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Sample records for adolescent tennis players

  1. Sagittal Spinal Morphology in Highly Trained Adolescent Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Muyor, José M.; Sánchez-Sánchez, Estefanía; Sanz-Rivas, David; López-Miñarro, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    Sports with a predominance of forward-bending and extension postures have been associated with alterations in the sagittal spinal curvatures and greater risk of spinal injury. Because, the tennis players adopt these postures, the aims of this study were: 1) to describe spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in male and female highly trained adolescent tennis players during relaxed standing posture and with thoracic spine corrected (in prone lying on the floor); and 2) to determine the frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis and lumbar hypo/hyper lordosis in these postures. Forty adolescent tennis players (24 male and 16 female) aged 13-18 years, participated voluntarily in this study. The Spinal Mouse system was used to measure sagittal spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt. The mean values in the relaxed standing posture were 43.83° ± 7.87° (thoracic kyphosis), - 27.58° ± 7.01° (lumbar lordosis), and 13.38° ± 5.57° (pelvic tilt) for male tennis players, respectively; and 36.13° ± 6.69° (thoracic kyphosis), - 32.69° ± 5.06° (lumbar lordosis), 20.94° ± 5.36° (pelvic tilt) for female tennis players (p < 0.05 between genders in all spinal parameters). The male and female tennis players showed a frequency of 62.5% and 93.8% (p = 0.032) for neutral thoracic kyphosis, and 83.3% and 93.8% (p = 0.062) in neutral lumbar lordosis, respectively. In conclusion, due to the high percentage of neutral spinal curvatures in both male and female tennis players, to practice tennis in these levels does not alter sagittal spinal morphology in the relaxed standing posture in adolescent highly trained tennis players. Key Points This study evaluated thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt during several postures in young highly trained tennis players. Female tennis players showed statistically significant greater anterior pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis and lower thoracic kyphosis than male tennis players. The high percentage of neutral thoracic kyphosis and lumbar

  2. Body composition and nutritional profile of male adolescent tennis players.

    PubMed

    Juzwiak, Claudia R; Amancio, Olga M S; Vitalle, Maria S S; Pinheiro, Marcelo M; Szejnfeld, Vera L

    2008-09-01

    In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the body composition and dietary intake of 44 adolescent tennis players. After being divided into two groups (age 10-13 years and age 14-18), the players had their weight, height, and sexual maturation assessed. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to assess body composition. Food intake was obtained from a non-consecutive 4-day food record. The data were analysed using the Virtual Nutri v.1.0 software and compared with the present recommendations for adolescent athletes or dietary reference intakes. Body mass index and body fat for tennis practice were adequate for 89% and 71% of the tennis players respectively, regardless of age group. A calorie deficit greater than 10% of energy expenditure was observed in 32% of the sample. Fifty percent of the athletes consumed carbohydrates in accordance with recommended values. Protein and lipid intakes were above recommended values, while fibre, calcium, potassium, magnesium, and folic acid intakes were below recommendation for 98%, 80%, 100%, 100%, and 98% of the tennis players respectively. The observed nutritional deficiencies represent an additional barrier for adolescents engaged in competitive sports to achieve an optimum nutrition to maintain growth, health, and performance.

  3. Body composition and physical capacity of elite adolescent female tennis players.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Ewa; Sledziewska, Ewelina; Grzywacz, Tomasz; Gibson, Ann L; Wierzba, Tomasz H

    2011-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate relationships among the major anthropological parameters: (body mass - BM, height, body mass index - BMI, lean body mass - FFM, proportion of fat mass -Fat%), physical capacity, and the tennis federations ranking position as an index of the temporal sport success. Seventeen elite female tennis players, divided into three age-matched groups (15, 16, and 17 yr) participated in this study. All the players had a national singles ranking (positions between 1st-80th) and in International Tennis Federation's Junior Circuit ranking (ITFJC; 21st to 990th position of ITF). Body composition was assessed via bioelectrical impedance. Maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) was calculated from the distance covered in 12-min run test via Cooper's formula. Wingate test with lactate assay was used as an index of anaerobic capacity. There was a significant age-related trend for an increase in BM, height, FFT, and Fat%, associated with impressive shift of the anthropological indexes of body weight and height, assessed by the percentile chart analysis. The unexpected body growth spurt evidently observed between aged 15 and 17 is supposed to reflect a delay in somatic development, related to extensive exercise load. Body composition did not correlate to the ranking positions. All tested tennis players revealed excellent aerobic capacity associated with poor indices of anaerobic fitness. The position in the tennis federations rankings correlated to VO2max but not with maximal power or maximal work output assessed by Wingate test. In the whole group the maximal power and work output were proportional to BMI and FFM, but not to Fat%. In conclusion, in light of the contradictory reports concerning a possible link between strenuous regular exercise performed by young children and adolescent elite sportsmen our data indicate a delayed growth spurt in the elite female tennis players to occur between ages 15 and 17. The other important finding in terms of

  4. Age-Related, Sport-Specific Adaptions of the Shoulder Girdle in Elite Adolescent Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Ann M.; Palmans, Tanneke; Johansson, Fredrik R.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Tennis requires repetitive overhead movements that can lead to upper extremity injury. The scapula and the shoulder play a vital role in injury-free playing. Scapular dysfunction and glenohumeral changes in strength and range of motion (ROM) have been associated with shoulder injury in the overhead athlete. Objective: To compare scapular position and strength and shoulder ROM and strength between Swedish elite tennis players of 3 age categories (<14, 14–16, and >16 years). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Tennis training sports facilities. Patients or Other Participants: Fifty-nine adolescent Swedish elite tennis players (ages 10–20 years) selected based on their national ranking. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used a clinical screening protocol with a digital inclinometer and a handheld dynamometer to measure scapular upward rotation at several angles of arm elevation, isometric scapular muscle strength, glenohumeral ROM, and isometric rotator cuff strength. Results: Players older than 16 years showed less scapular upward rotation on the dominant side at 90° and 180° (P < .05). Although all absolute scapular muscle strength values increased with age, there was no change in the body-weight–normalized strength of the middle (P = .9) and lower (P = .81) trapezius or serratus anterior (P = .17). Glenohumeral internal-rotation ROM and total ROM tended to decrease, but this finding was not statistically significant (P = .052 and P = .06, respectively). Whereas normalized internal-rotator strength increased from 14 to 16 years to older than 16 years (P = .009), normalized external-rotator and supraspinatus strength remained unchanged. Conclusions: Age-related changes in shoulder and scapular strength and ROM were apparent in elite adolescent tennis players. Future authors should examine the association of these adaptations with performance data and injury incidence. PMID:25098662

  5. MRI findings in the lumbar spines of asymptomatic, adolescent, elite tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Alyas, F; Turner, M; Connell, D

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the lumbar spine in asymptomatic elite adolescent tennis players, to serve as the baseline for a future prospective longitudinal cohort study. Design Observational study. Setting Institutional, national tennis centre. Participants 33 asymptomatic elite adolescent tennis players, mean (SD) age, 17.3 (1.7) years (18 male, 15 female). Methods Sagittal T1, T2, STIR, and axial T2 weighted MRI images were reviewed for the presence of abnormalities by two radiologists in consensus. Abnormalities included disc degeneration, disc herniation, pars lesions (fracture or stress reaction), and facet joint arthropathy. Results Five players (15.2%) had a normal MRI examination and 28 (84.8%) had an abnormal examination. Nine players showed pars lesions (10 lesions; one at two levels) predominately at the L5 level (9/10, L5; 1/10, L4). Three of the 10 lesions were complete fractures; two showed grade 1 and one grade 2 spondylolisthesis, both of which resulted in moderate narrowing of the L5 exit foramen. There were two acute and five chronic stress reactions of the pars. Twenty three patients showed signs of early facet arthropathy occurring at L5/S1 (15/29 joints) and L4/5 (12/29 joints). These were classified as mild degeneration (20/29) and moderate degeneration (9/29), with 20/29 showing sclerosis and 24/29 showing hypertrophy of the facet joint. Synovial cysts were identified in 14 of the 29 joints. Thirteen players showed disc desiccation and disc bulging (mild in 13; moderate in two) most often at L4/5 and L5/S1 levels (12 of 15 discs). Conclusions Abnormalities were frequent, predominately in the lower lumbar spine, almost exclusively at L4/5 and L5/S1 levels. Pars injuries and facet joint arthroses were relatively common. PMID:17640926

  6. The prevalence of disordered eating and possible health consequences in adolescent female tennis players from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Gabriela Morgado de Oliveira; de Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; de Mendonça, Laura Maria Carvalho; de Mello, Danielli Braga; Lanzillotti, Haydée Serrão; Ribeiro, Beatriz Gonçalves; Soares, Eliane de Abreu

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of disordered eating and possible health consequences in adolescent female tennis players. This cross-sectional controlled study investigated the pubertal development (Tanner stages); body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry-DXA); dietary intake (food record); presence of disordered eating (EAT-26, BITE and BSQ); menstrual status (questionnaire) and bone mineral density (DXA). The Female Athlete Triad (FAT) was divided into two severity stages. The study included 45 adolescents (24 athletes and 21 controls) at some pubertal developmental stage. The athletes exhibited better body composition profiles. We found that 91.7%, 33.3% and 25% of athletes and 71.4%, 9.5% and 33.3% of controls met criteria for disordered eating and/or low energy availability, menstrual irregularities and low bone mass, respectively. A greater percentage of athletes than controls presented with 1 and 2 FAT components (stage I), and 4.2% presented with the full syndrome. In conclusion, tennis players appear to present with more severe disorders than controls and should be monitored to avoid damage to their performance and health.

  7. The prevalence of disordered eating and possible health consequences in adolescent female tennis players from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Gabriela Morgado de Oliveira; de Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; de Mendonça, Laura Maria Carvalho; de Mello, Danielli Braga; Lanzillotti, Haydée Serrão; Ribeiro, Beatriz Gonçalves; Soares, Eliane de Abreu

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of disordered eating and possible health consequences in adolescent female tennis players. This cross-sectional controlled study investigated the pubertal development (Tanner stages); body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry-DXA); dietary intake (food record); presence of disordered eating (EAT-26, BITE and BSQ); menstrual status (questionnaire) and bone mineral density (DXA). The Female Athlete Triad (FAT) was divided into two severity stages. The study included 45 adolescents (24 athletes and 21 controls) at some pubertal developmental stage. The athletes exhibited better body composition profiles. We found that 91.7%, 33.3% and 25% of athletes and 71.4%, 9.5% and 33.3% of controls met criteria for disordered eating and/or low energy availability, menstrual irregularities and low bone mass, respectively. A greater percentage of athletes than controls presented with 1 and 2 FAT components (stage I), and 4.2% presented with the full syndrome. In conclusion, tennis players appear to present with more severe disorders than controls and should be monitored to avoid damage to their performance and health. PMID:23318655

  8. Spondylolysis in young tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz‐Cotorro, A; Balius‐Matas, R; Estruch‐Massana, A; Angulo, J Vilaró

    2006-01-01

    The general aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of spondylolysis, a bone defect in the pars interarticularis of the vertebra, are reviewed. A retrospective study of young tennis players diagnosed between 2000 and 2004 with spondylolysis with or without spondylolisthesis, assessed by radiography and planar bone scintigraphy, is described. If the radiographic results were negative, computed tomography was performed. Sixty six cases were evaluated: 53 L5 lesions, eight L4 lesions, two L3 lesions, and one bilateral lesion at the L2 level. Two more lesions at two levels were found (bilateral L5 and unilateral L4 and L3 on the right side). Classification, treatment, and outcome of the cases are reported. A combination of radiography, planar bone scintigraphy, and SPECT is useful for evaluating spondylolysis in tennis players and recommending treatment. Use of a brace did not appear to achieve significant results. PMID:16632576

  9. Advanced Tennis for Coaches, Teachers and Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilmanis, Gundars A.

    This book is designed to help the reader attain a real understanding of the mechanics of tennis. It provides an important link between tennis theory and practice. The book covers activities that develop skills in beginners through advanced tennis and tactics applicable for seasoned players. The author draws upon scientific principles of…

  10. Impact of Fitness Characteristics on Tennis Performance in Elite Junior Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Alexander; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The impact of fitness characteristics on tennis performance in adolescent players is not clearly understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to test whether physical characteristics are related to players' competitive level (i.e., national youth ranking). A secondary aim was to compare adolescent tennis players by performance level (i.e., regional selected players and the national team). A total of 902 male and female junior players (aged, 11-16 years) in Germany were evaluated using a physical testing battery: grip strength; countermovement jump; 10 and 20-m sprint; tennis-specific sprint; overhead, forehand, and backhand medicine ball throws (MBT); serve velocity and tennis-specific endurance test (hit and turn tennis test). Results showed that serve velocity (r = -0.43 to 0.64 for female subjects [♀]; r = -0.33 to 0.49 for male subjects [♂]) and upper-body power (e.g., MBT r = -0.26 to -0.49 ♀; r = -0.20 to -0.49 ♂) were the most correlated predictors of tennis performance (i.e., national youth ranking) in both female and male tennis players. Moreover, national selected players showed better performance levels than their regional counterparts, mainly in the most predictive physical characteristics (i.e., serve velocity: effect size [ES], 0.78-1.04 ♀; ES 0.92-1.02 ♂, MBT: ES, 0.66-0.88 ♀; ES, 0.67-1.04 ♂) and specific endurance (ES, 0.05-0.95 ♀; ES, 0.31-0.73 ♂). The present findings underline the importance of certain physical attributes, especially serve velocity and strength- and power-related variables (upper body), and suggest the need to include these parameters in the area of training, physical testing, and talent identification of young tennis players.

  11. Young tennis players and balance performance.

    PubMed

    Malliou, Vasiliki J; Beneka, Anastasia G; Gioftsidou, Asimenia F; Malliou, Paraskevi K; Kallistratos, Elias; Pafis, Giorgos K; Katsikas, Christos A; Douvis, Stavros

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of a tennis training session on the balance performance of young tennis players. The study was conducted on 36 elite tennis players (age 14 +/- 2 years; body mass 55 +/- 6 kg; body height 165 +/- 6 cm; mean +/- SD) participating in the national young tennis championship. Balance performance was assessed before and immediately after a tennis training session (pre-training and post-training, respectively). The balance assessment was performed with 2 different balance boards and the Biodex Stability System. In addition, dynamometric measurements of peak isokinetic moment in the knee flexors and extensors were performed pre and post tennis training session, to quantify the degree of muscle fatigue induced by the tennis training session. One-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to test for differences in balance performance and in isokinetic performance between pre and post tennis training session. The data analysis revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05) in balance performance, whereas there were significant differences in knee joint moment production between pre and post tennis training measures. Although the tennis training session of the present study had no significant effect (p > 0.05) on any of the balance performance indicators examined, there was a decline in balance performance, which suggests that different level of fatigue for an extended period (games) will have greater effect on balance performance. It is suggested that a tennis-specific balance exercise program should be included in the tennis training session.

  12. Diurnal patterns of salivary alpha-amylase and cortisol secretion in female adolescent tennis players after 16 weeks of training.

    PubMed

    Filaire, Edith; Ferreira, Jose Pedro; Oliveira, Miguel; Massart, Alain

    2013-07-01

    We examined the effects of 16 weeks of training on diurnal pattern of salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), cortisol, and the ratio of sAA over cortisol (AOC) in 12 national adolescent female tennis players. Stress and recovery were also evaluated using the Recovery-Stress-Questionnaire for Athletes-RESTQ-Sport. Data were collected after a 2-week rest (January, W0), and 4 months after W0 (W16). Subjects collected five saliva samples throughout a day. While all participants displayed the previously shown decrease after awakening in adolescents at W0, they showed a rise in the alpha-amylase awakening response and a higher alpha-amylase activity output (p<0.01) at W16 compared to W0. For the daily rhythm of cortisol we found subjects having a low overall output of salivary cortisol (p<0.01) and a blunted response to awakening at W16. Furthermore, an increase in the ratio AOC at W16, and a negative correlation between this ratio and Sport-specific recovery score. Our findings offer support for the hypothesis that increase of training load during the study period induced asymmetry activation between the two stress systems, in relation to psychological alterations and performance decrease. These results provide encouragement to continue exploring the impact of training program using a psychobiological approach among young athletes in order to prevent fatigue and preserve the health of these athletes.

  13. Rectus abdominis muscle strains in tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Maquirriain, Javier; Ghisi, Juan P; Kokalj, Antonio M

    2007-01-01

    Rectus abdominis muscle strains are common and debilitating injuries among competitive tennis players. Eccentric overload, followed by forced contraction of the non‐dominant rectus abdominis during the cocking phase of the service motion is the accepted injury mechanism. A tennis‐specific rehabilitation program emphasising eccentrics and plyometric strengthening of the abdominal wall muscles, contributes to the complete functional recovery in tennis players, and could help reduce recurrences. PMID:17957025

  14. Health benefits for veteran (senior) tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Marks, B L

    2006-01-01

    To explore the health benefits of tennis participation in veteran players and to identify future research needs, an electronic literature search using the Ovid (Cinhal, Medline, Sport Discus) library databases from 1966–2005 was undertaken. Specific search words were employed related to tennis, aging, exercise, health, and the psychophysiological systems. Public access internet search engines were also used (Google, PubMed), along with non‐electronic searches of library holdings. There is ample research documenting the health benefits of regular participation in moderately intense aerobic activity. There have been research studies targeting veteran tennis players but most were cross sectional. No tennis related study successfully eliminated all confounding cross training effects. The health of veteran tennis players is improved by enhanced aerobic capacity, greater bone densities in specific regions, lower body fat, greater strength, and maintained reaction time performance in comparison with age matched but less active controls. However, it is not certain whether tennis alone can be a sole contributor to these physiological variables. Well controlled longitudinal research among elite veteran and novice older adult players is needed. PMID:16632583

  15. A case study of virilizing adrenal tumor in an adolescent female elite tennis player--insight into the use of anabolic steroids in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, Alon; Cale-Benzoor, Mia; Klinger-Cantor, Beatrice; Freud, Enrique; Nemet, Dan; Feigin, Elad; Weintrob, Neomi

    2011-01-01

    A 14-year-old Caucasian girl was referred to the endocrine clinic for evaluation of voice deepening, facial hirsutism, and acne starting 2 years previously. She had been a competitive tennis player since age 7 years, practicing for 4-6 hours daily. On physical examination she was noticed to have a masculine appearance with mild facial acne and moderate hirsutism. Tanner stage was 1 for breast tissue and 5 for pubic hair. Her androgen levels (testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate) were extremely elevated. Adrenal ultrasonography revealed a round left 4.6 × 5.3-cm adrenal mass. Laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was performed. The histologic findings were compatible with a benign adrenocortical tumor. Postoperatively, androgen levels dropped to within the normal range. Breast development proceeded normally, menarche occurred 2 months after tumor resection, and menses has been regular since then. Muscle strength of the dominant and nondominant upper and lower extremities was measured 1 month before surgery and 1 year later, using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex Systems II, Biodex, Shirley, NY, USA). There was no significant decrease in overall muscle strength after removal of the virilizing tumor and the marked drop in circulating androgens. In addition, the patient maintained her age category, number 1, national tennis ranking. The results suggest that even extremely high levels of tumor-related circulating androgens had no evident effect on muscle strength and competitive performance in a female adolescent tennis player. The lack of beneficial effect on performance in adolescents, combined with the potentially hazardous side effects of anabolic steroids, suggests that teenage athletes should avoid their use.

  16. Rehabilitation of the shoulder in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Plancher, K D; Litchfield, R; Hawkins, R J

    1995-01-01

    The tennis player places unique demands on the shoulder by creating a high risk for overuse and overloading of the soft tissues. Tennis requires concentric work to position and move the arm, eccentric work to stabilize the shoulder, effective depression of the humeral head to avoid impingement in the overhead position, and normal stability to prevent secondary impingement. The tennis serve produces enormous angular velocities about the shoulder joint. A comprehensive rehabilitation program has been described in which the therapist, trainer, player, and physician alike need to have an understanding of the basic biomechanics of this sport. This program can be used to treat the painful shoulder, prevent injury, and enhance performance. PMID:7712546

  17. Addressing Competitive Stress in Junior Tennis Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Patricia; Berne, Linda A.

    1991-01-01

    The PRECEDE model (an acronym for predisposing, reinforcing, and enabling causes in education diagnosis and evaluation) emphasizes outcomes rather than inputs. The model was used in assessing the health needs of nationally ranked junior tennis players. The objective was to reduce stress illness in high-level competition. (JD)

  18. Low Back Pain in a Tennis Player.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracker, Mark; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A group of physicians meet to discuss a case in which a middle-aged tennis player suffers from low back pain. The diagnosis, treatment and management of the case are discussed. The article is one in an occasional series. (JL)

  19. Differential postural control and sensory organization in young tennis players and taekwondo practitioners.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Chung, Joanne W Y; Ng, Shamay S M; Ma, Ada W W; Chow, Lina P Y; Tsang, William W N

    2014-04-01

    This study compared the sensory organization and standing balance of adolescent tennis players, taekwondo (TKD) practitioners, and healthy control participants. Sixty participants including 12 tennis players, 21 TKD practitioners, and 27 healthy control participants were tested. All of the participants underwent the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) and the Unilateral Stance Test (UST) on a Smart Equitest system. Results revealed that tennis players had higher SOT visual ratios than the control participants (p = .005), and TKD practitioners swayed more slowly in the UST than the control participants (p = .039). No differences (p > .05) were found in the composite score, somatosensory ratio, or vestibular ratio between the groups. Tennis players swayed less when they relied more on visual input to maintain balance, whereas TKD practitioners were more stable when standing on one leg. Parents may consider these sports as recreational activities for their children to develop specific balance abilities. PMID:24018555

  20. Analyzing Movements of Tennis Players by Dynamic Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazaki, Shunpei; Yamamoto, Osami

    Recently, we can easily obtain a fast computer and a digital video camera as their prices go down. In this paper, we describe a method and a system for analyzing performance of tennis players of a given singles tennis game. We assume that a movie of the game has been shot by a digital video camera which is fixed at a place such that the camera could film whole area of the tennis court and the two players, and that we have the sequence of the images in the computer. Using the positions of the players and the ball detected by techniques of image processing and partially by human assistance, we analyzed the game by defining an evaluation function. We made a prototype of a tennis-player-evaluation system by implementing the method. The system appropriately evaluated performances of players of some sample tennis games, although the evaluation function cannot analyze the player's tactics enough.

  1. Coach/player relationships in tennis.

    PubMed

    Prapavessis, H; Gordon, S

    1991-09-01

    The present study examined the variables that predict coach/athlete compatibility. Compatibility among a sample of 52 elite tennis coach/player dyads was assessed using a sport adapted version of Schutz's (1966) Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behaviour (FIRO-B), a sport adapted version of Fiedler's (1967) Least Preferred Co-worker scale (LPC), and Chelladurai and Saleh's (1980) Leadership Scale for Sport (LSS). Self-ratings of the quality of the interaction were obtained from both coach and athlete. Multiple-regression analyses using self-rating scores as the dependent measure were carried out to determine which variables best predicted the degree of compatibility. The sole inventory that significantly predicted compatibility was the LSS. More specifically, the discrepancy between the athlete's preferences and perceptions on the autocratic dimension was the best predictor. Implications for tennis coaches and recommendations for future research in this area are discussed.

  2. Gender Differences in Coping among Elite Table Tennis Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirimoglu, Huseyin

    2011-01-01

    The current study aims to investigate the explanatory power of social support and coping in relation to a competitive sport event between male and female table tennis players. 246 university students table tennis players (120 men and 126 women) from different region and part of Turkey were invited to participate in a survey study included the…

  3. Mechanisms of neck and shoulder injuries in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Lee, H W

    1995-01-01

    Shoulder injuries are common among athletes involved in repetitive overhead arm movements, particularly baseball pitchers and tennis players. Due to the similarities between pitching and serving, both athletes often present with similar types of shoulder injuries. However, subtle differences in neck and shoulder movements between the pitcher and tennis player may be responsible for additional mechanisms of injuries specific to tennis players. This paper outlines the similarities and differences between the pitch and serve and discusses how these differences may relate to additional neck and/or shoulder injuries specific to tennis players. In the analyses of mechanisms of injuries sustained by tennis players, such detailed analyses of movement patterns occurring during the serve may optimize a clinician's sports-specific rehabilitation protocol. PMID:7889030

  4. Mechanisms of neck and shoulder injuries in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Lee, H W

    1995-01-01

    Shoulder injuries are common among athletes involved in repetitive overhead arm movements, particularly baseball pitchers and tennis players. Due to the similarities between pitching and serving, both athletes often present with similar types of shoulder injuries. However, subtle differences in neck and shoulder movements between the pitcher and tennis player may be responsible for additional mechanisms of injuries specific to tennis players. This paper outlines the similarities and differences between the pitch and serve and discusses how these differences may relate to additional neck and/or shoulder injuries specific to tennis players. In the analyses of mechanisms of injuries sustained by tennis players, such detailed analyses of movement patterns occurring during the serve may optimize a clinician's sports-specific rehabilitation protocol.

  5. Control of striking velocity by table tennis players.

    PubMed

    Marinovic, Welber; Iizuka, Cristina Akiko; Freudenheim, Andrea Michele

    2004-12-01

    This study investigated how 7 skilled table tennis players controlled velocity of a forehand drive stroke when the ball's trajectory, velocity, and spin were modified. They hit a target in response to balls launched under four different conditions. The relative and absolute times used in the backswing phase showed no significant differences among conditions. When subjects hit fastballs, there was a significant change in the time required for them to reach the peak of velocity in the forward swing phase. In addition, players decreased the velocity of their strokes to hit fast-approaching balls. These results indicate that highly skilled table tennis players need to adjust the striking velocity and striking time (relative and absolute) required to reach the peak of velocity in the forward swing phase for these task modifications. Since they used slower movement velocities to hit faster-approaching balls, skilled table tennis players may override this speed-coupling process. PMID:15648504

  6. Comparison of two aerobic field tests in young tennis players.

    PubMed

    Fargeas-Gluck, Marie-Agnès; Léger, Luc A

    2012-11-01

    This study compares the maximal responses of a new aerobic tennis field test, the NAVTEN to a known aerobic field test, often used with young tennis players, that is, the continuous multistage 20-m shuttle run test (20-m SRT). The NAVTEN is an intermittent (1-minute/1-minute) multistage test with side-to-side displacements and ball hitting. Ten young elite tennis players aged 12.9 ± 0.3 (mean ± SD) randomly performed both tests and were continuously monitored for heart rate (HR) and oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2) using the Vmax ST (Sensormedics). The 20-m SRT and NAVTEN show similar HRpeak (202 ± 6.1 vs. 208 ± 9.5, respectively) and V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak (54.2 ± 5.9 vs. 54.9 ± 6.0 ml·kg·min). Pearson correlations between both tests were 0.88 and 0.92 for V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak and maximal speed, respectively. The NAVTEN yielded V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak values that are typical for active subjects of that age and are similar to the 20-m SRT supporting its use to measure aerobic fitness of young tennis players in specific and entertaining field conditions. The fact that two-thirds of the tennis players achieved a different ranking (±1 rank) with the NAVTEN and the 20-m SRT suggests that the NAVTEN may be more specific than the 20-m SRT to assess aerobic fitness of tennis players. From a practical point of view, the NAVTEN test is more specific and pedagogical for young tennis players even though both tests yield similar maximal values.

  7. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery in Female Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W.; Safran, Marc R.; Dakic, Jodie; Nguyen, Michael L.; Stroia, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent publications have highlighted the relatively poor outcome of other overhead athletes, particularly baseball players, with regard to return to sports at the same or higher level after shoulder surgery. However, true assessment of their ability when returning to sport is not as clear. Further, ability to return to other overhead sports has not been reported. Our objective was to assess outcome and time to return to previous level of function following shoulder surgery in professional tennis players. Methods: The records of all female tennis players on the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) professional circuit between January 2008 and June 2010 were reviewed to identify players who underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant (serving) shoulder. Details of the surgery including date, procedures performed, and complications were recorded. The primary outcomes were ability and time to return to professional play, and if they were able to return to their previous level of function, as determined by singles ranking. Pre and post-operative singles rankings were used to determine rate and completeness of return to preoperative function. Their highest ranking pre-injury, post operatively, and the time to return to pre-injury ranking were evaluated. Results: During the study period eight professional women tennis players from the WTA underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant arm. All surgery was performed arthroscopically, 7 out of 8 players had more than one procedure performed during the surgery. In total, 3 players underwent debridement of a partial rotator cuff tear and 2 players underwent repair of a complete supraspinatus tear. Three players had an anterior labral repair or reconstruction for anterior instability, and one player underwent repair of a SLAP lesion. Two players underwent neurolysis of a suprascapular nerve, and three players in total underwent a subacromial decompression. All players (100%) returned to professional play. The mean

  8. LIPOSARCOMA OF THE KNEE IN A TENNIS PLAYER: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Garms, Emerson; Ramos, Leonardo Addeo; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsura; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Liposarcoma is an uncommon malignant tumor. It originates in the mesenchymal cells, and is the most common of the soft tissue sarcomas. The authors report a case of a 40 year-old male tennis player with liposarcoma in the posterior right knee and distal thigh region. PMID:27047841

  9. LIPOSARCOMA OF THE KNEE IN A TENNIS PLAYER: CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Garms, Emerson; Ramos, Leonardo Addeo; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsura; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moisés

    2012-01-01

    Liposarcoma is an uncommon malignant tumor. It originates in the mesenchymal cells, and is the most common of the soft tissue sarcomas. The authors report a case of a 40 year-old male tennis player with liposarcoma in the posterior right knee and distal thigh region. PMID:27047841

  10. Ranking benchmarks of top 100 players in men's professional tennis.

    PubMed

    Reid, Machar; Morris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    In men's professional tennis, players aspire to hold the top ranking position. On the way to the top spot, reaching the top 100 can be seen as a significant career milestone. National Federations undertake extensive efforts to assist their players to reach the top 100. However, objective data considering reasonable ranking yardsticks for top 100 success in men's professional tennis are lacking. Therefore, it is difficult for National Federations and those involved in player development to give empirical programming advice to young players. By taking a closer look at the ranking history of professional male tennis players, this article tries to provide those involved in player development a more objective basis for decision-making. The 100 names, countries, birthdates and ranking histories of the top 100 players listed in the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) at 31 December 2009 were recorded from websites in the public domain. Descriptive statistics were reported for the ranking milestones of interest. Results confirmed the merits of the International Tennis Federation's junior tour with 91% of the top 100 professionals earning a junior ranking, the mean peak of which was 94.1, s=148.9. On average, top 100 professionals achieved their best junior rankings and earned their first ATP point at similar ages, suggesting that players compete on both the junior and professional tours during their transition. Once professionally ranked, players took an average 4.5, s=2.1 years to reach the ATP top 100 at the mean age of 21.5, s=2.6 years, which contrasts with the mean current age of the top 100 of 26.8, s=3.2. The best professional rankings of players born in 1982 or earlier were positively related to the ages at which players earned their first ATP point and then entered the top 100, suggesting that the ages associated with these ranking milestones may have some forecasting potential. Future work should focus on the change in top 100 demographics over time as well

  11. Radiographic knee osteoarthritis in ex-elite table tennis players

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Table tennis involves adoption of the semi-flexed knee and asymmetrical torsional trunk movements creating rotational torques on the knee joint which may predispose players to osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. This study aims to compare radiographic signs of knee OA and associated functional levels in ex-elite male table tennis players and control subjects. Methods Study participants were 22 ex-elite male table tennis players (mean age 56.64 ± 5.17 years) with 10 years of involvement at the professional level and 22 non-athletic males (mean age 55.63 ± 4.08 years) recruited from the general population. A set of three radiographs taken from each knee were evaluated by an experienced radiologist using the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) scale (0-4) to determine radiographic levels of OA severity. The intercondylar distance was taken as a measure of lower limb angulation. Participants also completed the pain, stiffness, and physical function categories of the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) 3.1 questionnaire. Results The results showed 78.3% of the ex-elite table tennis players and 36.3% of controls had varying signs of radiographic knee OA with a significant difference in the prevalence levels of definite radiographic OA (KL scale > 2) found between the two groups (P ≤ 0.001). Based on the WOMAC scores, 68.2% of the ex-elite table tennis players reported symptoms of knee pain compared with 27.3% of the controls (p = 0.02) though no significant differences were identified in the mean physical function or stiffness scores between the two groups. In terms of knee alignment, 73.7% of the ex-elite athletes and 32% of the control group had signs of altered lower limb alignment (genu varum) (p = 0.01). Statistical differences were found in subjects categorized as having radiographic signs of OA and altered lower limb alignment (p = 0.03). Conclusions Ex-elite table tennis players were found to have increased levels of

  12. Tennis specific limitations in players with an ACL deficient knee

    PubMed Central

    Maquirriain, J; Megey, P J

    2006-01-01

    Background Complete rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) causes significant alteration of knee joint kinematics. Untreated patients often develop joint instability, chronic articular degeneration, and knee dysfunction. Demands on the ACL produced by playing tennis have not been investigated. Objective To identify subjective sport‐specific limitations in tennis players with isolated unilateral ACL deficiency. Study design Prospective case–control study. Methods 16 players (mean (SD) age, 39.9 (2.3) years; 14 men) with a chronic unilateral ACL deficient knee and 16 healthy controls (38.25 (8.47) years; 14 men) were recruited. ACL deficiency was confirmed by clinical and magnetic resonance imaging. A Lysholm score was obtained in all patients, together with subjective evaluation of their current tennis performance compared with pre‐injury levels, applying a 0–100% visual scale. Both groups completed a questionnaire on tennis specific abilities. Results Lysholm scores were: 85.6 (10.3) points in the study group and 100 (0) points in the control group (p<0.001, t test for independent samples). Injured players evaluated their current tennis performance as 66.8 (15.2)% compared with 100% pre‐injury level (p<0.005, t test for dependent samples). Abilities affected in the ACL deficient group were landing after a smash stroke (p<0.001); stopping abruptly and changing (p<0.001); playing a three set singles match (p<0.05); and playing on a hard court surface (p<0.001, Kolmogorov‐Smirnov test). Conclusions There are specific limitations associated with complete isolated ACL rupture, including subjective tennis performance impairment, limitations landing after a smash, stopping and changing step direction, difficulties playing a three set singles match, and playing on hard court surfaces. PMID:16632578

  13. MUSCLE DAMAGE AFTER A TENNIS MATCH IN YOUNG PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, R.V.; Santos, R.C.O.; Nosaka, K.; Moreira, A.; Miyabara, E.H.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated changes in indirect markers of muscle damage following a simulated tennis match play using nationally ranked young (17.6 ± 1.4 years) male tennis players. Ten young athletes played a 3-hour simulated match play on outdoor red clay courts following the International Tennis Federation rules. Muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity (CK), serum myoglobin concentration (Mb), one repetition maximum (1RM) squat strength, and squat jump (SJ) and counter movement jump (CMJ) heights were assessed before, immediately after, and 24 and 48 h after the simulated match play. All parameters were also evaluated in a non-exercised group (control group). A small increase in the indirect markers of muscle damage (muscle soreness, CK and Mb) was detected at 24-48 hours post-match (p < 0.05). A marked acute decrement in neuromuscular performance (1RM squat strength: -35.2 ± 10.4%, SJ: -7.0 ± 6.0%, CMJ: -10.0 ± 6.3%) was observed immediately post-match (p < 0.05). At 24 h post-match, the 1RM strength and jump heights were not significantly different from the baseline values. However, several players showed a decrease of these measures at 24 h after the match play. The simulated tennis match play induced mild muscle damage in young players. Coaches could monitor changes in the indirect markers of muscle damage to assess athletes’ recovery status during training and competition. PMID:24917686

  14. The adolescent basketball player.

    PubMed

    Sickles, R T; Lombardo, J A

    1993-04-01

    Adolescent basketball players can be viewed in two ways, as a unique population requiring special attention for their unique problems or as a similar group sharing the same problems as their adult counterparts. Attention should be paid to issues related to adolescence in general including changes in body size, growth of the musculoskeletal system, and hormonal changes that contribute to changes in behavior, emotions, and maturity. Attention to the particular needs of the adolescent basketball player may help prevent problems or lead to early recognition and intervention.

  15. An electromyographic analysis of shoulder function in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Ryu, R K; McCormick, J; Jobe, F W; Moynes, D R; Antonelli, D J

    1988-01-01

    Shoulder injuries in tennis players are common because of the repetitive, high-magnitude forces generated around the shoulder during the various tennis strokes. An understanding of the complex sequences of muscle activity in this area may help reduce injury, enhance performance, and assist the rapid rehabilitation of the injured athlete. The supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, middle deltoid, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, biceps brachii, and serratus anterior muscles were studied in six uninjured male Division II collegiate tennis players using dynamic electromyography (EMG) and synchronized high-speed photography. Each subject performed the tennis serve and the forehand and backhand groundstrokes, and each stroke was divided into stages. The tennis serve contains four stages. Three stages characterize the forehand and backhand groundstrokes. Our results indicate that the subscapularis, pectoralis major, and serratus anterior display the greatest activity during the serve and forehand. The middle deltoid, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus are most active in the acceleration and follow-through stages of the backhand. The biceps brachii increases its activity during cocking and follow-through in the serve with a similar pattern noted in the acceleration and follow-through stages of the forehand and backhand. The serratus anterior demonstrates intense activity in the serve and forehand, thus providing a stable platform for the humeral head and assisting in gleno-humeral-scapulothoracic synchrony. The tennis serve and forehand and backhand groundstrokes are accomplished by complex sequences of muscle activity that incorporate contributions from the lower extremities and trunk into smooth, coordinated patterns.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3189681

  16. The Ability of Elite Table Tennis Players with Intellectual Disabilities to Adapt Their Service/Return

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Biesen, Debbie; Verellen, Joeri; Meyer, Christophe; Mactavish, Jennifer; Van de Vliet, Peter; Vanlandewijck, Yves

    2010-01-01

    In this study the ability of elite table tennis players with intellectual disability (ID) to adapt their service/return to specific ball spin characteristics was investigated. This was done by examining the performance of 39 players with ID and a reference group of 8 players without ID on a standardized table tennis specific test battery. The…

  17. Physical determinants of tennis performance in competitive teenage players.

    PubMed

    Girard, Olivier; Millet, Gregoire P

    2009-09-01

    It is unclear how physical attributes influence tennis-specific performance in teenage players. The aims of this study were (a) to examine the relationships between speed, explosive power, leg stiffness, and muscular strength of upper and lower limbs; and (b) to determine to what extent these physical qualities relate to tournament play performance in a group of competitive teenage tennis players. A total of 12 male players aged 13.6 +/- 1.4 years performed a series of physical tests: a 5-m, 10-m, and 20-m sprint; squat jump (SJ); countermovement jump (CMJ); drop jump (DJ); multi-rebound jumps; maximum voluntary contraction of isometric grip strength; and plantar flexor of the dominant and nondominant side. Speed (r = 0.69, 0.63, and 0.74 for 5-, 10-, and 20-m sprints, respectively), vertical power abilities (r = -0.71, -0.80 and -0.66 for SJ, CMJ, and DJ, respectively), and maximal strength in the dominant side (r = -0.67 and -0.73 for handgrip and plantar flexor, respectively) were significantly correlated with tennis performance. However, strength in the nondominant side (r = -0.29 and -0.42 for handgrip and plantar flexor) and leg stiffness (r = -0.15) were not correlated with the performance ranking of the players. It seems that physical attributes have a strong influence on tennis performance in this age group and that an important asymmetry is already observed. By monitoring regularly such physical abilities during puberty, the conditioning coach can modify a program to compensate for the imbalances. This would in turn minimize the risks of injuries during this critical period.

  18. Muscle Hypertrophy in Prepubescent Tennis Players: A Segmentation MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Serrano-Sanchez, Jose A.; Dorado, Cecilia; Calbet, Jose A. L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To asses if tennis at prepubertal age elicits the hypertrophy of dominant arm muscles. Methods The volume of the muscles of both arms was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 7 male prepubertal tennis players (TP) and 7 non-active control subjects (CG) (mean age 11.0±0.8 years, Tanner 1–2). Results TP had 13% greater total muscle volume in the dominant than in the contralateral arm. The magnitude of inter-arm asymmetry was greater in TP than in CG (13 vs 3%, P<0.001). The dominant arm of TP was 16% greater than the dominant arm of CG (P<0.01), whilst non-dominant arms had similar total muscle volumes in both groups (P = 0.25), after accounting for height as covariate. In TP, dominant deltoid (11%), forearm supinator (55%) and forearm flexors (21%) and extensors (25%) were hypertrophied compared to the contralateral arm (P<0.05). In CG, the dominant supinator muscle was bigger than its contralateral homonimous (63%, P<0.05). Conclusions Tennis at prepubertal age is associated with marked hypertrophy of the dominant arm, leading to a marked level of asymmetry (+13%), much greater than observed in non-active controls (+3%). Therefore, tennis particpation at prepubertal age is associated with increased muscle volumes in dominant compared to the non-dominant arm, likely due to selectively hypertrophy of the loaded muscles. PMID:22428074

  19. Asymmetry in volume between dominant and nondominant upper limbs in young tennis players.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Ducher, Gaële; Brosseau, Olivier; Hautier, Christophe

    2008-08-01

    This study aimed at demonstrating the asymmetry in volume between the dominant and nondominant upper limbs in tennis players, controlled for maturity status. Upper limb volumes on both sides were calculated in 72 tennis players and 84 control subjects, using the truncated cone method. The participants' maturity status was determined using the predicted age at peak height velocity (PHV). The results showed significant larger side-to-side asymmetry in volume in tennis groups than in control groups. These findings suggested that, even before PHV, specific-sport adaptations occurred in the dominant upper limb in tennis players.

  20. Differences in physical fitness among young tennis players in between 1992 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Filipčič, Aleg; Filipčič, Tjasa; Leskošek, Bojan

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to find a trend of changes for selected anthropometric characteristics and motor abilities of young male and female tennis players of three different age groups. Trends were observed in the periods between 1992, 2000 and 2008. In addition, a comparison of results of tennis players and school pupils was included. The sample of subjects were selections of young tennis players and of primary and secondary schools pupils (boys and girls) divided into three age groups (12- to 13-year-olds, 14- to 15-year-olds, and 16- to 17-year-olds). Fitness tests items (backwards obstacle course, forward bend on the bench, 20-second hand-tapping, 60-second sit-ups) and three anthropometric measurements (body height, body weight, BMI) were included in this study. The analysis of trends for different periods of measurement in male and female tennis players revealed an increase in some test items and a decrease in others. In the majority of observed fitness test items, young tennis players performed better than their school peers, indicating the positive effects of training and an appropriate selection process of tennis players. Male and female tennis players were taller than the school pupils, and body height values in both groups increased from 1992 to 2008. The body weight and BMI values for male and female tennis players, and male and female pupils in all three age groups have been constantly increasing. PMID:26040081

  1. Differences in physical fitness among young tennis players in between 1992 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Filipčič, Aleg; Filipčič, Tjasa; Leskošek, Bojan

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to find a trend of changes for selected anthropometric characteristics and motor abilities of young male and female tennis players of three different age groups. Trends were observed in the periods between 1992, 2000 and 2008. In addition, a comparison of results of tennis players and school pupils was included. The sample of subjects were selections of young tennis players and of primary and secondary schools pupils (boys and girls) divided into three age groups (12- to 13-year-olds, 14- to 15-year-olds, and 16- to 17-year-olds). Fitness tests items (backwards obstacle course, forward bend on the bench, 20-second hand-tapping, 60-second sit-ups) and three anthropometric measurements (body height, body weight, BMI) were included in this study. The analysis of trends for different periods of measurement in male and female tennis players revealed an increase in some test items and a decrease in others. In the majority of observed fitness test items, young tennis players performed better than their school peers, indicating the positive effects of training and an appropriate selection process of tennis players. Male and female tennis players were taller than the school pupils, and body height values in both groups increased from 1992 to 2008. The body weight and BMI values for male and female tennis players, and male and female pupils in all three age groups have been constantly increasing.

  2. Expectancy effects in tennis: the impact of opponents' pre-match non-verbal behaviour on male tennis players.

    PubMed

    Buscombe, Richard; Greenlees, Iain; Holder, Tim; Thelwell, Richard; Rimmer, Matt

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of a male opponent's pre-match body language and clothing (general vs. sports-specific) on how his performances were judged by an observer. Forty male tennis players viewed videos of a male target tennis player warming up and then observed playing footage of the target. Each participant viewed the target player warming up displaying one of four combinations of body language and clothing (positive body language/tennis-specific clothing; positive body language/general sportswear; negative body language/tennis-specific clothing; negative body language/general sportswear). Participants rated the performance of the tennis player and gave their perceptions of the likely outcome of a tennis match with the target player. Analyses of variance indicated that clothing and body language had an interactive effect on both outcome expectations and ratings of performance. The findings support the contention that the initial impressions athletes form of their opponents can influence the way in which they judge the performances of opponents and their perceived likelihood of success against the same opponents. PMID:17101528

  3. Growth and maturity status of elite British junior tennis players.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Gillian K; Cumming, Sean P; Coelho E Silva, Manuel; Cooke, Karl; Malina, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Growth and maturation impact the selection, development and progression of youth athletes. Individual differences in the growth and maturity may afford a performance advantage, clouding coaches and practitioners' perceptions regarding current ability and future potential. This may result in the exclusion of talented, yet less physically gifted athletes. Participants were 91 male (n = 47) and female (n = 44) elite British Junior tennis players, 8-17 years of age (12.5 ± 1.9 years). Height and body mass were measured and compared to growth charts; hand-wrist radiographs were taken. Skeletal age (SA) was estimated with the Fels method and contrasted to chronological age (CA). Mean height and body mass of individual players ranged between the 50th and 90th centiles for age and sex. Females were advanced in SA relative to CA (0.3-0.89 years.) from 8 years. Males were average to delayed in maturation from 8 to 12 years, but advanced in SA from 14 to 16 years (0.75-1.23 years). Individual differences in growth and maturation appear to contribute towards the selection of elite junior tennis players, with a bias towards males and females who are advanced in maturation and comparatively tall and heavy for their age. This has important implications for talent identification and development. PMID:26930031

  4. Growth and maturity status of elite British junior tennis players.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Gillian K; Cumming, Sean P; Coelho E Silva, Manuel; Cooke, Karl; Malina, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Growth and maturation impact the selection, development and progression of youth athletes. Individual differences in the growth and maturity may afford a performance advantage, clouding coaches and practitioners' perceptions regarding current ability and future potential. This may result in the exclusion of talented, yet less physically gifted athletes. Participants were 91 male (n = 47) and female (n = 44) elite British Junior tennis players, 8-17 years of age (12.5 ± 1.9 years). Height and body mass were measured and compared to growth charts; hand-wrist radiographs were taken. Skeletal age (SA) was estimated with the Fels method and contrasted to chronological age (CA). Mean height and body mass of individual players ranged between the 50th and 90th centiles for age and sex. Females were advanced in SA relative to CA (0.3-0.89 years.) from 8 years. Males were average to delayed in maturation from 8 to 12 years, but advanced in SA from 14 to 16 years (0.75-1.23 years). Individual differences in growth and maturation appear to contribute towards the selection of elite junior tennis players, with a bias towards males and females who are advanced in maturation and comparatively tall and heavy for their age. This has important implications for talent identification and development.

  5. The interaction between the tennis court and the player: how does surface affect leg stiffness?

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2013-03-01

    An adequate level of leg stiffness is necessary for an optimal tennis performance and leg stiffness should be adapted to frequently changing surfaces as tennis players usually play on different courts. The aim of this study was to evaluate leg stiffness in competitive tennis players on different court surfaces. Ten healthy competitive tennis players (nine men and one woman; mean age = 17.6 +/- 3.2 years) underwent leg stiffness testing by modeling the vertical ground reaction force using an optical system. Flight time and contact time were determined during hopping on two different tennis court surfaces (clay and acrylic). No significant difference was found in the flight time, contact time, and jump height between the surfaces. No significant difference in leg stiffness was found between the surfaces (18.25 +/- 5.8 and 19.27 +/- 4.9 kN/m for clay and acrylic, respectively; p = 0.28). This study demonstrated that contact time and flight time as well as leg stiffness of tennis players remained unchanged when hopping on two different tennis surfaces. Results of this research provide objective data regarding the tennis-specific loading of the locomotor system and proper mechanical adaptation of the player on different surfaces, which may be useful for testing protocols and planning training programs.

  6. The Relative Age Effect and Physical Fitness Characteristics in German Male Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Ulbricht, Alexander; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the study were to test: 1) whether the relative age effect (RAE) was prevalent in young (U12-U18) German male tennis players; 2) the potential influence of age and/or skill level on RAE and 3) whether maturity, anthropometric and fitness measures vary according to birth date distribution in elite youth tennis players. For the present study the following male populations were analysed: Overall German population (n = 3.216.811), all players affiliated to the German Tennis Federation (DTB) (n = 120.851), players with DTB official ranking (n = 7165), regional (n = 381) and national (n = 57) squads (11-17 years old), as well as the top 50 German senior players were analyzed. RAEs were more prevalent at higher competitive levels with more players born in the first quarter of the year compared with the reference population for ranked (29.6%), regional (38.1%) and national (42.1%) players. No systematic differences were found in any of the maturity, anthropometric and fitness characteristics of the regional squad players born across different quarters. RAEs are present in the DTB competitive system and it was more pronounced at higher competitive levels. Compared with early born, late born players who were selected into elite squads did not differ in maturation, anthropometric and fitness characteristics. Key points RAEsexist in the selection of youth tennis players in Germany, a greater percentage of players analyzed was born in the 1st quarter compared to all licensed tennis players in the country, and more pronounced with an increased competition level in youth players. Players born later in the selection year and still selected in elite squads were likely to be similar across a range of physical fitness attributes compared with those born earlier in the year. The selection process should be reevaluated and changed to reduce the impact of RAEs on tennis players. PMID:26336351

  7. Bilateral segmental dystonia in a professional tennis player.

    PubMed

    Mayer, F; Topka, H; Boose, A; Horstmann, T; Dickhuth, H H

    1999-08-01

    Dystonias occur frequently as repetitive movements, persistent elevations of muscle tone, or tonic contortions, whereby the cause is assumed to be an impairment of basal ganglia function. Focal dystonias are especially known in musicians, although little is reported on focal dystonias in athletic stress. The present case report describes the case of a 34-yr-old professional tennis player with bilateral segmental dystonia. The symptoms were expressed in involuntary movements when he intended to hit the ball and in a progredient tremor, initially in one hand, later in both, making him unable to write. The altered mobility during athletic stress was confirmed by video analysis, the altered innervation with excessive, uncoordinated impulse influx by means of electromyography during sport-type specific stress, and writing incapacity during a writing test. The symptoms abated under therapy with trihexyphenidyl-HCL, so that the patient has been able to work as a tennis coach with improved athletic performance for the past 3 yr. It is concluded that the various forms of dystonia should be included in the differential diagnosis of impaired coordinative movements under athletic exercise, especially of the upper extremities.

  8. Effect of long-term unilateral activity on bone mineral density of female junior tennis players.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, H; Kannus, P; Sievänen, H; Pasanen, M; Uusi-Rasi, K; Heinonen, A; Oja, P; Vuori, I

    1998-02-01

    High peak bone mass in early adulthood is an important protective factor against osteoporotic fractures in later life, but little is known about the effects of exercise on growing bone. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine at which state of maturity (Tanner stage), the areal bone mineral density (BMD) differences between the playing and nonplaying arms of junior tennis players become obvious, and to clarify in each developmental stage which training and background variables, if any, could explain the interindividual differences in bones' response to mechanical loading. Ninety-one 7- to 17-year-old female tennis players and 58 healthy female controls were measured. In each Tanner stage, differences in BMD in playing and nonplaying (dominant and nondominant) arms (proximal humerus, humeral shaft, and distal radius) and BMD of the lumbar spine and nondominant distal radius were compared between the controls and players. Within each Tanner stage of players, the associations between training and background variables and BMD differences were analyzed with Spearman rank correlation coefficients. In players, BMD differences between the playing and nonplaying arms were significant (P < 0.05- < 0.001) in all Tanner stages, with the mean difference ranging from 1.6 to 15.7%. In controls, these dominant-to-nondominant arm differences were clearly smaller (ranging from -0.2 to 4.6%), but significant at some measured sites. In comparison with the relative side-to-side arm differences between the players and controls (i.e., examination of the training effect), the mean difference was not obvious and significant until the adolescent growth spurt (i.e., the girls in Tanner stage III with a mean age of 12.6 years). In the lumbar spine, significant BMD differences between players and controls were not found until Tanner stage IV (mean age 13.5 years; 8.7%, P < 0.05) and V (mean age 15.5 years; 12.4%, P < 0.05). In a nonloaded site of the skeleton (nondominant

  9. Participation motivation and competition anxiety among Korean and non-Korean wheelchair tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Irully; Park, Sunghee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in participation motivation and competition anxiety between Korean and non-Korean wheelchair tennis players and to identify relations between participation motivation and competition anxiety in each group. Sixty-six wheel-chair tennis players who participated in the 2013 Korea Open Wheel-chair Tennis Tournament in Seoul completed the Participation Motivation Survey and the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory II. Data were analyzed by a frequency analysis, descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation analysis, and independent samples t-test to identify participants’ demographic characteristics, differences in participation motivation, competition anxiety between Korean and non-Korean players, and correlations between participation motivation and competition anxiety in each group. Korean players reported significantly higher motivation in purification compared to non-Korean players, whereas non-Korean players reported significantly higher motivation in enjoyment. In addition, non-Korean players demonstrated higher cognitive anxiety and self-confidence compared to Korean players. Moreover, the physical anxiety of Korean players was negatively correlated with learning, health-fitness, and enjoyment motivation. On the other hand, only self-confidence was significantly related to learning motivation and enjoyment motivation in non-Korean players. Thus, the results presented herein provide evidence for the development of specialized counseling programs that consider the psychological characteristics of Korean wheelchair tennis players. PMID:24409429

  10. Tournament Structure and Success of Players Based on Location in Men's Professional Tennis.

    PubMed

    Filipcic, Ales; Panjan, Andrej; Reid, Machar; Crespo, Miguel; Sarabon, Nejc

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between success of professional male tennis players according to the country and world region from which they originate and the professional tournament structure in men's tennis in that world region and country. The success of a country or world region was defined by the number of players in the top 300 ATP rankings and was calculated for seven time periods between 1975 and 2008. The results showed the correlations between the total number of top 300 ranked players, the total number of tournaments, and the annual tournament prize money of the specific country. The correlations were nearly perfect in the 1975-1990 period (r = 0.93-0.95; p < 0.01) but only high in the 2005-2008 period (r = 0.60-0.64; p < 0.01), suggesting that the association between the number of top 300 ranked tennis players and professional tournaments, while still significant, is in decline. These data should inform the policy and investment decisions of regional and national federations, particularly as they relate to domestic professional tennis tournament structures and to explore opportunities to include professional tournaments of neighbour countries in their player's development programs. Key PointsThis paper observes relation changes between the total number of players, total number of ATP tournaments and total annual prize money in particular continents from 1975 to 2008.The correlation between the tennis success, total number of tournaments and total annual prize money in tournaments was highest from 1975 to 1989 and was gradually decreasing from 1990 to 2008.The leading tennis countries organise over 20 ATP tournaments and entry professional tournaments per year. Tennis less developed countries very often is using the competition systems of the most successful tennis countries.Indications are that tennis will continue to become increasingly global and that this trend may be unlikely to reverse. PMID:24149816

  11. Ultrasound of Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendon Subluxation in a Tennis Player.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Paul J; Romesberg, Amanda; Kamineni, Srinath; Beaman, Francesca D

    2016-06-01

    Wrist pain is common among competitive tennis players. Subluxation of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon has gained recognition as a cause of ulnar-side wrist pain in athletes. In tennis, the wrist is forcibly flexed, supinated, and ulnar deviated. These repetitive motions stress the ECU tendon stabilizers allowing tendon subluxation from the ulnar groove, especially in cases of anatomic variations such as a shallow groove. We present the presurgical and postsurgical imaging findings of recurrent ECU tendon subluxation in an elite tennis player.

  12. A comparison of two conative characteristics of top basketball and recreational table tennis players.

    PubMed

    Sindik, Josko; Missoni, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to adapt imported instruments for measuring multidimensional perfectionism in sport situations and perceived group cohesion, in terms of construct validity and reliability, as well as from the aspect of interpretability, addressed on Croatian samples of athletes. Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ) and Sport Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MSSP) are applied. The sample of 223 male Croatian athletes comprises of N1 = 107 top basketball players from nine teams in A-1 Croatian Basketball League and N2 = 116 recreational table tennis players who play in Table Tennis Organization of Clubs and Actives in Zagreb. Principal Components Analyses at both instruments showed two-component structures: combined social-task cohesion and friendship were latent dimensions of perceived group cohesion, while the internalized standards and externalized standards revealed two aspects of multidimensional perfectionism in sport situations. In perceived group cohesion, basketball players achieved higher average results than table tennis players in the friendship, while the table tennis players showed higher combined social and task orientation than basketball players. In multidimensional sport perfectionism, basketball players have higher average result than table tennis players in the dimension of internalized perfectionism, but in externalized perfectionism there is no statistical significant difference. Younger players showed higher average results than older players in the dimension of friendship, while older players showed higher combined social and task orientation than younger players. Younger players have higher average scores in internalized perfectionism. The main importance of the research is adjustment of multidimensional perfectionism in sport situations and perceived group cohesion to Croatian athletes, providing additional possibility of cross-cultural adjustment of both concepts, psychometrically and theoretically.

  13. A comparison of two conative characteristics of top basketball and recreational table tennis players.

    PubMed

    Sindik, Josko; Missoni, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to adapt imported instruments for measuring multidimensional perfectionism in sport situations and perceived group cohesion, in terms of construct validity and reliability, as well as from the aspect of interpretability, addressed on Croatian samples of athletes. Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ) and Sport Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MSSP) are applied. The sample of 223 male Croatian athletes comprises of N1 = 107 top basketball players from nine teams in A-1 Croatian Basketball League and N2 = 116 recreational table tennis players who play in Table Tennis Organization of Clubs and Actives in Zagreb. Principal Components Analyses at both instruments showed two-component structures: combined social-task cohesion and friendship were latent dimensions of perceived group cohesion, while the internalized standards and externalized standards revealed two aspects of multidimensional perfectionism in sport situations. In perceived group cohesion, basketball players achieved higher average results than table tennis players in the friendship, while the table tennis players showed higher combined social and task orientation than basketball players. In multidimensional sport perfectionism, basketball players have higher average result than table tennis players in the dimension of internalized perfectionism, but in externalized perfectionism there is no statistical significant difference. Younger players showed higher average results than older players in the dimension of friendship, while older players showed higher combined social and task orientation than younger players. Younger players have higher average scores in internalized perfectionism. The main importance of the research is adjustment of multidimensional perfectionism in sport situations and perceived group cohesion to Croatian athletes, providing additional possibility of cross-cultural adjustment of both concepts, psychometrically and theoretically. PMID:23914507

  14. Tournament Structure and Success of Players Based on Location in Men’s Professional Tennis

    PubMed Central

    Panjan, Andrej; Reid, Machar; Crespo, Miguel; Sarabon, Nejc

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between success of professional male tennis players according to the country and world region from which they originate and the professional tournament structure in men’s tennis in that world region and country. The success of a country or world region was defined by the number of players in the top 300 ATP rankings and was calculated for seven time periods between 1975 and 2008. The results showed the correlations between the total number of top 300 ranked players, the total number of tournaments, and the annual tournament prize money of the specific country. The correlations were nearly perfect in the 1975-1990 period (r = 0.93-0.95; p < 0.01) but only high in the 2005-2008 period (r = 0.60-0.64; p < 0.01), suggesting that the association between the number of top 300 ranked tennis players and professional tournaments, while still significant, is in decline. These data should inform the policy and investment decisions of regional and national federations, particularly as they relate to domestic professional tennis tournament structures and to explore opportunities to include professional tournaments of neighbour countries in their player’s development programs. Key Points This paper observes relation changes between the total number of players, total number of ATP tournaments and total annual prize money in particular continents from 1975 to 2008. The correlation between the tennis success, total number of tournaments and total annual prize money in tournaments was highest from 1975 to 1989 and was gradually decreasing from 1990 to 2008. The leading tennis countries organise over 20 ATP tournaments and entry professional tournaments per year. Tennis less developed countries very often is using the competition systems of the most successful tennis countries. Indications are that tennis will continue to become increasingly global and that this trend may be unlikely to reverse. PMID:24149816

  15. Anaerobic capacity may not be determined by critical power model in elite table tennis players.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, Alessandro M; Papoti, Marcelo; Gobatto, Claudio A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify the applicability of anaerobic work capacity (AWC) determined from the critical power model in elite table tennis players. Eight male international level table tennis players participated in the study. The tests undertaken were: 1) A critical frequency test used to determinate the anaerobic work capacity; 2) Wingate tests were performed using leg and arm ergometers. AWC corresponded to 99.5 ± 29.1 table tennis balls. AWC was not related to peak (r = -0.25), mean (r = -0.02), relative peak (r = -0.49) or relative mean power (r = 0.01), nor fatigue index (r = -0.52) (Wingate leg ergometer). Similar correlations for peak (r = -0.34), mean (r = -0.04), relative peak (r = -0.49), relative mean power (r = -0.14) and peak blood lactate concentration (r = -0.08) were determined in the Wingate arm ergometer test. Based on these results the AWC determined by a modified critical power test was not a good index for measurement of anaerobic capacity in table tennis players. Key pointsAnaerobic work capacity (AWC) was not good index of anaerobic capacity in table tennis.AWC determined using the table tennis ergometer showed low correlations with the Wingate test measures for cycle and arm ergometry.A sport-specific protocol is required for measuring anaerobic capacity in table tennis. PMID:24150134

  16. Electromyographic analysis of elbow function in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Morris, M; Jobe, F W; Perry, J; Pink, M; Healy, B S

    1989-01-01

    Muscle activity about the elbow during tennis strokes in nine professional and collegiate level players was studied using indwelling EMG and high speed photography. Eight muscles were evaluated for the serve, forehand, and backhand strokes. The serve was divided into six stages and the ground strokes into four stages. EMG tracings were subjected to analog-to-digital conversion and a relative measure of quantity was obtained. Analysis of variance and Turkey tests were then done to assess statistical significance (P less than 0.05). The ground strokes showed low activity in all muscles tested during the preparation phase. During the acceleration phase, both the backhand and forehand showed a generalized increase in all muscle activity. Both strokes showed marked activity of the wrist extensors and, in addition, the forehand showed high activity in the brachialis and biceps. In the follow-through phase, there was a generalized decrease in muscle activity. The serve showed low activity in all muscles tested during the wind-up phase. The wrist extensors increased their activity in the cooking phase, with marked activity in late cooking. The pronator teres and the triceps showed increased activity in the acceleration phase. Follow-through phase showed low muscle activity except for the biceps, which increased in late follow-through. In conclusion, the muscles of the elbow help stabilize the elbow as a unit during the ground strokes in these high level players. Power in the serve comes from increased activity in the triceps and pronator teres. The predominant activity of the wrist extensors in all strokes may be one explanation for predisposition to injury. PMID:2757127

  17. Electromyographic analysis of elbow function in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Morris, M; Jobe, F W; Perry, J; Pink, M; Healy, B S

    1989-01-01

    Muscle activity about the elbow during tennis strokes in nine professional and collegiate level players was studied using indwelling EMG and high speed photography. Eight muscles were evaluated for the serve, forehand, and backhand strokes. The serve was divided into six stages and the ground strokes into four stages. EMG tracings were subjected to analog-to-digital conversion and a relative measure of quantity was obtained. Analysis of variance and Turkey tests were then done to assess statistical significance (P less than 0.05). The ground strokes showed low activity in all muscles tested during the preparation phase. During the acceleration phase, both the backhand and forehand showed a generalized increase in all muscle activity. Both strokes showed marked activity of the wrist extensors and, in addition, the forehand showed high activity in the brachialis and biceps. In the follow-through phase, there was a generalized decrease in muscle activity. The serve showed low activity in all muscles tested during the wind-up phase. The wrist extensors increased their activity in the cooking phase, with marked activity in late cooking. The pronator teres and the triceps showed increased activity in the acceleration phase. Follow-through phase showed low muscle activity except for the biceps, which increased in late follow-through. In conclusion, the muscles of the elbow help stabilize the elbow as a unit during the ground strokes in these high level players. Power in the serve comes from increased activity in the triceps and pronator teres. The predominant activity of the wrist extensors in all strokes may be one explanation for predisposition to injury.

  18. [ANTHROPOMETRIC CHILEAN TABLE TENNIS PLAYERS OF COMPETITIVE FEATURES].

    PubMed

    Yáñez Sepúlveda, Rodrigo; Barraza, Fernando; Rosales Soto, Giovanni; Báez, Eduardo; Tuesta, Marcelo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the anthropometric profile and somatotype of a sample of 50 players table tennis competitive with an average age 21.6 (± 3.1) years belonging to the Chilean team and institutions of higher education in the region of Valparaiso. The evaluation was conducted under the protocol marking the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK) for the measurement procedure 25 restricted profile variables described by Drinkwater, Norton and Olds. Order to determine the body composition, fat, muscle, bone, skin and tissue residual was considered, using the equations proposed by Kerr. The body shape is characterized through somatotype method proposed by Carter. The sample was divided into 4 groups; Chilean Selection, Traditional Private Universities, State Universities and Private Universities Traditional Nontraditional. Regarding body composition; the Chilean team has the highest values of muscle tissue (45.6 ± 1.7%) and the lowest values of adipose tissue (25.2 ± 1.8%), also presenting lesser value in the Σ 6 skinfolds (mm) . The results showed no significant differences between groups in the aforementioned variables. In general somatotype compared by analyzing SANOVA no significant differences between groups (p = 0.409) was observed. The results show a biotype with such a characterization of endo-mesomorph with average values (4,1-4,9-1,8). This study provides updated data biotypological reference for this sport that can be used for decision-making.

  19. [ANTHROPOMETRIC CHILEAN TABLE TENNIS PLAYERS OF COMPETITIVE FEATURES].

    PubMed

    Yáñez Sepúlveda, Rodrigo; Barraza, Fernando; Rosales Soto, Giovanni; Báez, Eduardo; Tuesta, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the anthropometric profile and somatotype of a sample of 50 players table tennis competitive with an average age 21.6 (± 3.1) years belonging to the Chilean team and institutions of higher education in the region of Valparaiso. The evaluation was conducted under the protocol marking the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK) for the measurement procedure 25 restricted profile variables described by Drinkwater, Norton and Olds. Order to determine the body composition, fat, muscle, bone, skin and tissue residual was considered, using the equations proposed by Kerr. The body shape is characterized through somatotype method proposed by Carter. The sample was divided into 4 groups; Chilean Selection, Traditional Private Universities, State Universities and Private Universities Traditional Nontraditional. Regarding body composition; the Chilean team has the highest values of muscle tissue (45.6 ± 1.7%) and the lowest values of adipose tissue (25.2 ± 1.8%), also presenting lesser value in the Σ 6 skinfolds (mm) . The results showed no significant differences between groups in the aforementioned variables. In general somatotype compared by analyzing SANOVA no significant differences between groups (p = 0.409) was observed. The results show a biotype with such a characterization of endo-mesomorph with average values (4,1-4,9-1,8). This study provides updated data biotypological reference for this sport that can be used for decision-making. PMID:26545537

  20. Implementation of Motor Imagery during Specific Aerobic Training Session in Young Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Aymeric; Di Rienzo, Franck; Pialoux, Vincent; Simon, Germain; Skinner, Sarah; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of implementing motor imagery (MI) during specific tennis high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) sessions on groundstroke performance in young elite tennis players. Stroke accuracy and ball velocity of forehand and backhand drives were evaluated in ten young tennis players, immediately before and after having randomly performed two HIIT sessions. One session included MI exercises during the recovery phases, while the other included verbal encouragements for physical efforts and served as control condition. Results revealed that similar cardiac demand was observed during both sessions, while implementing MI maintained groundstroke accuracy. Embedding MI during HIIT enabled the development of physical fitness and the preservation of stroke performance. These findings bring new insight to tennis and conditioning coaches in order to fulfil the benefits of specific playing HIIT sessions, and therefore to optimise the training time. PMID:26580804

  1. Implementation of Motor Imagery during Specific Aerobic Training Session in Young Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Aymeric; Di Rienzo, Franck; Pialoux, Vincent; Simon, Germain; Skinner, Sarah; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of implementing motor imagery (MI) during specific tennis high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) sessions on groundstroke performance in young elite tennis players. Stroke accuracy and ball velocity of forehand and backhand drives were evaluated in ten young tennis players, immediately before and after having randomly performed two HIIT sessions. One session included MI exercises during the recovery phases, while the other included verbal encouragements for physical efforts and served as control condition. Results revealed that similar cardiac demand was observed during both sessions, while implementing MI maintained groundstroke accuracy. Embedding MI during HIIT enabled the development of physical fitness and the preservation of stroke performance. These findings bring new insight to tennis and conditioning coaches in order to fulfil the benefits of specific playing HIIT sessions, and therefore to optimise the training time.

  2. Implementation of Motor Imagery during Specific Aerobic Training Session in Young Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, Aymeric; Di Rienzo, Franck; Pialoux, Vincent; Simon, Germain; Skinner, Sarah; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of implementing motor imagery (MI) during specific tennis high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) sessions on groundstroke performance in young elite tennis players. Stroke accuracy and ball velocity of forehand and backhand drives were evaluated in ten young tennis players, immediately before and after having randomly performed two HIIT sessions. One session included MI exercises during the recovery phases, while the other included verbal encouragements for physical efforts and served as control condition. Results revealed that similar cardiac demand was observed during both sessions, while implementing MI maintained groundstroke accuracy. Embedding MI during HIIT enabled the development of physical fitness and the preservation of stroke performance. These findings bring new insight to tennis and conditioning coaches in order to fulfil the benefits of specific playing HIIT sessions, and therefore to optimise the training time. PMID:26580804

  3. From endurance to power athletes: The changing shape of successful male professional tennis players.

    PubMed

    Gale-Watts, Adam S; Nevill, Alan M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify whether the relative shape and size characteristics of elite male tennis players have changed over time, and in addition whether any anthropometric parameters characterise the more successful players in Grand Slam tournaments. The height and body mass of the players qualifying for the first round in all four Grand Slam tennis tournaments during the period 1982-2011 was obtained, and successful players defined arbitrarily as those reaching round 3 or beyond. Body mass index (BMI) and the reciprocal ponderal index (RPI) were used as our measures of body shape. Multilevel modelling was used to explore the trend over time using non-linear polynomials. The results suggest that the body shape of elite tennis players has changed over time, with a non-linear (cubic polynomial regression model) increase in BMI and a similar non-linear decline in the RPI. BMI, reflecting greater muscle mass rather than greater adiposity, has emerged as an important factor associated with success, identified by a significantly positive (steeper) "successful player"-by-"year" interaction term. The evidence that the RPI of elite tennis players has also decreased over time, together with a significantly negative "successful player"-by-"year" interaction term, suggests that a more linear (ectomorphic) body shape is a less important factor in terms of success. These results suggest that elite male tennis players are becoming more power trained athletes as opposed to endurance athletes, with greater muscle mass being an important factor associated with success in all Grand Slam tournaments.

  4. Iliopsoas and Gluteal Muscles Are Asymmetric in Tennis Players but Not in Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, Jose A. L.; Dorado, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of iliopsoas (IL) and gluteal muscles (GL) in tennis and soccer players. Methods IL and GL volumes were determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in male professional tennis (TP) and soccer players (SP), and in non-active control subjects (CG) (n = 8, 15 and 6, respectively). Results The dominant and non-dominant IL were hypertrophied in TP (24 and 36%, respectively, P<0.05) and SP (32 and 35%, respectively, P<0.05). In TP the asymmetric hypertrophy of IL (13% greater volume in the non-dominant than in the dominant IL, P<0.01) reversed the side-to-side relationship observed in CG (4% greater volume in the dominant than in the contralateral IL, P<0.01), whilst soccer players had similar volumes in both sides (P = 0.87). The degree of side-to-side asymmetry decreased linearly from the first lumbar disc to the pubic symphysis in TP (r = −0.97, P<0.001), SP (r = −0.85, P<0.01) and CG (r = −0.76, P<0.05). The slope of the relationship was lower in SP due to a greater hypertrophy of the proximal segments of the dominant IL. Soccer and CG had similar GL volumes in both sides (P = 0.11 and P = 0.19, for the dominant and contralateral GL, respectively). GL was asymmetrically hypertrophied in TP. The non-dominant GL volume was 20% greater in TP than in CG (P<0.05), whilst TP and CG had similar dominant GL volumes (P = 0.14). Conclusions Tennis elicits an asymmetric hypertrophy of IL and reverses the normal dominant-to-non-dominant balance observed in non-active controls, while soccer is associated to a symmetric hypertrophy of IL. Gluteal muscles are asymmetrically hypertrophied in TP, while SP display a similar size to that observed in controls. It remains to be determined whether the different patterns of IL and GL hypertrophy may influence the risk of injury. PMID:21829539

  5. ACUTE CHANGES IN PASSIVE GLENOHUMERAL ROTATION FOLLOWING TENNIS PLAY EXPOSURE IN ELITE FEMALE PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Kibler, W. Ben; Myers, Natalie L.; Smith, Belinda J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alterations in glenohumeral (GH) rotation especially internal rotation and total range of motion have been associated with altered GH kinematics and susceptibility to injury. Researchers have evaluated long-term change in baseball and tennis players, and short-term changes in baseball players. However, acute (short-term) changes in GH rotation have not been evaluated in tennis players. Hypotheses/Purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify short-term glenohumeral rotational changes within a group of professional women's tennis players following competitive play. It was hypothesized that there would be acute alterations in passive glenohumeral internal rotation and total range of motion following episodes of tennis play. Study Design Cohort Study Methods Passive glenohumeral external rotation (GER), glenohumeral internal rotation (GIR), and total range of motion (TROM) were evaluated in a cohort of 79 professional adult female tennis players. Measurements were taken at three different time points (TP): baseline before match play (TP1), immediately after match play (TP2), and 24-hours after baseline (TP3). Results There was a statistically significant decrease in the mean GIR from TP1 (43 ± 11 °) to TP2 (39 ± 9 °) (p=0.002) and from TP1 to TP3 (38 ± 10 °) (p=0.001). All measures were at the level of minimal detectable change (MDC) (4 °) indicating clinical significance. There was a decrease in mean TROM from TP1 (146 ± 11 °) to TP2 (142 ± 12 °) (p=0.04), which was not above MDC (7 °). Subgroup analysis showed that 47% of the players demonstrated a decrease in GIR beyond MDC, and 37% demonstrated a decrease in TROM beyond MDC. GER remained unchanged across all time points (p>0.05). Conclusion Both GIR and TROM were reduced after acute exposure to tennis play. In a large subgroup of the cohort, the changes were clinically significant and approached values previously demonstrated to be associated with

  6. A kinematic comparison of the overhand throw and tennis serve in tennis players: how similar are they really?

    PubMed

    Reid, Machar; Giblin, Georgia; Whiteside, David

    2015-01-01

    Tennis coaches often use the fundamental throwing skill as a training tool to develop the service action. However, recent skill acquisition literature questions the efficacy of non-specific training drills for developing complex sporting movements. Thus, this study examined the mechanical analogy of the throw and the tennis serve at three different levels of development. A 500 Hz, 22-camera VICON MX motion capture system recorded 28 elite female tennis players (prepubescent (n = 10), pubescent (n = 10), adult (n = 8)) as they performed flat serves and overhand throws. Two-way ANOVAs with repeated measures and partial correlations (controlling for group) assessed the strength and nature of the mechanical associations between the tasks. Preparatory mechanics were similar between the two tasks, while during propulsion, peak trunk twist and elbow extension velocities were significantly higher in the throw, yet the peak shoulder internal rotation and wrist flexion angular velocities were significantly greater in the serve. Furthermore, all of these peak angular velocities occurred significantly earlier in the serve. Ultimately, although the throw may help to prime transverse trunk kinematics in the serve, mechanics in the two skills appear less similar than many coaches seem to believe. Practitioners should, therefore, be aware that the throw appears less useful for priming the specific arm kinematics and temporal phasing that typifies the tennis serve. PMID:25517627

  7. A kinematic comparison of the overhand throw and tennis serve in tennis players: how similar are they really?

    PubMed

    Reid, Machar; Giblin, Georgia; Whiteside, David

    2015-01-01

    Tennis coaches often use the fundamental throwing skill as a training tool to develop the service action. However, recent skill acquisition literature questions the efficacy of non-specific training drills for developing complex sporting movements. Thus, this study examined the mechanical analogy of the throw and the tennis serve at three different levels of development. A 500 Hz, 22-camera VICON MX motion capture system recorded 28 elite female tennis players (prepubescent (n = 10), pubescent (n = 10), adult (n = 8)) as they performed flat serves and overhand throws. Two-way ANOVAs with repeated measures and partial correlations (controlling for group) assessed the strength and nature of the mechanical associations between the tasks. Preparatory mechanics were similar between the two tasks, while during propulsion, peak trunk twist and elbow extension velocities were significantly higher in the throw, yet the peak shoulder internal rotation and wrist flexion angular velocities were significantly greater in the serve. Furthermore, all of these peak angular velocities occurred significantly earlier in the serve. Ultimately, although the throw may help to prime transverse trunk kinematics in the serve, mechanics in the two skills appear less similar than many coaches seem to believe. Practitioners should, therefore, be aware that the throw appears less useful for priming the specific arm kinematics and temporal phasing that typifies the tennis serve.

  8. Fitness testing of tennis players: How valuable is it?

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Ulbricht, Alexander; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In tennis, sport-specific technical skills are predominant factors, although a complex profile of physical performance factors is also required. The fitness test batteries assist in examining tennis players’ capabilities for performance at different levels in the laboratory as well as in the field, in the junior or elite level. While laboratory tests can be, and are, used to evaluate basic performance characteristics of athletes in most individual sports, in a more specific approach, field-based methods are better suited to the demands of complex intermittent sports like tennis. A regular test battery performed at different periods of the year allows to obtain an individual's performance profile, as well as the ability to prescribe individual training interventions. Thus, the aim of the present review was to describe and evaluate the different physical tests recommended and used by practitioners, sports scientists and institutions (national tennis federations). PMID:24668375

  9. Late Stage Freiberg Infraction in a Division I Collegiate Tennis Player

    PubMed Central

    Faircloth, Johnnie; Mitchell, Jennifer J; Edwards, David S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Freiberg infraction is a relatively rare osteochondrosis of the metatarsal head. The etiology of Freiberg infraction is poorly understood but likely involves factors such as, repetitive trauma and vascular compromise. When discovered early, Freiberg infraction can be cured with conservative measures but late presentations require surgical intervention. We present a case of stage V Freiberg infraction in a Division I collegiate tennis player that responded to conservative treatment. Case Report: A 20 year old female tennis player presented with worsening of her chronic foot pain. She had tenderness to palpation and diminished range of motion at the second metatarsophalangeal joint. Radiographs revealed late stage Freiberg infraction of the second metatarsal. This patient’s pain was successfully treated with conservative measures; prolonging her collegiate tennis career. Conclusion: Surgical intervention is required for definitive treatment of late stage Freiberg infraction. Conservative treatment can be effective in prolonging the athlete’s career. PMID:27299057

  10. Player sensitivity to changes in string tension in a tennis racket.

    PubMed

    Bower, R; Cross, R

    2003-03-01

    Forty-one advanced recreational tennis players were tested to determine their ability to detect differences in string tension in a tennis racket. Subjects were given pairs of rackets that varied in tension by up to 98 N (10 kg) and were asked whether they noticed a difference in tension and if so, which racket was strung at a higher tension. Only 11 (27%) of those tested could correctly identify a tension difference of 5 kg (11 lb) or less. Fifteen (37%) could not pick a difference of 10 kg (22 lb). To examine the importance of sound as a means of discrimination, an additional test was undertaken where participants wore earplugs. Of the 26 subjects undertaking this additional test, only 6 (23%) were successful. It was concluded that advanced recreational tennis players demonstrated limited ability to correctly identify differences in string tension and that impact sound was an important factor for those participants who were successful at various levels of discrimination.

  11. Characteristics of upper limb muscular strength in male wheelchair tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyo-Bin; Park, Seung-Jae; Kim, Al-Chan; Jang, Jee-Hun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics of muscular strength in upper limb and to present the preliminary information for development of sports injury prevention program and exercise rehabilitation program in wheelchair tennis players. Participants were 12 male wheelchair tennis players. Muscular strength was measured in shoulder and elbow joints with isokinetic dynamometer. Ipsilateral (IR) and bilateral (BR) balance ratio were calculated with isokinetic strength at 60°/sec. As a result, extension strength (ES) was significantly higher than flexion strength (FS) (P< 0.001), and IR in both sides and BR in ES were maintained within normal range whereas BR in FS was lower than normal range in shoulder joint. In elbow joint FS was significantly higher than ES (P< 0.05), and IR and BR were lower than normal range. Consequently, the different tendency in IR between shoulder and elbow joints and lower IR and BR in elbow joints could be the characteristics in male wheelchair tennis players. It is suggested that flexor strengthening program in nondominant shoulder joint, extensor strengthening program in both elbow joint, and flexor strengthening program in non-dominant elbow joint should be introduced for male wheelchair tennis players. PMID:24278887

  12. A comparison of the activity profile and physiological demands between advanced and recreational veteran tennis players.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Sanz-Rivas, David; Sanchez-Muñoz, Cristobal; Pluim, Babette M; Tiemessen, Ivo; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether differences in playing level influence the activity profile and physiological demands of advanced and recreational veteran men's tennis players during an hour of tennis match play. Ten advanced (International Tennis Number [ITN] 3-5, 45.3 +/- 5.1 years) and 10 recreational (ITN 7-9, 44.8 +/- 4.7 years) veteran men's tennis players participated in 4 experimental sessions: (1) an ITN on-court assessment, (2) a laboratory incremental treadmill test, (3) an hour of simulated tennis match play, and (4) 30 minutes of tennis match play using a portable gas analyzer. Subjects' VO2 and heart rate (HR) were recorded by portable analyzers. Moreover, energy expenditure was evaluated by indirect calorimetry. Temporal structure and distance covered were determined from video recordings. Subjects' VO2 (24.5 +/- 4.1 vs. 23.3 +/- 3 ml x kg x min), HR (148.3 +/- 11.5 vs. 149.8 +/- 8.4 bpm), duration of rallies (DR) (6.3 +/- 4.1 vs. 7.6 +/- 5.5 seconds), and effective playing time (EPT) (21.7 +/- 5.0 vs. 23.6 +/- 5.4%), HR (148.3 +/- 11.5 vs. 149.8 +/- 8.4 bpm), and energy expenditure (263.1 +/- 49.4 and 281.3 +/- 61.8 kcal x min) during play did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) between advanced and recreational players. The advanced players covered significantly more meters than the recreational players during their 1-hour tennis matches (mean +/- SD: 3568.8 +/- 532.2 vs. 3173.8 +/- 226 m, p < 0.01) at lower running speeds. The results indicate that, independently of ability, tennis match play satisfies the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations for quantity and quality of exercise for the development and maintenance of cardiovascular fitness in healthy adults and seems to be a viable and highly popular mode of healthy activity.

  13. Winning the game: brain processes in expert, young elite and amateur table tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Sebastian; Brölz, Ellen; Scholz, David; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Keune, Philipp M.; Hautzinger, Martin; Birbaumer, Niels; Strehl, Ute

    2014-01-01

    This study tested two hypotheses: (1) compared with amateurs and young elite, expert table tennis players are characterized by enhanced cortical activation in the motor and fronto-parietal cortex during motor imagery in response to table tennis videos; (2) in elite athletes, world rank points are associated with stronger cortical activation. To this aim, electroencephalographic data were recorded in 14 expert, 15 amateur and 15 young elite right-handed table tennis players. All subjects watched videos of a serve and imagined themselves responding with a specific table tennis stroke. With reference to a baseline period, power decrease/increase of the sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) during the pretask- and task period indexed the cortical activation/deactivation (event-related desynchronization/synchronization, ERD/ERS). Regarding hypothesis (1), 8–10 Hz SMR ERD was stronger in elite athletes than in amateurs with an intermediate ERD in young elite athletes in the motor cortex. Regarding hypothesis (2), there was no correlation between ERD/ERS in the motor cortex and world rank points in elite experts, but a weaker ERD in the fronto-parietal cortex was associated with higher world rank points. These results suggest that motor skill in table tennis is associated with focused excitability of the motor cortex during reaction, movement planning and execution with high attentional demands. Among elite experts, less activation of the fronto-parietal attention network may be necessary to become a world champion. PMID:25386126

  14. Who is the best player ever? A complex network analysis of the history of professional tennis.

    PubMed

    Radicchi, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    We considered all matches played by professional tennis players between 1968 and 2010, and, on the basis of this data set, constructed a directed and weighted network of contacts. The resulting graph showed complex features, typical of many real networked systems studied in literature. We developed a diffusion algorithm and applied it to the tennis contact network in order to rank professional players. Jimmy Connors was identified as the best player in the history of tennis according to our ranking procedure. We performed a complete analysis by determining the best players on specific playing surfaces as well as the best ones in each of the years covered by the data set. The results of our technique were compared to those of two other well established methods. In general, we observed that our ranking method performed better: it had a higher predictive power and did not require the arbitrary introduction of external criteria for the correct assessment of the quality of players. The present work provides novel evidence of the utility of tools and methods of network theory in real applications. PMID:21339809

  15. On-court endurance and performance testing in competitive male tennis players.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Vallejo, Lisímaco; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were (a) to establish a specific endurance test procedure for competitive tennis players, combining performance, physiological and technical parameters and (b) to determine the relationship between these parameters and their competitive levels. Thirty-eight competitive male tennis players (age, 18.2 ± 1.3 years; height, 180 ± 0.08 cm; body mass, 72.7 ± 8.6 kg; mean ± SD) performed a specific endurance field test. Performance (level achieved), physiological (heart rate, maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), and ventilatory thresholds (VT1, VT2), and technical parameters (technical effectiveness [TE]) were assessed. Bivariate and multivariate models for predicting performance level were developed. Technical effectiveness was 63.1 ± 9.1%, with 3 identified phases throughout the test (adaptation, maximum effectiveness, and steady decline). Low to moderate correlations were found between performance (final stage), physiological (VT1, VT2) and TE, and competitive performance (r = 0.35-0.61; p = 0.038-0.000). Technical effectiveness explained 37% of variability in competitive performance (r = 0.61; p = 0.001). Using TE combined with VT2 or predictability increased explaining approximately 55% (p < 0.05) of the variance in competitive performance. The present study showed the usefulness of a field test including physiological and performance elements in high-caliber tennis players, and VT2 values combined with TE were good predictors of tennis performance.

  16. Effects of stimulus cueing on the acquisition of groundstrokes by beginning tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Susan G.

    1987-01-01

    A multiple baseline design was used to examine the effects of stimulus self-cueing on the acquisition of forehand and backhand returns by beginning tennis players (N = 24). A four-step verbal cueing program was introduced during intervention. Both the use of the technique and the successful number of returns were recorded. Each group showed an acceleration in skill acquisition during intervention, with both forehand and backhand returns improving over 45% from baseline conditions. Implications for the teaching of beginning tennis skills are discussed. PMID:16795709

  17. Relationship of Speed, Agility, Neuromuscular Power, and Selected Anthropometrical Variables and Performance Results of Male and Female Junior Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Munivrana, Goran; Filipčić, Aleš; Filipčić, Tjaša

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to analyses the relation between the selected speed, agility, and neuromuscular power test items. The sample of subjects consisted of 154 male and 152 female young tennis players. Using six motor and three anthropometrical tests we investigate differences between males and females and between two age categories. Finally, we analyzed the relation between motor and anthropometrical tests and a player's tennis performance. The correlation between the two agility test items and 5-m sprint is very large in male players, while only moderate with 20-m sprint in female category. Male tennis players have higher correlations between speed test items and neuromuscular test items. The speed test item (5-m sprint) has large correlation with a player's tennis performance. One-way analysis of variance results indicated that young male tennis players performed significantly better than females in all motor test items. Significant differences between genders have not been revealed only in the body mass index. Differences between the males aged 18& under and 16& under have been noted as significant in all test items, except the vertical jump, while differences between the females have been noted as significant in three anthropometrical tests, quarter jump, and the fan-drill test. Regression analyses have shown that the system of prediction variables explains a relatively small part of variance (46%--males and 40%--females). In both genders, it has been revealed that test items measuring speed significantly influence a player's tennis performance. PMID:26434018

  18. Relationship of Speed, Agility, Neuromuscular Power, and Selected Anthropometrical Variables and Performance Results of Male and Female Junior Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Munivrana, Goran; Filipčić, Aleš; Filipčić, Tjaša

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to analyses the relation between the selected speed, agility, and neuromuscular power test items. The sample of subjects consisted of 154 male and 152 female young tennis players. Using six motor and three anthropometrical tests we investigate differences between males and females and between two age categories. Finally, we analyzed the relation between motor and anthropometrical tests and a player's tennis performance. The correlation between the two agility test items and 5-m sprint is very large in male players, while only moderate with 20-m sprint in female category. Male tennis players have higher correlations between speed test items and neuromuscular test items. The speed test item (5-m sprint) has large correlation with a player's tennis performance. One-way analysis of variance results indicated that young male tennis players performed significantly better than females in all motor test items. Significant differences between genders have not been revealed only in the body mass index. Differences between the males aged 18& under and 16& under have been noted as significant in all test items, except the vertical jump, while differences between the females have been noted as significant in three anthropometrical tests, quarter jump, and the fan-drill test. Regression analyses have shown that the system of prediction variables explains a relatively small part of variance (46%--males and 40%--females). In both genders, it has been revealed that test items measuring speed significantly influence a player's tennis performance.

  19. Male professional tennis players maintain constant serve speed and accuracy over long matches on grass courts.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Baglione, Roberto; Cardey, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    The potential effect of fatigue on stroke production in tennis players is still controversial. The aim of this study was to analyse the tennis serve speed and accuracy in prolonged male professional matches played on grass courts. We analysed tennis serve statistics from five-set Wimbledon matches (n = 15; 30 players). Results showed that match duration averaged 208.3 ± 28.3 min. The overall serve speed was 177.0 ± 10.2 km/h in the first set and 176.1 ± 11.7 km/h in the fifth set (p = .34). The difference of all accuracy values of first set serves was not significantly different from those of the fifth set: percentage of valid first serves, 63.1 ± 11.1% vs. 62.3 ± 11.8%, respectively (p = .78); percentage of "aces", 11.2 ± 9.1% vs. 10.0 ± 8.9%, respectively (p = .39); percentage of "winners", 2.6 ± 7.6% vs. 1.2 ± 2.2%, respectively (p = .36); percentage of "double faults", 2.8 ± 3.0% vs. 2.8 ± 3.4% (p = .97). In conclusion, tennis players were able to maintain constant serve speed and accuracy over five-set matches played on grass courts. Professional tennis players are capable of overcoming fatigue and/or make movement adjustments to effectively perform complex technical strokes like the serve throughout matches played on grass courts lasting more than 3 h in average. PMID:26960753

  20. Large Asymmetric Hypertrophy of Rectus Abdominis Muscle in Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Dorado, Cecilia; Alayón, Santiago; Calbet, Jose A. L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of the musculus rectus abdominis (RA) in professional tennis players. Methods The volume of the RA was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 8 professional male tennis players and 6 non-active male control subjects. Results Tennis players had 58% greater RA volume than controls (P = 0.01), due to hypertrophy of both the dominant (34% greater volume, P = 0.02) and non-dominant (82% greater volume, P = 0.01) sides, after accounting for age, the length of the RA muscle and body mass index (BMI) as covariates. In tennis players, there was a marked asymmetry in the development of the RA, which volume was 35% greater in the non-dominant compared to the dominant side (P<0.001). In contrast, no side-to-side difference in RA volume was observed in the controls (P = 0.75). The degree of side-to-side asymmetry increased linearly from the first lumbar disc to the pubic symphysis (r = 0.97, P<0.001). Conclusions Professional tennis is associated with marked hypertrophy of the musculus rectus abdominis, which achieves a volume that is 58% greater than in non-active controls. Rectus abdominis hypertrophy is more marked in the non-dominant than in the dominant side, particularly in the more distal regions. Our study supports the concept that humans can differentially recruit both rectus abdominis but also the upper and lower regions of each muscle. It remains to be determined if this disequilibrium raises the risk of injury. PMID:21209832

  1. Male professional tennis players maintain constant serve speed and accuracy over long matches on grass courts.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Baglione, Roberto; Cardey, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    The potential effect of fatigue on stroke production in tennis players is still controversial. The aim of this study was to analyse the tennis serve speed and accuracy in prolonged male professional matches played on grass courts. We analysed tennis serve statistics from five-set Wimbledon matches (n = 15; 30 players). Results showed that match duration averaged 208.3 ± 28.3 min. The overall serve speed was 177.0 ± 10.2 km/h in the first set and 176.1 ± 11.7 km/h in the fifth set (p = .34). The difference of all accuracy values of first set serves was not significantly different from those of the fifth set: percentage of valid first serves, 63.1 ± 11.1% vs. 62.3 ± 11.8%, respectively (p = .78); percentage of "aces", 11.2 ± 9.1% vs. 10.0 ± 8.9%, respectively (p = .39); percentage of "winners", 2.6 ± 7.6% vs. 1.2 ± 2.2%, respectively (p = .36); percentage of "double faults", 2.8 ± 3.0% vs. 2.8 ± 3.4% (p = .97). In conclusion, tennis players were able to maintain constant serve speed and accuracy over five-set matches played on grass courts. Professional tennis players are capable of overcoming fatigue and/or make movement adjustments to effectively perform complex technical strokes like the serve throughout matches played on grass courts lasting more than 3 h in average.

  2. Kinetics of the upper limb during table tennis topspin forehands in advanced and intermediate players.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi; Kojima, Takeji

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of mechanical energy generation and transfer in the upper limb in generating the racket speed during table tennis topspin forehands. Nine advanced and eight intermediate table tennis players performed the forehand stroke at maximum effort against light and heavy backspin balls. Five high-speed video cameras operating at 200 fps were used to record the motions of the upper body of the players. The joint forces and torques of the racket arm were determined with inverse dynamics, and the amount of mechanical energy generated and transferred in the arm was determined. The shoulder internal rotation torque exerted by advanced players was significantly larger than that exerted by the intermediate players. Owing to a larger shoulder internal rotation torque, the advanced players transferred mechanical energy from the trunk of the body to the upper arm at a higher rate than the intermediate players could. Regression of the racket speed at ball impact on the energy transfer to the upper arm suggests that increase in the energy transfer may be an important factor for enabling intermediate players to generate a higher racket speed at impact in topspin forehands. PMID:22303787

  3. Modeling Longitudinal Changes in 5 m Sprinting Performance Among Young Male Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Tamara; Valente-Dos-Santos, João; Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel J; Malina, Robert M; Huijgen, Barbara C H; Smith, Joanne; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Visscher, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Year-to-year changes in sprinting in youth tennis players were examined in a mixed-longitudinal study (256 male players, aged 10-15 years: 993 measurements). Height (h), body mass (BM), lower limb explosive strength (LLES), and a 5-m sprint were measured over five years. During that period, players were classified as elite or sub-elite. To account for the repeated measurements within the individual nature of longitudinal data, multilevel random effects regression analyses were used. Sprint performance improved with age at each additional 1 year of age, thus predicting ∼.016 sec improvement in five-meter sprint time by all variables of the model. It was possible to predict the performance of elite tennis players in the 5-m sprint (sec) for elite players (1.1493 - (0.0159 ċ centered age) - (0.009 ċ BM) - (0.044 ċ LLES) and sub-elite players (1.1493 - (0.0159 ċ centered age) + 0.0135 - (0.009 ċ BM) - (0.044 ċ LLES) - (0.0557 ċ centered age). Sprint performance differences between elite and sub-elite players was related to longitudinal changes in body size and lower limb strength up until age 13. PMID:27420323

  4. Kinetics of the upper limb during table tennis topspin forehands in advanced and intermediate players.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi; Kojima, Takeji

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of mechanical energy generation and transfer in the upper limb in generating the racket speed during table tennis topspin forehands. Nine advanced and eight intermediate table tennis players performed the forehand stroke at maximum effort against light and heavy backspin balls. Five high-speed video cameras operating at 200 fps were used to record the motions of the upper body of the players. The joint forces and torques of the racket arm were determined with inverse dynamics, and the amount of mechanical energy generated and transferred in the arm was determined. The shoulder internal rotation torque exerted by advanced players was significantly larger than that exerted by the intermediate players. Owing to a larger shoulder internal rotation torque, the advanced players transferred mechanical energy from the trunk of the body to the upper arm at a higher rate than the intermediate players could. Regression of the racket speed at ball impact on the energy transfer to the upper arm suggests that increase in the energy transfer may be an important factor for enabling intermediate players to generate a higher racket speed at impact in topspin forehands.

  5. Modeling Longitudinal Changes in 5 m Sprinting Performance Among Young Male Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Tamara; Valente-Dos-Santos, João; Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel J; Malina, Robert M; Huijgen, Barbara C H; Smith, Joanne; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Visscher, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Year-to-year changes in sprinting in youth tennis players were examined in a mixed-longitudinal study (256 male players, aged 10-15 years: 993 measurements). Height (h), body mass (BM), lower limb explosive strength (LLES), and a 5-m sprint were measured over five years. During that period, players were classified as elite or sub-elite. To account for the repeated measurements within the individual nature of longitudinal data, multilevel random effects regression analyses were used. Sprint performance improved with age at each additional 1 year of age, thus predicting ∼.016 sec improvement in five-meter sprint time by all variables of the model. It was possible to predict the performance of elite tennis players in the 5-m sprint (sec) for elite players (1.1493 - (0.0159 ċ centered age) - (0.009 ċ BM) - (0.044 ċ LLES) and sub-elite players (1.1493 - (0.0159 ċ centered age) + 0.0135 - (0.009 ċ BM) - (0.044 ċ LLES) - (0.0557 ċ centered age). Sprint performance differences between elite and sub-elite players was related to longitudinal changes in body size and lower limb strength up until age 13.

  6. Aerobic Fitness and Technical Efficiency at High Intensity Discriminate between Elite and Subelite Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Baiget, E; Iglesias, X; Rodríguez, F A

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether selected physiological, performance and technical parameters derived from an on-court test are capable of discriminating between tennis players of national and international levels. 38 elite and subelite tennis players were divided into international level (INT, n=8) and national level players (NAT, n=30). They all performed a specific endurance field test, and selected physiological (maximum oxygen uptake [V˙O2max], and ventilatory thresholds [VT1 and VT2]), performance (test duration, final stage and hits per test) and technical (technical effectiveness [TE]) parameters were compared. INT showed greater V˙O2max, VO2 at VT2 (ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)), test duration (s), final stage (no.), hits per test (no.) and TE (% of successful hits), as compared with NAT (p<0.05). At high exercise intensity (stages 5 and 6), the INT achieved better TE than NAT (p=0.001-0.004), and the discriminant analyses showed that these technical parameters were the most discriminating factors. These results suggest that this specific endurance field test is capable of discriminating between tennis players at national and international levels, and that the better aerobic condition of the INT is associated with better technical efficiency at higher exercise intensities.

  7. Feasibility and efficacy of progressive electrostimulation strength training for competitive tennis players.

    PubMed

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Bramanti, Jacopo; Jubeau, Marc; Bizzini, Mario; Deley, Gaëlle; Cometti, Gilles

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to show the feasibility of electrostimulation (ES) strength exercise incorporated into tennis sessions during the preparatory season of competitive players, and its impact on anaerobic performance. Twelve tennis players (5 men, 7 women) completed 9 sessions of quadriceps ES (duration: 16 minutes; frequency: 85 Hz; on-off ratio: 5.25-25 seconds) during 3 weeks. The ES sessions were integrated into tennis training sessions. Subjects were baseline tested and retested 1 (week 4), 2 (week 5), 3 (week 6), and 4 weeks (week 7) after the ES training program for maximal quadriceps strength, vertical jump height, and shuttle sprint time. Participants were able to progressively increase ES current amplitude and evoked force throughout the 9 training sessions, with an optimal treatment compliance of 100%. Maximal quadriceps strength significantly increased during the entire duration of the experiment (p < 0.001). Countermovement jump height at week 5 (+5.3%) and week 6 (+6.4%) was significantly higher than at baseline (p < 0.05). In addition, 2 x 10-m sprint time at week 6 was significantly shorter (-3.3%; p = 0.004) compared with pretraining. The 3-week ES strength training program was successfully incorporated into preseason tennis training with a linear progression in all training parameters. Throughout the study period, a delayed enhancement of anaerobic power and stretch-shortening cycle performance was observed. Progressive ES strength training may be safely included in the early tennis season and can lead to improvements in the anaerobic performance of men and women players.

  8. Physiological Responses of Young Tennis Players to Training Drills and Simulated Match Play.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rodrigo V; Cunha, Vivian C R; Zourdos, Michael C; Aoki, Marcelo S; Moreira, Alexandre; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Capitani, Caroline D

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the responses of young tennis players during 5 different training drills and to compare the responses between drills. Ten (17.0 ± 1.2 years) male tennis players participated in this study. Each athlete completed 5 total training drills. Drills 1-4 consisted of each player returning balls from a ball-serving machine and were stroke/time-controlled over 6 points. The fifth drill was a simulated match (SM) play, between 2 opposing players, and also lasted 6 points. The 4 stroke/time-controlled drills had the following strokes/time for each point: drill 1: 2 strokes/∼4 seconds, drill 2: 4 strokes/∼8 seconds, drill 3: 7 strokes/∼14 seconds, drill 4: 10 strokes/∼20 seconds. Peak heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration (LA), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured after the first, third, and sixth point of each drill. Drills were performed in a randomized crossover design; a 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used with significance set at p ≤ 0.05. All dependent variables (HR, LA, and RPE) significantly increased (p ≤ 0.05) as strokes, and time per rally increased in each drill. Furthermore, all variables were elevated to a greater magnitude (p ≤ 0.05) during the 7 and 10 stroke drills after the first, third, and sixth points when compared with the SM and the 2 and 4 stroke drills at the corresponding time points. These results suggest that the physiological responses to tennis training drills were stroke/time-dependent. Therefore, because of the intense intermittent nature of tennis, stroke/time-controlled drills, which require significant physiological demands, should be incorporated along with technically focused shorter drills to fully mimic the conditions of competitive match play. PMID:26382129

  9. Tenosynovial Osteochondromatosis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus in a Division I Tennis Player.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Timothy W; Hogrefe, Christopher P; Hall, Mederic M; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-11-01

    Tenosynovial (extra-articular) chondromatosis (TC) is a condition characterized by the cartilaginous proliferation of synovial cells derived from the synovial lining of bursa and tendon sheaths. These lesions are often multinodular and most commonly present with complaints of swelling or pain. Treatment of TC primarily entails surgical excision. There are no known reports of TC in collegiate athletes. We present a case of TC in a Division I tennis player. PMID:25514138

  10. Acute effects of two different tennis sessions on dorsal and lumbar spine of adult players.

    PubMed

    Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Bonavolontà, Valerio; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Franciosi, Emanuele; Tito, Alessandro; Guidetti, Laura; Baldari, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the dorsal and lumbar spine of expert and recreational tennis players before (pre) and after (post) two different training sessions. The sample consisted of 17 male tennis players, nine expert and eight recreational males (age 21.2 ± 1.6 years). We assessed the back surface by rasterstereography pre and post two different training sessions both lasting 1.5 h: a standard training and a specific over-shoulder shots training session, respectively. Lordotic and kyphotic angle, length, imbalance, inclination for trunk, pelvic torsion, left and right lateral deviation and surface rotation were measured. Tennis expertise (expert versus recreational) significantly affected the surface rotation and right lateral deviation (P < 0.05). Trunk length was affected by intervention (pre versus post) (P < 0.05). Left lateral deviation differed both for type of session (session 1 versus session 2) and intervention (P < 0.001, P < 0.05). Expert tennis players had higher values on surface rotation and right lateral deviation, around or just above physiological values (0-5° and 0-5 mm, respectively). Type of session significantly affected left lateral deviation, indicating that over-shoulder shots lead to a higher stress for the spine; the workload produced by both single sessions led to a shortening effect on trunk length. A single training session can induce acute modifications in some parameters of dorsal and lumbar spine of players. PMID:25536347

  11. Tenosynovial Osteochondromatosis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus in a Division I Tennis Player.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Timothy W; Hogrefe, Christopher P; Hall, Mederic M; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-11-01

    Tenosynovial (extra-articular) chondromatosis (TC) is a condition characterized by the cartilaginous proliferation of synovial cells derived from the synovial lining of bursa and tendon sheaths. These lesions are often multinodular and most commonly present with complaints of swelling or pain. Treatment of TC primarily entails surgical excision. There are no known reports of TC in collegiate athletes. We present a case of TC in a Division I tennis player.

  12. Acute effects of two different tennis sessions on dorsal and lumbar spine of adult players.

    PubMed

    Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Bonavolontà, Valerio; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Franciosi, Emanuele; Tito, Alessandro; Guidetti, Laura; Baldari, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the dorsal and lumbar spine of expert and recreational tennis players before (pre) and after (post) two different training sessions. The sample consisted of 17 male tennis players, nine expert and eight recreational males (age 21.2 ± 1.6 years). We assessed the back surface by rasterstereography pre and post two different training sessions both lasting 1.5 h: a standard training and a specific over-shoulder shots training session, respectively. Lordotic and kyphotic angle, length, imbalance, inclination for trunk, pelvic torsion, left and right lateral deviation and surface rotation were measured. Tennis expertise (expert versus recreational) significantly affected the surface rotation and right lateral deviation (P < 0.05). Trunk length was affected by intervention (pre versus post) (P < 0.05). Left lateral deviation differed both for type of session (session 1 versus session 2) and intervention (P < 0.001, P < 0.05). Expert tennis players had higher values on surface rotation and right lateral deviation, around or just above physiological values (0-5° and 0-5 mm, respectively). Type of session significantly affected left lateral deviation, indicating that over-shoulder shots lead to a higher stress for the spine; the workload produced by both single sessions led to a shortening effect on trunk length. A single training session can induce acute modifications in some parameters of dorsal and lumbar spine of players.

  13. Physiological Responses of Young Tennis Players to Training Drills and Simulated Match Play.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rodrigo V; Cunha, Vivian C R; Zourdos, Michael C; Aoki, Marcelo S; Moreira, Alexandre; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Capitani, Caroline D

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the responses of young tennis players during 5 different training drills and to compare the responses between drills. Ten (17.0 ± 1.2 years) male tennis players participated in this study. Each athlete completed 5 total training drills. Drills 1-4 consisted of each player returning balls from a ball-serving machine and were stroke/time-controlled over 6 points. The fifth drill was a simulated match (SM) play, between 2 opposing players, and also lasted 6 points. The 4 stroke/time-controlled drills had the following strokes/time for each point: drill 1: 2 strokes/∼4 seconds, drill 2: 4 strokes/∼8 seconds, drill 3: 7 strokes/∼14 seconds, drill 4: 10 strokes/∼20 seconds. Peak heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration (LA), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured after the first, third, and sixth point of each drill. Drills were performed in a randomized crossover design; a 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used with significance set at p ≤ 0.05. All dependent variables (HR, LA, and RPE) significantly increased (p ≤ 0.05) as strokes, and time per rally increased in each drill. Furthermore, all variables were elevated to a greater magnitude (p ≤ 0.05) during the 7 and 10 stroke drills after the first, third, and sixth points when compared with the SM and the 2 and 4 stroke drills at the corresponding time points. These results suggest that the physiological responses to tennis training drills were stroke/time-dependent. Therefore, because of the intense intermittent nature of tennis, stroke/time-controlled drills, which require significant physiological demands, should be incorporated along with technically focused shorter drills to fully mimic the conditions of competitive match play.

  14. The effect of ball compression on the match-play characteristics of elite junior tennis players.

    PubMed

    Kachel, Kim; Buszard, Tim; Reid, Machar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to examine the effect of equipment scaling, through the modification of tennis ball compression, on elite junior tennis players (aged 10 years) within a match-play context. The two types of ball compressions that were compared were the standard compression (the normal ball) and 75% compression (termed the modified ball). Ten boys and 10 girls participated in the study. Participants were stratified into pairs based on their Australian Age Ranking and gender. Each pair played two two-set matches: one match with standard compression balls and one match with modified balls. The characteristics of each match were analysed and compared. The results showed that the use of the modified ball increased rally speed, allowed players to strike the ball at a lower (more comfortable) height on their groundstrokes and increased the number of balls played at the net. Ball compression had no effect on the relative number of winners, forehands, backhands, first serves in and double faults. The results are discussed in relation to skill acquisition for skilled junior tennis players. PMID:25093957

  15. The effect of ball compression on the match-play characteristics of elite junior tennis players.

    PubMed

    Kachel, Kim; Buszard, Tim; Reid, Machar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to examine the effect of equipment scaling, through the modification of tennis ball compression, on elite junior tennis players (aged 10 years) within a match-play context. The two types of ball compressions that were compared were the standard compression (the normal ball) and 75% compression (termed the modified ball). Ten boys and 10 girls participated in the study. Participants were stratified into pairs based on their Australian Age Ranking and gender. Each pair played two two-set matches: one match with standard compression balls and one match with modified balls. The characteristics of each match were analysed and compared. The results showed that the use of the modified ball increased rally speed, allowed players to strike the ball at a lower (more comfortable) height on their groundstrokes and increased the number of balls played at the net. Ball compression had no effect on the relative number of winners, forehands, backhands, first serves in and double faults. The results are discussed in relation to skill acquisition for skilled junior tennis players.

  16. Physiological Responses to On-Court vs Running Interval Training in Competitive Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Sanz-Rivas, David; Sanchez-Muñoz, Cristobal; de la Aleja Tellez, Jose Gonzalez; Buchheit, Martin; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare heart rate (HR), blood lactate (LA) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) responses to a tennis-specific interval training (i.e., on-court) session with that of a matched-on-time running interval training (i.e., off-court). Eight well-trained, male (n = 4) and female (n = 4) tennis players (mean ± SD; age: 16.4 ± 1.8 years) underwent an incremental test where peak treadmill speed, maximum HR (HRmax) and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) were determined. The two interval training protocols (i.e., off- court and on-court) consisted of 4 sets of 120 s of work, interspersed with 90 s rest. Percentage of HRmax (95.9 ± 2.4 vs. 96.1 ± 2.2%; p = 0.79), LA (6.9 ± 2.5 vs. 6.2 ± 2.4 mmol·L(-1); p = 0.14) and RPE (16.7 ± 2.1 vs. 16.3 ± 1.8; p = 0.50) responses were similar for off-court and on-court, respectively. The two interval training protocols used in the present study have equivalent physiological responses. Longitudinal studies are still warranted but tennis-specific interval training sessions could represent a time-efficient alternative to off-court (running) interval training for the optimization of the specific cardiorespiratory fitness in tennis players. Key pointsOn-court interval training protocol can be used as an alternative to running interval trainingTechnical/tactical training should be performed under conditions that replicate the physical and technical demands of a competitive matchDuring the competitive season tennis on-court training might be preferred to off-court training.

  17. The asymmetry of pectoralis muscles is greater in male prepubertal than in professional tennis players.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Dorado, Cecilia; Idoate, Fernando; González-Henríquez, Juan J; Serrano-Sanchez, Jose A; Calbet, Jose A L

    2016-10-01

    It is generally accepted that preadolescents have a limited capacity to develop muscle hypertrophy in response to exercise compared with older populations; however, studies are scarce and conflicting. The main aim of the present study was to assess if playing tennis is associated with the hypertrophy of dominant pectoralis muscles (PM) in professional (PRO) and in prepubescent tennis players (PRE). A secondary aim was to assess if the degree of asymmetry of PM is greater in PRO than PRE. The volume of PM of both sides was determined using magnetic resonance imaging in 8 male PRO (21.9 years), 6 male PRE (11 years, Tanner 1-2) and 12 male non-active controls (6 adults: 23.5 years; and 6 prepubescents: 10.7 years, Tanner 1-2). PRO and PRE had 15 and 30% greater volume, respectively, in the dominant than in the contralateral PM (P < .01). No significant side-to-side differences in PM volume were observed in the non-active controls (3%, P = .34 in adults and 5%, P = .17 in children). The degree of side-to-side asymmetry in PM volume was greater in PRE than in PRO (P < .05). In conclusion, tennis practice is associated with marked hypertrophy of dominant PM in tennis players, even at prepubertal age, whilst non-active age-matched control subjects display similar volumes in both sides. The larger asymmetry observed in PRE than in PRO may indicate a greater relative loading in the children or increased contralateral hypertrophy in the professionals. This study demonstrates that prepubertal children respond with marked hypertrophy to loading by tennis.

  18. Tactical proficiency among table tennis players with and without intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Van Biesen, Debbie; Mactavish, Jennifer; Vanlandewijck, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The effect of intellectual impairment on sports performance has received limited attention by researchers. As a contribution to closing this gap, the purpose of the present investigation was to examine the differences in tactical proficiency between table tennis players with and without intellectual disabilities (ID). These groups were matched for training-volume and experience and consisted of 41 male (age = 27±8) and 30 female (age= 28±8) elite players with ID and a reference group of 12 male (age= 24±12) and 5 female (age= 20±9) players without ID. In two different test settings - one a World Championship and the other a training camp - the players in each group performed 60 semi-standardised rallies against the same opponent. Players were told that 12 sets of five identical services would be delivered, and their goal was to return the service with the intention of 'winning the point'. The test results were validated for this study, to compute tactical proficiency scores (maximal score of eight points) for each player. A two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) revealed significantly lower proficiency scores for players with ID than for those without ID. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed that within each series of five rallies, starting with identical services, all participants were able to significantly improve their tactical proficiency gradually, but players without ID scored 4.3±0.5 from the first ball on, and while athletes with ID only 3.3±0.7 after five balls. The results of this study indicate that ID is associated with decreased tactical proficiency in table tennis. PMID:23923980

  19. Tennis Play Intensity Distribution and Relation with Aerobic Fitness in Competitive Players.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to describe the relative intensity of simulated tennis play based on the cumulative time spent in three metabolic intensity zones, and (ii) to determine the relationships between this play intensity distribution and the aerobic fitness of a group of competitive players. 20 male players of advanced to elite level (ITN) performed an incremental on-court specific endurance tennis test to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and the first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1, VT2). Ventilatory and gas exchange parameters were monitored using a telemetric portable gas analyser (K4 b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy). Two weeks later the participants played a simulated tennis set against an opponent of similar level. Intensity zones (1: low, 2: moderate, and 3: high) were delimited by the individual VO2 values corresponding to VT1 and VT2, and expressed as percentage of maximum VO2 and heart rate. When expressed relative to VO2max, percentage of playing time in zone 1 (77 ± 25%) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than in zone 2 (20 ± 21%) and zone 3 (3 ± 5%). Moderate to high positive correlations were found between VT1, VT2 and VO2max, and the percentage of playing time spent in zone 1 (r = 0.68-0.75), as well as low to high inverse correlations between the metabolic variables and the percentage of time spent in zone 2 and 3 (r = -0.49-0.75). Players with better aerobic fitness play at relatively lower intensities. We conclude that players spent more than 75% of the time in their low-intensity zone, with less than 25% of the time spent at moderate to high intensities. Aerobic fitness appears to determine the metabolic intensity that players can sustain throughout the game. PMID:26098638

  20. Tennis Play Intensity Distribution and Relation with Aerobic Fitness in Competitive Players.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to describe the relative intensity of simulated tennis play based on the cumulative time spent in three metabolic intensity zones, and (ii) to determine the relationships between this play intensity distribution and the aerobic fitness of a group of competitive players. 20 male players of advanced to elite level (ITN) performed an incremental on-court specific endurance tennis test to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and the first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1, VT2). Ventilatory and gas exchange parameters were monitored using a telemetric portable gas analyser (K4 b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy). Two weeks later the participants played a simulated tennis set against an opponent of similar level. Intensity zones (1: low, 2: moderate, and 3: high) were delimited by the individual VO2 values corresponding to VT1 and VT2, and expressed as percentage of maximum VO2 and heart rate. When expressed relative to VO2max, percentage of playing time in zone 1 (77 ± 25%) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than in zone 2 (20 ± 21%) and zone 3 (3 ± 5%). Moderate to high positive correlations were found between VT1, VT2 and VO2max, and the percentage of playing time spent in zone 1 (r = 0.68-0.75), as well as low to high inverse correlations between the metabolic variables and the percentage of time spent in zone 2 and 3 (r = -0.49-0.75). Players with better aerobic fitness play at relatively lower intensities. We conclude that players spent more than 75% of the time in their low-intensity zone, with less than 25% of the time spent at moderate to high intensities. Aerobic fitness appears to determine the metabolic intensity that players can sustain throughout the game.

  1. Tennis Play Intensity Distribution and Relation with Aerobic Fitness in Competitive Players

    PubMed Central

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to describe the relative intensity of simulated tennis play based on the cumulative time spent in three metabolic intensity zones, and (ii) to determine the relationships between this play intensity distribution and the aerobic fitness of a group of competitive players. 20 male players of advanced to elite level (ITN) performed an incremental on-court specific endurance tennis test to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and the first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1, VT2). Ventilatory and gas exchange parameters were monitored using a telemetric portable gas analyser (K4 b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy). Two weeks later the participants played a simulated tennis set against an opponent of similar level. Intensity zones (1: low, 2: moderate, and 3: high) were delimited by the individual VO2 values corresponding to VT1 and VT2, and expressed as percentage of maximum VO2 and heart rate. When expressed relative to VO2max, percentage of playing time in zone 1 (77 ± 25%) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than in zone 2 (20 ± 21%) and zone 3 (3 ± 5%). Moderate to high positive correlations were found between VT1, VT2 and VO2max, and the percentage of playing time spent in zone 1 (r = 0.68–0.75), as well as low to high inverse correlations between the metabolic variables and the percentage of time spent in zone 2 and 3 (r = -0.49–0.75). Players with better aerobic fitness play at relatively lower intensities. We conclude that players spent more than 75% of the time in their low-intensity zone, with less than 25% of the time spent at moderate to high intensities. Aerobic fitness appears to determine the metabolic intensity that players can sustain throughout the game. PMID:26098638

  2. The influence of shoe drop on the kinematics and kinetics of children tennis players.

    PubMed

    Herbaut, Alexis; Chavet, Pascale; Roux, Maxime; Guéguen, Nils; Gillet, Christophe; Barbier, Franck; Simoneau-Buessinger, Emilie

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the immediate effects of reducing the shoe drop (i.e. the difference between the heel and the forefoot height) on the kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremities of children tennis players performing a tennis-specific movement. Thirteen children tennis players performed a series of simulated open stance forehands wearing 3 pairs of shoes differing only in the drop: 0 (D0), 6 (D6) and the control condition of 12 mm (D12). Two embedded forceplates and a motion capture system were used to analyse the ground reaction forces and ankle and knee joint angles and moments of the leading lower limb. In D6 compared with D12, the peak impact force was reduced by 24% (p = .004) and the ankle was less dorsiflexed at foot strike (p = .037). In D0 compared with D12, the peak impact force was reduced by 17% (p = .049), the ankle was less dorsiflexed at foot strike (p = .045) and the knee was more flexed at foot strike (p = .007). In addition, 4 out of 13 participants (31%) presented a forefoot strike pattern for some of the trials in D0. No difference was observed across shoe conditions for the peak knee extensor moment (p = .658) or the peak ankle plantarflexor moment (p = .071). The results provide preliminary data supporting the hypothesis that for children tennis players, using a 6-mm lower shoe drop might reduce heel impact forces and thus limit potentially impact-related injuries. PMID:27210455

  3. The influence of shoe drop on the kinematics and kinetics of children tennis players.

    PubMed

    Herbaut, Alexis; Chavet, Pascale; Roux, Maxime; Guéguen, Nils; Gillet, Christophe; Barbier, Franck; Simoneau-Buessinger, Emilie

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the immediate effects of reducing the shoe drop (i.e. the difference between the heel and the forefoot height) on the kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremities of children tennis players performing a tennis-specific movement. Thirteen children tennis players performed a series of simulated open stance forehands wearing 3 pairs of shoes differing only in the drop: 0 (D0), 6 (D6) and the control condition of 12 mm (D12). Two embedded forceplates and a motion capture system were used to analyse the ground reaction forces and ankle and knee joint angles and moments of the leading lower limb. In D6 compared with D12, the peak impact force was reduced by 24% (p = .004) and the ankle was less dorsiflexed at foot strike (p = .037). In D0 compared with D12, the peak impact force was reduced by 17% (p = .049), the ankle was less dorsiflexed at foot strike (p = .045) and the knee was more flexed at foot strike (p = .007). In addition, 4 out of 13 participants (31%) presented a forefoot strike pattern for some of the trials in D0. No difference was observed across shoe conditions for the peak knee extensor moment (p = .658) or the peak ankle plantarflexor moment (p = .071). The results provide preliminary data supporting the hypothesis that for children tennis players, using a 6-mm lower shoe drop might reduce heel impact forces and thus limit potentially impact-related injuries.

  4. Positive and negative stimuli in relation to tennis players' reaction time.

    PubMed

    Mead, T P; Drowatzky, J N; Hardin-Crosby, L

    2000-02-01

    Research has indicated that negative and positive thoughts may affect sport performance. The purpose of this analogue study was to assess whether negative and positive stimuli influenced tennis performance similar to positive and negative thought. The reaction time (RT) of 40 competitive tennis players was measured during a timed response to a tennis ball rotating in a topspin, sidespin, or backspin direction on the computer screen. Immediately prior to the ball presentation, a phrase (accessory stimulus) was presented visually or aurally. The accessory stimulus provided either positive (e.g., 'nice shot') or negative information (e.g., 'bad shot') followed by the subject's name. Analysis showed a main effect only for the type of spin. The slowest RT occurred when responding to a tennis ball rotating in a backspin direction. A significant interaction was found for the sensory modality (audition vs vision) and polarity (positive vs negative) of the accessory stimulus. RT to negative stimuli was slowest when the accessory stimulus was presented aurally. The quickest RT to positive stimuli occurred when the accessory stimulus was presented aurally. These results indicated that negative and positive stimuli, when presented aurally, affected performance as positive and negative thoughts measured in other studies. Not measured was whether negative and positive stimuli actually produce the negative and positive thoughts, respectively, that have been reported to affect performance.

  5. Positive and negative stimuli in relation to tennis players' reaction time.

    PubMed

    Mead, T P; Drowatzky, J N; Hardin-Crosby, L

    2000-02-01

    Research has indicated that negative and positive thoughts may affect sport performance. The purpose of this analogue study was to assess whether negative and positive stimuli influenced tennis performance similar to positive and negative thought. The reaction time (RT) of 40 competitive tennis players was measured during a timed response to a tennis ball rotating in a topspin, sidespin, or backspin direction on the computer screen. Immediately prior to the ball presentation, a phrase (accessory stimulus) was presented visually or aurally. The accessory stimulus provided either positive (e.g., 'nice shot') or negative information (e.g., 'bad shot') followed by the subject's name. Analysis showed a main effect only for the type of spin. The slowest RT occurred when responding to a tennis ball rotating in a backspin direction. A significant interaction was found for the sensory modality (audition vs vision) and polarity (positive vs negative) of the accessory stimulus. RT to negative stimuli was slowest when the accessory stimulus was presented aurally. The quickest RT to positive stimuli occurred when the accessory stimulus was presented aurally. These results indicated that negative and positive stimuli, when presented aurally, affected performance as positive and negative thoughts measured in other studies. Not measured was whether negative and positive stimuli actually produce the negative and positive thoughts, respectively, that have been reported to affect performance. PMID:10769904

  6. The influence of tennis court surfaces on player perceptions and biomechanical response.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, Chelsea; Damm, Loïc; Clarke, James; Carré, Matt; Capel-Davis, Jamie; Miller, Stuart; Stiles, Victoria; Dixon, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to examine player perceptions and biomechanical responses to tennis surfaces and to evaluate the influence of prior clay court experience. Two groups with different clay experiences (experience group, n = 5 and low-experience group, n = 5) performed a 180° turning movement. Three-dimensional ankle and knee movements (50 Hz), plantar pressure of the turning step (100 Hz) and perception data (visual analogue scale questionnaire) were collected for two tennis courts (acrylic and clay). Greater initial knee flexion (acrylic 20. 8 ± 11.2° and clay 32.5 ± 9.4°) and a more upright position were reported on the clay compared to the acrylic court (P < 0.05). This suggests adaptations to increase player stability on clay. Greater hallux pressures and lower midfoot pressures were observed on the clay court, allowing for sliding whilst providing grip at the forefoot. Players with prior clay court experience exhibited later peak knee flexion compared to those with low experience. All participants perceived the differences in surface properties between courts and thus responded appropriately to these differences. The level of previous clay court experience did not influence players' perceptions of the surfaces; however, those with greater clay court experience may reduce injury risk as a result of reduced loading through later peak knee flexion. PMID:26699792

  7. Comparing technical proficiency of elite table tennis players with intellectual disability: simulation testing versus game play.

    PubMed

    Van Biesen, Debbie; Mactavish, Jennifer J; Vanlandewijck, Yves C

    2014-04-01

    Technical skill proficiency among elite table tennis players with intellectual disabilities (ID) was investigated in this study using two approaches: an off-court simulation testing protocol and an on-court, standardized observational framework during game play. Participants included 24 players with ID (M age = 25 yr., SD = 6; M IQ = 61, SD = 9), the top 16 performers, 13 men and 11 women, at the International Federation for sport for para-athletes with an intellectual disability (Inas) World Championships. Self-reported table tennis training experience of the players was 13 +/- 5 yr. In the Simulation Testing condition, players were instructed to play five sets of basic and five sets of advanced skills, which were subsequently assessed by experts using a standardized and validated observational protocol. The same protocol was used to assess the same skills during Game Play. Ratings of overall technical proficiency were not significantly different between Simulation Testing and Game Play conditions. There was a strong positive correlation between technical proficiency measured during Game Play vs Simulation Testing for the variables flick, topspin forehand, and topspin backhand. No correlations were found for the variables contra, block, and push. Insight into this relationship is important for future development of classification systems for ID athletes in the Paralympic Games, because comparing competition observation with the athlete's potential shown during the classification session is essential information for classifiers to confirm the athlete's competition class.

  8. Importance of the ITF Junior Girls' Circuit in the development of women professional tennis players.

    PubMed

    Reid, Machar; Crespo, Miguel; Santilli, Luca

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we examined the extent to which ranking in professional women's tennis can be predicted by that in the top 20 International Tennis Federation's Junior Circuit. The names, nationalities, and birth dates of all players who achieved a top-20 girls' year-end ranking from 1995 to 2002 were recorded, with their progress through the professional ranks tracked to March 2008. Ninety-nine percent of top-20 ranked girls achieved a professional women's ranking. Stepwise regression analysis revealed peak junior ranking and the age at which that rank was achieved to be predictors of future professional ranking (r(2) = 0.133, P < 0.05). The following regression equation showed the achievement of a top-20 junior rank as a reasonable benchmark in the development of professional women players: log-transformed predicted professional rank = -0.552 + (0.032 x junior rank + 0.116 x age at junior rank). The predominant court surface on which junior players honed their skills was also implicated in professional ranking success, with clay-court play linked to the development of higher-ranked players (P < or = 0.01).

  9. The influence of tennis court surfaces on player perceptions and biomechanical response.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, Chelsea; Damm, Loïc; Clarke, James; Carré, Matt; Capel-Davis, Jamie; Miller, Stuart; Stiles, Victoria; Dixon, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to examine player perceptions and biomechanical responses to tennis surfaces and to evaluate the influence of prior clay court experience. Two groups with different clay experiences (experience group, n = 5 and low-experience group, n = 5) performed a 180° turning movement. Three-dimensional ankle and knee movements (50 Hz), plantar pressure of the turning step (100 Hz) and perception data (visual analogue scale questionnaire) were collected for two tennis courts (acrylic and clay). Greater initial knee flexion (acrylic 20. 8 ± 11.2° and clay 32.5 ± 9.4°) and a more upright position were reported on the clay compared to the acrylic court (P < 0.05). This suggests adaptations to increase player stability on clay. Greater hallux pressures and lower midfoot pressures were observed on the clay court, allowing for sliding whilst providing grip at the forefoot. Players with prior clay court experience exhibited later peak knee flexion compared to those with low experience. All participants perceived the differences in surface properties between courts and thus responded appropriately to these differences. The level of previous clay court experience did not influence players' perceptions of the surfaces; however, those with greater clay court experience may reduce injury risk as a result of reduced loading through later peak knee flexion.

  10. Sleep restriction and serving accuracy in performance tennis players, and effects of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Reyner, L A; Horne, J A

    2013-08-15

    Athletes often lose sleep on the night before a competition. Whilst it is unlikely that sleep loss will impair sports mostly relying on strength and endurance, little is known about potential effects on sports involving psychomotor performance necessitating judgement and accuracy, rather than speed, as in tennis for example, and where caffeine is 'permitted'. Two studies were undertaken, on 5h sleep (33%) restriction versus normal sleep, on serving accuracy in semi-professional tennis players. Testing (14:00 h-16:00 h) comprised 40 serves into a (1.8 m×1.1 m) 'service box' diagonally, over the net. Study 1 (8 m; 8 f) was within-Ss, counterbalanced (normal versus sleep restriction). Study 2 (6m;6f -different Ss) comprised three conditions (Latin square), identical to Study 1, except for an extra sleep restriction condition with 80 mg caffeine vs placebo in a sugar-free drink, given (double blind), 30 min before testing. Both studies showed significant impairments to serving accuracy after sleep restriction. Caffeine at this dose had no beneficial effect. Study 1 also assessed gender differences, with women significantly poorer under all conditions, and non-significant indications that women were more impaired by sleep restriction (also seen in Study 2). We conclude that adequate sleep is essential for best performance of this type of skill in tennis players and that caffeine is no substitute for 'lost sleep'. 210. PMID:23916998

  11. Technical proficiency among table tennis players with and without intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Van Biesen, Debbie; Mactavish, Jennifer; Pattyn, Nele; Vanlandewijck, Yves

    2012-12-01

    A relatively small body of research addresses the effect of intellectual impairment on proficiency in sport. The aim in the present study was to determine whether the technical proficiency of table tennis players (TTP) with and without intellectual disability (ID), matched for years of training experience, are different. The sample consisted of 71 elite TTP with ID (41 males, age=27±8 years, IQ=61±9; and 30 females, age=28±8 years, IQ=57±10; M±SD) and a comparison group of 17 players (12 males; age=24±12 years; and 5 females, age=20±9 years) without ID. All were assessed using a test-battery that included 10 sets of five basic and five advanced technical skills. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) revealed no gender differences in proficiency. The total score on technical proficiency for ID players (63.7%±12.5) ranged between 53% (advanced strokes) and 76% (basic strokes). Table tennis players without ID scored significantly better: 87.6%±6.2 (range: 80-94%). The significance of these differences in technical proficiency held even when delimiting the comparison to the top 8 players (age=25.9±7.0, IQ=61.8±9.8) with ID and counter-parts without ID who competed at regional levels in their country. The top eight players scored 73.1%±7.4 (range: 65-81.6%). These results suggest that impaired cognitive functioning may have a direct bearing on technical proficiency in sport.

  12. Balance training exercises decrease lower-limb strength asymmetry in young tennis players.

    PubMed

    Sannicandro, Italo; Cofano, Giacomo; Rosa, Rosa A; Piccinno, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    The issue of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs has been the subject of numerous recent investigations concerning many different contact, limited-contact and non-contact sports. The presence of strength asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young athletes practicing various sporting disciplines is considered an intrinsic risk factor for injury; in such cases, compensation strategies should thus be implemented aimed at eliminating, or at least limiting, the degree of asymmetry in order to avoid the negative consequences asymmetries can have upon the health of young sportsmen and women on the long-term. The aim of the present study was to examine the presence of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young tennis players in strength and speed drill performance and to test a specific balance-training programme in its capacity to effectively reduce such asymmetries. Twenty-three young tennis players were randomly assigned to the Experimental Group (EG) (n = 11: 4 females, 7 males; 13.2 ± 0.9 years; 50.8 ± 8.9 Kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m) or Comparison Group (CG) (n = 12: 4 females, 8 males; 13.0 ± 0.9 years; 51.1 ± 9.2 Kg; 1.61 ± 0.09 m). To quantify percent asymmetries in lower-limb strength before (T0) and following (T1) training, performances were assessed in the one-leg hop test (OLH), side-hop test (SH) and side steps and forward 4.115-m test (4m-SSF). Performances in the 10 and 20m sprint tests and the Foran test were also assessed. The EG completed a total of 12 training sessions directed at balance training: two 30-minute sessions/week over a 6-week period. The CG followed an identical training schedule, but training sessions consisted of tennis-specific drills only. The results reveal significant differences between pre- and post-training tests in the EG only: the degree of lower-limb asymmetry was decreased in the EG following completion of the training programme, as assessed using the OLH test (p < 0.001), SH test (p < 0.001) and 4m-SSF test (p < 0

  13. Balance Training Exercises Decrease Lower-Limb Strength Asymmetry in Young Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Sannicandro, Italo; Cofano, Giacomo; Rosa, Rosa A.; Piccinno, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The issue of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs has been the subject of numerous recent investigations concerning many different contact, limited-contact and non-contact sports. The presence of strength asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young athletes practicing various sporting disciplines is considered an intrinsic risk factor for injury; in such cases, compensation strategies should thus be implemented aimed at eliminating, or at least limiting, the degree of asymmetry in order to avoid the negative consequences asymmetries can have upon the health of young sportsmen and women on the long-term. The aim of the present study was to examine the presence of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young tennis players in strength and speed drill performance and to test a specific balance-training programme in its capacity to effectively reduce such asymmetries. Twenty-three young tennis players were randomly assigned to the Experimental Group (EG) (n = 11: 4 females, 7 males; 13.2 ± 0.9 years; 50.8 ± 8.9 Kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m) or Comparison Group (CG) (n = 12: 4 females, 8 males; 13.0 ± 0.9 years; 51.1 ± 9.2 Kg; 1.61 ± 0.09 m). To quantify percent asymmetries in lower-limb strength before (T0) and following (T1) training, performances were assessed in the one-leg hop test (OLH), side-hop test (SH) and side steps and forward 4.115-m test (4m-SSF). Performances in the 10 and 20m sprint tests and the Foran test were also assessed. The EG completed a total of 12 training sessions directed at balance training: two 30-minute sessions/week over a 6-week period. The CG followed an identical training schedule, but training sessions consisted of tennis-specific drills only. The results reveal significant differences between pre- and post-training tests in the EG only: the degree of lower-limb asymmetry was decreased in the EG following completion of the training programme, as assessed using the OLH test (p < 0.001), SH test (p < 0.001) and 4m-SSF test (p < 0

  14. Balance training exercises decrease lower-limb strength asymmetry in young tennis players.

    PubMed

    Sannicandro, Italo; Cofano, Giacomo; Rosa, Rosa A; Piccinno, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    The issue of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs has been the subject of numerous recent investigations concerning many different contact, limited-contact and non-contact sports. The presence of strength asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young athletes practicing various sporting disciplines is considered an intrinsic risk factor for injury; in such cases, compensation strategies should thus be implemented aimed at eliminating, or at least limiting, the degree of asymmetry in order to avoid the negative consequences asymmetries can have upon the health of young sportsmen and women on the long-term. The aim of the present study was to examine the presence of functional asymmetries in the lower-limbs of young tennis players in strength and speed drill performance and to test a specific balance-training programme in its capacity to effectively reduce such asymmetries. Twenty-three young tennis players were randomly assigned to the Experimental Group (EG) (n = 11: 4 females, 7 males; 13.2 ± 0.9 years; 50.8 ± 8.9 Kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m) or Comparison Group (CG) (n = 12: 4 females, 8 males; 13.0 ± 0.9 years; 51.1 ± 9.2 Kg; 1.61 ± 0.09 m). To quantify percent asymmetries in lower-limb strength before (T0) and following (T1) training, performances were assessed in the one-leg hop test (OLH), side-hop test (SH) and side steps and forward 4.115-m test (4m-SSF). Performances in the 10 and 20m sprint tests and the Foran test were also assessed. The EG completed a total of 12 training sessions directed at balance training: two 30-minute sessions/week over a 6-week period. The CG followed an identical training schedule, but training sessions consisted of tennis-specific drills only. The results reveal significant differences between pre- and post-training tests in the EG only: the degree of lower-limb asymmetry was decreased in the EG following completion of the training programme, as assessed using the OLH test (p < 0.001), SH test (p < 0.001) and 4m-SSF test (p < 0

  15. A six-week neuromuscular training program for competitive junior tennis players.

    PubMed

    Barber-Westin, Sue D; Hermeto, Alex A; Noyes, Frank R

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a tennis-specific training program on improving neuromuscular indices in competitive junior players. Tennis is a demanding sport because it requires speed, agility, explosive power, and aerobic conditioning along with the ability to react and anticipate quickly, and there are limited studies that evaluate these indices in young players after a multiweek training program. The program designed for this study implemented the essential components of a previously published neuromuscular training program and also included exercises designed to improve dynamic balance, agility, speed, and strength. Fifteen junior tennis players (10 girls, 5 boys; mean age, 13.0 +/- 1.5 years) who routinely participated in local tournaments and high-school teams participated in the 6-week supervised program. Training was conducted 3 times a week, with sessions lasting 1.5 hours that included a dynamic warm-up, plyometric and jump training, strength training (lower extremity, upper extremity, core), tennis-specific drills, and flexibility. After training, statistically significant improvements and large-to-moderate effect sizes were found in the single-leg triple crossover hop for both legs (p < 0.05), the baseline forehand (p = 0.006) and backhand (p = 0.0008) tests, the service line (p = 0.0009) test, the 1-court suicide (p < 0.0001), the 2-court suicide (p = 0.02), and the abdominal endurance test (p = 0.01). Mean improvements between pretrain and posttrain test sessions were 15% for the single-leg triple crossover hop, 10-11% for the baseline tests, 18% for the service line test, 21% for the 1-court suicide, 10% for the 2-court suicide, and 76% for the abdominal endurance test. No athlete sustained an injury or developed an overuse syndrome as a result of the training program. The results demonstrate that this program is feasible, low in cost, and appears to be effective in improving the majority of neuromuscular indices tested. We accomplished

  16. Association between body height and serve speed in elite tennis players.

    PubMed

    Vaverka, Frantisek; Cernosek, Miroslav

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between the body height (BH) of elite tennis players and their serve speeds: SF (fastest serve in a match), S1 (average speed of the first serve in a match), and S2 (average speed of the second serve in a match). Data were collected from the world's best tennis players who participated in all four Grand Slam tournaments in 2008 (men, n = 78-84, BH = 1.85 +/- 0.07 m; women, n = 70-78, BH = 1.73 +/- 0.07 m). Statistically significant correlations (r) between BH and serve speed were found in all 24 statistical analyses (p < 0.01). The correlation coefficients were similar in men and women. The correlation coefficients of BH with SF and S1 ranged 0.48-0.64 for men and 0.48-0.59 for women. The correlations between BH and S2 were weaker and more variable (r = 0.20-0.50 for men and 0.24-0.42 for women). The BH of the men explained 27%, 30%, and 14% of the variance of SF, S1, and S2, respectively, with corresponding values for female players of 27%, 27%, and 12%.

  17. Enhancing physical performance in elite junior tennis players with a caffeinated energy drink.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco; Abián-Vicén, Javier; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gonzalez-Millán, Cristina; Portillo, Javier; Muñoz, Victor; Juarez, Daniel; Del Coso, Juan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a caffeinated energy drink to enhance physical performance in elite junior tennis players. In 2 different sessions separated by 1 wk, 14 young (16 ± 1 y) elite-level tennis players ingested 3 mg caffeine per kg body mass in the form of an energy drink or the same drink without caffeine (placebo). After 60 min, participants performed a handgrip-strength test, a maximal-velocity serving test, and an 8 × 15-m sprint test and then played a simulated singles match (best of 3 sets). Instantaneous running speed during the matches was assessed using global positioning (GPS) devices. Furthermore, the matches were videotaped and notated afterward. In comparison with the placebo drink, the ingestion of the caffeinated energy drink increased handgrip force by ~4.2% ± 7.2% (P = .03) in both hands, the running pace at high intensity (46.7 ± 28.5 vs 63.3 ± 27.7 m/h, P = .02), and the number of sprints (12.1 ± 1.7 vs 13.2 ± 1.7, P = .05) during the simulated match. There was a tendency for increased maximal running velocity during the sprint test (22.3 ± 2.0 vs 22.9 ± 2.1 km/h, P = .07) and higher percentage of points won on service with the caffeinated energy drink (49.7% ± 9.8% vs 56.4% ± 10.0%, P = .07) in comparison with the placebo drink. The energy drink did not improve ball velocity during the serving test (42.6 ± 4.8 vs 42.7 ± 5.0 m/s, P = .49). The preexercise ingestion of caffeinated energy drinks was effective to enhance some aspects of physical performance of elite junior tennis players. PMID:25158287

  18. Enhancing physical performance in elite junior tennis players with a caffeinated energy drink.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco; Abián-Vicén, Javier; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gonzalez-Millán, Cristina; Portillo, Javier; Muñoz, Victor; Juarez, Daniel; Del Coso, Juan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a caffeinated energy drink to enhance physical performance in elite junior tennis players. In 2 different sessions separated by 1 wk, 14 young (16 ± 1 y) elite-level tennis players ingested 3 mg caffeine per kg body mass in the form of an energy drink or the same drink without caffeine (placebo). After 60 min, participants performed a handgrip-strength test, a maximal-velocity serving test, and an 8 × 15-m sprint test and then played a simulated singles match (best of 3 sets). Instantaneous running speed during the matches was assessed using global positioning (GPS) devices. Furthermore, the matches were videotaped and notated afterward. In comparison with the placebo drink, the ingestion of the caffeinated energy drink increased handgrip force by ~4.2% ± 7.2% (P = .03) in both hands, the running pace at high intensity (46.7 ± 28.5 vs 63.3 ± 27.7 m/h, P = .02), and the number of sprints (12.1 ± 1.7 vs 13.2 ± 1.7, P = .05) during the simulated match. There was a tendency for increased maximal running velocity during the sprint test (22.3 ± 2.0 vs 22.9 ± 2.1 km/h, P = .07) and higher percentage of points won on service with the caffeinated energy drink (49.7% ± 9.8% vs 56.4% ± 10.0%, P = .07) in comparison with the placebo drink. The energy drink did not improve ball velocity during the serving test (42.6 ± 4.8 vs 42.7 ± 5.0 m/s, P = .49). The preexercise ingestion of caffeinated energy drinks was effective to enhance some aspects of physical performance of elite junior tennis players.

  19. The hypertrophy of the lateral abdominal wall and quadratus lumborum is sport-specific: an MRI segmental study in professional tennis and soccer players.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, Jose A; Dorado, Cecilia

    2013-03-01

    The aim was to determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of quadratus lumborum (QL), obliques, and transversus abdominis; the last two considered conjointly (OT), in tennis and soccer players. The volume of QL and OT was determined using magnetic resonance imaging in professional tennis and soccer players, and in non-active controls (n = 8, 14, and 6, respectively). In tennis players the hypertrophy of OT was limited to proximal segments (cephalic segments), while in soccer players it was similar along longitudinal axis. In tennis players the hypertrophy was asymmetric (18% greater volume in the non-dominant than in the dominant OT, p = 0.001), while in soccer players and controls both sides had similar volumes (p > 0.05). In controls, the non-dominant QL was 15% greater than that of the dominant (p = 0.049). Tennis and soccer players had similar volumes in both sides of QL. Tennis alters the dominant-to-non-dominant balance in the muscle volume of the lateral abdominal wall. In tennis the hypertrophy is limited to proximal segments and is greater in the non-dominant side. Soccer, however, is associated to a symmetric hypertrophy of the lateral abdominal wall. Tennis and soccer elicit an asymmetric hypertrophy of QL.

  20. The Effect of Moderate and High-Intensity Fatigue on Groundstroke Accuracy in Expert and Non-Expert Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Mark; Al-Nakeeb, Yahya; Hankey, Joanne; Nevill, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Exploring the effects of fatigue on skilled performance in tennis presents a significant challenge to the researcher with respect to ecological validity. This study examined the effects of moderate and high-intensity fatigue on groundstroke accuracy in expert and non-expert tennis players. The research also explored whether the effects of fatigue are the same regardless of gender and player’s achievement motivation characteristics. 13 expert (7 male, 6 female) and 17 non-expert (13 male, 4 female) tennis players participated in the study. Groundstroke accuracy was assessed using the modified Loughborough Tennis Skills Test. Fatigue was induced using the Loughborough Intermittent Tennis Test with moderate (70%) and high-intensities (90%) set as a percentage of peak heart rate (attained during a tennis-specific maximal hitting sprint test). Ratings of perceived exertion were used as an adjunct to the monitoring of heart rate. Achievement goal indicators for each player were assessed using the 2 x 2 Achievement Goals Questionnaire for Sport in an effort to examine if this personality characteristic provides insight into how players perform under moderate and high-intensity fatigue conditions. A series of mixed ANOVA’s revealed significant fatigue effects on groundstroke accuracy regardless of expertise. The expert players however, maintained better groundstroke accuracy across all conditions compared to the novice players. Nevertheless, in both groups, performance following high-intensity fatigue deteriorated compared to performance at rest and performance while moderately fatigued. Groundstroke accuracy under moderate levels of fatigue was equivalent to that at rest. Fatigue effects were also similar regardless of gender. No fatigue by expertise, or fatigue by gender interactions were found. Fatigue effects were also equivalent regardless of player’s achievement goal indicators. Future research is required to explore the effects of fatigue on performance in

  1. Differences among Tennis Players Aged 12, 14 And 16 Years in Certain Morphological Characteristics: A Croatian Prospective.

    PubMed

    Novak, Dario; Milanović, Dragan; Barbaros-Tudor, Petar

    2015-09-01

    A sample of young tennis players aged 12, 14 and 16 in Croatia. Sixty (60) tennis players ranked on the scale of the Croatian Tennis Association were analyzed through differences in morphological characteristics, as identified by a standard laboratory diagnostic procedure in Sports-diagnostic Centre of the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of Zagreb. Significant differences were obtained in most of the monitored measures for the assessment of the morphological characteristics but the most significant differences were reflected in the variables for assessment of longitudinal dimensionality of the skeleton and body mass and voluminosity of the body. The statistical significance was defined at p<0.05. These differences may lead to decelerating the development of important fitness abilities (i.e., coordination), but also highlights the importance for changing the official propositions for the category of players between the ages due to the significant differences in certain morphological characteristics among all age categories. This study indicates an importance of understand grow characteristics of young players in order to effectively define tennis players playing style. PMID:26898054

  2. Differences among Tennis Players Aged 12, 14 And 16 Years in Certain Morphological Characteristics: A Croatian Prospective.

    PubMed

    Novak, Dario; Milanović, Dragan; Barbaros-Tudor, Petar

    2015-09-01

    A sample of young tennis players aged 12, 14 and 16 in Croatia. Sixty (60) tennis players ranked on the scale of the Croatian Tennis Association were analyzed through differences in morphological characteristics, as identified by a standard laboratory diagnostic procedure in Sports-diagnostic Centre of the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of Zagreb. Significant differences were obtained in most of the monitored measures for the assessment of the morphological characteristics but the most significant differences were reflected in the variables for assessment of longitudinal dimensionality of the skeleton and body mass and voluminosity of the body. The statistical significance was defined at p<0.05. These differences may lead to decelerating the development of important fitness abilities (i.e., coordination), but also highlights the importance for changing the official propositions for the category of players between the ages due to the significant differences in certain morphological characteristics among all age categories. This study indicates an importance of understand grow characteristics of young players in order to effectively define tennis players playing style.

  3. A Physiological Case Study of a Paralympic Wheelchair Tennis Player: Reflective Practise

    PubMed Central

    Diaper, Nicholas J.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the physiological changes caused by long-term training in a world class female tennis player in preparation for a major championship. Additionally, we aim to describe the training interventions and determine a suitable cooling strategy that was to be used at the 2004 Paralympic Games. The athlete underwent regular physiological assessment during 2003-2004. Physiological measures involved body composition, submaximal and peak oxygen uptake and key variables associated with maximal sprinting. In addition, a suitable match-play cooling intervention and hydration strategy was also explored. Body composition improved over the course of the study. Aerobic capacity fell by 21%, yet the submaximal physiological variables such as lactate profile and pushing economy improved. The trade off of aerobic capacity was perhaps noticeably counter-balanced with the maintenance of the peak sprinting speed and improvement found in the fatigue profile across ten repeated sprints. The extensive training programme was responsible for these changes and these adaptations resulted in a more confident athlete, in peak physical condition leading into the Paralympic Games. It is difficult to appreciate the extent to which this work had an impact on tennis performance given the skill requirements of wheelchair tennis and this warrants future attention. Key points Physiological adaptations were apparent over the two-year training period. The training emphasis resulted in a reduction in aerobic capacity, yet an improvement in repetitive sprint performance was seen leading into the Major competition. An effective cooling technique was identified that could be used during wheelchair tennis performance. The athlete and coaches were complimentary to the physiological support provided, which resulted in a more confident athlete at the Paralympic Games. PMID:24149542

  4. The effects of "grunting" on serve and forehand velocities in collegiate tennis players.

    PubMed

    OʼConnell, Dennis G; Hinman, Martha R; Hearne, Kevin F; Michael, Zach S; Nixon, Sam L

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of grunting on velocity and force production during dynamic and static tennis strokes in collegiate tennis players. Thirty-two (16 male and 16 female) division II and III collegiate tennis athletes with a mean age of 20.2 ± 1.89 years participated as subjects. Demographic and survey data were obtained before subjects completed a 10- to 15-minute warm-up of serves and ground strokes while grunting and not grunting. The subjects performed randomized sets (3 grunting and 3 nongrunting trials) of serves and forehand strokes both dynamically and isometrically. Stroke velocities and isometric forces were measured with a calibrated radar gun and calibrated dynamometer, respectively. Electromyographic (EMG) data from subjects' dominant pectoralis major and contralateral external oblique muscles were recorded and averaged for data analysis. A repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (RM-MANOVA) compared dynamic stroke velocity, isometric muscle force, and peak EMG activity during each breathing condition at the 0.05 alpha level. The RM-MANOVA indicated that dynamic velocity and isometric force of both serves and forehand strokes were significantly greater when the subjects grunted (F = 46.572, p < 0.001, power = 1.00). Peak muscle activity in the external oblique and pectoralis major muscles was also greater when grunting during both types of strokes (F = 3.867, p = 0.05, power = 0.950). Grunt history, gender, perceived advantages, and disadvantages of grunting, years of experience, highest level of competition, and order of testing did not significantly alter any of these results. The velocity, force, and peak muscle activity during tennis serves and forehand strokes are significantly enhanced when athletes are allowed to grunt.

  5. The effects of "grunting" on serve and forehand velocities in collegiate tennis players.

    PubMed

    OʼConnell, Dennis G; Hinman, Martha R; Hearne, Kevin F; Michael, Zach S; Nixon, Sam L

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of grunting on velocity and force production during dynamic and static tennis strokes in collegiate tennis players. Thirty-two (16 male and 16 female) division II and III collegiate tennis athletes with a mean age of 20.2 ± 1.89 years participated as subjects. Demographic and survey data were obtained before subjects completed a 10- to 15-minute warm-up of serves and ground strokes while grunting and not grunting. The subjects performed randomized sets (3 grunting and 3 nongrunting trials) of serves and forehand strokes both dynamically and isometrically. Stroke velocities and isometric forces were measured with a calibrated radar gun and calibrated dynamometer, respectively. Electromyographic (EMG) data from subjects' dominant pectoralis major and contralateral external oblique muscles were recorded and averaged for data analysis. A repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (RM-MANOVA) compared dynamic stroke velocity, isometric muscle force, and peak EMG activity during each breathing condition at the 0.05 alpha level. The RM-MANOVA indicated that dynamic velocity and isometric force of both serves and forehand strokes were significantly greater when the subjects grunted (F = 46.572, p < 0.001, power = 1.00). Peak muscle activity in the external oblique and pectoralis major muscles was also greater when grunting during both types of strokes (F = 3.867, p = 0.05, power = 0.950). Grunt history, gender, perceived advantages, and disadvantages of grunting, years of experience, highest level of competition, and order of testing did not significantly alter any of these results. The velocity, force, and peak muscle activity during tennis serves and forehand strokes are significantly enhanced when athletes are allowed to grunt. PMID:25412161

  6. The Effects of "Grunting" on Serve and Forehand Velocity in Collegiate Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Dennis G; Hinman, Martha; Hearne, Kevin F; Michael, Zach S; Nixon, Sam L

    2014-06-30

    To examine the effects of grunting on velocity and force production during dynamic and static tennis strokes in collegiate tennis players. Thirty-two (16 M and 16 F) Division II and III collegiate tennis athletes with a mean age of 20.2 ± 1.89 years participated as subjects. Demographic and survey data were obtained prior to subjects completing a 10-15 minute warm-up of serves and ground strokes while grunting and not grunting. Subjects performed randomized sets (3 grunting and 3 non-grunting trials) of serves and forehand strokes both dynamically and isometrically. Stroke velocities and isometric forces were measured with a calibrated radar gun and calibrated dynamometer, respectively. EMG data from subjects' dominant pectoralis major and contralateral external oblique muscles were recorded and averaged for data analysis. A repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (RM-MANOVA) compared dynamic stroke velocity, isometric muscle force, and peak EMG activity during each breathing condition at the 0.05 alpha level. The RMANOVA indicated that dynamic velocity and isometric force of both serves and forehand strokes were significantly greater when subjects grunted (F=46.572, p<0.001, power=1.00). Peak muscle activity in the external oblique and pectoralis major muscles was also greater when grunting during both types of strokes (F=3.867, p=0.05, power=0.950). Grunt history, gender, perceived advantages and disadvantages of grunting, years of experience, highest level of competition, and order of testing did not significantly alter any of these results. The velocity, force, and peak muscle activity during tennis serves and forehand strokes are significantly enhanced when athletes are allowed to grunt. PMID:24983852

  7. Upper limb joint muscle/tendon injury and anthropometric adaptations in French competitive tennis players.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Genevois, Cyril; Klouche, Shahnaz; Rahme, Michel; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the upper limb anthropometric dimensions and a history of dominant upper limb injury in tennis players. Dominant and non-dominant wrist, forearm, elbow and arm circumferences, along with a history of dominant upper limb injuries, were assessed in 147 male and female players, assigned to four groups based on location of injury: wrist (n = 9), elbow (n = 25), shoulder (n = 14) and healthy players (n = 99). From anthropometric dimensions, bilateral differences in circumferences and in proportions were calculated. The wrist group presented a significant bilateral difference in arm circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between wrist and forearm, as well as between elbow and arm, compared to the healthy group (6.6 ± 3.1% vs. 4.9 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01; -3.6 ± 3.0% vs. -0.9 ± 2.9%, P < 0.05; and -2.2 ± 2.2% vs. 0.1 ± 3.4%, P < 0.05, respectively). The elbow group displayed asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and arm compared to the healthy group (-0.4 ± 4.3% vs. 1.5 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01). The shoulder group showed significant bilateral difference in elbow circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and elbow when compared to the healthy group (5.8 ± 4.7% vs. 3.1 ± 4.8%, P < 0.05 and -1.7 ± 4.5% vs. 1.4 ± 4.3%, P < 0.01, respectively). These findings suggest that players with a history of injury at the upper limb joint present altered dominant upper limb proportions in comparison with the non-dominant side, and such asymmetrical proportions would appear to be specific to the location of injury. Further studies are needed to confirm the link between location of tennis injury and asymmetry in upper limb proportions using high-tech measurements in symptomatic tennis players. PMID:25881663

  8. Upper limb joint muscle/tendon injury and anthropometric adaptations in French competitive tennis players.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Genevois, Cyril; Klouche, Shahnaz; Rahme, Michel; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the upper limb anthropometric dimensions and a history of dominant upper limb injury in tennis players. Dominant and non-dominant wrist, forearm, elbow and arm circumferences, along with a history of dominant upper limb injuries, were assessed in 147 male and female players, assigned to four groups based on location of injury: wrist (n = 9), elbow (n = 25), shoulder (n = 14) and healthy players (n = 99). From anthropometric dimensions, bilateral differences in circumferences and in proportions were calculated. The wrist group presented a significant bilateral difference in arm circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between wrist and forearm, as well as between elbow and arm, compared to the healthy group (6.6 ± 3.1% vs. 4.9 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01; -3.6 ± 3.0% vs. -0.9 ± 2.9%, P < 0.05; and -2.2 ± 2.2% vs. 0.1 ± 3.4%, P < 0.05, respectively). The elbow group displayed asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and arm compared to the healthy group (-0.4 ± 4.3% vs. 1.5 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01). The shoulder group showed significant bilateral difference in elbow circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and elbow when compared to the healthy group (5.8 ± 4.7% vs. 3.1 ± 4.8%, P < 0.05 and -1.7 ± 4.5% vs. 1.4 ± 4.3%, P < 0.01, respectively). These findings suggest that players with a history of injury at the upper limb joint present altered dominant upper limb proportions in comparison with the non-dominant side, and such asymmetrical proportions would appear to be specific to the location of injury. Further studies are needed to confirm the link between location of tennis injury and asymmetry in upper limb proportions using high-tech measurements in symptomatic tennis players.

  9. Improving the 'how' and 'what' decisions of elite table tennis players.

    PubMed

    Raab, Markus; Masters, Rich S W; Maxwell, Jonathan P

    2005-06-01

    Training methods in sport usually focus on improving either technical or tactical aspects of performance, ignoring the fact that successful performance requires the athlete to simultaneously decide what movement to perform and how it should be executed. Young elite table tennis players were trained, in a first phase, to improve their forehand and backhand movements and, in a second phase, to make a tactical switch between forehand and backhand movements. Half of the players took part in behavioral training focusing on how to perform the required movements, whereas half received additional video feedback about their technical and tactical performance (decision training). The results indicate that improvements of how decisions (techniques) and what decisions (tactics) can occur as a consequence of combining technical and tactical training. These results were stable in delayed Post-test analyses of competitive matches. It was concluded that a combination of both technical and tactical training is beneficial to elite table tennis performers, particularly during early seasonal training programs. PMID:16081176

  10. MONITORING TRAINING LOADS, STRESS, IMMUNE-ENDOCRINE RESPONSES AND PERFORMANCE IN TENNIS PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, A.; Lodo, L.; Nosaka, K.; Coutts, A.J.; Aoki, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    The study aim was to investigate the effect of a periodised pre-season training plan on internal training load and subsequent stress tolerance, immune-endocrine responses and physical performance in tennis players. Well-trained young tennis players (n = 10) were monitored across the pre-season period, which was divided into 4 weeks of progressive overloading training and a 1-week tapering period. Weekly measures of internal training load, training monotony and stress tolerance (sources and symptoms of stress) were taken, along with salivary testosterone, cortisol and immunoglobulin A. One repetition maximum strength, running endurance, jump height and agility were assessed before and after training. The periodised training plan led to significant weekly changes in training loads (i.e. increasing in weeks 3 and 4, decreasing in week 5) and post-training improvements in strength, endurance and agility (P < 0.05). Cortisol concentration and the symptoms of stress also increased in weeks 3 and/or 4, before returning to baseline in week 5 (P < 0.05). Conversely, the testosterone to cortisol ratio decreased in weeks 3 and 4, before returning to baseline in week 5 (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the training plan evoked adaptive changes in stress tolerance and hormonal responses, which may have mediated the improvements in physical performance. PMID:24744485

  11. Automated processes in tennis: do left-handed players benefit from the tactical preferences of their opponents?

    PubMed

    Loffing, Florian; Hagemann, Norbert; Strauss, Bernd

    2010-02-01

    Previous research on laterality in sport suggests an over-representation of left-handers in interactive sports such as tennis and cricket. These findings potentially reflect left-handers' advantage over their right-handed competitors in those sports. Although considered crucial for successful performance, the tactical component of their superiority has yet to be analysed. Two studies were conducted to test for a side bias in tennis players' tactical preferences. In the first study, 108 right- and left-handed players of varying skill watched rallies on a computer screen and had to indicate where they would place the ball in the opposing half. The results showed the tactical preference of players to place more balls on a left-handed opponent's mostly stronger forehand side compared with when faced with a right-hander. In the second study, 54 professional tennis matches involving right- and left-handers were analysed with respect to ball placement frequencies on the opponent's backhand side. Significantly fewer balls were hit to the backhand side of a left-handed opponent, thus replicating the findings of Study 1 in on-court situations. Both studies indicate players' preference to place shots to their right irrespective of their opponent's handedness. Findings support the assumption that left-handers might enjoy a strategic advantage in tennis. PMID:20175013

  12. Automated processes in tennis: do left-handed players benefit from the tactical preferences of their opponents?

    PubMed

    Loffing, Florian; Hagemann, Norbert; Strauss, Bernd

    2010-02-01

    Previous research on laterality in sport suggests an over-representation of left-handers in interactive sports such as tennis and cricket. These findings potentially reflect left-handers' advantage over their right-handed competitors in those sports. Although considered crucial for successful performance, the tactical component of their superiority has yet to be analysed. Two studies were conducted to test for a side bias in tennis players' tactical preferences. In the first study, 108 right- and left-handed players of varying skill watched rallies on a computer screen and had to indicate where they would place the ball in the opposing half. The results showed the tactical preference of players to place more balls on a left-handed opponent's mostly stronger forehand side compared with when faced with a right-hander. In the second study, 54 professional tennis matches involving right- and left-handers were analysed with respect to ball placement frequencies on the opponent's backhand side. Significantly fewer balls were hit to the backhand side of a left-handed opponent, thus replicating the findings of Study 1 in on-court situations. Both studies indicate players' preference to place shots to their right irrespective of their opponent's handedness. Findings support the assumption that left-handers might enjoy a strategic advantage in tennis.

  13. Carbon outclasses wood in racket paddles: Ratings of expert and intermediate tennis players.

    PubMed

    Overney, L S; Michaud, V; Fischer, C; Heubi, J; Veldhuis, L; Blanke, O; Herzog, M H; Månson, J-A

    2010-11-01

    Wooden racket paddles were modified with rubber and carbon fibre laminates and their differences tested in terms of flexural, damping, and coefficient of restitution properties. Four rackets types were designed: a wood reference, wood with rubber, carbon fibre 0°, and carbon fibre 90°. Seven expert and eight intermediate tennis players tested the rackets. To determine which of the four rackets suited the players best, we asked the players to compare the rackets two by two. After each pair tested, participants had to fill out a 4-item questionnaire in which different aspects of the rackets' performance were judged. The most preferred racket was the 0° carbon fibre racket, followed by the 90° carbon fibre racket, the wood racket and, finally, the 1-mm rubber racket. Thus, rackets with the highest stiffness, least damping, and highest coefficient of restitution were the most preferred. Interestingly, although experts and intermediate players overall judged the rackets in very similar ways according to force, vibration, and control, they were sensitive to quite different physical characteristics of the rackets.

  14. The effects of plyometric, tennis-drills, and combined training on reaction, lateral and linear speed, power, and strength in novice tennis players.

    PubMed

    Salonikidis, Konstantinos; Zafeiridis, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Reaction time, first-step quickness, lateral (side steps), and forward speed over short distances are important parameters for tennis performance. The aims of this study were: (i) to diagnose the presence of laterality in tennis lateral movements and (ii) to compare the effects of plyometric training (PT), tennis-specific drills training (TDT), and combined training (CT) on performance in tennis-specific movements and power/strength of lower limbs. Sixty-four novice tennis players (21.1 +/- 1.3 years) were equally (n = 16) assigned to a control (C), PT, TDT, or CT. Training was performed 3 times/week for 9 weeks. Testing was conducted before and after training for the evaluation of reaction time (single lateral step), 4-m lateral and forward sprints, 12-m forward sprints with and without turn, reactive ability, power, and strength. There was a significant difference in lateral speed (side-steps) between the 2 sides (P < 0.05). PT, TDT, or CT improved the 4m lateral and forward sprints (P < 0.05). PT and CT improved also the reaction time of the "slow" side (P < 0.05), whereas TDT and CT improved the 12-m sprint performances with and without turn (P < 0.05). Power and strength improved in most tests after PT and CT. Lateral and forward sprints were correlated (r = -0.50 to -0.75; P < 0.05) with power/strength. In conclusion, PT improved fitness characteristics that rely more on reactive strength and powerful push-off of legs such as, lateral reaction time, 4-m lateral and forward sprints, drop jump and maximal force. TDT improved all 4-m and 12-m sprint performances, whereas CT appeared to incorporate the advantage of both programs and improved most tests items. Tennis coaches should be aware that each training regimen may induce more favorable changes to different aspects of fitness.

  15. Effect of ball size on player reaction and racket acceleration during the tennis volley.

    PubMed

    Andrew, D P S; Chow, J W; Knudson, D V; Tillman, M D

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of ball size on reaction time (from ball projection to initial racket movement), movement time (from ball projection to ball-racket impact), mean rectified acceleration and vibration frequency of the racket during the impact phase (100 ms duration after ball-racket impact) of the tennis volley. Twenty-nine beginning to intermediate level tennis players performed volleys under 18 experimental conditions including variations in lateral contact location (forehand and backhand), ball type (Penn oversize, Wilson oversize, regular size), and ball speed (fast, medium, slow). A ball machine was shielded so that the subjects could not predict the ball trajectory before it was released from the machine. Outcome measures were determined using a miniature uni-axial accelerometer and a Photogate timing device. ANOVA with repeated measures and Tukey's post hoc tests were used in statistical analyses (p < .025). The reaction times for the fast speed were significantly shorter than the corresponding times for the slow speed and the reaction times for the forehand volley were significantly shorter than that of the backhand volley. The significant interaction in movement time between ball speed and ball type indicates that the benefits of the larger ball (to slow the game down) increase as the ball speed increases. No significant effect of ball type or ball speed, or interactions were found on mean rectified acceleration and vibration frequency. These results suggest that oversized balls would not cause an increased load to the hitting arm while executing a tennis volley. PMID:12801215

  16. Effect of ball size on player reaction and racket acceleration during the tennis volley.

    PubMed

    Andrew, D P S; Chow, J W; Knudson, D V; Tillman, M D

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of ball size on reaction time (from ball projection to initial racket movement), movement time (from ball projection to ball-racket impact), mean rectified acceleration and vibration frequency of the racket during the impact phase (100 ms duration after ball-racket impact) of the tennis volley. Twenty-nine beginning to intermediate level tennis players performed volleys under 18 experimental conditions including variations in lateral contact location (forehand and backhand), ball type (Penn oversize, Wilson oversize, regular size), and ball speed (fast, medium, slow). A ball machine was shielded so that the subjects could not predict the ball trajectory before it was released from the machine. Outcome measures were determined using a miniature uni-axial accelerometer and a Photogate timing device. ANOVA with repeated measures and Tukey's post hoc tests were used in statistical analyses (p < .025). The reaction times for the fast speed were significantly shorter than the corresponding times for the slow speed and the reaction times for the forehand volley were significantly shorter than that of the backhand volley. The significant interaction in movement time between ball speed and ball type indicates that the benefits of the larger ball (to slow the game down) increase as the ball speed increases. No significant effect of ball type or ball speed, or interactions were found on mean rectified acceleration and vibration frequency. These results suggest that oversized balls would not cause an increased load to the hitting arm while executing a tennis volley.

  17. Preseason Training: The Effects of a 17-Day High-Intensity Shock Microcycle in Elite Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Sanz-Rivas, David; Sarabia, Jose Manuel; Moya, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    Preseasons in tennis are normally reduced to 5 to 7 weeks duration, and coaches should use an integrated approach to conditioning and skill-based work. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of adding a high-intensity training (HIT) shock microcycle to the normal training content in several physical performance indicators in the preseason training of high-level male tennis players. Over 17 days, 12 male tennis players performed 13 HIT sessions in addition to their usual training. Physical performance tests (30:15 intermittent fitness test [VIFT], 20 m sprint, countermovement jump [CMJ], repeated sprint ability [RSA]) were conducted before (pre-test) and 5 days after the intervention (post-test). After the shock microcycle, results showed a significant increase in the VIFT (p < 0.001; Large ES) and a significant decrease in the mean RSA time (RSAm) (p = 0.002; Small ES), while there were no significant changes in the other parameters analysed (e.g., 20 m, CMJ, best RSA time [RSAb]; percentage of decrement in the RSA [%Dec]). Moreover, the training load (TL) during tennis sessions was significantly higher (p < 0.01; Large ES) than the TL during the integrated sessions, except during the first training session. A 17-day shock microcycle (i.e., 13 HIT sessions) in addition to the regular tennis training significantly improved parameters that can impact physical performance in tennis. Moreover, additional sessions, including running exercises based on the 30:15ITF and on-court specific exercises, were characterised by significantly lower TL than tennis-training sessions. Key pointsHIT shock microcycle increases performance in professional tennis players in a short period of time.The inclusion of additional sessions, with running exercises based on the 30:15ITF and on-court specific exercises, was characterised by a significantly lower TL than tennis-training sessions alone.Coaches should be aware of TL (e.g., RPE) and fatigue-related parameters (e

  18. Preseason Training: The Effects of a 17-Day High-Intensity Shock Microcycle in Elite Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Sanz-Rivas, David; Sarabia, Jose Manuel; Moya, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Preseasons in tennis are normally reduced to 5 to 7 weeks duration, and coaches should use an integrated approach to conditioning and skill-based work. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of adding a high-intensity training (HIT) shock microcycle to the normal training content in several physical performance indicators in the preseason training of high-level male tennis players. Over 17 days, 12 male tennis players performed 13 HIT sessions in addition to their usual training. Physical performance tests (30:15 intermittent fitness test [VIFT], 20 m sprint, countermovement jump [CMJ], repeated sprint ability [RSA]) were conducted before (pre-test) and 5 days after the intervention (post-test). After the shock microcycle, results showed a significant increase in the VIFT (p < 0.001; Large ES) and a significant decrease in the mean RSA time (RSAm) (p = 0.002; Small ES), while there were no significant changes in the other parameters analysed (e.g., 20 m, CMJ, best RSA time [RSAb]; percentage of decrement in the RSA [%Dec]). Moreover, the training load (TL) during tennis sessions was significantly higher (p < 0.01; Large ES) than the TL during the integrated sessions, except during the first training session. A 17-day shock microcycle (i.e., 13 HIT sessions) in addition to the regular tennis training significantly improved parameters that can impact physical performance in tennis. Moreover, additional sessions, including running exercises based on the 30:15ITF and on-court specific exercises, were characterised by significantly lower TL than tennis-training sessions. Key points HIT shock microcycle increases performance in professional tennis players in a short period of time. The inclusion of additional sessions, with running exercises based on the 30:15ITF and on-court specific exercises, was characterised by a significantly lower TL than tennis-training sessions alone. Coaches should be aware of TL (e.g., RPE) and fatigue-related parameters

  19. High-resolution ultrasound of rotator cuff and biceps reflection pulley in non-elite junior tennis players: anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tennis is believed to be potentially harmful for the shoulder, therefore the purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomy of the rotator cuff and the coraco-humeral ligament (CHL) in a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players with high-resolution ultrasound (US). Methods From August 2009 to September 2010 n = 90 a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players (mean age ± standard deviation: 15 ± 3) and a control group of age- and sex- matched subjects were included. Shoulder assessment with a customized standardized protocol was performed. Body mass index, dominant arm, years of practice, weekly hours of training, racket weight, grip (Eastern, Western and semi-Western), kind of strings were recorded. Results Abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 14/90 (15%) players. Two players had supraspinatus tendinosis, two had subacromial impingement and ten had subacromial bursitis. CHL thickness resulted comparable in the dominant and non-dominant arms (11.3 ± 4.4 mm vs. 13 ± 4.2, p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that no association was present among CHL thickness and the variables evaluated. In the control group, abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 6/60 (10%) subjects (sub-acromial bursitis). No statistically significant differences between players and control group were found (p = 0.71). Conclusion In a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players only minor shoulder abnormalities were found. PMID:25034864

  20. The use of anticipatory visual cues by highly skilled tennis players.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jaeho; Carlton, Les G; Chow, John W; Chae, Woen-Sik

    2005-03-01

    The authors examined 13 skilled and 12 novice tennis performers' ability to use visual information of an opponent's movement pattern to anticipate and respond. In Experiment 1, skilled and novice players anticipated the type of stroke and the direction in which the ball was hit in a highly coupled perception-action environment. Both groups of players correctly anticipated at greater than chance levels. Skilled players were significantly more accurate than novices with live and video displays but not with point-light displays. In Experiment 2, the reaction latencies of 10 expert performers were significantly faster when they returned balls hit by a live opponent than when they returned balls projected from a cloaked ball machine. The findings indicate that experts are able to use movement-pattern information to determine shot selection and to use that information to significantly reduce their response delay times. The findings are discussed in terms of perception-action coupling in time-stress activities. PMID:15730949

  1. Psychophysiological stress responses during training and competition in young female competitive tennis players.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, J; Boullosa, D A; Sanz-Rivas, D; Abreu, L; Filaire, E; Mendez-Villanueva, A

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to compare the psychophysiological stress responses during an actual competitive game and a training session in a group of high-level young female tennis players. 12 players were monitored during one match and a training day (i.e., simulated match play). Measurements included salivary cortisol (SC), the revised Competitive Sport Anxiety Inventory, heart rate (HR), and rate of perceived exertion (RPE). Match day elicited higher SC levels for losers at all points in time when compared to winners. All players showed significantly lower SC levels during training when compared to the match at all points in time except during the evening for winners. Winners of match and training situations had significantly higher self-confidence and lower cognitive anxiety and somatic anxiety scores than losers. Heart rate and RPE were significantly higher for losers only during the match (158.9±8.3 vs. 168±6.7 bpm; 12.9±1.2 vs. 15±0.8, for losers and winners, respectively). There were moderate to strong correlations between SC, self-confidence and anxiety scores, and match workload (i.e., HR and RPE) only during the match day. These results indicate that the interplay between psychophysiological responses, match workload and outcome was evident only under real competitive situations. PMID:25251448

  2. Trunk and upper limb muscle activation during flat and topspin forehand drives in young tennis players.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Rouffet, David; Lambalot, Frederic; Brosseau, Olivier; Hautier, Christophe

    2011-02-01

    This study compared EMG activity of young tennis players' muscles during forehand drives in two groups, GD-those able to raise by more than 150% the vertical velocity of racket-face at impact from flat to topspin forehand drives, and GND, those not able to increase their vertical velocity to the same extent. Upper limb joint angles, racket-face velocities, and average EMGrms values, were studied. At similar joint angles, a fall in horizontal velocity and a rise in racket-face vertical velocity from flat to topspin forehand drives were observed. Shoulder muscle activity rose from flat to topspin forehand drives in GND, but not for drives in GD. Forearm muscle activity reduced from flat to topspin forehand drives in GD, but muscle activation was similar in GND. The results show that radial deviation increased racket-face vertical velocity more at impact from the flat to topspin forehand drives than shoulder abduction.

  3. Shoulder injuries in adolescent rugby players

    PubMed Central

    Hodhody, Ghazal; Mackenzie, Tanya A

    2016-01-01

    Background Rugby is a high-intensity contact sport, frequently causing shoulder injuries. Between the ages of 12 years to 18 years, academy and county level players are being selected for professional contracts, making this is a critical stage of their career. The present study aimed to describe the patterns of injury in adolescent rugby players with shoulder injuries. Methods Academy and county level rugby players in the target age group, over a 7-year period, were included in the present study. Data collected included the mechanism of injury, position and level of play, radiology and surgical findings, and recurrence rate at a minimum of 2 years post-surgery. Results One hundred and sixty-nine cases adhered to the inclusion criteria, with most cases involving two or more pathologies in the shoulder (54%). Forwards sustained more shoulder injuries than backs, incurring more labral injuries. By contrast, backs had a higher incidence of bony pathology. The mechanism of injury frequently correlated with player positions. There was a 21% injury recurrence rate, with forwards (7%) and higher level academy players (11%) most likely to suffer a recurrence. Conclusions Shoulder injury patterns in this important group of adolescent contact athletes are complex, with recurrence rates being higher than those in older rugby players. PMID:27583014

  4. Motor skill failure or flow-experience? Functional brain asymmetry and brain connectivity in elite and amateur table tennis players.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Sebastian; Brölz, Ellen; Keune, Philipp M; Wesa, Benjamin; Hautzinger, Martin; Birbaumer, Niels; Strehl, Ute

    2015-02-01

    Functional hemispheric asymmetry is assumed to constitute one underlying neurophysiological mechanism of flow-experience and skilled psycho-motor performance in table tennis athletes. We hypothesized that when initiating motor execution during motor imagery, elite table tennis players show higher right- than left-hemispheric temporal activity and stronger right temporal-premotor than left temporal-premotor theta coherence compared to amateurs. We additionally investigated, whether less pronounced left temporal cortical activity is associated with more world rank points and more flow-experience. To this aim, electroencephalographic data were recorded in 14 experts and 15 amateur table tennis players. Subjects watched videos of an opponent serving a ball and were instructed to imagine themselves responding with a specific table tennis stroke. Alpha asymmetry scores were calculated by subtracting left from right hemispheric 8-13 Hz alpha power. 4-7 Hz theta coherence was calculated between temporal (T3/T4) and premotor (Fz) cortex. Experts showed a significantly stronger shift towards lower relative left-temporal brain activity compared to amateurs and a significantly stronger right temporal-premotor coherence than amateurs. The shift towards lower relative left-temporal brain activity in experts was associated with more flow-experience and lower relative left temporal activity was correlated with more world rank points. The present findings suggest that skilled psycho-motor performance in elite table tennis players reflect less desynchronized brain activity at the left hemisphere and more coherent brain activity between fronto-temporal and premotor oscillations at the right hemisphere. This pattern probably reflect less interference of irrelevant communication of verbal-analytical with motor-control mechanisms which implies flow-experience and predict world rank in experts.

  5. Motor skill failure or flow-experience? Functional brain asymmetry and brain connectivity in elite and amateur table tennis players.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Sebastian; Brölz, Ellen; Keune, Philipp M; Wesa, Benjamin; Hautzinger, Martin; Birbaumer, Niels; Strehl, Ute

    2015-02-01

    Functional hemispheric asymmetry is assumed to constitute one underlying neurophysiological mechanism of flow-experience and skilled psycho-motor performance in table tennis athletes. We hypothesized that when initiating motor execution during motor imagery, elite table tennis players show higher right- than left-hemispheric temporal activity and stronger right temporal-premotor than left temporal-premotor theta coherence compared to amateurs. We additionally investigated, whether less pronounced left temporal cortical activity is associated with more world rank points and more flow-experience. To this aim, electroencephalographic data were recorded in 14 experts and 15 amateur table tennis players. Subjects watched videos of an opponent serving a ball and were instructed to imagine themselves responding with a specific table tennis stroke. Alpha asymmetry scores were calculated by subtracting left from right hemispheric 8-13 Hz alpha power. 4-7 Hz theta coherence was calculated between temporal (T3/T4) and premotor (Fz) cortex. Experts showed a significantly stronger shift towards lower relative left-temporal brain activity compared to amateurs and a significantly stronger right temporal-premotor coherence than amateurs. The shift towards lower relative left-temporal brain activity in experts was associated with more flow-experience and lower relative left temporal activity was correlated with more world rank points. The present findings suggest that skilled psycho-motor performance in elite table tennis players reflect less desynchronized brain activity at the left hemisphere and more coherent brain activity between fronto-temporal and premotor oscillations at the right hemisphere. This pattern probably reflect less interference of irrelevant communication of verbal-analytical with motor-control mechanisms which implies flow-experience and predict world rank in experts. PMID:25616246

  6. Professional tennis players' serve: correlation between segmental angular momentums and ball velocity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caroline; Kulpa, Richard; Delamarche, Paul; Bideau, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the relationships between segmental angular momentum and ball velocity between the following events: ball toss, maximal elbow flexion (MEF), racket lowest point (RLP), maximal shoulder external rotation (MER), and ball impact (BI). Ten tennis players performed serves recorded with a real-time motion capture. Mean angular momentums of the trunk, upper arm, forearm, and the hand-racket were calculated. The anteroposterior axis angular momentum of the trunk was significantly related with ball velocity during the MEF-RLP, RLP-MER, and MER-BI phases. The strongest relationships between the transverse-axis angular momentums and ball velocity followed a proximal-to-distal timing sequence that allows the transfer of angular momentum from the trunk (MEF-RLP and RLP-MER phases) to the upper arm (RLP-MER phase), forearm (RLP-MER and MER-BI phases), and the hand-racket (MER-BI phase). Since sequence is crucial for ball velocity, players should increase angular momentums of the trunk during MEF-MER, upper arm during RLP-MER, forearm during RLP-BI, and the hand-racket during MER-BI.

  7. Motivational climate and goal orientations as predictors of perceptions of improvement, satisfaction and coach ratings among tennis players.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, I; Duda, J L; Crespo, M

    1999-12-01

    One purpose of this work was to study the relationship of goal orientations and the perceived motivational climate created by the coach in relation to 219 competitive Spanish tennis players': a) perceived improvement in different facets of the game, b) satisfaction with their competitive results, overall level of play, and coach, and c) ratings of their coach. The second purpose was to examine whether the dependent variables were best predicted by the perceived situationally emphasized goal structure created by the coach and/or the athletes' dispositional goal perspective. Intermediate (N=70), advanced (N=124), and professional (N=25) level players completed Spanish versions of the TEOSQ and the PMCSQ-2 and items assessing perceived improvement specific to tennis, satisfaction and coach ratings. The results were consistent with the tenets of goal perspective theory and provide further support for the promotion of a task involving atmosphere in sport.

  8. Acute and Time-Course Effects of Traditional and Dynamic Warm-Up Routines in Young Elite Junior Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Francisco; Moreno-Pérez, Víctor; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J; Moya, Manuel; Sanz-Rivas, David; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of studies that have examined the acute effects of different warm up modalities (WU) on physical performance, none of them have documented the time course of potential performance recovery in tennis players. The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to analyze and compare the acute effects of two different WU modalities (traditional WU [TWU] and dynamic WU [DWU]) on physical performance (i.e., CMJ, sprint, serve speed and accuracy) in elite junior players, as well as (b) to monitor the time course of any WU-induced changes after 30 and 60 min of simulated match-play. Twelve junior elite players completed both WUs modalities (TWU and DWU) in a counterbalanced order on separate days. In each experimental session, counter movement jump (CMJ), 20-m sprint, tennis serve speed and accuracy tests were performed before (immediately after TWU or DWU) during (30 min) and after 60 min of a simulated match play. Measures were compared via four factorial (WU intervention and time) repeated measures ANOVAs. There were main effects of WU (TWU and DWU) throughout the time for all the variables analysed. The results indicate that DWU routine led to significantly faster 20 m sprint times and higher CMJs as well as faster and more accurate tennis serves at both post warm-up and 30 min match-play testing moments in comparison with the scores reported by the TWU routine (p < 0.05; positive effects with a probability of >75-99%). No significant intergroup differences were found at 60-min match-play testing moment in any variable (except for the 20 m sprint). Therefore, the findings of this study recommend for optimal performance in these elite tennis players, DWU routines should be performed prior to formal training and competition rather than TWU routines. PMID:27071014

  9. Mechanical, hormonal and psychological effects of a non-failure short-term strength training program in young tennis players.

    PubMed

    Sarabia, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Juan-Recio, Casto; Hernández-Davó, Hector; Urbán, Tomás; Moya, Manuel

    2015-03-29

    This study examined the effects of a 6-week non-failure strength training program in youth tennis players. Twenty tennis players (age: 15.0 ± 1 years, body height: 170.9 ± 5.1 cm, body mass: 63.3 ± 9.1 kg) were divided into experimental and control groups. Pre and post-tests included half squats, bench press, squat jumps, countermovement-jumps and side-ball throws. Salivary cortisol samples were collected, and the Profile of Mood States questionnaire was used weekly during an anatomical adaptation period, a main training period and after a tapering week. The results showed that, after the main training period, the experimental group significantly improved (p<0.05) in mean and peak power output and in the total number of repetitions during the half-squat endurance test; mean force, power and velocity in the half-squat power output test; Profile of Mood States (in total mood disturbance between the last week of the mean training period and the tapering week); and in squat-jump and countermovement-jump height. Moreover, significant differences were found between the groups at the post-tests in the total number of repetitions, mean and peak power during the half-squat endurance test, mean velocity in the half-squat power output test, salivary cortisol concentration (baselines, first and third week of the mean training period) and in the Profile of Mood States (in fatigue subscale: first and third week of the mean training period). In conclusion, a non-failure strength training protocol improved lower-limb performance levels and produced a moderate psychophysiological impact in youth elite tennis players, suggesting that it is a suitable program to improve strength. Such training protocols do not increase the total training load of tennis players and may be recommended to improve strength.

  10. Acute and Time-Course Effects of Traditional and Dynamic Warm-Up Routines in Young Elite Junior Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Pérez, Víctor; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J.; Moya, Manuel; Sanz-Rivas, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of studies that have examined the acute effects of different warm up modalities (WU) on physical performance, none of them have documented the time course of potential performance recovery in tennis players. The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to analyze and compare the acute effects of two different WU modalities (traditional WU [TWU] and dynamic WU [DWU]) on physical performance (i.e., CMJ, sprint, serve speed and accuracy) in elite junior players, as well as (b) to monitor the time course of any WU-induced changes after 30 and 60 min of simulated match-play. Twelve junior elite players completed both WUs modalities (TWU and DWU) in a counterbalanced order on separate days. In each experimental session, counter movement jump (CMJ), 20-m sprint, tennis serve speed and accuracy tests were performed before (immediately after TWU or DWU) during (30 min) and after 60 min of a simulated match play. Measures were compared via four factorial (WU intervention and time) repeated measures ANOVAs. There were main effects of WU (TWU and DWU) throughout the time for all the variables analysed. The results indicate that DWU routine led to significantly faster 20 m sprint times and higher CMJs as well as faster and more accurate tennis serves at both post warm-up and 30 min match-play testing moments in comparison with the scores reported by the TWU routine (p < 0.05; positive effects with a probability of >75–99%). No significant intergroup differences were found at 60-min match-play testing moment in any variable (except for the 20 m sprint). Therefore, the findings of this study recommend for optimal performance in these elite tennis players, DWU routines should be performed prior to formal training and competition rather than TWU routines. PMID:27071014

  11. Mechanical, Hormonal and Psychological Effects of a Non-Failure Short-Term Strength Training Program in Young Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Sarabia, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Juan-Recio, Casto; Hernández-Davó, Hector; Urbán, Tomás; Moya, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a 6-week non-failure strength training program in youth tennis players. Twenty tennis players (age: 15.0 ± 1 years, body height: 170.9 ± 5.1 cm, body mass: 63.3 ± 9.1 kg) were divided into experimental and control groups. Pre and post-tests included half squats, bench press, squat jumps, countermovement-jumps and side-ball throws. Salivary cortisol samples were collected, and the Profile of Mood States questionnaire was used weekly during an anatomical adaptation period, a main training period and after a tapering week. The results showed that, after the main training period, the experimental group significantly improved (p<0.05) in mean and peak power output and in the total number of repetitions during the half-squat endurance test; mean force, power and velocity in the half-squat power output test; Profile of Mood States (in total mood disturbance between the last week of the mean training period and the tapering week); and in squat-jump and countermovement-jump height. Moreover, significant differences were found between the groups at the post-tests in the total number of repetitions, mean and peak power during the half-squat endurance test, mean velocity in the half-squat power output test, salivary cortisol concentration (baselines, first and third week of the mean training period) and in the Profile of Mood States (in fatigue subscale: first and third week of the mean training period). In conclusion, a non-failure strength training protocol improved lower-limb performance levels and produced a moderate psychophysiological impact in youth elite tennis players, suggesting that it is a suitable program to improve strength. Such training protocols do not increase the total training load of tennis players and may be recommended to improve strength. PMID:25964812

  12. Acute and Time-Course Effects of Traditional and Dynamic Warm-Up Routines in Young Elite Junior Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Francisco; Moreno-Pérez, Víctor; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J; Moya, Manuel; Sanz-Rivas, David; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of studies that have examined the acute effects of different warm up modalities (WU) on physical performance, none of them have documented the time course of potential performance recovery in tennis players. The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to analyze and compare the acute effects of two different WU modalities (traditional WU [TWU] and dynamic WU [DWU]) on physical performance (i.e., CMJ, sprint, serve speed and accuracy) in elite junior players, as well as (b) to monitor the time course of any WU-induced changes after 30 and 60 min of simulated match-play. Twelve junior elite players completed both WUs modalities (TWU and DWU) in a counterbalanced order on separate days. In each experimental session, counter movement jump (CMJ), 20-m sprint, tennis serve speed and accuracy tests were performed before (immediately after TWU or DWU) during (30 min) and after 60 min of a simulated match play. Measures were compared via four factorial (WU intervention and time) repeated measures ANOVAs. There were main effects of WU (TWU and DWU) throughout the time for all the variables analysed. The results indicate that DWU routine led to significantly faster 20 m sprint times and higher CMJs as well as faster and more accurate tennis serves at both post warm-up and 30 min match-play testing moments in comparison with the scores reported by the TWU routine (p < 0.05; positive effects with a probability of >75-99%). No significant intergroup differences were found at 60-min match-play testing moment in any variable (except for the 20 m sprint). Therefore, the findings of this study recommend for optimal performance in these elite tennis players, DWU routines should be performed prior to formal training and competition rather than TWU routines.

  13. In-season effect of a combined repeated sprint and explosive strength training program on elite junior tennis players.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Sanz-Rivas, David; Kovacs, Mark S; Moya, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of a combined explosive strength (ExpS) and repeated sprint (RS)-training program (2 times per week) on performance (sprint, jumping ability, and RS ability [RSA]) in young elite tennis players during a competitive period. Eight competitive internationally ranked male junior tennis players participated in an 8-week training intervention. After training, except for percentage of decrement in the RS test (p = 0.72) and maximal aerobic performance (p = 1.0), all performance variables (i.e., sprint, countermovement jump, and RSA) were significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05; effect sizes ranging from 0.56 to 1.12). Although one can expect greater effects of ExpS or RS training programs alone than a combined program, the results obtained here show that the inclusion of a combined ExpS and RS training program seems to be an effective training tool to improve neuromuscular performance (i.e., changes in jumping ability and single sprint) as well as RSA in high-level tennis players. PMID:25436636

  14. In-season effect of a combined repeated sprint and explosive strength training program on elite junior tennis players.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Sanz-Rivas, David; Kovacs, Mark S; Moya, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of a combined explosive strength (ExpS) and repeated sprint (RS)-training program (2 times per week) on performance (sprint, jumping ability, and RS ability [RSA]) in young elite tennis players during a competitive period. Eight competitive internationally ranked male junior tennis players participated in an 8-week training intervention. After training, except for percentage of decrement in the RS test (p = 0.72) and maximal aerobic performance (p = 1.0), all performance variables (i.e., sprint, countermovement jump, and RSA) were significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05; effect sizes ranging from 0.56 to 1.12). Although one can expect greater effects of ExpS or RS training programs alone than a combined program, the results obtained here show that the inclusion of a combined ExpS and RS training program seems to be an effective training tool to improve neuromuscular performance (i.e., changes in jumping ability and single sprint) as well as RSA in high-level tennis players.

  15. Racquet string tension directly affects force experienced at the elbow: implications for the development of lateral epicondylitis in tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Mohandhas, Badri R; Makaram, Navnit; Drew, Tim S; Wang, Weijie; Arnold, Graham P

    2016-01-01

    Background Lateral epicondylitis (LE) occurs in almost half of all tennis players. Racket-string tension is considered to be an important factor influencing the development of LE. No literature yet exists that substantiates how string-tension affects force transmission to the elbow, as implicated in LE development. We establish a quantitative relationship between string-tension and elbow loading, analyzing tennis strokes using rackets with varying string-tensions. Methods Twenty recreational tennis players simulated backhand tennis strokes using three rackets strung at tensions of 200 N, 222 N and 245 N. Accelerometers recorded accelerations at the elbow, wrist and racket handle. Average peak acceleration was determined to correlate string-tension with elbow loading. Results Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed when average peak acceleration at the elbow at 200 N string-tension (acceleration of 5.58 m/s2) was compared with that at 222 N tension (acceleration of 6.83 m/s2) and 245 N tension (acceleration of 7.45 m/s2). The 200 N racket induced the least acceleration at the elbow. Conclusions Although parameters determining force transmission to the elbow during a tennis stroke are complex, the present study was able to control these parameters, isolating the effect of string-tension. Lower string-tensions transmit less force to the elbow in backhand strokes. Reducing string-tension should be considered favourably with respect to reducing the risk of developing LE. PMID:27583017

  16. Reliability and criterion-related validity of the 20-yard shuttle test in competitive junior tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Anna; Johansson, Fredrik R; Bäck, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study adds to the previous work in the field of sport-specific fitness testing by evaluating a tennis-specific agility test called “the 20-yard shuttle test”. The aim of the study was to evaluate the test–retest reliability, the inter-rater reliability, and the criterion-related validity of the 20-yard shuttle test on competitive junior tennis players. Participants and methods Totally, 34 Swedish tennis players (13 girls), mean age 14±1.6 years, participated in the study. To examine test–retest reliability, the subjects performed the 20-yard shuttle test three times on the same day and then the same procedure was repeated after 3 days. To test the inter-rater reliability, the time was measured with a stopwatch simultaneously by two different raters. The time recorded manually was compared to the gold standard of digital timing to evaluate the criterion-related validity. Results Excellent test–retest reliability was found both within the same day (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 0.95) and between days (ICC 0.91). Furthermore, the results showed excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.99) and criterion-related validity on both test occasions (ICC 0.99). Conclusion We have provided introductory support for the 20-yard shuttle test as a reliable and valid test for use in competitive junior tennis players. The ease of administration makes this test a practical alternative to evaluate physical fitness in order to optimally train the athletes. PMID:26316829

  17. Ultrasound imaging of the patellar tendon attachment to the tibia during puberty: a 12-month follow-up in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Ducher, G; Cook, J; Spurrier, D; Coombs, P; Ptasznik, R; Black, J; Bass, S

    2010-02-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the ultrasound appearance of the patellar tendon attachment to the tibia throughout puberty in young tennis players with and without Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD). Twenty-eight competitive players (17 boys), aged 10.6-15.3 years, had bilateral ultrasound imaging of the patellar tendon attachment to the tibia at baseline and 1 year later. On each occasion, anthropometric measurements, pubertal status and injury history were recorded. Ultrasound appearance of the patellar tendon attachment was categorized into three stages: cartilage attachment, insertional cartilage and mature attachment. Stage 1 appearance, a large anechoic region with or without ossicles and irregularity of the apophysis that are classically associated with OSD, was found in eight players, seven of them were pain free. A majority (62%) of the patellar tendons in stage 1 at baseline progressed toward stage 2 or stage 3 1 year later. Likewise the patellar tendon attachment in most athletes with cartilage insertion showed progression to a mature enthesis over 1 year. The imaging appearance that is classically interpreted as OSD was common in asymptomatic knees. This ultrasonographic description of the patellar tendon attachment to the tibia during growth provides a reference for the assessment of bone tendon attachments in adolescents.

  18. Myokines in Response to a Tournament Season among Young Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Witek, K.; Żurek, P.; Jaworska, J.; Lipińska, P.; Dzedzej-Gmiat, A.; Antosiewicz, J.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated changes in myokines, heat shock proteins, and growth factors in highly ranked, young, male tennis players in response to physical workload during the competitive season and their potential correlations with match scores. Blood collections were carried out at the beginning, the midpoint, and the end of the tournament season. Data analysis revealed a significant increase in interleukin 6 and its inverse correlation with the number of lost games (r = −0.45; 90% CI −0.06 to 0.77). Neither the irisin nor BDNF level changed notably, yet delta changes of irisin across the season significantly correlated with the number of games won. The concentration of HSP27 recorded a small increase (31.2%; 90% CI 10.7 to 55.5, most likely). A negative correlation was noted between IGF-1 and HSP27 concentration at baseline (−0.70 very high; 90% CI −0.89 to −0.31, very likely). At the end of the season IGF-1 correlated positively with the number of games won (r = 0.37 moderate, 90% CI −0.16 to 0.73, likely) but negatively with the number of games lost (r = −0.39, 90% CI −0.14 to −0.74, likely). In conclusion our data indicated that Il-6, irisin, and growth factor IGF-1 may modify overall performance during a long lasting season, expressed in the amount of games won or lost.

  19. Myokines in Response to a Tournament Season among Young Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Witek, K; Żurek, P; Zmijewski, P; Jaworska, J; Lipińska, P; Dzedzej-Gmiat, A; Antosiewicz, J; Ziemann, E

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated changes in myokines, heat shock proteins, and growth factors in highly ranked, young, male tennis players in response to physical workload during the competitive season and their potential correlations with match scores. Blood collections were carried out at the beginning, the midpoint, and the end of the tournament season. Data analysis revealed a significant increase in interleukin 6 and its inverse correlation with the number of lost games (r = -0.45; 90% CI -0.06 to 0.77). Neither the irisin nor BDNF level changed notably, yet delta changes of irisin across the season significantly correlated with the number of games won. The concentration of HSP27 recorded a small increase (31.2%; 90% CI 10.7 to 55.5, most likely). A negative correlation was noted between IGF-1 and HSP27 concentration at baseline (-0.70 very high; 90% CI -0.89 to -0.31, very likely). At the end of the season IGF-1 correlated positively with the number of games won (r = 0.37 moderate, 90% CI -0.16 to 0.73, likely) but negatively with the number of games lost (r = -0.39, 90% CI -0.14 to -0.74, likely). In conclusion our data indicated that Il-6, irisin, and growth factor IGF-1 may modify overall performance during a long lasting season, expressed in the amount of games won or lost. PMID:27652258

  20. Myokines in Response to a Tournament Season among Young Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Witek, K; Żurek, P; Zmijewski, P; Jaworska, J; Lipińska, P; Dzedzej-Gmiat, A; Antosiewicz, J; Ziemann, E

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated changes in myokines, heat shock proteins, and growth factors in highly ranked, young, male tennis players in response to physical workload during the competitive season and their potential correlations with match scores. Blood collections were carried out at the beginning, the midpoint, and the end of the tournament season. Data analysis revealed a significant increase in interleukin 6 and its inverse correlation with the number of lost games (r = -0.45; 90% CI -0.06 to 0.77). Neither the irisin nor BDNF level changed notably, yet delta changes of irisin across the season significantly correlated with the number of games won. The concentration of HSP27 recorded a small increase (31.2%; 90% CI 10.7 to 55.5, most likely). A negative correlation was noted between IGF-1 and HSP27 concentration at baseline (-0.70 very high; 90% CI -0.89 to -0.31, very likely). At the end of the season IGF-1 correlated positively with the number of games won (r = 0.37 moderate, 90% CI -0.16 to 0.73, likely) but negatively with the number of games lost (r = -0.39, 90% CI -0.14 to -0.74, likely). In conclusion our data indicated that Il-6, irisin, and growth factor IGF-1 may modify overall performance during a long lasting season, expressed in the amount of games won or lost.

  1. Sources of acute stress, cognitive appraisal, and coping strategies among highly skilled Mexican and U.S. competitive tennis players.

    PubMed

    Puente-Díaz, Rogelio; Anshel, Mark H

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to identify sources of acute stress, cognitive appraisal (i.e., perceived controllability), and the use of coping strategies as a function of culture among highly skilled tennis players from Mexico and the United States. Participants were 112 competitive tennis players, 54 of whom were from Mexico (44 boys, 10 girls), and 58 of whom were from the United States (30 boys, 28 girls). A qualitative analysis indicated that the most common sources of acute stress in tennis include "receiving negative comments from coaches and relatives" and "opponent cheating." The authors adapted the COPE Instrument (C. Carver, M. F. Scheier, & J. K. Weintraub, 1989) to ascertain the athletes' use of coping strategies. Regression analysis assessed the extent to which culture predicted the athletes' perceived controllability of the stressors and their use of coping strategies. The results indicated that culture significantly predicted both perceived controllability and the use of coping strategies. The authors discussed implications for the role of culture in predicting cognitive appraisal and coping in sport.

  2. On the Use of a Test to Exhaustion Specific to Tennis (TEST) with Ball Hitting by Elite Players

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to a) introduce a new Test to Exhaustion Specific to Tennis (TEST) and compare performance (test duration) and physiological responses to those obtained during the 20-m multistage shuttle test (MSST), and b) determine to which extent those variables correlate with performance level (tennis competitive ranking) for both test procedures. Methods Twenty-seven junior players (8 males, 19 females) members of the national teams of the French Tennis Federation completed MSST and TEST, including elements of the game (ball hitting, intermittent activity, lateral displacement), in a randomized order. Cardiorespiratory responses were compared at submaximal (respiratory compensation point) and maximal loads between the two tests. Results At the respiratory compensation point oxygen uptake (50.1 ± 4.7 vs. 47.5 ± 4.3 mL.min-1.kg-1, p = 0.02), but not minute ventilation and heart rate, was higher for TEST compared to MSST. However, load increment and physiological responses at exhaustion did not differ between the two tests. Players’ ranking correlated negatively with oxygen uptake measured at submaximal and maximal loads for both TEST (r = -0.41; p = 0.01 and -0.55; p = 0.004) and MSST (r = -0.38; P = 0.05 and -0.51; p = 0.1). Conclusion Using TEST provides a tennis-specific assessment of aerobic fitness and may be used to prescribe aerobic exercise in a context more appropriate to the game than MSST. Results also indicate that VO2 values both at submaximal and maximal load reached during TEST and MSST are moderate predictors of players competitive ranking. PMID:27035342

  3. Effects of Tennis Training on Personality Development in Children and Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Erdal; Sahin, Gülsah; Sentürk, Ugur; Aydin, Halide; Altinkök, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of a 12-week basic tennis training program on the personality development of early adolescents aged between 9 and 11 years. The research methodology consisted of a single group pre-test/post-test design implemented with a total of eight volunteer children (three boys and five girls). The…

  4. Can Perceptuo-Motor Skills Assessment Outcomes in Young Table Tennis Players (7-11 years) Predict Future Competition Participation and Performance? An Observational Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Faber, Irene R; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Faber, Niels R; Oosterveld, Frits G J; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-01-01

    Forecasting future performance in youth table tennis players based on current performance is complex due to, among other things, differences between youth players in growth, development, maturity, context and table tennis experience. Talent development programmes might benefit from an assessment of underlying perceptuo-motor skills for table tennis, which is hypothesized to determine the players' potential concerning the perceptuo-motor domain. The Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment intends to measure the perceptuo-motor potential for table tennis in youth players by assessing the underlying skills crucial for developing technical and tactical qualities. Untrained perceptuo-motor tasks are used as these are suggested to represent a player's future potential better than specific sport skills themselves as the latter depend on exposure to the sport itself. This study evaluated the value of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment for a talent developmental programme by evaluating its predictive validity for competition participation and performance in 48 young table tennis players (7-11 years). Players were tested on their perceptuo-motor skills once during a regional talent day, and the subsequent competition results were recorded half-yearly over a period of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that test scores did not predict future competition participation (p >0.05). Yet, the Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, including the test items 'aiming at target', 'throwing a ball', and 'eye-hand coordination' in the best fitting model, revealed that the outcomes of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment were significant predictors for future competition results (R2 = 51%). Since the test age influences the perceptuo-motor skills assessment's outcome, another multivariable model was proposed including test age as a covariate (R2 = 53%). This evaluation demonstrates promising prospects for the perceptuo-motor skills assessment to be included in a talent

  5. Can Perceptuo-Motor Skills Assessment Outcomes in Young Table Tennis Players (7-11 years) Predict Future Competition Participation and Performance? An Observational Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Faber, Irene R; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Faber, Niels R; Oosterveld, Frits G J; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-01-01

    Forecasting future performance in youth table tennis players based on current performance is complex due to, among other things, differences between youth players in growth, development, maturity, context and table tennis experience. Talent development programmes might benefit from an assessment of underlying perceptuo-motor skills for table tennis, which is hypothesized to determine the players' potential concerning the perceptuo-motor domain. The Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment intends to measure the perceptuo-motor potential for table tennis in youth players by assessing the underlying skills crucial for developing technical and tactical qualities. Untrained perceptuo-motor tasks are used as these are suggested to represent a player's future potential better than specific sport skills themselves as the latter depend on exposure to the sport itself. This study evaluated the value of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment for a talent developmental programme by evaluating its predictive validity for competition participation and performance in 48 young table tennis players (7-11 years). Players were tested on their perceptuo-motor skills once during a regional talent day, and the subsequent competition results were recorded half-yearly over a period of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that test scores did not predict future competition participation (p >0.05). Yet, the Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, including the test items 'aiming at target', 'throwing a ball', and 'eye-hand coordination' in the best fitting model, revealed that the outcomes of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment were significant predictors for future competition results (R2 = 51%). Since the test age influences the perceptuo-motor skills assessment's outcome, another multivariable model was proposed including test age as a covariate (R2 = 53%). This evaluation demonstrates promising prospects for the perceptuo-motor skills assessment to be included in a talent

  6. Bone geometry in response to long-term tennis playing and its relationship with muscle volume: a quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Ducher, G; Courteix, D; Même, S; Magni, C; Viala, J F; Benhamou, C L

    2005-10-01

    The benefit of impact-loading activity for bone strength depends on whether the additional bone mineral content (BMC) accrued at loaded sites is due to an increased bone size, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) or both. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the aim of this study was to characterize the geometric changes of the dominant radius in response to long-term tennis playing and to assess the influence of muscle forces on bone tissue by investigating the muscle-bone relationship. Twenty tennis players (10 men and 10 women, mean age: 23.1+/-4.7 years, with 14.3+/-3.4 years of playing) were recruited. The total bone volume, cortical volume, sub-cortical volume and muscle volume were measured at both distal radii by MRI. BMC was assessed by DXA and was divided by the total bone volume to derive vBMD. Grip strength was evaluated with a dynamometer. Significant side-to-side differences (P<0.0001) were found in muscle volume (+9.7%), grip strength (+13.3%), BMC (+13.5%), total bone volume (+10.3%) and sub-cortical volume (+20.6%), but not in cortical volume (+2.6%, ns). The asymmetry in total bone volume explained 75% of the variance in BMC asymmetry (P<0.0001). vBMD was slightly higher on the dominant side (+3.3%, P<0.05). Grip strength and muscle volume correlated with all bone variables (except vBMD) on both sides (r=0.48-0.86, P<0.05-0.0001) but the asymmetries in muscle parameters did not correlate with those in bone parameters. After adjustment for muscle volume or grip strength, BMC was still greater on the dominant side. This study showed that the greater BMC induced by long-term tennis playing at the dominant radius was associated to a marked increase in bone size and a slight improvement in volumetric BMD, thereby improving bone strength. In addition to the muscle contractions, other mechanical stimuli seemed to exert a direct effect on bone tissue, contributing to the specific bone response to tennis

  7. Myokines in Response to a Tournament Season among Young Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Witek, K.; Żurek, P.; Jaworska, J.; Lipińska, P.; Dzedzej-Gmiat, A.; Antosiewicz, J.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated changes in myokines, heat shock proteins, and growth factors in highly ranked, young, male tennis players in response to physical workload during the competitive season and their potential correlations with match scores. Blood collections were carried out at the beginning, the midpoint, and the end of the tournament season. Data analysis revealed a significant increase in interleukin 6 and its inverse correlation with the number of lost games (r = −0.45; 90% CI −0.06 to 0.77). Neither the irisin nor BDNF level changed notably, yet delta changes of irisin across the season significantly correlated with the number of games won. The concentration of HSP27 recorded a small increase (31.2%; 90% CI 10.7 to 55.5, most likely). A negative correlation was noted between IGF-1 and HSP27 concentration at baseline (−0.70 very high; 90% CI −0.89 to −0.31, very likely). At the end of the season IGF-1 correlated positively with the number of games won (r = 0.37 moderate, 90% CI −0.16 to 0.73, likely) but negatively with the number of games lost (r = −0.39, 90% CI −0.14 to −0.74, likely). In conclusion our data indicated that Il-6, irisin, and growth factor IGF-1 may modify overall performance during a long lasting season, expressed in the amount of games won or lost. PMID:27652258

  8. Short‐term effects of light and heavy load interventions on service velocity and precision in elite young tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Ferrauti, Alexander; Bastiaens, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to investigate the acute effects of a complex throwing intervention set‐up, with light or heavy loads, on the service velocity of elite junior tennis players. Methods On 3 separate test days, 13 elite juniors (mean (SD) 12.3 (0.8) years, 149 (9) cm, 37.5 (5.5) kg) performed four sets of six serves with different between‐set conditions. In a cross‐over design, the players performed respectively 6, 4 and 2 maximum effort throws with a 200 g ball (LI, light intervention), 6, 4 and 2 maximum effort throws with a 600 g ball (HI, heavy intervention) and no throws (NI, no intervention) during the 2 min in between‐set period. Participants were instructed to serve, with maximum speed, to a target near the midline of the deuce court service box. A two‐factor analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of intervention type and set number on “service velocity”, “service precision” (eg, percentage of serves in) and “service touch” (11 point rating scale). Results Mean (SD) service velocity decreased significantly in HI (124.3 (7.8) km/h) as compared to NI (126.6 (9.3) km/h, p<0.05, effect size d = 0.26), yet no such differences were found between LI (125.2 (7.9) km/h) and NI. Service velocity also remained constant between sets (p = 0.406). Service precision and service touch were unaffected by the interventions. Conclusions Under the conditions of our study, a heavy throwing intervention during service training has no beneficial effect on service velocity in young elite tennis players (under 14). PMID:17957011

  9. Recognition of tennis serve performed by a digital player: comparison among polygon, shadow, and stick-figure models.

    PubMed

    Ida, Hirofumi; Fukuhara, Kazunobu; Ishii, Motonobu

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the cognitive effect of human character models on the observer's ability to extract relevant information from computer graphics animation of tennis serve motions. Three digital human models (polygon, shadow, and stick-figure) were used to display the computationally simulated serve motions, which were perturbed at the racket-arm by modulating the speed (slower or faster) of one of the joint rotations (wrist, elbow, or shoulder). Twenty-one experienced tennis players and 21 novices made discrimination responses about the modulated joint and also specified the perceived swing speeds on a visual analogue scale. The result showed that the discrimination accuracies of the experienced players were both above and below chance level depending on the modulated joint whereas those of the novices mostly remained at chance or guessing levels. As far as the experienced players were concerned, the polygon model decreased the discrimination accuracy as compared with the stick-figure model. This suggests that the complicated pictorial information may have a distracting effect on the recognition of the observed action. On the other hand, the perceived swing speed of the perturbed motion relative to the control was lower for the stick-figure model than for the polygon model regardless of the skill level. This result suggests that the simplified visual information can bias the perception of the motion speed toward slower. It was also shown that the increasing the joint rotation speed increased the perceived swing speed, although the resulting racket velocity had little correlation with this speed sensation. Collectively, observer's recognition of the motion pattern and perception of the motion speed can be affected by the pictorial information of the human model as well as by the perturbation processing applied to the observed motion.

  10. Recognition of Tennis Serve Performed by a Digital Player: Comparison among Polygon, Shadow, and Stick-Figure Models

    PubMed Central

    Ida, Hirofumi; Fukuhara, Kazunobu; Ishii, Motonobu

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the cognitive effect of human character models on the observer's ability to extract relevant information from computer graphics animation of tennis serve motions. Three digital human models (polygon, shadow, and stick-figure) were used to display the computationally simulated serve motions, which were perturbed at the racket-arm by modulating the speed (slower or faster) of one of the joint rotations (wrist, elbow, or shoulder). Twenty-one experienced tennis players and 21 novices made discrimination responses about the modulated joint and also specified the perceived swing speeds on a visual analogue scale. The result showed that the discrimination accuracies of the experienced players were both above and below chance level depending on the modulated joint whereas those of the novices mostly remained at chance or guessing levels. As far as the experienced players were concerned, the polygon model decreased the discrimination accuracy as compared with the stick-figure model. This suggests that the complicated pictorial information may have a distracting effect on the recognition of the observed action. On the other hand, the perceived swing speed of the perturbed motion relative to the control was lower for the stick-figure model than for the polygon model regardless of the skill level. This result suggests that the simplified visual information can bias the perception of the motion speed toward slower. It was also shown that the increasing the joint rotation speed increased the perceived swing speed, although the resulting racket velocity had little correlation with this speed sensation. Collectively, observer's recognition of the motion pattern and perception of the motion speed can be affected by the pictorial information of the human model as well as by the perturbation processing applied to the observed motion. PMID:22439009

  11. Examination of Anxiety Levels and Anger Expression Manners of Undergraduate Table Tennis Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karademir, Tamer; Türkçapar, Ünal

    2016-01-01

    This research was done for the determination of how their anxiety levels' and anger expressions' get shaped according to some variances. For this reason there were 76 female 125 male totally 201 sportsmen, who participated to the table tennis championship between universities in 2016 and ages differ from 18 to 28, were included the research group.…

  12. Tennis, Anyone?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Ted R.; Burke, Maurice J.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the variety of strategies that can be used to determine the probability that a player wins a tennis game, given a probability of 60 percent that he or she wins each point. The article suggests strategies for using the problem in 9-12 classrooms.

  13. Motivation in tennis.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Miguel; Reid, Machar M

    2007-11-01

    Motivation underpins successful tennis performance, representing one of the game's foremost psychological skills. This paper elaborates on its role in tennis play, and takes an overview of the current state of motivation research applied to tennis. First, the importance of motivation in player and coach performance is explored. The body of evidence pertaining to players' motives for participation and the relevance of goal achievement motivation in tennis is then examined. Finally, the efficacy of motivational climates created by significant others is discussed in light of current practice.

  14. Comparison of Ball-And-Racket Impact Force in Two-Handed Backhand Stroke Stances for Different-Skill-Level Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kuo-Cheng; Hsieh, Yung-Chun

    2016-06-01

    This study compared the kinetic roles of the upper extremities in racket impact force generation between the open stance (OS) and square stance (SS) for tennis players with different skill levels in two-handed backhand strokes. Twelve male tennis players were divided into an advanced group (AG) (L3-L2 skill level) and intermediate group (IG) (L7-L6 skill level), and their data were used in a three-dimensional kinetic analysis. Their motions were captured using 21 reflective markers attached to anatomic landmarks for two-handed backhand stroke motion data collection. During the acceleration phase, significant differences were not observed between both stances, but they were observed between the groups with different skill levels for the force of the upper extremities (p = 0.027). The joint forces were significantly lower in the AG than in the IG. Players performing the SS had significantly larger pronation and supination of the wrist joint moment than those in the OS (p = 0.032) during the acceleration phase, irrespective of the playing level. Higher internal rotation moment after impact was observed at each joint, particularly among young intermediate tennis players, regardless of their stance. The AG demonstrated a higher joint force and moment at every joint compared with the IG at impact. Moreover, the AG demonstrated superior stroke efficiency and effectively reduced joint moment after impact and sports injury. Key pointsAdvanced players, regardless of open stance or square stance, have larger joint force and moment at each joint before ball impact resulting in better stroke efficiency and reduced chance of injury.Intermediate players, regardless of stance, have higher internal rotation moment at each joint instead of larger joint force as compared to advanced players before ball impact. The higher internal rotation moment will induce higher joint impact force which makes the player injury-prone.Young intermediate tennis players may want to avoid excessive

  15. Comparison of Ball-And-Racket Impact Force in Two-Handed Backhand Stroke Stances for Different-Skill-Level Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kuo-Cheng; Hsieh, Yung-Chun

    2016-06-01

    This study compared the kinetic roles of the upper extremities in racket impact force generation between the open stance (OS) and square stance (SS) for tennis players with different skill levels in two-handed backhand strokes. Twelve male tennis players were divided into an advanced group (AG) (L3-L2 skill level) and intermediate group (IG) (L7-L6 skill level), and their data were used in a three-dimensional kinetic analysis. Their motions were captured using 21 reflective markers attached to anatomic landmarks for two-handed backhand stroke motion data collection. During the acceleration phase, significant differences were not observed between both stances, but they were observed between the groups with different skill levels for the force of the upper extremities (p = 0.027). The joint forces were significantly lower in the AG than in the IG. Players performing the SS had significantly larger pronation and supination of the wrist joint moment than those in the OS (p = 0.032) during the acceleration phase, irrespective of the playing level. Higher internal rotation moment after impact was observed at each joint, particularly among young intermediate tennis players, regardless of their stance. The AG demonstrated a higher joint force and moment at every joint compared with the IG at impact. Moreover, the AG demonstrated superior stroke efficiency and effectively reduced joint moment after impact and sports injury. Key pointsAdvanced players, regardless of open stance or square stance, have larger joint force and moment at each joint before ball impact resulting in better stroke efficiency and reduced chance of injury.Intermediate players, regardless of stance, have higher internal rotation moment at each joint instead of larger joint force as compared to advanced players before ball impact. The higher internal rotation moment will induce higher joint impact force which makes the player injury-prone.Young intermediate tennis players may want to avoid excessive

  16. Comparison of Ball-And-Racket Impact Force in Two-Handed Backhand Stroke Stances for Different-Skill-Level Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kuo-Cheng; Hsieh, Yung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the kinetic roles of the upper extremities in racket impact force generation between the open stance (OS) and square stance (SS) for tennis players with different skill levels in two-handed backhand strokes. Twelve male tennis players were divided into an advanced group (AG) (L3-L2 skill level) and intermediate group (IG) (L7-L6 skill level), and their data were used in a three-dimensional kinetic analysis. Their motions were captured using 21 reflective markers attached to anatomic landmarks for two-handed backhand stroke motion data collection. During the acceleration phase, significant differences were not observed between both stances, but they were observed between the groups with different skill levels for the force of the upper extremities (p = 0.027). The joint forces were significantly lower in the AG than in the IG. Players performing the SS had significantly larger pronation and supination of the wrist joint moment than those in the OS (p = 0.032) during the acceleration phase, irrespective of the playing level. Higher internal rotation moment after impact was observed at each joint, particularly among young intermediate tennis players, regardless of their stance. The AG demonstrated a higher joint force and moment at every joint compared with the IG at impact. Moreover, the AG demonstrated superior stroke efficiency and effectively reduced joint moment after impact and sports injury. Key points Advanced players, regardless of open stance or square stance, have larger joint force and moment at each joint before ball impact resulting in better stroke efficiency and reduced chance of injury. Intermediate players, regardless of stance, have higher internal rotation moment at each joint instead of larger joint force as compared to advanced players before ball impact. The higher internal rotation moment will induce higher joint impact force which makes the player injury-prone. Young intermediate tennis players may want to avoid excessive

  17. Coincidence-anticipation performance of adolescent baseball players and nonplayers.

    PubMed

    Dunham, P

    1989-06-01

    10 adolescent baseball players and 10 nonplayers made estimates of baseballs' arrival at the front edge of a home plate. Balls were projected 45 ft. by a pitching machine at speeds of 35, 40, 45, and 50 mph. Subjects made estimates with the dominant and nondominant eye closest to the oncoming ball. Analysis indicated that players were no more accurate than nonplayers but did respond significantly earlier and with consistency. Eye dominance had no effect on performance.

  18. Can Perceptuo-Motor Skills Assessment Outcomes in Young Table Tennis Players (7–11 years) Predict Future Competition Participation and Performance? An Observational Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Forecasting future performance in youth table tennis players based on current performance is complex due to, among other things, differences between youth players in growth, development, maturity, context and table tennis experience. Talent development programmes might benefit from an assessment of underlying perceptuo-motor skills for table tennis, which is hypothesized to determine the players’ potential concerning the perceptuo-motor domain. The Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment intends to measure the perceptuo-motor potential for table tennis in youth players by assessing the underlying skills crucial for developing technical and tactical qualities. Untrained perceptuo-motor tasks are used as these are suggested to represent a player’s future potential better than specific sport skills themselves as the latter depend on exposure to the sport itself. This study evaluated the value of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment for a talent developmental programme by evaluating its predictive validity for competition participation and performance in 48 young table tennis players (7–11 years). Players were tested on their perceptuo-motor skills once during a regional talent day, and the subsequent competition results were recorded half-yearly over a period of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that test scores did not predict future competition participation (p >0.05). Yet, the Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, including the test items ‘aiming at target’, ‘throwing a ball’, and ‘eye-hand coordination’ in the best fitting model, revealed that the outcomes of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment were significant predictors for future competition results (R2 = 51%). Since the test age influences the perceptuo-motor skills assessment’s outcome, another multivariable model was proposed including test age as a covariate (R2 = 53%). This evaluation demonstrates promising prospects for the perceptuo-motor skills assessment to be

  19. Adolescents Risky MP3-Player Listening and Its Psychosocial Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Ineke; Brug, Johannes; Van Der Ploeg, Catharina P. B.; Raat, Hein

    2011-01-01

    Analogue to occupational noise-induced hearing loss, MP3-induced hearing loss may be evolving into a significant social and public health problem. To inform prevention strategies and interventions, this study investigated correlates of adolescents' risky MP3-player listening behavior primarily informed by protection motivation theory. We invited…

  20. Effects of repetitive loading on bone mass and geometry in young male tennis players: a quantitative study using MRI.

    PubMed

    Ducher, Gaele; Daly, Robin M; Bass, Shona L

    2009-10-01

    Pre- and early puberty seem to be the most opportune times for exercise to improve bone strength in girls, but few studies have addressed this issue in boys. This study investigated the site-, surface-, and maturity-specific exercise-induced changes in bone mass and geometry in young boys. The osteogenic effects of loading were analyzed by comparing the playing and nonplaying humeri of 43 male pre-, peri-, and postpubertal competitive tennis players 10-19 yr of age. Total bone area, medullary area, and cortical area were determined at the mid (40-50%) and distal humerus (60-70%) of both arms using MRI. Humeral bone mass (BMC) was derived from a whole body DXA scan. In prepubertal boys, BMC was 17% greater in the playing compared with nonplaying arm (p < 0.001), which was accompanied by a 12-21% greater cortical area, because of greater periosteal expansion than medullary expansion at the midhumerus and periosteal expansion associated with medullary contraction at the distal humerus. Compared with prepuberty, the side-to-side differences in BMC (27%) and cortical area (20-33%) were greater in peripuberty (p < 0.01). No differences were found between peri- and postpuberty despite longer playing history in the postpubertal players. The osteogenic response to loading was greater in peri- compared with prepubertal boys, which is in contrast with our previous findings in girls and may be caused by differences in training history. This suggests that the window of opportunity to improve bone mass and size through exercise may be longer in boys than in girls.

  1. Tibial tubercle avulsion fractures in adolescent basketball players.

    PubMed

    Jakoi, Andre; Freidl, Michael; Old, Andrew; Javandel, Mitra; Tom, James; Realyvasquez, Juan

    2012-08-01

    Tibial tubercle avulsion fractures most commonly occur in adolescent boys and usually result from pushing off or landing while jumping. These fractures are relatively uncommon but can have a significant functional effect. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome with return to play in 8 adolescent basketball players with at least 4 years of postoperative reconditioning. Results with return to play at the preinjury level are favorable after treatment of acute tibial avulsion fractures in adolescent basketball players. Long-term outcome was excellent in all patients regardless of fracture type. Open reduction and internal fixation using 1 or 2 cancellous bone screws achieved union in all cases.

  2. Prediction of Impact Shock Vibrations at Tennis Player's Wrist Joint: Comparison between Conventional Weight Racket and Light Weight Racket with Super Large Head Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Masamichi; Casolo, Federico; Tomosue, Ryoso; Yoshinari, Keiko

    The lightweight racket with handle-light configuration and large head size is recent tendency of high-tech tennis rackets, increasing power or post-impact ball velocity with an increasing racket swing speed. This paper investigated the performance of lightweight tennis racket with super-large head size in terms of feel or comfort. It predicted the effect of the mass and mass distribution of super-large sized rackets on the impact shock vibrations of the racket handle and the player's wrist joint when a player hits a flat forehand drive. The prediction is based on the identification of the racket characteristics, the damping of the racket-arm system, equivalent mass of the player's arm system and the approximate nonlinear impact analysis in tennis. A super-light weight balanced racket (mass: 292 g, the center of gravity LG: 363 mm from the butt end) and a conventional weight and weight balanced racket (349 g, LG: 323 mm) are selected as representatives. They are the super-large sized rackets made of carbon graphite with a head size of 120 square inches and the same geometry. The result showed that the shock vibration of the super-light weight balanced racket with super-large sized head is much larger than that of the conventional weight balanced type racket. It also showed that the sweet area of the former in terms of the shock vibration shifts from the center to the topside on the racket face compared to the latter. This is because the location of the grip on the racket handle is further from the location of the node on the handle of the first mode of super-light racket than that of the conventional weight racket.

  3. The Effects of Forced Exhalation and Inhalation, Grunting, and Valsalva Maneuver on Forehand Force in Collegiate Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    OʼConnell, Dennis G; Brewer, Jacob F; Man, Timothy H; Weldon, John S; Hinman, Martha R

    2016-02-01

    To examine the effects of forced expiration (FE), forced inspiration (FI), grunting (GR), and valsalva maneuver (VM), on air volume, maximum force production, and muscle recruitment during a simulated forehand stroke in collegiate tennis players. Superficial electrodes were placed over the anterior deltoid, pectoralis major, rectus abdominis, lumbar and thoracic erector spinae, and external and internal obliques. Subjects stood in a simulated forehand stroke stance with their dominant hand positioned on a force plate. Subjects performed 3 repetitions of maximal 2- to 3-second isometric forehands with randomly assigned breathing conditions (FE, FI, VM, and GR) and 30-seconds rest between contractions. Air volumes were also collected during each trial. A repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance compared normalized peak electromyographic activity across the 7 muscle groups. Separate repeated measures ANOVAs compared the effect of breathing conditions on peak force production and air volume. Statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05 for all analyses. Overall muscle activity differed significantly by breathing condition (p = 0.031) with greater anterior deltoid activity was seen in FE and GR vs. VM. Internal oblique activity was significantly greater in GR than FI or VM, and thoracic erector spinae activity was significantly greater during FE and VM than FI. Force production did not differ significantly among breathing conditions (p = 0.74); however, GR forces were greater than FI and VM forces (p ≤ 0.05). Forced expiration air volume was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than FI, GR, or VM. These findings suggest that either GR or a more quiescent FE can be used to enhance force production. Forced expiration is a potentially safer alternative to VM and more aurally pleasing than GR. PMID:26270695

  4. The Effects of Forced Exhalation and Inhalation, Grunting, and Valsalva Maneuver on Forehand Force in Collegiate Tennis Players.

    PubMed

    OʼConnell, Dennis G; Brewer, Jacob F; Man, Timothy H; Weldon, John S; Hinman, Martha R

    2016-02-01

    To examine the effects of forced expiration (FE), forced inspiration (FI), grunting (GR), and valsalva maneuver (VM), on air volume, maximum force production, and muscle recruitment during a simulated forehand stroke in collegiate tennis players. Superficial electrodes were placed over the anterior deltoid, pectoralis major, rectus abdominis, lumbar and thoracic erector spinae, and external and internal obliques. Subjects stood in a simulated forehand stroke stance with their dominant hand positioned on a force plate. Subjects performed 3 repetitions of maximal 2- to 3-second isometric forehands with randomly assigned breathing conditions (FE, FI, VM, and GR) and 30-seconds rest between contractions. Air volumes were also collected during each trial. A repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance compared normalized peak electromyographic activity across the 7 muscle groups. Separate repeated measures ANOVAs compared the effect of breathing conditions on peak force production and air volume. Statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05 for all analyses. Overall muscle activity differed significantly by breathing condition (p = 0.031) with greater anterior deltoid activity was seen in FE and GR vs. VM. Internal oblique activity was significantly greater in GR than FI or VM, and thoracic erector spinae activity was significantly greater during FE and VM than FI. Force production did not differ significantly among breathing conditions (p = 0.74); however, GR forces were greater than FI and VM forces (p ≤ 0.05). Forced expiration air volume was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than FI, GR, or VM. These findings suggest that either GR or a more quiescent FE can be used to enhance force production. Forced expiration is a potentially safer alternative to VM and more aurally pleasing than GR.

  5. Neuropsychological consequence of soccer play in adolescent U.K. School team soccer players.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Richard; Rutherford, Andrew; Potter, Douglas; Fernie, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    To assess mild head injury effects in adolescent soccer players, neuropsychological performance across school team soccer players, rugby players and noncontact sport players was assessed in a quasi-experimental cross-sectional design. One hundred eighty-five males were tested (ages 13-16; response rate 55%) and 86 contributed data to the analyses after exclusion for recent concussion and overlapping sports participation. Soccer players showed lower premorbid intellectual functioning, but neither soccer players nor rugby players showed neuropsychological decrement compared with noncontact sport players. Cumulative heading did not predict neuropsychological performance. While no specific attribute of soccer was linked with neuropsychological impairment, head injury predicted reduced attention for all participants.

  6. Physique and Body Composition in Soccer Players across Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Vassilios Karydis, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Although the contribution of physique and body composition in soccer performance was recognized, these parameters of physical fitness were not well-studied in adolescent players. Aim of this study was to investigate physique and body composition across adolescence. Methods Male adolescents (N=297 aged 12.01–20.98 y), classified into nine one-year age-groups, child (control group, N=16 aged 7.34–11.97 y) and adult players (control group, N=29 aged 21.01–31.59 y), all members of competitive soccer clubs, performed a series of anthropometric measures (body mass, height, skinfolds, circumferences and girths), from which body mass index (BMI), percentage of body fat (BF%), fat mass (FM), fat free mass (FFM) and somatotype (Heath-Carter method) were calculated. Results Age had a positive association with FM (r=0.2, P<0.001) and FFM (r=0.68, P<0.001), and a negative association with BF (r=−0.12, P=0.047). Somatotype components changed across adolescence as well; age was linked to endomorphy (r=−0.17, P=0.005), mesomorphy (r=0.14, P=0.019) and ectomorphy (r=−0.17, P=0.004). Compared with age-matched general population, participants exhibited equal body mass, higher stature, lower body mass index and lower BF. Conclusion During adolescence, soccer players presented significant differences in terms of body composition and physique. Thus, these findings could be employed by coaches and fitness trainers engaged in soccer training in the context of physical fitness assessment and talent identification. PMID:22375222

  7. Evaluations of the psychometric properties of the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes among a sample of young French table tennis players.

    PubMed

    Martinent, Guillaume; Decret, Jean-Claude; Isoard-Gautheur, Sandrine; Filaire, Edith; Ferrand, Claude

    2014-04-01

    This study used confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) among a sample of young French table tennis players to test: (a) original 19-factor structure, (b) 14-factor structure recently suggested in literature, and (c) hierarchical factor structure of the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes (RESTQ-Sport). 148 table tennis players completed the RESTQ-Sport and other self-report questionnaires between one to five occasions with a delay of 1 mo. between each completion. Results of CFAs showed: (a) evidence for relative superiority of the original model in comparison to an alternative model recently proposed in literature, (b) a good fit of the data for the 67-item 17-factor model of the RESTQ-Sport, and (c) an acceptable fit of the data for the hierarchical model of the RESTQ-Sport. Correlations between RESTQ-Sport subscales and burnout and motivation subscales also provided evidence for criterion-related validity of the RESTQ-Sport. This study provided support for reliability and validity of the RESTQ-Sport.

  8. Biomechanics and tennis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, B

    2006-01-01

    Success in tennis requires a mix of player talent, good coaching, appropriate equipment, and an understanding of those aspects of sport science pertinent to the game. This paper outlines the role that biomechanics plays in player development from sport science and sport medicine perspectives. Biomechanics is a key area in player development because all strokes have a fundamental mechanical structure and sports injuries primarily have a mechanical cause. PMID:16632567

  9. Qualitative Biomechanics and the Tennis Ground Strokes. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Errington, Joseph

    This tennis stroke analysis, based on the application of biomechanic principles, is designed to help those who play tennis only once or twice a week. It is noted that, because the tennis player has a limited power potential, the only way to increase his racket head speed is to rotate his body. The mechanics of tennis are discussed by dividing it…

  10. Traumatic subscapularis tendon tear in an adolescent american football player.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Margaret E; Gurley, Daniel; Trenhaile, Scott

    2013-05-01

    Isolated traumatic subscapularis tendon tears are uncommon at any age. In adolescent patients, this type of injury is even more infrequent and usually presents as a bony avulsion of the lesser tuberosity. This report reviews a case of an adolescent American football player sustaining a posterior impact to an abducted, extended arm that resulted in an isolated subscapularis tendon tear. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder revealed an isolated subscapularis tear retracted 1.6 cm without bony avulsion from the lesser tuberosity. Surgical repair was performed with 2 biocomposite absorbable anchors in the lesser tuberosity. The patient returned to basketball 12 weeks after surgery. This case illustrates that a high index of suspicion is required for an appropriate diagnosis in young athletes.

  11. [Injuries in male and female adolescent soccer players].

    PubMed

    Schneider, A S; Mayer, H M; Geißler, U; Rumpf, M C; Schneider, C

    2013-03-01

    This study addresses the epidemiology of injuries in adolescent male and female soccer players in Germany. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to analyse the injuries in male and female youth soccer players in Germany. This study was designed as a cross-sectional web-based survey. From March until December 2011 we investigated 1110 soccer players (male n = 841; female n = 269) aged 12 - 19 years (15.0 ± 2.0 years) from 60 clubs in Southern Germany. A total of 664 (79 %) of the 841 boys and 67 (25 %) of the 269 girls reported being injured due to soccer. The total number of injuries was 2373. Respectively the frequency of injury was 2.85 in boys and 7.10 in girls. The lower extremities were affected in 70 % of all reported cases. Strains were the most common injuries in the lower and upper extremities (35 %). The boys reported in 51.5 % of all injuries that the injury was non-contact in nature. In contrast, 52.1 % of the injuries in girls were reported as contact injuries. Similar amounts of injuries were observed in training versus games for both genders. Prevention procedures, such as a thorough warm-up, should be implemented before every game and training to reduce the risk of injury.

  12. Comparing sports vision among three groups of soft tennis adolescent athletes: Normal vision, refractive errors with and without correction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Tsun; Liu, Yen-Hsiu; Lee, Jiahn-Shing; See, Lai-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Background: The effect of correcting static vision on sports vision is still not clear. Aim: To examine whether sports vision (depth perception [DP], dynamic visual acuity [DVA], eye movement [EM], peripheral vision [PV], and momentary vision [MV],) were different among soft tennis adolescent athletes with normal vision (Group A), with refractive error and corrected with (Group B) and without eyeglasses (Group C). Setting and Design: A cross-section study was conducted. Soft tennis athletes aged 10–13 who played softball tennis for 2–5 years, and who were without any ocular diseases and without visual training for the past 3 months were recruited. Materials and Methods: DPs were measured in an absolute deviation (mm) between a moving rod and fixing rod (approaching at 25 mm/s, receding at 25 mm/s, approaching at 50 mm/s, receding at 50 mm/s) using electric DP tester. A smaller deviation represented better DP. DVA, EM, PV, and MV were measured on a scale from 1 (worse) to 10 (best) using ATHLEVISION software. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test and Kruskal–Wallis test was used to compare the data among the three study groups. Results: A total of 73 athletes (37 in Group A, 8 in Group B, 28 in Group C) were enrolled in this study. All four items of DP showed significant difference among the three study groups (P = 0.0051, 0.0004, 0.0095, 0.0021). PV displayed significant difference among the three study groups (P = 0.0044). There was no significant difference in DVA, EM, and MV among the three study groups. Conclusions: Significant better DP and PV were seen among soft tennis adolescent athletes with normal vision than those with refractive error regardless whether they had eyeglasses corrected. On the other hand, DVA, EM, and MV were similar among the three study groups. PMID:26632127

  13. Intensity of tennis match play

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, J; Mendez‐Villanueva, A; Pluim, B M

    2006-01-01

    This review focuses on the characteristics of tennis players during match play and provides a greater insight into the energy demands of tennis. A tennis match often lasts longer than an hour and in some cases more than five hours. During a match there is a combination of periods of maximal or near maximal work and longer periods of moderate and low intensity activity. Match intensity varies considerably depending on the players' level, style, and sex. It is also influenced by factors such as court surface and ball type. This has important implications for the training of tennis players, which should resemble match intensity and include interval training with appropriate work to rest ratios. PMID:16632566

  14. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescent violin players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1996-08-01

    Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and the frequency of radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of adolescent violin players (VP group) were investigated in a group of 31 music students and in their age- and sex-matched controls (C group). All subjects underwent a routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles. The VP group reported a higher frequency of the subjective symptoms: pain in the TMJ when chewing, a feeling of stiffness in the TMJ, and clenching of the teeth. Clinically, the VP group showed a greater range of maximal protrusion and of maximal laterotrusion to the right, and a greater frequency of deviation to the right on opening. They also showed more palpatory tenderness in the masticatory muscles and pain in the TMJ on maximal opening. The number of playing years and the number of weekly playing hours correlated with several signs and symptoms of TMDs. In terms of radiologic findings in the condyles of the TMJs there was no difference between the groups. It is concluded that intense violin playing may have a predisposing role in the etiology of TMDs in adolescence. PMID:8876740

  15. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescent violin players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1996-08-01

    Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and the frequency of radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of adolescent violin players (VP group) were investigated in a group of 31 music students and in their age- and sex-matched controls (C group). All subjects underwent a routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles. The VP group reported a higher frequency of the subjective symptoms: pain in the TMJ when chewing, a feeling of stiffness in the TMJ, and clenching of the teeth. Clinically, the VP group showed a greater range of maximal protrusion and of maximal laterotrusion to the right, and a greater frequency of deviation to the right on opening. They also showed more palpatory tenderness in the masticatory muscles and pain in the TMJ on maximal opening. The number of playing years and the number of weekly playing hours correlated with several signs and symptoms of TMDs. In terms of radiologic findings in the condyles of the TMJs there was no difference between the groups. It is concluded that intense violin playing may have a predisposing role in the etiology of TMDs in adolescence.

  16. A reciprocal effects model of the temporal ordering of motivation and burnout among youth table tennis players in intensive training settings.

    PubMed

    Martinent, Guillaume; Decret, Jean-Claude; Guillet-Descas, Emma; Isoard-Gautheur, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Using self-determination theory (SDT) (Deci, E.L., & Ryan, R.M. (1985). Intrinsic motivation and self-determination in human behavior. New York, NY: Plenum) as the theoretical framework, we conducted a longitudinal investigation of the temporal ordering between motivation and burnout among youth athletes in intensive training setting. Data were collected from 145 table tennis players in intensive training centres at three time points during a 2-month period characterised by a simultaneous increase in social, physical and psychological demands for these athletes. Structural equation modelling of cross-lagged panel models was used to test the hypotheses. Results showed significant paths leading from athlete burnout - especially sport devaluation and reduced sense of accomplishment - at time 1 to amotivation, intrinsic and extrinsic motivations at times 2 and 3. Only two significant paths leading from motivation (introjected regulation at time 1) to burnout (emotional/physical exhaustion at time 2 and reduced sense of accomplishment at time 3) were identified. Overall, our results suggest that athlete burnout predicts motivation over time but motivation did not predict athlete burnout over time. Results are discussed in terms of current research findings on SDT. PMID:24802802

  17. Effects of repetitive loading on the growth-induced changes in bone mass and cortical bone geometry: a 12-month study in pre/peri- and postmenarcheal tennis players.

    PubMed

    Ducher, Gaele; Bass, Shona L; Saxon, Leanne; Daly, Robin M

    2011-06-01

    Pre- and early puberty may be the most opportune time to strengthen the female skeleton, but there are few longitudinal data to support this claim. Competitive female premenarcheal (pre/peri, n = 13) and postmenarcheal (post, n = 32) tennis players aged 10 to 17 years were followed over 12 months. The osteogenic response to loading was studied by comparing the playing and nonplaying humeri for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) bone mineral content (BMC) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) total bone area (ToA), medullary area (MedA), cortical area (CoA), and muscle area (MCSA) at the humerus. Over 12 months, growth-induced gains (nonplaying arm) in BMC, ToA, and CoA were greater in pre/peri (10% to 19%, p < .001) than in post (3% to 5%, p < .05 to .001) players. At baseline, BMC, ToA, CoA, and MCSA were 8% to 18% greater in the playing versus nonplaying arms in pre/peri and post players (all p < .001); MedA was smaller in the playing versus nonplaying arms in post only players (p < .05). When comparing the annual gains in the playing arm relative to changes in the nonplaying arm, the increases in ToA and CoA were greater in pre/peri than post players (all p < .05). The smaller the side-to-side differences in BMC and CoA at baseline, the larger the exercise benefits at 12 months (r = -0.39 to -0.48, p < .01). The exercise-induced change in MCSA was predictive of the exercise benefits in BMC in pre/peri players only (p < .05). In conclusion, both pre/peri- and postmenarcheal tennis players showed significant exercise-induced skeletal benefits within a year, with greater benefits in cortical bone geometry in pre/perimenarcheal girls.

  18. Intrateam Communication and Performance in Doubles Tennis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lausic, Domagoj; Tennebaum, Gershon; Eccles, David; Jeong, Allan; Johnson, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    Verbal and nonverbal communication is a critical mediator of performance in team sports and yet there is little extant research in sports that involves direct measures of communication. Our study explored communication within NCAA Division I female tennis doubles teams. Video and audio recordings of players during doubles tennis matches captured…

  19. Kinematic differences of elite and high-performance tennis players in the cross court and down the line forehand.

    PubMed

    Landlinger, Johannes; Lindinger, Stefan Josef; Stöggl, Thomas; Wagner, Herbert; Müller, Erich

    2010-11-01

    This study identified and compared the full body kinematics of different skill levels in the forehand groundstroke when balls were hit cross court and down the line. Forty-three three-dimensional retroreflective marker trajectories of six elite and seven high-performance players were recorded using an eight-camera 400 Hz, Vicon motion analysis system. The six highest horizontal velocity forehands with reliable kinematics of all participants were analysed for each specific situation (a total of 156 analysed shots). Significant differences (p < 0.01) and large effect sizes were observed between elite and high-performance players in linear velocity of the shoulder (2.0 vs. 1.2 m/s), angular velocity of the pelvis (295 vs. 168 degrees/s), and angular velocity of the upper trunk (453 vs. 292 degrees/s) at impact. The elite group showed a tendency towards higher racquet velocities at impact (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found in angular displacement of the racquet, hip alignment, or shoulder alignment at the completion of the backswing; nor did angular displacement vary significantly at impact. Irrespective of the group, different shoulder, hip, and racquet angles were found at impact, depending on the situation. The results should assist coaches when striving to improve their players' forehand. PMID:21309302

  20. Health benefits of tennis

    PubMed Central

    Pluim, Babette M; Staal, J Bart; Marks, Bonita L; Miller, Stuart; Miley, Dave

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the role of tennis in the promotion of health and prevention of disease. The focus was on risk factors and diseases related to a sedentary lifestyle, including low fitness levels, obesity, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis. A literature search was undertaken to retrieve relevant articles. Structured computer searches of PubMed, Embase, and CINAHL were undertaken, along with hand searching of key journals and reference lists to locate relevant studies published up to March 2007. These had to be cohort studies (of either cross sectional or longitudinal design), case–control studies, or experimental studies. Twenty four studies were identified that dealt with physical fitness of tennis players, including 17 on intensity of play and 16 on maximum oxygen uptake; 17 investigated the relation between tennis and (risk factors for) cardiovascular disease; and 22 examined the effect of tennis on bone health. People who choose to play tennis appear to have significant health benefits, including improved aerobic fitness, a lower body fat percentage, a more favourable lipid profile, reduced risk for developing cardiovascular disease, and improved bone health. PMID:17504788

  1. Can laboratory-based tennis profiles predict field tests of tennis performance?

    PubMed

    Perry, Arlette C; Wang, Xuewen; Feldman, Brandon B; Ruth, Tiffany; Signorile, Joseph

    2004-02-01

    The present study examined the impact of physical characteristics of adolescent competitive tennis players (13-18 years) on field tests of tennis performance. Results (n = 33) showed that boys were taller (p = 0.001), possessed greater wingspan (p = 0.030), had greater maximum oxygen consumption (p = 0.001), and performed better on isokinetic strength measurements. Multiple regression analyses controlling for age and sex showed that height (p = 0.025), maximum minute ventilation (p = 0.005), and isokinetic strength measurements significantly and positively affected ball velocity. Knee extension average power was the only variable to positively and significantly affect ball placement (p = 0.040); however, several isokinetic strength measurements negatively affected ball placement. For the nondominant side, down-the-line strokes showed reduced accuracy (p = 0.001) and ball velocity (p = 0.001) compared with cross-court strokes. Given our results, resistance training may be beneficial for the performance of on-court tennis play. PMID:14971970

  2. Muscle hypertrophy and increased expression of leptin receptors in the musculus triceps brachii of the dominant arm in professional tennis players.

    PubMed

    Olmedillas, Hugo; Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Fuentes, Teresa; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Ponce-González, Jesus G; Morales-Alamo, David; Santana, Alfredo; Dorado, Cecilia; Calbet, José A L; Guerra, Borja

    2010-03-01

    In rodents, endurance training increases leptin sensitivity in skeletal muscle; however, little is known about the effects of exercise on the leptin signalling system in human skeletal muscle. Thus, to determine whether chronic muscle loading increases leptin receptor (OB-R170) protein expression, body composition dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was assessed in nine professional male tennis players (24 +/- 4 years old) and muscle biopsies were obtained from the dominant (DTB) and non-dominant (NDTB) arm triceps brachii (TB), and also from the right vastus lateralis (VL). In each biopsy, the protein content of OB-R170, perilipin A, suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3), protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation were determined by western blot. The DTB had 15% greater lean mass (P < 0.05) and 62% greater OB-R170 protein expression (P < 0.05) than the NDTB. SOCS3 and PTP1B protein expression was similar in both arms, while STAT3 phosphorylation was reduced in the NDTB. OB-R170 protein content was also higher in DTB than in VL (P < 0.05). In summary, this study shows that the functional isoform of the leptin receptor is up-regulated in the hypertrophied TB. The latter combined with the fact that both SOCS3 and PTP1B protein expression were unaltered is compatible with increased leptin sensitivity in this muscle. Our findings are also consistent with a role of leptin signalling in muscle hypertrophy in healthy humans.

  3. Motion analyses of adolescent rugby union players: a comparison of training and game demands.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Timothy B; Naughton, Geraldine; Searl, John

    2011-04-01

    This research described the physiological demands of participation in adolescent rugby union including positional differences and the degree to which training practices replicate game demands. Between 2003 and 2008, 118 male adolescent rugby players aged 14 to 18 years were recruited from 10 teams representing 3 levels of adolescent rugby. Time-motion analyses using global positioning satellite tracking devices (SPI10; GPSports Systems Pty Ltd 2003) and computer-based tracking software (Trak Performance; Sports Tec Pty Ltd) applied to video footage determined player movement patterns 161 times during rugby training sessions and 53 times during rugby games. Compared with rugby training, rugby games were consistently characterized by more time spent jogging (14 vs. 8%), striding (3.2 vs. 1.3%), and sprinting (1.3 vs. 0.1%) (p < 0.001). Players also covered greater distances (4000 ± 500 vs. 2710 ± 770 m) and performed more sprints (21.8 vs. 1) during games compared with training (p < 0.001). The average sprint duration of 2 seconds was similar in games and training; however, the frequency of sprint efforts in training sessions was low (1 per hour). A major finding of this study is the disparity between physical game demands and on-field rugby training practices in adolescent players determined using time-motion analyses. Sprint pattern differences between games and training in particular could have important implications for player performance during competition. Results of this study should assist in the development of game-specific training sessions and drills that provide the kinds of physically demanding experiences observed in games. Additionally, coaches could assist in the management of adolescent players' participation loads by increasing the intensity and specificity and decreasing the volume of training. PMID:20647941

  4. Motion analyses of adolescent rugby union players: a comparison of training and game demands.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Timothy B; Naughton, Geraldine; Searl, John

    2011-04-01

    This research described the physiological demands of participation in adolescent rugby union including positional differences and the degree to which training practices replicate game demands. Between 2003 and 2008, 118 male adolescent rugby players aged 14 to 18 years were recruited from 10 teams representing 3 levels of adolescent rugby. Time-motion analyses using global positioning satellite tracking devices (SPI10; GPSports Systems Pty Ltd 2003) and computer-based tracking software (Trak Performance; Sports Tec Pty Ltd) applied to video footage determined player movement patterns 161 times during rugby training sessions and 53 times during rugby games. Compared with rugby training, rugby games were consistently characterized by more time spent jogging (14 vs. 8%), striding (3.2 vs. 1.3%), and sprinting (1.3 vs. 0.1%) (p < 0.001). Players also covered greater distances (4000 ± 500 vs. 2710 ± 770 m) and performed more sprints (21.8 vs. 1) during games compared with training (p < 0.001). The average sprint duration of 2 seconds was similar in games and training; however, the frequency of sprint efforts in training sessions was low (1 per hour). A major finding of this study is the disparity between physical game demands and on-field rugby training practices in adolescent players determined using time-motion analyses. Sprint pattern differences between games and training in particular could have important implications for player performance during competition. Results of this study should assist in the development of game-specific training sessions and drills that provide the kinds of physically demanding experiences observed in games. Additionally, coaches could assist in the management of adolescent players' participation loads by increasing the intensity and specificity and decreasing the volume of training.

  5. Protein intake and nitrogen balance in male non-active adolescents and soccer players.

    PubMed

    Boisseau, N; Le Creff, C; Loyens, M; Poortmans, J R

    2002-12-01

    Recommendations for the requirements for protein intake amount usually to 0.8-1.0 g x kg(-1) body mass x day(-1) in adolescents without any reference to the undertaking of acute exercise or to the training status. The present investigation intended to determine the nitrogen balance and protein intake in 8 healthy male non-active adolescents and 11 adolescent soccer players, both groups aged about 15 years. An assessment of nutrient intake was obtained by analysing 7 day food records collected by a questionnaire. Nitrogen excretion rate was determined and nitrogen balance was calculated from the mean daily protein intake and the urinary excretion. The results showed that the nutritional status of the two groups was similar. Nevertheless, we found that their diets were quite inappropriate in terms of the intakes of carbohydrate, some minerals (zinc, calcium, magnesium), vitamins (A, B6, D) and fibre. A positive nitrogen balance was observed from a mean protein intake of 1.57 g x kg(-1) body mass x day(-1) in these adolescents, whether they were non-active or athletes. Thus, the present investigation indicated that the growth and development in non-active adolescents and in adolescent soccer-players give rise to a need for a higher protein intake than is usually recommended. However, the higher protein requirements did not seem to be related only to the increased energy expenditure imposed by the exercise training in the soccer-player group.

  6. Modern tennis rackets, balls, and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Miller, S

    2006-05-01

    Modern rackets have facilitated a change in playing style from one of technique to one characterised by power and spin. The combination of the increased stiffness of modern rackets and the tendency for tennis balls to have become harder has led to an increased shock transmission from the racket to the player, which is probably a major contributor to tennis elbow. The paucity of tennis specific research on shoes and surfaces makes it difficult to link their characteristics with lower limb injury, although, as their interaction directly affects the magnitude of the forces to which the player is exposed, such a link seems reasonable. PMID:16632569

  7. Reliability and Usefulness of Linear Sprint Testing in Adolescent Rugby Union and League Players.

    PubMed

    Darrall-Jones, Joshua D; Jones, Ben; Roe, Gregory; Till, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate (a) whether there were differences in sprint times at 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 m between rugby union and rugby league players, (b) determine the reliability and usefulness of linear sprint testing in adolescent rugby players. Data were collected on 28 rugby union and league academy players over 2 testing sessions, with 3-day rest between sessions. Rugby league players were faster at 5 m than rugby union players, with further difference unclear. Sprint time at 10, 20, 30, and 40 m was all reliable (coefficient of variation [CV] = 3.1, 1.8, 2.0, and 1.3%) but greater than the smallest worthwhile change (SWC [0.2 × between-subject SD]), rating the test as marginal for usefulness. Although the test was incapable of detecting the SWC, we recommend that practitioners and researchers use Hopkins' proposed method; whereby plotting the change score of the individual at each split (±typical error [TE] expressed as a CV) against the SWC and visually inspecting whether the TE crosses into the SWC are capable of identifying whether a change is both real (greater than the noise of the test, i.e., >TE) and of practical significance (>SWC). Researchers and practitioners can use the TE and SWC from this study to assess changes in performance of adolescent rugby players when using single beam timing gates.

  8. Adolescent Identities and Sexual Behavior: An Examination of Anderson's Player Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Peggy C.; Longmore, Monica A.; Manning, Wendy D.; Northcutt, Miriam J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the social and behavioral characteristics of male adolescents who self-identify as players, focusing particularly on Anderson's claim that this social role is inextricably linked with poverty and minority status. Results indicate that black respondents, those affiliated with liberal peers and young men who initially report a…

  9. Trajectories of Affective States in Adolescent Hockey Players: Turning Point and Motivational Antecedents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudreau, Patrick; Amiot, Catherine E.; Vallerand, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal trajectories of positive and negative affective states with a sample of 265 adolescent elite hockey players followed across 3 measurement points during the 1st 11 weeks of a season. Latent class growth modeling, incorporating a time-varying covariate and a series of predictors assessed at the onset of the season,…

  10. Nutrition for Tennis: Practical Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Ranchordas, Mayur K.; Rogersion, David; Ruddock, Alan; Killer, Sophie C.; Winter, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Tennis is a pan-global sport that is played year-round in both hemispheres. This places notable demands on the physical and psychological preparation of players and included in these demands are nutritional and fluid requirements both of training and match- play. Thus, the purpose of this article is to review nutritional recommendations for tennis. Notably, tennis players do not excel in any particular physiological or anthropometric characteristic but are well adapted in all areas which is probably a result of the varied nature of the training demands of tennis match play. Energy expenditures of 30.9 ± 5.5 and 45.3 ± 7.3 kJ·min-1 have been reported in women and men players respectively regardless of court surface. Tennis players should follow a habitually high carbohydrate diet of between 6-10 g·kg-1·d-1 to ensure adequate glycogen stores, with women generally requiring slightly less than men. Protein intake guidelines for tennis players training at a high intensity and duration on a daily basis should be ~1.6 g·kg-1·d-1 and dietary fat intake should not exceed 2 g·kg-1·d-1. Caffeine in doses of 3 mg·kg-1 provides ergogenic benefit when taken before and/or during tennis match play. Depending on environmental conditions, sweat rates of 0.5 to and over 5 L·hr-1 and sodium losses of 0.5 - 1.8 g have been recorded in men and women players. 200 mL of fluid containing electrolytes should be consumed every change-over in mild to moderate temperatures of < 27°C but in temperatures greater than 27°C players should aim for ≤ 400 mL. 30-60 g·hr-1 of carbohydrate should be ingested when match play exceeds 2 hours. Key Points Tennis players should follow a habitually high carbohydrate diet of between 6-10 g·kg-1 to ensure adequate glycogen stores, with women generally requiring slightly less than men. Protein intake guidelines for tennis players training at a high intensity and duration on a daily basis should be ~1.6 g·kg-1·d-1. Dietary fat intake should

  11. Fractured diaphyseal tibiofibular synostosis in an adolescent soccer player.

    PubMed

    Santa Maria, Daniel L; Shaw, Thomas; Allen, Marque; Marin, James

    2015-01-01

    Diaphyseal tibiofibular synostosis is a rare cause of symptomatic shin pain with exertion. In this case, a 14-year-old male soccer player presented with atraumatic right shin pain made worse with running. Computed tomography revealed heterotopic ossification, or synostosis, of the tibial-fibular syndesmosis. The patient's symptoms improved with rest, without the need for operative intervention. PMID:25171880

  12. The Snapping Elbow Syndrome as a Reason for Chronic Elbow Neuralgia in a Tennis Player – MR, US and Sonoelastography Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Łasecki, Mateusz; Olchowy, Cyprian; Pawluś, Aleksander; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Ulnar neuropathy is the second most common peripheral nerve neuropathy after median neuropathy, with an incidence of 25 cases per 100 000 men and 19 cases per 100 000 women each year. Skipping (snapping) elbow syndrome is an uncommon cause of pain in the posterior-medial elbow area, sometimes complicated by injury of the ulnar nerve. One of the reason is the dislocation of the abnormal insertion of the medial triceps head over the medial epicondyle during flexion and extension movements. Others are: lack of the Osboune fascia leading to ulnar nerve instability and focal soft tissue tumors (fibromas, lipomas, etc). Recurrent subluxation of the nerve at the elbow results in a tractional and frictional neuritis with classical symptoms of peripheral neuralgia. As far as we know snapping triceps syndrome had never been evaluated in sonoelastography. Case Report A 28yo semi-professional left handed tennis player was complaining about pain in posterior-medial elbow area. Initial US examination suggest golfers elbow syndrome which occurs quite commonly and has a prevalence of 0.3–0.6% in males and 0–3–1.1% in women and may be associated (approx. 50% of cases) with ulnar neuropathy. However subsequently made MRI revealed unusual distal triceps anatomy, moderate ulnar nerve swelling and lack of medial epicondylitis symptoms. Followed (second) US examination and sonoelastography have detected slipping of the both ulnar nerve and the additional band of the medial triceps head. Discussion Snapping elbow syndrome is a poorly known medical condition, sometimes misdiagnosed as the medial epicondylitis. It describes a broad range of pathologies and anatomical abnormalities. One of the most often reasons is the slipping of the ulnar nerve as the result of the Osborne fascia/anconeus epitrochlearis muscle absence. Simultaneously presence of two or more “snapping reasons” is rare but should be always taken under consideration. Conclusions There are no

  13. Performance enhancement among adolescent players after 10 weeks of pitching training with appropriate baseball weights.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Wen; Liu, Ya-Chen; Lu, Lee-Chang; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Chou, Paul Pei-Hsi; Liu, Chiang

    2013-12-01

    Compared with regulation-weight baseballs, lightweight baseballs generate lower torque on the shoulder and elbow joints without altering the pitching movement and timing. This study investigates the throwing accuracy, throwing velocity, arm swing velocity, and maximum shoulder external rotation (MSER) of adolescent players after 10 weeks of pitching training with appropriate lightweight baseballs. We assigned 24 adolescent players to a lightweight baseball group (group L) and a regulation-weight baseball group (group R) based on their pretraining throwing velocity. Both groups received pitching training 3 times per week for 10 weeks with 4.4- and 5-oz baseballs. The players' throwing accuracy, throwing velocity, arm swing velocity, and MSER were measured from 10 maximum efforts throws using a regulation-weight baseball before and after undergoing the pitching training. The results showed that the players in group L significantly increased their throwing velocity and arm swing velocity (p < 0.05) after 10 weeks of pitching training with the 4.4-oz baseball, whereas group R did not (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the percentage change in the throwing velocity and arm swing velocity of group L was significantly superior to that of group R (p < 0.05). Thus, we concluded that the 10 weeks of pitching training with an appropriate lightweight baseball substantially enhanced the arm swing velocity and throwing velocity of the adolescent baseball players. These findings suggest that using a lightweight baseball, which can reduce the risk of injury without altering pitching patterns, has positive training effects on players in the rapid physical growth and technique development stage.

  14. Performance enhancement among adolescent players after 10 weeks of pitching training with appropriate baseball weights.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Wen; Liu, Ya-Chen; Lu, Lee-Chang; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Chou, Paul Pei-Hsi; Liu, Chiang

    2013-12-01

    Compared with regulation-weight baseballs, lightweight baseballs generate lower torque on the shoulder and elbow joints without altering the pitching movement and timing. This study investigates the throwing accuracy, throwing velocity, arm swing velocity, and maximum shoulder external rotation (MSER) of adolescent players after 10 weeks of pitching training with appropriate lightweight baseballs. We assigned 24 adolescent players to a lightweight baseball group (group L) and a regulation-weight baseball group (group R) based on their pretraining throwing velocity. Both groups received pitching training 3 times per week for 10 weeks with 4.4- and 5-oz baseballs. The players' throwing accuracy, throwing velocity, arm swing velocity, and MSER were measured from 10 maximum efforts throws using a regulation-weight baseball before and after undergoing the pitching training. The results showed that the players in group L significantly increased their throwing velocity and arm swing velocity (p < 0.05) after 10 weeks of pitching training with the 4.4-oz baseball, whereas group R did not (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the percentage change in the throwing velocity and arm swing velocity of group L was significantly superior to that of group R (p < 0.05). Thus, we concluded that the 10 weeks of pitching training with an appropriate lightweight baseball substantially enhanced the arm swing velocity and throwing velocity of the adolescent baseball players. These findings suggest that using a lightweight baseball, which can reduce the risk of injury without altering pitching patterns, has positive training effects on players in the rapid physical growth and technique development stage. PMID:23603999

  15. Fitness profiling of elite level adolescent Gaelic football players.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Bryan D; Cregg, Cathal J; Kelly, David T; Hughes, Sarah M; Daly, Pat G; Moyna, Niall M

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anthropometric characteristics and fitness levels of elite level under 18 (U-18) Gaelic football players to establish normative centile scores for selected fitness parameters and to compare the physical and fitness characteristics relative to each playing position. A total of 265 male U-18 Gaelic football players (age: 16.96 ± 0.7 years; height: 178.11 ± 6.27 cm; weight: 72.07 ± 8.68 kg) participated in the study. According to positional roles, players were categorized as goalkeepers (n = 13), defenders (n = 113), midfielders (n = 30), and forwards (n = 109). Height and weight were measured, and skinfolds were taken before participants sequentially performed a sit and reach test (S&R), countermovement jump (CMJ), standing long jump (SLJ), 5- and 20-m speed test, and the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1 (YYIRT1). The percentage body fat was higher (p < 0.01) in goalkeepers than the other playing positions. Goalkeepers had a higher body mass index than defenders (p < 0.05) and forwards (p < 0.01). Midfielders and goalkeepers were taller (p < 0.01) and heavier (p < 0.01) than defenders and forwards. The total distance covered in the YYIRT1 was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in goalkeepers than the other playing positions. There was no significant positional difference in the performance scores in the S&R test, CMJ, SLJ, and 5- and 20-m running speed. The study findings indicate minimal differences in the anthropometric and physiological characteristics between playing positions in elite youth level Gaelic football players. The norm-referenced percentile scores will enable conditioning coaches to benchmark elite performance and design training programs.

  16. Evidence of favorable sleep-EEG patterns in adolescent male vigorous football players compared to controls.

    PubMed

    Brand, Serge; Beck, Johannes; Gerber, Markus; Hatzinger, Martin; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2010-03-01

    Sleep is crucial for psychological functioning and daily performance. Both lay and scientific opinion hold that physical activity encourages restorative sleep. However, research on this in adolescence is limited. The aim of the present study was to compare sleep-EEG patterns of vigorous exercisers and controls. Twelve adolescent male football players (14 h of vigorous exercise per week) and 12 controls (1.5 h of vigorous exercise per week) matched for gender, age (about 16 years), and educational level, took part in the study. Sleep-EEG registration was performed following a day without exercise. Sleep-EEG analyses revealed that, compared to controls, the football players showed greater sleep efficiency, shortened sleep onset latency, less awakenings after sleep onset, more stage 4, and less REM sleep. Importantly, this pattern of results emerged following a day without exercise. Moreover, vigorous football players reported better daily performance and displayed less weeknight (Sunday to Thursday) to weekend night (Friday and Saturday nights) variation. Findings suggest that for the football players, vigorous exercise seemed to lead to longer-lasting electrophysiological change in brain activity irrespective of acute bouts of exercise. PMID:19606405

  17. Effect of core strength training on dynamic balance and agility in adolescent badminton players.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Tarik; Aydogmus, Mert

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate effect of core strength training (CST) on core endurance, dynamic balance and agility in adolescent badminton players. Twenty adolescent (age = 10.8 ± 0.3 years; height = 140.6 ± 4.4 cm, weight = 33.9 ± 5.8 kg) badminton players were randomly divided into two groups as training group (TG) and control (CG) group. All subjects were evaluated with Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), Illinois Agility Test, and the core endurance tests. The TG completed CST twice a week, for 6 weeks. There were significant increases in (p < 0.05) directions of SEBT and core endurance tests (p < 0.05). However, no significant change was observed for agility (p > 0.05). The CST resulted in significant gains in directions of the SEBT and core endurances in adolescent badminton players, but not in agility. PMID:27634079

  18. The effects of resistance training on explosive strength indicators in adolescent basketball players.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eduardo J A M; Janeira, Manuel A A S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a lower- and upper-body 10-week in-season resistance training program on explosive strength development in young basketball players. Twenty-five adolescent male athletes, aged 14-15 years old, were randomly assigned to an experimental group (EG; n = 15) and a control group (CG; n = 10). The subjects were assessed at baseline and after training for squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), Abalakov test, drop jump, and seated medicine ball throw (MBT). The EG showed significant increases (p < 0.05) in all the variable scores. Conversely, the CG significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in SJ, CMJ, and Abalakov test scores and significantly increased in the results of MBT test (p < 0.05). The groups were similar on pretest, but significant differences (p < 0.05) occurred on posttest in all the variables. The results of this study show that a 10-week in-season resistance training program with moderate volume and intensity loads increased vertical jump and MBT performance in adolescent male basketball players. Coaches should know that such a short resistance training program specifically designed for young basketball players induce increased explosivity levels, which are essential to a better basketball performance, with no extra overload on adolescents' skeletal muscle development.

  19. Game intensity analysis of elite adolescent ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Stanula, Arkadiusz; Roczniok, Robert

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine ice-hockey players' playing intensity based on their heart rates (HRs) recorded during a game and on the outcomes of an incremental maximum oxygen uptake test. Twenty ice-hockey players, members of the Polish junior national team (U18), performed an incremental test to assess their maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) in the two week's period preceding 5 games they played at the World Championships. Players' HRs at the first and second ventilatory thresholds obtained during the test were utilized to determine intensity zones (low, moderate, and high) that were subsequently used to classify HR values recorded during each of the games. For individual intensity zones, the following HRs expressed as mean values and as percentages of the maximal heart rate (HRmax) were obtained: forwards 148-158 b·min(-1) (79.5-84.8% HRmax), 159-178 b·min(-1) (85.4-95.6% HRmax), 179-186 b·min(-1) (96.1-100.0% HRmax); defensemen 149-153 b·min(-1) (80.0-82.1% HRmax), 154-175 b·min(-1) (82.6-94.0% HRmax), 176-186 b·min(-1) (94.5-100.0% HRmax). The amount of time the forwards and defensemen spent in the three intensity zones expressed as percentages of the total time of the game were: 54.91 vs. 55.62% (low), 26.40 vs. 22.38% (moderate) and 18.68 vs. 22.00% (high). The forwards spent more time in the low intensity zone than the defensemen, however, the difference was not statistically significant. The results of the study indicate that using aerobic and anaerobic metabolism variables to determine intensity zones can significantly improve the reliability of evaluation of the physiological demands of the game, and can be a useful tool for coaches in managing the training process. PMID:25713682

  20. Anthropometric profile and body composition of Irish adolescent rugby union players aged 16-18.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Byrne, Risteard B; Doolin, Rachel K; McInerney, Rory G; Ruddock, Ciaran T J; Green, Brian S

    2013-12-01

    The literature suggests that one of the key determinants of success at rugby union international competitions is the anthropometric profile of players. The Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU) long-term player development (LTPD) model is a framework designed to guide the development of the tactical, physical, and psychological domains of sporting participation. In Ireland, the Train-to-Train stage of the IRFU model is a critical stage, whereby the next developmental progression would include the transition of players into professional academies. To date, no previously published studies have examined the anthropometric profile of Irish Schools' rugby union players at the Train-to-Train stage of the IRFU model. The anthropometric profile of 136 male adolescent rugby union players at the Train-to-Train stage of the IRFU model was assessed using total-body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Significant differences in height, body mass, body fat percentage, fat mass, lean mass, and fat-free mass were observed between players assigned to the forward and back units, and for specific position categorizations within each unit. Direct logistic regression revealed that body mass was a statistically significant (p < 0.01) predictor of unit position classification, with an odds ratio of 2.35, indicating that the players with a higher body mass were twice as likely to be classified as forwards. The results of this study indicate that at the Train-to-Train stage of the IRFU model, forward and back units have distinctly different anthropometric profiles. Furthermore, anthropometric differentiation also exists within specific position categorizations within each of these playing units. Thus, anthropometric profiling should be carried out on a systematic and periodic basis, because this will allow for the evaluation of the effectiveness of the implementation strategies of the IRFU model on a national basis.

  1. Bilateral midshaft femoral fractures in an adolescent baseball player.

    PubMed

    Ju, D G; Mogayzel, P J; Sponseller, P D; Familiari, F; McFarland, E G

    2016-07-01

    Bone disease, specifically low bone mineral density, is a common and undertreated complication that begins during childhood in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This case describes a male baseball player, aged 14years, with undiagnosed CF who sustained a left midshaft femoral fracture while running toward base; 8months later, he sustained a right midshaft femoral fracture under similar conditions. After the second fracture, further evaluation revealed low bone mineral density and CF. There is no previously published report of pathologic fractures occurring in the femoral shaft in an athlete with undiagnosed CF. Patients with CF have a higher fracture rate. Low-energy fractures of major bones in athletically active individuals should be viewed with suspicion for an underlying process.

  2. Bilateral midshaft femoral fractures in an adolescent baseball player.

    PubMed

    Ju, D G; Mogayzel, P J; Sponseller, P D; Familiari, F; McFarland, E G

    2016-07-01

    Bone disease, specifically low bone mineral density, is a common and undertreated complication that begins during childhood in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This case describes a male baseball player, aged 14years, with undiagnosed CF who sustained a left midshaft femoral fracture while running toward base; 8months later, he sustained a right midshaft femoral fracture under similar conditions. After the second fracture, further evaluation revealed low bone mineral density and CF. There is no previously published report of pathologic fractures occurring in the femoral shaft in an athlete with undiagnosed CF. Patients with CF have a higher fracture rate. Low-energy fractures of major bones in athletically active individuals should be viewed with suspicion for an underlying process. PMID:26927602

  3. Juvenile tillaux fracture in an adolescent basketball player.

    PubMed

    Cassas, Kyle J; Jamison, John P

    2005-02-01

    Forced external rotation of the foot may cause a syndesmosis or high ankle sprain in an adult, but in a teenage patient, a juvenile Tillaux fracture may occur if the tibial physis has not yet closed. Diagnosis is made with plain radiographs, but CT may be necessary to determine the true articular displacement. Closed reduction with casting for 6 weeks is usually sufficient for most nondisplaced or minimally displaced fractures. Patients with more than 2 mm of displacement, as in this case of a 16-year-old basketball player, should be referred to an orthopedic surgeon. Complications include residual angular deformity and premature osteoarthritis. Most patients are able to return to full activity at 3 months postinjury.

  4. On the Gender Effects of Handedness in Professional Tennis

    PubMed Central

    Breznik, Kristijan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of the gender variable in relation to other player and match characteristics on the advantage possessed by left-handed professional tennis players over their right-handed rivals. The data include 16 732 male tennis players and 16 432 female tennis players who played 438 937 and 415 346 matches, respectively, in the period from 1968 to the end of 2011. The results revealed that the advantage of left-handed professional tennis players is higher in males compared to females. The inverse impact of player and match quality on the left- handers’ advantage was clearly confirmed. On the contrary, it seems that the type of court surface does not directly imply this advantage. To obtain an overview on the individual level, directed and weighted networks of tennis matches in both gender categories were constructed. Applying network analytic methods and the PageRank algorithm, the best left and right-handed players in the Open Era of tennis were identified. The top three ranked left-handed players in the male and female categories were found to be far more consistent in their ranks achieved against left and right-handed opponents compared to their right-handed counterparts. Key Points The advantage of left-handed professional tennis players over their right-handed opponents is higher in males compared to females. The quality of player and match is inversely proportional to the advantage of left-handers against their right-handed counterparts. On the contrary, it seems that the type of court surface does not directly imply this advantage. When the tennis talent appears in left-handers it is likely to be an outstanding one, particularly in the female category. PMID:24149815

  5. The physics of tennis. III. The ball-racket interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, H.

    1997-10-01

    A simple, one-dimensional, rigid-body model of a tennis racket interacting with a tennis ball agrees well with data taken when balls are fired at a stationary, free racket. The results are then transformed into the tennis court frame of reference, where the racket is moving. Data obtained on the rotational aspects of a tennis swing are then included in the model. For ground strokes, the results are used to predict strategies that will reduce unforced errors by players. The serve is then analyzed with respect to the current problem of the speed of the game. This paper is the third of a series of papers on tennis by this author. The two previous papers were "Physics of the Tennis Racket" [Am. J. Phys. 47, 482 (1979)] and "Physics of the Tennis Racket. II. The Sweet Spot" [Am. J. Phys. 49, 816 (1981)].

  6. The Effects of Rhythm Training on Tennis Performance

    PubMed Central

    Söğüt, Mustafa; Kirazci, Sadettin; Korkusuz, Feza

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm training is an integral part of sports. The purposes of the study were to analyze the effects of rhythm training on tennis performance and rhytmic competence of tennis players, to compare the improvement levels of tennis specific and general rhythm training and to examine the effects of shorter and longer tempos on rhythmic competence. Thirty university students whose mean score of International Tennis Number (ITN) was 7.3 (±0.9) were divided randomly into three sub-groups: Tennis Group, General Rhythm Training Group and Tennis-Specific Rhythm Training Group. The experimental procedure lasted 8 weeks. During this period, all groups had the same tennis training twice a week. The Tennis Group had regular tennis training sessions. In addition to regular tennis training sessions, the General Rhythm Training Group followed the general rhythm training sessions and the Tennis-Specific Rhythm Training Group had tennis-specific rhythm training. The measurement instruments were ITN, Rhythmic Competence Analysis Test and Untimed Consecutive Rally Test. The results indicated that participation in tennis-specific or general rhythm training resulted in progress in tennis playing levels, forehand consistency performance and rhythmic competence of the participants. On the other hand, attendance to the regular 8-week tennis training was enough to solely increase the tennis playing level but not sufficient to develop forehand consistency performance and rhythmic competence. Although the participants in the TRTG had better improvement scores than the ones in the GRTG, no significant difference was found between the rhythm training groups. The results also revealed that participants exhibited higher rhythmic competence scores on fast tempo compared to slow tempo. PMID:23486093

  7. Evaluation of stroke performance in tennis.

    PubMed

    Vergauwen, L; Spaepen, A J; Lefevre, J; Hespel, P

    1998-08-01

    In the present studies, the Leuven Tennis Performance Test (LTPT), a newly developed test procedure to measure stroke performance in match-like conditions in elite tennis players, was evaluated as to its value for research purposes. The LTPT is enacted on a regular tennis court. It consists of first and second services, and of returning balls projected by a machine to target zones indicated by a lighted sign. Neutral, defensive, and offensive tactical situations are elicited by appropriately programming the machine. Stroke quality is determined from simultaneous measurements of error rate, ball velocity, and precision of ball placement. A velocity/precision (VP) an a velocity/precision/error (VPE) index are also calculated. The validity and sensitivity of the LTPT were determined by verifying whether LTPT scores reflect minor differences in tennis ranking on the one hand and the effects of fatigue on the other hand. Compared with lower ranked players, higher ones made fewer errors (P < 0.05). In addition, stroke velocity was higher (P < 0.05), and lateral stroke precision, VP, and VPE scores were better (P < 0.05) in the latter. Furthermore, fatigue induced by a prolonged tennis load increased (P < 0.05) error rate and decreased (P < 0.05) stroke velocity and the VP and VPE indices. It is concluded that the LTPT is an accurate, reliable, and valid instrument for the evaluation of stroke quality in high-level tennis players. PMID:9710870

  8. Improved Tennis Racquets Have Tapered Strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Design concept for better performing tennis racquet. Essence of concept to taper strings in such way as to shift center of percussion (also called "sweet spot") toward the toe (outer end of racquet, farthest from player's hand). In addition to increasing power on serves, also improves player's control and feel of racquet in player's hand. Racquet less likely to twist in player's hand on off-center shots. Important element of better feel is better absorption of vibrations; especially for players having chronic arm problems. String material nylon, animal gut, or other naturally or artifically spun threads. String can be attached to conventional racquet frame.

  9. Anterior translation and morphologic changes of the ulnar nerve at the elbow in adolescent baseball players.

    PubMed

    Tai, Ta-Wei; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Chau; Wang, Lin-Hwa; Chao, Shu-Yi; Huang, Christine Nai-Hui; Jou, I-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The effect of repetitive throwing on the ulnar nerve is not clear. There are no published imaging studies regarding this issue in adolescent baseball players. The purpose of this cross-sectional ultrasonographic study was to use 5- to 10-MHz frequency ultrasonography to define the anterior translation and flattening of the ulnar nerve in different elbow positions. We divided 39 adolescent baseball players into two groups, 19 pitchers and 20 fielders, according to the amount of throwing. Twenty-four non-athlete junior high school students were also included as controls. We ultrasonographically examined each participant's ulnar nerve in the cubital tunnel with the elbow extended and at 45°, 90° and 120° of flexion. Anterior translation and flattening of the ulnar nerve occurred in all groups. Pitchers had larger-scale anterior translation than did controls. In pitchers, the ulnar nerve exhibited more anterior movement on the dominant side than on the non-dominant side. The anterior subluxation of the ulnar nerve occurred in players without ulnar nerve palsy and was not correlated with elbow pain. In addition to the known musculoskeletal adaptations of pitchers' elbows, ultrasonography revealed new changes in the ulnar nerve, anterior translation and subluxation, after repetitive throwing. These changes might also be physiologic adaptations of throwing elbows.

  10. Pattern of Use of Earphone and Music Player Devices among Iranian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Hossein; Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar; Rostami, Fatemeh; Maleki, Ahdieh; Sahebihagh, Mohammad Hassan; Naieni, Kourosh Holakouie

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is no information about the pattern of use of earphones and music players in Iranian adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and pattern of the use of earphone and music player devices as a main risk factor for hearing loss in adolescents of Tabriz city, northwest of Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study in November 2011, 2,359 high school students were randomly selected and were asked to complete a 20-item questionnaire about the pattern of using earphones and music players. Results: The results showed that 44.3% [confidence interval (CI) 95%: 38.3-50.3] of the respondents had a history of hearing problems that was significantly different between males and females (42.2% of males and 47% of females, p: 0.02). Notably, 36.8% of the participants stated that they listened to music without any rest or stop. Almost 49.6% (CI 95%: 44.4-54.4) of the students reported listening to ‘somewhat loud’ (gain setting at 50%) or ‘very loud’ (gain setting more than 50%) volume level of music. In terms of the kind of earphones, 17.1% of the participants used headphones, 34.8% used earbud-style headphones, 32.3% used supra-aural headphones, and 15.8% of them did not use any type of earphones. Conclusions: Students have risky patterns of using earphones and music-listening devices. Planning educational programs in this domain for adolescents especially in high schools is necessary. PMID:25013698

  11. Exercise-induced bone gain is due to enlargement in bone size without a change in volumetric bone density: a peripheral quantitative computed tomography study of the upper arms of male tennis players.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, H; Kontulainen, S; Sievänen, H; Kannus, P; Järvinen, M; Vuori, I

    2000-09-01

    Bilateral bone characteristics of the humerus (proximal, shaft, and distal sites) and radius (shaft and distal sites) in 12 former Finnish national-level male tennis players (mean age 30 years) and their 12 age-, height-, and weight-matched controls were measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). The pQCT variables analyzed were bone mineral content (BMC), total cross-sectional area of bone (Tot.Ar), cross-sectional area of the marrow cavity (M.Cav.Ar), cortical bone (Co.Ar) and trabecular bone (Tr.Ar), volumetric density of cortical (Co.Dn) and trabecular (Tr. Dn) bone, cortical wall thickness (Co.Wi.Th), bone strength index (BSI), and principal moments of inertia (I(min) and I(max)). In the players, significant side-to-side differences, in favor of the dominant (playing) arm, were found in BMC (ranging 14%-27%), Tot.Ar (16%-21%), Co.Ar (12%-32%), BSI (23%-37%), I(min) (33%-61%), and I(max) (27%-67%) at all measured bone sites, and in Co.Wi.Th. (5%-25%) at the humeral and radial shafts, and distal humerus. The side-to-side M.Cav.Ar difference was significant at the proximal humerus (19%) and radial shaft (29%). Concerning the players' Co.Dn and Tr.Dn, the only significant side-to-side difference was found in the Co.Dn of the distal humerus, with the playing arm showing a slightly smaller Co.Dn than the nonplaying arm (-2%). In controls, significant dominant-to-nondominant side differences were also found, but with the majority of the differences being rather small, and significantly lower than those of the players. In conclusion, despite the large side-to-side differences in BMC, the volumetric bone density (Co.Dn, Tr.Dn) was almost identical in the dominant and nondominant arms of the players and controls. Thus, the players' high playing-arm BMC was due to increases in the Tot.Ar, M.Cav.Ar, Co.Ar, and CW.Th. In other words, the playing arm's extra bone mineral, and thus increased bone strength, was mainly due to increased bone size and not

  12. Teaching Tennis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breag, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an approach to teaching the basic skills of tennis to students in grades 4 and 5. It relates a five-lesson unit suitable to a near-weekly class schedule. The author found it effective when seeing his students as infrequently as once every four days for fifty minutes.

  13. Unforced errors and error reduction in tennis

    PubMed Central

    Brody, H

    2006-01-01

    Only at the highest level of tennis is the number of winners comparable to the number of unforced errors. As the average player loses many more points due to unforced errors than due to winners by an opponent, if the rate of unforced errors can be reduced, it should lead to an increase in points won. This article shows how players can improve their game by understanding and applying the laws of physics to reduce the number of unforced errors. PMID:16632568

  14. Simplifying Tennis Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasil, Jay

    2005-01-01

    How many physical education programs incorporate tennis into the curriculum? How many physical educators feel proficient enough to teach tennis? Equally important, do students truly make progress when tennis is taught? Tennis instruction in secondary physical education settings is often frustrating for students and teachers alike. Many physical…

  15. The dynamic impact characteristics of tennis balls with tennis rackets.

    PubMed

    Haake, S J; Carré, M J; Goodwill, S R

    2003-10-01

    The dynamic properties of six types of tennis balls were measured using a force platform and high-speed digital video images of ball impacts on rigidly clamped tennis rackets. It was found that the coefficient of restitution reduced with velocity for impacts on a rigid surface or with a rigidly clamped tennis racket. Pressurized balls had the highest coefficient of restitution, which decreased by 20% when punctured. Pressureless balls had a coefficient of restitution approaching that of a punctured ball at high speeds. The dynamic stiffness of the ball or the ball-racket system increased with velocity and pressurized balls had the highest stiffness, which decreased by 35% when punctured. The characteristics of pressureless balls were shown to be similar to those of punctured balls at high velocity and it was found that lowering the string tension produced a smaller range of stiffness or coefficient of restitution. It was hypothesized that players might consider high ball stiffness to imply a high coefficient of restitution. Plots of coefficient of restitution versus stiffness confirmed the relationship and it was found that, generally, pressurized balls had a higher coefficient of restitution and stiffness than pressureless balls. The players might perceive these parameters through a combination of sound, vibration and perception of ball speed off the racket. PMID:14620027

  16. Age determination by magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in adolescent male football players

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Jiri; George, John; Junge, Astrid; Hodler, Juerg

    2007-01-01

    Background In football there are established age‐related tournaments for males and females to guarantee equal chances within the game for all the different age groups. To prevent participation in the incorrect age group, and owing to the fact that in some Asian and African countries registration at birth is not compulsory, other methods of age determination need to be available. Standard radiographs of the left wrist have been used for assessment of skeletal age for many years. This is, however, not ethical in the sporting environment. Aim To study the possible use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has no radiation risk, in estimating the age of healthy adolescent football players. Methods The examination protocol was applied in four countries using, their respective MRI equipment using a 1‐T or 1.5‐T magnet and a wrist coil. 496 healthy male adolescent football players between the ages of 14 and 19 years from Switzerland, Malaysia, Algeria and Argentina were selected for the study. The degree of fusion of the left distal radial physis was determined by three independent raters by a newly developed grading system which can be used in future MRI epiphysial fusion grading studies. Results The inter‐rater reliability for grading was high (r = 0.91 and 0.92); all correlations were highly significant (p<0.001). The average age increased with a higher grading of fusion, and the correlation between age and grade of fusion was highly significant (r = 0.69, p<0.001). Only one player (0.8%) in the 16‐year‐old age group was graded as completely fused. Conclusion MRI of the wrist offers an alternative as a non‐invasive method of age determination in 14–19‐year‐old male adolescents. The grading system presented here clearly identifies the skeletal maturity by complete fusion in all MRI slices, which eliminates any risk associated with standard radiographic rating as determined by the International Atomic Energy Agency. PMID:17021001

  17. Hydration and temperature in tennis - a practical review.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Mark S

    2006-01-01

    Competitive tennis is typically played in warm and hot environments. Because hypohydration will impair tennis performance and increases the risk of heat injury, consumption of appropriate fluid levels is necessary to prevent dehydration and enhance performance. The majority of research in this area has focused on continuous aerobic activity - unlike tennis, which has average points lasting less than ten seconds with rest periods dispersed between each work period. For this reason, hydration and temperature regulation methods need to be specific to the activity. Tennis players can sweat more than 2.5 L·h(-1) and replace fluids at a slower rate during matches than in practice. Latter stages of matches and tournaments are when tennis players are more susceptible to temperature and hydration related problems. Sodium (Na(+)) depletion, not potassium (K(+)), is a key electrolyte in tennis related muscle cramps. However, psychological and competitive factors also contribute. CHO drinks have been shown to promote fluid absorption to a greater degree than water alone, but no performance benefits have been shown in tennis players in short matches. It is advisable to consume a CHO beverage if practice or matches are scheduled longer than 90-120 minutes. Key PointsAlthough substantial research has been performed on temperature and hydration concerns in aerobic activities, there is little information with regard to tennis performance and safetyTennis athletes should be on an individualized hydration schedule, consuming greater than 200ml of fluid every changeover (approximately 15 minutes).Optimum hydration and temperature regulation will reduce the chance of tennis related muscle cramps and performance decrements. PMID:24198676

  18. Hydration and temperature in tennis - a practical review.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Mark S

    2006-03-01

    Competitive tennis is typically played in warm and hot environments. Because hypohydration will impair tennis performance and increases the risk of heat injury, consumption of appropriate fluid levels is necessary to prevent dehydration and enhance performance. The majority of research in this area has focused on continuous aerobic activity - unlike tennis, which has average points lasting less than ten seconds with rest periods dispersed between each work period. For this reason, hydration and temperature regulation methods need to be specific to the activity. Tennis players can sweat more than 2.5 L·h(-1) and replace fluids at a slower rate during matches than in practice. Latter stages of matches and tournaments are when tennis players are more susceptible to temperature and hydration related problems. Sodium (Na(+)) depletion, not potassium (K(+)), is a key electrolyte in tennis related muscle cramps. However, psychological and competitive factors also contribute. CHO drinks have been shown to promote fluid absorption to a greater degree than water alone, but no performance benefits have been shown in tennis players in short matches. It is advisable to consume a CHO beverage if practice or matches are scheduled longer than 90-120 minutes. Key PointsAlthough substantial research has been performed on temperature and hydration concerns in aerobic activities, there is little information with regard to tennis performance and safetyTennis athletes should be on an individualized hydration schedule, consuming greater than 200ml of fluid every changeover (approximately 15 minutes).Optimum hydration and temperature regulation will reduce the chance of tennis related muscle cramps and performance decrements.

  19. Home advantage in professional tennis.

    PubMed

    Koning, Ruud H

    2011-01-01

    Home advantage is a pervasive phenomenon in sport. It has been established in team sports such as basketball, baseball, American football, and European soccer. Attention to home advantage in individual sports has so far been limited. The aim of this study was to examine home advantage in professional tennis. Match-level data are used to measure home advantage. The test used is based on logit models, and consistent specification is addressed explicitly. Depending on the interpretation of home advantage, restrictions on the specification of the model need to be imposed. We find that although significant home advantage exists for men, the performance of women tennis players appears to be unaffected by home advantage.

  20. Cartilage degeneration at symptomatic persistent olecranon physis in adolescent baseball players.

    PubMed

    Enishi, Tetsuya; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Elbow overuse injuries are common in adolescent baseball players, but symptomatic persistent olecranon physis is rare, and its pathogenesis remains unclear. Purpose. To examine the histopathological and imaging findings of advanced persistent olecranon physis. Methods. The olecranon physes of 2 baseball pitchers, aged 14 and 15 years, were examined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical specimens were examined histologically. Results. T2-weighted MRI revealed alterations in the intrachondral signal intensity possibly related to collagen degeneration and increased free water content. Histological findings of specimens stained with hematoxylin-eosin showed complete disorganization of the cartilage structure, hypocellularity, chondrocyte cluster formation, and moderately reduced staining. All these findings are hallmarks of osteoarthritis and are suggestive of cartilage degeneration. Conclusion. Growth plate degeneration was evident in advanced cases of symptomatic persistent olecranon physis. These findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of this disease.

  1. Cartilage Degeneration at Symptomatic Persistent Olecranon Physis in Adolescent Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Enishi, Tetsuya; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Elbow overuse injuries are common in adolescent baseball players, but symptomatic persistent olecranon physis is rare, and its pathogenesis remains unclear. Purpose. To examine the histopathological and imaging findings of advanced persistent olecranon physis. Methods. The olecranon physes of 2 baseball pitchers, aged 14 and 15 years, were examined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical specimens were examined histologically. Results. T2-weighted MRI revealed alterations in the intrachondral signal intensity possibly related to collagen degeneration and increased free water content. Histological findings of specimens stained with hematoxylin-eosin showed complete disorganization of the cartilage structure, hypocellularity, chondrocyte cluster formation, and moderately reduced staining. All these findings are hallmarks of osteoarthritis and are suggestive of cartilage degeneration. Conclusion. Growth plate degeneration was evident in advanced cases of symptomatic persistent olecranon physis. These findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25580304

  2. A rare cause of chronic elbow pain in an adolescent baseball player: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wasylynko, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present a case of chronic elbow pain as a result of a hidden underlying osteochondral defect. Clinical Features: A 17-year old baseball player presented with chronic lateral elbow pain. Examination revealed swelling of the elbow with signs of possible ligament, muscle, and tendon injury. Diagnosis and Treatment: Although there was apparent soft-tissue injury, the elbow swelling created immediate suspicion of a more serious underlying condition. Examination revealed a swollen and tender elbow, with plain x-ray confirming a subchondral bone disorder (osteochondral defect) of the capitellum. Surgical repair was performed by an orthopedic surgeon using DeNovo NT Natural Tissue Grafts: the implantation of small pieces of juvenile joint cartilage into the affected area, using glue-like fibrin. Rehabilitation of the elbow began immediately following surgery. Summary: Examination and imaging indicated that elbow pain in an adolescent baseball player could be from multiple sources, however, the chronic swelling raised suspicion of a condition requiring immediate and further investigation. PMID:27713578

  3. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRUNK ENDURANCE PLANK TESTS AND ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE TESTS IN ADOLESCENT SOCCER PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Kaneoka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Background Although it is believed that trunk function is important for athletic performance, few researchers have demonstrated a significant relationship between the trunk function and athletic performance. Recently, the prone plank and side plank tests have been used to assess trunk function. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between trunk endurance plank tests and athletic performance tests, including whether there is a relationship between long distance running and trunk endurance plank tests in adolescent male soccer players. Study design Cross sectional study design. Methods Fifty-five adolescent male soccer players performed prone and side plank tests and seven performance tests: the Cooper test, the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test, the step 50 agility test, a 30-m sprint test, a vertical countermovement jump, a standing five-step jump, and a rebound jump. The relationships between each individual plank test, the combined score of both plank tests, and performance tests were analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results The combined score of plank tests was highly correlated with the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test (r = 0.710, p < 0.001), and was moderately correlated with the Cooper test (r = 0.567, p < 0.001). Poor correlation was observed between the prone plank test and step 50 agility test (r = -0.436, p = 0.001) and no significant correlations were observed between plank tests and jump performance tests. Conclusions The results suggest that trunk endurance plank tests are positively correlated with the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test, the Cooper test, and the step 50 agility test. Level of Evidence Level 2 PMID:27757284

  4. An adjustable table tennis bat and grip system for tetraplegics.

    PubMed

    Taktak, D M

    1997-01-01

    A table tennis bat and gripping system has been devised which can be used by people who are tetraplegic who are unable to hold the bat unassisted. The multi-positional head of the bat allows the user to alter the bat angle with respect to the hand whilst an elasticated glove ensures the bat is held firmly in place allowing the player access to a greater range of playing shots. The system has been used successfully to introduce recently injured players to the game, and has also been used by a British ranked tetraplegic table tennis player. It is suitable for general, rehabilitative or competition use.

  5. Epidemiological analysis of doping offences in the professional tennis circuit

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Tennis is a professional sport under a strict anti-doping control. However, since the first violation of the code, the positive cases have not been statistically studied. The objective of this study was to analyze doping offences in the international professional tennis circuit. Methods All offences to the Doping Code committed by tennis players during 2003-2009 were collected from the ITF official webpage, registered and analyzed. Results An average of 1905.7 (±174.5) samples was obtained per year. Fifty-two doping offences were reported and the overall incidence of positive doping samples accounted for 0.38% and 7.4 (±4.1) cases/year. Male players showed higher incidence doping offences than females (p = 0.0004). The incidence in wheelchair players was higher than in non-handicapped subjects (p = 0.0001) Banned substance distribution showed: stimulants 32.69%, cannabis 23.07%; anabolic 11.53%, diuretics and masking agents 11.53, β2-agonists 9.61%; corticosteroids 3.84%, others 3.84%. The overall incidence of 'social drugs' (cocaine, cannabis) was 36.53%. All EPO and blood samples were normal, while the incidence of 'out-of-competition' offences was 0.12%. The lower incidence of doping was found in Grand Slams tournaments. Conclusions The incidence of positive doping samples among professional tennis players is quite low supporting the assumption that there is no evidence of systematic doping in Tennis. "Social drugs" misuse constitutes the main problem of doping in tennis. Male and wheelchair tennis players showed higher risk of infringing the doping code than their females and non-handicapped counterparts. Findings of this study should help to determine the direction of the ongoing strategy in the fight against doping in Tennis. PMID:21159201

  6. Does carbohydrate supplementation enhance tennis match play performance?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion may be an interesting approach to avoid significant decrement to the tennis match performance. The aim of the present investigation was to assess the effects of CHO supplementation on tennis match play performance. Methods Twelve young tennis players (18.0 ± 1.0 years; 176 ± 3.4 cm; 68.0 ± 2.3 kg; body fat: 13.7 ± 2.4%) with national rankings among the top 50 in Brazil agreed to participate in this study, which utilized a randomized, crossover, double blind research design. The experiment was conducted over a 5-day period in which each player completed two simulated tennis matches of a 3-hour duration. The players received either a CHO or a placebo (PLA) drinking solution during simulated tennis matches. Athlete’s performance parameters were determined by filming each match with two video cameras. Each player was individually tracked for the entire duration of the match to measure the following variables: (1) games won; (2) rally duration; (3) strokes per rally; (4) effective playing time (%); (5) aces; (6) double faults; (7) first service in; (8) second service in; (9) first return in and (10) second return in. Results There were no differences between trials in any of the variables analyzed. Conclusions CHO supplementation did not improve tennis match play performance under the present experimental conditions. PMID:24148197

  7. Dimensions and estimated mechanical characteristics of the humerus after long-term tennis loading.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, H; Sievanen, H; Kannus, P; Heinonen, A; Oja, P; Vuori, I

    1996-06-01

    .2%, players +1.6%). Compared with the controls, the players' relative side-to-side differences in BMC (range, +7.6 to +25.2%), BMD (+5.8 to +22.5%), BMAD (+5.5 to +20.4%), CWT (+6.9 to +45.2%), CSMI (+7.8 to +26.4%), and Z (+3.0 to +21.7%) were significantly larger in all measured humeral sites except BMAD in the distal humeri of the older female players. These relative side-to-side differences were clearly and significantly larger in the young players (+11.7 to +45.2%) than in the older players (+3.0 to +12.4%). In conclusion, long-term intensive tennis playing, especially if started in childhood or adolescence, clearly increases the humeral BMC, BMD, and CWT but seems to have only a minor effect on the width of this particular bone. In this respect, there seems to be no sex difference. However, along with the increases in mineral mass and density, the changes in bone width are important in increasing the bending stiffness and strength of the humerus. In older players, the relative side-to-side differences are at the same level or only slightly larger than those in their age-matched controls. This suggests that even intense physical loading of a mature bone is only marginally better in increasing the bone mass, bone density, and CWT of the target bone than the normal daily use of the dominant extremity.

  8. The Diet Quality of Competitive Adolescent Male Rugby Union Players with Energy Balance Estimated Using Different Physical Activity Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Tracy; Harries, Simon K.; Williams, Rebecca L.; Lum, Cheryl; Callister, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of the current study were to comprehensively assess the dietary intakes and diet quality of a sample of Australian competitive adolescent rugby union players and compare these intakes with National and Sports Dietitians Association (SDA) Recommendations for adolescent athletes. A secondary aim investigated applying different physical activity level (PAL) coefficients to determine total energy expenditure (TEE) in order to more effectively evaluate the adequacy of energy intakes. Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: Anthropometrics and dietary intakes were assessed in 25 competitive adolescent male rugby union players (14 to 18 years old). Diet was assessed using the validated Australian Eating Survey (AES) food frequency questionnaire and diet quality was assessed through the Australian Recommended Food Score. Results: The median dietary intakes of participants met national recommendations for percent energy (% E) from carbohydrate, protein and total fat, but not carbohydrate intake when evaluated as g/day as proposed in SDA guidelines. Median intakes of fibre and micronutrients including calcium and iron also met national recommendations. Overall diet quality was classified as ‘good’ with a median diet quality score of 34 (out of a possible 73); however, there was a lack of variety within key food groups including carbohydrates and proteins. Non-core food consumption exceeded recommended levels at 38% of the daily total energy intake, with substantial contributions from takeaway foods and sweetened beverages. A PAL coefficient of 1.2–1.4 was found to best balance the energy intakes of these players in their pre-season. Conclusions: Adolescent rugby players met the percent energy recommendations for macronutrients and attained an overall ‘good’ diet quality score. However, it was identified that when compared to specific recommendations for athletes, carbohydrate intakes were below recommendations and these players in their pre

  9. Agreement between Two Methods of Dietary Data Collection in Male Adolescent Academy-Level Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Marc A.; Rumbold, Penny L. S.; Cockburn, Emma; Russell, Mark; Stevenson, Emma J.

    2015-01-01

    Collecting accurate and reliable nutritional data from adolescent populations is challenging, with current methods providing significant under-reporting. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the accuracy of a combined dietary data collection method (self-reported weighed food diary, supplemented with a 24-h recall) when compared to researcher observed energy intake in male adolescent soccer players. Twelve Academy players from an English Football League club participated in the study. Players attended a 12 h period in the laboratory (08:00 h–20:00 h), during which food and drink items were available and were consumed ad libitum. Food was also provided to consume at home between 20:00 h and 08:00 h the following morning under free-living conditions. To calculate the participant reported energy intake, food and drink items were weighed and recorded in a food diary by each participant, which was supplemented with information provided through a 24-h recall interview the following morning. Linear regression, limits of agreement (LOA) and typical error (coefficient of variation; CV) were used to quantify agreement between observer and participant reported 24-h energy intake. Difference between methods was assessed using a paired samples t-test. Participants systematically under-reported energy intake in comparison to that observed (p < 0.01) but the magnitude of this bias was small and consistent (mean bias = −88 kcal·day−1, 95% CI for bias = −146 to −29 kcal·day−1). For random error, the 95% LOA between methods ranged between −1.11 to 0.37 MJ·day−1 (−256 to 88 kcal·day−1). The standard error of the estimate was low, with a typical error between measurements of 3.1%. These data suggest that the combined dietary data collection method could be used interchangeably with the gold standard observed food intake technique in the population studied providing that appropriate adjustment is made for the systematic under-reporting common to such

  10. Pseudonephritis is associated with high urinary osmolality and high specific gravity in adolescent soccer players.

    PubMed

    Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Van Biervliet, Jean Pierre; Watteyne, Karel; Langlois, Michel; Bernard, Dirk; Vande Walle, Johan

    2013-08-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of exercise on urine sediment in adolescent soccer players. In 25 15-year-old (range 14.4-15.8 yrs) athletes, urinary protein, osmolality and cytology were analyzed by flow cytometry and automated dipstick analysis before (T(0)), during (T(1)), and after a match (T(2)). All athletes had normal urine analysis and blood pressure at rest, tested before the start of the soccer season. Fifty-eight samples were collected (T(0): 20, T(1): 17, T(2): 21). Proteinuria was present in 20 of 38 samples collected after exercise. Proteinuria was associated with increased urinary osmolality (p < .001) and specific gravity (p < .001). Hyaline and granular casts were present in respectively 8 of 38 and 8 of 38 of the urinary samples after exercise. The presence of casts was associated with urine protein concentration, osmolality, and specific gravity. This was also the case for hematuria (25 of 38) and leucocyturia (9 of 38). Squamous epithelial cells were excreted in equal amounts to white and red blood cells. A notable proportion of adolescent athletes developed sediment abnormalities, which were associated with urinary osmolality and specific gravity.

  11. Analysis of Experts’ Quantitative Assessment of Adolescent Basketball Players and the Role of Anthropometric and Physiological Attributes

    PubMed Central

    Štrumbelj, Erik; Erčulj, Frane

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated two questions: (1) can measurements of anthropometric and physiological attributes substitute for expert assessment of adolescent basketball players, and (2) how much does the quantitative assessment of a player vary among experts? The first question is relevant to the potential simplification of the player selection process. The second question pertains directly to the validity of expert quantitative assessment. Our research was based on data from 148 U14 female and male basketball players. For each player, an array of anthropometric and physiological attributes was recorded, including body height, body mass, BMI, and several motor skill tests. Furthermore, each player’s current ability and potential ability were quantitatively evaluated by two different experts from a group of seven experts. Analysis of the recorded data showed that the anthropometric and physiological attributes explained between 15% and 40% of the variance in experts’ scores. The primary predictive attributes were speed and agility (for predicting current ability) and body height and growth potential (for predicting potential ability). We concluded that these attributes were not sufficiently informative to act as a substitute for expert assessment of the players’ current or potential ability. There is substantial variability in different experts’ scores of the same player’s ability. However, the differences between experts are mostly in scale, and the relationships between experts’ scores are monotonic. That is, different experts rank players on ability very similarly, but their scores are not well calibrated. PMID:25414759

  12. Comparison of segmental linear and angular momentum transfers in two-handed backhand stroke stances for different skill level tennis players.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Hwa; Lin, Hwai-Ting; Lo, Kuo-Cheng; Hsieh, Yung-Chun; Su, Fong-Chin

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences of momentum transfer from the trunk and upper extremities to the racket between open and square stances for different skill levels players in the two-handed backhand stroke. The motion capture system with twenty-one reflective markers attached on anatomic landmarks of the subject was used for two-handed backhand stroke motion data collection. Twelve subjects were divided into an advanced group and an intermediate group based on skill level. The three-dimensional linear and angular momentums of the trunk, upper arm, forearm, hand and racket were used for kinetic chain analysis. Results showed that all players with the square stance had significantly larger backward linear momentum contribution in trunk and upper arm than with the open stance (p<.05) irrespective of playing level. However, the external rotation angular momentum of the shoulder joint was significantly larger with an open stance than with a square stance (p=.047). Comparison of playing levels showed that the intermediate group performed higher linear momentum in three components of the trunk, upper arm backward linear momentum, and trunk right bending angular momentum than the advanced group significantly (p<.05). The advanced group reduces trunk linear movement to keep stability and applies trunk and linkage segment rotation to generate backhand stroke power. The advanced group also has a quick backswing for increasing acceleration and maintains longer in the follow-through phase for shock energy absorption. This information could improve training protocol design for teaching the two-handed backhand stroke and teaching players, especially beginners, how to make an effective stroke.

  13. Lateral epicondylitis in tennis: update on aetiology, biomechanics and treatment

    PubMed Central

    De Smedt, Thomas; de Jong, Andy; Van Leemput, Wim; Lieven, Dossche; Van Glabbeek, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) is the most frequent type of myotendinosis and can be responsible for substantial pain and loss of function of the affected limb. Tennis biomechanics, player characteristics and equipment are important in preventing the condition. This article presents an overview of the current knowledge on lateral epicondylitis, and focuses on treatment strategies. Conservative and surgical treatment options are discussed, and recent techniques are outlined. PMID:17616547

  14. Effects of age and soccer expertise on general tests of perceptual and motor performance among adolescent soccer players.

    PubMed

    Vänttinen, T; Blomqvist, M; Luhtanen, P; Häkkinen, K

    2010-06-01

    This study of perceptual and motor skills in soccer players was conducted on adolescent males. The goals were to monitor the development of general perceptual motor skills in nonsoccer-playing and soccer-playing groups (n = 245), to examine the relationship between physical maturity and general perceptual motor skills (n = 41), and to compare the differences in general perceptual motor skills between groups with different soccer expertise (n = 142). The measured variables were simple reaction time, peripheral awareness, eye-hand-foot coordination, and testosterone blood level. The results suggested that general perceptual motor skills improved with age, the development of these skills was related to participants' blood testosterone concentration (especially between 12 and 14 years), and general perceptual motor skills improved with soccer expertise. However, the differences between subelite and elite soccer players were not meaningful enough to encourage practitioners to test general perceptual motor skills on a large scale when evaluating the potential of young players.

  15. Scaling lower-limb isokinetic strength for biological maturation and body size in adolescent basketball players.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Humberto Moreira; Coelho-e-Silva, Manuel; Valente-dos-Santos, João; Gonçalves, Rui Soles; Philippaerts, Renaat; Malina, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The relationships between knee joint isokinetic strength, biological maturity status and body size were examined in 14-16-year-old basketball players, considering proportional allometric modeling. Biological maturity status was assessed with maturity offset protocol. Stature, body mass, sitting height, and estimated thigh volume were measured by anthropometry. Maximal moments of force of concentric and eccentric muscular actions for the knee extensors and flexors were assessed by isokinetic dynamometry at 60° s(-1). Regression analysis revealed a linear relation between maximal moments of force of the knee extensors in both muscular actions and knee flexors in concentric actions were moderately high (0.55 ≤ r ≤ 0.64). As for knee flexors in eccentric actions, a squared term of maturity indicator was significant indicating that the relationship with maturity offset tended to plateau approximately 2 years after PHV. Incorporating maturity indicator term with body size term (body mass or thigh volume) in the allometric models revealed that the size exponents for both body mass and thigh volume were reduced compared with simple allometric modeling. The results indicate a significant inter-individual variation in lower-limb isokinetic strength performance at 60° s(-1) in concentric and eccentric muscular actions in late adolescent basketball players. The variability in performance is related to inter-individual variation in estimated time before or after peak height velocity, as well as differences in body size. Proportional allometric models indicate that the influence of estimated time from age at peak height velocity on isokinetic strength performance is mostly mediated by corresponding changes in overall body mass.

  16. Injuries in racket sports among Slovenian players.

    PubMed

    Kondric, Miran; Matković, Branka R; Furjan-Mandić, Gordana; Hadzić, Vedran; Dervisević, Edvin

    2011-06-01

    On the sample of 83 top Slovenian athletes we have studied the frequency of injuries among table tennis, tennis and badminton players, types of injuries and severity of injuries--the latter based on data of players absences from training and/or competition processes. The most liable parts to injuries are shoulder girdle (17.27%), spine (16.55%) and ankle (15.83%), while foot (10.07%) and wrist (12.23%) are slightly less liable to injuries. The most frequent injuries in racket sports pertain to muscle tissues. According to this data, the majority of injuries occur halfway through a training session or a competition event, mostly during a competition season. The injuries primarily pertain to muscle tissues; these are followed by joint and tendon injuries. There are no differences between male and female players. Compared to other racket sports players, table tennis players suffer from fewer injuries.

  17. Case Report: Wrist Pain Associated with 'Fractured' Handle Weights in a Tennis Racket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinzur, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    Three case studies of tennis players with vague wrist pain when hitting the ball showed unremarkable physical examination results. However, x-rays taken of the tennis rackets they used showed fractures in the handle weights, and replacement of the rackets relieved all symptoms. (Author/CB)

  18. Shoulder proprioception is not related to throwing speed or accuracy in elite adolescent male baseball players.

    PubMed

    Freeston, Jonathan; Adams, Roger D; Rooney, Kieron

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence throwing speed and accuracy is critical to performance in baseball. Shoulder proprioception has been implicated in the injury risk of throwing athletes, but no such link has been established with performance outcomes. The purpose of this study was to describe any relationship between shoulder proprioception acuity and throwing speed or accuracy. Twenty healthy elite adolescent male baseball players (age, 19.6 ± 2.6 years), who had represented the state of New South Wales in the past 18 months, were assessed for bilateral active shoulder proprioception (shoulder rotation in 90° of arm abduction moving toward external rotation using the active movement extent discrimination apparatus), maximal throwing speed (MTS, meters per second measured via a radar gun), and accuracy (total error in centimeters determined by video analysis) at 80 and 100% of MTS. Although proprioception in the dominant and nondominant arms was significantly correlated with each other (r = 0.54, p < 0.01), no relationship was found between shoulder proprioception and performance. Shoulder proprioception was not a significant determinant of throwing performance such that high levels of speed and accuracy were achieved without a high degree of proprioception. There is no evidence to suggest therefore that this particular method of shoulder proprioception measurement should be implemented in clinical practice. Consequently, clinicians are encouraged to consider proprioception throughout the entire kinetic chain rather than the shoulder joint in isolation as a determining factor of performance in throwing athletes. PMID:24936898

  19. Shoulder proprioception is not related to throwing speed or accuracy in elite adolescent male baseball players.

    PubMed

    Freeston, Jonathan; Adams, Roger D; Rooney, Kieron

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence throwing speed and accuracy is critical to performance in baseball. Shoulder proprioception has been implicated in the injury risk of throwing athletes, but no such link has been established with performance outcomes. The purpose of this study was to describe any relationship between shoulder proprioception acuity and throwing speed or accuracy. Twenty healthy elite adolescent male baseball players (age, 19.6 ± 2.6 years), who had represented the state of New South Wales in the past 18 months, were assessed for bilateral active shoulder proprioception (shoulder rotation in 90° of arm abduction moving toward external rotation using the active movement extent discrimination apparatus), maximal throwing speed (MTS, meters per second measured via a radar gun), and accuracy (total error in centimeters determined by video analysis) at 80 and 100% of MTS. Although proprioception in the dominant and nondominant arms was significantly correlated with each other (r = 0.54, p < 0.01), no relationship was found between shoulder proprioception and performance. Shoulder proprioception was not a significant determinant of throwing performance such that high levels of speed and accuracy were achieved without a high degree of proprioception. There is no evidence to suggest therefore that this particular method of shoulder proprioception measurement should be implemented in clinical practice. Consequently, clinicians are encouraged to consider proprioception throughout the entire kinetic chain rather than the shoulder joint in isolation as a determining factor of performance in throwing athletes.

  20. Assessment of Energy Intake and Energy Expenditure of Male Adolescent Academy-Level Soccer Players during a Competitive Week.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Marc A; Cockburn, Emma; Rumbold, Penny L S; Rae, Glen; Stevenson, Emma J; Russell, Mark

    2015-10-02

    This study investigated the energy intake and expenditure of professional adolescent academy-level soccer players during a competitive week. Over a seven day period that included four training days, two rest days and a match day, energy intake (self-reported weighed food diary and 24-h recall) and expenditure (tri-axial accelerometry) were recorded in 10 male players from a professional English Premier League club. The mean macronutrient composition of the dietary intake was 318 ± 24 g·day(-1) (5.6 ± 0.4 g·kg(-1) BM) carbohydrate, 86 ± 10 g·day(-1) (1.5 ± 0.2 g·kg(-1) BM) protein and 70 ± 7 g·day(-1) (1.2 ± 0.1 g·kg(-1) BM) fats, representing 55% ± 3%, 16% ± 1%, and 29% ± 2% of mean daily energy intake respectively. A mean daily energy deficit of -1302 ± 1662 kJ (p = 0.035) was observed between energy intake (9395 ± 1344 kJ) and energy expenditure (10679 ± 1026 kJ). Match days (-2278 ± 2307 kJ, p = 0.012) and heavy training days (-2114 ± 2257 kJ, p = 0.016) elicited the greatest deficits between intake and expenditure. In conclusion, the mean daily energy intake of professional adolescent academy-level soccer players was lower than the energy expended during a competitive week. The magnitudes of these deficits were greatest on match and heavy training days. These findings may have both short and long term implications on the performance and physical development of adolescent soccer players.

  1. Assessment of Energy Intake and Energy Expenditure of Male Adolescent Academy-Level Soccer Players during a Competitive Week

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Marc A.; Cockburn, Emma; Rumbold, Penny L. S.; Rae, Glen; Stevenson, Emma J.; Russell, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the energy intake and expenditure of professional adolescent academy-level soccer players during a competitive week. Over a seven day period that included four training days, two rest days and a match day, energy intake (self-reported weighed food diary and 24-h recall) and expenditure (tri-axial accelerometry) were recorded in 10 male players from a professional English Premier League club. The mean macronutrient composition of the dietary intake was 318 ± 24 g·day−1 (5.6 ± 0.4 g·kg−1 BM) carbohydrate, 86 ± 10 g·day−1 (1.5 ± 0.2 g·kg−1 BM) protein and 70 ± 7 g·day−1 (1.2 ± 0.1 g·kg−1 BM) fats, representing 55% ± 3%, 16% ± 1%, and 29% ± 2% of mean daily energy intake respectively. A mean daily energy deficit of −1302 ± 1662 kJ (p = 0.035) was observed between energy intake (9395 ± 1344 kJ) and energy expenditure (10679 ± 1026 kJ). Match days (−2278 ± 2307 kJ, p = 0.012) and heavy training days (−2114 ± 2257 kJ, p = 0.016) elicited the greatest deficits between intake and expenditure. In conclusion, the mean daily energy intake of professional adolescent academy-level soccer players was lower than the energy expended during a competitive week. The magnitudes of these deficits were greatest on match and heavy training days. These findings may have both short and long term implications on the performance and physical development of adolescent soccer players. PMID:26445059

  2. Assessment of Energy Intake and Energy Expenditure of Male Adolescent Academy-Level Soccer Players during a Competitive Week.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Marc A; Cockburn, Emma; Rumbold, Penny L S; Rae, Glen; Stevenson, Emma J; Russell, Mark

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the energy intake and expenditure of professional adolescent academy-level soccer players during a competitive week. Over a seven day period that included four training days, two rest days and a match day, energy intake (self-reported weighed food diary and 24-h recall) and expenditure (tri-axial accelerometry) were recorded in 10 male players from a professional English Premier League club. The mean macronutrient composition of the dietary intake was 318 ± 24 g·day(-1) (5.6 ± 0.4 g·kg(-1) BM) carbohydrate, 86 ± 10 g·day(-1) (1.5 ± 0.2 g·kg(-1) BM) protein and 70 ± 7 g·day(-1) (1.2 ± 0.1 g·kg(-1) BM) fats, representing 55% ± 3%, 16% ± 1%, and 29% ± 2% of mean daily energy intake respectively. A mean daily energy deficit of -1302 ± 1662 kJ (p = 0.035) was observed between energy intake (9395 ± 1344 kJ) and energy expenditure (10679 ± 1026 kJ). Match days (-2278 ± 2307 kJ, p = 0.012) and heavy training days (-2114 ± 2257 kJ, p = 0.016) elicited the greatest deficits between intake and expenditure. In conclusion, the mean daily energy intake of professional adolescent academy-level soccer players was lower than the energy expended during a competitive week. The magnitudes of these deficits were greatest on match and heavy training days. These findings may have both short and long term implications on the performance and physical development of adolescent soccer players. PMID:26445059

  3. Tennis elbow

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lateral pain in the elbow affects up to 3% of the population, and is considered an overload injury of the extensor tendons of the forearm where they attach at the lateral epicondyle. Although usually self-limiting, symptoms may persist for over 1 year in up to 20% of people. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for tennis elbow? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, autologous whole blood injections, corticosteroid injections, combination physical therapies, exercise, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, iontophoresis, low-level laser therapy, manipulation, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (oral and topical), orthoses (bracing), platelet-rich plasma injections, pulsed electromagnetic field treatment, surgery, and ultrasound. PMID:21708051

  4. Low compression tennis balls and skill development.

    PubMed

    Hammond, John; Smith, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Coaching aims to improve player performance and coaches have a number of coaching methods and strategies they use to enhance this process. If new methods and ideas can be determined to improve player performance they will change coaching practices and processes. This study investigated the effects of using low compression balls (LCBs) during coaching sessions with beginning tennis players. In order to assess the effectiveness of LCBs on skill learning the study employed a quasi-experimental design supported by qualitative and descriptive data. Beginner tennis players took part in coaching sessions, one group using the LCBs while the other group used standard tennis balls. Both groups were administered a skills at the beginning of a series of coaching sessions and again at the end. A statistical investigation of the difference between pre and post-test results was carried out to determine the effect of LCBs on skill learning. Additional qualitative data was obtained through interviews, video capture and the use of performance analysis of typical coaching sessions for each group. The skill test results indicated no difference in skill learning when comparing beginners using the LCBs to those using the standard balls. Coaches reported that the LCBs appeared to have a positive effect on technique development, including aspects of technique that are related to improving power of the shot. Additional benefits were that rallies went on longer and more opportunity for positive reinforcement. In order to provide a more conclusive answer to the effects of LCBs on skill learning and technique development recommendations for future research were established including a more controlled experimental environment and larger sample sizes across a longer period of time. Key PointsLCB may aid skill learning in tennis.Qualitative indicators.Statistical evidence not conclusive.Further studies of larger groups recommended. PMID:24357952

  5. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Conditions in Tennis-Teaching Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Ricardo E.; Aune, Kyle T.; Propst, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tennis-teaching professionals represent a significant proportion of all avid tennis players worldwide, with 15,000 belonging to the largest professional organization, the United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA). However, there is no epidemiologic study to date reporting the prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions in these tennis-teaching professionals. Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions in tennis-teaching professionals following the International Tennis Federation’s (ITF) guidelines for epidemiologic studies. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Electronic surveys were distributed to 13,500 American members of the USPTA. The prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions was calculated. Results: A total of 1176 USPTA members completed the survey. Most participants reported teaching more than 5 days per week and more than 2 hours per day. The prevalence of musculoskeletal injury secondary to teaching tennis was 42%. The most affected area was the lower extremities (43% of all injuries) followed by the upper extremities (37%). The most commonly injured structures were muscles or tendons (36% of all injuries) and joints or ligaments (28%). The majority of injuries did not cause participants to miss more than 24 hours of teaching (57%). Conclusion: This is the first epidemiologic study on the occupational risk of musculoskeletal injuries and conditions in tennis-teaching professionals. Tennis-teaching professionals have a significant risk of musculoskeletal injuries or conditions related to their occupation. The prevalence of injury is consistent with previously published studies of injury prevalence among other tennis-playing populations. The proportions of upper and lower extremity injuries were fairly equitable. PMID:27790624

  6. Cubital tunnel syndrome in adolescent baseball players: a report of six cases with 3- to 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Kanaya, Kohei; Aiki, Hikono; Wada, Takuro; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Ogiwara, Naoshi

    2005-06-01

    In this case report, we describe the clinical features and surgical outcome of cubital tunnel syndrome in adolescent baseball players. Two infielders, 2 pitchers, and 2 catchers who suffered cubital tunnel syndrome during adolescence (average age, 14 years) were surgically treated. Symptoms of medial elbow pain first appeared during throwing in competition games in summer or autumn seasons. After the onset, they suffered limitation of elbow extension and weakness on grabbing balls. They could not throw because of recurrent medial elbow pain. Laxity of the medial collateral ligament was not detected by stress radiography. Duration of symptoms from the onset to surgery was less than 6 months for 2 patients, 1 year for 2, and longer than 2 years for 2 patients. Anterior subcutaneous transposition of the ulnar nerve relieved symptoms up to 3.3 postoperative years. Medial protrusion of the triceps muscle was observed to cause irritation of the ulnar nerve. Fibrosis surrounding the ulnar nerve was observed without pseudoneuroma. Throwing performance returned completely to competitive level in 5 months postoperatively in 5 of 6 patients. Early diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome in adolescent baseball players is very important. Anterior subcutaneous transposition of the ulnar nerve relieves symptoms and restores throwing function.

  7. Mouth protectors and oral trauma: a study of adolescent football players.

    PubMed

    Garon, M W; Merkle, A; Wright, J T

    1986-05-01

    A total of 754 junior high school and high school football players from the Birmingham, AL, area were studied to determine the extent of sports-related oral trauma among players. More than half the oral injuries and more than a third of the concussions were reported in sports other than football. Basketball and baseball players had a high prevalence of hard tissue oral trauma with virtually none of the players wearing mouth protectors. The results of this study indicate that current mouth protector designs are helpful in preventing hard tissue trauma, yet additional soft tissue protection is indicated in football mouth protector design.

  8. An 8-Stage Model for Evaluating the Tennis Serve

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Mark; Ellenbecker, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Background: The tennis serve is a complex stroke characterized by a series of segmental rotations involving the entire kinetic chain. Many overhead athletes use a basic 6-stage throwing model; however, the tennis serve does provide some differences. Evidence Acquisition: To support the present 8-stage descriptive model, data were gathered from PubMed and SPORTDiscus databases using keywords tennis and serve for publications between 1980 and 2010. Results: An 8-stage model of analysis for the tennis serve that includes 3 distinct phases—preparation, acceleration, and follow-through—provides a more tennis-specific analysis than that previously presented in the clinical tennis literature. When a serve is evaluated, the total body perspective is just as important as the individual segments alone. Conclusion: The 8-stage model provides a more in-depth analysis that should be utilized in all tennis players to help better understand areas of weakness, potential areas of injury, as well as components that can be improved for greater performance. PMID:23016050

  9. The Physiological Demands of Table Tennis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kondrič, Miran; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Sekulić, Damir

    2013-01-01

    Although table tennis has a tradition lasting more than 100 years, relatively little is known about players’ physiological requirements – especially during competition. In this review we discuss research studies that have led to our current understanding of how the body functions during table tennis training and competition and how this is altered by training. Match and practice analysis of the table tennis game indicates that during intense practice and competition it is predominantly the anaerobic alactic system that is called into play, while the endurance system is relied on to recovery the anaerobic stores used during such effort. It is thus important for coaches to keep in mind that, while the anaerobic alactic system is the most energetic system used during periods of exertion in a table tennis game, a strong capacity for endurance is what helps a player recover quicker for the following match and the next day of competition. This paper provides a review of specific studies that relate to competitive table tennis, and highlights the need for training and research programs tailored to table tennis. Key Points Match and practice analysis of the table tennis game indicates that during intense practice and competition it is predominantly the anaerobic alactic system that is called into play. The endurance system is relied on to recovery the anaerobic stores used during hard practice and competition effort. It is important for coaches to keep in mind that, while the anaerobic alactic system is the most energetic system used during periods of exertion in a table tennis game, a strong capacity for endurance is what helps a player recover quicker for the following match and the next day of competition. PMID:24149139

  10. The influence of parenting practices and parental presence on children's and adolescents' pre-competitive anxiety.

    PubMed

    Bois, Julien E; Lalanne, Julien; Delforge, Catherine

    2009-08-01

    We examined parental influence on athletes' pre-competitive anxiety. The effect of parental presence during competition was studied as was the role of parenting practices. Data were collected from a sample of 341 athletes (201 basketball players and 140 tennis players) before an official competition. Analysis of variance indicated that the presence of both parents was associated with higher pre-competitive anxiety for all participants, except male tennis players. The absence of both parents did not result in less anxiety. A second analysis of variance revealed that females tennis players at provincial and national level perceived greater parental pressure than most other participants. Canonical correlation analysis showed a positive relationship between pre-competitive anxiety and parenting practices for tennis players, but not for basketball players. Directive behaviours and pressure were positively associated with pre-competitive anxiety for all tennis players, whereas praise and understanding was negatively related to anxiety for female tennis players only.

  11. Test-retest reliability for hitting accuracy tennis test.

    PubMed

    Strecker, Estevam; Foster, Ernest B; Pascoe, David D

    2011-12-01

    Strecker, E, Foster, EB, and Pascoe, DD. Test-retest reliability for hitting accuracy tennis test. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3501-3505, 2011-The purpose of this investigation was to assess a test-retest reliability of the hitting accuracy tennis test (HATT). Twelve National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) division I tennis players (4 men and 8 women) volunteered to participate in this investigation. Skill tests consisted of 15 consecutive ground strokes in all 4 directions (forehand [FH] and backhand [BH]; crosscourt and up the line) with not >1 minute between directions. The court was divided into 12 areas, and each area was assigned a value according to a grid system based on offensive, defensive, and neutral shots ranging from 1 point to 6 points. Total score, unforced errors, and shot index (total number of shots that landed on optimal performance areas 5 and 6 minus total number of unforced errors) were used for statistical analysis. The order of shot direction was randomized between participants and trials. The analysis of variance with repeated measures (p value ≤ 0.05) of this investigation showed no statistical difference between trials on any of the measurements. The results also suggest that division I level tennis players have the ability to hit accurately specific targets on a tennis court using either FH or BH with minimal daily variation. Therefore, we conclude that the HATT for trained tennis athletes is a simple, reliable, and accurate assessment tool to measure tennis skill performance based on accuracy. The HATT is also an easy, inexpensive training device that coaches can use to monitor players development.

  12. Scapulothoracic kinematics during tennis forehand drive.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Chèze, Laurence; Dumas, Raphaël

    2014-06-01

    Scapular dyskinesis is recognized as an abnormality in the kinetic chain; yet, there has been little research quantifying scapular motion during sport tasks. Tennis forehand drives of eight highly skilled tennis players were studied to assess the scapulothoracic kinematics and evaluate repeatability using video-based motion analysis. Scapulothoracic downward/upward rotation, posterior/anterior tilt, and internal/external rotation were computed using an acromial marker cluster. On average, the upward rotation, anterior tilt, and internal rotation varied from 1 degrees to 26 degrees, from 7 degrees to 32 degrees, and from 42 degrees to 100 degrees, respectively, during the tennis forehand drive. During the backswing and forward swing phases of the forehand stroke, small changes were observed for the three scapular angle values, while all angles increased rapidly during the follow-through phase. This suggests that the tennis forehand drive may contribute to scapula dyskinesis, mainly due to the great amplitude in scapulothoracic anterior tilt and internal rotation observed during the follow-through phase. Knowledge of normal scapula motion during sport tasks performed at high velocity could improve the understanding of various sport-specific adaptations and pathologies. PMID:25123001

  13. Scapulothoracic kinematics during tennis forehand drive.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Chèze, Laurence; Dumas, Raphaël

    2014-06-01

    Scapular dyskinesis is recognized as an abnormality in the kinetic chain; yet, there has been little research quantifying scapular motion during sport tasks. Tennis forehand drives of eight highly skilled tennis players were studied to assess the scapulothoracic kinematics and evaluate repeatability using video-based motion analysis. Scapulothoracic downward/upward rotation, posterior/anterior tilt, and internal/external rotation were computed using an acromial marker cluster. On average, the upward rotation, anterior tilt, and internal rotation varied from 1 degrees to 26 degrees, from 7 degrees to 32 degrees, and from 42 degrees to 100 degrees, respectively, during the tennis forehand drive. During the backswing and forward swing phases of the forehand stroke, small changes were observed for the three scapular angle values, while all angles increased rapidly during the follow-through phase. This suggests that the tennis forehand drive may contribute to scapula dyskinesis, mainly due to the great amplitude in scapulothoracic anterior tilt and internal rotation observed during the follow-through phase. Knowledge of normal scapula motion during sport tasks performed at high velocity could improve the understanding of various sport-specific adaptations and pathologies.

  14. Tennis: Applied Examples of a Game-Based Teaching Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespo, Miguel; Reid, Machar M.; Miley, Dave

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors reveal that tennis has been increasingly taught with a tactical model or game-based approach, which emphasizes learning through practice in match-like drills and actual play, rather than in practicing strokes for exact technical execution. Its goal is to facilitate the player's understanding of the tactical, physical…

  15. Comparing 9 to 10 Years Old Children's Performance in Tennis and Physical Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olcucu, Burcin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the degree of performance-related physical coordination of elementary education children (male and female) that play tennis according to their age and gender and to investigate the relationship between their motor ability tests and performances. A total of 210 children tennis players (9 to 10 years; 105 males…

  16. The effects of plyometric training followed by detraining and reduced training periods on explosive strength in adolescent male basketball players.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eduardo J A M; Janeira, Manuel A A S

    2011-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effects of (a) plyometric training on explosive strength indicators in adolescent male basketball players and (b) detraining and reduced training on previously achieved explosive strength gains. Two groups were formed: an experimental and a control group. The former was submitted to a 10-week in-season plyometric training program, twice weekly, along with regular basketball practice. Simultaneously, the control group participated in regular basketball practice only. At the end of this period, the experimental group was subdivided into 2 groups: a reduced training group and a detraining group. All participants were assessed on squat jump, countermovement jump, Abalakov test, depth jump, mechanical power, and medicine ball throw at the beginning and at the end of the 10-week in-season plyometric training and on weeks 4, 8, 12, and 16 of the in-season detraining and reduced training periods. In the first phase of the study, the experimental group significantly increased all the assessed indicators (p < 0.05). In the following phase and in general all the groups maintained the previously achieved results. In conclusion, plyometric training showed positive effects on upper- and lower-body explosive strength in adolescent male basketball players. Moreover, we can state that both detraining and a reduced training program indistinctly contribute to maintenance of strength levels. These results highlight the unique power that basketball-specific training seems to have on the sustainability and maintenance of sport performance.

  17. Cumulative Incidence of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum in Child and Adolescent Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Iwame, Toshiyuki; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Prevalence of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum is high among individuals who have played baseball since childhood. Recently two cross-sectional studies according to prevalence of OCD have been published. In a study of 1040 baseball players aged 10 to 12 years, Matsuura et al found that 2.1% of players had OCD, with no differences in prevalence according to age or player position. Kida et al., in their study of 2433 baseball players aged 12 to 18 years, found OCD in 3.4% of subjects. Furthermore, they found that players with OCD began playing baseball at earlier ages, had played for longer periods, and had experienced more elbow pain. The player’s current baseball position may not be related to the existence of OCD lesions. Together, these findings led us to examine the longitudinal study for examining the risk factors for occurrence of OCD. Our objectives were to determine (1) cumulative incidence rates of OCD in the school child players aged 6-11 years old, (2) the relative risk of OCD by age, beginning age playing baseball, playing period, experimental hours per week, playing position, and elbow pain. Methods: A total of 1,275 players aged 6-11 years (mean, 9.4 years) belonged to youth baseball teams without OCD lesions received examination in the next year and were the subjects of this investigation. Subjects were examined by questionnaire, and ultrasonographic and radiographic examination. Questionnaire items included age, player position, beginning age of playing baseball, playing period of baseball, number of training hours per week and history of elbow pain. Ultrasonography of the lateral aspect of the elbow was performed. An irregularity of the subchondral bone of the capitellum was regarded as an abnormality. Radiographic examination was recommended to players who had an abnormal finding on ultrasonographic examination. We investigated the following risk factors for occurrence of OCD: age, player position, beginning age of

  18. You Can't Be Serious, that Ball Was IN: An Investigation of Junior Tennis Cheating Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Because junior tennis players have to enforce the rules of the game against each other, cheating to give a player an unfair advantage is common. While this deviant behavior is found to be commonplace in the sport, there is little research to investigate its cause or influences. Results indicated that junior players felt that personal and parental…

  19. Indirect ultrasound measurement of humeral torsion in adolescent baseball players and non-athletic adults: reliability and significance.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Rod; Ginn, Karen; Nicholson, Leslie; Adams, Roger

    2006-08-01

    Accurate clinical interpretation of shoulder rotation range requires knowledge of the contribution of humeral torsion. This study compares the reliability of indirectly measuring humeral torsion using ultrasound visualisation with direct palpation and compares the degree of humeral torsion in a non-throwing adult population with a population of elite adolescent baseballers. The reliability of a novel method of indirectly measuring humeral torsion using palpation and ultrasound was established prior to using the ultrasound method to determine the amount of humeral torsion in both humeri of a group of 16 non-throwing subjects and 36 elite adolescent baseball players. Excellent inter-tester reliability was found for the ultrasound method of measuring humeral torsion in each arm (ICC 2,1: 0.98 and 0.94) but poor reliability for the direct palpation method (ICC 2,1: 0.51 and 0.49). Using the ultrasound method, side-to-side differences in humeral torsion ranged from 0 to 13 degrees for the non-throwing group and 0 to 29 degrees for the baseball players. This side-to-side difference was significant in the baseball players (p<0.001) but not significant in the non-throwing group (p=0.43). Whilst side-to-side differences in humeral torsion were noted between all subjects irrespective of arm dominance, only throwers demonstrated consistently greater humeral retrotorsion in their throwing arm. A reliable clinical tool for estimating humeral torsion, such as that employed in this study, will allow for a more valid prescription of interventions for the treatment of shoulder dysfunction.

  20. Relationships between the yo-yo intermittent recovery test and anaerobic performance tests in adolescent handball players.

    PubMed

    Hermassi, Souhail; Aouadi, Ridha; Khalifa, Riadh; van den Tillaar, Roland; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel

    2015-03-29

    The aim of the present study was to investigate relationships between a performance index derived from the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) and other measures of physical performance and skill in handball players. The other measures considered included peak muscular power of the lower limbs (Wpeak), jumping ability (squat and counter-movement jumps (SJ, CMJ), a handball skill test and the average sprinting velocities over the first step (VS) and the first 5 m (V5m). Test scores for 25 male national-level adolescent players (age: 17.2 ± 0.7 years) averaged 4.83 ± 0.34 m·s(-1) (maximal velocity reached at the Yo-Yo IR1); 917 ± 105 Watt, 12.7 ± 3 W·kg(-1) (Wpeak); 3.41 ± 0.5 m·s(-1) and 6.03 ± 0.6 m·s(-1) (sprint velocities for Vs and V5m respectively) and 10.3 ± 1 s (handball skill test). Yo-Yo IR1 test scores showed statistically significant correlations with all of the variables examined: Wpeak (W and W·kg(-1)) r = 0.80 and 0.65, respectively, p≤0.001); sprinting velocities (r = 0.73 and 0.71 for VS and V5m respectively; p≤0.001); jumping performance (SJ: r = 0.60, p≤0.001; CMJ: r= 0.66, p≤0.001) and the handball skill test (r = 0.71; p≤0.001). We concluded that the Yo-Yo test score showed a sufficient correlation with other potential means of assessing handball players, and that intra-individual changes of Yo-Yo IR1 score could provide a useful composite index of the response to training or rehabilitation, although correlations lack sufficient precision to help in players' selection.

  1. Influence of a Prolonged Tennis Match Play on Serve Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caroline; Bideau, Benoit; Delamarche, Paul; Kulpa, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify kinematic, kinetic and performance changes that occur in the serve throughout a prolonged tennis match play. Serves of eight male advanced tennis players were recorded with a motion capture system before, at mid-match, and after a 3-hour tennis match. Before and after each match, electromyographic data of 8 upper limb muscles obtained during isometric maximal voluntary contraction were compared to determine the presence of muscular fatigue. Vertical ground reaction forces, rating of perceived exertion, ball speed, and ball impact height were measured. Kinematic and upper limb kinetic variables were computed. The results show decrease in mean power frequency values for several upper limb muscles that is an indicator of local muscular fatigue. Decreases in serve ball speed, ball impact height, maximal angular velocities and an increase in rating of perceived exertion were also observed between the beginning and the end of the match. With fatigue, the majority of the upper limb joint kinetics decreases at the end of the match. No change in timing of maximal angular velocities was observed between the beginning and the end of the match. A prolonged tennis match play may induce fatigue in upper limb muscles, which decrease performance and cause changes in serve maximal angular velocities and joint kinetics. The consistency in timing of maximal angular velocities suggests that advanced tennis players are able to maintain the temporal pattern of their serve technique, in spite of the muscular fatigue development. PMID:27532421

  2. Transfer of tennis racket vibrations onto the human forearm.

    PubMed

    Hennig, E M; Rosenbaum, D; Milani, T L

    1992-10-01

    One of several factors suspected in the development of lateral epicondylitis, often referred to as tennis elbow, is the impact-induced vibration of the racket-and-arm system at ball contact. Using two miniature accelerometers at the wrist and the elbow of 24 tennis players, the effects of 23 different tennis racket constructions were evaluated in a simulated backhand stroke situation. The influences of body weight, skill level, and tennis racket construction onto the magnitude of vibrations at wrist and elbow were investigated. Amplitudes, integrals, and fourier components were used to characterize arm vibration. More than fourfold reductions in acceleration amplitude and integral were found between wrist and elbow. Off-center as compared with center ball impacts resulted in approximately three times increased acceleration values. Between subjects, body weight as well as skill level were found to influence arm vibration. Compared with proficient players, a group of less skilled subjects demonstrated increased vibration loads on the arm. Between different racket constructions, almost threefold differences in acceleration values could be observed. Increased racket head size as well as a higher resonance frequency of the racket were found to reduce arm vibration. The vibration at the arm after ball impact showed a strong inverse relationship (r = -0.88) with the resonance frequency of tennis rackets.

  3. Influence of a Prolonged Tennis Match Play on Serve Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caroline; Bideau, Benoit; Delamarche, Paul; Kulpa, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify kinematic, kinetic and performance changes that occur in the serve throughout a prolonged tennis match play. Serves of eight male advanced tennis players were recorded with a motion capture system before, at mid-match, and after a 3-hour tennis match. Before and after each match, electromyographic data of 8 upper limb muscles obtained during isometric maximal voluntary contraction were compared to determine the presence of muscular fatigue. Vertical ground reaction forces, rating of perceived exertion, ball speed, and ball impact height were measured. Kinematic and upper limb kinetic variables were computed. The results show decrease in mean power frequency values for several upper limb muscles that is an indicator of local muscular fatigue. Decreases in serve ball speed, ball impact height, maximal angular velocities and an increase in rating of perceived exertion were also observed between the beginning and the end of the match. With fatigue, the majority of the upper limb joint kinetics decreases at the end of the match. No change in timing of maximal angular velocities was observed between the beginning and the end of the match. A prolonged tennis match play may induce fatigue in upper limb muscles, which decrease performance and cause changes in serve maximal angular velocities and joint kinetics. The consistency in timing of maximal angular velocities suggests that advanced tennis players are able to maintain the temporal pattern of their serve technique, in spite of the muscular fatigue development.

  4. Anthropometric, physiological and maturational characteristics in selected elite and non-elite male adolescent basketball players.

    PubMed

    Torres-Unda, Jon; Zarrazquin, Idoia; Gil, Javier; Ruiz, Fátima; Irazusta, Amaia; Kortajarena, Maider; Seco, Jesus; Irazusta, Jon

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anthropometric, physiological and maturation characteristics of young players (13-14 years old) associated with being successful in basketball. Body parameters were measured (stature, total body mass, skinfolds and lengths) and physiological capacities were assessed by endurance, sprint (20 m), jump and dribbling tests. Chronological age (CA) was recorded and maturity estimated using predicted age at peak height velocity (APHV). Anthropometric analysis indicated that elite players were taller, heavier and had a higher percentage of muscle. Further, physiological testing showed that these elite players perform better in jump, endurance, speed and agility tests (especially in the agility and ball tests). In addition, these skills are correlated with point average during the regular season. More basketball players born in the first semester of the year are selected and there is a predominance of early-maturing boys among those selected for the elite team. Those who are more mature have advantages in anthropometric characteristics and physiological test results. In conclusion, around puberty, physical and physiological parameters associated with maturity and CA are important in determining the success of basketball players. These findings should be taken into account by trainers and coaches, to avoid artificial bias in their selection choices.

  5. A practical method of estimating energy expenditure during tennis play.

    PubMed

    Novas, A M P; Rowbottom, D G; Jenkins, D G

    2003-03-01

    This study aimed to develop a practical method of estimating energy expenditure (EE) during tennis. Twenty-four elite female tennis players first completed a tennis-specific graded test in which five different Intensity levels were applied randomly. Each intensity level was intended to simulate a "game" of singles tennis and comprised six 14 s periods of activity alternated with 20 s of active rest. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously and each player's rate of perceived exertion (RPE) was recorded at the end of each intensity level. Rate of energy expenditure (EE(VO2)) during the test was calculated using the sum of VO2 during play and the 'O2 debt' during recovery, divided by the duration of the activity. There were significant individual linear relationships between EE(VO2) and RPE, EE(VO2) and HR (r > or = 0.89 & r > or = 0.93; p < 0.05). On a second occasion, six players completed a 60-min singles tennis match during which VO2, HR and RPE were recorded; EE(VO2) was compared with EE predicted from the previously derived RPE and HR regression equations. Analysis found that EE(VO2) was overestimated by EE(RPE) (92 +/- 76 kJ x h(-1)) and EE(HR) (435 +/- 678 kJ x h(-1)), but the error of estimation for EE(RPE) (t = -3.01; p = 0.03) was less than 5% whereas for EE(HR) such error was 20.7%. The results of the study show that RPE can be used to estimate the energetic cost of playing tennis.

  6. [Nutritional status and physical condition of adolescent football players after consuming fishmeal as a nutritional complement].

    PubMed

    Accinelli-Tanaka, Roberto; López-Oropeza, Lidia

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the study is to identify the changes in the nutritional parameters and the physical condition of teenage players after eating fishmeal as a nutritional complement. For this purpose, a quasi-experimental study, blinded for investigators, was conducted, involving 100 teenage football players, divided in two groups, homogeneous in terms of all study parameters, one of which received fishmeal for four months. After evaluating the nutritional status and physical condition, before and after the intervention, no change was found in the nutritional and anthropometric status or laboratory results, or in the physical condition. However, those who received fishmeal did report a change in their hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in comparison to the control group. In conclusion, the consumption of fishmeal did not lead to changes in the nutritional status or the physical condition of teenage football players.

  7. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Lateral epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... Soon after surgery, severe pain will decrease, but you may have mild soreness for 3 to 6 months.

  8. The Variability of the Serve Toss in Tennis Under the Influence of Artificial Crosswind

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Pedro C.; Fuentes, Juan P.; Mendes, Rui; Martins, Fernando M.L.; Clemente, Filipe M.; Couceiro, Micael S.

    2013-01-01

    This study was made to analyze the variability and stability of the serve toss in tennis, on the x (side-to-side), y (back-to-front) and z (vertical) axes, with 12 experienced players under the influence of crosswind (induced aerodynamic flow) produced by an industrial ventilator. The players were analyzed individually after serving at maximum speed and accuracy to the intersection point of the centre line and service line (“T ”point). The results allow us to conclude that the experienced players tend to stabilize the vertical dimension of the service (z axis). Additionally, this study confirms the invariability of the player height ratio: height of impact (1:1.5) in experienced players even when constrained by the “artificial crosswind. ”Given the above, the vertical dimension of the tennis serve is assumed as a constant feature, which is guaranteed in the remaining varying dimensions (y and x axes) of the ball toss. Thus, the variability should be seen as part of the solution and not as something to be avoided by players and coaches. Key Points Analysis of the tennis serve variability under the effect of artificial crosswind Twelve experienced tennis players performed a set of 20 free serves (without wind constraints), and four other sets of 20 serves under different practice conditions (with different crosswind intensities) The players tend to stabilize in the z axis and vary in the y- (back-to-front) and x-axes (side-to-side) during the ball toss tennis serve in all the practice conditions (with and without crosswind) The maintenance of a player height ratio: impact height of approximately 1:1.5 in experienced players, even when constrained by “artificial crosswind”. PMID:24149810

  9. Basketball Performance Is Related to Maturity and Relative Age in Elite Adolescent Players.

    PubMed

    Torres-Unda, Jon; Zarrazquin, Idoia; Gravina, Leyre; Zubero, Jaime; Seco, Jesús; Gil, Susana M; Gil, Javier; Irazusta, Jon

    2016-05-01

    During a national championship, the anthropometric, physiological, and maturation characteristics of 13- to 14-year-old players of elite basketball teams and their association with sport performance were analyzed. Body parameters (weight, height, skinfold thicknesses, and lengths) were measured and physiological capacities assessed by sprint (20 m) and jump tests (i.e., countermovement jump with arm swing). Chronological age (CA) and maturity offset (years from age at peak height velocity; YAPHV) were calculated, and then predicted age at peak height velocity, as the difference between CA and YAPHV. Game performance was assessed with point averages and the performance index rating (PIR). The birth-date distribution of players was biased, those born early in the selection year outnumbering those born later. Anthropometric analysis indicated that players who performed better had longer body lengths. Physiological testing showed that semi-finalists had better sprint performance than quarter-finalists and those players with greater jump capacity scored more points. Early maturation and advanced maturity status were also associated with better PIR and scored points per game. Multiple blockwise regression analysis showed that, among the factors analyzed, YAPHV was the best predictor of basketball performance. In conclusion, around puberty, physical and physiological parameters associated with maturity and CA are important in determining the success of elite basketball players. Consequently, boys who are born in the second half of the year and/or late maturing tend to be marginalized or totally excluded, and not given the chance to play under equal conditions; their careers may then be held back by the relative disadvantage associated with inexperience. PMID:26439783

  10. Basketball Performance Is Related to Maturity and Relative Age in Elite Adolescent Players.

    PubMed

    Torres-Unda, Jon; Zarrazquin, Idoia; Gravina, Leyre; Zubero, Jaime; Seco, Jesús; Gil, Susana M; Gil, Javier; Irazusta, Jon

    2016-05-01

    During a national championship, the anthropometric, physiological, and maturation characteristics of 13- to 14-year-old players of elite basketball teams and their association with sport performance were analyzed. Body parameters (weight, height, skinfold thicknesses, and lengths) were measured and physiological capacities assessed by sprint (20 m) and jump tests (i.e., countermovement jump with arm swing). Chronological age (CA) and maturity offset (years from age at peak height velocity; YAPHV) were calculated, and then predicted age at peak height velocity, as the difference between CA and YAPHV. Game performance was assessed with point averages and the performance index rating (PIR). The birth-date distribution of players was biased, those born early in the selection year outnumbering those born later. Anthropometric analysis indicated that players who performed better had longer body lengths. Physiological testing showed that semi-finalists had better sprint performance than quarter-finalists and those players with greater jump capacity scored more points. Early maturation and advanced maturity status were also associated with better PIR and scored points per game. Multiple blockwise regression analysis showed that, among the factors analyzed, YAPHV was the best predictor of basketball performance. In conclusion, around puberty, physical and physiological parameters associated with maturity and CA are important in determining the success of elite basketball players. Consequently, boys who are born in the second half of the year and/or late maturing tend to be marginalized or totally excluded, and not given the chance to play under equal conditions; their careers may then be held back by the relative disadvantage associated with inexperience.

  11. Tennis service stroke benefits humerus bone: is torsion the cause?

    PubMed

    Ireland, Alex; Degens, Hans; Maffulli, Nicola; Rittweger, Jörn

    2015-08-01

    Regular tennis play is associated with impressive asymmetries in bone strength in favor of the racquet arm, particularly in the humerus. However, the relative effects of service and ground strokes are not known. Serendipitously, we encountered a 46-year-old regular tennis player who has played service and ground strokes with different arms for over 30 years, and thus allowed differentiation of stroke effects. Grip strength and peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans of both arms of radius at 4 % distal-proximal ulna length, radius and ulna at 60 % distal-proximal ulna length, and at distal (35 % length) humerus were analyzed in this player, and 12 male veteran players of similar age, height, and mass who played a conventional single-sided style. Confidence intervals (95 %) were calculated for asymmetries and bone, muscle and force parameters in the control players-values in the case study player were compared to these intervals. Sizeable differences in bone strength in favor of the serving arm humerus were observed in this player-comparable to those found in the control players. While asymmetries in favor of the ground stroke arm ulna were also evident, no sizeable asymmetry was found in proximal or distal radius, forearm or upper arm muscle size or hand grip force. These results suggest that the service stroke is responsible for the humeral hypertrophy observed in tennis players, and that ulna adaptation may be attributable to the ground strokes. The osteogenic potential of the service stroke may be related to the large torsional stresses it produces. PMID:25894070

  12. Tennis service stroke benefits humerus bone: is torsion the cause?

    PubMed

    Ireland, Alex; Degens, Hans; Maffulli, Nicola; Rittweger, Jörn

    2015-08-01

    Regular tennis play is associated with impressive asymmetries in bone strength in favor of the racquet arm, particularly in the humerus. However, the relative effects of service and ground strokes are not known. Serendipitously, we encountered a 46-year-old regular tennis player who has played service and ground strokes with different arms for over 30 years, and thus allowed differentiation of stroke effects. Grip strength and peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans of both arms of radius at 4 % distal-proximal ulna length, radius and ulna at 60 % distal-proximal ulna length, and at distal (35 % length) humerus were analyzed in this player, and 12 male veteran players of similar age, height, and mass who played a conventional single-sided style. Confidence intervals (95 %) were calculated for asymmetries and bone, muscle and force parameters in the control players-values in the case study player were compared to these intervals. Sizeable differences in bone strength in favor of the serving arm humerus were observed in this player-comparable to those found in the control players. While asymmetries in favor of the ground stroke arm ulna were also evident, no sizeable asymmetry was found in proximal or distal radius, forearm or upper arm muscle size or hand grip force. These results suggest that the service stroke is responsible for the humeral hypertrophy observed in tennis players, and that ulna adaptation may be attributable to the ground strokes. The osteogenic potential of the service stroke may be related to the large torsional stresses it produces.

  13. Surgical treatment of posterior interosseous nerve paralysis in a tennis player☆

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Kenjiro; Tsukamoto, Yoshitane; Oi, Takanori; Takagi, Yohei; Tanaka, Juichi; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) paralysis in a tennis player. The PIN, a 2 cm section from a bifurcation point of the radial nerve, presented increased stiffness in the surgical findings and treated with free sural nerve grafting after excision of the degenerative portion of the PIN. We speculate that PIN paralysis associated with hourglass-like constriction can be caused and exacerbated by repetitive forearm pronation and supination in playing tennis. PMID:25104896

  14. Effects of Plyometric and Sprint Training on Physical and Technical Skill Performance in Adolescent Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Sáez de Villarreal, Eduardo; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Requena, Bernardo; Haff, Gregory G; Ferrete, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    To determine the influence of a short-term combined plyometric and sprint training (9 weeks) within regular soccer practice on explosive and technical actions of pubertal soccer players during the in-season. Twenty-six players were randomly assigned to 2 groups: control group (CG) (soccer training only) and combined group (CombG) (plyometric + acceleration + dribbling + shooting). All players trained soccer 4 times per week and the experimental groups supplemented the soccer training with a proposed plyometric-sprint training program for 40 minutes (2 days per weeks). Ten-meter sprint, 10-m agility with and without ball, CMJ and Abalakov vertical jump, ball-shooting speed, and Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test were measured before and after training. The experimental group followed a 9-week plyometric and sprint program (i.e., jumping, hurdling, bouncing, skipping, and footwork) implemented before the soccer training. Baseline-training results showed no significant differences between the groups in any of the variables tested. No improvement was found in the CG; however, meaningful improvement was found in all variables in the experimental group: CMJ (effect size [ES] = 0.9), Abalakov vertical jump (ES = 1.3), 10-m sprint (ES = 0.7-0.9), 10-m agility (ES = 0.8-1.2), and ball-shooting speed (ES = 0.7-0.8). A specific combined plyometric and sprint training within regular soccer practice improved explosive actions compared with conventional soccer training only. Therefore, the short-term combined program had a beneficial impact on explosive actions, such as sprinting, change of direction, jumping, and ball-shooting speed which are important determinants of match-winning actions in soccer performance. Therefore, we propose modifications to current training methodology for pubertal soccer players to include combined plyometric and speed training for athlete preparation in this sport.

  15. Exercise‐induced homeostatic perturbations provoked by singles tennis match play with reference to development of fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Mendez‐Villanueva, Alberto; Fernandez‐Fernandez, Jaime; Bishop, David

    2007-01-01

    This review addresses metabolic, neural, mechanical and thermal alterations during tennis match play with special focus on associations with fatigue. Several studies have provided a link between fatigue and the impairment of tennis skills proficiency. A tennis player's ability to maintain skilled on‐court performance and/or optimal muscle function during a demanding match can be compromised as a result of several homeostatic perturbations, for example hypoglycaemia, muscle damage and hyperthermia. Accordingly, an important physiological requirement to succeed at competitive level might be the player's ability to resist fatigue. However, research evidence on this topic is limited and it is unclear to what extent players experience fatigue during high‐level tennis match play and what the physiological mechanisms are that are likely to contribute to the deterioration in performance. PMID:17957005

  16. Physics of the Tennis Racket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, H.

    1979-01-01

    Examines several parameters concerning the performance of tennis rackets, such as the location of the center of percussion, the time of contact, the period of oscillation of the tennis racket, and the coefficient of restitution of a tennis ball. The purpose is to design a racket with improved playing characteristics. (Author/GA)

  17. Canadian Open Tennis. Puzzle Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Ian A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the du Maurier Open, a women's tennis tournament. Explains that tennis becomes an elite sport at the level of the du Maurier Open. Presents a crossword puzzle that focuses on many of the female tennis stars and provides the across and down clues, a word list, and the answer key. (CMK)

  18. Tennis injuries: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dines, Joshua S; Bedi, Asheesh; Williams, Phillip N; Dodson, Christopher C; Ellenbecker, Todd S; Altchek, David W; Windler, Gary; Dines, David M

    2015-03-01

    Tennis places high loads on the joints of players, with supraphysiologic forces being generated at the shoulder and elbow hundreds of times per match. Acute injuries tend to affect the lower extremity; chronic injuries usually involve the upper extremity. Commonly encountered upper extremity conditions include rotator cuff injury, internal impingement, superior labral tears, and epicondylitis of the elbow. Serving is the most strenuous stroke in tennis, with the highest peak muscle activity in the shoulder and forearm occurring during this stroke. The kinetic chain links upper extremity, lower extremity, and core muscle segments by transmitting coordinated activation and motion; in this regard, any pathologic process that disturbs the groin, hip, and abdominal musculature can further result in an increased risk of injury to the shoulder and upper extremity. Evolution in equipment and in play surfaces has also affected the type and frequency of injuries. Prevention programs that address the muscular imbalances throughout the kinetic chain may help reduce the incidence of both acute and chronic injuries experienced by tennis athletes. PMID:25667400

  19. Tennis injuries: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dines, Joshua S; Bedi, Asheesh; Williams, Phillip N; Dodson, Christopher C; Ellenbecker, Todd S; Altchek, David W; Windler, Gary; Dines, David M

    2015-03-01

    Tennis places high loads on the joints of players, with supraphysiologic forces being generated at the shoulder and elbow hundreds of times per match. Acute injuries tend to affect the lower extremity; chronic injuries usually involve the upper extremity. Commonly encountered upper extremity conditions include rotator cuff injury, internal impingement, superior labral tears, and epicondylitis of the elbow. Serving is the most strenuous stroke in tennis, with the highest peak muscle activity in the shoulder and forearm occurring during this stroke. The kinetic chain links upper extremity, lower extremity, and core muscle segments by transmitting coordinated activation and motion; in this regard, any pathologic process that disturbs the groin, hip, and abdominal musculature can further result in an increased risk of injury to the shoulder and upper extremity. Evolution in equipment and in play surfaces has also affected the type and frequency of injuries. Prevention programs that address the muscular imbalances throughout the kinetic chain may help reduce the incidence of both acute and chronic injuries experienced by tennis athletes.

  20. Perceptual uncertainty and line-call challenges in professional tennis.

    PubMed

    Mather, George

    2008-07-22

    Fast-moving sports such as tennis require both players and match officials to make rapid accurate perceptual decisions about dynamic events in the visual world. Disagreements arise regularly, leading to disputes about decisions such as line calls. A number of factors must contribute to these disputes, including lapses in concentration, bias and gamesmanship. Fundamental uncertainty or variability in the sensory information supporting decisions must also play a role. Modern technological innovations now provide detailed and accurate physical information that can be compared against the decisions of players and officials. The present paper uses this psychophysical data to assess the significance of perceptual limitations as a contributor to real-world decisions in professional tennis. A detailed analysis is presented of a large body of data on line-call challenges in professional tennis tournaments over the last 2 years. Results reveal that the vast majority of challenges can be explained in a direct highly predictable manner by a simple model of uncertainty in perceptual information processing. Both players and line judges are remarkably accurate at judging ball bounce position, with a positional uncertainty of less than 40mm. Line judges are more reliable than players. Judgements are more difficult for balls bouncing near base and service lines than those bouncing near side and centre lines. There is no evidence for significant errors in localization due to image motion. PMID:18426755

  1. The biomechanics of tennis elbow. An integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Roetert, E P; Brody, H; Dillman, C J; Groppel, J L; Schultheis, J M

    1995-01-01

    Tennis elbow afflicts 40% to 50% of the average, recreational tennis players; most of these players more than 30 years of age. Tennis elbow is thought to be the result of microtrauma, the overuse and inflammation at the origin of the ECRB as a result of repeated large impact forces created when the ball hits the racket in the backhand stroke. Several authors have found that EMG activity in the ECRB, the muscle and tendon complex afflicted in tennis elbow, is high during the acceleration and early follow-through phases of the groundstrokes and during the cocking phase of the serve. Unfortunately, none of the authors gave evidence to support the claim that muscle activity in the ECRB at ball contact is high. In the one-handed backhand, the torques at impact (17-24 nm) will be absorbed by the tendons of the elbow. Giangarra and his colleagues observed that the two-handed backhand "allows the forces at ball impact to be transmitted through the elbow rather than absorbed by the tissues at the elbow." Other authors have reported that players using a two-handed backhand will rarely develop lateral epicondylitis, because the helping arm appears to absorb more energy and changes the mechanics of the swing. As seen by Morris and colleagues, Giangarra and associates, and Leach and colleagues, players who utilize the two-handed backhand have a very low incidence of tennis elbow. These three studies conclude that the two-handed backhand stroke is probably the most effective backhand stroke to prevent lateral tennis elbow. Studies show that wrist extensors are highly involved in all strokes (serve, forehand, and both one- and two-handed backhand strokes). This relatively high involvement (40%-70% MVC) throughout play may result in overload of this muscular group. Thus, tennis elbow may be caused simply by continued use of this muscular system in all strokes, and not just because of the high forces absorbed at impact. Another theory concerning impact states that if the extensor

  2. Tennis, incidence of URTI and salivary IgA.

    PubMed

    Novas, A M P; Rowbottom, D G; Jenkins, D G

    2003-04-01

    Tennis played at an elite level requires intensive training characterized by repeated bouts of brief intermittent high intensity exercise over relatively long periods of time (1 - 3 h or more). Competition can place additional stress on players. The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal association between specific components of tennis training and competition, the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), and salivary IgA, in a cohort of seventeen elite female tennis players. Timed, whole unstimulated saliva samples were collected before and after selected 1-h training sessions at 2 weekly intervals, over 12 weeks. Salivary IgA concentration was measured by ELISA and IgA secretion rate calculated (microg IgA x ml -1 x ml saliva x min -1). Players reported URTI symptoms and recorded training and competition in daily logs. Data analysis showed that higher incidence of URTI was significantly associated with increased training duration and load, and competition level, on a weekly basis. Salivary IgA secretion rate (S-IgA) dropped significantly after 1 hour of tennis play. Over the 12-week period, pre-exercise salivary IgA concentration and secretion rate were directly associated with the amount of training undertaken during the previous day and week (p < 0.05). However, the decline in S-IgA after 1 h of intense tennis play was also positively related to the duration and load of training undertaken during the previous day and week (p < 0.05). Although exercise-induced suppression of salivary IgA may be a risk factor, it could not accurately predict the occurrence of URTI in this cohort of athletes.

  3. Left-handedness in professional and amateur tennis.

    PubMed

    Loffing, Florian; Hagemann, Norbert; Strauss, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent effects rather than innate predispositions may provide left-handers with an advantage in one-on-one fighting situations. Support mainly comes from cross-sectional studies which found significantly enhanced left-hander frequencies among elite athletes exclusively in interactive sports such as baseball, cricket, fencing and tennis. Since professional athletes' training regimes continuously improve, however, an important unsolved question is whether the left-handers' advantage in individual sports like tennis persists over time. To this end, we longitudinally tracked left-hander frequencies in year-end world rankings (men: 1973-2011, ladies: 1975-2011) and at Grand Slam tournaments (1968-2011) in male and female tennis professionals. Here we show that the positive impact of left-handed performance on high achievement in elite tennis was moderate and decreased in male professionals over time and was almost absent in female professionals. For both sexes, left-hander frequencies among year-end top 10 players linearly decreased over the period considered. Moreover, left-handedness was, however, no longer seems associated with higher probability of attaining high year-end world ranking position in male professionals. In contrast, cross-sectional data on left-hander frequencies in male and female amateur players suggest that a left-handers' advantage may still occur on lower performance levels. Collectively, our data is in accordance with the frequency-dependent hypothesis since reduced experience with left-handers in tennis is likely to be compensated by players' professionalism.

  4. Left-handedness in professional and amateur tennis.

    PubMed

    Loffing, Florian; Hagemann, Norbert; Strauss, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent effects rather than innate predispositions may provide left-handers with an advantage in one-on-one fighting situations. Support mainly comes from cross-sectional studies which found significantly enhanced left-hander frequencies among elite athletes exclusively in interactive sports such as baseball, cricket, fencing and tennis. Since professional athletes' training regimes continuously improve, however, an important unsolved question is whether the left-handers' advantage in individual sports like tennis persists over time. To this end, we longitudinally tracked left-hander frequencies in year-end world rankings (men: 1973-2011, ladies: 1975-2011) and at Grand Slam tournaments (1968-2011) in male and female tennis professionals. Here we show that the positive impact of left-handed performance on high achievement in elite tennis was moderate and decreased in male professionals over time and was almost absent in female professionals. For both sexes, left-hander frequencies among year-end top 10 players linearly decreased over the period considered. Moreover, left-handedness was, however, no longer seems associated with higher probability of attaining high year-end world ranking position in male professionals. In contrast, cross-sectional data on left-hander frequencies in male and female amateur players suggest that a left-handers' advantage may still occur on lower performance levels. Collectively, our data is in accordance with the frequency-dependent hypothesis since reduced experience with left-handers in tennis is likely to be compensated by players' professionalism. PMID:23145151

  5. Age-related differences in the neck strength of adolescent rugby players

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, D. F.; Gatherer, D.; Jenkins, P. J.; Maclean, J. G. B.; Hutchison, J. D.; Nutton, R. W.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the neck strength of school-aged rugby players, and to define the relationship with proxy physical measures with a view to predicting neck strength. Methods Cross-sectional cohort study involving 382 rugby playing schoolchildren at three Scottish schools (all male, aged between 12 and 18 years). Outcome measures included maximal isometric neck extension, weight, height, grip strength, cervical range of movement and neck circumference. Results Mean neck extension strength increased with age (p = 0.001), although a wide inter-age range variation was evident, with the result that some of the oldest children presented with the same neck strength as the mean of the youngest group. Grip strength explained the most variation in neck strength (R2 = 0.53), while cervical range of movement and neck girth demonstrated no relationship. Multivariable analysis demonstrated the independent effects of age, weight and grip strength, and the resultant model explained 62.1% of the variance in neck strength. This model predicted actual neck strength well for the majority of players, although there was a tendency towards overestimation at the lowest range and underestimation at the highest. Conclusion A wide variation was evident in neck strength across the range of the schoolchild-playing population, with a surprisingly large number of senior players demonstrating the same mean strength as the 12-year-old mean value. This may suggest that current training regimes address limb strength but not neck strength, which may be significant for future neck injury prevention strategies. Age, weight and grip strength can predict around two thirds of the variation in neck strength, however specific assessment is required if precise data is sought. PMID:23610685

  6. Supination control increases performance in sideward cutting movements in tennis.

    PubMed

    Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Brizuela, Gabriel; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; García-Belenguer, Ana C; Crespo, Miguel

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the effects of tennis shoe characteristics on performance during sideward cutting movements followed by direction changes. Five tennis players (age = 21.5 +/- 0.8 years, mass = 75.2 +/- 2.8 kg, and height = 1.78 +/- 0.05 m) participated in the study and 10 tennis shoes were tested. Several footwear mechanical parameters were analyzed: Shore A hardness, longitudinal and transverse flexibility, midsole height at heel, presence of heel counters, and weight. A force plate was used to measure the kinetic variables, and two video cameras were used to perform a three-dimensional photogrammetric analysis. Results revealed that subject-footwear interaction was statistically not significant (p > 0.05) for the kinetic and kinematic variables. Only contact time (p = 0.008) and supination movement (p = 0.009) were footwear dependent. Positive correlations between contact time and first supination peak (r = 0.783, p = 0.007) and second supination peak (r = 0.730, p = 0.016) were observed. Impulse was not changed, which means shoes limiting supination allowed tennis players to perform faster sideward cutting movements.

  7. Why bigger may in fact be better... in the context of table tennis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd; Pan, Zhao; Belden, Jesse

    2014-11-01

    We submit that table tennis is too fast. Because of the high ball velocities relative to the small table size, players are required to act extremely quickly, often exceeding the limits of human reaction time. Additionally, the Magnus effect resulting from large rotation rates introduces dramatically curved paths and causes rapid direction changes after striking the table or paddle, which effectively reduces reaction time further. Moreover, watching a professional game is often uninteresting and even tiring because the ball is moving too quickly to follow with the naked eye and the action of the players is too subtle to resolve from a distance. These facts isolate table tennis from our quantitatively defined ``fun game club,'' and make it less widely appealing than sports like baseball and soccer. Over the past 100 years, the rules of table tennis have changed several times in an effort to make the game more attractive to players and spectators alike, but the game continues to lose popularity. Here, we experimentally quantify the historic landmark equipment changes of table tennis from a fluid dynamics perspective. Based on theory and observation, we suggest a larger diameter ball for table tennis to make the game more appealing to both spectators and amateur players.

  8. Training increases anabolic response and reduces inflammatory response to a single practice in elite male adolescent volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Nemet, Dan; Portal, Shawn; Zadik, Zvi; Pilz-Burstein, Rutie; Adler-Portal, Dana; Meckel, Yoav; Eliakim, Alon

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effect of training on hormonal and inflammatory response to a single volleyball practice in elite adolescent players. Fourteen male, elite, national team-level, Israeli volleyball players (age, 16.3±1.1 years, Tanner stage 4-5) participated in the study. Blood samples were collected before and immediately after a typical 60-min volleyball practice, before and after 7 weeks of training during the initial phases of the volleyball season. Hormonal measurements included the anabolic hormones growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, and testosterone; the catabolic hormone cortisol; the pro-inflammatory markers interleukin (IL) 6, and the anti-inflammatory marker IL-1 receptor antagonist. Training led to a significant improvement of both anaerobic and aerobic properties. Before the training intervention, the typical volleyball practice was associated with a significant increase of GH and testosterone and also with a significant increase of IL-6. Training resulted in a significantly greater GH response (ΔGH, 2.5±2.4 vs. 4.7±3.0 ng/mL, before and after training, respectively; p<0.02) and reduced IL-6 response (ΔIL-6, 2.0±1.6 vs. 0.6±0.7 pg/mL, before and after training, respectively; p<0.01) to the same relative intensity volleyball practice. The results suggest that, along with the improvement of anaerobic and aerobic characteristics, training leads to a greater anabolic and reduced inflammatory response to exercise. PMID:23426816

  9. Effects of two different short-term training programs on the physical and technical abilities of adolescent basketball players.

    PubMed

    Bogdanis, Gregory C; Ziagos, Vaghelis; Anastasiadis, Michalis; Maridaki, Maria

    2007-04-01

    This study evaluated and compared the effectiveness of two different off-season, short-term basketball training programs on physical and technical abilities of young basketball players. Twenty-seven adolescent basketball players (14.7+/-0.5 years; Tanner stage: 3.5+/-0.5) were randomly divided into a specialized basketball training group (SP, n=10), a mixed basketball plus conditioning training group (MX, n=10) and a control group (n=7). Training included five sessions per week (100-120 min each) and was performed for 4 weeks. Maximal oxygen uptake was similarly improved after SP (4.9+/-1.8%) and MX (4.9+/-1.4%), but there was no effect on ventilatory threshold. Peak and mean power output measured during the Wingate test were also improved by a similar magnitude after SP (21+/-5%) and MX (15+/-6%). Trunk muscle endurance was equally increased (SP: 23+/-4%, MX: 25+/-5%), but arms endurance was improved significantly more after MX (50+/-11%) compared to SP (11+/-14%, p<0.05). Performance in four basketball technical skills was similarly increased (by 17-27%) in both groups, with a tendency for greater improvement of the SP groups in the technical skills of shooting and passing. These results indicate that a SP basketball training program, performed exclusively on-court was as effective as a MX training program in terms of aerobic and anaerobic fitness improvement. Furthermore, the decrease of the total on-court training time in the MX group resulted in a tendency for a smaller improvement of basketball technical skills. In conclusion, both SP and MX training are equally effective in order to limit and/or reverse the detraining effects that occur during the off-season in basketball. PMID:16824797

  10. Effects of two different short-term training programs on the physical and technical abilities of adolescent basketball players.

    PubMed

    Bogdanis, Gregory C; Ziagos, Vaghelis; Anastasiadis, Michalis; Maridaki, Maria

    2007-04-01

    This study evaluated and compared the effectiveness of two different off-season, short-term basketball training programs on physical and technical abilities of young basketball players. Twenty-seven adolescent basketball players (14.7+/-0.5 years; Tanner stage: 3.5+/-0.5) were randomly divided into a specialized basketball training group (SP, n=10), a mixed basketball plus conditioning training group (MX, n=10) and a control group (n=7). Training included five sessions per week (100-120 min each) and was performed for 4 weeks. Maximal oxygen uptake was similarly improved after SP (4.9+/-1.8%) and MX (4.9+/-1.4%), but there was no effect on ventilatory threshold. Peak and mean power output measured during the Wingate test were also improved by a similar magnitude after SP (21+/-5%) and MX (15+/-6%). Trunk muscle endurance was equally increased (SP: 23+/-4%, MX: 25+/-5%), but arms endurance was improved significantly more after MX (50+/-11%) compared to SP (11+/-14%, p<0.05). Performance in four basketball technical skills was similarly increased (by 17-27%) in both groups, with a tendency for greater improvement of the SP groups in the technical skills of shooting and passing. These results indicate that a SP basketball training program, performed exclusively on-court was as effective as a MX training program in terms of aerobic and anaerobic fitness improvement. Furthermore, the decrease of the total on-court training time in the MX group resulted in a tendency for a smaller improvement of basketball technical skills. In conclusion, both SP and MX training are equally effective in order to limit and/or reverse the detraining effects that occur during the off-season in basketball.

  11. Effects of complex training on explosive strength in adolescent male basketball players.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eduardo J A M; Janeira, Manuel A A S

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a complex training program, a combined practice of weight training and plyometrics, on explosive strength development of young basketball players. Twenty-five young male athletes, aged 14-15 years old, were assessed using squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), Abalakov test (ABA), depth jump (DJ), mechanical power (MP), and medicine ball throw (MBT), before and after a 10-week in-season training program. Both the control group (CG; n = 10) and the experimental group (EG; n = 15) kept up their regular sports practice; additionally, the EG performed 2 sessions per week of a complex training program. The EG significantly improved in the SJ, CMJ, ABA, and MBT values (p < 0.05). The CG significantly decreased the values (p < 0.05) of CMJ, ABA, and MP, while significantly increasing the MBT values (p < 0.05). Our results support the use of complex training to improve the upper and lower body explosivity levels in young basketball players. In conclusion, this study showed that more strength conditioning is needed during the sport practice season. Furthermore, we also conclude that complex training is a useful working tool for coaches, innovative in this strength-training domain, equally contributing to a better time-efficient training.

  12. Effects of pre-exercise, endurance, and recovery designer sports drinks on performance during tennis tournament simulation.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Sébastien L; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie; Metz, Lore; Ennequin, Gael; Aubineau, Nicolas; Lescuyer, Jean-François; Duclos, Martine; Brink, Thibault; Sirvent, Pascal

    2013-11-01

    Sports drinks are often used before, during, and after tennis tournaments, but their ability to influence physiological and psychological variables and the characteristics of tennis match play remains uncertain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of ingesting specially formulated pre-exercise, endurance, and recovery sports drinks on glycemia and performance indices during a simulated tennis tournament. Eight well-trained male tennis players performed two 3-match round-robin tennis tournaments although ingesting sports drinks (SPDs) or placebos (PLAs) before, during, and after each match (crossover study design). Before the first tournament, match and drink order were randomized (SPDs or PLAs first) and players were placed under controlled nutritional and hydration conditions. Glycemia, heart rate response, rate of perceived exertion, and notational/match analysis were assessed during each match. Sports drinks maintained higher glycemia levels during match 2 and 3 of the tennis tournament compared with PLAs (p < 0.01). Moreover, higher mean heart rates (p < 0.01) and stroke frequencies (p < 0.01) concomitantly with lower rates of perceived exertion (p < 0.01) were recorded throughout the duration of the tournament, when players used the SPDs. During a 3-match tennis tournament, SPDs allow higher stroke frequency during play, with decreased rates of perceived exertion.

  13. Relationships Between the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test and Anaerobic Performance Tests in Adolescent Handball Players

    PubMed Central

    Hermassi, Souhail; Aouadi, Ridha; Khalifa, Riadh; van den Tillaar, Roland; Shephard, Roy J.; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate relationships between a performance index derived from the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) and other measures of physical performance and skill in handball players. The other measures considered included peak muscular power of the lower limbs (Wpeak), jumping ability (squat and counter-movement jumps (SJ, CMJ), a handball skill test and the average sprinting velocities over the first step (VS) and the first 5 m (V5m). Test scores for 25 male national-level adolescent players (age: 17.2 ± 0.7 years) averaged 4.83 ± 0.34 m·s−1 (maximal velocity reached at the Yo-Yo IR1); 917 ± 105 Watt, 12.7 ± 3 W·kg−1 (Wpeak); 3.41 ± 0.5 m·s−1 and 6.03 ± 0.6 m·s−1 (sprint velocities for Vs and V5m respectively) and 10.3 ± 1 s (handball skill test). Yo-Yo IR1 test scores showed statistically significant correlations with all of the variables examined: Wpeak (W and W·kg−1) r = 0.80 and 0.65, respectively, p≤0.001); sprinting velocities (r = 0.73 and 0.71 for VS and V5m respectively; p≤0.001); jumping performance (SJ: r = 0.60, p≤0.001; CMJ: r= 0.66, p≤0.001) and the handball skill test (r = 0.71; p≤0.001). We concluded that the Yo-Yo test score showed a sufficient correlation with other potential means of assessing handball players, and that intra-individual changes of Yo-Yo IR1 score could provide a useful composite index of the response to training or rehabilitation, although correlations lack sufficient precision to help in players’ selection. PMID:25964822

  14. The relationships between simulated tennis performance and biomarkers for nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Akşit, Tolga; Turgay, Faruk; Kutlay, Emine; Z Özkol, Mehmet; Vural, Faik

    2013-01-01

    Tennis performance requires a good aerobic endurance and recovering capacity. Nitric oxide (NO) is a gas which is not only a vasodilator and antioxidant but it also regulates the use of oxygen and glucose. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between simulated tennis performance test (PT) and NOx (sum of nitrate+nitrite) levels and lactate elimination speed (LES). Twenty well trained male tennis players with game levels of ITN 4 (International Tennis Number) and lower (mean ± SD; age 22.9 ± 2.6 yrs; height 1.82 ± 0.06 m and mass 75.7 ± 8.0 kg) participated in the study. Participants performed three 4-min bouts and a 2-min continuous groundstroke against balls projected from a tennis ball machine at speeds of 50, 55, 62 and 70 km·h(-1). After this exercise, subjects were given a 20 min passive rest. After each period and at during the recovery phase; plasma NOx, glucose (GLU) and lactate (LA) levels were determined. LES was calculated during passive recovery. GLU, LA and heart rate (HR) showed a linear increase in comparison to the values in the previous step while PT decreased significantly. Following each period NOx and glucose levels increased independently, but their decreasing rates in recovery phase were related (r = 0.470, p < 0.05). The successive increase in NOx and GLU parameters between the third and the forth periods was significant (p < 0.05). Only in the third period was there a significant relation between PT and NOx (r = 0.494; p < 0.05). In the present study, no significant relationship was found between PT and GLU, LA levels and LES. No significant correlation was found between simulated tennis performance and blood NOx levels. However the addition of loads like those in the third period in tennis trainings can be beneficial for performance in trained tennis players. It is recommended that the relationships between tennis performance with NOx and GLU are studied during a real tennis match. Key PointsIn a sport like tennis

  15. Mental Toughness in Competitive Tennis: Relationships with Resilience and Stress.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Richard G; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Oppong Asante, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between mental toughness (MT), resilience, and stress among competitive South African tennis players. A total of 351 tennis players participating at various competitive standards completed the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire, the Resilience Scale for Adults, and a modified version of the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes. The results indicated that total MT was positively associated with total resilience (r = 0.59), but negatively associated with total stress (r = -0.44). The resilience subscales of perception of self, perception of future, social competence, and social resources, but not family cohesion, significantly predicted total MT (R (2) = 0.35). Both total resilience and total MT significantly predicted total stress (R (2) = 0.21). Based on the findings, interrelations between MT and resilience are explored, implications outlined, and additional research is suggested to ascertain the contextual relevance and outcomes associated with each construct in sport. PMID:27014132

  16. Mental Toughness in Competitive Tennis: Relationships with Resilience and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cowden, Richard G.; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Oppong Asante, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between mental toughness (MT), resilience, and stress among competitive South African tennis players. A total of 351 tennis players participating at various competitive standards completed the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire, the Resilience Scale for Adults, and a modified version of the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes. The results indicated that total MT was positively associated with total resilience (r = 0.59), but negatively associated with total stress (r = -0.44). The resilience subscales of perception of self, perception of future, social competence, and social resources, but not family cohesion, significantly predicted total MT (R2 = 0.35). Both total resilience and total MT significantly predicted total stress (R2 = 0.21). Based on the findings, interrelations between MT and resilience are explored, implications outlined, and additional research is suggested to ascertain the contextual relevance and outcomes associated with each construct in sport. PMID:27014132

  17. Mental Toughness in Competitive Tennis: Relationships with Resilience and Stress.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Richard G; Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Oppong Asante, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between mental toughness (MT), resilience, and stress among competitive South African tennis players. A total of 351 tennis players participating at various competitive standards completed the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire, the Resilience Scale for Adults, and a modified version of the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes. The results indicated that total MT was positively associated with total resilience (r = 0.59), but negatively associated with total stress (r = -0.44). The resilience subscales of perception of self, perception of future, social competence, and social resources, but not family cohesion, significantly predicted total MT (R (2) = 0.35). Both total resilience and total MT significantly predicted total stress (R (2) = 0.21). Based on the findings, interrelations between MT and resilience are explored, implications outlined, and additional research is suggested to ascertain the contextual relevance and outcomes associated with each construct in sport.

  18. Tennis ball fuzziness: assessing textile surface roughness using digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, C.; Jones, R.; Leaney, P. G.

    2006-06-01

    Wear plays an important role in the game of tennis as it affects both ball performance and player perceived ball quality. Visual appearance can be used in ball differentiation, but has so far been limited to subjective assessments used to estimate ball wear and performance characteristics. A metric for ball surface condition will allow performance and perception data from varied testing set-ups to be objectively compared and analysed. A versatile new method of assessing surface roughness using digital imaging has been developed to allow the quantitative assessment of tennis ball condition. This metric allows manufacturers and researchers to predict ball performance and player perception from worn ball samples, developing acceptable wear limits. In the successful implementation of this metric, several key factors, including lighting, image thresholding, algorithm implementation and camera specifications, were identified to aid future alternative implementations.

  19. Kinematic analysis of the wheelchair tennis serve: Implications for classification.

    PubMed

    Cavedon, V; Zancanaro, C; Milanese, C

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the validity of the classification system used in Open-class wheelchair tennis by investigating the relationship between post-impact ball velocity in the serve (measured using a sports radar gun) and the severity of impairment. Shoulder and wrist angles at the instant of ball impact were also estimated from 2D motion analysis. Forty-three nationally ranked Italian Open-class wheelchair tennis players were assigned to four groups (A–D) according to descending level of activity limitation. Ten successful flat serves (WFSs) and 10 successful kick serves (WKSs) for each player were recorded. One-way ANOVA showed that the severity of impairment significantly (P < 0.05) affected post-impact ball velocity and shoulder angle at the instant of ball impact. Furthermore, the mean value of post-impact ball velocity in WFS increased from group A to group D, i.e., with descending level of activity limitation. The results of this cross-sectional study indicate that the severity of impairment per se is associated with velocity of the wheelchair tennis serve, suggesting that the current classification is flawed in that it overlooks the impact of severity of impairment on players' performance. PMID:25371933

  20. Effects of reduced training and detraining on upper and lower body explosive strength in adolescent male basketball players.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eduardo J A M; Janeira, Manuel A A S

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the effects of detraining and of a reduced training program on upper- and lower-body explosive strength in adolescent male basketball players. To study this, 15 subjects, aged 14 to 15 years old, were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 following groups: reduced training (RT; n = 8) and detraining (DTR; n = 7). The participants were assessed on squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), Abalakov test (ABA), depth jump (DJ), mechanical power (MP), and medicine ball throw (MBT) after a 10-week in-season complex training program (T0) and at the end of 4 (T4), 8 (T8), 12 (T12), and 16 (T16) weeks of detraining and of the reduced training periods. Both groups showed maintenance of explosive strength values and statistical similarity between them whatever the moment of evaluation. In conclusion, 16 weeks of detraining or of reduced training allow for the maintenance of the gains previously achieved by the application of a 10-week in-season complex training program. However, the lack of differences between detraining and reduced training leads to the conclusion that regular basketball practice can sustain by itself the previously achieved explosive strength gains, considering its mainly explosive characteristics.

  1. Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to athletic activity. This is usually 4 to 6 months after surgery. Tennis elbow surgery is considered successful in 80% to 90% of patients. However, it is not uncommon to see a loss of strength. New Developments Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is currently being investigated for its effectiveness ...

  2. Tennis: Group Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Lawn Tennis Association, New York, NY.

    This manual is a guide to group instruction of basic tennis. Chapter 1 discusses four premises. Chapter 2 illustrates basic strokes, including the forehand and backhand ground strokes, the forehand and backhand volleys, the lob and overhead smash, and the half-volley. Chapter 3 presents methods of teaching the strokes, some corrective techniques,…

  3. Anyone for Tennis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2004-01-01

    Tennis is a sport in which the mathematics involves an unusual scoring system together with other applications pertinent to the draw for different types of tournaments and the relative ratios of points won and lost. The name of the sport is thought to have originated from the French word "tenez", which translates roughly as "to receive (the…

  4. Effects of two training protocols on the forehand drive performance in tennis.

    PubMed

    Genevois, Cyril; Frican, Baptiste; Creveaux, Thomas; Hautier, Christophe; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of 2 training modalities on the tennis forehand drive performance. Forty-four tennis players (mean ± SD: age = 26.9 ± 7.5 years; height = 178.6 ± 6.7 cm; mass = 72.5 ± 8.0 kg; International Tennis Number = 3) were randomly assigned into 3 groups. During 6 weeks, the first group performed handled medicine ball (HMB) throws included in the regular tennis practice, the second group (overweight racket-OWR) played tennis forehand drives with an overweighed racket during the regular tennis practice, and the third group (regular tennis training-RTT) practiced only tennis training as usual. Before and after the 6-week program, velocity and accuracy of tennis crosscourt forehand drives were evaluated in the 3 groups. The main results showed that after 6-week training, the maximal ball velocity was significantly increased in HMB and OWR groups in comparison with RTT (p < 0.001 and p = 0. 001, respectively). The estimated averaged increase in ball velocity was greater in HMB than in OWR (11 vs. 5%, respectively; p = 0.017), but shot accuracy tended to be deteriorated in HMB when compared with OWR and RTT (p = 0.043 and p = 0.027, respectively). The findings of this study highlighted the efficiency of both training modalities to improve tennis forehand drive performance but also suggested that the HMB throws may be incorporated into the preseason program preferably, whereas the OWR forehand drives may be included in the on-season program. PMID:22592176

  5. Effects of two training protocols on the forehand drive performance in tennis.

    PubMed

    Genevois, Cyril; Frican, Baptiste; Creveaux, Thomas; Hautier, Christophe; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of 2 training modalities on the tennis forehand drive performance. Forty-four tennis players (mean ± SD: age = 26.9 ± 7.5 years; height = 178.6 ± 6.7 cm; mass = 72.5 ± 8.0 kg; International Tennis Number = 3) were randomly assigned into 3 groups. During 6 weeks, the first group performed handled medicine ball (HMB) throws included in the regular tennis practice, the second group (overweight racket-OWR) played tennis forehand drives with an overweighed racket during the regular tennis practice, and the third group (regular tennis training-RTT) practiced only tennis training as usual. Before and after the 6-week program, velocity and accuracy of tennis crosscourt forehand drives were evaluated in the 3 groups. The main results showed that after 6-week training, the maximal ball velocity was significantly increased in HMB and OWR groups in comparison with RTT (p < 0.001 and p = 0. 001, respectively). The estimated averaged increase in ball velocity was greater in HMB than in OWR (11 vs. 5%, respectively; p = 0.017), but shot accuracy tended to be deteriorated in HMB when compared with OWR and RTT (p = 0.043 and p = 0.027, respectively). The findings of this study highlighted the efficiency of both training modalities to improve tennis forehand drive performance but also suggested that the HMB throws may be incorporated into the preseason program preferably, whereas the OWR forehand drives may be included in the on-season program.

  6. Biomechanical analysis of abdominal injury in tennis serves. A case report.

    PubMed

    Tubez, François; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Cordonnier, Caroline; Brüls, Olivier; Denoël, Vincent; Berwart, Gilles; Joris, Maurice; Grosdent, Stéphanie; Schwartz, Cédric

    2015-06-01

    The serve is an important stroke in any high level tennis game. A well-mastered serve is a substantial advantage for players. However, because of its repeatability and its intensity, this stroke is potentially deleterious for upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk. The trunk is a vital link in the production and transfer of energy from the lower limbs to the upper limbs; therefore, kinematic disorder could be a potential source of risk for trunk injury in tennis. This research studies the case of a professional tennis player who has suffered from a medical tear on the left rectus abdominis muscle after tennis serve. The goal of the study is to understand whether the injury could be explained by an inappropriate technique. For this purpose, we analyzed in three dimensions the kinematic and kinetic aspects of the serve. We also performed isokinetic tests of the player's knees. We then compared the player to five other professional players as reference. We observed a possible deficit of energy transfer because of an important anterior pelvis tilt. Some compensation made by the player during the serve could be a possible higher abdominal contraction and a larger shoulder external rotation. These particularities could induce an abdominal overwork that could explain the first injury and may provoke further injuries. Key pointsIn the proximal-distal sequence, energy is transmitted from lower limbs to upper limps via trunk.The 3D analysis tool is an indispensable test for an objective evaluation of the kinematic in the tennis serve.Multiple evaluations techniques are useful for fuller comprehension of the kinematics and contribute to the awareness of the player's staff concerning pathologies and performance. PMID:25983591

  7. A caffeinated energy drink improves jump performance in adolescent basketball players.

    PubMed

    Abian-Vicen, Javier; Puente, Carlos; Salinero, Juan José; González-Millán, Cristina; Areces, Francisco; Muñoz, Gloria; Muñoz-Guerra, Jesús; Del Coso, Juan

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effects of a commercially available energy drink on shooting precision, jump performance and endurance capacity in young basketball players. Sixteen young basketball players (first division of a junior national league; 14.9 ± 0.8 years; 73.4 ± 12.4 kg; 182.3 ± 6.5 cm) volunteered to participate in the research. They ingested either (a) an energy drink that contained 3 mg of caffeine per kg of body weight or (b) a placebo energy drink with the same appearance and taste. After 60 min for caffeine absorption, they performed free throw shooting and three-point shooting tests. After that, participants performed a maximal countermovement jump (CMJ), a repeated maximal jumps test for 15 s (RJ-15), and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1). Urine samples were obtained before and 30 min after testing. In comparison to the placebo, the ingestion of the caffeinated energy drink did not affect precision during the free throws (Caffeine = 70.7 ± 11.8 % vs placebo = 70.3 ± 11.0 %; P = 0.45), the three-point shooting test (39.9 ± 11.8 vs 38.1 ± 12.8 %; P = 0.33) or the distance covered in the Yo-Yo IR1 (2,000 ± 706 vs 1,925 ± 702 m; P = 0.19). However, the energy drink significantly increased jump height during the CMJ (38.3 ± 4.4 vs 37.5 ± 4.4 cm; P < 0.05) mean jump height during the RJ-15 (30.2 ± 3.6 vs 28.8 ± 3.4 cm; P < 0.05) and the excretion of urinary caffeine (1.2 ± 0.7 vs 0.1 ± 0.1 μg/mL; P < 0.05). The intake of a caffeine-containing energy drink (3 mg/kg body weight) increased jump performance although it did not affect basketball shooting precision. PMID:24599611

  8. A caffeinated energy drink improves jump performance in adolescent basketball players.

    PubMed

    Abian-Vicen, Javier; Puente, Carlos; Salinero, Juan José; González-Millán, Cristina; Areces, Francisco; Muñoz, Gloria; Muñoz-Guerra, Jesús; Del Coso, Juan

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effects of a commercially available energy drink on shooting precision, jump performance and endurance capacity in young basketball players. Sixteen young basketball players (first division of a junior national league; 14.9 ± 0.8 years; 73.4 ± 12.4 kg; 182.3 ± 6.5 cm) volunteered to participate in the research. They ingested either (a) an energy drink that contained 3 mg of caffeine per kg of body weight or (b) a placebo energy drink with the same appearance and taste. After 60 min for caffeine absorption, they performed free throw shooting and three-point shooting tests. After that, participants performed a maximal countermovement jump (CMJ), a repeated maximal jumps test for 15 s (RJ-15), and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1). Urine samples were obtained before and 30 min after testing. In comparison to the placebo, the ingestion of the caffeinated energy drink did not affect precision during the free throws (Caffeine = 70.7 ± 11.8 % vs placebo = 70.3 ± 11.0 %; P = 0.45), the three-point shooting test (39.9 ± 11.8 vs 38.1 ± 12.8 %; P = 0.33) or the distance covered in the Yo-Yo IR1 (2,000 ± 706 vs 1,925 ± 702 m; P = 0.19). However, the energy drink significantly increased jump height during the CMJ (38.3 ± 4.4 vs 37.5 ± 4.4 cm; P < 0.05) mean jump height during the RJ-15 (30.2 ± 3.6 vs 28.8 ± 3.4 cm; P < 0.05) and the excretion of urinary caffeine (1.2 ± 0.7 vs 0.1 ± 0.1 μg/mL; P < 0.05). The intake of a caffeine-containing energy drink (3 mg/kg body weight) increased jump performance although it did not affect basketball shooting precision.

  9. Sequential avulsions of the tibial tubercle in an adolescent basketball player.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying Chieh; Chao, Ying-Hao; Lien, Fang-Chieh

    2010-05-01

    Tibial tubercle avulsion is an uncommon fracture in physically active adolescents. Sequential avulsion of tibial tubercles is extremely rare. We reported a healthy, active 15-year-old boy who suffered from left tibial tubercle avulsion fracture during a basketball game. He received open reduction and internal fixation with two smooth Kirschner wires and a cannulated screw, with every effort to reduce the plate injury. Long-leg splint was used for protection followed by programmed rehabilitation. He recovered uneventfully and returned to his previous level of activity soon. Another avulsion fracture happened at the right tibial tubercle 3.5 months later when he was playing the basketball. From the encouragement of previous successful treatment, we provided him open reduction and fixation with two small-caliber screws. He recovered uneventfully and returned to his previous level of activity soon. No genu recurvatum or other deformity was happening in our case at the end of 2-year follow-up. No evidence of Osgood-Schlatter disease or osteogenesis imperfecta was found. Sequential avulsion fractures of tibial tubercles are rare. Good functional recovery can often be obtained like our case if we treat it well. To a physically active adolescent, we should never overstate the risk of sequential avulsion of the other leg to postpone the return to an active, functional life.

  10. Coordination and variability in the elite female tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, David; Elliott, Bruce Clifford; Lay, Brendan; Reid, Machar

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the understanding of coordination and variability in the tennis serve may be of interest to coaches as they work with players to improve performance. The current study examined coordinated joint rotations and variability in the lower limbs, trunk, serving arm and ball location in the elite female tennis serve. Pre-pubescent, pubescent and adult players performed maximal effort flat serves while a 22-camera 500 Hz motion analysis system captured three-dimensional body kinematics. Coordinated joint rotations in the lower limbs and trunk appeared most consistent at the time players left the ground, suggesting that they coordinate the proximal elements of the kinematic chain to ensure that they leave the ground at a consistent time, in a consistent posture. Variability in the two degrees of freedom at the elbow became significantly greater closer to impact in adults, possibly illustrating the mechanical adjustments (compensation) these players employed to manage the changing impact location from serve to serve. Despite the variable ball toss, the temporal composition of the serve was highly consistent and supports previous assertions that players use the location of the ball to regulate their movement. Future work should consider these associations in other populations, while coaches may use the current findings to improve female serve performance. PMID:25358037

  11. Left-Handedness in Professional and Amateur Tennis

    PubMed Central

    Loffing, Florian; Hagemann, Norbert; Strauss, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent effects rather than innate predispositions may provide left-handers with an advantage in one-on-one fighting situations. Support mainly comes from cross-sectional studies which found significantly enhanced left-hander frequencies among elite athletes exclusively in interactive sports such as baseball, cricket, fencing and tennis. Since professional athletes’ training regimes continuously improve, however, an important unsolved question is whether the left-handers’ advantage in individual sports like tennis persists over time. To this end, we longitudinally tracked left-hander frequencies in year-end world rankings (men: 1973–2011, ladies: 1975–2011) and at Grand Slam tournaments (1968–2011) in male and female tennis professionals. Here we show that the positive impact of left-handed performance on high achievement in elite tennis was moderate and decreased in male professionals over time and was almost absent in female professionals. For both sexes, left-hander frequencies among year-end top 10 players linearly decreased over the period considered. Moreover, left-handedness was, however, no longer seems associated with higher probability of attaining high year-end world ranking position in male professionals. In contrast, cross-sectional data on left-hander frequencies in male and female amateur players suggest that a left-handers’ advantage may still occur on lower performance levels. Collectively, our data is in accordance with the frequency-dependent hypothesis since reduced experience with left-handers in tennis is likely to be compensated by players’ professionalism. PMID:23145151

  12. Effect of carbohydrate supplementation on the physiological and perceptual responses to prolonged tennis match play.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rodrigo V; Moreira, Alexandre; Coutts, Aaron J; Capitani, Caroline D; Aoki, Marcelo S

    2014-03-01

    Carbohydrate supplementation is a popular nutritional practice used in tennis to enhance physical capacities, motor-skill performance, and delay fatigue. However, the effects of carbohydrate supplementation on physiological and perceptual responses during tennis match play are not established. This double blind, randomized, placebo (PLA)-controlled crossover study was designed to determine the influence of carbohydrate supplementation (0.5 g·kg·h) on glycemia, salivary hormones (cortisol and testosterone) concentration, salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentration, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during 3 hours of tennis match play in 12 well-trained tennis players. The only significant difference between the 2 conditions was a lower salivary cortisol concentration postmatch in the carbohydrate trial (p < 0.05); however, there was a trend for higher glucose concentration (p = 0.06) and lower session-RPE (p = 0.08) after tennis match play in the carbohydrate condition, which may have some practical implications. There was no change in salivary testosterone, salivary IgA, and RPE responses during tennis match play between conditions (p > 0.05). These data indicate that carbohydrate ingestion during 3 hours of competitive tennis match play helps to maintain glycemia and attenuates the increase in salivary cortisol concentration compared with PLA.

  13. Indicators of throwing arm fatigue in elite adolescent male baseball players: a randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Freeston, Jonathan; Adams, Roger; Ferdinands, René E D; Rooney, Kieron

    2014-08-01

    Throwing carries an inherent risk of injury that worsens in the presence of arm fatigue. The purpose of this study was to identify markers that could facilitate the early detection of this type of fatigue, by comparing the response to bouts of throwing-specific and running-based exercise. Thirteen elite junior male baseball players were tested twice, 7 days apart with a randomized crossover design. They were assessed for shoulder proprioception, maximal throwing velocity, and throwing accuracy before and after a 10-minute bout of either throwing-specific (THROW) or general (RUN) exercise. Maximal throwing velocity was reduced similarly after both THROW and RUN bouts (-1.0 ± 0.4 vs. -0.6 ± 0.2 m·s-1, respectively; p ≤ 0.05); however, accuracy was only reduced after THROW (7.6 ± 3.4 cm; p ≤ 0.05). Arm soreness increased significantly more after THROW than RUN (3.5 ± 0.7 vs. 1.4 ± 0.5 km·h-1, respectively; p ≤ 0.05). Shoulder proprioception did not change after either exercise bout. The results suggest that throwing velocity is an indicator of general fatigue, whereas throwing accuracy and arm soreness are markers of arm fatigue. Shoulder proprioception does not seem to be a sensitive marker of either type of fatigue. Throwing velocity should be monitored to gauge overall fatigue levels, whereas accuracy and arm soreness should be closely monitored to gauge arm fatigue and throwing-induced injury risk. PMID:24513620

  14. Indicators of throwing arm fatigue in elite adolescent male baseball players: a randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Freeston, Jonathan; Adams, Roger; Ferdinands, René E D; Rooney, Kieron

    2014-08-01

    Throwing carries an inherent risk of injury that worsens in the presence of arm fatigue. The purpose of this study was to identify markers that could facilitate the early detection of this type of fatigue, by comparing the response to bouts of throwing-specific and running-based exercise. Thirteen elite junior male baseball players were tested twice, 7 days apart with a randomized crossover design. They were assessed for shoulder proprioception, maximal throwing velocity, and throwing accuracy before and after a 10-minute bout of either throwing-specific (THROW) or general (RUN) exercise. Maximal throwing velocity was reduced similarly after both THROW and RUN bouts (-1.0 ± 0.4 vs. -0.6 ± 0.2 m·s-1, respectively; p ≤ 0.05); however, accuracy was only reduced after THROW (7.6 ± 3.4 cm; p ≤ 0.05). Arm soreness increased significantly more after THROW than RUN (3.5 ± 0.7 vs. 1.4 ± 0.5 km·h-1, respectively; p ≤ 0.05). Shoulder proprioception did not change after either exercise bout. The results suggest that throwing velocity is an indicator of general fatigue, whereas throwing accuracy and arm soreness are markers of arm fatigue. Shoulder proprioception does not seem to be a sensitive marker of either type of fatigue. Throwing velocity should be monitored to gauge overall fatigue levels, whereas accuracy and arm soreness should be closely monitored to gauge arm fatigue and throwing-induced injury risk.

  15. Aging and Tennis Playing in a Coincidence-Timing Task with an Accelerating Object: The Role of Visuomotor Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobjois, Regis; Benguigui, Nicolas; Bertsch, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether playing a specific ball sport, such as tennis, could maintain the coincidence-timing (CT) performance of older adults at a similar level to that of younger ones. To address this question, tennis players and nonplayers of three different age ranges (ages 20-30, 60-70, and 70-80 years)…

  16. The effect of a volleyball practice on anabolic hormones and inflammatory markers in elite male and female adolescent players.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, Alon; Portal, Shawn; Zadik, Zvi; Rabinowitz, Jonathan; Adler-Portal, Dana; Cooper, Dan M; Zaldivar, Frank; Nemet, Dan

    2009-08-01

    The effect of a single exercise as well as exercise training on the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) axis and inflammatory cytokines was studied mainly in adults participating in individualized endurance-type sports. The gender-specific effect of exercise on these systems in adolescents is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a typical volleyball practice on anabolic (GH, IGF-I, and testosterone) and catabolic hormones (cortisol) and inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 [IL-6]) in elite, national team level, male (n = 14) and female (n = 13) adolescent volleyball players (13-18 years, Tanner stage 4-5). Exercise consisted of a typical 1-hour volleyball practice. Blood samples were collected before and immediately after the practice. Exercise led to significant increases in GH (0.2 +/- 0.1 to 2.7 +/- 0.7 and 1.7 +/- 0.5 to 6.4 +/- 1.4 ng x mL, in men and women, respectively, p < 0.05 for both), testosterone (6.1 +/- 0.9 to 7.3 +/- 1.0 and 2.4 +/- 0.6 to 3.3 +/- 0.7 ng x mL, in men and women, respectively, p < 0.05 for both), and IL-6 (1.1 +/- 0.6 to 3.1 +/- 1.5 and 1.2 +/- 0.5 to 2.5 +/- 1.1 pg x mL, in men and women, respectively, p < 0.002 for both). Exercise had no significant effect on IGF-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, and cortisol levels. There were no gender differences in the hormonal response to training. Changes in GH and testosterone after the volleyball practice suggest exercise-related anabolic adaptations. The increase in IL-6 may indicate its important role in muscle tissue repair. These changes may serve as an objective quantitative tool to monitor training intensity in unique occasions in team sports.

  17. Management of tennis elbow

    PubMed Central

    Chesterton, Linda S; Mallen, Christian D; Hay, Elaine M

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question What is the best treatment for tennis elbow? Results Despite a wealth of research, there is no true consensus on the most efficacious management of tennis elbow especially for effective long-term outcomes. Corticosteroid injections do show large pain-relieving effects in the short term but are associated with risks of adverse events and long-term reoccurrence. Advice with a “wait and see” approach is recommended as the first-line treatment in primary care for most cases. In the medium term physiotherapy and or low-level laser therapy may be effective. Implementation Rule out alternative diagnosis. Onward referral may be indicated if the condition does not resolve after 12 months. PMID:24198571

  18. Teaching and Coaching Tennis Using System 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfrich, Janet

    2006-01-01

    The United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA) has developed a universal language for tennis instruction entitled System 5: The Five Keys to Tennis, which is extremely easy to teach and learn and covers court positioning, strategy, and stroke selection. Many professional tennis instructors have used System 5 since its inception but…

  19. The physiological cost of velocity coupling during tennis groundstrokes.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Karl; Davey, Polly R

    2007-05-01

    Velocity coupling denotes a perceptual motor behaviour known to occur during coincidence timing tasks. Individuals have been shown to increase their effector limb speed with increases in stimulus speed during interceptive tasks. However, little is known about the physiological effects of velocity coupling. The aim of this study was to determine the physiological cost of velocity coupling during tennis groundstrokes. Eight male and eight female competitive tennis players volunteered to perform three 4-min bouts of continuous groundstrokes against balls projected from a tennis ball machine at speeds of 18, 22, and 27 m x s(-1) (65, 79, and 97 km x h(-1)) and a frequency of 14 balls per minute, the order of which was counterbalanced. Breath-by-breath pulmonary gas exchange, heart rate, locomotion time, and limb acceleration were measured throughout each of the 4-min bouts. Capillary blood samples (for blood lactate analysis), rating of perceived exertion, and difficulty rating were taken at the end of each bout. Increasing ball speed did not influence the locomotion time between groundstrokes but did result in a bilateral increase in both the mean upper- and lower-limb acceleration (all P < 0.05). Velocity coupling behaviour increased oxygen uptake, blood lactate concentration, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, and perceived task difficulty (all P < 0.05). It would appear, therefore, that velocity coupling influenced tennis groundstroke behaviour and indirectly modified the concurrent cardiopulmonary and metabolic responses. PMID:17454549

  20. Perception of Kinematic Characteristics of Tennis Strokes for Anticipating Stroke Type and Direction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Jaeho; Carlton, Les G.; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the sources of visual information used by highly skilled tennis players in anticipating their opponent's shots. In Experiment 1, motion analysis of the strokes showed that the relative motion between the racquet and forearm was different between the ground strokes and lobs, but there were no reliable…

  1. Teaching Tennis for Net Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Bryce

    1989-01-01

    A program for teaching tennis to beginners, NET (Net Easy Teaching) is described. The program addresses three common needs shared by tennis students: active involvement in hitting the ball, clearing the net, and positive reinforcement. A sample lesson plan is included. (IAH)

  2. A Preliminary Investigation Regarding the Effect of Tennis Grunting: Does White Noise During a Tennis Shot Have a Negative Impact on Shot Perception?

    PubMed Central

    Sinnett, Scott; Kingstone, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a growing chorus of critics who complain that many of the top-ranked professional tennis players who grunt when they hit the ball gain an unfair advantage because the sound of the grunt interferes with their opponent's game. However, there is no scientific evidence to support this claim. Methodology/Principal Findings We explored this potential detrimental effect of grunting by presenting videos of a tennis player hitting a ball to either side of a tennis court; the shot either did, or did not, contain a brief sound that occurred at the same time as contact. The participants' task was to respond as quickly as possible, indicating whether the ball was being hit to the left- or right-side of the court. The results were unequivocal: The presence of an extraneous sound interfered with a participants' performance, making their responses both slower and less accurate. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that a grunting player has a competitive edge on the professional tennis tour. The mechanism that underlies this effect is a topic for future investigation. Viable alternatives are discussed. For example, the possibility that the interfering auditory stimulus masks the sound of the ball being struck by the racket or it distracts an opponent's attention away from the sound of the ball. PMID:20957210

  3. Mechanism of Tennis Racket Spin Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Yoshihiko; Okimoto, Kenji; Okimoto, Keiko

    Players often say that some strings provide a better grip and more spin than others, but ball spin did not depend on string type, gauge, or tension in pervious laboratory experiments. There was no research work on spin to uncover what is really happening during an actual tennis impact because of the difficulty of performing the appropriate experiments. The present paper clarified the mechanism of top spin and its improvement by lubrication of strings through the use of high-speed video analysis. It also provided a more detailed explanation of spin behavior by comparing a racket with lubricated strings with the famous “spaghetti” strung racket, which was banned in 1978 by the International Tennis Federation because it used plastic spaghetti tubing over the strings to reduce friction, resulting in excessive ball spin. As the main strings stretch and slide sideways more, the ball is given additional spin due to the restoring force parallel to the string face when the main strings spring back and the ball is released from the strings. Herein, we also showed that the additional spin results in a reduction of shock vibrations of the wrist joint during impact.

  4. Learning strategies in table tennis using inverse reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Muelling, Katharina; Boularias, Abdeslam; Mohler, Betty; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Peters, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Learning a complex task such as table tennis is a challenging problem for both robots and humans. Even after acquiring the necessary motor skills, a strategy is needed to choose where and how to return the ball to the opponent's court in order to win the game. The data-driven identification of basic strategies in interactive tasks, such as table tennis, is a largely unexplored problem. In this paper, we suggest a computational model for representing and inferring strategies, based on a Markov decision problem, where the reward function models the goal of the task as well as the strategic information. We show how this reward function can be discovered from demonstrations of table tennis matches using model-free inverse reinforcement learning. The resulting framework allows to identify basic elements on which the selection of striking movements is based. We tested our approach on data collected from players with different playing styles and under different playing conditions. The estimated reward function was able to capture expert-specific strategic information that sufficed to distinguish the expert among players with different skill levels as well as different playing styles.

  5. Learning strategies in table tennis using inverse reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Muelling, Katharina; Boularias, Abdeslam; Mohler, Betty; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Peters, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Learning a complex task such as table tennis is a challenging problem for both robots and humans. Even after acquiring the necessary motor skills, a strategy is needed to choose where and how to return the ball to the opponent's court in order to win the game. The data-driven identification of basic strategies in interactive tasks, such as table tennis, is a largely unexplored problem. In this paper, we suggest a computational model for representing and inferring strategies, based on a Markov decision problem, where the reward function models the goal of the task as well as the strategic information. We show how this reward function can be discovered from demonstrations of table tennis matches using model-free inverse reinforcement learning. The resulting framework allows to identify basic elements on which the selection of striking movements is based. We tested our approach on data collected from players with different playing styles and under different playing conditions. The estimated reward function was able to capture expert-specific strategic information that sufficed to distinguish the expert among players with different skill levels as well as different playing styles. PMID:24756167

  6. The development of fatigue during match-play tennis

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Machar; Duffield, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Data describing the activity profile and physiological characteristics of tennis match-play are extensive. However, these data have generally provided descriptive accounts of the one-off match-play of amateur or lowly ranked professional players lasting <3 h. Accordingly, these research efforts have likely failed to fully capture the demands of Grand Slam tennis match-play, particularly in the men's game where matches can last >5 h. Furthermore, there is a distinct lack of evidence-based insight regarding the manifestation of fatigue within and between tennis matches, notwithstanding that skeletal muscle function has been reported to reduce following prolonged match-play. Moreover, it is evident that match-play evokes pronounced and prolonged physiological, neuromuscular and psychological perturbations that may be exacerbated with consecutive days of match-play. Separate to these internal load responses, a collection of non-uniform movement and technical performance changes are reported, though rarely from match-play data. Consequently, direct or causal links between altered physiological or muscle contractile function and subsequent match-play outcomes are lacking. Indeed, emerging evidence seems to infer that players adjust their game strategy, and the resultant execution of stroke play, to accommodate any such deterioration in physiological function. The purpose of this review was to discuss the available literature in terms of the physiological, mechanical and psychological responses that occur during prolonged match-play in the context of their likely effect on match-play performance. PMID:24668384

  7. Effects of a 6-week junior tennis conditioning program on service velocity.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Ellenbecker, Todd; Sanz-Rivas, David; Ulbricht, Alexander; Ferrautia, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a 6-week strength-training program on serve velocity in youth tennis players. Thirty competitive healthy and nationally ranked male junior tennis players (13 years of age) were randomly and equally divided into control and training groups. The training group performed 3 sessions (60-70 min) weekly for 6 weeks, comprising core strength, elastic resistance and medicine ball exercises. Both groups (control and training) also performed a supervised stretching routine at the end of each training session, during the 6 week intervention. Service velocity, service accuracy and shoulder internal/external rotation were assessed initially and at the end of the 6-week conditioning program for both, control and training groups. There was a significant improvement in the serve velocity for the training group (p = 0. 0001) after the intervention, whereas in the control group there were no differences between pre and post-tests (p = 0.29). Serve accuracy was not affected in the training group (p = 0.10), nor in the control group (p = 0.15). Shoulder internal/external rotation ROM significantly improved in both groups, training (p = 0.001) and control (p = 0.0001). The present results showed that a short- term training program for young tennis players, using minimum equipment and effort, can result in improved tennis performance (i.e., serve velocity) and a reduction in the risk of a possible overuse injury, reflected by an improvement in shoulder external/internal range of motion. Key PointsA short-term training program for young tennis players, using minimum equipment and effort, can result in improved tennis performance and a reduction in the risk of a possible overuse injury, reflected by an improvement in shoulder external/internal range of motionA combination of core stabilization, elastic resistance exercises, and upper body plyometric exercises (i.e., medicine ball throws), focussing on the primary muscle groups and stabilizers involved in

  8. Effects of A 6-Week Junior Tennis Conditioning Program on Service Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Ellenbecker, Todd; Sanz-Rivas, david; Ulbricht, Alexander; Ferrautia, lexander

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a 6-week strength-training program on serve velocity in youth tennis players. Thirty competitive healthy and nationally ranked male junior tennis players (13 years of age) were randomly and equally divided into control and training groups. The training group performed 3 sessions (60-70 min) weekly for 6 weeks, comprising core strength, elastic resistance and medicine ball exercises. Both groups (control and training) also performed a supervised stretching routine at the end of each training session, during the 6 week intervention. Service velocity, service accuracy and shoulder internal/external rotation were assessed initially and at the end of the 6-week conditioning program for both, control and training groups. There was a significant improvement in the serve velocity for the training group (p = 0. 0001) after the intervention, whereas in the control group there were no differences between pre and post-tests (p = 0.29). Serve accuracy was not affected in the training group (p = 0.10), nor in the control group (p = 0.15). Shoulder internal/external rotation ROM significantly improved in both groups, training (p = 0.001) and control (p = 0.0001). The present results showed that a short- term training program for young tennis players, using minimum equipment and effort, can result in improved tennis performance (i.e., serve velocity) and a reduction in the risk of a possible overuse injury, reflected by an improvement in shoulder external/internal range of motion. Key Points A short-term training program for young tennis players, using minimum equipment and effort, can result in improved tennis performance and a reduction in the risk of a possible overuse injury, reflected by an improvement in shoulder external/internal range of motion A combination of core stabilization, elastic resistance exercises, and upper body plyometric exercises (i.e., medicine ball throws), focussing on the primary muscle groups and stabilizers involved

  9. Biomechanical Analysis of Abdominal Injury in Tennis Serves. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tubez, François; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Cordonnier, Caroline; Brüls, Olivier; Denoël, Vincent; Berwart, Gilles; Joris, Maurice; Grosdent, Stéphanie; Schwartz, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    The serve is an important stroke in any high level tennis game. A well-mastered serve is a substantial advantage for players. However, because of its repeatability and its intensity, this stroke is potentially deleterious for upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk. The trunk is a vital link in the production and transfer of energy from the lower limbs to the upper limbs; therefore, kinematic disorder could be a potential source of risk for trunk injury in tennis. This research studies the case of a professional tennis player who has suffered from a medical tear on the left rectus abdominis muscle after tennis serve. The goal of the study is to understand whether the injury could be explained by an inappropriate technique. For this purpose, we analyzed in three dimensions the kinematic and kinetic aspects of the serve. We also performed isokinetic tests of the player’s knees. We then compared the player to five other professional players as reference. We observed a possible deficit of energy transfer because of an important anterior pelvis tilt. Some compensation made by the player during the serve could be a possible higher abdominal contraction and a larger shoulder external rotation. These particularities could induce an abdominal overwork that could explain the first injury and may provoke further injuries. Key points In the proximal-distal sequence, energy is transmitted from lower limbs to upper limps via trunk. The 3D analysis tool is an indispensable test for an objective evaluation of the kinematic in the tennis serve. Multiple evaluations techniques are useful for fuller comprehension of the kinematics and contribute to the awareness of the player’s staff concerning pathologies and performance. PMID:25983591

  10. Infrared observations of the mechanical performance of tennis strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Minh Phong

    2001-03-01

    The paper aims to illustrate three advantages of infrared thermography as a non-destructive, non-contact and real time technique (a) to detect the occurrence of intrinsic dissipation localization, (b) to observe the progressive damage processes and mechanisms of tennis string failure, and (c) to determine the optimal tension for each type of string. Experimental results evidence a limit of acceptable damage beyond which strings will fail due to the coalescence of defects and/or weakness zones. In addition, owing to the thermomechanical coupling, this technique provides a simple means for evaluating the wear resistance of strings of interest for skilled tennis players who impart on the ball a great amount of spin combined with a high stroke velocity.

  11. Hydration and thermal strain during tennis in the heat

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Competitive tennis in the heat can prompt substantial sweat losses and extensive consequent body water and electrolyte deficits, as well as a level of thermal strain that considerably challenges a player's physiology, perception of effort, and on-court well-being and performance. Adequate hydration and optimal performance can be notably difficult to maintain when multiple same-day matches are played on successive days in hot weather. Despite the recognised effects of the heat, much more research needs to be carried out to better appreciate the broader scope and full extent of the physiological demands and hydration and thermal strain challenges facing junior and adult players in various environments, venues and competition scenarios. However, certain recommendations of best practices should be emphasised to minimise exertional heat illness risk and improve player safety, well-being and on-court performance. PMID:24668373

  12. Applied physiology of tennis performance

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, M S

    2006-01-01

    Competitive tennis play requires a combination of the major physiological variables; however, the specifics of these variables have yet to be determined appropriately. General strength and flexibility training have been suggested as being beneficial for performance and injury prevention, yet specific guidelines are lacking. This paper provides a review of specific studies that relate to competitive tennis, and highlights the need for tennis‐specific training as opposed to generalised physical training. It identifies specific studies that support the premise that tennis has physiological requirements which need to be understood when designing training and research programmes. PMID:16632565

  13. A one-season prospective study of injuries and illness in elite junior tennis.

    PubMed

    Pluim, B M; Loeffen, F G J; Clarsen, B; Bahr, R; Verhagen, E A L M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence and prevalence of injury and illness among elite junior tennis players. A cohort of 73 players (11-14 years) in the 2012-2013 Dutch national high-performance program was followed for 32 weeks; all participants completed the study. The OSTRC Questionnaire on Health Problems was used to record self-reported injuries and illnesses and to record training and match exposure. Main outcome measures were average prevalence of overuse injury and illness and incidence density of acute injury. On average, players practiced 9.1 h/week (SD 0.6; range 2.3-12.0) and had 2.2 h of match play (SD 0.6; range 2.3-12.0). During the course of the study, 67 players reported a total of 187 health problems. The average weekly prevalence of all health problems was 21.3% (95% CI: 19.2-22.9), of which 12.1% (95% CI: 10.9-13.3) constituted overuse injuries and 5.8% (95% CI: 4.6-6.9) illnesses. The incidence of acute injuries was 1.2/1000 h of tennis play (95% CI: 0.7-1.7). The high occurrence of overuse injuries among elite junior tennis players suggests that an early focus on preventative measures is warranted, with a particular focus on the monitoring and management of workload.

  14. Epidemiology of tennis injuries: An eight-year review of Davis Cup retirements.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Baglione, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Tennis practice, especially at elite levels, may place players at risk for debilitating musculoskeletal injuries. The aim of this study was to analyse the epidemiological pattern of retirements due to medical conditions sustained by tennis players during Davis Cup matches in the 2006-2013 period. All uncompleted matches due to a medical condition (injuries and illnesses) occurred in the above-mentioned competition were collected from the official source, registered and analysed according to published guidelines. The overall incidence of match retirements was 1.66% (12/719). The injury rate was 6.05/1000 playing hours; and 6.64/1000 match exposures. Musculotendinous lesions were the most common type of injury (66.66%). The incidence of lower-limb injuries was higher than upper-limb and trunk lesions. The incidence of retired matches due to medical conditions was higher in hard courts than in clay courts (2.97% and 0.90%, respectively; p = 0.04), while the median value of inactivity of injuries was 32.0 days (range 3-297). In conclusion, the incidence of retirements due to medical conditions in Davis Cup matches was low supporting the assumption that elite tennis is a low-risk sport activity. Findings provided scientific evidences of injury patterns among male professional tennis players and may contribute to conduct better injury prevention strategies. PMID:25675134

  15. Epidemiology of tennis injuries: An eight-year review of Davis Cup retirements.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Baglione, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Tennis practice, especially at elite levels, may place players at risk for debilitating musculoskeletal injuries. The aim of this study was to analyse the epidemiological pattern of retirements due to medical conditions sustained by tennis players during Davis Cup matches in the 2006-2013 period. All uncompleted matches due to a medical condition (injuries and illnesses) occurred in the above-mentioned competition were collected from the official source, registered and analysed according to published guidelines. The overall incidence of match retirements was 1.66% (12/719). The injury rate was 6.05/1000 playing hours; and 6.64/1000 match exposures. Musculotendinous lesions were the most common type of injury (66.66%). The incidence of lower-limb injuries was higher than upper-limb and trunk lesions. The incidence of retired matches due to medical conditions was higher in hard courts than in clay courts (2.97% and 0.90%, respectively; p = 0.04), while the median value of inactivity of injuries was 32.0 days (range 3-297). In conclusion, the incidence of retirements due to medical conditions in Davis Cup matches was low supporting the assumption that elite tennis is a low-risk sport activity. Findings provided scientific evidences of injury patterns among male professional tennis players and may contribute to conduct better injury prevention strategies.

  16. Effects of sports drinks on the maintenance of physical performance during 3 tennis matches: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tennis tournaments often involve playing several consecutive matches interspersed with short periods of recovery. Objective The objective of this study was firstly to assess the impact of several successive tennis matches on the physical performance of competitive players and secondly to evaluate the potential of sports drinks to minimize the fatigue induced by repeated matches. Methods This was a crossover, randomized controlled study. Eight male regionally-ranked tennis players participated in this study. Players underwent a series of physical tests to assess their strength, speed, power and endurance following the completion of three tennis matches each of two hours duration played over three consecutive half-days (1.5 day period for each condition). In the first condition the players consumed a sports drink before, during and after each match; in the second, they drank an identical volume of placebo water. The results obtained were compared with the third ‘rest’ condition in which the subjects did not play any tennis. Main outcomes measured were maximal isometric strength and fatigability of knee and elbow extensors, 20-m sprint speed, jumping height, specific repeated sprint ability test and hand grip strength. Results The physical test results for the lower limbs showed no significant differences between the three conditions. Conversely, on the upper limbs the EMG data showed greater fatigue of the triceps brachii in the placebo condition compared to the rest condition, while the ingestion of sports drinks attenuated this fatigue. Conclusions This study has demonstrated for the first time that, when tennis players are adequately hydrated and ingest balanced meals between matches, then no large drop in physical performance is observed even during consecutive competitive matches. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01353872. PMID:25302057

  17. The Whys of Teaching Tennis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Brett R.; Brusseau, Timothy A.; Hannon, James C.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the importance of clearly defining tennis terms and explaining the reasons behind certain techniques so that students will learn and apply the material taught and enjoy the game more fully. (Contains 4 figures.)

  18. Data logger device applicability for wheelchair tennis court movement.

    PubMed

    Sindall, Paul; Lenton, John; Cooper, Rory; Tolfrey, Keith; Goosey-Tolfrey, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of movement logging devices is required to ensure suitability for the determination of court-movement variables during competitive sports performance and allow for practical recommendations to be made. Hence, the purpose was to examine wheelchair tennis speed profiles to assess data logger device applicability for court-movement quantification, with match play stratified by rank (HIGH, LOW), sex (male, female) and format (singles, doubles). Thirty-one wheelchair tennis players were monitored during competitive match play. Mixed sampling was employed (male = 23, female = 8). Friedman's test with Wilcoxon signed-rank post hoc testing revealed a higher percentage of time below 2.5 m · s(-1) [<2.5 vs. ≥2.5 m · s(-1): 89.4 (5.0) vs. 1.2 (3.5)%, Z = -4.860, P < 0.0005, r = 0.87] with the remaining time [9.0 (4.9%)] spent stationary. LOW-ranked players were stationary for longer than HIGH-ranked counterparts [12.6 (8.7) vs. 8.2 (5.1)%, U = 30.000, P = 0.011, r = 0.46] with more time at low propulsion speeds (<1.0 m · s(-1)). HIGH-ranked and doubles players spent more time in higher speed zones than respective counterparts. Females spent more time in the 1.0-1.49 m · s(-1) zone (U = 48.000, P = 0.047, r = 0.36). Regardless of rank, sex or format, propulsion speeds during wheelchair tennis match play are consistent with data logger accuracy. Hence, data logging is appropriate for court-movement quantification. PMID:25278114

  19. Data logger device applicability for wheelchair tennis court movement.

    PubMed

    Sindall, Paul; Lenton, John; Cooper, Rory; Tolfrey, Keith; Goosey-Tolfrey, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of movement logging devices is required to ensure suitability for the determination of court-movement variables during competitive sports performance and allow for practical recommendations to be made. Hence, the purpose was to examine wheelchair tennis speed profiles to assess data logger device applicability for court-movement quantification, with match play stratified by rank (HIGH, LOW), sex (male, female) and format (singles, doubles). Thirty-one wheelchair tennis players were monitored during competitive match play. Mixed sampling was employed (male = 23, female = 8). Friedman's test with Wilcoxon signed-rank post hoc testing revealed a higher percentage of time below 2.5 m · s(-1) [<2.5 vs. ≥2.5 m · s(-1): 89.4 (5.0) vs. 1.2 (3.5)%, Z = -4.860, P < 0.0005, r = 0.87] with the remaining time [9.0 (4.9%)] spent stationary. LOW-ranked players were stationary for longer than HIGH-ranked counterparts [12.6 (8.7) vs. 8.2 (5.1)%, U = 30.000, P = 0.011, r = 0.46] with more time at low propulsion speeds (<1.0 m · s(-1)). HIGH-ranked and doubles players spent more time in higher speed zones than respective counterparts. Females spent more time in the 1.0-1.49 m · s(-1) zone (U = 48.000, P = 0.047, r = 0.36). Regardless of rank, sex or format, propulsion speeds during wheelchair tennis match play are consistent with data logger accuracy. Hence, data logging is appropriate for court-movement quantification.

  20. Deliberate practice predicts performance over time in adolescent chess players and drop-outs: a linear mixed models analysis.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Anique B H; Smits, Niels; Rikers, Remy M J P; Schmidt, Henk G

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the longitudinal relation between deliberate practice and performance in chess was examined using a linear mixed models analysis. The practice activities and performance ratings of young elite chess players, who were either in, or had dropped out of the Dutch national chess training, were analysed since they had started playing chess seriously. The results revealed that deliberate practice (i.e. serious chess study alone and serious chess play) strongly contributed to chess performance. The influence of deliberate practice was not only observable in current performance, but also over chess players' careers. Moreover, although the drop-outs' chess ratings developed more slowly over time, both the persistent and drop-out chess players benefited to the same extent from investments in deliberate practice. Finally, the effect of gender on chess performance proved to be much smaller than the effect of deliberate practice. This study provides longitudinal support for the monotonic benefits assumption of deliberate practice, by showing that over chess players' careers, deliberate practice has a significant effect on performance, and to the same extent for chess players of different ultimate performance levels. The results of this study are not in line with critique raised against the deliberate practice theory that the factors deliberate practice and talent could be confounded. PMID:18433518

  1. The contribution of stretch-shortening cycle and arm-swing to vertical jumping performance in children, adolescents, and adult basketball players.

    PubMed

    Gerodimos, Vassilis; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Perkos, Stefanos; Dipla, Konstantina; Manou, Vassiliki; Kellis, Spiros

    2008-11-01

    This study examined from childhood to adulthood: (1) the effects of countermovement (use of stretch-shortening cycle-SSC) and arm-swing (AS) on vertical jumping (VJ) performance and (2) the ability to use the SSC and AS during VJ. Male basketball players (n = 106) were divided according to their age into: children (12.0 +/- 0.23), young adolescents (14.5 +/- 0.41), old adolescents (16.9 +/- 0.27), and adults (21.9 +/- 0.32). Each participant executed three maximal squat jumps (SJ), countermovement jumps without arms (CMJ) and with arms (CMJA). The contribution of SSC and AS was calculated by the augmentation (difference and percent change) in performance between CMJ and SJ, and CMJA and CMJ, respectively. CMJA performance was significantly (p < .05) higher than CMJ and SJ, and CMJ was higher than SJ within all age-groups. There were no significant differences (p > .05) among children, young and old adolescents, and adults in the percent contribution of SSC and AS to VJ performance. The variability in the contribution of SSC and AS to VJ performance was about twofold higher in children vs. adults. It appears that the ability to use the SSC and AS is not affected by the maturation process in males, trained in basketball.

  2. Relationship Between Motor Variability, Accuracy, and Ball Speed in the Tennis Serve

    PubMed Central

    Antúnez, Ruperto Menayo; Hernández, Francisco Javier Moreno; García, Juan Pedro Fuentes; Vaíllo, Raúl Reina; Arroyo, Jesús Sebastián Damas

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze the motor variability in the performance of the tennis serve and its relationship to performance outcome. Seventeen male tennis players took part in the research, and they performed 20 serves. Linear and non-linear variability during the hand movement was measured by 3D Motion Tracking. Ball speed was recorded with a sports radar gun and the ball bounces were video recorded to calculate accuracy. The results showed a relationship between the amount of variability and its non-linear structure found in performance of movement and the outcome of the serve. The study also found that movement predictability correlates with performance. An increase in the amount of movement variability could affect the tennis serve performance in a negative way by reducing speed and accuracy of the ball. PMID:23486998

  3. Effect of type 3 (oversize) tennis ball on serve performance and upper extremity muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, John; Knudson, Duane

    2002-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of the larger diameter (Type 3) tennis ball on performance and muscle activation in the serve. Sixteen male advanced tennis players performed serves using regular size and Type 3 tennis balls. Ball speed, surface electromyography, and serve accuracy were measured. There were no significant differences in mean initial serve speeds between balls, but accuracy was significantly greater (19.3%) with the Type 3 ball than with the regular ball. A consistent temporal sequence of muscle activation and significant differences in mean activation of different muscles were observed. However, ball type had no effect on mean arm muscle activation. These data, combined with a previous study, suggest that play with the larger ball is not likely to increase the risk of overuse injury, but serving accuracy may increase compared to play with the regular ball. PMID:14658375

  4. Competitive Performance Correlates of Mental Toughness in Tennis: A Preliminary Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Richard G

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated relationships between mental toughness and measures of competitive performance in tennis. Forty-three male (N = 25) and female (N = 18) players (M age = 13.6 years, SD = 2.4) completed the mental toughness inventory, and the point-by-point outcomes recorded during a competitive tennis match (singles) were used to generate performance indices for each athlete. The results indicated that mental toughness was associated with several, but not all, macro, micro, and critical moment performance indices. The findings suggest mental toughness may contribute to successful performance during tennis competition, although the importance of the construct appears to depend depend on specific match situations. Future mental toughness research should consider a range of factors related to sport performance, including athletes' and opponents' physical, technical, and tactical abilities. PMID:27502244

  5. Competitive Performance Correlates of Mental Toughness in Tennis: A Preliminary Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Richard G

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated relationships between mental toughness and measures of competitive performance in tennis. Forty-three male (N = 25) and female (N = 18) players (M age = 13.6 years, SD = 2.4) completed the mental toughness inventory, and the point-by-point outcomes recorded during a competitive tennis match (singles) were used to generate performance indices for each athlete. The results indicated that mental toughness was associated with several, but not all, macro, micro, and critical moment performance indices. The findings suggest mental toughness may contribute to successful performance during tennis competition, although the importance of the construct appears to depend depend on specific match situations. Future mental toughness research should consider a range of factors related to sport performance, including athletes' and opponents' physical, technical, and tactical abilities.

  6. Constrained layer damping of a tennis racket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Michael R.; Gopal, H. S.; Lai, Ming-Lai; Cheng, Po-Jen

    1996-05-01

    When a tennis ball strikes a racket the impact causes vibrations which are distracting and undesirable to the player. In this work a passive damping system used to reduce vibration is described. The damping system uses a viscoelastic material along with a stiff composite constraining layer which is molded on the inner surface of the tennis racket frame. When a ball strikes a racket with this damping system the vibration causes shearing strain in the viscoelastic material. This strain energy is partially dissipated by the viscoelastic material, thereby increasing the racket damping. An analysis of the design was performed by creating a solid CAD model of the racket using Pro/Engineer. A finite element mesh was created and the mesh was then exported to ANSYS for the finite element modal analysis. The technique used to determine the damping ratio is the modal strain energy method. Experimental testing using accelerometers was conducted to determine the natural frequency and the damping ratio of rackets with and without the damping system. The natural frequency of the finite element model was benchmarked to the experimental data and damping ratios were compared. The modal strain energy method was found to be a very effective means of determining the damping ratio, and the frequencies and damping ratios correlated well with the experimental data. Using this analysis method, the effectiveness of the damping ratio to the change in key variables can be studied, minimizing the need for prototypes. This method can be used to determine an optimum design by maximizing the damping ratio with minimal weight addition.

  7. Effects of Body Mass Index and Full Body Kinematics on Tennis Serve Speed

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Francis KH; Keung, Jackie HK; Lau, Newman ML; Ng, Douglas KS; Chung, Joanne WY; Chow, Daniel HK

    2014-01-01

    Effective training to improve serve speed is important for competitive tennis players. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of anthropometric factors and whole body kinematics of elite players on ball speed and to propose possible training strategies for improving the quality of tennis serves. Body and racket kinematics of tennis serves of 12 male elite Hong Kong players were investigated. The tennis serve was divided into four phases: I) Back-Swing Phase, II) Lead-Leg-Drive Phase, III) Forward-Swing Phase, and IV) Follow-Through Phase. It was shown that racket-side knee range of motion during phases II and III (r=0.705; p<0.05), racket-side knee peak extension velocity during phase II (r=0.751; p<0.01), racket-side hip peak extension velocity during phase II (r=0.657; p<0.05), racket-side shoulder range of motion in the coronal plane during phase III (r=0.616; p<0.05), racket-side elbow peak extension velocity during phase III (r=0.708; p<0.01) and body mass index (r=0.577; p<0.05) were significantly correlated with ball speed. Body mass index and the identified kinematic parameters that were significantly correlated with ball speed could be used as training guidelines for coaches and players to improve serve speed. Players should pay particular attention in training to increasing the extension velocity and range of motion of the identified joints. PMID:25031669

  8. Validity of critical frequency test for measuring table tennis aerobic endurance through specific protocol

    PubMed Central

    Zagatto, Alessandro M.; Papoti, Marcelo; Gobatto, Claudio A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate critical frequency specific test (critf) for the estimation of the aerobic endurance in table tennis players. Methods: Eight male international-level table tennis players participated of this study. Specific tests were applied by using a mechanical ball thrower to control the intensity of the exercise. The critf was determined by applying three or four series of exercises to exhaustion (Tlim). The critf was evaluated by using lactate steady state test (90, 100, and 106 % of critf intensity). The other specific test was an incremental protocol used to determine the anaerobic threshold (AnTBI) and the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA) using a ball thrower. Results: The critf (39.87 ± 3.31 balls·min-1) was not significantly different among AnTBI (48.11 ± 7.36 balls·min- 1) and OBLA3.5 (49.36 ± 12.04 balls·min-1) frequencies and it was correlated with AnTBI parameter (r = 0.78). At frequencies of the 90 and 100% of critf a dynamic equilibrium was verified in lactate concentration between the eighth and twentieth minutes. However, this dynamic equilibrium was not found at 106% intensity. Conclusion: The data indicate that in table tennis the critf model can be used for measuring the aerobic endurance. Key pointsIn table tennis is need the use of a specific protocol for evaluation of the aerobic endurance.The critical frequency test in table tennis seems to represent the intensity of maximal equilibrium of lactatemia.The critical frequency test can be used for measuring table tennis aerobic endurance through specific protocol. PMID:24149951

  9. Tennis elbow. Anatomical, epidemiological and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Verhaar, J A

    1994-10-01

    Five studies of tennis elbow are presented. Epidemiological studies showed an incidence of tennis elbow between 1 and 2%. The prevalence of tennis elbow in women between 40 and 50 years of age was 10%. Half of the patients with tennis elbow seek medical attention. Local corticosteroid injections were superior to the physiotherapy regime of Cyriax. Release of the common forearm extensor origin resulted in 70% excellent or good results one year after operation and 89% at five years. Anatomical investigations and nerve conduction studies of the Radial Tunnel Syndrome supported the hypothesis that the Lateral Cubital Force Transmission System is involved in the pathogenesis of tennis elbow.

  10. Effects of string stiffness on muscle fatigue after a simulated tennis match.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Jean Bernard; Martin, Vincent; Borelli, Gil; Theurel, Jean; Grélot, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    We tested the influence of string stiffness on the occurrence of forearm muscle fatigue during a tennis match. Sixteen tennis players performed two prolonged simulated tennis matches with low-stiffness or high-stiffness string. Before and immediately after exercise, muscle fatigability was evaluated on the forearm muscles during a maximal intermittent gripping task. Groundstroke ball speeds and the profile of acceleration of the racquet frame at collision were recorded during each match. The peak-to-peak amplitude of acceleration and the resonant frequency of the frame were significantly greater with high- (5060 ± 1892 m/s(2) and 204 ± 29 Hz, respectively) than with low-stiffness string (4704 ± 1671 m/s(2) and 191 ± 16 Hz, respectively). The maximal and the averaged gripping forces developed during the gripping task were significantly reduced after the tennis match with high- (-15 ± 14%, and -22 ± 14%, respectively), but not with low-stiffness string. The decrease of ball speed during the simulated matches tended to be greater with high- than with low-stiffness string (P = .06). Hence, playing tennis with high-stiffness string promotes forearm muscle fatigue development, which could partly contribute to the groundstroke ball speed decrement during the game.

  11. High-intensity interval training vs. repeated-sprint training in tennis.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Zimek, Rico; Wiewelhove, Thimo; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and repeated-sprint training (RST) on aerobic fitness, tennis-specific endurance, linear and repeated-sprint ability (RSA), and jumping ability. Thirty-one competitive male tennis players took part in a training intervention of 6 weeks. The players were matched into 3 groups, HIIT (n = 11), RST (n = 12), or control group (CON, n = 9). The results showed significant time × intervention interactions for VO(2)peak, with a significant increase in the VO(2)peak level of 6.0% in HIIT (p = 0.008) and 4.9% in RST (p = 0.010), whereas no changes occurred in CON. However, the following differences were found between the intervention groups: The HIIT-induced greater improvements in tennis-specific endurance (HIIT 28.9% vs. RST 14.5%; p < 0.05) and RST led to a significant improvement in RSA (i.e., reduction in the mean sprint time of 3.8%; p < 0.05). Neither training strategy induced any effects on jumping and sprinting abilities. Both training interventions showed similar improvements in general aerobic fitness. Also, the present results suggest that RST represents a time-efficient stimulus for a simultaneous improvement of general and tennis-specific aerobic fitness as well for RSA.

  12. Does an eye-hand coordination test have added value as part of talent identification in table tennis? A validity and reproducibility study.

    PubMed

    Faber, Irene R; Oosterveld, Frits G J; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7-12 years) from national (n = 13), regional (n = 11) and local training centres (n = 19) participated. During the eye-hand coordination test, children needed to throw a ball against a vertical positioned table tennis table with one hand and to catch the ball correctly with the other hand as frequently as possible in 30 seconds. Four different test versions were assessed varying the distance to the table (1 or 2 meter) and using a tennis or table tennis ball. 'Within session' reproducibility was estimated for the two attempts of the initial tests and ten youngsters were retested after 4 weeks to estimate 'between sessions' reproducibility. Validity analyses using age as covariate showed that players from the national and regional centres scored significantly higher than players from the local centre in all test versions (p<0.05). The tests at 1 meter demonstrated better discriminative ability than those at 2 meter. While all tests but one had a positive significant association with competition outcome, which were corrected for age influences, the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter showed the highest association (r = 0.54; p = 0.001). Differences between the first and second attempts were comparable for all test versions (between -8 and +7 repetitions) with ICC's ranging from 0.72 to 0.87. The smallest differences were found for the test with a table tennis ball at 1 meter (between -3 and +3 repetitions). Best test version as part of talent identification appears to be the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter regarding the psychometric characteristics evaluated. Longitudinal studies are necessary to evaluate the predictive value of this test.

  13. Arthroscopic tennis elbow release.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Felix H; O'Brien, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Lateral epicondylitis, originally referred to as tennis elbow, affects between 1% and 3% of the population and is usually found in patients aged 35 to 50 years. Although it was initially thought that lateral epicondylitis was caused by an inflammatory process, most microscopic studies of excised tissue demonstrate a failure of reparative response in the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon and in any of the associated structures. Most cases of lateral epicondylitis respond to appropriate nonsurgical treatment protocols, which include medication, bracing, physical therapy, corticosteroid injections, shock wave therapy, platelet-rich plasma, and low-dose thermal or ultrasound ablation devices. However, when these protocols are unsuccessful, surgical measures may be appropriate and have a high rate of success. The results of arthroscopic surgical procedures have documented satisfactory results, with improvement rates reported between 91% and 97.7%. Recent advances in arthroscopic repair and plication of these lesions, along with recognizing the presence and repair of coexisting lesions, have allowed arthroscopic techniques to provide excellent results. PMID:25745908

  14. Arthroscopic tennis elbow release.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Felix H; VanSice, Wade; O'Brien, Michael J

    2010-03-01

    Lateral epicondylitis, originally referred to as "tennis elbow," affects between 1% and 3% of the population and is usually noted in patients aged between 35 and 50 years old. Although it was first thought lateral epicondylitis was caused by an inflammatory process, most microscopic studies of excised tissue demonstrate a failure of reparative response in the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon in any of these associated structures. Most cases of lateral epicondylitis respond to appropriate nonoperative treatment protocols. Nonoperative management includes medication, bracing, physical therapy, corticosteroid injections, shock wave therapy, platelet-rich plasma, and low-dose thermal ablation devices. When these are unsuccessful, however, surgical measures may be performed with a high rate of success. Satisfactory results of the arthroscopic surgical procedures have been documented, with reported improvement rates of 91% to 97.7%. The recent advances in arthroscopic repair and plication of these lesions, along with the recognition of the presence and repair of coexisting lesions, have allowed arthroscopic techniques to provide results superior to other measures. PMID:20188266

  15. Effects of the Five-step Strategy with videotape modeling on performance of the tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, L J; Singer, R N

    1998-06-01

    This study was designed to compare two methods of instructing Singer's Five-step Strategy and their effect on the learning and performance of a tennis serve. 63 university students classified as recreational tennis players were stratified by sex and then randomly assigned to one of three groups: Five-step Strategy with videotaped modeling, audiotape Five-step Strategy plus written transcript, or no strategy. Players performed seven blocks of 10 service attempts per block of serves. Points accumulated with each service attempt as well as the number of errors were the dependent measures. Separate 2-way analyses of variance were conducted for each phase of the study. No significant pretreatment differences were noted among groups. Further, all groups improved significantly across time on both dependent measures and maintained this improved performance on a subsequent retention test.

  16. Subject-specific computer simulation model for determining elbow loading in one-handed tennis backhand groundstrokes.

    PubMed

    King, Mark A; Glynn, Jonathan A; Mitchell, Sean R

    2011-11-01

    A subject-specific angle-driven computer model of a tennis player, combined with a forward dynamics, equipment-specific computer model of tennis ball-racket impacts, was developed to determine the effect of ball-racket impacts on loading at the elbow for one-handed backhand groundstrokes. Matching subject-specific computer simulations of a typical topspin/slice one-handed backhand groundstroke performed by an elite tennis player were done with root mean square differences between performance and matching simulations of < 0.5 degrees over a 50 ms period starting from ball impact. Simulation results suggest that for similar ball-racket impact conditions, the difference in elbow loading for a topspin and slice one-handed backhand groundstroke is relatively small. In this study, the relatively small differences in elbow loading may be due to comparable angle-time histories at the wrist and elbow joints with the major kinematic differences occurring at the shoulder. Using a subject-specific angle-driven computer model combined with a forward dynamics, equipment-specific computer model of tennis ball-racket impacts allows peak internal loading, net impulse, and shock due to ball-racket impact to be calculated which would not otherwise be possible without impractical invasive techniques. This study provides a basis for further investigation of the factors that may increase elbow loading during tennis strokes.

  17. Grunting in tennis increases ball velocity but not oxygen cost.

    PubMed

    Callison, Emily R; Berg, Kris E; Slivka, Dusting R

    2014-07-01

    Grunting is widely used by professional tennis players, but no research has been done to verify enhanced performance with grunting. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if grunting enhanced ball velocity in groundstrokes and secondly, to determine if grunting increased the physiological cost of hitting (VO2, HR, VE/VO2, and RPE). Participants were 10 members of the men's (n = 5) and women's (n = 5) tennis teams at a Division I university who had just completed their indoor competitive season. Two hitting sessions were used as players repetitively hit forehand and backhand shots while either grunting or not grunting. Each hitting session consisted of five 2-minute periods with a 1-minute break in between each period. Ball velocity was measured with a radar gun. During each hitting session, players wore a portable metabolic measuring unit. HR was monitored using a Polar monitor, and RPE was assessed using Borg's 6-20 scale. Grunting increased ball velocity (kph) 3.8% compared with non-grunting condition (p < 0.034) with the mean ± SD being 83.4 ± 0.6.1 and 80.3 ± 0.8.7, respectively. The physiological responses (VO2, HR, VE/VO2, and RPE) for the 2 hitting conditions were not significantly different for any variable. When averaged across both hitting conditions, HR over the 5-time periods was higher in periods 3-5 than period (p < 0.018) 1, whereas VE/VO2 and RPE were greater in periods 2-5 than period 1 (p = 0.001). RPE significantly increased over time with periods 2-5 being greater than period 1 (p = 0.001). It was concluded that grunting increased ball velocity without increasing VO2 or VE/VO2 or RPE in comparison with not grunting. It may be worthwhile for players and coaches in tennis and other sports to experiment with grunting to determine possible improvement in performance.

  18. Playing vs. nonplaying aerobic training in tennis: physiological and performance outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pialoux, Vincent; Genevois, Cyril; Capoen, Arnaud; Forbes, Scott C; Thomas, Jordan; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effects of playing and nonplaying high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) on physiological demands and tennis stroke performance in young tennis players. Eleven competitive male players (13.4 ± 1.3 years) completed both a playing and nonplaying HIIT session of equal distance, in random order. During each HIIT session, heart rate (HR), blood lactate, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored. Before and after each HIIT session, the velocity and accuracy of the serve, and forehand and backhand strokes were evaluated. The results demonstrated that both HIIT sessions achieved an average HR greater than 90% HRmax. The physiological demands (average HR) were greater during the playing session compared to the nonplaying session, despite similar lactate concentrations and a lower RPE. The results also indicate a reduction in shot velocity after both HIIT sessions; however, the playing HIIT session had a more deleterious effect on stroke accuracy. These findings suggest that 1) both HIIT sessions may be sufficient to develop maximal aerobic power, 2) playing HIIT sessions provide a greater physiological demand with a lower RPE, and 3) playing HIIT has a greater deleterious effect on stroke performance, and in particular on the accuracy component of the ground stroke performance, and should be incorporated appropriately into a periodization program in young male tennis players. PMID:25816346

  19. Playing vs. nonplaying aerobic training in tennis: physiological and performance outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pialoux, Vincent; Genevois, Cyril; Capoen, Arnaud; Forbes, Scott C; Thomas, Jordan; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effects of playing and nonplaying high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) on physiological demands and tennis stroke performance in young tennis players. Eleven competitive male players (13.4 ± 1.3 years) completed both a playing and nonplaying HIIT session of equal distance, in random order. During each HIIT session, heart rate (HR), blood lactate, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored. Before and after each HIIT session, the velocity and accuracy of the serve, and forehand and backhand strokes were evaluated. The results demonstrated that both HIIT sessions achieved an average HR greater than 90% HRmax. The physiological demands (average HR) were greater during the playing session compared to the nonplaying session, despite similar lactate concentrations and a lower RPE. The results also indicate a reduction in shot velocity after both HIIT sessions; however, the playing HIIT session had a more deleterious effect on stroke accuracy. These findings suggest that 1) both HIIT sessions may be sufficient to develop maximal aerobic power, 2) playing HIIT sessions provide a greater physiological demand with a lower RPE, and 3) playing HIIT has a greater deleterious effect on stroke performance, and in particular on the accuracy component of the ground stroke performance, and should be incorporated appropriately into a periodization program in young male tennis players.

  20. Effect of low-compression balls on wheelchair tennis match-play.

    PubMed

    Sindall, P; Lenton, J P; Malone, L; Douglas, S; Cooper, R A; Hiremath, S; Tolfrey, K; Goosey-Tolfrey, V

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare court-movement variables and physiological responses to wheelchair tennis match-play when using low vs. standard compression tennis balls. Eleven wheelchair basketball players were monitored during repeated bouts of tennis (20 min) using both ball types. Graded and peak exercise tests were completed. For match-play, a data logger was used to record distance and speed. Individual linear heart rate oxygen consumption relationships were used to estimate match-play oxygen uptake. Significant main effects for ball type revealed that total distance (P<0.05), forward distance (P<0.05), and average speed (P<0.05) were higher for play using a low-compression ball. A lower percentage of total time was spent stationary (P<0.001), with significantly more time spent at speeds of 1-1.49 (P<0.05), 1.5-1.99 (P<0.05) and 2.0-2.49 (P<0.05) m ∙ sec(-1) when using the low-compression ball. Main effects for physiological variables were not significant. Greater total and forward distance, and higher average speeds are achieved using a low-compression ball. The absence of any difference in measured HR and estimated physiological responses would indicate that players move further and faster at no additional mean physiological cost. This type of ball will be useful for novice players in the early phases of skill development. PMID:24081621

  1. The effects of surface traction characteristics on frictional demand and kinematics in tennis.

    PubMed

    Damm, Loïc; Low, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Clarke, James; Carré, Matt; Dixon, Sharon

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between footwear and surfaces influences the forces experienced by tennis players. The purpose of this study was to investigate traction demand and kinematic adaptation during tennis-specific movements with changes in traction characteristics of surfaces. We hypothesised that players would increase the utilised coefficient of friction (horizontal to vertical ground reaction force ratio) when the shoe surface combination had a high coefficient of friction and flex their knee after contact to facilitate braking. Eight participants performed two separate movements, side jump out of stance and running forehand. Ground reaction force was measured and three-dimensional kinematic data were recorded. Clay surface and cushioned acrylic hard court (low vs. high shoe-surface friction) were used. The peak utilised coefficient of friction was greater on clay than the hard court. The knee was less flexed at impact on clay (-5.6 +/- 10.2 degrees) and at peak flexion (-13.1 +/- 12.0 degrees) during the running forehand. Our results indicate that tennis players adapt the level ofutilised friction according to the characteristics of the surface, and this adaptation favours sliding on the low friction surface. Less knee flexion facilitates sliding on clay, whereas greater knee flexion contributes to braking on the hard court.

  2. Playing vs. Nonplaying Aerobic Training in Tennis: Physiological and Performance Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pialoux, Vincent; Genevois, Cyril; Capoen, Arnaud; Forbes, Scott C.; Thomas, Jordan; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effects of playing and nonplaying high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) on physiological demands and tennis stroke performance in young tennis players. Eleven competitive male players (13.4 ± 1.3 years) completed both a playing and nonplaying HIIT session of equal distance, in random order. During each HIIT session, heart rate (HR), blood lactate, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored. Before and after each HIIT session, the velocity and accuracy of the serve, and forehand and backhand strokes were evaluated. The results demonstrated that both HIIT sessions achieved an average HR greater than 90% HRmax. The physiological demands (average HR) were greater during the playing session compared to the nonplaying session, despite similar lactate concentrations and a lower RPE. The results also indicate a reduction in shot velocity after both HIIT sessions; however, the playing HIIT session had a more deleterious effect on stroke accuracy. These findings suggest that 1) both HIIT sessions may be sufficient to develop maximal aerobic power, 2) playing HIIT sessions provide a greater physiological demand with a lower RPE, and 3) playing HIIT has a greater deleterious effect on stroke performance, and in particular on the accuracy component of the ground stroke performance, and should be incorporated appropriately into a periodization program in young male tennis players. PMID:25816346

  3. Effect of low-compression balls on wheelchair tennis match-play.

    PubMed

    Sindall, P; Lenton, J P; Malone, L; Douglas, S; Cooper, R A; Hiremath, S; Tolfrey, K; Goosey-Tolfrey, V

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare court-movement variables and physiological responses to wheelchair tennis match-play when using low vs. standard compression tennis balls. Eleven wheelchair basketball players were monitored during repeated bouts of tennis (20 min) using both ball types. Graded and peak exercise tests were completed. For match-play, a data logger was used to record distance and speed. Individual linear heart rate oxygen consumption relationships were used to estimate match-play oxygen uptake. Significant main effects for ball type revealed that total distance (P<0.05), forward distance (P<0.05), and average speed (P<0.05) were higher for play using a low-compression ball. A lower percentage of total time was spent stationary (P<0.001), with significantly more time spent at speeds of 1-1.49 (P<0.05), 1.5-1.99 (P<0.05) and 2.0-2.49 (P<0.05) m ∙ sec(-1) when using the low-compression ball. Main effects for physiological variables were not significant. Greater total and forward distance, and higher average speeds are achieved using a low-compression ball. The absence of any difference in measured HR and estimated physiological responses would indicate that players move further and faster at no additional mean physiological cost. This type of ball will be useful for novice players in the early phases of skill development.

  4. Ball machine usage in tennis: movement initiation and swing timing while returning balls from a ball machine and from a real server.

    PubMed

    Carboch, Jan; Süss, Vladimir; Kocib, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Practicing with the use of a ball machine could handicap a player compared to playing against an actual opponent. Recent studies have shown some differences in swing timing and movement coordination, when a player faces a ball projection machine as opposed to a human opponent. We focused on the time of movement initiation and on stroke timing during returning tennis serves (simulated by a ball machine or by a real server). Receivers' movements were measured on a tennis court. In spite of using a serving ball speed from 90 kph to 135 kph, results showed significant differences in movement initiation and backswing duration between serves received from a ball machine and serves received from a real server. Players had shorter movement initiation when they faced a ball machine. Backswing duration was longer for the group using a ball machine. That demonstrates different movement timing of tennis returns when players face a ball machine. Use of ball machines in tennis practice should be limited as it may disrupt stroke timing. Key pointsPlayers have shorter initial move time when they are facing the ball machine.Using the ball machine results in different swing timing and movement coordination.The use of the ball machine should be limited.

  5. Ball machine usage in tennis: movement initiation and swing timing while returning balls from a ball machine and from a real server.

    PubMed

    Carboch, Jan; Süss, Vladimir; Kocib, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Practicing with the use of a ball machine could handicap a player compared to playing against an actual opponent. Recent studies have shown some differences in swing timing and movement coordination, when a player faces a ball projection machine as opposed to a human opponent. We focused on the time of movement initiation and on stroke timing during returning tennis serves (simulated by a ball machine or by a real server). Receivers' movements were measured on a tennis court. In spite of using a serving ball speed from 90 kph to 135 kph, results showed significant differences in movement initiation and backswing duration between serves received from a ball machine and serves received from a real server. Players had shorter movement initiation when they faced a ball machine. Backswing duration was longer for the group using a ball machine. That demonstrates different movement timing of tennis returns when players face a ball machine. Use of ball machines in tennis practice should be limited as it may disrupt stroke timing. Key pointsPlayers have shorter initial move time when they are facing the ball machine.Using the ball machine results in different swing timing and movement coordination.The use of the ball machine should be limited. PMID:24790483

  6. Ball Machine Usage in Tennis: Movement Initiation and Swing Timing While Returning Balls from a Ball Machine and from a Real Server

    PubMed Central

    Carboch, Jan; Süss, Vladimir; Kocib, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Practicing with the use of a ball machine could handicap a player compared to playing against an actual opponent. Recent studies have shown some differences in swing timing and movement coordination, when a player faces a ball projection machine as opposed to a human opponent. We focused on the time of movement initiation and on stroke timing during returning tennis serves (simulated by a ball machine or by a real server). Receivers’ movements were measured on a tennis court. In spite of using a serving ball speed from 90 kph to 135 kph, results showed significant differences in movement initiation and backswing duration between serves received from a ball machine and serves received from a real server. Players had shorter movement initiation when they faced a ball machine. Backswing duration was longer for the group using a ball machine. That demonstrates different movement timing of tennis returns when players face a ball machine. Use of ball machines in tennis practice should be limited as it may disrupt stroke timing. Key points Players have shorter initial move time when they are facing the ball machine. Using the ball machine results in different swing timing and movement coordination. The use of the ball machine should be limited. PMID:24790483

  7. Kinematics of table tennis topspin forehands: effects of performance level and ball spin.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi; Kojima, Takeji

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether performance level and ball spin affect arm and racket kinematics of the table tennis topspin forehand. Nine advanced and eight intermediate male table tennis players hit topspin forehands against light and heavy backspins. Five high-speed video cameras were used to record their strokes at 200 fps. Contributions of joint rotations to the racket speed, the racket kinematics at ball impact, the time required for racket acceleration and the maximum slope of the racket speed-time curve (s(max)) were determined. The advanced players showed a significantly larger contribution of lower trunk axial rotation to the racket speed at impact and a significantly larger value of s(max), and tended to require a less time for racket acceleration than the intermediate players. The racket speed at impact was not significantly different between the two player groups. The players adjusted the racket face angle rather than the inclination of the racket path at impact to the different ball spins. The results suggest that the ability to accelerate the racket in less time in the topspin forehand against backspin balls may be an important factor that affects the performance level. PMID:19746298

  8. Changes in angular momentum during the tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Bahamonde, R E

    2000-08-01

    Three-dimensional cinematography and the direct linear transformation method were used to obtain the coordinates of the landmarks of five right-handed collegiate tennis players. A 15-segment model was used to calculate the total body angular momentum about three orthogonal axes (X, parallel to the baseline; Y, normal to baseline and pointing towards the net; and Z, pointing upwards) passing through the centre of mass and to obtain the segmental contribution of the trunk, arms and legs. Most of the clockwise angular momentum about the X-axis was concentrated in the trunk and the racket-arm. Between the events of maximum external rotation and ball impact, the clockwise angular momentum about the X-axis of rotation of most body segments was reduced and the racket-arm gained clockwise angular momentum. The body angular momentum about the Y-axis of rotation had two distinct patterns and was the result of the lateral rotation of the trunk as the racket shoulder was elevated in preparation for impact. This body angular momentum was clockwise from the event of maximum external rotation to impact for the players with the greatest ball speed, whereas it was counterclockwise for the other players. The angular momentum about the Z-axis of rotation was small and lacked a consistent pattern. The largest source of angular momentum in the tennis serve derives from the remote angular momentum about the X- and Y-axes of rotation, which are then transferred from the trunk to the racket-arm and finally to the racket. Near impact, most of the angular momentum (75.1%) was concentrated in the racket-arm. Of the angular momentum of the racket-arm, the largest percentages were concentrated in the racket (35.9%) and the forearm segment (25.7%).

  9. Shoulder Rotator Muscle Dynamometry Characteristics: Side Asymmetry and Correlations with Ball-Throwing Speed in Adolescent Handball Players

    PubMed Central

    Pontaga, Inese; Zidens, Janis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to: 1) compare shoulder external/internal rotator muscles’ peak torques and average power values and their ratios in the dominant and non-dominant arm; 2) determine correlations between shoulder rotator muscles’ peak torques, average power and ball-throwing speed in handball players. Fourteen 14 to 15-year-old male athletes with injury-free shoulders participated in the study (body height: 176 ± 7 cm, body mass 63 ± 9 kg). The tests were carried out by an isokinetic dynamometer system in the shoulder internal and external rotation movements at angular velocities of 60°/s, 90°/s and 240°/s during concentric contractions. The eccentric external– concentric internal rotator muscle contractions were performed at the velocity of 90°/s. The player threw a ball at maximal speed keeping both feet on the floor. The speed was recorded with reflected light rays. Training in handball does not cause significant side asymmetry in shoulder external/internal rotator muscle peak torques or the average power ratio. Positive correlations between isokinetic characteristics of the shoulder internal and external rotator muscles and ball-throwing speed were determined. The power produced by internal rotator muscles during concentric contractions after eccentric contractions of external rotator muscles was significantly greater in the dominant than in the non-dominant arm. Thus, it may be concluded that the shoulder eccentric external/concentric internal rotator muscle power ratio is significantly greater than this ratio in the concentric contractions of these muscles. PMID:25414738

  10. Body composition assessment of paddle and tennis adult male players.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Roche Collado, Enrique; Vicente-Salar, Néstor

    2014-09-12

    Introducción: los deportistas que practican disciplinas deportivas de raqueta necesitan mejorar constantemente sus cualidades físicas con el fin de competir al máximo nivel. Por lo tanto, es necesario conseguir y mantener en dichos jugadores una óptima composición corporal, pero no obstante, existen pocos estudios publicados relacionados con esta temática. Objetivo: el presente trabajo trata de ofrecer un perfil antropométrico completo, incluyendo el somatotipo y la composición corporal de jugadores varones adultos de pádel y tenis. Material y métodos: se realizaron diversas medidas antropométricas, incluyendo peso corporal total, estatura, pliegues cutáneos, perímetros y diámetros, en 21 jugadores de pádel y 26 jugadores de tenis. Los resultados obtenidos de cada grupo de jugadores se compararon entre ellos y frente a un grupo control que no practicaba deportes de raqueta. Resultados: no se encontraron diferencias significativas en cuanto a las variables de composición corporal analizadas entre los grupos de jugadores de pádel y tenis, mostrando ambos grupos un somatotipo meso-endomófico. Los jugadores presentaron una menor masa muscular, y por tanto un menor componente mesomórfico, cuando se compararon con el grupo control. Conclusión: ya que la composición corporal es determinante en el rendimiento de los jugadores de deportes de raqueta, es imprescindible realizar un control de la grasa y masa muscular mediante herramientas dietético-nutricionales así como de programas de entrenamiento adecuados.

  11. Designing for Insight: A Case Study from Tennis Player Analysis.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Kim; Yucesoy, Burcu

    2016-01-01

    Visualization is an important tool, necessary for making sense of vast amounts of data. Many data science projects make use of visualization techniques to illustrate and explain their results. But complex interactive visualizations can also be excellent exploration tools to help guide the analysis, detect early signs of problems and irregularities, suggest new discoveries, and test the effectiveness and efficiency of scientific models. This article describes a combinatory design process that uses a method of incremental addition to create increasingly complex arrangements and thus create new ways to see data and discover new insights. PMID:27514032

  12. Designing for Insight: A Case Study from Tennis Player Analysis.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Kim; Yucesoy, Burcu

    2016-01-01

    Visualization is an important tool, necessary for making sense of vast amounts of data. Many data science projects make use of visualization techniques to illustrate and explain their results. But complex interactive visualizations can also be excellent exploration tools to help guide the analysis, detect early signs of problems and irregularities, suggest new discoveries, and test the effectiveness and efficiency of scientific models. This article describes a combinatory design process that uses a method of incremental addition to create increasingly complex arrangements and thus create new ways to see data and discover new insights.

  13. Technique effects on upper limb loading in the tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B; Fleisig, G; Nicholls, R; Escamilia, R

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shoulder and elbow joint loads during the tennis serve. Two synchronised 200 Hz video cameras were used to record the service action of 20 male and female players at the Sydney 2000 Olympics. The displacement histories of 20 selected landmarks, were calculated using the direct linear transformation approach. Ball speed was recorded from the stadium radar gun. The Peak Motus system was used to smooth displacements, while a customised inverse-dynamics program was used to calculate 3D shoulder and elbow joint kinematics and kinetics. Male players, who recorded significantly higher service speeds (male = 183 km hr(-1): female = 149 km hr(-1)) recorded significantly higher normalised and absolute internal rotation shoulder torque at the position when the arm was maximally externally rotated (MER) (male = 4.6% and 64.9 Nm: female = 3.5% and 37.5 Nm). A higher absolute elbow varus torque (67.6 Nm) was also recorded at MER, when compared with the female players (41.3 Nm). Peak normalised horizontal adduction torque (male = 7.6%: female = 6.5%), normalised shoulder compressive force (male = 79.6%: female = 59.1%) and absolute compressive force (male = 608.3 N: female = 363.7 N), were higher for the male players. Players who flexed at the front knee by 7.6 degrees, in the backswing phase of the serve, recorded a similar speed (162 km hr(-1)), and an increased normalised internal rotation torque at MER (5.0%), when compared with those who flexed by 14.7 degrees. They also recorded a larger normalised varus torque at MER (5.3% v 3.9%) and peak value (6.3% v 5.2%). Players who recorded a larger knee flexion also recorded less normalised and absolute (4.3%, 55.6 Nm) peak internal rotation torque compared with those with less flexion (5.6%, 63.9 Nm). Those players who used an abbreviated backswing were able to serve with a similar speed and recorded similar kinetic values. Loading on the shoulder and elbow joints is higher for the male

  14. Technique effects on upper limb loading in the tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B; Fleisig, G; Nicholls, R; Escamilia, R

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shoulder and elbow joint loads during the tennis serve. Two synchronised 200 Hz video cameras were used to record the service action of 20 male and female players at the Sydney 2000 Olympics. The displacement histories of 20 selected landmarks, were calculated using the direct linear transformation approach. Ball speed was recorded from the stadium radar gun. The Peak Motus system was used to smooth displacements, while a customised inverse-dynamics program was used to calculate 3D shoulder and elbow joint kinematics and kinetics. Male players, who recorded significantly higher service speeds (male = 183 km hr(-1): female = 149 km hr(-1)) recorded significantly higher normalised and absolute internal rotation shoulder torque at the position when the arm was maximally externally rotated (MER) (male = 4.6% and 64.9 Nm: female = 3.5% and 37.5 Nm). A higher absolute elbow varus torque (67.6 Nm) was also recorded at MER, when compared with the female players (41.3 Nm). Peak normalised horizontal adduction torque (male = 7.6%: female = 6.5%), normalised shoulder compressive force (male = 79.6%: female = 59.1%) and absolute compressive force (male = 608.3 N: female = 363.7 N), were higher for the male players. Players who flexed at the front knee by 7.6 degrees, in the backswing phase of the serve, recorded a similar speed (162 km hr(-1)), and an increased normalised internal rotation torque at MER (5.0%), when compared with those who flexed by 14.7 degrees. They also recorded a larger normalised varus torque at MER (5.3% v 3.9%) and peak value (6.3% v 5.2%). Players who recorded a larger knee flexion also recorded less normalised and absolute (4.3%, 55.6 Nm) peak internal rotation torque compared with those with less flexion (5.6%, 63.9 Nm). Those players who used an abbreviated backswing were able to serve with a similar speed and recorded similar kinetic values. Loading on the shoulder and elbow joints is higher for the male

  15. Effects of the racket polar moment of inertia on dominant upper limb joint moments during tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Chèze, Laurence; Macé, Pierre; Dumas, Raphaël

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the polar moment of inertia of a tennis racket on upper limb loading in the serve. Eight amateur competition tennis players performed two sets of 10 serves using two rackets identical in mass, position of center of mass and moments of inertia other than the polar moment of inertia (0.00152 vs 0.00197 kg.m2). An eight-camera motion analysis system collected the 3D trajectories of 16 markers, located on the thorax, upper limbs and racket, from which shoulder, elbow and wrist net joint moments and powers were computed using inverse dynamics. During the cocking phase, increased racket polar moment of inertia was associated with significant increases in the peak shoulder extension and abduction moments, as well the peak elbow extension, valgus and supination moments. During the forward swing phase, peak wrist extension and radial deviation moments significantly increased with polar moment of inertia. During the follow-through phase, the peak shoulder adduction, elbow pronation and wrist external rotation moments displayed a significant inverse relationship with polar moment of inertia. During the forward swing, the magnitudes of negative joint power at the elbow and wrist were significantly larger when players served using the racket with a higher polar moment of inertia. Although a larger polar of inertia allows players to better tolerate off-center impacts, it also appears to place additional loads on the upper extremity when serving and may therefore increase injury risk in tennis players. PMID:25117871

  16. Effects of the racket polar moment of inertia on dominant upper limb joint moments during tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Chèze, Laurence; Macé, Pierre; Dumas, Raphaël

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the polar moment of inertia of a tennis racket on upper limb loading in the serve. Eight amateur competition tennis players performed two sets of 10 serves using two rackets identical in mass, position of center of mass and moments of inertia other than the polar moment of inertia (0.00152 vs 0.00197 kg.m2). An eight-camera motion analysis system collected the 3D trajectories of 16 markers, located on the thorax, upper limbs and racket, from which shoulder, elbow and wrist net joint moments and powers were computed using inverse dynamics. During the cocking phase, increased racket polar moment of inertia was associated with significant increases in the peak shoulder extension and abduction moments, as well the peak elbow extension, valgus and supination moments. During the forward swing phase, peak wrist extension and radial deviation moments significantly increased with polar moment of inertia. During the follow-through phase, the peak shoulder adduction, elbow pronation and wrist external rotation moments displayed a significant inverse relationship with polar moment of inertia. During the forward swing, the magnitudes of negative joint power at the elbow and wrist were significantly larger when players served using the racket with a higher polar moment of inertia. Although a larger polar of inertia allows players to better tolerate off-center impacts, it also appears to place additional loads on the upper extremity when serving and may therefore increase injury risk in tennis players.

  17. Effects of the Racket Polar Moment of Inertia on Dominant Upper Limb Joint Moments during Tennis Serve

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Chèze, Laurence; Macé, Pierre; Dumas, Raphaël

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the polar moment of inertia of a tennis racket on upper limb loading in the serve. Eight amateur competition tennis players performed two sets of 10 serves using two rackets identical in mass, position of center of mass and moments of inertia other than the polar moment of inertia (0.00152 vs 0.00197 kg.m2). An eight-camera motion analysis system collected the 3D trajectories of 16 markers, located on the thorax, upper limbs and racket, from which shoulder, elbow and wrist net joint moments and powers were computed using inverse dynamics. During the cocking phase, increased racket polar moment of inertia was associated with significant increases in the peak shoulder extension and abduction moments, as well the peak elbow extension, valgus and supination moments. During the forward swing phase, peak wrist extension and radial deviation moments significantly increased with polar moment of inertia. During the follow-through phase, the peak shoulder adduction, elbow pronation and wrist external rotation moments displayed a significant inverse relationship with polar moment of inertia. During the forward swing, the magnitudes of negative joint power at the elbow and wrist were significantly larger when players served using the racket with a higher polar moment of inertia. Although a larger polar of inertia allows players to better tolerate off-center impacts, it also appears to place additional loads on the upper extremity when serving and may therefore increase injury risk in tennis players. PMID:25117871

  18. Relationship between anaerobic parameters provided from MAOD and critical power model in specific table tennis test.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, A M; Gobatto, C A

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the validity of the curvature constant parameter (W'), calculated from 2-parameter mathematical equations of critical power model, in estimating the anaerobic capacity and anaerobic work capacity from a table tennis-specific test. Specifically, we aimed to i) compare constants estimated from three critical intensity models in a table tennis-specific test (Cf); ii) correlate each estimated W' with the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD); iii) correlate each W' with the total amount of anaerobic work (W ANAER) performed in each exercise bout performed during the Cf test. Nine national-standard male table tennis players participated in the study. MAOD was 63.0(10.8) mL · kg - 1 and W' values were 32.8(6.6) balls for the linear-frequency model, 38.3(6.9) balls for linear-total balls model, 48.7(8.9) balls for Nonlinear-2 parameter model. Estimated W' from the Nonlinear 2-parameter model was significantly different from W' from the other 2 models (P<0.05). Also, none W' values were significantly correlated with MAOD or W ANAER (r ranged from - 0.58 to 0.51; P>0.13). Thus, W' estimated from the 2-parameter mathematical equations did not correlate with MAOD or W ANAER in table tennis-specific tests, indicating that W' may not provide a strong and valid estimation of anaerobic capacity and anaerobic capacity work. PMID:22562729

  19. Comparison of Heart Rate Response to Tennis Activity between Persons with and without Spinal Cord Injuries: Implications for a Training Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barfield, J. P.; Malone, Laurie A.; Coleman, Tristica A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to reach a training threshold during on-court sport activity. Monitors collected heart rate (HR) data every 5 s for 11 wheelchair tennis players (WCT) with low paraplegia and 11 able-bodied controls matched on experience and skill level (ABT).…

  20. Team Tennis and Camps, a Perfect Match.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    Team tennis programs offer campers an equal chance to share the responsibilities and excitement of team competition, fostering feelings of self-esteem that can lead to remarkable changes in behavior. Recommendations cover organization of a team tennis program, conducting matches, and program adaptations for special circumstances. (LP)

  1. Measuring the Velocity of a Tennis Serve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eng, John; Lietman, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Presents an alternative to the use of a radar to determine how fast an individual can serve a tennis ball. Equipped with a tape recorder and a Macintosh computer, students determine the velocity of a tennis ball by analyzing the sounds and echoes heard on the court. (ZWH)

  2. Quantifying the nature of anticipation in professional tennis.

    PubMed

    Triolet, Celine; Benguigui, Nicolas; Le Runigo, Cyrille; Williams, A Mark

    2013-01-01

    We quantify the nature and frequency of anticipation behaviours in professional tennis using video coding of incidents where the time delay between the opponent's stroke and the reaction of the player were recorded. We argue that anticipation is based on uncertain information and should lead in some situations to erroneous decisions. We identified the transition between reaction (with 100% accuracy in the selection of where the ball is played on the court) and anticipation (with less than 100% accuracy) as being 140-160 ms after ball contact. Anticipation behaviours occurred on between 6.14% and 13.42% of the coded situations. These anticipation behaviours appeared almost exclusively in 'unfavourable' situations, where the opponent had a significant tactical advantage, with the type of playing surface having only a limited effect. Moreover, the decrease in accuracy with shorter response times is not monotonic, with an increase in response accuracy being observed for times shorter than 120 ms before ball contact. We propose that very early anticipation behaviours occur when players use significant context-specific information before the opponent's stroke. When such information is not available, players produce anticipation behaviours that are closer to the moment of ball-racket contact using information that is more likely to be based on the opponent's preparation of the stroke. This study opens new directions for research focusing on the testing and training of anticipation in fast ball sports.

  3. Tennis Racket Vibrations and Shock Transmission to the Wrist during Forehand Drive.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Triquigneaux, Sylvain; Macé, Pierre; Gauthier, Fabien; Sevrez, Violaine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of two different racket models and two different forehand drive velocities on the three-dimensional vibration behavior of the racket and shock transmission to the player's wrist under real playing conditions. Nine tennis players performed a series of crosscourt flat forehand drives at two velocities, using a lightly and a highly vibrant racket. Two accelerometers were fixed on the racket frame and the player's wrist. The analysis of vibration signals in both time and frequency domains showed no interaction effect of velocity and racket conditions either on the racket vibration behavior or on shock transmission. An increase in playing velocity enlarged the amount of vibrations at the racket and wrist, but weakly altered their frequency content. As compared to a racket perceived as highly vibrating, a racket perceived as lightly vibrating damped longer in the out-of-plane axis of the racket and shorter on the other axis of the racket and on the wrist, and displayed a lower amount of energy in the high frequency of the vibration signal at the racket and wrist. These findings indicated that the playing velocity must be controlled when investigating the vibration loads due to the racket under real playing conditions. Similarly, a reduced perception of vibration by the tennis player would be linked to decreased amplitude of the racket vibration signal, which may concentrate the signal energy in the low frequencies. PMID:26177373

  4. Tennis Racket Vibrations and Shock Transmission to the Wrist during Forehand Drive.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Triquigneaux, Sylvain; Macé, Pierre; Gauthier, Fabien; Sevrez, Violaine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of two different racket models and two different forehand drive velocities on the three-dimensional vibration behavior of the racket and shock transmission to the player's wrist under real playing conditions. Nine tennis players performed a series of crosscourt flat forehand drives at two velocities, using a lightly and a highly vibrant racket. Two accelerometers were fixed on the racket frame and the player's wrist. The analysis of vibration signals in both time and frequency domains showed no interaction effect of velocity and racket conditions either on the racket vibration behavior or on shock transmission. An increase in playing velocity enlarged the amount of vibrations at the racket and wrist, but weakly altered their frequency content. As compared to a racket perceived as highly vibrating, a racket perceived as lightly vibrating damped longer in the out-of-plane axis of the racket and shorter on the other axis of the racket and on the wrist, and displayed a lower amount of energy in the high frequency of the vibration signal at the racket and wrist. These findings indicated that the playing velocity must be controlled when investigating the vibration loads due to the racket under real playing conditions. Similarly, a reduced perception of vibration by the tennis player would be linked to decreased amplitude of the racket vibration signal, which may concentrate the signal energy in the low frequencies.

  5. How to know and choose online games: differences between current and potential players.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ching-I; Lo, Shao-Kang; Wang, Pe-Cheng

    2007-12-01

    This study investigated how different adolescent players acquire game information and the criteria they use in choosing online games and found that (1) current players generally use comprehensive information sources more than potential players do; (2) current players rely on free trials and smooth display of motion graphics as choice criteria more than potential players do; (3) potential players rely on the look of advertisements more than current players do; (4) both current and potential players most likely use word-of-mouth and gaming programs on TV as information sources; and (5) endorser attractiveness is ranked the least important among six choice criteria by both current and potential players.

  6. Tennis injuries: occurrence, aetiology, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pluim, B M; Staal, J B; Windler, G E; Jayanthi, N

    2006-01-01

    A systematic search of published reports was carried out in three electronic databases from 1966 on to identify relevant articles relating to tennis injuries. There were 39 case reports, 49 laboratory studies, 28 descriptive epidemiological studies, and three analytical epidemiological studies. The principal findings of the review were: first, there is a great variation in the reported incidence of tennis injuries; second, most injuries occur in the lower extremities, followed by the upper extremities and then the trunk; third, there have been very few longitudinal cohort studies that investigated the association between risk factors and the occurrence of tennis injuries (odds ratios, risk ratios, hazard ratios); and fourth, there were no randomised controlled trials investigating injury prevention measures in tennis. More methodologically sound studies are needed for a better understanding of risk factors, in order to design useful strategies to prevent tennis injuries. PMID:16632572

  7. Mechanical energy generation and transfer in the racket arm during table tennis topspin backhands.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi; Kojima, Takeji

    2016-06-01

    The ability to generate a high racket speed and a large amount of racket kinetic energy on impact is important for table tennis players. The purpose of this study was to understand how mechanical energy is generated and transferred in the racket arm during table tennis backhands. Ten male advanced right-handed table tennis players hit topspin backhands against pre-impact topspin and backspin balls. The joint kinetics at the shoulder, elbow and wrist of the racket arm was determined using inverse dynamics. A majority of the mechanical energy of the racket arm acquired during forward swing (65 and 77% against topspin and backspin, respectively) was due to energy transfer from the trunk. Energy transfer by the shoulder joint force in the vertical direction was the largest contributor to the mechanical energy of the racket arm against both spins and was greater against backspin than against topspin (34 and 28%, respectively). The shoulder joint force directed to the right, which peaked just before impact, transferred additional energy to the racket. Our results suggest that the upward thrust of the shoulder and the late timing of the axial rotation of the upper trunk are important for an effective topspin backhand. PMID:27111711

  8. The effect of tennis racket string vibration dampers on racket handle vibrations and discomfort following impacts.

    PubMed

    Stroede, C L; Noble, L; Walker, H S

    1999-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of the use of tennis racket string vibration dampers on racket handle vibrations, and perceptions of hand and arm discomfort experienced by tennis players owing to stationary racket impacts. Twenty tennis players (10 males, 10 females) aged 18-29 years volunteered for the study. Two different racket models were impacted at the geometric centre of the racket face and 100 mm distal to the centre both with and without string vibration dampers in place. The participants could neither see nor hear the impacts, and they indicated their discomfort immediately after each impact using a visual analogue scale. An analysis of variance (2 x 2 x 2 factorial) was performed on the scaled discomfort ratings with the factors damping condition, racket type and impact location. No significant differences in discomfort ratings between damped and undamped impacts or between the two racket types were found. Also, central impacts were found to be more comfortable than impacts 100 mm distal to the centre (P< 0.05). There were no significant interaction effects. Vibration traces from an accelerometer mounted on the racket handle revealed that string vibration dampers quickly absorbed high-frequency string vibration without attenuating the lower-frequency frame vibration. In conclusion, we found no evidence to support the contention that string vibration dampers reduce hand and arm impact discomfort.

  9. Relationship between muscle coordination and racket mass during forehand drive in tennis.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Faucon, Aurélien; Rota, Samuel; Champely, Stéphane; Guillot, Aymeric; Hautier, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    This study aimed at investigating the relationship between the trunk and upper limb muscle coordination and mass of the tennis racket during forehand drive. A total of 15 male tennis players performed seven series of ten crosscourt forehand drives, both with their personal racket and six rackets with increased mass ranging from 6 to 16% (step = 2%) of their personal racket mass. The electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from nine trunk and upper limb muscles. The onset before impact and EMGrms values of the bursts were individually calculated. Results showed that the ball speed and the muscle activation temporal sequences were similar, whatever the increase in racket mass. Interestingly, in all participants, the activation level of the pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi and biceps brachii decreased when the racket mass increased, while the variations in the anterior deltoid activation level were correlated to the individual personal racket mass. These findings strongly suggest that the study of muscle activity during tennis practice should be considered as a complementary technique to determine a better adequacy of the racket characteristics to those of the player.

  10. Mechanical energy generation and transfer in the racket arm during table tennis topspin backhands.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi; Kojima, Takeji

    2016-06-01

    The ability to generate a high racket speed and a large amount of racket kinetic energy on impact is important for table tennis players. The purpose of this study was to understand how mechanical energy is generated and transferred in the racket arm during table tennis backhands. Ten male advanced right-handed table tennis players hit topspin backhands against pre-impact topspin and backspin balls. The joint kinetics at the shoulder, elbow and wrist of the racket arm was determined using inverse dynamics. A majority of the mechanical energy of the racket arm acquired during forward swing (65 and 77% against topspin and backspin, respectively) was due to energy transfer from the trunk. Energy transfer by the shoulder joint force in the vertical direction was the largest contributor to the mechanical energy of the racket arm against both spins and was greater against backspin than against topspin (34 and 28%, respectively). The shoulder joint force directed to the right, which peaked just before impact, transferred additional energy to the racket. Our results suggest that the upward thrust of the shoulder and the late timing of the axial rotation of the upper trunk are important for an effective topspin backhand.

  11. A stochastic Markov chain approach for tennis: Monte Carlo simulation and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Kamran

    This dissertation describes the computational formulation of probability density functions (pdfs) that facilitate head-to-head match simulations in tennis along with ranking systems developed from their use. A background on the statistical method used to develop the pdfs , the Monte Carlo method, and the resulting rankings are included along with a discussion on ranking methods currently being used both in professional sports and in other applications. Using an analytical theory developed by Newton and Keller in [34] that defines a tennis player's probability of winning a game, set, match and single elimination tournament, a computational simulation has been developed in Matlab that allows further modeling not previously possible with the analytical theory alone. Such experimentation consists of the exploration of non-iid effects, considers the concept the varying importance of points in a match and allows an unlimited number of matches to be simulated between unlikely opponents. The results of these studies have provided pdfs that accurately model an individual tennis player's ability along with a realistic, fair and mathematically sound platform for ranking them.

  12. Medical assistance at the Brazilian juniors tennis circuit--a one-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Silva, R T; Takahashi, R; Berra, B; Cohen, M; Matsumoto, M H

    2003-03-01

    A prospective study was conducted during one year to evaluate injuries in Brazilian Junior tennis players during the national circuit, in 2001. Male and female athletes in the age categories under 12, under 14, under 16 and under 18 years, all members of The Brazilian Tennis Confederation, participated in the study. Two physiotherapists and/or one physician evaluated the athletes. A total of 280 medical examinations were performed in 151 tennis players who needed medical treatment during the tournaments. The 151 athletes had 1-6 medical treatments during the tournaments and the mean was 1.8 treatment per athlete. The overall incidence was 6.9 medical treatments for every 1,000 games played. Medical assistance tothe athletes was performed on court in 83 (29.6%) occasions, 185 (66.1%) at the medical department and in both in 12 (4.3%) occasions. Retirement of the match was reported in 9 (3.2%) lesions. The most frequent injuries were: muscle contractures (76 - 27.14%), muscle pain/fatigue (36-12.85%), muscle strain (35-12.52%), tendinopathies (20 - 7.14%), cramps (16 -5.71%), ankle sprain (12 -4.28%) and low back pain (10-3.57%). Muscle pathology was the major source of injuries causing the athlete to seek medical assistance. Preventative measures are important to reduce the number of injuries, which may include muscle stretching programs and adequate nutrition and hydration.

  13. Upper limb joint kinetic analysis during tennis serve: Assessment of competitive level on efficiency and injury risks.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Bideau, B; Ropars, M; Delamarche, P; Kulpa, R

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the joint kinetics and stroke production efficiency for the shoulder, elbow, and wrist during the serve between professionals and advanced tennis players and to discuss their potential relationship with given overuse injuries. Eleven professional and seven advanced tennis players were studied with an optoelectronic motion analysis system while performing serves. Normalized peak kinetic values of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints were calculated using inverse dynamics. To measure serve efficiency, all normalized peak kinetic values were divided by ball velocity. t-tests were used to determine significant differences between the resultant joint kinetics and efficiency values in both groups (advanced vs professional). Shoulder inferior force, shoulder anterior force, shoulder horizontal abduction torque, and elbow medial force were significantly higher in advanced players. Professional players were more efficient than advanced players, as they maximize ball velocity with lower joint kinetics. Since advanced players are subjected to higher joint kinetics, the results suggest that they appeared more susceptible to high risk of shoulder and elbow injuries than professionals, especially during the cocking and deceleration phases of the serve. PMID:23293868

  14. Importance of Hierarchical Structure Determining Tennis Performance for Modern Defensive Baseliner.

    PubMed

    Đurović, Nikša; Dizdar, Dražan; Zagorac, Nebojša

    2015-07-01

    Hierarchies are present everywhere (physics, medicine, nature, human needs, etc.) and tennis is no exception. Is counterpuncher's goal just to chase down every ball and force the opponents into long rallies? The aim of this first empirical study is integrate theory and practice about overall quality evaluation and accurately analyze offensive and defensive tennis priorities for counterpunchers. Weight of each criterion was obtained using AHP technique in Expert Choice software. The results indicate that this model is able to provide important training variables in order to control and manipulate training process. Also, issues prior to research indicate that sports scientists and expert coaches need to learn from each other in order to help players maximizing their performance. PMID:26434017

  15. Importance of Hierarchical Structure Determining Tennis Performance for Modern Defensive Baseliner.

    PubMed

    Đurović, Nikša; Dizdar, Dražan; Zagorac, Nebojša

    2015-07-01

    Hierarchies are present everywhere (physics, medicine, nature, human needs, etc.) and tennis is no exception. Is counterpuncher's goal just to chase down every ball and force the opponents into long rallies? The aim of this first empirical study is integrate theory and practice about overall quality evaluation and accurately analyze offensive and defensive tennis priorities for counterpunchers. Weight of each criterion was obtained using AHP technique in Expert Choice software. The results indicate that this model is able to provide important training variables in order to control and manipulate training process. Also, issues prior to research indicate that sports scientists and expert coaches need to learn from each other in order to help players maximizing their performance.

  16. Physiological responses and characteristics of table tennis matches determined in official tournaments.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, Alessandro M; Morel, Erika A; Gobatto, Claudio A

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the physiological responses and the match characteristics of table tennis and also to compare these responses in 2 different performance-level athletes from official tournaments. Twenty male table tennis players (12 regional experience-RP and 8 national and international experience-NP) were participants in the study. Blood lactate concentration ([LAC]) and heart rate (HR) were measured as physiological parameters in 21 official table tennis matches, and other 12 matches had recorded the duration of rally (DR), rest time, effort and rest ratio (E:R), total playing time (TPT), effective playing time (EPT), and frequency of shots by video analyses. The [LAC] verified in all matches was 1.8 mmol.L (+/-0.8), whereas the [LAC] peak was 2.2 mmol.L (+/-0.8). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups (p > 0.05) in both parameters. The HR was 164 b.min (+/-14), corresponding to 81.2% (+/-7.4) of the predicted maximum HR. As characteristics of the matches, the DR corresponded to 3.4 seconds (+/-1.7), rest time to 8.1 seconds (+/-5.1), E:R to 0.4 (+/-0.2), TPT to 970.5 seconds (+/-336.1), EPT to 44.3% (+/-23.7), and frequency of shots to 35.3 balls.min (+/-7.7). Among groups, the rest time was lower in RP than in NP. Consistently, the E:R and EPT were higher in RP than in NP (p < 0.05). The results suggest that table tennis matches present the aerobic system as a principal output energy, the phosphagenic system being the most important during efforts. The information pertaining to the physiological profile and the characteristics of table tennis should be used by coaches planning physical training and specific exercise prescriptions aiming at achieving maximal sport performance. PMID:20300034

  17. Tennis ball diameter: the effect on performance and the concurrent physiological responses.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Karl; Davey, Polly R

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of a pressurized tennis ball 6% greater in diameter (Type 3) than a standard sized (Type 2) ball on performance and the physiological responses to the Loughborough Intermittent Tennis Test (LITT) (Davey et al., 2002). Eight competitive tennis players (males, n = 4, age 24.8+/-3.5 years, body mass 81.3+/-3.1 kg, height 1.74+/-0.02 m, estimated VO2max 54.4+/-2.6 ml x kg(-1) min(-1); females, n = 4, age 26.3+/-3.1 years, body mass 67.0+/-6.7 kg, height 1.68 + 0.02 m, estimated VO2max 49.9+/-3.3 ml kg(-1) min(-1); mean+/-s(x)) completed two main trials of the LITT with either the Type 2 or Type 3 tennis balls to the point of volitional fatigue. The mean time to volitional fatigue was 29.5% greater during the Type 3 trials than during the Type 2 trials (56.9+/-6.4 min vs 40.1+/-3.7 min; P < 0.05). The mean percentage accuracy and mean percentage consistency recorded for the entire LITT were greater for the Type 3 than the Type 2 trials (9.2+/-1.5 vs 4.0+/-0.3% and 61.1+/-0.6 vs 51.3+/-0.6%, respectively; P < 0.01). A significantly lower mean heart rate and blood lactate concentration were observed during the Type 3 than during the Type 2 trials. There was a clear effect of ball diameter on tennis performance and certain physiological responses. PMID:15841593

  18. Intention understanding over T: a neuroimaging study on shared representations and tennis return predictions

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, Stephanie; Fontang, Frederic; Patel, Nisa; Decety, Jean; Monteleone, George; Cacioppo, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Studying the way athletes predict actions of their peers during fast-ball sports, such as a tennis, has proved to be a valuable tool for increasing our knowledge of intention understanding. The working model in this area is that the anticipatory representations of others' behaviors require internal predictive models of actions formed from pre-established and shared representations between the observer and the actor. This model also predicts that observers would not be able to read accurately the intentions of a competitor if the competitor were to perform the action without prior knowledge of their intention until moments before the action. To test this hypothesis, we recorded brain activity from 25 male tennis players while they performed a novel behavioral tennis intention inference task, which included two conditions: (i) one condition in which they viewed video clips of a tennis athlete who knew in advance where he was about to act/serve (initially intended serves) and (ii) one condition in which they viewed video clips of that same athlete when he did not know where he was to act/serve until the target was specified after he had tossed the ball into the air to complete his serve (non-initially intended serves). Our results demonstrated that (i) tennis expertise is related to the accuracy in predicting where another server intends to serve when that server knows where he intends to serve before (but not after) he tosses the ball in the air; and (ii) accurate predictions are characterized by the recruitment of both cortical areas within the human mirror neuron system (that is known to be involved in higher-order (top-down) processes of embodied cognition and shared representation) and subcortical areas within brain regions involved in procedural memory (caudate nucleus). Interestingly, inaccurate predictions instead recruit areas known to be involved in low-level (bottom-up) computational processes associated with the sense of agency and self-other distinction

  19. Intention understanding over T: a neuroimaging study on shared representations and tennis return predictions.

    PubMed

    Cacioppo, Stephanie; Fontang, Frederic; Patel, Nisa; Decety, Jean; Monteleone, George; Cacioppo, John T

    2014-01-01

    Studying the way athletes predict actions of their peers during fast-ball sports, such as a tennis, has proved to be a valuable tool for increasing our knowledge of intention understanding. The working model in this area is that the anticipatory representations of others' behaviors require internal predictive models of actions formed from pre-established and shared representations between the observer and the actor. This model also predicts that observers would not be able to read accurately the intentions of a competitor if the competitor were to perform the action without prior knowledge of their intention until moments before the action. To test this hypothesis, we recorded brain activity from 25 male tennis players while they performed a novel behavioral tennis intention inference task, which included two conditions: (i) one condition in which they viewed video clips of a tennis athlete who knew in advance where he was about to act/serve (initially intended serves) and (ii) one condition in which they viewed video clips of that same athlete when he did not know where he was to act/serve until the target was specified after he had tossed the ball into the air to complete his serve (non-initially intended serves). Our results demonstrated that (i) tennis expertise is related to the accuracy in predicting where another server intends to serve when that server knows where he intends to serve before (but not after) he tosses the ball in the air; and (ii) accurate predictions are characterized by the recruitment of both cortical areas within the human mirror neuron system (that is known to be involved in higher-order (top-down) processes of embodied cognition and shared representation) and subcortical areas within brain regions involved in procedural memory (caudate nucleus). Interestingly, inaccurate predictions instead recruit areas known to be involved in low-level (bottom-up) computational processes associated with the sense of agency and self-other distinction

  20. Ratings of perceived exertion-lactate association during actual singles tennis match play.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Fernandez-Fernández, Jaime; Bishop, David; Fernandez-Garcia, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    To examine the relationship between metabolic (i.e., blood lactate concentration) and perceptual (ratings of perceived exertion, RPE) responses and their association with variables describing the characteristics of the singles tennis match play. Eight trained and internationally ranked (Association of Tennis Professionals rankings) male tennis players were studied during singles matches (best of 3 sets) played on an outdoor clay court surface during a professional invitational tournament. Ratings of perceived exertion and blood lactate concentrations were determined at selected change overs during the game. The variables describing the characteristics of the matches, (a) duration of rallies (DR), (b) rest time, (c) effective playing time, and (d) strokes per rally (SR), were determined from video recordings. Significant correlations (r = 0.57-0.48; p < 0.01) were found for RPE-blood lactate responses during the games. Both RPE and blood lactate concentration values were significantly correlated with SR and DR (r = 0.80-0.61; p < 0.001) in service games. Average RPE was significantly higher (p < 0.05) following service games (13.5 +/- 1.9; n = 24) than following receiving games (12.2 +/- 2.0; n = 22). Mean blood lactate concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.05) following service games (4.4 +/- 2.4 mmol.L; n = 24) than following receiving games (3.0 +/- 1.3 mmol.L; n = 22). These results indicate that monitoring RPE may be a useful technique for regulating on-court tennis training intensity. Moreover, blood lactate may mediate the relation between RPE and tennis match play intensity.

  1. Physiological responses and characteristics of table tennis matches determined in official tournaments.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, Alessandro M; Morel, Erika A; Gobatto, Claudio A

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the physiological responses and the match characteristics of table tennis and also to compare these responses in 2 different performance-level athletes from official tournaments. Twenty male table tennis players (12 regional experience-RP and 8 national and international experience-NP) were participants in the study. Blood lactate concentration ([LAC]) and heart rate (HR) were measured as physiological parameters in 21 official table tennis matches, and other 12 matches had recorded the duration of rally (DR), rest time, effort and rest ratio (E:R), total playing time (TPT), effective playing time (EPT), and frequency of shots by video analyses. The [LAC] verified in all matches was 1.8 mmol.L (+/-0.8), whereas the [LAC] peak was 2.2 mmol.L (+/-0.8). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups (p > 0.05) in both parameters. The HR was 164 b.min (+/-14), corresponding to 81.2% (+/-7.4) of the predicted maximum HR. As characteristics of the matches, the DR corresponded to 3.4 seconds (+/-1.7), rest time to 8.1 seconds (+/-5.1), E:R to 0.4 (+/-0.2), TPT to 970.5 seconds (+/-336.1), EPT to 44.3% (+/-23.7), and frequency of shots to 35.3 balls.min (+/-7.7). Among groups, the rest time was lower in RP than in NP. Consistently, the E:R and EPT were higher in RP than in NP (p < 0.05). The results suggest that table tennis matches present the aerobic system as a principal output energy, the phosphagenic system being the most important during efforts. The information pertaining to the physiological profile and the characteristics of table tennis should be used by coaches planning physical training and specific exercise prescriptions aiming at achieving maximal sport performance.

  2. Psychological predictors of mental toughness in elite tennis: an exploratory study in learned resourcefulness and competitive trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Richard G; Fuller, Dana K; Anshel, Mark H

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which two constructs, learned resourcefulness and competitive trait anxiety, measured by the Self-Control Schedule and Sports Competition Anxiety Test, respectively, predicted mental toughness on the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire among male and female elite tennis players. The participants included two NCAA Division 1 (U.S.) intercollegiate tennis teams comprising eight male (M age = 19.4 yr., SD = 1.2) and eight female (M age = 20.9 yr., SD = 1.4) players and their respective head coaches (N = 2, M age = 28 yr., SD = 5.7). Results of regression analyses indicated that learned resourcefulness was the primary predictor of athlete self-rated mental toughness and that competitive trait anxiety was relatively unrelated to coach and athlete-rated mental toughness. The positive significant relationship between mental toughness and learned resourcefulness suggests that the latter may be an integral component of mental toughness, at least among elite tennis players. Further research is needed to examine related components of mental toughness, including learned resourcefulness, and to determine the effectiveness of interventions that increase mental toughness to optimal levels, particularly as a function of sport type. PMID:25387038

  3. Psychological predictors of mental toughness in elite tennis: an exploratory study in learned resourcefulness and competitive trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Richard G; Fuller, Dana K; Anshel, Mark H

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which two constructs, learned resourcefulness and competitive trait anxiety, measured by the Self-Control Schedule and Sports Competition Anxiety Test, respectively, predicted mental toughness on the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire among male and female elite tennis players. The participants included two NCAA Division 1 (U.S.) intercollegiate tennis teams comprising eight male (M age = 19.4 yr., SD = 1.2) and eight female (M age = 20.9 yr., SD = 1.4) players and their respective head coaches (N = 2, M age = 28 yr., SD = 5.7). Results of regression analyses indicated that learned resourcefulness was the primary predictor of athlete self-rated mental toughness and that competitive trait anxiety was relatively unrelated to coach and athlete-rated mental toughness. The positive significant relationship between mental toughness and learned resourcefulness suggests that the latter may be an integral component of mental toughness, at least among elite tennis players. Further research is needed to examine related components of mental toughness, including learned resourcefulness, and to determine the effectiveness of interventions that increase mental toughness to optimal levels, particularly as a function of sport type.

  4. The effect of age on discrete kinematics of the elite female tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, David; Elliott, Bruce; Lay, Brendan; Reid, Machar

    2013-10-01

    The importance of the flat serve in tennis is well documented, with an abundance of research evaluating the service technique of adult male players. Comparatively, the female and junior serves have received far less attention. Therefore, the aims of this study were to quantify the flat serve kinematics in elite prepubescent, pubescent, and postpubescent female tennis players. Full body, racket, and ball kinematics were derived using a 22-camera Vicon motion capture system. Racket velocity was significantly lower in the prepubescent group than in the two older groups. In generating racket velocity, the role of the serving arm appears to become more pronounced after the onset of puberty, whereas leg drive and "shoulder-over-shoulder" rotation mature even later in development. These factors are proposed to relate to strength deficits and junior players' intentions to reduce the complexity of the skill. Temporally, coupling perception (cues from the ball) and action (body movements) are less refined in the prepubescent serve, presumably reducing the "rhythm" (and dynamism) of the service action. Practically, there appears scope for equipment scaling to preserve kinematic relevance between the junior and senior serve and promote skill acquisition.

  5. Performance Prediction of Active Piezo Fiber Rackets in Terms of Tennis Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Masamichi

    Several former top players sent a letter to the International Tennis Federation (ITF) encouraging the governing body to revisit the question of rackets. In the letter, the players wrote that racket technology has led to major changes in how the game is played at the top level. This paper investigated the physical properties of a new type of racket with active piezoelectric fibers appeared recently in the market, and predicted the various factors associated with the frontal impact, such as impact force, contact time, deformation of ball and strings, and also estimated the racket performance such as the coefficient of restitution, the rebound power coefficient, the post-impact ball velocity and the sweet areas relevant to the power in tennis. It is based on the experimental identification of the dynamics of the ball-racket-arm system and the approximate nonlinear impact analysis with a simple swing model. The predicted results with forehand stroke model can explain the difference in mechanism of performance between the new type racket with active piezoelectric fibers and the conventional passive representative rackets. It showed that this new type racket provides higher coefficient of restitution on the whole area of string face and also gives larger rebound power coefficients particularly at the topside and bigger powers on the whole area of string face but the difference was not so large. It seems that the racket-related improvements in play are relatively small and the players themselves continue to improve, accordingly there is a gap between a perception and reality.

  6. 1. FACILITY 26, TENNIS AND BASKETBALL COURTS. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FACILITY 26, TENNIS AND BASKETBALL COURTS. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD QUARTERS F. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, Tennis Courts, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  7. VIEW OF BUILDING 221 (TENNIS COURTS) FROM NORTHEAST CORNER, BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BUILDING 221 (TENNIS COURTS) FROM NORTHEAST CORNER, BUILDING 24 IN BACKGROUND, FACING SOUTHWEST - Roosevelt Base, Tennis Courts, Corner of Reeves Avenue & Pennsylvania Street, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. VIEW OF BUILDING 221 (TENNIS COURTS) FROM NORTHWEST CORNER WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BUILDING 221 (TENNIS COURTS) FROM NORTHWEST CORNER WITH BUILDING 23 IN BACKGROUND, FACING SOUTHEAST - Roosevelt Base, Tennis Courts, Corner of Reeves Avenue & Pennsylvania Street, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. WEST TENNIS COURTS AND NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICER'S HOUSING, FROM SOUTH OAKWOOD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST TENNIS COURTS AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICER'S HOUSING, FROM SOUTH OAKWOOD DRIVE - Hamilton Field, Tennis Courts, Escolta Avenue at Sixth Street, & Crescent Drive near South Oakwood Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  10. General view, Belair Bath and Tennis Club, Belair at Bowie, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view, Belair Bath and Tennis Club, Belair at Bowie, Maryland, looking west. - Belair Bath and Tennis Club, Southwest corner of Belair Drive and Tulip Grove Drive, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  11. Does an Eye-Hand Coordination Test Have Added Value as Part of Talent Identification in Table Tennis? A Validity and Reproducibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Faber, Irene R.; Oosterveld, Frits G. J.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7–12 years) from national (n = 13), regional (n = 11) and local training centres (n = 19) participated. During the eye-hand coordination test, children needed to throw a ball against a vertical positioned table tennis table with one hand and to catch the ball correctly with the other hand as frequently as possible in 30 seconds. Four different test versions were assessed varying the distance to the table (1 or 2 meter) and using a tennis or table tennis ball. ‘Within session’ reproducibility was estimated for the two attempts of the initial tests and ten youngsters were retested after 4 weeks to estimate ‘between sessions’ reproducibility. Validity analyses using age as covariate showed that players from the national and regional centres scored significantly higher than players from the local centre in all test versions (p<0.05). The tests at 1 meter demonstrated better discriminative ability than those at 2 meter. While all tests but one had a positive significant association with competition outcome, which were corrected for age influences, the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter showed the highest association (r = 0.54; p = 0.001). Differences between the first and second attempts were comparable for all test versions (between −8 and +7 repetitions) with ICC's ranging from 0.72 to 0.87. The smallest differences were found for the test with a table tennis ball at 1 meter (between −3 and +3 repetitions). Best test version as part of talent identification appears to be the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter regarding the psychometric characteristics evaluated. Longitudinal studies are necessary to evaluate the predictive value of this test. PMID:24465638

  12. Comparison of endpoint data treatment methods for estimation of kinematics and kinetics near impact during the tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Reid, M M; Campbell, Amity C; Elliott, B C

    2012-02-01

    Tennis stroke mechanics have attracted considerable biomechanical analysis, yet current filtering practice may lead to erroneous reporting of data near the impact of racket and ball. This research had three aims: (1) to identify the best method of estimating the displacement and velocity of the racket at impact during the tennis serve, (2) to demonstrate the effect of different methods on upper limb kinematics and kinetics and (3) to report the effect of increased noise on the most appropriate treatment method. The tennis serves of one tennis player, fit with upper limb and racket retro-reflective markers, were captured with a Vicon motion analysis system recording at 500 Hz. The raw racket tip marker displacement and velocity were used as criterion data to compare three different endpoint treatments and two different filters. The 2nd-order polynomial proved to be the least erroneous extrapolation technique and the quintic spline filter was the most appropriate filter. The previously performed "smoothing through impact" method, using a quintic spline filter, underestimated the racket velocity (9.1%) at the time of impact. The polynomial extrapolation method remained effective when noise was added to the marker trajectories.

  13. Heart rate deflection point relates to second ventilatory threshold in a tennis test.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) has been studied in continuous sports, but never in a tennis-specific test. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between HRDP and the VT2, and between the maximal test performance and the maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) in an on-court specific endurance tennis test. Thirty-five high-level tennis players performed a progressive tennis-specific field test to exhaustion to determine HRDP, VT2, and (Equation is included in full-text article.). Ventilatory gas exchange parameters were continuously recorded by a portable telemetric breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system. Heart rate deflection point was identified at the point at which the slope values of the linear portion of the time/heart rate (HR) relationship began to decline and was successfully determined in 91.4% of the players. High correlations (r = 0.79-0.96; p < 0.001) between physiological (HR and oxygen uptake [(Equation is included in full-text article.)]) and performance (Time, Stage, and Frequency of balls [Ballf]) variables corresponding to HRDP and VT2 were observed. Frequency of balls at the HRDP (BallfHRDP) was detected at 19.8 ± 1.7 shots per minute. Paired t-test showed no significant differences in HR (178.9 ± 8.5 vs. 177.9 ± 8.7 b·min for HRDP vs. HRVT2, respectively) at intensities corresponding to HRDP and VT2. Maximal test performance and (Equation is included in full-text article.)were moderately correlated (r = 0.56; p < 0.001). Heart rate deflection point obtained from this specific tennis test can be used to determine the VT2, and the BallfHRDP can be used as a practical performance variable to prescribe on-court specific aerobic training at or near VT2. PMID:25162649

  14. Heart rate deflection point relates to second ventilatory threshold in a tennis test.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) has been studied in continuous sports, but never in a tennis-specific test. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between HRDP and the VT2, and between the maximal test performance and the maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) in an on-court specific endurance tennis test. Thirty-five high-level tennis players performed a progressive tennis-specific field test to exhaustion to determine HRDP, VT2, and (Equation is included in full-text article.). Ventilatory gas exchange parameters were continuously recorded by a portable telemetric breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system. Heart rate deflection point was identified at the point at which the slope values of the linear portion of the time/heart rate (HR) relationship began to decline and was successfully determined in 91.4% of the players. High correlations (r = 0.79-0.96; p < 0.001) between physiological (HR and oxygen uptake [(Equation is included in full-text article.)]) and performance (Time, Stage, and Frequency of balls [Ballf]) variables corresponding to HRDP and VT2 were observed. Frequency of balls at the HRDP (BallfHRDP) was detected at 19.8 ± 1.7 shots per minute. Paired t-test showed no significant differences in HR (178.9 ± 8.5 vs. 177.9 ± 8.7 b·min for HRDP vs. HRVT2, respectively) at intensities corresponding to HRDP and VT2. Maximal test performance and (Equation is included in full-text article.)were moderately correlated (r = 0.56; p < 0.001). Heart rate deflection point obtained from this specific tennis test can be used to determine the VT2, and the BallfHRDP can be used as a practical performance variable to prescribe on-court specific aerobic training at or near VT2.

  15. The Dutch motor skills assessment as tool for talent development in table tennis: a reproducibility and validity study.

    PubMed

    Faber, Irene R; Nijhuis-Van Der Sanden, Maria W G; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Oosterveld, Frits G J

    2015-01-01

    A motor skills assessment could be helpful in talent development by estimating essential perceptuo-motor skills of young players, which are considered requisite to develop excellent technical and tactical qualities. The Netherlands Table Tennis Association uses a motor skills assessment in their talent development programme consisting of eight items measuring perceptuo-motor skills specific to table tennis under varying conditions. This study aimed to investigate this assessment regarding its reproducibility, internal consistency, underlying dimensions and concurrent validity in 113 young table tennis players (6-10 years). Intraclass correlation coefficients of six test items met the criteria of 0.7 with coefficients of variation between 3% and 8%. Cronbach's alpha valued 0.853 for internal consistency. The principal components analysis distinguished two conceptually meaningful factors: "ball control" and "gross motor function." Concurrent validity analyses demonstrated moderate associations between the motor skills assessment's results and national ranking; boys r = -0.53 (P < 0.001) and girls r = -0.45 (P = 0.015). In conclusion, this evaluation demonstrated six test items with acceptable reproducibility, good internal consistency and good prospects for validity. Two test items need revision to upgrade reproducibility. Since the motor skills assessment seems to be a reproducible, objective part of a talent development programme, more longitudinal studies are required to investigate its predictive validity. PMID:25482916

  16. The Dutch motor skills assessment as tool for talent development in table tennis: a reproducibility and validity study.

    PubMed

    Faber, Irene R; Nijhuis-Van Der Sanden, Maria W G; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Oosterveld, Frits G J

    2015-01-01

    A motor skills assessment could be helpful in talent development by estimating essential perceptuo-motor skills of young players, which are considered requisite to develop excellent technical and tactical qualities. The Netherlands Table Tennis Association uses a motor skills assessment in their talent development programme consisting of eight items measuring perceptuo-motor skills specific to table tennis under varying conditions. This study aimed to investigate this assessment regarding its reproducibility, internal consistency, underlying dimensions and concurrent validity in 113 young table tennis players (6-10 years). Intraclass correlation coefficients of six test items met the criteria of 0.7 with coefficients of variation between 3% and 8%. Cronbach's alpha valued 0.853 for internal consistency. The principal components analysis distinguished two conceptually meaningful factors: "ball control" and "gross motor function." Concurrent validity analyses demonstrated moderate associations between the motor skills assessment's results and national ranking; boys r = -0.53 (P < 0.001) and girls r = -0.45 (P = 0.015). In conclusion, this evaluation demonstrated six test items with acceptable reproducibility, good internal consistency and good prospects for validity. Two test items need revision to upgrade reproducibility. Since the motor skills assessment seems to be a reproducible, objective part of a talent development programme, more longitudinal studies are required to investigate its predictive validity.

  17. Changes in exercise characteristics, maximal voluntary contraction, and explosive strength during prolonged tennis playing

    PubMed Central

    Girard, O; Lattier, G; Micallef, J‐P; Millet, G P

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine changes in exercise characteristics, maximal voluntary contraction, and explosive strength during prolonged tennis playing. Methods Maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC), leg stiffness (hopping), and peak power in squat (SJ) and countermovement (CMJ) jumps were measured before, every 30 minutes during, and 30 minutes after a three hour tennis match in 12 well trained players. Heart rate (HR), the effective playing time (EPT), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and muscle soreness of knee extensors were also measured. Results Decreases in MVC (−9%; p<0.05) and leg stiffness (−9%; p  =  0.17) were observed after the match and were significantly correlated (r  =  0.66; p  =  0.05). Peak power in SJ and CMJ tests was maintained during the match but was lower (p<0.001) 30 minutes after. Average HR and EPT were 144 (8) beats/min and 21 (4)% respectively. A strong correlation was found between EPT and HR (r  =  0.93; p<0.05). RPE and muscle soreness increased linearly during the exercise and were significantly correlated (r  =  0.99; p<0.001). Conclusions Progressive reductions in maximal voluntary strength and leg stiffness highly correlated with increases in perceived exertion and muscle soreness were observed throughout a three hour tennis match, whereas explosive strength was maintained and decreased only after the match. These alterations may result in less efficient on‐court movement and stroke production. They are, however, lower than those reported during continuous exercise of the same duration. The intermittent pattern of tennis and the numerous stretch‐shortening cycle movements partly explain these results. PMID:16720888

  18. Activity patterns, blood lactate concentrations and ratings of perceived exertion during a professional singles tennis tournament

    PubMed Central

    Mendez‐Villanueva, Alberto; Fernandez‐Fernandez, Jaime; Bishop, David; Fernandez‐Garcia, Benjamin; Terrados, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the game characteristics and physiological (ie, blood lactate concentration) and perceptual (ie, rating of perceived exertion, RPE) responses during actual tennis competition in professional performers. Methods Eight trained and internationally ranked (Association of Tennis Professionals rankings) male tennis players were studied during singles matches (best of three sets) played on an outdoor clay court surface during a professional, invitational tournament. Blood lactate concentrations (n = 53) and RPE (n = 113) were determined at selected changeovers during the game. The variables describing the characteristics of the matches, (a) duration of rallies (DRs); (b) rest time (RT); (c) effective playing time (EPT); and (d) shots per rally (SR), were determined from video recordings. Results The mean (SD) values for the match‐play activity variables were DR 7.5 (7.3) s, RT 16.2 (5.2) s, EPT 21.5 (4.9%), SR 2.7 (2.2) shots. Average blood lactate concentration and RPE values were 3.8 (2.0) mmol/l and 13 (2). Blood lactate concentrations and RPE values were significantly higher (p<0.01) in service games than in receiving games. Both blood lactate concentration and RPE values were significantly correlated with SR and DR (r = 0.80 to 0.28; p<0.001). Conclusions Blood lactate concentrations and RPE were found to be influenced by the characteristics of the match and the playing situation (ie, serving or returning). These specific situations might be used to alter the overload training stimulus during tennis on‐court practice. PMID:17237121

  19. 'Football is good for your sleep': favorable sleep patterns and psychological functioning of adolescent male intense football players compared to controls.

    PubMed

    Brand, Serge; Beck, Johannes; Gerber, Markus; Hatzinger, Martin; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2009-11-01

    It is commonly assumed that physical activity exerts a favorable impact on sleep, although scientific evidence is lacking. This study investigated the impact of football sports on the sleep patterns of 36 male chronic and intense football players and 34 controls. Participants completed a sleep log for seven consecutive days. Compared to controls, football players reported shorter sleep onset latency, fewer awakenings, higher scores of sleep quality and a lower variability of sleep from weekdays to weekends. The findings suggest that football sports activity is positively associated with both quantitative and qualitative dimensions of sleep. PMID:19858334

  20. Joint Kinetics to Assess the Influence of the Racket on a Tennis Player’s Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Creveaux, Thomas; Dumas, Raphaël; Hautier, Christophe; Macé, Pierre; Chèze, Laurence; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the influence of three rackets on shoulder net joint moments, power and muscle activity during the flat tennis serve under field- conditions. A 6-camera Eagle® motion analysis system, operating at 256 Hz, captured racket and dominant upper limb kinematics of the serve in five tennis players under three racket conditions (A: low mass, high balance and polar moment, B: low three moments of inertia, and C: high mass, swingweight and twistweight). The electromyographic activity of six trunk and arm muscles was simultaneously recorded. Shoulder net joint moments and power were computed by 3D inverse dynamics. The results showed that greater shoulder joint power and internal/external rotation peak moments were found to accelerate and decelerate racket A in comparison with the racket C. Moreover, serving with the racket A resulted in less activity in latissimus dorsi muscle during the acceleration phase, and biceps brachii muscle during the follow-through phase when compared with racket C. These initial findings encourage studying the biomechanical measurements to quantify the loads on the body during play in order to reduce them, and then prevent shoulder injuries. Racket specifications may be a critical point for coaches who train players suffering from shoulder pain and chronic upper limb injuries should be considered in relation to the racket specifications of the players. Key Points Light racket required more joint power than heavy one to achieve similar post impact ball velocity. Serving with a light racket resulted in higher shoulder internal and external rotation moments than using a heavy one for similar performance. Chronic shoulder pain should encourage coaches to check for potentially inappropriate racket specifications of their players. PMID:24149804

  1. Energy expenditure during tennis play: a preliminary video analysis and metabolic model approach.

    PubMed

    Botton, Florent; Hautier, Christophe; Eclache, Jean-Paul

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate, using video analysis, what proportion of the total energy expenditure during a tennis match is accounted for by aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, respectively. The method proposed involved estimating the metabolic power (MP) of 5 activities, which are inherent to tennis: walking, running, hitting the ball, serving, and sitting down to rest. The energy expenditure concerned was calculated by sequencing the activity by video analysis. A bioenergetic model calculated the aerobic energy expenditure (EEO2mod) in terms of MP, and the anaerobic energy expenditure was calculated by subtracting this (MP - EEO2mod). Eight tennis players took part in the experiment as subjects (mean ± SD: age 25.2 ± 1.9 years, weight 79.3 ± 10.8 kg, VO2max 54.4 ± 5.1 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)). The players started off by participating in 2 games while wearing the K4b2, with their activity profile measured by the video analysis system, and then by playing a set without equipment but with video analysis. There was no significant difference between calculated and measured oxygen consumptions over the 16 games (p = 0.763), and these data were strongly related (r = 0.93, p < 0.0001). The EEO2mod was quite weak over all the games (49.4 ± 4.8% VO2max), whereas the MP during points was up to 2 or 3 times the VO2max. Anaerobic metabolism reached 32% of the total energy expenditure across all the games 67% for points and 95% for hitting the ball. This method provided a good estimation of aerobic energy expenditure and made it possible to calculate the anaerobic energy expenditure. This could make it possible to estimate the metabolic intensity of training sessions and matches using video analysis.

  2. Effect of skill decomposition on racket and ball kinematics of the elite junior tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Reid, Machar; Whiteside, David; Elliott, Bruce

    2010-11-01

    Whole body kinematics of the tennis serve have been reported extensively in the literature, yet comparatively less information exists regarding the kinematic characteristics of the swing and toss. In attempting to develop consistency in placement of the toss and racket trajectory, coaches will often decompose the serve and practice it in separate parts. A 22-camera VICON MX motion analysis system, operating at 250 Hz, captured racket, ball and hand kinematics of the serves of five elite junior players under three conditions. The conditions were flat first serves (FS) directed to a 1 x 1 m target bordering the 'T' of the deuce service box, a ball toss (BT) in isolation and a free swing (SW) in isolation. Players were instructed to perform BT and SW as in the FS. Paired t-tests assessed within-group differences in hand, racket and ball kinematics between the discrete skill and the two decomposed conditions. Vertical displacement of the ball at its zenith increased significantly during BT compared with the FS and temporal associations between racket and ball motion during the FS (r = 0.861) were affected during task decomposition. This study questions the pervasive use of task decomposition in the development of the tennis serve.

  3. Tennis Racket Vibrations and Shock Transmission to the Wrist during Forehand Drive

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Triquigneaux, Sylvain; Macé, Pierre; Gauthier, Fabien; Sevrez, Violaine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of two different racket models and two different forehand drive velocities on the three-dimensional vibration behavior of the racket and shock transmission to the player’s wrist under real playing conditions. Nine tennis players performed a series of crosscourt flat forehand drives at two velocities, using a lightly and a highly vibrant racket. Two accelerometers were fixed on the racket frame and the player’s wrist. The analysis of vibration signals in both time and frequency domains showed no interaction effect of velocity and racket conditions either on the racket vibration behavior or on shock transmission. An increase in playing velocity enlarged the amount of vibrations at the racket and wrist, but weakly altered their frequency content. As compared to a racket perceived as highly vibrating, a racket perceived as lightly vibrating damped longer in the out-of-plane axis of the racket and shorter on the other axis of the racket and on the wrist, and displayed a lower amount of energy in the high frequency of the vibration signal at the racket and wrist. These findings indicated that the playing velocity must be controlled when investigating the vibration loads due to the racket under real playing conditions. Similarly, a reduced perception of vibration by the tennis player would be linked to decreased amplitude of the racket vibration signal, which may concentrate the signal energy in the low frequencies. PMID:26177373

  4. Biochemical assessments of retinol, alpha-tocopherol, pyridoxal--5-phosphate oxidative stress index and total antioxidant status in adolescent professional basketball players and sedentary controls.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Necat; Erel, Ozcan; Hazer, Muhsin; Bağci, Cahit; Namiduru, Emine; Gül, Ece

    2007-01-01

    Physical training is known to increase the antioxidant defence system and reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress. However, intense physical aerobic and anaerobic training with competition, such as those imposed on young professional basketball players can induce an increase of oxidative stress, which can be implicated with overtraining. The aim of this study was to test the effect of training and competition load on oxidative stress, antioxidant status, and vitamin levels in basketball players. Oxidative Stres Index (OSI 1), Total Peroxide (TPx) antioxidant (vitamin E, A and The total antioxidant status (TAC 1)), biochemical lipid parameters, as well as training results were measured. Results showed that all plasma vitamin levels were significantly higher in basketball players (vitamin A: 1.61 +/- 0.05 mmol/l, vitamin E: 26.45 +/- 0.72 mmol/l, vitamin B6: 10.58 +/- 0.7 mgr/l) than sedentary controls (vitamin A: 1.22 +/- 0.04 mmol /l, vitamin E: 19.24 +/- 0.73 mmol/l, vitamin B6: 6.0 +/- 0.35 mgr/l) (p < 0.01). In addition TAC 1 was 2.06 +/- 0.02 and 1.89 +/- 0.01 mmol Trolox eq/L in basketball players and controls, respectively (p < 0.01). Conversely OSI was 0.89 +/- 0.09 arbitrary unit and 0.88 +/- 0.071 arbitrary unit in basketball players and controls, respectively (p > 0.05). However, total plasma peroxide level (TPx) of basketball players and controls was not statistically different (18.55 +/- 2.07 and 17.18 +/- 1.61 micromol H2O2/L, respectively; p > 0.05). We conclude that physical exercise increase antioxidant levels and cause balance of the homeostasis. Training can not have positive or negative effects on oxidative stress depending on training load. The results suggested that oxidative stress and antioxidant measurement are significant in the biological follow-up of young basketball players.

  5. Tennis racket shock mitigation experiments.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J F; Davis, J S

    1995-11-01

    Measured in this study was the effectiveness of two types of retrofits in mitigating shocks in tennis rackets with ideally high grip fixity. The retrofits were a cushioned grip tape and a string implant device. Three types of rackets were investigated: wood, graphite composite, and metal. For low speed ball impact, neither retrofit changed significantly the magnitude and distribution of e, the coefficient of restitution on the racket heads. For moderate ball speeds impacting the rackets along the vertical centerline, three dynamic racket responses were measured: the free vibration damping based on racket head acceleration, the root-mean-square (rms) grip reaction force, and the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the grip force. These latter experiments showed that the string implant device had a negligible effect on the three dynamic measures of racket response. However, the cushioned grip tape increased racket damping by up to 100 percent, reduced the rms grip force by about 20 percent, and reduced the magnitude of the FFT of this force by about 40 percent.

  6. Vibration modeling and supression in tennis racquets.

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C. R.; Buechler, M. A.; Espino, Luis; Thompson, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    The size of the 'sweet spot' is one measure of tennis racquet performance. In terms of vibration, the sweet spot is determined by the placement of nodal lines across the racquet head. In this studx the vibrational characteristics of a tennis racquet are explorod to discover the size and location of the sweet spot. A numerical model of the racquet is developed using finite element analysis and the model is verified using the results from an experimental modal analysis. The affects of string tension on the racquet's sweet spot and mode shapes are then quantified. An investigation is also carried out to determine how add-on vibrational datnpers affect the sweet spot.

  7. The dead spot of a tennis racket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    1997-08-01

    It is shown that a tennis racket has a dead spot, but it does not have a well-defined sweet spot, when measured in terms of the rebound of a tennis ball. A ball dropped onto the center of the strings bounces to about 30% its original height. The bounce is much weaker near the tip of the racket, being almost zero at the dead spot. These effects are explained in terms of the effective mass and rotational inertia of the racket, and by reference to the behavior of other cantilevered beams. It is concluded, somewhat paradoxically, that the best place to hit a serve or smash is at the dead spot.

  8. Standoffish perhaps, but successful as well: evidence that avoidant attachment can be beneficial in professional tennis and computer science.

    PubMed

    Ein-Dor, Tsachi; Reizer, Abira; Shaver, Phillip R; Dotan, Eyal

    2012-06-01

    Attachment-related avoidance and anxiety have repeatedly been associated with poorer adjustment in various social, emotional, and behavioral domains. We examined 2 domains in which avoidant individuals might be better equipped than their less avoidant peers to succeed and be satisfied--professional singles tennis and computer science. These fields may reward self-reliance, independence, and the ability to work without proximal social support from loved ones. In study 1, we followed 58 professional singles tennis players for 16 months and found that scores on attachment-related avoidance predicted a higher ranking, above and beyond the contributions of training and coping resources. In study 2, we sampled 100 students and found that those who scored higher on avoidance were happier with their choice of computer science as a career than those who scored lower on avoidance. Results are discussed in relation to the possible adaptive functions of certain personality characteristics often viewed as undesirable.

  9. Buyer's Guide for Tennis Court Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Tennis Court & Track Builders Association.

    This booklet examines seven planning and decision-making tips for investing in and building tennis courts that can prolong court life and get the most from the investment. It examines defining needs, developing a budget, considering the use of a consultant, choosing a site, choosing a surface and developing working specifications, making specific…

  10. Tennis Rackets and the Parallel Axis Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Derek

    2014-04-01

    This simple experiment uses an unusual graph straightening exercise to confirm the parallel axis theorem for an irregular object. Along the way, it estimates experimental values for g and the moment of inertia of a tennis racket. We use Excel to find a 95% confidence interval for the true values.

  11. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  12. Tennis Rackets and the Parallel Axis Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Derek

    2014-01-01

    This simple experiment uses an unusual graph straightening exercise to confirm the parallel axis theorem for an irregular object. Along the way, it estimates experimental values for g and the moment of inertia of a tennis racket. We use Excel to find a 95% confidence interval for the true values.

  13. Serving to different locations: set-up, toss, and racket kinematics of the professional tennis serve.

    PubMed

    Reid, Machar; Whiteside, David; Elliott, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    The serve, as the most important stroke in tennis, has attracted considerable biomechanical interest. Of its component parts, the swing has received disproportionate research attention and consequently, little is known regarding toss kinematics. Indeed, the age-old question of whether players serve to different parts of the court from the same toss remains unanswered. Six right-handed professionally ranked players hit first serves (FSs) and second serves (SSs) to three 2 x 1 m target areas reflecting the landing locations of T, body and wide serves, respectively, on the deuce court. A 22 camera, 250 Hz VICON MX motion analysis system captured racket, ball, foot, and h and kinematics. Repeated measures ANOVAs assessed within-player differences in foot, racket, and ball kinematics within the FS and SS as a function of landing location. The positions of the front foot, ball zenith, and ball impact were significantly different in the FS, while kinematics across all SS were consistent. Front foot position was closer to the centre mark in the T FS and players impacted the ball further left in the wide FS compared to the T FS. This study discusses the findings in the context of the development of the serve as well as potential implications for the return.

  14. Sodium bicarbonate supplementation prevents skilled tennis performance decline after a simulated match

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The supplementation of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) could increase performance or delay fatigue in intermittent high-intensity exercise. Prolonged tennis matches result in fatigue, which impairs skilled performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of NaHCO3 supplementation on skilled tennis performance after a simulated match. Nine male college tennis players were recruited for this randomized cross-over, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. The participants consumed NaHCO3 (0.3 g. kg-1) or NaCl (0.209 g. kg-1) before the trial. An additional supplementation of 0.1 g. kg-1 NaHCO3 or 0.07 g. kg-1 NaCl was ingested after the third game in the simulated match. The Loughborough Tennis Skill Test was performed before and after the simulated match. Post-match [HCO3-] and base excess were significantly higher in the bicarbonate trial than those in the placebo trial. Blood [lactate] was significantly increased in the placebo (pre: 1.22 ± 0.54; post: 2.17 ± 1.46 mM) and bicarbonate (pre: 1.23 ± 0.41; post: 3.21 ± 1.89 mM) trials. The match-induced change in blood [lactate] was significantly higher in the bicarbonate trial. Blood pH remained unchanged in the placebo trial (pre: 7.37 ± 0.32; post: 7.37 ± 0.14) but was significantly increased in the bicarbonate trial (pre: 7.37 ± 0.26; post: 7.45 ± 0.63), indicating a more alkaline environment. The service and forehand ground stroke consistency scores were declined significantly after the simulated match in the placebo trial, while they were maintained in the bicarbonate trial. The match-induced declines in the consistency scores were significantly larger in the placebo trial than those in the bicarbonate trial. This study suggested that NaHCO3 supplementation could prevent the decline in skilled tennis performance after a simulated match. PMID:20977701

  15. Field-Based Pre-Cooling for On-Court Tennis Conditioning Training in the Heat

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Rob; Bird, Stephen P.; Ballard, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of pre-cooling for on- court, tennis-specific conditioning training in the heat. Eight highly-trained tennis players performed two on-court conditioning sessions in 35°C, 55% Relative Humidity. Sessions were randomised, involved either a pre-cooling or control session, and consisted of 30-min of court- based, tennis movement drills. Pre-cooling involved 20-min of an ice-vest and cold towels to the head/neck and legs, followed by warm-up in a cold compression garment. On-court movement distance was recorded by 1Hz Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) devices, while core temperature, heart rate and perceptual exertion and thermal stress were also recorded throughout the session. Additionally, mass and lower-body peak power during repeated counter-movement jumps were measured before and after each session. No significant performance differences were evident between conditions, although a moderate-large effect (d = 0.7-1.0; p > 0.05) was evident for total (2989 ± 256 v 2870 ± 159m) and high-intensity (805 ± 340 v 629 ± 265m) distance covered following pre-cooling. Further, no significant differences were evident between conditions for rise in core temperature (1.9 ± 0.4 v 2. 2 ± 0.4°C; d > 0.9; p > 0.05), although a significantly smaller change in mass (0.9 ± 0.3 v 1. 3 ± 0.3kg; p < 0.05) was present following pre-cooling. Perceived thermal stress and exertion were significantly lower (d > 1.0; p < 0.05) during the cooling session. Finally, lower-body peak power did not differ between conditions before or after training (d < 0.3; p > 0.05). Conclusions: Despite trends for lowered physiological load and increased distances covered following cooling, the observed responses were not significantly different or as explicit as previously reported laboratory-based pre-cooling research. Key points Pre-cooling did not significantly enhance training performance or reduce physiological load for tennis training in the heat

  16. Lower trunk kinematics and muscle activity during different types of tennis serves

    PubMed Central

    Chow, John W; Park, Soo-An; Tillman, Mark D

    2009-01-01

    Background To better understand the underlying mechanisms involved in trunk motion during a tennis serve, this study aimed to examine the (1) relative motion of the middle and lower trunk and (2) lower trunk muscle activity during three different types of tennis serves - flat, topspin, and slice. Methods Tennis serves performed by 11 advanced (AV) and 8 advanced intermediate (AI) male tennis players were videorecorded with markers placed on the back of the subject used to estimate the anatomical joint (AJ) angles between the middle and lower trunk for four trunk motions (extension, left lateral flexion, and left and right twisting). Surface electromyographic (EMG) techniques were used to monitor the left and right rectus abdominis (LRA and RRA), external oblique (LEO and REO), internal oblique (LIO and RIO), and erector spinae (LES and RES). The maximal AJ angles for different trunk motions during a serve and the average EMG levels for different muscles during different phases (ascending and descending windup, acceleration, and follow-through) of a tennis serve were evaluated. Results The repeated measures Skill × Serve Type × Trunk Motion ANOVA for maximal AJ angle indicated no significant main effects for serve type or skill level. However, the AV group had significantly smaller extension (p = 0.018) and greater left lateral flexion (p = 0.038) angles than the AI group. The repeated measures Skill × Serve Type × Phase MANOVA revealed significant phase main effects in all muscles (p < 0.001) and the average EMG of the AV group for LRA was significantly higher than that of the AI group (p = 0.008). All muscles showed their highest EMG values during the acceleration phase. LRA and LEO muscles also exhibited high activations during the descending windup phase, and RES muscle was very active during the follow-through phase. Conclusion Subjects in the AI group may be more susceptible to back injury than the AV group because of the significantly greater trunk

  17. Effects of neuromuscular function and split step on reaction speed in simulated tennis response.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Marko J J; Piirainen, Jarmo M; Salmi, Jukka A; Linnamo, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether split step (small hop before step) would be more beneficial than no-split condition in simulated tennis response situation. In addition, it was studied if movement time of the response is related to separately measured force production capabilities and reflex sensitivity of the players. Nine skilled male tennis players participated in this study. Subjects stood on a force plate and reacted to a light signal and moved to appointed direction as fast as possible. With split step the participants were 13.1% faster (P <0.05) than without split step from the start to the distal end of the so called close range movement continuum (2.70 m). This was mainly explained by 43.6% faster time (P <0.05) from the signal to the onset of force production. Greater vertical forces were observed with split step: 15.7% greater F(z) mean force (P <0.05), 60.0% greater F(z) peak force (P<0.01). In split step both mean (r= - 0.813, P <0.01) and peak (r=-0.765, P <0.05) vertical forces (Fz) correlated negatively with the time from the onset of the force production to the photocell. With split step higher EMGs were observed in muscles responsible for ankle joint movement indicating that different strategies were used. Due to the split step the players were able to start the movement faster which mostly explains the advantages over the no-split step condition. Split step condition may also benefit from stretch shortening type of muscle action.

  18. Effect of Notched Strings on Tennis Racket Spin Performance: Ultrahigh-Speed Video Analysis of Spin Rate, Contact Time, and Post-Impact Ball Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Masamichi

    While some tennis racket strings have more grip than others do, this does not guarantee that they will impart more spin to a tennis ball. Experiments with hand-held rackets are required to determine the longstanding question of how players can discern that different strings behave differently when laboratory tests indicate that they should play the same. In a previous study, we clarified the top-spin mechanism of a tennis racket by using high-speed video analysis on a tennis court for the first time. Furthermore, we improved it by using lubricated notched nylon strings. These experiments revealed that the more the main strings stretch and bend laterally, the more spin is imparted to the ball. This is due to the restoring force being parallel to the string face when the main strings spring back and the ball is released from the strings. Notched strings reduce the spin rate, but this can be effectively counteracted by employing lubricants. Furthermore, we found that imparting more spin reduces shock vibrations on the wrist during impact. The present study revealed that a ball has a 40% lower spin rate when hit with a racket with notched strings than with one with unnotched strings in the case of nylon (it had to be determined whether new strings or lubricated used strings give more spin). The experiments also showed that 30% more spin is imparted to a ball when the string intersections are lubricated by oil than when notched used nylon strings are used. Furthermore, we found that used natural gut notched strings reduced the spin rate by 70% compared to when new natural gut unnotched strings are used. We also investigated different top-spin behaviors obtained when professional and amateur tennis players hit a ball.

  19. Inducing Attitude Change toward Online Gaming among Adolescent Players Based on Dissonance Theory: The Role of Threats and Justification of Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Chin-Sheng; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2010-01-01

    The negative impact of online gaming on adolescents has received much attention. The question of how to reduce their pathological use of online gaming is a critical issue. Based on the concept of external justification in dissonance theory, this experimental study aimed to examine whether severity of threat and justification of effort would impact…

  20. Scapular Resting Position and Gleno-Humeral Movement Dysfunction in Asymptomatic Racquet Players: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Shimpi, Apurv P.; Bhakti, Shah; Roshni, Karnik; Rairikar, Savita A.; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Racquet sports, especially lawn tennis and badminton have been gaining popularity in Asian countries like India. With this increase in popularity, the injury rate in the sport has also increased. Objectives: The study will help detect the presence of gleno-humeral movement dysfunction and scapular resting position abnormality in asymptomatic racquet players, thus providing basis for screening the players and allow the clinician to determine if the asymmetry is a normal adaptation in the player or an abnormal change associated with injury. Materials and Methods: 46 asymptomatic professional players were divided into a study group of 23 players (16 tennis and 7 badminton) and control group of 23 football players. Assessment of passive gleno-humeral range of motion and distance of spine and inferior angle of scapula from corresponding spinous process were measured bilaterally and between groups. Results: There was statistically significant reduction in range of internal rotation (62.17 ± 8.09), extension (39.78 ± 4.12) and an increase in the external rotation (106.95 ± 7.49) of dominant compared to non-dominant arm of racquet players and a statistically significant decrease in internal rotation (78.69 ± 10.24), extension (44.78 ± 3.19), adduction (37.39 ± 6.54) and an increase in external rotation (102.6 ± 5.19) of dominant arm of racquet players compared to football players. Study also showed statistically significant increase in the spino-scapular distance at the level of inferior angle of scapula (10.23 ± 1.43) on dominant side compared to non-dominant. Conclusions: The dominant side scapula of asymptomatic racquet players showed increased external rotation and elevation as compared to the non-dominant side. Also, reduced shoulder internal rotation, extension and adduction and gain in shoulder external rotation was observed on the dominant side of racquet players when compared to the control group. PMID:26715968

  1. Effects of long-term tennis playing on the muscle-bone relationship in the dominant and nondominant forearms.

    PubMed

    Ducher, Gaële; Jaffré, Christelle; Arlettaz, Alexandre; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent; Courteix, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    The relationship between muscle strength and bone mineral density illustrates the positive effect of mechanical loading on bone. But local and systemic factors may affect both muscle and bone tissues. This study investigated the effects of long-term tennis playing on the relationship between lean tissue mass and bone mineral content in the forearms, taking the body dimensions into account. Fifty-two tennis players (age 24.2 +/- 5.8 yrs, 16.2 +/- 6.1 yrs of practice) were recruited. Lean tissue mass (LTM), bone area, bone mineral content (BMC), and bone mineral density were measured at the forearms from a DXA whole-body scan. Grip strength was assessed with a dynamometer. A marked side-to-side difference (p < 0.0001) was found in favor of the dominant forearm in all parameters. Bone area and BMC correlated with grip strength on both sides (r = 0.81-0.84, p < 0.0001). The correlations were still significant after adjusting for whole-body BMC, body height, or forearm length. This result reinforced the putative role of the muscles in the mechanical loading on bones. In addition, forearm BMC adjusted to LTM or grip strength was higher on the dominant side, suggesting that tennis playing exerts a direct effect on bone.

  2. The physiological demands of hitting and running in tennis on different surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Kinner, Vanessa; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine how the training surface (i.e., clay or carpet) affects the characteristics (i.e., ball velocity, running pressure, running volume, and physiological responses) of a tennis training session. Ten competitive healthy and nationally ranked male tennis players (mean ± SD: age 24.2 ± 1.7 years, weight 81.4 ± 7.6 kg, height 1.88 ± 0.05 m, body mass index 23.1 ± 1.8) participated in a maximal treadmill test and a field test (e.g., an on-court tennis training session, which consisted of 4 exercises). Subjects' oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) were recorded by portable analyzers, and the ball velocity was measured using a radar gun during the training sessions. We did not find any significant influence of the court surface on any of the variables analyzed under the standardized exercise conditions of the study, as suggested in previous studies conducted under match-play conditions. Moreover, data showed significant differences between maximal forehand and backhand stroke velocities, the forehand stroke being significantly faster (p = 0.01) and more energy demanding on both playing surfaces (clay: 122.0 ± 9.1 vs. 111.1 ± 7.5; carpet: 120.4 ± 6.0 vs 111.5 ± 7.0 km·h). Comparing the same stroke on the same court surface, but at different stroke velocities, we found significant differences (p < 0.05) in all the physiological measurements (e.g., HR, %HRmax; VO2; %VO2), which significantly increased with hitting velocity.

  3. Thermal, physiological and perceptual strain mediate alterations in match-play tennis under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Périard, Julien D; Racinais, Sébastien; Knez, Wade L; Herrera, Christopher P; Christian, Ryan J; Girard, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study compared the thermal, physiological and perceptual responses associated with match-play tennis in HOT (∼34°C wet-bulb-globe temperature (WBGT)) and COOL (∼19°C WBGT) conditions, along with the accompanying alterations in match characteristics. Methods 12 male tennis players undertook two matches for an effective playing time (ie, ball in play) of 20 min, corresponding to ∼119 and ∼102 min of play in HOT and COOL conditions, respectively. Rectal and skin temperatures, heart rate, subjective ratings of thermal comfort, thermal sensation and perceived exertion were recorded, along with match characteristics. Results End-match rectal temperature increased to a greater extent in the HOT (∼39.4°C) compared with the COOL (∼38.7°C) condition (p<0.05). Thigh skin temperature was higher throughout the HOT match (p<0.001). Heart rate, thermal comfort, thermal sensation and perceived exertion were also higher during the HOT match (p<0.001). Total playing time was longer in the HOT compared with the COOL match (p<0.05). Point duration (∼7.1 s) was similar between conditions, while the time between points was ∼10 s longer in the HOT relative to the COOL match (p<0.05). This led to a ∼3.4% lower effective playing percentage in the heat (p<0.05). Although several thermal, physiological and perceptual variables were individually correlated to the adjustments in time between points and effective playing percentage, thermal sensation was the only predictor variable associated with both adjustments (p<0.005). Conclusions These adjustments in match-play tennis characteristics under severe heat stress appear to represent a behavioural strategy adopted to minimise or offset the sensation of environmental conditions being rated as difficult. PMID:24668377

  4. Carbohydrate supplementation improves stroke performance in tennis.

    PubMed

    Vergauwen, L; Brouns, F; Hespel, P

    1998-08-01

    The effect of carbohydrate supplementation on stroke quality during prolonged simulated tennis match-play was investigated. Well-trained tennis palyers reported to the test center three times. At each occasion they performed a pretest, consisting of the leuven Tennis Performance Test (LTPT) and a shuttle run (SHR), which they repeated (posttest) after a 2-h strenuous training session. Throughout the test session, they received in a double blind random order either a placebo drink (P), a carbohydrate solution (0.7 gxkg(-1) BWxh(-1); CHO), or CHO plus a dose of caffeine (5 mg per kg BW). Stroke quality was evaluated during the LTPT by means of measurements of error rate, ball velocity, precision of ball placement, and a velocity-precision (VP) and a velocity-precision-error (VPE) index. Pretest scores were similar during P and CHO. During P, compared with the pretest, stroke quality during the posttest deteriorated (P < 0.05) both for the first service and strokes during defensive rallies and for SHR performance. However, compared with P, the increase in error rate and number of nonreached balls indefensive rallies was smaller (P < 0.05) during CHO. Similarily, CHO attenuated (P < 0.05) the increase in error rate and the decrease in both the VP (P < 0.1) and VPE (P < 0.05) indices for the first service upon fatigue. Furthermore, CHO improved posttest SHR performance. Stroke quality and SHR time were similar during CHO alone and during combined CHO plus caffeine administration, both for the pretest and for the pretest and for the posttest. It is concluded that CHO supplementation improves stroke quality during the final stages of prolonged tennis play. The data prove that CHO intake may facilitate the maintenance of physical quality during long-lasting intermittent exercise to fatigue. PMID:9710871

  5. Fractal aggregates in tennis ball systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, J.; Bandín, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-09-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the images of the cluster of balls, following Forrest and Witten's pioneering studies on the aggregation of smoke particles, to estimate their fractal dimension.

  6. A double pendulum model of tennis strokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2011-05-01

    The physics of swinging a tennis racquet is examined by modeling the forearm and the racquet as a double pendulum. We consider differences between a forehand and a serve, and show how they differ from the swing of a bat and a golf club. It is also shown that the swing speed of a racquet, like that of a bat or a club, depends primarily on its moment of inertia rather than on its mass.

  7. Tennis for physical health: acute age- and gender-based physiological responses to cardio tennis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Alistair P; Duffield, Rob; Reid, Machar

    2014-11-01

    This study described physiological and perceptual responses to Cardio tennis for "younger" and "older" adult populations of both sexes for health-related outcomes. Thirty-one active participants, each with prior recreational tennis experience (∼2 years) (8 younger and 8 older males, and 7 younger and 8 older females) performed preliminary testing and a 50-minute instructor-led Cardio tennis session. Cardio tennis is a conditioning-based tennis program comprised of warm-up movements, drill-based exercises (set movement and hitting games), and competitive play scenarios. Participants performed the 20-m shuttle run test to determine maximal heart rate (HR) during preliminary testing. Before, after, and 30-minute post Cardio tennis session, HR, blood pressure (BP), rate pressure product (RPP), and capillary blood lactate and glucose were determined. Furthermore, HR and pedometer-derived step counts were measured throughout, while the session was filmed and coded for technical skill. After the session, ratings of perceived exertion, enjoyment, and challenge were obtained. Heart rate, systolic BP, and RPP were significantly increased by Cardio tennis (p ≤ 0.05), though returned to pre-exercise levels after 30 minutes (p > 0.05). Heart rate and BP did not differ between groups pre- or 30-minute postexercise (p > 0.05); however, these were lower in younger males during and higher in younger females postsession (p ≤ 0.05). Lactate and glucose concentrations were increased in all groups (p ≤ 0.05), with lactate being highest in male groups (p ≤ 0.05), without differences in glucose between groups (p > 0.05). Stroke and step counts were not different between groups (p > 0.05). Ratings of perceived exertion and perceived challenge were lowest in the younger male group compared with all other groups (p ≤ 0.05). Cardio tennis presents as an effective stimulus to invoke sufficient cardiovascular and metabolic load to benefit health and fitness, though age- and sex

  8. Viscoelastic modelling of tennis ball properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissler, L.; Jones, R.; Leaney, P. G.; Harland, A.

    2010-06-01

    An explicit finite element (FE) tennis ball model which illustrates the effects of the viscoelastic materials of a tennis ball on ball deformation and bounce during normal impacts is presented. A tennis ball is composed of a rubber core and a fabric cover comprised of a wool-nylon mix which exhibit non-linear strain rate properties during high velocity impacts. The rubber core model was developed and validated using low strain rate tensile tests on rubber samples as well as high velocity normal impacts of pressurised cores at velocities ranging from 15 m/s to 50 m/s. The impacts were recorded using a high speed video (HSV) camera to determine deformation, impact time and coefficient of restitution (COR). The material properties of the core model were tuned to match the HSV results. A two component anisotropic fabric model was created which included artificial Rayleigh damping to account for hysteresis effects, and the core model 'tuning' process was used to refine the cloth layer. The ball model's parameters were in good agreement with experimental data at all velocities for both cores and complete balls, and a time sequenced comparison of HSV ball motion and FE model confirmed the validity of the model.

  9. Effects of a Simulated Tennis Match on Lymphocyte Subset Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Mark; Kell, Holly; Navalta, James; Tibana, Ramires; Lyons, Scott; Arnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Tennis is an activity requiring both endurance and anaerobic components, which could have immunosuppressive effects postexercise. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of a simulated tennis match on apoptotic and migratory markers on lymphocyte subsets. Method: Male high school (n = 5) and college (n = 3) tennis…

  10. Influence of racket properties on injuries and performance in tennis.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Ewald M

    2007-04-01

    Racket properties may affect tennis elbow development. Shock and vibration to the arm is influenced by the location of ball impacts on the racket head, racket stiffness, and grip force. Beginners experience increased arm loads, and they hit the ball lower on the racket head. Tennis rackets behave differently during actual play compared with the performance predicted by physics.

  11. USTC & TBA Guidelines for Tennis Court & Running Track Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Tennis Court & Track Builders Association.

    Guidelines are presented on tennis court and track and field construction that reflect the latest developments in construction technology, methodology, and practice. Based on contributions from experienced certified tennis court and track builders, material suppliers and design professionals, this manual examines each of the critical areas of…

  12. Modifying Equipment in Early Skill Development: A Tennis Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buszard, Tim; Farrow, Damian; Reid, Machar; Masters, Rich S. W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The International Tennis Federation recently launched a worldwide campaign advocating the use of equipment scaling for children learning to play tennis. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence that varying racquet sizes and ball compressions had on children's ability to play a forehand groundstroke. Method: This was a…

  13. Tennis Enhances Well-being in University Students.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Ahmet Bulent; Gul, Mine; Yazici, Esra; Gul, Gazanfer Kemal

    2016-05-18

    Sports and physical activity are widely recommended, both as guidelines and in clinical practice, because of their broad range of positive effects on health, depression, anxiety, and psychological well-being. While several studies have examined the anti-depressive and anxiolytic effects of physical activity in clinical populations, and fewer studies have focused on the nonclinical populations, the relationship between tennis and well-being has not been clearly investigated. This study was carried out with 76 student volunteers from Kocaeli University (Turkey) who had chosen tennis lessons as their University. The tennis exercise program consisted of 90-minute basic tennis skills lessons for 13 weeks. At the beginning and at the end of the study, the students were given the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scales, and were evaluated by the DeWitt-Dugan Tennis Service Test, the DeWitt-Dugan Speed Test, and the Dyer Backboard Tennis Test. Upon evaluating the students' pre- and post-test scores, we concluded that their BDI and BAI scores had significantly decreased, with the most significant decreases seen in several sub-scores of the SCL-90-R; their tennis skills, meanwhile, increased significantly. This study shows that partaking in tennis exercise once a week decreases depression and anxiety symptoms and enhances well-being in healthy young people.

  14. Table Top Tennis: A Vehicle for Teaching Sportspersonship and Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwager, Susan; Stylianou, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Table top tennis is a game that can be played in the classroom or lunchroom when the gymnasium is unavailable. It is a good activity for developing sportspersonship and responsibility in students in grades four and up. This article provides a description of table top tennis, including basic rules and strategies; an explanation of how it can…

  15. "New Balls, Please!"--The Prosody of Tennis Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swerts, Marc; van Wijk, Carel

    2010-01-01

    Tennis scores represent a natural language domain that offers the unique opportunity to study the effects of discourse constraints on prosody with strict control over syntactic and lexical variation. This study analyzed a set of tennis scores, such as "30-15," from live recordings of several Wimbledon and Davis Cup matches. The objective was to…

  16. Tennis Enhances Well-being in University Students

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Ahmet Bulent; Gul, Mine; Yazici, Esra; Gul, Gazanfer Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Sports and physical activity are widely recommended, both as guidelines and in clinical practice, because of their broad range of positive effects on health, depression, anxiety, and psychological well-being. While several studies have examined the anti-depressive and anxiolytic effects of physical activity in clinical populations, and fewer studies have focused on the nonclinical populations, the relationship between tennis and well-being has not been clearly investigated. This study was carried out with 76 student volunteers from Kocaeli University (Turkey) who had chosen tennis lessons as their University. The tennis exercise program consisted of 90-minute basic tennis skills lessons for 13 weeks. At the beginning and at the end of the study, the students were given the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scales, and were evaluated by the DeWitt-Dugan Tennis Service Test, the DeWitt-Dugan Speed Test, and the Dyer Backboard Tennis Test. Upon evaluating the students’ pre- and post-test scores, we concluded that their BDI and BAI scores had significantly decreased, with the most significant decreases seen in several sub-scores of the SCL-90-R; their tennis skills, meanwhile, increased significantly. This study shows that partaking in tennis exercise once a week decreases depression and anxiety symptoms and enhances well-being in healthy young people. PMID:27403277

  17. Upper-body kinematics in team-handball throw, tennis serve, and volleyball spike.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H; Pfusterschmied, J; Tilp, M; Landlinger, J; von Duvillard, S P; Müller, E

    2014-04-01

    Overarm movements are essential skills in many different sport games; however, the adaptations to different sports are not well understood. The aim of the study was to analyze upper-body kinematics in the team-handball throw, tennis serve, and volleyball spike, and to calculate differences in the proximal-to-distal sequencing and joint movements. Three-dimensional kinematic data were analyzed via the Vicon motion capturing system. The subjects (elite players) were instructed to perform a team-handball jump throw, tennis serve, and volleyball spike with a maximal ball velocity and to hit a specific target. Significant differences (P < 0.05) between the three overarm movements were found in 17 of 24 variables. The order of the proximal-to-distal sequencing was equal in the three analyzed overarm movements. Equal order of the proximal-to-distal sequencing and similar angles in the acceleration phase suggest there is a general motor pattern in overarm movements. However, overarm movements appear to be modifiable in situations such as for throwing or hitting a ball with or without a racket, and due to differences at takeoff (with one or two legs). PMID:22813080

  18. Upper-body kinematics in team-handball throw, tennis serve, and volleyball spike.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H; Pfusterschmied, J; Tilp, M; Landlinger, J; von Duvillard, S P; Müller, E

    2014-04-01

    Overarm movements are essential skills in many different sport games; however, the adaptations to different sports are not well understood. The aim of the study was to analyze upper-body kinematics in the team-handball throw, tennis serve, and volleyball spike, and to calculate differences in the proximal-to-distal sequencing and joint movements. Three-dimensional kinematic data were analyzed via the Vicon motion capturing system. The subjects (elite players) were instructed to perform a team-handball jump throw, tennis serve, and volleyball spike with a maximal ball velocity and to hit a specific target. Significant differences (P < 0.05) between the three overarm movements were found in 17 of 24 variables. The order of the proximal-to-distal sequencing was equal in the three analyzed overarm movements. Equal order of the proximal-to-distal sequencing and similar angles in the acceleration phase suggest there is a general motor pattern in overarm movements. However, overarm movements appear to be modifiable in situations such as for throwing or hitting a ball with or without a racket, and due to differences at takeoff (with one or two legs).

  19. Contributions of upper limb rotations to racket velocity in table tennis backhands against topspin and backspin.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi; Mori, Teruaki; Kojima, Takeji

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the contributions of racket arm joint rotations to the racket tip velocity at ball impact in table tennis topspin backhands against topspin and backspin using the method of Sprigings et al. (1994). Two cine cameras were used to determine three-dimensional motions of the racket arm and racket, and the contributions of the rotations for 11 male advanced table tennis players. The racket upward velocity at impact was significantly higher in the backhand against backspin than against topspin, while the forward velocity was not significantly different between the two types of backhands. The negative contribution of elbow extension to the upward velocity was significantly less against backspin than against topspin. The contribution of wrist dorsiflexion to the upward velocity was significantly greater against backspin than against topspin. The magnitudes of the angular velocities of elbow extension and wrist dorsiflexion at impact were both similar between the two types of backhands. Our results suggest that the differences in contributions of elbow extension and wrist dorsiflexion to the upward velocity were associated with the difference in upper limb configuration rather than in magnitudes of their angular velocities.

  20. An Exploration of Exertion in Mixed Reality Systems via the ``Table Tennis for Three'' Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Florian ‘Floyd'; Gibbs, Martin R.; Vetere, Frank

    Humans experience their physical and social environment through their bodies and their associated movement actions. However, most mixed reality systems approach the integration of the real with a virtual world from a computational perspective, often neglecting the body’s capabilities by offering only limited interaction possibilities with a few augmented tangible objects. We propose a view on mixed reality systems that focuses on the human body and its movements, because we believe such an approach has the potential to support novel interaction experiences, as explored by a prototypal gaming system that was inspired by exertion actions exhibited in table tennis. “Table Tennis for Three” enables augmented bodily experiences while offering new opportunities for interaction, such as supporting three players simultaneously across geographical distances. This case study offers an exploration of the role of the human body and its associated movement actions in mixed reality systems, aiming to contribute toward an understanding of the use of exertion in such systems. Such an understanding can support leveraging the many benefits of exertion through mixed reality systems and therefore guide future advances in this research field.

  1. Physiological, perceptual, and technical responses to on-court tennis training on hard and clay courts.

    PubMed

    Reid, Machar M; Duffield, Rob; Minett, Geoffrey M; Sibte, Narelle; Murphy, Alistair P; Baker, John

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of court surface (clay vs. hard court) on technical, physiological, and perceptual responses to on-court tennis training. Four high-performance junior male players performed 2 identical training sessions on hard and clay courts, respectively. Sessions included both physical conditioning and technical elements as led by the coach. Each session was filmed for later notational analysis of stroke count and error rates. Furthermore, players wore a global positioning satellite device to measure distance covered during each session, while heart rate, countermovement jump distance, and capillary blood measures of metabolites were measured before, during, and after each session. Additionally, a respective coach and athlete rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured after each session. Total duration and distance covered during each session were comparable (p > 0.05; d < 0.20). Although forehand and backhands stroke volume did not differ between sessions (p > 0.05; d < 0.30), large effects for increased unforced and forced errors were present on the hard court (p > 0.05; d > 0.90). Furthermore, large effects for increased heart rate, blood lactate, and RPE values were evident on clay compared with hard courts (p > 0.05; d > 0.90). Additionally, although player and coach RPE on hard courts were similar, there were large effects for coaches to underrate the RPE of players on clay courts (p > 0.05; d > 0.90). In conclusion, training on clay courts results in trends for increased heart rate, lactate, and RPE values, suggesting that sessions on clay courts tend towards higher physiological and perceptual loads than hard courts. Furthermore, coaches seem effective at rating player RPE on hard courts but may underrate the perceived exertion of sessions on clay courts.

  2. Another day, another tennis coaching intervention, but does this one do what coaches purport?

    PubMed

    Reid, Machar; Giblin, Georgia

    2015-06-01

    A proficient serve is critical to successful tennis performance, and consequently coaches and players devote considerable time refining this stroke. In so doing, a wide variety of interventions are used or trialled, generally with very little empirical support. This study examined the efficacy of a commonly used service intervention, where players focus on exaggerating their finish (arabesque) position to promote specific chang