variant-based victimization is victimization based on the way others perceive an individual to convey masculine, feminine, and androgynous characteristics through their appearance, mannerisms, and behaviors. Previous work identifies gender-variant-based victimization as a risk factor for health-risking outcomes among same-sex attracted youths. The current study seeks to examine this relationship among other-sex attracted youths and same-sex attracted youth, and determine if gender-variant-based victimization is similarly or differentially associated with poor outcomes between these two groups. Anonymous data from a school-based survey of 2,438 racially diverse middle and high school students in the Eastern U.S. was examined. For other-sex attracted adolescents, gender-variant-based victimization was associated with a higher odds of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, regular use of cigarettes, and drug use. When compared to same-sex attracted adolescents, the harmful relationship between gender-variant-based victimization and each of these outcomes was similar in nature. These findings suggest that gender-variant-based victimization has potentially serious implications for the psychological wellbeing and substance use of other-sex attracted adolescents, not just same-sex attracted adolescents, supporting the need to address gender expression as a basis for victimization separate from sexuality- or gender-minority status. The impact that gender-variant-based victimization has on all adolescents should not be overlooked in research and interventions aimed at addressing sexual orientation-based and gender-variant-based victimization, substance use, and suicide prevention. PMID:26068796

  13. Adolescent pregnancy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Clear, specific information about sexual behavior and its consequences is frequently not provided to adolescents by their families, schools and communities. The "sex education" that many receive comes from misinformed or uninformed peers.

  14. Ethnic and Sex Differences in Visceral, Subcutaneous, and Total Body Fat in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Staiano, A. E.; Broyles, S. T.; Gupta, A. K.; Katzmarzyk, P. T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study investigated ethnic and sex differences in the distribution of fat during childhood and adolescence. Design and Methods A cross-sectional sample (n=382), aged 5 to 18 years, included African American males (n=84), White males (n=96), African American females (n=118), and White females (n=84). Measures for total body fat (TBF) mass and abdominal adipose tissue (total volume and L4–L5 cross-sectional area) for both subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral (VAT) depots were assessed by DXA and MRI, respectively. ANCOVAs were used to determine ethnic and sex differences in TBF (adjusted for age) and ethnic and sex differences in SAT and VAT (adjusted for both age and TBF). Results Age-adjusted TBF was greater in African Americans (p=0.017) and females (p<0.0001) compared to Whites and males, respectively. In age- and TBF-adjusted ANCOVAs, no differences were found in the SAT. The VAT volume was, however, greater in Whites (p<0.0001) and males (p<0.0001) compared to African Americans and females, respectively. Similar patterns were observed in SAT and VAT area at L4–L5. Conclusions The demonstrated ethnic and sex differences are important confounders in the prevalence of obesity and in the assignment of disease risk in children and adolescents. PMID:23670982

  15. Does the Effect of Exposure to TV Sex on Adolescent Sexual Behavior Vary by Genre?

    PubMed Central

    Gottfried, Jeffrey A.; Vaala, Sarah E.; Bleakley, Amy; Hennessy, Michael; Jordan, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Using the Integrated Model of Behavioral Prediction, this study examines the effects of exposure to sexual content on television by genre, specifically looking at comedy, drama, cartoon, and reality programs, on adolescents’ sex-related cognitions and behaviors. Additionally, we compared the amount and explicitness of sexual content as well as the frequency of risk and responsibility messages in these four genres. Findings show that overall exposure to sexual content on television was not related to teens’ engagement in sexual intercourse the following year. When examined by genre, exposure to sexual content in comedies was positively associated while exposure to sexual content in dramas was negatively associated with attitudes regarding sex, perceived normative pressure, intentions, and engaging in sex one year later. Implications of adolescent exposure to various types of content and for using genre categories to examine exposure and effects are discussed. PMID:24187395

  16. Do adolescent child abusers, peer abusers, and non-sex offenders have different personality profiles?

    PubMed

    Glowacz, Fabienne; Born, Michel

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify two sub-populations of sex offenders based on the age of the victims and on the age difference between the abuser and the victim (child sexual abusers vs. peer sexual abusers), and to compare the personality characteristics of these two subgroups with those of juvenile non-sex offenders. The group was composed of 67 adolescent offenders aged 13-18 years who were adjudicated for sexual offenses or non-sexual offenses: 20 non-sex offenders (JNSOs), 26 child sexual abusers (CAs), and 21 peer sexual abusers (PAs). The Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) was administered to all participants. The mean scores and clinical cutoffs on the MACI scales were compared across the three samples. Compared with PAs, CAs were more submissive and conforming, and they experienced more anxious feelings. Peer sexual abusers scored higher on the unruly and forceful personality scales, on social insensitivity, and on delinquent predisposition. Peer sexual abusers also reported higher scores on substance-abuse proneness, impulsive propensities, and antisocial functioning than CAs, but their scores were similar to those of JNSOs. Our results show clear similarities between PAs and JNSOs in terms of personality and clinical characteristics, especially with regard to antisocial personality traits. Child sexual abusers did not display the personality characteristics typical of PAs and JNSOs which predisposed them to delinquent activities. These results raise questions as to whether juvenile sex offenders should be treated within the same institutions as non-sex offenders and whether the same treatment programs should be implemented for all types of juvenile sex offenders. PMID:23064997

  17. Sex Education in Modern and Contemporary China: Interrupted Debates across the Last Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aresu, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Since the late 1980s sex education has been widely promoted in the PRC, but this is not the first time in China's modern history that attempts to develop sex education have been made. The present essay traces the development of sex education debates over the last century, identifying the historical, political and social contexts in which they…

  18. Pupils' Perceptions of Sex and Reproductive Health Education in Primary Schools in Tanzania: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapinga, Orestes Silverius; Hyera, Daniel Frans

    2015-01-01

    This study explored pupils' perceptions of sex and reproductive health education in primary schools in Tanzania. Specifically, the study aimed at (i) exploring pupils' views on sex and reproductive health education in primary schools; (ii) determining opinions on the appropriateness of sex and reproductive health education for pupils in primary…

  19. Sex-Education Needs and Interests of High School Students in a Rural New York County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Naomi; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Administered sex-education quiz to 163 rural area high school students who also described their sexual and contraceptive experiences and sex-education interests. Most (57 percent) wanted to learn more about contraceptives and venereal disease prevention, either as primary focus of sex-education curriculum or combined with topics of sexual values,…

  20. Consequences of a Recent Campaign of Criticism against School Sex Education in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insights into recent events concerning school sex education in Japan. A campaign of criticism against school sex education emerged in 2002 at both national and regional levels, and included a court case in Tokyo. Despite leaving a depressing atmosphere regarding sex education teaching practices, this campaign also…

  1. Validity of a Scale to Measure Teachers' Attitudes towards Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Almeida Reis, Maria Helena; Vilar, Duarte Goncalo Rei

    2006-01-01

    Despite the current legislation requiring sex education as part of the school curriculum in Portugal, great obstacles to its implementation remain. Furthermore, sex education is far from being systematically administered. Thus, the main interest in our project was to validate a scale that measures teachers' attitudes towards sex education. There…

  2. The Salience and Utility of School Sex Education to Young Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buston, Katie; Wight, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on young men's views on the school sex education they have received, the influence of this sex education on their intended or actual behaviour, and the extent to which other sources of information complement or supplement school sex education. Thirty-five in-depth interviews and eight group discussions were conducted with male…

  3. Life science teachers' decision making on sex education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Puneet Singh

    The desires of young people and especially young bodies are constructed at the intersections of policies that set the parameters of sex education policies, the embodied experiences of students in classrooms, and the way bodies are discussed in the complex language of science. Moreover, more research points to the lack of scientifically and medically accurate information about sex education. Through this research, I hope to extend the discussion about sex education to life science classrooms, where youth can discuss how sex occurs according to scientific concepts and processes. However, science classrooms are caught in a double bind: They maintain positivist methods of teaching science while paying little attention to the nature of science or the nature and function of science that offer explanations of scientific phenomena. In this study, I describe how science teachers made decisions about what to include or not include about sexuality in a life science classroom and the discursive frameworks that shaped these decisions. I also analyzed the ways that these relationships functioned to produce certain truths, or discourses. The current trends in research concerning SSI are pointing to understanding how controversial issues are framed according to personal philosophies, identities, and teaching approaches. If we can understand science teachers' inner aspects as they relate to sexuality education, we can also understand the deep-seeded motivations behind how these specific issues are being taught. In science classrooms where a discussion of the body is part of the curriculum, specific discourses of the body and sex/sexuality are excluded. In this study, I describe how science teachers made decisions about what to include or not include about sexuality in a life science classroom and the discursive practices that shaped these decisions.

  4. Sex, temperament, and family context: how the interaction of early factors differentially predict adolescent alcohol use and are mediated by proximal adolescent factors.

    PubMed

    Burk, Linnea R; Armstrong, Jeffrey M; Goldsmith, H Hill; Klein, Marjorie H; Strauman, Timothy J; Costanzo, Phillip; Essex, Marilyn J

    2011-03-01

    Adolescent alcohol use is common and has serious immediate and long-term ramifications. While concurrent individual and context factors are robustly associated with adolescent alcohol use, the influence of early childhood factors, particularly in interaction with child sex, are less clear. Using a prospective community sample of 362 (190 girls), this study investigated sex differences in the joint influence of distal childhood and proximal adolescent factors on Grade 10 alcohol use. All risk factors and two-way early individual-by-context interactions, and interactions of each of these with child sex, were entered into the initial regression. Significant sex interactions prompted the use of separate models for girls and boys. In addition to the identification of early (family socioeconomic status, authoritative parenting style) and proximal adolescent (mental health symptoms, deviant friends) risk factors for both girls and boys, results highlighted important sex differences. In particular, girls with higher alcohol consumption at Grade 10 were distinguished by the interaction of early temperamental disinhibition and exposure to parental stress; boys with higher alcohol consumption at Grade 10 were distinguished primarily by early temperamental negative affect. Results have implications for the timing and type of interventions offered to adolescents. PMID:21443307

  5. Implementation of The World Starts With Me, a comprehensive rights-based sex education programme in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Rijsdijk, Liesbeth E; Bos, Arjan E R; Lie, Rico; Leerlooijer, Joanne N; Eiling, Ellen; Atema, Vera; Gebhardt, Winifred A; Ruiter, Robert A C

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a process evaluation of the implementation of the sex education programme the World Starts With Me (WSWM) for secondary school students in Uganda. The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to examine factors associated with dose delivered (number of lessons implemented) and fidelity of implementation (implementation according to the manual), as well as to identify the main barriers and facilitators of implementation. Teachers' confidence in teaching WSWM was negatively associated with dose delivered. Confidence in educating and discussing sexuality issues in class was positively associated with fidelity of implementation, whereas the importance teachers attached to open sex education showed a negative association with fidelity. Main barriers for implementing WSWM were lack of time, unavailability of computers, lack of student manuals and lack of financial support and rewards. Other barriers for successful implementation were related to high turnover of staff and insufficient training and guidance of teachers. Teachers' beliefs/attitudes towards sexuality of adolescents, condom use and sex education were found to be important socio-cognitive factors intervening with full fidelity of implementation. These findings can be used to improve the intervention implementation and to better plan for large-scale dissemination of school-based sex education programmes in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24441513

  6. Nigerian secondary school adolescents' perspective on abstinence-only sexual education as an effective tool for promotion of sexual health.

    PubMed

    Inyang, Mfrekemfon P; Inyang, Obonganyie P

    2013-01-01

    The success of any type of sexual education programme depends on the knowledge and preparedness for practice by adolescents. A recent study has found that an 'abstinence-only' sexual education programme is effective in reducing sexual activity among adolescents. Knowledge of abstinence-only sexual education and preparedness for practice as an effective tool for promotion of sexual health among Nigerian secondary school adolescents was studied. An analytic descriptive survey design was used for the study. The research population comprised of all public secondary schools in three southern geopolitical zones of the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. A multistage sampling technique was used to select 2020 senior secondary school (SS1-SS3) students as sample for the study. A partially self-designed and partially adapted questionnaire from an 'abstinence-only versus comprehensive sex education' debate, from debatepedia (http://wiki.idebate.org/), entitled 'Questionnaire on Nigerian Secondary School Adolescents' Perspective on Abstinence-Only Sexual Education (QNSSAPAOSE)' was used in eliciting information from respondents. Hypotheses were formulated and tested. Frequency counts, percentage and Pearson Product Moment Correlation were used in analysing data. A greater proportion of secondary school adolescents in this study lacked knowledge of sexual education. About 80% of the respondents could not define sexual education. The general perspective on abstinence-only sexual education was negative, as revealed by the larger number of respondents who demonstrated unwillingness to practice abstinence-only sexual education. Specifically, of those who responded in favour of abstinence-only sexual education, the youngest group of adolescents (11-13 years) and the male respondents were more likely to accept this type of education than the other groups. Poor knowledge of sexual education could be responsible for unwillingness to practice abstinence-only sexual education. Sexual

  7. Understanding Links Between Adolescent Health and Educational Attainment

    PubMed Central

    JACKSON, MARGOT I.

    2009-01-01

    The educational and economic consequences of poor health during childhood and adolescence have become increasingly clear, with a resurgence of evidence leading researchers to reconsider the potentially significant contribution of early-life health to population welfare both within and across generations. Meaningful relationships between early-life health and educational attainment raise important questions about how health may influence educational success in young adulthood and beyond, as well as for whom its influence is strongest. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, I examine how adolescents’ health and social status act together to create educational disparities in young adulthood, focusing on two questions in particular. First, does the link between adolescent health and educational attainment vary across socioeconomic and racial/ethnic groups? Second, what academic factors explain the connection between adolescent health and educational attainment? The findings suggest that poorer health in adolescence is strongly negatively related to educational attainment, net of both observed confounders and unobserved, time-invariant characteristics within households. The reduction in attainment is particularly large for non-Hispanic white adolescents, suggesting that the negative educational consequences of poor health are not limited to only the most socially disadvantaged adolescents. Finally, I find that the link between adolescent health and educational attainment is explained by academic factors related to educational participation and, most importantly, academic performance, rather than by reduced educational expectations. These findings add complexity to our understanding of how the educational consequences of poor health apply across the social hierarchy, as well as why poor health may lead adolescents to complete less schooling. PMID:20084824

  8. The emergence of sex differences in personality traits in early adolescence: A cross-sectional, cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    De Bolle, Marleen; De Fruyt, Filip; McCrae, Robert R; Löckenhoff, Corinna E; Costa, Paul T; Aguilar-Vafaie, Maria E; Ahn, Chang-kyu; Ahn, Hyun-nie; Alcalay, Lidia; Allik, Jüri; Avdeyeva, Tatyana V; Bratko, Denis; Brunner-Sciarra, Marina; Cain, Thomas R; Chan, Wayne; Chittcharat, Niyada; Crawford, Jarret T; Fehr, Ryan; Ficková, Emília; Gelfand, Michele J; Graf, Sylvie; Gülgöz, Sami; Hřebíčková, Martina; Jussim, Lee; Klinkosz, Waldemar; Knežević, Goran; Leibovich de Figueroa, Nora; Lima, Margarida P; Martin, Thomas A; Marušić, Iris; Mastor, Khairul Anwar; Nakazato, Katsuharu; Nansubuga, Florence; Porrata, Jose; Purić, Danka; Realo, Anu; Reátegui, Norma; Rolland, Jean-Pierre; Schmidt, Vanina; Sekowski, Andrzej; Shakespeare-Finch, Jane; Shimonaka, Yoshiko; Simonetti, Franco; Siuta, Jerzy; Szmigielska, Barbara; Vanno, Vitanya; Wang, Lei; Yik, Michelle; Terracciano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Although large international studies have found consistent patterns of sex differences in personality traits among adults (i.e., women scoring higher on most facets), less is known about cross-cultural sex differences in adolescent personality and the role of culture and age in shaping them. The present study examines the NEO Personality Inventory-3 (McCrae, Costa, & Martin, 2005) informant ratings of adolescents from 23 cultures (N = 4,850), and investigates culture and age as sources of variability in sex differences of adolescents' personality. The effect for Neuroticism (with females scoring higher than males) begins to take on its adult form around age 14. Girls score higher on Openness to Experience and Conscientiousness at all ages between 12 and 17 years. A more complex pattern emerges for Extraversion and Agreeableness, although by age 17, sex differences for these traits are highly similar to those observed in adulthood. Cross-sectional data suggest that (a) with advancing age, sex differences found in adolescents increasingly converge toward adult patterns with respect to both direction and magnitude; (b) girls display sex-typed personality traits at an earlier age than boys; and (c) the emergence of sex differences was similar across cultures. Practical implications of the present findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25603371

  9. Association between maternal education and objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sherar, Lauren B; Griffin, Tom P; Ekelund, Ulf; Cooper, Ashley R; Esliger, Dale W; van Sluijs, Esther M F; Bo Andersen, Lars; Cardon, Greet; Davey, Rachel; Froberg, Karsten; Hallal, Pedro C; Janz, Kathleen F; Kordas, Katarzyna; Kriemler, Susi; Pate, Russell R; Puder, Jardena J; Sardinha, Luis B; Timperio, Anna F; Page, Angie S

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigating socioeconomic variation in physical activity (PA) and sedentary time is important as it may represent a pathway by which socioeconomic position (SEP) leads to ill health. Findings on the association between children's SEP and objectively assessed PA and/or sedentary time are mixed, and few studies have included international samples. Objective Examine the associations between maternal education and adolescent's objectively assessed PA and sedentary time. Methods This is an observational study of 12 770 adolescents (10–18 years) pooled from 10 studies from Europe, Australia, Brazil and the USA. Original PA data were collected between 1997 and 2009. The associations between maternal education and accelerometer variables were examined using robust multivariable regression, adjusted for a priori confounders (ie, body mass index, monitor wear time, season, age and sex) and regression coefficients combined across studies using random effects meta-analyses. Analyses were conducted in March 2014. Results Adolescents of university educated mothers spent more time sedentary (9.5 min/day, p=0.005) and less time in light activity (10 min/day, p<0.001) compared with adolescents of high school educated mothers. Pooled analysis across two studies from Brazil and Portugal (analysed separately because of the different coding of maternal education) showed that children of higher educated mothers (tertiary vs primary/secondary) spent less time in moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (6.6 min/day, p=0.001) and in light PA (39.2 min/day: p<0.001), and more time sedentary (45.9 min/day, p<0.001). Conclusions Across a number of international samples, adolescents of mothers with lower education may not be at a disadvantage in terms of overall objectively measured PA. PMID:26802168

  10. The influence of sex steroids on structural brain maturation in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Koolschijn, P Cédric M P; Peper, Jiska S; Crone, Eveline A

    2014-01-01

    Puberty reflects a period of hormonal changes, physical maturation and structural brain reorganization. However, little attention has been paid to what extent sex steroids and pituitary hormones are associated with the refinement of brain maturation across adolescent development. Here we used high-resolution structural MRI scans from 215 typically developing individuals between ages 8-25, to examine the association between cortical thickness, surface area and (sub)cortical brain volumes with luteinizing hormone, testosterone and estradiol, and pubertal stage based on self-reports. Our results indicate sex-specific differences in testosterone related influences on gray matter volumes of the anterior cingulate cortex after controlling for age effects. No significant associations between subcortical structures and sex hormones were found. Pubertal stage was not a stronger predictor than chronological age for brain anatomical differences. Our findings indicate that sex steroids are associated with cerebral gray matter morphology in a sex specific manner. These hormonal and morphological differences may explain in part differences in brain development between boys and girls. PMID:24416184

  11. Sex education and rehabilitation with schizophrenic male outpatients.

    PubMed

    Lukoff, D; Gioia-Hasick, D; Sullivan, G; Golden, J S; Nuechterlein, K H

    1986-01-01

    Research indicates that schizophrenic patients lack intimate relationships and show a high rate of sexual dysfunction. Despite increasing awareness of the rights of handicapped persons to sexual expression, the treatment of schizophrenic patients rarely addresses their sexuality. A sex education program for recent-onset male schizophrenic patients attending an outpatient clinic was developed in response to several incidents involving patients' inappropriate sexual behaviors. To enhance our understanding of the current sexual functioning and needs of these patients, sex histories were taken. Almost all of the 16 patients interviewed were sexually active, with autoerotic activity predominating. Sixty-three percent of the patients reported orgasmic and/or erectile dysfunctions. Other studies have linked sexual dysfunction to the side effects of antipsychotic medications. The objectives of the sex education program were: to provide information; to clarify values; to overcome sexual dysfunction; and to enhance intimacy skills. The authors used role playing, modeling, group exercises, and explicit sex therapy audiovisual material to improve patients' intimacy skills. Patients participated actively and used the group to explore sexual issues. No exacerbations of symptoms were observed among patients participating in the program. PMID:3027886

  12. Beyond Controversies: Sexuality Education for Adolescents in India

    PubMed Central

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Clark, Jeffrey; Kumar, Raman

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality education for adolescents is one of the most controversial topics in the field of child health. In the past decade, policymakers in India have also struggled with the issue and there has been greater public discourse. However, policymaking and public discussions on adolescent sexuality education are frequently fueled by religious, social, and cultural values, while receiving scant scientific attention. To meet the needs of an expanding young population in India, scientific evidence for best practices must be kept at the core of policymaking in the context of sexuality education for adolescents. PMID:25374847

  13. Sex Roles and Soap Operas: What Adolescents Learn about Single Motherhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Mary Strom

    1996-01-01

    Investigated the contribution of daytime television soap operas to the perception of the roles of single mothers. Findings reveal there is a perception that single mothers have good jobs, are well educated, are not poverty prone, have healthy babies, and have men friends who provide their children with love. The problem of adolescents and gender…

  14. Sex, Drugs, and Catholic Schools: Private Schooling and Non-Market Adolescent Behaviors. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figlio, David; Ludwig, Jens

    This paper examines the effects of private schooling on adolescent nonmarket behaviors. Differences between private- and public-school students were controlled by making use of the rich set of covariates available with the Nation Education Longitudinal Survey (NELS) microdataset. An instrumental-variables strategy was also employed that exploits…

  15. Teens could get new message on waiting for sex. Sex education.

    PubMed

    1997-04-21

    It's best to wait until you are older to have sex. But if you decide to have intercourse, use a condom. We'll show you how. That's the message most New Jersey teens get in their sex education classes. It's the law. But a new source of federal funding could help advocates of "abstinence-only" education find a way around that requirement. The state Department of Health and Senior Services is considering whether to apply for federal money limited to programs teaching teens that abstinence is the only certain way to prevent pregnancy and avoid contracting sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. The federally funded programs also would have to teach that sex before marriage is morally wrong. About $50 million for these abstinence-only programs was quietly tucked into the welfare bill that President Clinton signed into law in 1996. New Jersey is eligible to receive $843,000. The health department is hearing from people on both sides of the issue, said Celeste Wood, who plans to submit a report to Health Commissioner Len Fishman by the end of the month. Fishman will then decide whether New Jersey should apply for the money, she said. Historically, debate between "comprehensive" and "abstinence-only" sex education has centered around the classroom and education department. Comprehensive programs teach both abstinence and contraception. Abstinence-only programs prohibit discussion of contraception. Comprehensive education advocates have won that battle in New Jersey public schools. The state's core curriculum standards currently call for schools to teach teens about both abstinence and contraception. But the new federal money is being funneled through state health departments. "This skates around the schools by bringing the money in through the public health arena," said Daniel Daley, director of public policy for the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the US. "They are trying to influence community-based programs and make an end-run around the schools

  16. Effect of Age, Sex, and Race Distance on Front Crawl Stroke Parameters in Subelite Adolescent Swimmers During Competition.

    PubMed

    Dormehl, Shilo J; Osborough, Conor D

    2015-08-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effect of age, sex and race distance on velocity (v), stroke rate (SR), stroke length (SL) and stroke index (SI) of subelite adolescent swimmers in competition, and to investigate their pacing strategies during the 100-m and 200-m events. Video footage of 112 adolescent swimmers (56 female; 56 male), competing in the 100-m and 200-m freestyle events, in two age groups (12-14; 15-18 years) was recorded and subsequently analyzed. A MANOVA showed that all stroke parameters significantly differed between sexes and between race distances. The older adolescents had a higher v, a longer SL and a greater SI (p < .01) than the younger adolescents. There were significant interaction effects between age and sex for v, SL and SI. Most adolescents had a SL that was within 7% of that reported for 1992 Olympians, but had up to 16% lower SRs. Separate Friedman's ANOVAs showed that SL differed between successive race quarters for both age groups, both sexes and both race distances. It is likely that physical immaturity, inexperience in competition pacing and within-race fatigue strongly influence the performances of subelite adolescent front crawl swimmers. PMID:25902554

  17. Background for Community Level Work on Educational Adjustment in Adolescence: Reviewing the Literature on Contributing Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redd, Zakia; Brooks, Jennifer; McGarvey, Ayelish M.

    Given the importance of adolescents' educational adjustment, a key question for those concerned with improving adolescent functioning is what can be done to increase adolescents' levels of educational functioning. This review addresses a number of broad facets of adolescents' educational functioning, including those in the psychological…

  18. Later Education Start Times in Adolescence: Time for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Paul; Lee, Clark

    2015-01-01

    School start times for adolescents in the United States are typically too early to be healthy for this age group. There is significant evidence from the research literature that early starts have serious negative impacts on students. In particular, early education start times in adolescence cause chronic sleep deprivation, which damages both…

  19. An educational program enhances food label understanding of young adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While much research has focused on intake and eating behaviors of young adolescents, few studies have examined their knowledge of the Nutrition Facts label. The goals of this project were to assess the understanding of Nutrition Facts labels and the response of young adolescents to an educational pr...

  20. Family Dynamics, Supportive Relationships, and Educational Resilience During Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosnoe, Robert; Elder, Glen H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    If problematic relationships with parents are an academic risk factor during adolescence, then nonparental sources of support (e.g., friends, siblings, and teachers) may be arenas of comfort that promote educational resilience in the face of such risk. In a series of structural models using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the…

  1. Parental Contributions to Adolescents' Possessions and Educational Expenses: Gender Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Explored adolescent gender differences in possessions and parental financial assistance. Eight common adolescent possessions were analyzed, as well as expected parental contributions to their children's postsecondary education. Findings from 448 high school students revealed that males were significantly more likely to own stereos and athletic…

  2. Familism, family ethnic socialization, and Mexican-origin adolescent mothers' educational adjustment.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Diamond Y; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Guimond, Amy B; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Jahromi, Laudan B

    2014-07-01

    The current longitudinal study examined how familism values and family ethnic socialization impacted Mexican-origin adolescent mothers' (N = 205) educational adjustment (i.e., educational expectations, educational utility), and whether these associations were moderated by adolescent mothers' ethnic centrality. Findings indicated that adolescent mothers' reports of familism values and family ethnic socialization were positively associated with their beliefs about educational utility, but not educational expectations. Ethnic centrality moderated the association between adolescent mothers' familism values and educational utility, such that adolescent mothers' endorsement of familism values during pregnancy were associated with significant increases in educational utility after their transition to parenthood, but only when adolescents reported high levels of ethnic centrality. Moreover, ethnic centrality was positively associated with adolescent mothers' educational expectations. Results highlight the importance of familism, ethnic socialization, and ethnic centrality for promoting Mexican-origin adolescent mothers' educational outcomes. Findings are discussed with respect to understanding adolescent mothers' educational adjustment in the context of family and culture. PMID:25045950

  3. "It Was as Useful as a Chocolate Kettle": Sex Education in the Lives of Same-Sex-Attracted Young People in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Lynne; Mitchell, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Sex education is a contested site in the school curriculum as communities grapple with who should teach young people about sex and how it should be taught. In this paper we ask whether same-sex-attracted young people are being exposed to appropriate and relevant sex education at school, and if they are not whether it is necessary that sex…

  4. "Because She Was My First Girlfriend, I Didn't Know Any Different": Making the Case for Mainstreaming Same-Sex Sex/Relationship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Catherine; Hester, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the case for those entering/considering same-sex relationships to be included in sex and relationship education in schools. The Government's Guidance on Sex and Relationship Education provides a rationale for including same-sex relationships when it says that schools should meet the needs of all their pupils "whatever…

  5. Adolescent exposure to cocaine, amphetamine, and methylphenidate cross-sensitizes adults to methamphetamine with drug- and sex-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Ryan A; Ross, Jordan M; Doyle, Hillary H; Helton, Amanda K; Picou, Brittany N; Schulz, Jordyn; Tavares, Chris; Bryant, Sarah; Dawson, Bryan L; Lloyd, Steven A

    2015-03-15

    The increasing availability, over-prescription, and misuse and abuse of ADHD psychostimulant medications in adolescent populations necessitates studies investigating the long-term effects of these drugs persisting into adulthood. Male and female C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to amphetamine (AMPH) (1.0 and 10 mg/kg), methylphenidate (MPD) (1.0 and 10 mg/kg), or cocaine (COC) (5.0 mg/kg) from postnatal day 22 to 31, which represents an early adolescent period. After an extended period of drug abstinence, adult mice were challenged with a subacute methamphetamine (METH) dose (0.5 mg/kg), to test the long-term effects of adolescent drug exposures on behavioral cross-sensitization using an open field chamber. There were no sex- or dose-specific effects on motor activity in adolescent, saline-treated controls. However, AMPH, MPD, and COC adolescent exposures induced cross-sensitization to a subacute METH dose in adulthood, which is a hallmark of addiction and a marker of long-lasting plastic changes in the brain. Of additional clinical importance, AMPH-exposed male mice demonstrated increased cross-sensitization to METH in contrast to the female-specific response observed in MPD-treated animals. There were no sex-specific effects after adolescent COC exposures. This study demonstrates differential drug, dose, and sex-specific alterations induced by early adolescent psychostimulant exposure, which leads to behavioral alterations that persist into adulthood. PMID:25496784

  6. Sex-Related Online Behaviors, Perceived Peer Norms and Adolescents' Experience with Sexual Behavior: Testing an Integrative Model.

    PubMed

    Doornwaard, Suzan M; ter Bogt, Tom F M; Reitz, Ellen; van den Eijnden, Regina J J M

    2015-01-01

    Research on the role of sex-related Internet use in adolescents' sexual development has often isolated the Internet and online behaviors from other, offline influencing factors in adolescents' lives, such as processes in the peer domain. The aim of this study was to test an integrative model explaining how receptive (i.e., use of sexually explicit Internet material [SEIM]) and interactive (i.e., use of social networking sites [SNS]) sex-related online behaviors interrelate with perceived peer norms in predicting adolescents' experience with sexual behavior. Structural equation modeling on longitudinal data from 1,132 Dutch adolescents (M(age) T1 = 13.95; range 11-17; 52.7% boys) demonstrated concurrent, direct, and indirect effects between sex-related online behaviors, perceived peer norms, and experience with sexual behavior. SEIM use (among boys) and SNS use (among boys and girls) predicted increases in adolescents' perceptions of peer approval of sexual behavior and/or in their estimates of the numbers of sexually active peers. These perceptions, in turn, predicted increases in adolescents' level of experience with sexual behavior at the end of the study. Boys' SNS use also directly predicted increased levels of experience with sexual behavior. These findings highlight the need for multisystemic research and intervention development to promote adolescents' sexual health. PMID:26086606

  7. Adolescent Family Experiences and Educational Attainment during Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Melby, Janet N.; Conger, Rand D.; Fang, Shu-Ann; Wickrama, K. A. S.; Conger, Katherine J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the degree to which a family investment model would help account for the association between family of origin socioeconomic characteristics and the later educational attainment of 451 young adults (age 26) from two-parent families. Parents’ educational level, occupational prestige, and family income in 1989 each had a statistically significant direct relationship with youths’ educational attainment in 2002. Consistent with the theoretical model guiding the study, parents’ educational level and family income also demonstrated statistically significant indirect effects on later educational attainment through their associations with growth trajectories for supportive parenting, sibling relations, and adolescent academic engagement. Supportive parenting and sibling relations were linked to later educational attainment through their association with adolescent academic engagement. Academic engagement during adolescence was associated with educational attainment in young adulthood. These basic processes operated similarly regardless of youths’ gender, target youths’ age relative to a near-age sibling, gender composition of the sibling dyad, or gender of parent. PMID:18999319

  8. Adolescent Body Image Distortion: A Consideration of Immigrant Generational Status, Immigrant Concentration, Sex and Body Dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Melissa; Georgiades, Katholiki; Couturier, Jennifer; Jack, Susan M; Wahoush, Olive

    2015-11-01

    Immigrant adolescents represent a significant and growing proportion of the population in the United States. Yet, little is known about their experiences of body image distortion. This is particularly concerning given that body image distortion has been identified as a significant and modifiable risk factor for a number of mental illnesses, including depression and eating disorders. This study uses multi-level modeling to examine the associations between immigrant generational status, neighborhood immigrant concentration, sex, body dissatisfaction and risk for body image distortion. Data come from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and includes 10,962 11-19 year olds (49.6 % female). First generation immigrant females were significantly more likely than 3rd generation-or-later adolescents to experience underweight body image distortion. There was no association between neighborhood immigrant concentration and risk for body image distortion. Body dissatisfaction was associated with greater risk for underweight and overweight body image distortion, with the magnitude of underweight distortion risk significantly greater among 1st generation immigrants. Interventions that encourage the development of a healthy body image have the potential to reduce the onset and duration of body image distortion among immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents. PMID:26194338

  9. Same-sex sexual attraction does not spread in adolescent social networks.

    PubMed

    Brakefield, Tiffany A; Mednick, Sara C; Wilson, Helen W; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

    2014-02-01

    Peers have a powerful effect on adolescents' beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. Here, we examine the role of social networks in the spread of attitudes towards sexuality using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Although we found evidence that both sexual activity (OR = 1.79) and desire to have a romantic relationship (OR = 2.69) may spread from person to person, attraction to same sex partners did not spread (OR = 0.96). Analyses of comparable power to those that suggest positive and significant peer-to-peer influence in sexual behavior fail to demonstrate a significant relationship on sexual attraction between friends or siblings. These results suggest that peer influence has little or no effect on the tendency toward heterosexual or homosexual attraction in teens, and that sexual orientation is not transmitted via social networks. PMID:23842784

  10. Age, sex, and pubertal phase influence mentalizing about emotions and actions in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Keulers, Esther H H; Evers, Elisabeth A T; Stiers, Peter; Jolles, Jelle

    2010-01-01

    This study examined (1) emotional versus cognitive developmental trajectories and (2) the influence of age-extrinsic factors (i.e., sex and puberty). Using a cross-sectional design, adolescents (N = 252) divided into four age-groups (ages 13, 15, 17, 19) performed two versions of a mentalizing task, about emotions and actions, as well as the Tower task. First, performance on all tasks improved linearly into late adolescence (age 19). Thus no differential trajectories were found for emotional versus cognitive development. Second, girls outperformed boys in mentalizing speed regarding both emotions and actions. In boys, a later pubertal phase was associated with increased mentalizing speed after controlling for age-group. PMID:20721775

  11. Adolescent and young adult male sex offenders: understanding the role of recidivism.

    PubMed

    Riser, Diana K; Pegram, Sheri E; Farley, Julee P

    2013-01-01

    The current review explores the complex paths that can lead to adolescent and young adult males becoming sexually abusive. Because sexual abuse is an ongoing issue in our society that is often oversimplified, this article distinguishes between the various risk factors that predict sexually abusive behavior and types of sex offenders, particularly recidivistic offenders. It is imperative to focus on adolescents and young adults who sexually abuse because they represent a particularly important intervention point in preventing sexual abuse in comparison to older age groups and address the importance of differentiating among youths who sexually abuse, particularly between one-time offenders and recidivistic offenders. Implications for addressing these differences are discussed. PMID:23350537

  12. What influences peer-led sex education in the classroom? A view from the peer educators.

    PubMed

    Strange, Vicki; Forrest, Simon; Oakley, Ann

    2002-06-01

    This paper is the second of two presenting data gathered from peer educators in the RIPPLE study-a randomized controlled trial of peer-led sex education in English secondary schools. Peer educators were recruited from Year 12 students (aged 16/17 years) in 13 schools in two successive cohorts in 1997 and 1998. Following a standardized training programme they delivered sex education sessions to Year 9 students (aged 13/14 years). Through analysis of 18 focus group discussions and of post-programme questionnaire data (n = 301), this paper aims to identify the issues and processes considered by peer educators to be important in implementing a peer education programme, and to examine peer educators' views on the relationship between themselves and the Year 9 students. Methodological issues arising when collecting, analysing and presenting such data are discussed, and some recommendations are outlined for carrying out school-based peer education. PMID:12120849

  13. Anxiety Symptoms During Adolescence Predicts Salivary Cortisol in Early Adulthood Among Blacks; Sex differences

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin; Moghani Lankarani, Maryam; Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard; Zimmerman, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although the link between psychological distress and altered cortisol level has been already shown; very limited information exists about this association among Black youth. Objectives: We tested sex differences in predictive role of symptoms of anxiety during adolescence on annual decline in morning salivary cortisol levels in early adulthood among Black youth. Patients and Methods: Data came from wave 1 (year 1994), wave 6 (year 2000), and wave 7 (year 2001) of the Flint adolescent study. In this study 176 Black youth (85 males and 91 females) were followed for 7 years from mean age of 15 at baseline to 22 at the end of follow up. Linear regression was used for data analysis with change in salivary cortisol from 2000 to 2001 as the dependent variable, symptoms of anxiety, at 1994 as independent variable, age, number of employed parents, depressive symptoms and alcohol use at 1994 as controls, and sex as the moderator. Results: Higher level of anxiety symptoms at 1994 was predictive of a higher decline in morning salivary cortisol from 2000 to 2001 for all youths, while the effects of baseline socio-economics, depressive symptoms, and alcohol use were controlled. Among female participants, anxiety symptoms at 1994 were predictive of a greater decline in morning salivary cortisol level from 2000 to 2001. The association was not found among males. Conclusions: Our findings suggest sex differences in the predictive role of anxiety symptoms during adolescence on the annual decline in cortisol level during early adulthood. While most research on this topic is among White middle class individuals, our findings shed more light on the longitudinal links between psychological distress and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function among Black youth. PMID:26633980

  14. Sex-specific age-related changes of information processing rate indicators during childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Zebec, Mislav S; Budimir, Sanja; Merkas, Marina; Szirovicza, Lajos; Zivicnjak, Miroslav

    2014-06-01

    Despite the relevant findings on non-average information processing rate (IPR) indicators-intelligence relation, and on age-related changes of some of these indicators during aging, the research on sex-specific age-related changes of these indicators during childhood and adolescence are lacking. In a transversal study, 1197 school children (598 girls) aged 8-18 have been individually measured on 5 IPR indicators--two averages (mean_t, median_t) and three non-averages (min_t, max_t, sd_t). The results corroborated the expected non-linear changes of average IPR indicators in the observed developmental period, whereby the sex difference in related developmental patterns was detected: marked age-related decrement in girls ceased at the age of 12, and in boys around the age of 13-14, after which progress in both sexes gradually ceased by the age of 18 and was less pronounced in girls. Generally similar non-linear age-related decrements of non-average indicators were registered, but they showed mutual intensity differences at specific ages and sex difference in developmental patterns was detected, analogously to average indicators. Systematic sex differences in the whole observed period were obtained only in two non-average indicators: girls showed minor sd_t and boys showed minor min_t. In specific age groups, a number of sex differences were obtained that are explainable by two possible mechanisms: earlier maturation in girls and sex bias of the IPR task content. The justifiability of separate, average and non-average, IPR indicators application was corroborated by their distribution form differences, by mutual, predominantly low and medium correlations, by the different intensity of their developmental changes and by their different ability to detect sex differences. For all registered phenomena, the theoretical and/or empirical explanations were offered from the domain of sex specific intellectual, motor and neural development, and it has been shown that non

  15. Single-sex versus coeducational environment and achievement in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Monaco, N M; Gaier, E L

    1992-01-01

    For women, the nature and range of experiences during the high school years take on special significance, since it is during this period that they usually weigh their various roles and adjust their levels of aspirations accordingly. If the high school environment is successful in reducing the discrepancy between what are often viewed as conflicting roles, adolescent females may place greater emphasis on achievement. It is within this context that the present paper explored the differential benefits of single-sex and coeducational schooling. The issue explored is not whether one is preferable for females; rather, the concern here is how each of these settings influences both achievement and personal fulfillment. PMID:1414569

  16. Sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll: caring for adolescents and young adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sue; Davies, Simon; Palmer, Susan; Plaster, Meg

    2010-11-10

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer are a distinct group whose needs have been poorly addressed within health care systems. This imbalance is being addressed in some countries, and this growing specialty is now receiving the recognition it requires in order to develop further. This article discusses some of the psychosocial issues of AYAs and, with reference to the phrase of sex, drugs, and rock and roll, highlights the various rites of passage that young people experience. It also discusses how services and professionals can work alongside AYAs, enabling them to feel a part of the process by providing age-appropriate environment and expertise. PMID:20498401

  17. Sex Education, First Sex and Sexual Health Outcomes in Adulthood: Findings from a Nationally Representative Sexual Health Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Ashling; Boduszek, Daniel; Kelleher, Caroline; McBride, Orla; Morgan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between school sex education and sexual health behaviours at first sex and later in adulthood, using nationally representative data. Respondents were adults from the 2010 Irish Contraception and Crisis Pregnancy Survey, a cross-sectional survey designed to assess knowledge, attitudes and behaviours relating…

  18. Gender roles as mediators of sex differences in adolescent alcohol use and abuse.

    PubMed

    Huselid, R F; Cooper, M L

    1992-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that internalized gender-role personality attributes and gender-role ideology mediate sex differences in alcohol use and drinking problems in a random sample of 1,077 adolescents aged 13 to 19. Results indicated that gender roles substantially, although not completely, mediated the effects of sex on drinking patterns. The relationships between gender roles and alcohol use were largely consistent with the hypothesis that individuals with conventional gender identities conform more closely to cultural norms that condone drinking among males but not among females. However, effects of the gender-linked attributes of expressivity, emotional control, and instrumentality on drinking also may be interpreted within a framework that views them as functional coping styles. Finally, differences between Black and White teens in the relationships between alcohol use and the masculine attributes of instrumentality and emotional control suggest possible race differences in the functional value of these attributes. PMID:1464719

  19. Does the "Negro" "Still" Need Separate Schools? Single-Sex Educational Settings as Critical Race Counterspaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Clarence L., Sr.; Flennaugh, Terry K.; Blackmon, Samarah M.; Howard, Tyrone C.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores whether contemporary educators should consider single-sex educational settings as viable interventions in educating African American males. Using qualitative data from a 2-year study of single-sex educational spaces in two Los Angeles County high schools, the authors argue that when all-male spaces effectively function as…

  20. A Guide for Vocational Education Sex Equity Personnel. Research and Development Series No. 143.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter, Louise; And Others

    This training package is designed to assist sex equity personnel in implementing the Education Amendments of 1976. Chapter 1 examines the sex equity problem as it relates to vocational education. Chapter 2 discusses the concepts of program management and change agents in relation to the functions of the job of sex equity personnel. Chapter 3…

  1. Transitions to Adulthood for Homeless Adolescents: Education and Public Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, William G.; Gupton, Jarrett T.; Hallett, Ronald E.

    2008-01-01

    Education plays a critical role in how adolescents mature into adults. A vulnerable, and often forgotten, sub-population of the poor is homeless youth, for whom lack of a stable or adequate residence creates a unique set of educational barriers. The Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis (CHEPA) spent 18 months documenting the experiences of…

  2. The Emergence of Sex Differences in Personality Traits in Early Adolescence: A Cross-Sectional, Cross-Cultural Study

    PubMed Central

    De Bolle, Marleen; De Fruyt, Filip; McCrae, Robert R.; Löckenhoff, Corinna E.; Costa, Paul T.; Aguilar-Vafaie, Maria E.; Ahn, Chang-kyu; Ahn, Hyun-nie; Alcalay, Lidia; Allik, Jüri; Avdeyeva, Tatyana V.; Bratko, Denis; Brunner-Sciarra, Marina; Cain, Thomas R.; Chan, Wayne; Chittcharat, Niyada; Crawford, Jarret T.; Fehr, Ryan; Ficková, Emília; Gelfand, Michele J.; Graf, Sylvie; Gülgöz, Sami; Hřebíčková, Martina; Jussim, Lee; Klinkosz, Waldemar; Knežević, Goran; de Figueroa, Nora Leibovich; Lima, Margarida P.; Martin, Thomas A.; Marušić, Iris; Mastor, Khairul Anwar; Nakazato, Katsuharu; Nansubuga, Florence; Porrata, Jose; Purić, Danka; Realo, Anu; Reátegui, Norma; Rolland, Jean-Pierre; Schmidt, Vanina; Sekowski, Andrzej; Shakespeare-Finch, Jane; Shimonaka, Yoshiko; Simonetti, Franco; Siuta, Jerzy; Szmigielska, Barbara; Vanno, Vitanya; Wang, Lei; Yik, Michelle; Terracciano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Although large international studies have found consistent patterns of sex differences in personality traits among adults (i.e., women scoring higher on most facets), less is known about cross-cultural sex differences in adolescent personality and the role of culture and age in shaping them. The present study examines NEO Personality Inventory-3 (NEO-PI-3, McCrae, Costa, & Martin, 2005) informant ratings of adolescents from 23 cultures (N = 4,850) and investigates culture and age as sources of variability in sex differences of adolescents’ personality. The effect for Neuroticism (with females scoring higher than males) begins to take on its adult form around age 14. Girls score higher on Openness to Experience and Conscientiousness at all ages between 12 and 17 years. A more complex pattern emerges for Extraversion and Agreeableness, although by age 17, sex differences for these traits are highly similar to those observed in adulthood. Cross-sectional data suggest that (1) with advancing age, sex differences found in adolescents increasingly converge towards adult patterns with respect to both direction and magnitude; (2) girls display sex-typed personality traits at an earlier age than boys; and (3) the emergence of sex differences was similar across culture. Practical implications of the present findings are discussed. PMID:25603371

  3. Brief report: Sex differences in suicide rates and suicide methods among adolescents in South Korea, Japan, Finland, and the US.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin

    2015-04-01

    Sex differences in suicide rates and suicide methods was compared among adolescents in South Korea, Japan, Finland, and the United States. This study analyzed suicide rates and suicide methods of adolescents aged 15-19 years in four countries, using the World Health Organization mortality database. Among both male and female adolescents, the most common method of suicide was jumping from heights in South Korea and hanging in Japan. In Finland, jumping in front of moving objects and firearms were frequently used by males, but not by females. In the United States, males were more likely to use firearms, and females were more likely to use poison. The male to female ratio of suicide rates was higher in the United States (3.8) and Finland (3.6) than in Korea (1.3) and Japan (1.9). Sex differences in suicide methods may contribute to differences in the suicide rates among males and female adolescents in different countries. PMID:25660214

  4. Academic performance of opposite-sex and same-sex twins in adolescence: A Danish national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ahrenfeldt, Linda; Petersen, Inge; Johnson, Wendy; Christensen, Kaare

    2015-03-01

    Testosterone is an important hormone in the sexual differentiation of the brain, contributing to differences in cognitive abilities between males and females. For instance, studies in clinical populations such as females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) who are exposed to high levels of androgens in utero support arguments for prenatal testosterone effects on characteristics such as visuospatial cognition and behaviour. The comparison of opposite-sex (OS) and same-sex (SS) twin pairs can be used to help establish the role of prenatal testosterone. However, although some twin studies confirm a masculinizing effect of a male co-twin regarding for instance perception and cognition it remains unclear whether intra-uterine hormone transfer exists in humans. Our aim was to test the potential influences of testosterone on academic performance in OS twins. We compared ninth-grade test scores and teacher ratings of OS (n=1812) and SS (n=4054) twins as well as of twins and singletons (n=13,900) in mathematics, physics/chemistry, Danish, and English. We found that males had significantly higher test scores in mathematics than females (.06-.15 SD), whereas females performed better in Danish (.33-.49 SD), English (.20 SD), and neatness (.45-.64 SD). However, we did not find that OS females performed better in mathematics than SS and singleton females, nor did they perform worse either in Danish or English. Scores for OS and SS males were similar in all topics. In conclusion, this study did not provide evidence for a masculinization of female twins with male co-twins with regard to academic performance in adolescence. PMID:25655669

  5. Academic performance of opposite-sex and same-sex twins in adolescence: A Danish national cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Inge; Johnson, Wendy; Christensen, Kaare

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is an important hormone in the sexual differentiation of the brain, contributing to differences in cognitive abilities between males and females. For instance, studies in clinical populations such as females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) who are exposed to high levels of androgens in utero support arguments for prenatal testosterone effects on characteristics such as visuospatial cognition and behaviour. The comparison of opposite-sex (OS) and same-sex (SS) twin pairs can be used to help establish the role of prenatal testosterone. However, although some twin studies confirm a masculinizing effect of a male co-twin regarding for instance perception and cognition it remains unclear whether intra-uterine hormone transfer exists in humans. Our aim was to test the potential influences of testosterone on academic performance in OS twins. We compared ninth-grade test scores and teacher ratings of OS (n = 1812) and SS (n = 4054) twins as well as of twins and singletons (n = 13,900) in mathematics, physics/chemistry, Danish, and English. We found that males had significantly higher test scores in mathematics than females (.06–.15 SD), whereas females performed better in Danish (.33–.49 SD), English (.20 SD), and neatness (.45–.64 SD). However, we did not find that OS females performed better in mathematics than SS and singleton females, nor did they perform worse either in Danish or English. Scores for OS and SS males were similar in all topics. In conclusion, this study did not provide evidence for a masculinization of female twins with male co-twins with regard to academic performance in adolescence. PMID:25655669

  6. Starting family life & sex education programs: a health agency's perspective.

    PubMed

    Wagman, E; Bignell, S

    1981-04-01

    Focus is on the ways school districts can develop sex education programs with minimal funds, utilizing existing teachers and building on existing support among students, parents, faculty and administrators. In 1978, Planned Parenthood, funded by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, implemented the Family Life Education Program Development Project. This was a statewide research and demonstration project that worked with 13 diverse California school districts to develop programs. Within each district, an administrator and a designated district trainer were initially trained. After community and administrative involvement and support were ensured, teacher training was conducted, and programs were successfully implemented in 12 of 13 selected districts. Preliminary evaluation findings based on observation and interviews with participating district staff identified 4 key factors critical to program success: 1) community involvement and support; 2) administrative involvement and support; 3) effective and acceptable curriculum; and 4) teacher training with impact. These factors are reviewed in detail, and suggestions are presented related to each. In most communities there is existing support for family life and sex education. What is needed is to involve the community in the creation of the local program, for this ensures support. Mechanisms to ensure involvement include advisory and specialized committees, broad community input, and community orientation workshop, school boards, and parent preview sessions. Unless the school administration is solidly behind a program, its chances for successful and continued implementation will remain low. PMID:6908934

  7. Family planning and sex education: the Chinese approach.

    PubMed

    Fraser, S E

    1977-03-01

    The limitation of population growth in China to about 1.7% annually is, in large part, the result of changing sexual norms which have been brought about by community-wide sexual education. These changes include elevating the status of women, dismissing the traditional striving for male children as "old fashioned," and emphasizing responsible parenthood. About 6% of China's population is made up of minority peoples, some 54 distinctive groups including a few such as the Khalkhas and Sibos who have virtually been saved from extinction during the past 25 years. For these groups the growth rate is 6% and the central government in Peking stresses to visitors that for minorities there is no limitation of family size but that health of the mother is stressed. Conversations with Chinese health workers indicate that rural women are much more in favor of family planning than their husbands and are much more willing to be sterilized when the acceptable family size of 2 or 3 children is reached. However, men are becoming more willing to use condoms which are available without cost from village health workers. There is little sex education in the schools. Physiology is included as a minor part of general biology. Young people are cautioned not to "fall in love" at too early an age or else they will not keep their minds on their studies and will get married too early. Emphasis is on late marriage, 25 for women and 27 for men. Only a modest glance at population or sexually oriented topics are encouraged until marriage is contemplated. Then sex education is given in great variety and detail. It is the opinion of doctors and health workers that sex education is a matter for the married, not the single. Chinese society has little external sexual stimuli, nudity or seminudity is not acceptable except at the beach or the swimming pool, and the young people are generally taught to be circumspect. There is none of the advertising which permeates Western culture. It is understandable

  8. Adolescent Sexual Health Education: Parents Benefit Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinaj-Koci, Veronica; Deveaux, Lynette; Wang, Bo; Lunn, Sonya; Marshall, Sharon; Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of parents in adolescent-targeted interventions is intended to benefit the adolescent. Limited research has explored whether parents participating in these programs also benefit directly. We examined the impact of Caribbean Informed Parents and Children Together, the parenting portion of an adolescent-targeted HIV prevention…

  9. Sex-Role Stereotyping in Occupational Education: A Selected Bibliography for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ, Anne J., Comp.

    This annotated bibliography on sex role stereotyping in occupational education documents the background resources consulted during a project for the Cornell Institute for Occupational Education. It is divided into three sections: resources for and about secondary students (fourteen entries), resources for vocational and career educators…

  10. Sex Education in Rural Schools in the United States: Impact of Rural Educators' Community Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinn-Pike, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The overall purpose of this exploratory research was to better understand rural educators' feelings about school-based sex education in order to foster better communication and collaboration between prevention researchers and rural teachers and administrators. In order to accomplish this purpose, the research question asked "How does…

  11. From I to We: Sex Education as a Form of Civics Education in a Neoliberal Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Sharon; Randazzo, Renee

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the question of how a sex education curriculum can be a form of civics education, moving students from a discourse of personal responsibility to a discourse that represents a "we" voice and takes into consideration not only the other person but society. In two 8-week classes delivered in a charter school to a…

  12. Seventy Years of Sex Education in "Health Education Journal": A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyer, Padmini; Aggleton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines key debates and perspectives on sex education in "Health Education Journal" ("HEJ"), from the date of the journal's first publication in March 1943 to the present day. Matters relating to sexuality and sexual health are revealed to be integral to "HEJ'"s history. First published as Health…

  13. Sex Education in the Public Schools: A Clash of Religious Freedom and the General Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    First, Patricia F.

    1992-01-01

    Court litigation, state legislation, school board policy, and public opinion clash over sex education in public schools. However, rising teen pregnancy rates and AIDS make the availability of uncensored health and sex information in schools a necessity. (SK)

  14. Handbook for Educating on Adolescent Reproductive and Sexual Health. Book One, Understanding the Adolescents and Their Reproductive and Sexual Health: Guide to Better Educational Strategies [and] Book Two, Strategies and Materials on Adolescent Reproductive and Sexual Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Clearing House on Population Education and Communication.

    This two-part handbook presents information on educating adolescents about reproductive and sexual health issues. "Book One, Understanding the Adolescents and Their Reproductive and Sexual Health: Guide to Better Educational Strategies" focuses on the demographic profile of adolescents as well as their fertility, sexual behavior, incidence of…

  15. “Let's Talk about Sex”: A Qualitative Study of Rwandan Adolescents' Views on Sex and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Van Nuil, Jennifer Ilo; Mutwa, Philippe; Asiimwe-Kateera, Brenda; Kestelyn, Evelyne; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Pool, Robert; Ruhirimbura, John; Kanakuze, Chantal; Reiss, Peter; Geelen, Sibyl P. M.; van de Wijgert, Janneke H.; Boer, Kimberly R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This qualitative study explored the views and experiences of adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV in Kigali, Rwanda, regarding sex, love, marriage, children and hope for the future. Design The study enrolled 42 adolescents who had received combination antiretroviral therapy for at least 12 months, and a selection of their primary caregivers. Study methods included 3 multiple day workshops consisting of role-playing and focus group discussions (FGDs) with adolescents, 8 in-depth interviews with adolescents, and one FGD with caregivers. Results The adolescents reported experiencing similar sexual needs and dilemmas as most other adolescents, but with an added layer of complexity due to fears related to HIV transmission and/or rejection by partners. They desired more advice from their parents/caregivers on these topics. Although they struggled with aspects of sex, love, marriage and having children, most agreed that they would find love, be married and have children in the future. The two most discussed HIV-related anxieties were how and when to disclose to a (potential) sex/marriage partner and whether to have children. However, most adolescents felt that they had a right to love and be loved, and were aware of prevention-of-mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT) options in Rwanda. Adolescents generally spoke about their future role in society in a positive manner. Conclusion Strengthening the life skills of HIV-positive adolescents, especially around HIV disclosure and reduction of HIV transmission, as well as the support skills of parents/caregivers, may not only reduce onward HIV transmission but also improve quality of life by reducing anxiety. PMID:25093572

  16. Age and Sex Influence Cystatin C in Adolescents With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maahs, David M.; Prentice, Nicole; McFann, Kim; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Jalal, Diana; Bishop, Franziska K.; Aragon, Brittany; Wadwa, R. Paul

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare serum cystatin C levels, a novel biomarker of renal function, in adolescents with and without type 1 diabetes and to determine what factors affect cystatin C levels. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Cystatin C was measured in youth 12–19 years of age with (n = 259, diabetes duration 9 ± 3 years, HbA1c 8.9 ± 1.6%) and without diabetes (n = 78). Data were compared by diabetes status, and linear regression was used to determine factors affecting cystatin C. RESULTS Cystatin C (0.698 ± 0.083 vs. 0.688 ± 0.127 mg/L, P = 0.40) was similar by diabetes status. In multiple linear regression, cystatin C was associated with age and serum creatinine in nondiabetic subjects and sex, age, and serum creatinine in subjects with diabetes (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest sex differences and age-related changes in cystatin C in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. An understanding of these changes is needed to determine the potential role of cystatin C as a marker of renal function in this population. PMID:21926294

  17. PE Teacher and Classmate Support in Level of Physical Activity: The Role of Sex and BMI Status in Adolescents from Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Bronikowski, Michal; Bronikowska, Malgorzata; Laudańska-Krzemińska, Ida; Kantanista, Adam; Morina, Besnik; Vehapi, Shemsedin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the role of physical education (PE) teacher and classmate support in relation to sex and BMI status in adolescents' physical activity (PA) in Kosovo. A Classmate and Teacher Support Scale (with additional questions) was used on a cross-sectional sample of 608 girls and 620 boys aged 15–18, randomly selected from secondary schools of seven major municipalities in Kosovo. PA level was determined with a Physical Activity Screening Measure questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and a three-way ANOVA, along with Tukey's HSD post hoc test, were employed. The findings showed the levels of teacher and classmate support to be important factors in stimulating adolescents' PA. It was found that boys with normal weight, high support from teachers, and medium or high support from classmates were more physically active, compared with girls. PMID:26380268

  18. Adolescents' beliefs about forced sex in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    De Vries, Hein; Eggers, Sander Matthijs; Jinabhai, Champak; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Sathiparsad, Reshma; Taylor, Myra

    2014-08-01

    Gender-based violence has serious consequences for the psychological, physical, and sexual well-being of both men and women. Various gender roles, attitudes, and practices in South Africa create an environment that fosters submission and silence in females and hegemony and coercion in males. One of the expressions of this power inequity is a high prevalence of forced sex, which in its turn is associated with higher risk of HIV infection. This study therefore assessed potential gender differences in beliefs about forced sex and in prevalence of reported forced sex among high school students (N = 764) in KwaZulu-Natal. Results showed that significantly more boys were sexually active (26 %) than girls (12 %) and that boys experienced earlier sexual debut by over a year. Boys also held a more positive view about forced sex than girls since they associated it more often with signs of love, as an appropriate way to satisfy sexual urges, and as acceptable if the girl was financially dependent on the boy. The perception that peers and friends considered forced sex to be an effective way to punish a female partner was also more common among boys. On the other hand, boys were less knowledgeable about the health and legal consequences of forced sex, but no significant differences were found for other sociocognitive items, such as self-efficacy and behavioral intention items. Consequently, health education programs are needed to inform both boys and girls about the risks of forced sex, to convince boys and their friends about its inappropriateness and girls to empower themselves to avoid forced sex. PMID:24729133

  19. [Specificities of sex-cord stromal tumors in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Thebaud, Estelle; Orbach, Daniel; Faure-Conter, Cécile; Patte, Catherine; Hameury, Frederic; Kalfa, Nicolas; Dijoud, Frédérique; Martelli, Hélène; Fresneau, Brice

    2015-06-01

    Sex-cord stromal tumors (SCT) are rare pediatric tumors accounting for less than 5% of gonadal tumors in children and adolescents. They differ from those diagnosed in adults by their presentation, histology, evolution and treatment modalities. Testicular SCT occur mostly in infants less than 6 months. Testicular swelling is often the only symptom, but signs of hormonal secretion with gynecomastia may be present. Juvenile granulosa SCT is the main histologic subtype. Sertoli SCTs are much less frequent while Leydig tumors occurred in older children and adolescents. Prognosis is excellent after inguinal orchiectomy. Testis sparing surgery could be performed but indications and modalities have to be strongly defined. Ovarian SCT are diagnosed in older children and adolescents and present with abdominal symptoms and/or signs of hormonal secretion: estrogenic manifestations (isosexual pseudoprecocity, menometrorrhagia) or virilization (hirsutism, amenorrhea). Main histologic subtype is juvenile granulosa (rarely Sertoli-Leydig). If oophorectomy (or salpingo-oophorectomy) may be curative for localized disease, adjuvant cisplatin-containing chemotherapy is mandatory in case of tumor rupture or peritoneal dissemination to prevent recurrences. Because of the rarity of these pediatric tumors, concerted multidisciplinary cares are required to best adapt therapeutic strategy before any surgical intervention. PMID:26028491

  20. Sex differences in sensitivity to the social consequences of acute ethanol and social drinking during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Truxell, Eric M.; Spear, Linda P.

    2015-01-01

    In human adolescents, sociable males frequently drink to enhance positive emotional states, whereas anxious females often drink to avoid negative affective states. This study used a rat model of adolescence to provide information regarding possible sex differences in contributors to social drinking. The effects of ethanol (0, 0.5, and 0.75 g/kg) on play fighting and social preference were assessed on P30, P32, and P34 using a within-subject design. Then animals were tested in a social drinking paradigm (P37-P40), with this testing revealing high drinkers and low drinkers. Sex differences in sensitivity to ethanol emerged among high and low drinkers. High socially drinking males, but not females, when tested prior to drinking sessions, showed significant increases in play fighting at both doses. In low drinking males, play fighting was increased by 0.5 g/kg ethanol, whereas the higher dose of 0.75 g/kg produced significant decreases in play fighting. High drinking females initially showed low levels of social preference than high drinking males and low drinking females and were extremely sensitive to ethanol-induced enhancement of this social measure. Low social drinkers, both males and females, were more sensitive to the suppressing effects of ethanol on social preference following 0.75 g/kg ethanol. These findings indicate that during adolescence enhanced sensitivity to the facilitating effects of ethanol on play fighting is associated with heavy drinking among males, whereas low social preference together with high sensitivity to ethanol-induced enhancement of social preference is related to high social drinking in females. PMID:25557799

  1. Social feedback processing from early to late adolescence: influence of sex, age, and attachment style

    PubMed Central

    Vrtička, Pascal; Sander, David; Anderson, Brittany; Badoud, Deborah; Eliez, Stephan; Debbané, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective The establishment of an accurate understanding of one's social context is a central developmental task during adolescence. A critical component of such development is to learn how to integrate the objective evaluation of one's behavior with the social response to the latter—here referred to as social feedback processing. Case report We measured brain activity by means of fMRI in 33 healthy adolescents (12–19 years old, 14 females). Participants played a difficult perceptual game with integrated verbal and visual feedback. Verbal feedback provided the participants with objective performance evaluation (won vs. lost). Visual feedback consisted of either smiling or angry faces, representing positive or negative social evaluations. Together, the combination of verbal and visual feedback gave rise to congruent versus incongruent social feedback combinations. In addition to assessing sex differences, we further tested for the effects of age and attachment style on social feedback processing. Results revealed that brain activity during social feedback processing was significantly modulated by sex, age, and attachment style in prefrontal cortical areas, ventral anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, caudate, and amygdala/hippocampus. We found indication for heightened activity during incongruent social feedback processing in females, older participants, and individuals with an anxious attachment style. Conversely, we observed stronger activity during processing of congruent social feedback in males and participants with an avoidant attachment style. Conclusion Our findings not only extend knowledge on the typical development of socio-emotional brain function during adolescence, but also provide first clues on how attachment insecurities, and particularly attachment avoidance, could interfere with the latter mechanisms. PMID:25328847

  2. Sex differences in sensitivity to the social consequences of acute ethanol and social drinking during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Truxell, Eric M; Spear, Linda P

    2015-04-01

    In human adolescents, sociable males frequently drink to enhance positive emotional states, whereas anxious females often drink to avoid negative affective states. This study used a rat model of adolescence to provide information regarding possible sex differences in contributors to social drinking. The effects of ethanol (0, 0.5, and 0.75g/kg) on play fighting and social preference were assessed on P30, P32, and P34 using a within-subject design. Then animals were tested in a social drinking paradigm (P37-P40), with this testing revealing high drinkers and low drinkers. Sex differences in sensitivity to ethanol emerged among high and low drinkers. High socially drinking males, but not females, when tested prior to drinking sessions, showed significant increases in play fighting at both doses. In low drinking males, play fighting was increased by 0.5g/kg ethanol, whereas the higher dose of 0.75g/kg produced significant decreases in play fighting. High drinking females initially showed low levels of social preference than high drinking males and low drinking females and were extremely sensitive to ethanol-induced enhancement of this social measure. Low social drinkers, both males and females, were more sensitive to the suppressing effects of ethanol on social preference following 0.75g/kg ethanol. These findings indicate that during adolescence enhanced sensitivity to the facilitating effects of ethanol on play fighting is associated with heavy drinking among males, whereas low social preference together with high sensitivity to ethanol-induced enhancement of social preference is related to high social drinking in females. PMID:25557799

  3. Exploration of virtual body-representation in adolescence: the role of age and sex in avatar customization.

    PubMed

    Villani, Daniela; Gatti, Elena; Triberti, Stefano; Confalonieri, Emanuela; Riva, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The malleable nature of the self led researchers to investigate the meaning of virtual identity by exploring virtual self-representation through avatars and its association with users' identity. The present study aims to investigate the changes in virtual body-representation in adolescence related to age levels and sex and the association with adolescents' self-esteem and body esteem. Anthropometric features, body esteem and self-esteem were used to assess adolescents' body image and identity. The scoring code of the "Drawing Me" graphical test was used to evaluate the avatars. The sample is composed of 63 adolescents of different ages-early, middle and late adolescence-balanced by sex. Results show that the creation of a digital avatar changes with age and is partially associated with adolescents' perceptions in terms of body esteem and self-esteem. Moreover, the creation of avatars occurs differently for boys, who enrich their avatars with many sexual features, than for girls, who prefer to detail their avatars' clothing to enrich them. Critical reflections and implications for psychological interventions that may use avatars to investigate adolescents' identity in integration with other tools will be discussed. PMID:27376008

  4. Sibling sex ratio and birth order in early-onset gender dysphoric adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schagen, Sebastian E E; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A; Blanchard, Ray; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T

    2012-06-01

    Several sibship-related variables have been studied extensively in sexual orientation research, especially in men. Sibling sex ratio refers to the ratio of brothers to sisters in the aggregate sibships of a group of probands. Birth order refers to the probands' position (e.g., first-born, middle-born, last-born) within their sibships. Fraternal birth order refers to their position among male siblings only. Such research was extended in this study to a large group of early-onset gender dysphoric adolescents. The probands comprised 94 male-to-female and 95 female-to-male gender dysphoric adolescents. The overwhelming majority of these were homosexual or probably prehomosexual. The control group consisted of 875 boys and 914 girls from the TRAILS study. The sibling sex ratio of the gender dysphoric boys was very high (241 brothers per 100 sisters) compared with the expected ratio (106:100). The excess of brothers was more extreme among the probands' older siblings (300:100) than among their younger siblings (195:100). Between-groups comparisons showed that the gender dysphoric boys had significantly more older brothers, and significantly fewer older sisters and younger sisters, than did the control boys. In contrast, the only notable finding for the female groups was that the gender dysphoric girls had significantly fewer total siblings than did the control girls. The results for the male probands were consistent with prior speculations that a high fraternal birth order (i.e., an excess of older brothers) is found in all homosexual male groups, but an elevated sibling sex ratio (usually caused by an additional, smaller excess of younger brothers) is characteristic of gender dysphoric homosexual males. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena remain unknown. PMID:21674256

  5. The eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic: an interdisciplinary model of care for children and adolescents with sex chromosome aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Nicole; Howell, Susan; Wilson, Rebecca; Janusz, Jennifer; Boada, Richard; Martin, Sydney; Frazier, Jacqueline B; Pfeiffer, Michelle; Regan, Karen; McSwegin, Sarah; Zeitler, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are born with an atypical number of X and/or Y chromosomes, and present with a range of medical, developmental, educational, behavioral, and psychological concerns. Rates of SCA diagnoses in infants and children are increasing, and there is a need for specialized interdisciplinary care to address associated risks. The eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic was established to provide comprehensive and experienced care for children and adolescents with SCA, with an interdisciplinary team composed of developmental–behavioral pediatrics, endocrinology, genetic counseling, child psychology, pediatric neuropsychology, speech–language pathology, occupational therapy, nursing, and social work. The clinic model includes an interdisciplinary approach to care, where assessment results by each discipline are integrated to develop unified diagnostic impressions and treatment plans individualized for each patient. Additional objectives of the eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic program include prenatal genetic counseling, research, education, family support, and advocacy. Methods Satisfaction surveys were distributed to 496 patients, and responses were received from 168 unique patients. Results Satisfaction with the overall clinic visit was ranked as “very satisfied” in 85%, and as “satisfied” in another 9.8%. Results further demonstrate specific benefits from the clinic experience, the importance of a knowledgeable clinic coordinator, and support the need for similar clinics across the country. Three case examples of the interdisciplinary approach to assessment and treatment are included. PMID:26229481

  6. Sorting Test, Tower Test, and BRIEF-SR do not predict school performance of healthy adolescents in preuniversity education.

    PubMed

    Boschloo, Annemarie; Krabbendam, Lydia; Aben, Aukje; de Groot, Renate; Jolles, Jelle

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) such as self-monitoring, planning, and organizing are known to develop through childhood and adolescence. They are of potential importance for learning and school performance. Earlier research into the relation between EF and school performance did not provide clear results possibly because confounding factors such as educational track, boy-girl differences, and parental education were not taken into account. The present study therefore investigated the relation between executive function tests and school performance in a highly controlled sample of 173 healthy adolescents aged 12-18. Only students in the pre-university educational track were used and the performance of boys was compared to that of girls. Results showed that there was no relation between the report marks obtained and the performance on executive function tests, notably the Sorting Test and the Tower Test of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Functions System (D-KEFS). Likewise, no relation was found between the report marks and the scores on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Self-Report Version (BRIEF-SR) after these were controlled for grade, sex, and level of parental education. The findings indicate that executive functioning as measured with widely used instruments such as the BRIEF-SR does not predict school performance of adolescents in preuniversity education any better than a student's grade, sex, and level of parental education. PMID:24782794

  7. A Study of the Implementation of Sex Education in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Che, Fok Shui

    2005-01-01

    Sex education is not treated as an important subject in the school curriculum of Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Education Department issued in 1986 and 1997, respectively, two guidelines on sex education for schools' reference. The 1997 Guidelines cover a broader conceptual framework relating to different aspects of human sexuality and also include…

  8. Student Participation in the Sex Industry: Higher Education Responses and Staff Experiences and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagar, Tracey; Jones, Deborah; Symons, Katrien; Bowring, Joanne; Roberts, Ron

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses student sex workers in higher education in Wales from an institutional perspective. It investigates how student sex work is dealt with within higher education and in doing so highlights the lack of higher education policies/guidance/training to assist staff members who have experiences with students working in the sex…

  9. Constructing the Ideal Muslim Sexual Subject: Problematics of School-Based Sex Education in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabatabaie, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    School-based sex education is an underdeveloped and challenging issue to address in Iran. This paper provides insights into the main challenges in developing and implementing school-based sex education in Iran. Through an investigation of one Iranian boys' school that, in contrast to the majority of Iranian educational institutions, has an…

  10. Comprehensive Re-Organisation: Debating Single-Sex and Mixed Education in Wiltshire 1967-1985

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    Comprehensive re-organisation largely swept away single-sex secondary education in the state maintained sector in England and Wales. Literature suggests this occurred with little discussion. Single-sex versus mixed education was debated as part of Wiltshire education committee's re-organisation of the Trowbridge and Salisbury girls' high schools…

  11. Poz-itively Transformational: Sex Workers and HIV/AIDS Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    HIV and AIDS are complex events that offer numerous opportunities for adult education. However, mainstream education on this issue has often not been relevant to a number of subpopulations, including sex workers. This chapter explores sources and content of HIV/AIDS education in the sex work industry (including art and the Internet) and suggests…

  12. Getting "Foolishly Hot and Bothered"? Parents and Teachers and Sex Education in the 1940s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Hera

    2012-01-01

    The reluctance of parents to provide sex education has been a problem for educators since the first attempts at the modernisation of sex education in the early twentieth century, yet the sexual needs, desires and fears of parents are rarely even mentioned in pedagogical debates. This article examines the intense anxiety and embarrassment felt by…

  13. Sex difference in travel is concentrated in adolescence and tracks reproductive interests

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Emily J.; Gurven, Michael; Kaplan, Hillard; Gaulin, Steven J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual selection theory suggests that the sex with a higher potential reproductive rate will compete more strongly for access to mates. Stronger intra-sexual competition for mates may explain why males travel more extensively than females in many terrestrial vertebrates. A male-bias in lifetime distance travelled is a purported human universal, although this claim is based primarily on anecdotes. Following sexual maturity, motivation to travel outside the natal territory may vary over the life course for both sexes. Here, we test whether travel behaviour among Tsimane forager–horticulturalists is associated with shifting reproductive priorities across the lifespan. Using structured interviews, we find that sex differences in travel peak during adolescence when men and women are most intensively searching for mates. Among married adults, we find that greater offspring dependency load is associated with reduced travel among women, but not men. Married men are more likely to travel alone than women, but only to the nearest market town and not to other Tsimane villages. We conclude that men's and women's travel behaviour reflects differential gains from mate search and parenting across the life course. PMID:25320169

  14. Sex difference in travel is concentrated in adolescence and tracks reproductive interests.

    PubMed

    Miner, Emily J; Gurven, Michael; Kaplan, Hillard; Gaulin, Steven J C

    2014-12-01

    Sexual selection theory suggests that the sex with a higher potential reproductive rate will compete more strongly for access to mates. Stronger intra-sexual competition for mates may explain why males travel more extensively than females in many terrestrial vertebrates. A male-bias in lifetime distance travelled is a purported human universal, although this claim is based primarily on anecdotes. Following sexual maturity, motivation to travel outside the natal territory may vary over the life course for both sexes. Here, we test whether travel behaviour among Tsimane forager-horticulturalists is associated with shifting reproductive priorities across the lifespan. Using structured interviews, we find that sex differences in travel peak during adolescence when men and women are most intensively searching for mates. Among married adults, we find that greater offspring dependency load is associated with reduced travel among women, but not men. Married men are more likely to travel alone than women, but only to the nearest market town and not to other Tsimane villages. We conclude that men's and women's travel behaviour reflects differential gains from mate search and parenting across the life course. PMID:25320169

  15. Experimental But Not Sex Differences of a Mental Rotation Training Program on Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rodán, Antonio; Contreras, María José; Elosúa, M Rosa; Gimeno, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of visuospatial processing in areas related to the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, where there is still a considerable gap in the area of sex differences, the interest in the effects of visuospatial skills training continues to grow. Therefore, we have evaluated the visuospatial improvement of adolescents after performing a computerized mental rotation training program, as well as the relationship of this visuospatial ability with other cognitive, emotional factors and those factors based on the experience with videogames. The study, which was performed on students aged 14 and 15 years old, showed a significant improvement in this visuospatial skill for a training group (n = 21) compared to a control group (n = 24). Furthermore, no significant sex differences were obtained for spatial ability or for any of the other tasks evaluated, either before or after training. Regarding the relationship between skills, a significant correlation between experience with video games and spatial ability was found, as well as between mathematical reasoning and intelligence and with spatial ability in the initial phase for the total sample. These findings are discussed from a cognitive point of view and within the current sociocultural context, where the equal use of new technologies could help reduce the visuospatial gap between sexes. PMID:27462290

  16. Sex differences in COMT polymorphism effects on prefrontal inhibitory control in adolescence.

    PubMed

    White, Thomas P; Loth, Eva; Rubia, Katya; Krabbendam, Lydia; Whelan, Robert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lawrence, Claire; Mann, Karl; Paillère, Marie-Laure; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor; Smolka, Michael N; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; Schumann, Gunter

    2014-10-01

    Catecholamine-0-methyl-transferase (COMT) gene variation effects on prefrontal blood oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) activation are robust; however, despite observations that COMT is estrogenically catabolized, sex differences in its prefrontal repercussions remain unclear. Here, in a large sample of healthy adolescents stratified by sex and Val(158)Met genotype (n=1133), we examine BOLD responses during performance of the stop-signal task in right-hemispheric prefrontal regions fundamental to inhibitory control. A significant sex-by-genotype interaction was observed in pre-SMA during successful-inhibition trials and in both pre-SMA and inferior frontal cortex during failed-inhibition trials with Val homozygotes displaying elevated activation compared with other genotypes in males but not in females. BOLD activation in the same regions significantly mediated the relationship between COMT genotype and inhibitory proficiency as indexed by stop-signal reaction time in males alone. These sexually dimorphic effects of COMT on inhibitory brain activation have important implications for our understanding of the contrasting patterns of prefrontally governed psychopathology observed in males and females. PMID:24820538

  17. Sex Differences in COMT Polymorphism Effects on Prefrontal Inhibitory Control in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas P; Loth, Eva; Rubia, Katya; Krabbendam, Lydia; Whelan, Robert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun LW; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lawrence, Claire; Mann, Karl; Paillère, Marie-Laure; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor; Smolka, Michael N; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; Schumann, Gunter

    2014-01-01

    Catecholamine-0-methyl-transferase (COMT) gene variation effects on prefrontal blood oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) activation are robust; however, despite observations that COMT is estrogenically catabolized, sex differences in its prefrontal repercussions remain unclear. Here, in a large sample of healthy adolescents stratified by sex and Val158Met genotype (n=1133), we examine BOLD responses during performance of the stop-signal task in right-hemispheric prefrontal regions fundamental to inhibitory control. A significant sex-by-genotype interaction was observed in pre-SMA during successful-inhibition trials and in both pre-SMA and inferior frontal cortex during failed-inhibition trials with Val homozygotes displaying elevated activation compared with other genotypes in males but not in females. BOLD activation in the same regions significantly mediated the relationship between COMT genotype and inhibitory proficiency as indexed by stop-signal reaction time in males alone. These sexually dimorphic effects of COMT on inhibitory brain activation have important implications for our understanding of the contrasting patterns of prefrontally governed psychopathology observed in males and females. PMID:24820538

  18. Experimental But Not Sex Differences of a Mental Rotation Training Program on Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Rodán, Antonio; Contreras, María José; Elosúa, M. Rosa; Gimeno, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of visuospatial processing in areas related to the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, where there is still a considerable gap in the area of sex differences, the interest in the effects of visuospatial skills training continues to grow. Therefore, we have evaluated the visuospatial improvement of adolescents after performing a computerized mental rotation training program, as well as the relationship of this visuospatial ability with other cognitive, emotional factors and those factors based on the experience with videogames. The study, which was performed on students aged 14 and 15 years old, showed a significant improvement in this visuospatial skill for a training group (n = 21) compared to a control group (n = 24). Furthermore, no significant sex differences were obtained for spatial ability or for any of the other tasks evaluated, either before or after training. Regarding the relationship between skills, a significant correlation between experience with video games and spatial ability was found, as well as between mathematical reasoning and intelligence and with spatial ability in the initial phase for the total sample. These findings are discussed from a cognitive point of view and within the current sociocultural context, where the equal use of new technologies could help reduce the visuospatial gap between sexes. PMID:27462290

  19. Age and educational track influence adolescent discounting of delayed rewards

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nikki C.; de Groot, Renate H. M.; Boschloo, Annemarie; Dekker, Sanne; Krabbendam, Lydia; Jolles, Jelle

    2013-01-01

    This study examined age-related changes in a specific aspect of adolescent decision-making, namely the preference for future versus immediate outcomes. A sample of 622 Dutch adolescents aged 12–17 years completed a temporal discounting task. Participants were asked to choose between a delayed reward of €50 or an immediate reward of lower value. The delay interval was varied in three blocks (1 week, 1 month, 6 months). Results showed that preferences for large delayed rewards over smaller immediate rewards increased with age: late adolescents made more long-term decisions than early adolescents. This change was related to educational track. In the lower educational track, an age-related decrease in discounting was found for all three delay intervals. In the higher educational track this decrease only occurred for the 6 month delay interval. However, across all delay intervals enrolment in a higher level educational track was associated with an increased preference for long-term rewards. These results suggest that late adolescents are less susceptible than early adolescents to the competing presence of an immediate reward when making long-term decisions, a skill which becomes increasingly important as they transition into adulthood. PMID:24421778

  20. Sex differences in monoamines following amphetamine and social reward in adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Virginia G; Hofford, Rebecca S; Yates, Justin R; Jennings, Faith C; Bardo, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Interaction with social peers may increase rates of drug self-administration, but a recent study from our laboratory showed that social interaction may serve as a type of alternative reward that competes with drug taking in adolescent male rats. Based on those previous results, the current study examined sex differences in preference for social interaction compared to amphetamine (AMPH) in adolescent rats using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Similar to previous results with males, females showed AMPH CPP regardless whether they were individual- or pair-housed. In contrast to males, however, females failed to show social CPP, and they did not prefer a peer-associated compartment over an AMPH-associated compartment in a free-choice test. In separate experiments, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) metabolite levels were measured in adolescent males and females that were exposed acutely to peer interaction, no peer interaction, AMPH, or saline. In amygdala, levels of the DA metabolite dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were altered more in response to peer interaction in males than females; in contrast, there was a greater amygdala DOPAC response to AMPH in females. Furthermore, there were greater changes in the 5-HT metabolite 5-HIAA in females than in males following social interaction. These results indicate that the ability of peer interactions to reduce drug reward is greater in adolescent males than females, perhaps due to a greater ability of social cues to activate limbic reward mechanisms in males or a greater ability of AMPH cues to activate limbic reward mechanisms in females. PMID:26237317