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Sample records for adolescents perinatally infected

  1. Mental health functioning among children and adolescents with perinatal HIV infection and perinatal HIV exposure

    PubMed Central

    Malee, Kathleen M.; Tassiopoulos, Katherine; Huo, Yanling; Siberry, George; Williams, Paige L.; Hazra, Rohan; Smith, Renee A.; Allison, Susannah M.; Garvie, Patricia A.; Kammerer, Betsy; Kapetanovic, Suad; Nichols, Sharon; Van Dyke, Russell; Seage, George R.; Mellins, Claude A.

    2012-01-01

    Mental health problems (MHPs) among children with perinatal HIV infection have been described prior to and during the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. Yet child, caregiver and socio-demographic factors associated with MHPs are not fully understood. We examined the prevalence of MHPs among older children and adolescents with perinatal HIV exposure, including both perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) and perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected (PHEU) youth. Our aims were to identify the impact of HIV infection by comparing PHIV+ and PHEU youth and to delineate risk factors associated with MHPs, in order to inform development of appropriate prevention and intervention strategies. Youth and their caregivers were interviewed with the Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd edition (BASC-2) to estimate rates of at-risk and clinically significant MHPs, including caregiver-reported behavioral problems and youth-reported emotional problems. The prevalence of MHPs at the time of study entry was calculated for the group overall, as well as by HIV status and by demographic, child health, and caregiver characteristics. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with youth MHPs. Among 416 youth enrolled between March 2007 and July 2009 (295 PHIV+, 121 PHEU), the overall prevalence of MHPs at entry was 29% and greater than expected based on recent national surveys of the general population. MHPs were more likely among PHEU than among PHIV+ children (38% versus 25%, p < 0.01). Factors associated with higher odds of MHPs at p < 0.10 included caregiver characteristics (psychiatric disorder, limit-setting problems, health-related functional limitations) and child characteristics (younger age and lower IQ). These findings suggest that PHEU children are at high risk for MHPs, yet current models of care for these youth may not support early diagnosis and treatment. Family-based prevention and intervention programs for HIV affected youth and

  2. Mental health functioning among children and adolescents with perinatal HIV infection and perinatal HIV exposure.

    PubMed

    Malee, Kathleen M; Tassiopoulos, Katherine; Huo, Yanling; Siberry, George; Williams, Paige L; Hazra, Rohan; Smith, Renee A; Allison, Susannah M; Garvie, Patricia A; Kammerer, Betsy; Kapetanovic, Suad; Nichols, Sharon; Van Dyke, Russell; Seage, George R; Mellins, Claude A

    2011-12-01

    Mental health problems (MHPs) among children with perinatal HIV infection have been described prior to and during the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. Yet child, caregiver and socio-demographic factors associated with MHPs are not fully understood. We examined the prevalence of MHPs among older children and adolescents with perinatal HIV exposure, including both perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV +) and perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected (PHEU) youth. Our aims were to identify the impact of HIV infection by comparing PHIV + and PHEU youth and to delineate risk factors associated with MHPs, in order to inform development of appropriate prevention and intervention strategies. Youth and their caregivers were interviewed with the Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd edition (BASC-2) to estimate rates of at-risk and clinically significant MHPs, including caregiver-reported behavioral problems and youth-reported emotional problems. The prevalence of MHPs at the time of study entry was calculated for the group overall, as well as by HIV status and by demographic, child health, and caregiver characteristics. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with youth MHPs. Among 416 youth enrolled between March 2007 and July 2009 (295 PHIV +, 121 PHEU), the overall prevalence of MHPs at entry was 29% and greater than expected based on recent national surveys of the general population. MHPs were more likely among PHEU than among PHIV + children (38% versus 25%, p < 0.01). Factors associated with higher odds of MHPs at p < 0.10 included caregiver characteristics (psychiatric disorder, limit-setting problems, health-related functional limitations) and child characteristics (younger age and lower IQ). These findings suggest that PHEU children are at high risk for MHPs, yet current models of care for these youth may not support early diagnosis and treatment. Family-based prevention and intervention programs for HIV affected youth and

  3. Perinatally infected adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (perinatally human immunodeficiency virus)

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Leticia S; Cardoso, Claudete A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of highly potent antiretroviral treatment during the last decades has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic disease. Children that were diagnosed during the first months or years of life and received treatment, are living longer and better and are presently reaching adolescence and adulthood. Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIV) and young adults may present specific clinical, behavior and social characteristics and demands. We have performed a literature review about different aspects that have to be considered in the care and follow-up of PHIV. The search included papers in the MEDLINE database via PubMed, located using the keywords “perinatally HIV-infected” AND “adolescents”. Only articles published in English or Portuguese from 2003 to 2014 were selected. The types of articles included original research, systematic reviews, and quantitative or qualitative studies; case reports and case series were excluded. Results are presented in the following topics: “Puberal development and sexual maturation”, “Growth in weight and height”, “Bone metabolism during adolescence”, “Metabolic complications”, “Brain development, cognition and mental health”, “Reproductive health”, “Viral drug resistance” and “Transition to adult outpatient care”. We hope that this review will support the work of pediatricians, clinicians and infectious diseases specialists that are receiving these subjects to continue treatment. PMID:26279988

  4. The challenges of success: adolescents with perinatal HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Mofenson, Lynne M; Cotton, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    The great success in the prevention and treatment of pediatric HIV in high resource countries, and now in low resource countries, has changed the face of the HIV epidemic in children from one of near certain mortality to that of a chronic disease. However, these successes pose new challenges as perinatally HIV-infected youth survive into adulthood. Increased survival of HIV-infected children is associated with challenges in maintaining adherence to what is likely life-long therapy, and in selecting successive antiretroviral drug regimens, given the limited availability of pediatric formulations, limitations in pharmacokinetic and safety data of drugs in children, and the development of extensive drug resistance in multi-drug-experienced children. Pediatric HIV care must now focus on morbidity related to long-term HIV infection and its treatment. Survival into adulthood of perinatally HIV-infected youth in high resource countries provides important lessons about how the epidemic will change with increasing access to antiretroviral therapy for children in low resource countries. This series of papers will focus on issues related to management of perinatally infected youth and young adults. PMID:23782484

  5. The challenges of success: adolescents with perinatal HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Mofenson, Lynne M; Cotton, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    The great success in the prevention and treatment of pediatric HIV in high resource countries, and now in low resource countries, has changed the face of the HIV epidemic in children from one of near certain mortality to that of a chronic disease. However, these successes pose new challenges as perinatally HIV-infected youth survive into adulthood. Increased survival of HIV-infected children is associated with challenges in maintaining adherence to what is likely life-long therapy, and in selecting successive antiretroviral drug regimens, given the limited availability of pediatric formulations, limitations in pharmacokinetic and safety data of drugs in children, and the development of extensive drug resistance in multi-drug-experienced children. Pediatric HIV care must now focus on morbidity related to long-term HIV infection and its treatment. Survival into adulthood of perinatally HIV-infected youth in high resource countries provides important lessons about how the epidemic will change with increasing access to antiretroviral therapy for children in low resource countries. This series of papers will focus on issues related to management of perinatally infected youth and young adults. PMID:23782484

  6. Bone health in children and adolescents with perinatal HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Siberry, George K

    2013-01-01

    The long-term impact on bone health of lifelong HIV infection and prolonged ART in growing and developing children is not yet known. Measures of bone health in youth must be interpreted in the context of expected developmental and physiologic changes in bone mass, size, density and strength that occur from fetal through adult life. Low bone mineral density (BMD) appears to be common in perinatally HIV-infected youth, especially outside of high-income settings, but data are limited and interpretation complicated by the need for better pediatric norms. The potential negative effects of tenofovir on BMD and bone mass accrual are of particular concern as this drug may be used more widely in younger children. Emphasizing good nutrition, calcium and vitamin D sufficiency, weight-bearing exercise and avoidance of alcohol and smoking are effective and available approaches to maintain and improve bone health in all settings. More data are needed to inform therapies and monitoring for HIV-infected youth with proven bone fragility. While very limited data suggest lack of marked increase in fracture risk for youth with perinatal HIV infection, the looming concern for these children is that they may fail to attain their expected peak bone mass in early adulthood which could increase their risk for fractures and osteoporosis later in adulthood. PMID:23782476

  7. Neurodevelopment in perinatally HIV-infected children: a concern for adolescence.

    PubMed

    Laughton, Barbara; Cornell, Morna; Boivin, Michael; Van Rie, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    Globally, an estimated 3.4 million children are living with HIV, yet little is known about the effects of HIV and antiretroviral treatment (ART) on the developing brain, and the neurodevelopmental and behavioural outcomes of perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) adolescents. We reviewed the literature on neurodevelopmental outcomes in PHIV+ children and adolescents, and summarized the current evidence on behaviour, general cognition, specific domains, hearing and language, school performance and physical disabilities due to neurological problems. Evidence suggests that PHIV+ children do not perform as well as controls on general cognitive tests, processing speed and visual-spatial tasks, and are at much higher risk for psychiatric and mental health problems. Children with AIDS-defining diagnoses are particularly at risk for poorer outcomes. A striking finding is the lack of published data specific to the adolescent age group (10-25 years), particularly from resource-constrained countries, which have the highest HIV prevalence. In addition, extreme heterogeneity in terms of timing and source of infection, and antiretroviral experience limits our ability to summarize findings of studies and generalize results to other settings. Due to the complex nature of the developing adolescent brain, environmental influences and variation in access to ART, there is an urgent need for research on the longitudinal trajectory of neurodevelopment among children and adolescents perinatally infected with HIV, especially in high burden resource-constrained settings. PMID:23782482

  8. Perinatally acquired HIV infection in adolescents from sub-Saharan Africa: a review of emerging challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lowenthal, Elizabeth D; Bakeera-Kitaka, Sabrina; Marukutira, Tafireyi; Chapman, Jennifer; Goldrath, Kathryn; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, more than three million children are infected with HIV, 90% of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa. As the HIV epidemic matures and antiretroviral treatment is scaled up, children with HIV are reaching adolescence in large numbers. The growing population of adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV infection living within this region presents not only unprecedented challenges but also opportunities to learn about the pathogenesis of HIV infection. In this Review, we discuss the changing epidemiology of paediatric HIV and the particular features of HIV infection in adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. Longstanding HIV infection acquired when the immune system is not developed results in distinctive chronic clinical complications that cause severe morbidity. As well as dealing with chronic illness, HIV-infected adolescents have to confront psychosocial issues, maintain adherence to drugs, and learn to negotiate sexual relationships, while undergoing rapid physical and psychological development. Context-specific strategies for early identification of HIV infection in children and prompt linkage to care need to be developed. Clinical HIV care should integrate age-appropriate sexual and reproductive health and psychological, educational, and social services. Health-care workers will need to be trained to recognise and manage the needs of these young people so that the increasing numbers of children surviving to adolescence can access quality care beyond specialist services at low-level health-care facilities. PMID:24406145

  9. Antiretroviral treatment, management challenges and outcomes in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Agwu, Allison L; Fairlie, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Three decades into the HIV/AIDS epidemic there is a growing cohort of perinatally HIV-infected adolescents globally. Their survival into adolescence and beyond represent one of the major successes in the battle against the disease that has claimed the lives of millions of children. This population is diverse and there are unique issues related to antiretroviral treatment and management. Drawing from the literature and experience, this paper discusses several broad areas related to antiretroviral management, including: 1) diverse presentation of HIV, (2) use of combination antiretroviral therapy including in the setting of co-morbidities and rapid growth and development, (3) challenges of cART, including nonadherence, resistance, and management of the highly treatment-experienced adolescent patient, (4) additional unique concerns and management issues related to PHIV-infected adolescents, including the consequences of longterm inflammation, risk of transmission, and transitions to adult care. In each section, the experience in both resource-rich and limited settings are discussed with the aim of highlighting the differences and importantly the similarities, to share lessons learnt and provide insight into the multi-faceted approaches that may be needed to address the challenges faced by this unique and resilient population. PMID:23782477

  10. Reproductive Health Decision-Making in Perinatally HIV-Infected Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Zadeh, Sima; Albright, Jamie; Mellins, Claude Ann; Mancilla, Michael; Tepper, Vicki; Trexler, Connie; Purdy, Julia; Osherow, Janet; Lovelace, Susan; Kapetanovic, Suad

    2013-01-01

    With widespread access to antiretroviral therapy in the United States, many perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) children are surviving into adolescence and adulthood, becoming sexually active and making decisions about their reproductive health. The literature focusing on the reproductive decisions of individuals behaviorally infected with HIV can serve as a springboard for understanding the decision-making process of PHIV+ youth. Yet, there are many differences that critically distinguish reproductive health and related decision-making of PHIV+ youth. Given the potential public health implications of their reproductive decisions, better understanding of factors influencing the decision-making process is needed to help inform the development of salient treatment and prevention interventions. To begin addressing this understudied area, a “think tank” session, comprised of clinicians, medical providers, and researchers with expertise in the area of adolescent HIV, was held in Bethesda, MD, on September 21, 2011. The focus was to explore what is known about factors that influence the reproductive decision-making of PHIV+ adolescents and young adults, determine what important data are needed in order to develop appropriate intervention for PHIV+ youth having children, and to recommend future directions for the field in terms of designing and carrying out collaborative studies. In this report, we summarize the findings from this meeting. The paper is organized around the key themes that emerged, including utilizing a developmental perspective to create an operational definition of reproductive decision-making, integration of psychosocial services with medical management, and how to design future research studies. Case examples are presented and model program components proposed. PMID:22736033

  11. Characterizing HIV Manifestations and Treatment Outcomes of Perinatally Infected Adolescents in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Kariminia, Azar; Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Nallusamy, Revathy; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Dung, Khu Thi Khanh; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Lumbiganon, Pagakrong; Viet, Do Chau; Kurniati, Nia; Yusoff, Nik Khairuddin Nik; Razali, Kamarul; Fong, Siew Moy; Khanh, Truong Huu; Wati, Dewi Kumara; Sohn, Annette H.

    2013-01-01

    Background More perinatally HIV-infected children in Asia are reaching adolescence. Methods We analyzed data from July 1991 to March 2011 reported by 18 clinics in six countries of children age >12 years. Results Of 1,254 adolescents, 33 (2.6%) died, and 52 (4.2%) were lost to follow-up within 2.4-year (3566 person-years) median follow-up period. Of 1,061 adolescents under active follow-up, 485 (46%) were male, median (IQR) age was 14.7 (13.3-16.4) years, 73% had lost a parent(s), 93% attended school, and 62% were aware of their HIV status. At the most recent evaluation, 93% were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART), 71% (N=737/1035) had CD4 >500 cells/mm3 and 86% (N=718/830) had viral load (VL) <400 copies/mL. Current CD4 >200 cells/mm3, no previous WHO stage 3 or 4, and being on a first-line regimen were independently associated with recent VL <400 copies/mL. Current age <15 years, VL <400 copies/ml, CD4 15-24% (vs. <10%) at ART initiation, no previous WHO stage 3 or 4, and ART duration of >1 year were associated with recent CD4 >500 cells/mm3.Primary causes of death after age 12 were opportunistic infections (N=15/33) and other AIDS- or treatment-related conditions (N=9/33). Those at age 12 with CD4 <200 vs. >500 cells/mm3 and those with VL >10,000 vs. <10,000 copies/mL were 17.4 and 4.76 times more likely to die in adolescence, respectively. Conclusion Adolescents in this cohort have been successfully maintained in HIV care. Initiating treatment at earlier stages of disease was associated with immune recovery and virologic suppression during adolescence. PMID:23942457

  12. The changing epidemiology of the global paediatric HIV epidemic: keeping track of perinatally HIV-infected adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Annette H; Hazra, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    The global paediatric HIV epidemic is shifting into a new phase as children on antiretroviral therapy (ART) move into adolescence and adulthood, and face new challenges of living with HIV. UNAIDS reports that 3.4 million children aged below 15 years and 2 million adolescents aged between 10 and 19 years have HIV. Although the vast majority of children were perinatally infected, older children are combined with behaviourally infected adolescents and youth in global reporting, making it difficult to keep track of their outcomes. Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIVA) are a highly unique patient sub-population, having been infected before development of their immune systems, been subject to suboptimal ART options and formulations, and now face transition from complete dependence on adult caregivers to becoming their own caregivers. As we are unable to track long-term complications and survival of PHIVA through national and global reporting systems, local and regional cohorts are the main sources for surveillance and research among PHIVA. This global review will utilize those data to highlight the epidemiology of PHIVA infection, treatment challenges and chronic disease risks. Unless mechanisms are created to count and separate out PHIVA outcomes, we will have few opportunities to characterize the negative consequences of life-long HIV infection in order to find ways to prevent them. PMID:23782474

  13. Disclosure of HIV Status to Perinatally Infected Adolescents in Urban Uganda: A Qualitative Study on Timing, Process, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mutumba, Massy; Musiime, Victor; Tsai, Alexander C; Byaruhanga, Judith; Kiweewa, Francis; Bauermeister, José A; Snow, Rachel C

    2015-01-01

    Disclosure of HIV status to children and adolescents living with HIV remains a challenge in pediatric HIV care. Many of the current disclosure guidelines from national and international bodies recommend that perinatally infected children be informed of their HIV status prior to adolescence, but rates of disclosure in both high- and low-income countries remains low. The applicability of the recommendations to low-income countries remains largely unknown, as few studies have explored the disclosure process in these settings. Our purpose was to explore disclosure experiences of HIV-infected adolescents in Uganda. Disclosure was a largely one-time event conducted by health care providers. The average age at disclosure was 13 years. Disclosure elicited a diverse array of positive and negative reactions, including suicidal ideation; reactions were closely associated with participant age, gender, knowledge about HIV, and health status at time of disclosure. Interventions to promote locally effective, process-oriented approaches to early disclosure are needed. PMID:26066697

  14. The Impact of HAART on Cardiomyopathy among Children and Adolescents Perinatally Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunjal; van Dyke, Russell B.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Colan, Steven D.; Oleske, James M.; Seage, George R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Previous studies of cardiomyopathy among children perinatally infected with HIV were conducted before the routine use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Nucleoside analogues (NRTIs), the backbone of HAART, have been associated with mitochondrial toxicity, which can lead to cardiomyopathy. We evaluated the association of HAART and specific NRTIs associated with mitochondrial toxicity, on development of cardiomyopathy among perinatally HIV-infected children. Design 3,035 perinatally HIV-infected children enrolled in a US-based multicenter prospective cohort study, were followed for cardiomyopathy, defined as a clinical diagnosis or initiation of digoxin, from 1993–2007. Methods Cox models were used to estimate the effects of HAART and NRTIs on cardiomyopathy, identify predictors of cardiomyopathy among HAART users, and estimate the association between development of cardiomyopathy and mortality. Results 99 cases of cardiomyopathy were identified over follow-up (incidence rate: 5.6 cases per 1,000 person-years) at a median age of 9.4 years. HAART was associated with a 50% lower incidence of cardiomyopathy compared to no HAART use (95% confidence interval: 20%, 70%). Zalcitabine (ddC) use, however, was associated with an 80% higher incidence of cardiomyopathy. Among HAART users, older age at HAART initiation, ddC use before HAART initiation, initiating a HAART regimen containing zidovudine (ZDV), and a nadir CD4<15% were independently associated with a higher rate of cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy was associated with a 6-fold higher mortality rate. Conclusions HAART has dramatically decreased the incidence of cardiomyopathy among perinatally HIV-infected children. However, they remain at increased risk for cardiomyopathy and ongoing ZDV exposure may increase this risk. PMID:22781228

  15. Age at Virologic Control Influences Peripheral Blood HIV Reservoir Size and Serostatus in Perinatally-Infected Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Persaud, Deborah; Patel, Kunjal; Karalius, Brad; Rainwater-Lovett, Kaitlin; Ziemniak, Carrie; Ellis, Angela; Chen, Ya Hui; Richman, Douglas; Siberry, George K.; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Burchett, Sandra; Seage, George R.; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Importance Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiated within several weeks of HIV infection in adults limits proviral reservoirs that preclude HIV cure. Biomarkers of restricted proviral reservoirs may aid in the monitoring of HIV remission or cure. Objectives To quantify peripheral blood proviral reservoir size in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and to identify correlates of limited proviral reservoirs. Design, Setting, and Participants A cross-sectional study including 144 perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) youth (median age: 14.3 years), enrolled in the US-based Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, on durable (median: 10.2 years) cART, stratified by age at virologic control. Main Outcome and Measures The primary endpoint was peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proviral load following virologic control at different ages. Correlations between proviral load and markers of active HIV production (HIV-specific antibodies, 2-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles), and markers of immune activation and inflammation were also assessed. Results Proviral reservoir size was markedly reduced in the PHIV+ youth who achieved virologic control by age 1 year (4.2 [interquartile range, 2.6-8 6] copies per 1 million PBMCs) compared to those who achieved virologic control between 1-5 years of age (19.4 [interquartile range, 5.5-99.8] copies per 1 million PBMCs) or after age 5 years (−(70.7 [interquartile range, 23.2-209.4] copies per 1 million PBMCs; P < .00l). A proviral burden <10 copies/million PBMCs was measured in 11 (79%), 20 (40%), and 13 (18%) participants with virologic control at ages <1 year, 1-5 years, and >5 years, respectively (p<0.001). Lower proviral load was associated with undetectable 2-LTR circles (p<0.001) and HIV negative or indeterminate serostatus (p<0.001), but not with concentrations of soluble immune activation markers CD14 and CD163. Conclusions and Relevance Early effective cART along with prolonged virologic suppression after perinatal HIV

  16. Impact of HAART and CNS-penetrating antiretroviral regimens on HIV encephalopathy among perinatally infected children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunjal; Ming, Xue; Williams, Paige L.; Robertson, Kevin R.; Oleske, James M.; Seage, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Prior to antiretroviral treatment, HIV-infected children frequently developed encephalopathy, resulting in debilitating morbidity and mortality. This is the first large study to evaluate the impact of HAART and central nervous system (CNS)-penetrating antiretroviral regimens on the incidence of HIV encephalopathy and survival after diagnosis of HIV encephalopathy among perinatally infected children. Design A total of 2398 perinatally HIV-infected children with at least one neurological examination were followed in a US-based prospective cohort study conducted from 1993 to 2007. Methods Trends in incidence rates over calendar time were described and Cox regression models were used to estimate the effects of time-varying HAART and CNS-penetrating antiretroviral regimens on HIV encephalopathy and on survival after diagnosis of HIV encephalopathy. Results During a median of 6.4 years of follow-up, 77 incident cases of HIV encephalopathy occurred [incidence rate 5.1 cases per 1000 person-years, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.0–6.3]. A 10-fold decline in incidence was observed beginning in 1996, followed by a stable incidence rate after 2002. HAART regimens were associated with a 50% decrease (95% CI 14–71%) in the incidence of HIV encephalopathy compared with non-HAART regimens. High CNS-penetrating regimens were associated with a substantial survival benefit (74% reduction in the risk of death, 95% CI 39–89%) after HIV encephalopathy diagnosis compared with low CNS-penetrating regimens. Conclusion A dramatic decrease in the incidence of HIV encephalopathy occurred after the introduction of HAART. The use of HAART was highly effective in reducing the incidence of HIV encephalopathy among perinatally infected children and adolescents. Effective CNS-penetrating antiretroviral regimens are important in affecting survival after diagnosis of HIV encephalopathy. PMID:19644348

  17. Youth in Transition: Life Skills Among Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Exposed Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, Sarah L.; Dolezal, Curtis; Elkington, Katherine S.; Santamaria, E. Karina; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Cruz, Jennifer E.; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine mastery of life skills necessary for independent adulthood among perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) and perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected (PHIV−) youth. Methods Participants were recruited from four medical centers in New York City as part of a longitudinal study. Data for this article came from interviews of 150 PHIV+ and 95 PHIV− youth (age 13–24 years) and their caregivers. Life skills mastery was assessed using the Ansell-Casey Life Skills Assessment (ACLSA). Results PHIV+ youth had lower daily living skill mastery than PHIV− youth according to both youth and caregivers, and lower self-care mastery according to caregiver report. No HIV-status group differences were found in social relationships scores, but PHIV− youth had higher scores than an ACLSA benchmark sample. Conclusions PHIV+ youth may need supportive services in daily living and self-care needs to transition into adulthood. Normal-to-high functioning in social relationships may be important for learning to live independently. PMID:24124197

  18. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Mounerou; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Butel, Christelle; Vidal, Nicole; Serrano, Laetitia; Takassi, Elom; Konou, Abla A; Houndenou, Spero; Dapam, Nina; Singo-Tokofaï, Assetina; Pitche, Palokinam; Atakouma, Yao; Prince-David, Mireille; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF) and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods HIV viral load (VL) testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014). Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA). Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59%) were adolescents and 116 (41%) were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months). For 228 (80.6%), the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (zidovudine and lamivudine) and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) (nevirapine or efavirenz). Only 28 (9.9%) were on a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml) for 102 (36%), between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4%) and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%). Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%); 110/125 (88.0%) were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8%) to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2%) to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125) of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  19. Potential drug–drug interactions in HIV-perinatally infected adolescents on antiretroviral therapy in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, Ezequiel; Cecchini, Diego; Rodriguez, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction An increasing number of treatment-experienced perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHA) are being transitioned from paediatric centres to adult HIV-care [1]. Most of them had been heavily exposed to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs), harbour drug-resistant viruses and require non-antiretroviral medication due to comorbidities [2]. This may predispose for clinically significant drug–drug interactions (CSDDIs) [3]. There are no studies concerning CSDDIs in PHA. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of concomitant medications and CSDDIs in PHA who were transitioned for adult HIV-care to the Infectious Diseases Unit, Cosme Argerich Hospital, Buenos Aires City, Argentina. Materials and Methods Descriptive pilot cross-sectional study (March to June 2014). PHA under ARVs at the time of the study were assessed for concomitant medication. CSDDIs were screened and categorized using the University of Liverpool Drug Interactions Program (www.hiv-druginteractions.org) [4]. Results Forty-five patients were included. Female sex: 53%. Median (IQR) age: 20 years (18–22). CDC-stage C was observed in 27 (79%); 50% had ≥1 comorbidities including 3 with HCV co-infection. Drug abuse was observed in 6 (13%). The median of prior ARV regimens was 3 (3–5). Current ARV regimen included: PI: 87%, NNRTI: 27%, INSTI: 20%, enfuvirtide: 7% and CCR5 inhibitor: 4%. Median CD4 T-cell count: 568 cells/mL (279–771). Viral load <50 copies/mL: 80%. Sixty percent (27/45) had ≥1 co-medications (median 1). The most frequent co-medications were NSAIDs (40%), hormonal therapy (19%) and antimicrobials (19%). Use of herbal supplements was observed in 10 (22%). Overall, 23 (51%) had ≥ 1 CSDDIs: 19/27 (70%) with co-medication (orange flag=18 and red flag=1); and 2/10 (20%) with herbal supplements. ARV–ARV interactions were observed in 4/45 (9%): unboosted atazanavir+tenofovir (n=2), unboosted atazanavir+efavirenz (n=1) and lopinavir/ritonavir+efavirenz (n=1) (all orange flag). Considering

  20. Following young people with perinatal HIV infection from adolescence into adulthood: the protocol for PHACS AMP Up, a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tassiopoulos, Katherine; Patel, Kunjal; Alperen, Julie; Kacanek, Deborah; Ellis, Angela; Berman, Claire; Allison, Susannah M; Hazra, Rohan; Barr, Emily; Cantos, Krystal; Siminski, Suzanne; Massagli, Michael; Bauermeister, Jose; Siddiqui, Danish Q; Puga, Ana; Van Dyke, Russell; Seage, George R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The first generation of adolescents born with HIV infection has reached young adulthood due to advances in treatment. It is important to continue follow-up of these individuals to assess their long-term medical, behavioural and mental health and ability to successfully transition to adulthood while coping with a chronic, potentially stigmatising condition. To accomplish this, and to maintain their interest in long-term research participation, we need to accommodate the changing lifestyles and interests of young adult study participants while ensuring valid data collection. We report the protocol for Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) Adolescent Master Protocol (AMP) Up, a prospective cohort study enrolling young adult participants for long-term follow-up. Methods and analysis AMP Up is recruiting 850 young men and women 18 years of age and older—600 perinatally HIV-infected and a comparison group of 250 perinatally HIV-exposed, uninfected—at 14 clinical research sites in the USA and Puerto Rico. Recruitment began in April 2014 and is ongoing, with 305 participants currently enrolled. Planned follow-up is ≥6 years. Data are collected with a flexible hybrid of online and in-person methods. Outcomes include: transition to adult clinical care and retention in care; end-organ diseases; malignancies; metabolic complications; sexually transmitted infections; reproductive health; mental health and neurocognitive functioning; adherence to antiretroviral treatment; sexual behaviour and substance use; hearing and language impairments; and employment and educational achievement. Ethics and dissemination The study received ethical approval from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health's institutional review board (IRB), and from the IRBs of each clinical research site. All participants provide written informed consent; for cognitively impaired individuals with legally authorised representatives, legal guardian permission and participant assent

  1. Cognitive, Academic and Behavioral Correlates of Medication Adherence in Children and Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Sharon L.; Montepiedra, Grace; Farley, John J.; Sirois, Patricia A; Malee, Kathleen; Kammerer, Betsy; Garvie, Patricia A.; Naar-King, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Objective Medication adherence is critical to the success of antiretroviral therapies for children and youth with perinatally acquired HIV. Factors that influence successful transition of medication responsibility from caregivers to youth are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of medication adherence with demographic, cognitive, academic, and behavioral characteristics. Method Randomly selected youth, N = 151, age 8-18, completed cognitive and academic measures, and they and their caregivers completed questionnaires assessing behavior and emotional well-being. An announced pill count and questionnaires completed by youth and their caregivers were used to evaluate adherence. Results Of 151 participants, 100 completed all adherence measures. Adherence rates varied by assessment method. Non-adherence (<90%) by pill count was associated with older child age, greater youth responsibility for medications, and other demographic and medication regimen variables. Verbal impairment predicted better self-reported adherence and reading problems predicted better self- and caregiver-reported adherence. Youth-reported locus of control was associated with pill count non-adherence, and poor relationships with parents were associated with youth-reported non-adherence. Conclusion Consideration of youth cognitive or academic status may be helpful in evaluating medication adherence in patients with perinatally acquired HIV infection, particularly when using self- or caregiver reports to assess adherence. Vigilance for adherence problems is indicated when youth are older, responsible for medications, report poor caregiver relationships, and/or sense a lack of control over their lives. PMID:22366661

  2. Vitamin D status in a Brazilian cohort of adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Schtscherbyna, Annie; Gouveia, Carla; Pinheiro, Maria Fernanda Miguens Castelar; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; Machado, Elizabeth Stankiewicz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the prevalence and related factors of vitamin D (VitD) insufficiency in adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus. A cohort of 65 patients (17.6 ± 2 years) at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were examined for pubertal development, nutrition, serum parathormone and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [s25(OH)D]. s25(OH)D levels < 30 ng/mL (< 75 nmol/L) were defined as VitD insufficiency. CD4+ T-cell counts and viral load, history of worst clinical status, immunologic status as nadir, current immunologic status, and antiretroviral (ART) regimen were also evaluated as risk factors for VitD insufficiency. Mean s25(OH)D was 37.7 ± 13.9 ng/mL and 29.2% had VitD insufficiency. There was no difference between VitD status and gender, age, nutritional status, clinical and immunological classification, and type of ART. Only VitD consumption showed tendency of association with s25(OH)D (p = 0.064). Individuals analysed in summer/autumn season had a higher s25(OH)D compared to the ones analysed in winter/spring (42.6 ± 14.9 vs. 34.0 ± 11.9, p = 0.011). Although, the frequency of VitD insufficiency did not differ statistically between the groups (summer/autumn 17.9% vs. winter/spring 37.8%, p = 0.102), we suggest to monitor s25(OH)D in seropositive adolescents and young adults, especially during winter/spring months, even in sunny regions. PMID:26872341

  3. Vitamin D status in a Brazilian cohort of adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Schtscherbyna, Annie; Gouveia, Carla; Pinheiro, Maria Fernanda Miguens Castelar; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; Machado, Elizabeth Stankiewicz

    2016-02-01

    The purpose was to determine the prevalence and related factors of vitamin D (VitD) insufficiency in adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus. A cohort of 65 patients (17.6 ± 2 years) at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were examined for pubertal development, nutrition, serum parathormone and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [s25(OH)D]. s25(OH)D levels < 30 ng/mL (< 75 nmol/L) were defined as VitD insufficiency. CD4+ T-cell counts and viral load, history of worst clinical status, immunologic status as nadir, current immunologic status, and antiretroviral (ART) regimen were also evaluated as risk factors for VitD insufficiency. Mean s25(OH)D was 37.7 ± 13.9 ng/mL and 29.2% had VitD insufficiency. There was no difference between VitD status and gender, age, nutritional status, clinical and immunological classification, and type of ART. Only VitD consumption showed tendency of association with s25(OH)D (p = 0.064). Individuals analysed in summer/autumn season had a higher s25(OH)D compared to the ones analysed in winter/spring (42.6 ± 14.9 vs. 34.0 ± 11.9, p = 0.011). Although, the frequency of VitD insufficiency did not differ statistically between the groups (summer/autumn 17.9% vs. winter/spring 37.8%, p = 0.102), we suggest to monitor s25(OH)D in seropositive adolescents and young adults, especially during winter/spring months, even in sunny regions. PMID:26872341

  4. Sexual Behavior and Knowledge among Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Compared to HIV-Uninfected Adolescents at an Urban Tertiary Center in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ashlesha; Pineda, Carol; Kest, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sexual behaviors and knowledge among PHIV-infected (PHIV(+)) adolescents in comparison with HIV-uninfected youths are not well understood and continue to be studied actively. Objective. To compare sexual behavior and sexual knowledge of PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents at an urban, tertiary-care center in New Jersey. Study Design. Modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance questionnaire was administered to PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents to assess and compare sexual behavior and knowledge over a 1-year-period. Results. Twenty-seven PHIV(+) and 100 HIV-uninfected adolescents were studied; 59% PHIV(+) and 52% HIV-uninfected adolescents were sexually active. A significantly higher proportion of PHIV(+) adolescents compared to HIV-uninfected adolescents reported ≥1 occasion of unprotected penetrative sex (p < 0.0001) and reported multiple (>4) sexual partners (p = 0.037). Significantly more PHIV(+) males reported receptive anal intercourse (p < 0.001). About 1/3 of adolescents in both groups were unaware that sexual abstinence can prevent HIV transmission and >80% adolescents in both groups did not consider multiple sexual partners a risk factor for HIV transmission. Only 25% PHIV(+) adolescents reported disclosing their seropositive status to their first sexual partners. Conclusions. High risk sexual behaviors were significantly more prevalent among PHIV(+) youths; however both groups demonstrated considerable gaps in sexual knowledge. There is an urgent need for heightening awareness about risky behaviors, interventions for prevention, and reproductive health promotion among adolescents. PMID:27595131

  5. Sexual Behavior and Knowledge among Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Compared to HIV-Uninfected Adolescents at an Urban Tertiary Center in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Carol; Kest, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sexual behaviors and knowledge among PHIV-infected (PHIV+) adolescents in comparison with HIV-uninfected youths are not well understood and continue to be studied actively. Objective. To compare sexual behavior and sexual knowledge of PHIV+ and HIV-uninfected adolescents at an urban, tertiary-care center in New Jersey. Study Design. Modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance questionnaire was administered to PHIV+ and HIV-uninfected adolescents to assess and compare sexual behavior and knowledge over a 1-year-period. Results. Twenty-seven PHIV+ and 100 HIV-uninfected adolescents were studied; 59% PHIV+ and 52% HIV-uninfected adolescents were sexually active. A significantly higher proportion of PHIV+ adolescents compared to HIV-uninfected adolescents reported ≥1 occasion of unprotected penetrative sex (p < 0.0001) and reported multiple (>4) sexual partners (p = 0.037). Significantly more PHIV+ males reported receptive anal intercourse (p < 0.001). About 1/3 of adolescents in both groups were unaware that sexual abstinence can prevent HIV transmission and >80% adolescents in both groups did not consider multiple sexual partners a risk factor for HIV transmission. Only 25% PHIV+ adolescents reported disclosing their seropositive status to their first sexual partners. Conclusions. High risk sexual behaviors were significantly more prevalent among PHIV+ youths; however both groups demonstrated considerable gaps in sexual knowledge. There is an urgent need for heightening awareness about risky behaviors, interventions for prevention, and reproductive health promotion among adolescents. PMID:27595131

  6. Analysis of the social and psychosocial factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy in adolescents with perinatal HIV-1 infection in Panama from a gender perspective.

    PubMed

    Estripeaut, Dora; Luciani, Kathia; García, Ricardo; Banús, Rita; Aguais, Trina María; Berrío, Edilma; Jenkins, Alma; Smoot, Sharene

    2016-03-01

    Adherence is vital for an effective antiretroviral treatment. This cross-sectional study explored social and psychosocial factors associated with adherence among adolescents with perinatal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in Panama from a gender perspective. A questionnaire developed for the study was applied to 38 adolescent patients (20 female, 18 male; median age, 14 years). Thirty-two patients (86%; one missing response) still depended on an adult to remember taking their medication, among whom 28 relied on a female relative. Although 18 (47%) patients reported to become ill no more than once a year, only 10 (26%) patients showed an undetectable viral load, and 4 (11%) patients showed no CD4 suppression. Seventeen (45%) patients recalled correctly their medication. During the week prior to the interview, 26 patients (68%) reported that they had missed at least one dose. When asked the reason for missing a dose, 23 out of 34 (68%; 4 missing responses) patients responded, "I forgot". Female patients gave more excuses for missing doses (mean ± SD number of excuses per female, 2.4 ± 2; per male, 1.2 ± 1; p = .02), while more male than female patients described an action plan if they ran out of medication (13 vs. 8; p = .05). Educational programs involving patients and also family members are warranted to improve adherence. PMID:27392001

  7. Analysis of the social and psychosocial factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy in adolescents with perinatal HIV-1 infection in Panama from a gender perspective

    PubMed Central

    Estripeaut, Dora; Luciani, Kathia; García, Ricardo; Banús, Rita; Aguais, Trina María; Berrío, Edilma; Jenkins, Alma; Smoot, Sharene

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adherence is vital for an effective antiretroviral treatment. This cross-sectional study explored social and psychosocial factors associated with adherence among adolescents with perinatal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in Panama from a gender perspective. A questionnaire developed for the study was applied to 38 adolescent patients (20 female, 18 male; median age, 14 years). Thirty-two patients (86%; one missing response) still depended on an adult to remember taking their medication, among whom 28 relied on a female relative. Although 18 (47%) patients reported to become ill no more than once a year, only 10 (26%) patients showed an undetectable viral load, and 4 (11%) patients showed no CD4 suppression. Seventeen (45%) patients recalled correctly their medication. During the week prior to the interview, 26 patients (68%) reported that they had missed at least one dose. When asked the reason for missing a dose, 23 out of 34 (68%; 4 missing responses) patients responded, “I forgot”. Female patients gave more excuses for missing doses (mean ± SD number of excuses per female, 2.4 ± 2; per male, 1.2 ± 1; p = .02), while more male than female patients described an action plan if they ran out of medication (13 vs. 8; p = .05). Educational programs involving patients and also family members are warranted to improve adherence. PMID:27392001

  8. Distortion product otoacoustic emission data in perinatally HIV-infected and HIV-exposed but uninfected children and adolescents in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Torre, Peter; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Zeldow, Bret; Williams, Paige; Hoffman, Howard J; Siberry, George K

    2015-03-01

    The effect of perinatal HIV infection and exposure on sub-clinical auditory function can be measured with distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). DPOAEs were obtained at 4 frequency bins (1, 2, 3 and 4 kHz) and categorized by a signal-to-noise ratio. HIV infection was not associated with poorer DPOAEs. Among HIV-infected children, HIV viral load≥400 copies/mL had significantly lower odds of better DPOAEs. PMID:25742077

  9. Rates and Types of Psychiatric Disorders in Perinatally Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Youth and Seroreverters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellins, Claude Ann; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Elkington, Katherine S.; Dolezal, Curtis; Wiznia, Andrew; McKay, Mary; Bamji, Mahrukh; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine 1) the prevalence of psychiatric and substance use disorders in perinatally HIV-infected (HIV+) adolescents and 2) the association between HIV infection and these mental health outcomes by comparing HIV+ youths to HIV exposed but uninfected youths (HIV-) from similar communities. Methods: Data…

  10. Children and Adolescents with Perinatal HIV-1 Infection: Factors Associated with Adherence to Treatment in the Brazilian Context

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Letícia Santos; Cardoso, Claudete A. Araújo; Darmont, Mariana Q.; Dickstein, Paulo; Bastos, Francisco I.; Souza, Edvaldo; Andrade, Solange D.; Fabbro, Marcia D’All; Fonseca, Rosana; Monteiro, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Challenges to the adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy among the pediatric population should be understood in the context of the trajectories of families, their interaction with healthcare services, and their access to material and symbolic goods. The present study analyzed individual, institutional and social factors that might be associated with the caregivers’ role in the treatment adherence of children and adolescents living with HIV (CALHIV). Based on semi-structured interviews and questionnaires applied to 69 caregivers seen at pediatric AIDS services of five Brazilian macro-regions, we observed that adherent caregivers had better acceptance of diagnosis and treatment, were less likely to face discrimination and social isolation secondary to AIDS-related stigma and tended to believe in the efficacy of treatment, and to be more optimistic about life perspectives of CALHIV. Interventions aiming to improve adherence and to promote the health of CALHIV should take in consideration the interplay of such different factors. PMID:27338431

  11. Children and Adolescents with Perinatal HIV-1 Infection: Factors Associated with Adherence to Treatment in the Brazilian Context.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Maria Letícia Santos; Cardoso, Claudete A Araújo; Darmont, Mariana Q; Dickstein, Paulo; Bastos, Francisco I; Souza, Edvaldo; Andrade, Solange D; Fabbro, Marcia D'All; Fonseca, Rosana; Monteiro, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Challenges to the adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy among the pediatric population should be understood in the context of the trajectories of families, their interaction with healthcare services, and their access to material and symbolic goods. The present study analyzed individual, institutional and social factors that might be associated with the caregivers' role in the treatment adherence of children and adolescents living with HIV (CALHIV). Based on semi-structured interviews and questionnaires applied to 69 caregivers seen at pediatric AIDS services of five Brazilian macro-regions, we observed that adherent caregivers had better acceptance of diagnosis and treatment, were less likely to face discrimination and social isolation secondary to AIDS-related stigma and tended to believe in the efficacy of treatment, and to be more optimistic about life perspectives of CALHIV. Interventions aiming to improve adherence and to promote the health of CALHIV should take in consideration the interplay of such different factors. PMID:27338431

  12. Sexual Behavior and Perceived Peer Norms: Comparing Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Affected Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauermeister, Jose A.; Elkington, Katherine; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Dolezal, Curtis; Mellins, Claude Ann

    2009-01-01

    A large proportion of perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children are becoming adolescents and exploring their sexuality. This study explored the prevalence of sexual behaviors (kissing, touching, engaging in oral sex, or having vaginal/anal intercourse) in a sample of predominantly ethnic minority youths (N = 339; 54.1% Black and 30.4% Latino; 51%…

  13. The physical and psychological effects of HIV infection and its treatment on perinatally HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Vreeman, Rachel C; Scanlon, Michael L; McHenry, Megan S; Nyandiko, Winstone M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) transforms human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) into a manageable chronic disease, new challenges are emerging in treating children born with HIV, including a number of risks to their physical and psychological health due to HIV infection and its lifelong treatment. Methods We conducted a literature review to evaluate the evidence on the physical and psychological effects of perinatal HIV (PHIV+) infection and its treatment in the era of HAART, including major chronic comorbidities. Results and discussion Perinatally infected children face concerning levels of treatment failure and drug resistance, which may hamper their long-term treatment and result in more significant comorbidities. Physical complications from PHIV+ infection and treatment potentially affect all major organ systems. Although treatment with antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has reduced incidence of severe neurocognitive diseases like HIV encephalopathy, perinatally infected children may experience less severe neurocognitive complications related to HIV disease and ARV neurotoxicity. Major metabolic complications include dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, complications that are associated with both HIV infection and several ARV agents and may significantly affect cardiovascular disease risk with age. Bone abnormalities, particularly amongst children treated with tenofovir, are a concern for perinatally infected children who may be at higher risk for bone fractures and osteoporosis. In many studies, rates of anaemia are significantly higher for HIV-infected children. Renal failure is a significant complication and cause of death amongst perinatally infected children, while new data on sexual and reproductive health suggest that sexually transmitted infections and birth complications may be additional concerns for perinatally infected children in adolescence. Finally, perinatally infected children may face psychological challenges, including

  14. Maternal and Perinatal Effects of Adolescent Childbearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Nancy C.; LaBarba, Richard C.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated developmental consequences of adolescent childbearing in 60 low-income, pregnant adolescents and a low-income control group of pregnant adult women. Racial and age influences were investigated. Adolescents did not differ from controls on emotionality; a significant age by race interaction was found for depression. (Author/DB)

  15. Standing between Two Worlds in Harlem: A Developmental Psychopathology Perspective of Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Ezer; Mellins, Claude Ann; Ng, Warren Yiu Kee; Robinson, Lisa-Gaye; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2008-01-01

    Perinatal HIV infection in the US continues to evolve from a fatal pediatric illness to a chronic medical condition of childhood and adolescence. Although navigating this period is influenced by multi-leveled deprivations commonly experienced by low-income minority families, HIV alters the timing and experience of developmental milestones for many…

  16. Factors Associated with Insulin Resistance among Children and Adolescents Perinatally Infected with HIV-1 in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Geffner, Mitchell E.; Patel, Kunjal; Miller, Tracie L.; Hazra, Rohan; Silio, Margarita; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Borkowsky, William; Worrell, Carol; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Jacobson, Denise L.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: Because of prior inconsistent findings, we studied a large cohort of HIV-infected children to determine: (1) prevalence of insulin resistance (IR); (2) anthropometric and clinical correlates of IR, and (3) concomitant abnormalities of glucose tolerance. Methods The study population consisted of 451 children from the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. The outcome of interest was HOMA-IR. Covariates included demographic, metabolic, growth, body composition, HIV laboratory tests, and treatment characteristics. Children meeting triggers for IR underwent oral glucose tolerance tests and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements. Results Among 402 children with glucose and insulin measurements, 15.2% had IR of whom 79% were pubertal. IR was associated with higher alanine aminotransferase, body mass index, and nadir CD4%, Tanner stage 5, and ever having received amprenavir. Of those with IR, three had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), three impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), one IFG and IGT, none diabetic glucose tolerance, and three HbA1c between 6.1 and 6.5%. Conclusion In our cohort of HIV-infected adolescents, we observed a 15.2% prevalence of IR more closely linked to obesity than any other variable. This finding mirrors the high prevalence of obesity-mediated IR in American youth. However, associations with CD4 count and use of protease inhibitors may indicate some effect of HIV and/or its treatment. PMID:22042056

  17. Psychosocial adjustment in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus infected or exposed children – a Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zalwango, Sarah K; Kizza, Florence N; Nkwata, Allan K; Sekandi, Juliet N; Kakaire, Robert; Kiwanuka, Noah; Whalen, Christopher C; Ezeamama, Amara E

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether perinatal HIV infection and exposure adversely affected psychosocial adjustment (PA) between 6 and 18 years of life (i.e. during school-age and adolescence). Methods We enrolled 58 perinatally HIV-infected, 56 HIV-exposed uninfected and 54 unexposed controls from Kampala, Uganda. Perinatal HIV status was determined by 18 months of age using a DNA-polymerase chain-reaction test and was confirmed via HIV rapid diagnostic test at psychosocial testing when the children were 6 to 18 years old. Five indicators of PA (depressive symptoms, distress, hopelessness, positive future orientation and esteem) were measured using validated, culturally adapted and translated instruments. Multivariable linear regression analyses estimated HIV-status-related percent differences (β) in PA indicators and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results During school-age and adolescence, positive outlook (β=−3.8, 95% CI: −7.2, −0.1) and self-esteem (β=−4.3, 95% CI: −6.7, −1.8) scores were significantly lower, whereas depressive (β=11.4, 95% CI: 3.3, 19.5) and distress (β=12.3, 95% CI: 5.9, 18.7) symptoms were elevated for perinatally HIV-infected, compared to unexposed controls and exposed uninfected children. Similarly, positive outlook (β=−4.3, 95% CI: −7.3, −1.2) and self-esteem were lower for exposed controls versus HIV-unexposed children. Hopelessness was similar by perinatal HIV status. Likewise, the distress and depressive symptom levels were comparable for HIV-exposed uninfected and HIV-unexposed children. Conclusions Perinatal HIV infection predicted higher distress and depressive symptoms, while HIV-affected status (infection/exposure) predicted low self-esteem and diminished positive outlook in the long term. However, HIV-affected status had no impact on hopelessness, suggesting that psychosocial interventions as an integral component of HIV care for infected children or primary care exposed uninfected children may

  18. Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Acinetobacter baumannii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Mai; Kostadinov, Stefan; Gundogan, Fusun; Struminsky, Judith; Pinar, Halit; Sung, C James

    2013-05-01

    Objective To determine perinatal and pregnancy outcomes of Acinetobacter baumannii infection using clinicopathologic material from pregnant women, neonates, and perinatal postmortem examinations with positive cultures. Study Design This is a retrospective record review with placental and postmortem examination. Results During a 5-year period, 40 positive cultures were found. Three pregnancies with positive cultures close in the peripartum period were all associated with adverse outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, and one full-term birth with histological chorioamnionitis. Two positive cultures were found in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. Two of three cases of perinatal death grew pure cultures from blood and/or fetal tissue with placental or fetal examination demonstrating evidence of infection/inflammation with fetal inflammatory response. Conclusion This is the first case series report of A. baumannii-positive cultures in maternal, fetal, and neonatal specimen, with histopathologic evidence of infection. The results suggest a significant role of A. baumannii infection in adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes. PMID:23943711

  19. Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Mai; Kostadinov, Stefan; Gundogan, Fusun; Struminsky, Judith; Pinar, Halit; Sung, C. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine perinatal and pregnancy outcomes of Acinetobacter baumannii infection using clinicopathologic material from pregnant women, neonates, and perinatal postmortem examinations with positive cultures. Study Design This is a retrospective record review with placental and postmortem examination. Results During a 5-year period, 40 positive cultures were found. Three pregnancies with positive cultures close in the peripartum period were all associated with adverse outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, and one full-term birth with histological chorioamnionitis. Two positive cultures were found in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. Two of three cases of perinatal death grew pure cultures from blood and/or fetal tissue with placental or fetal examination demonstrating evidence of infection/inflammation with fetal inflammatory response. Conclusion This is the first case series report of A. baumannii-positive cultures in maternal, fetal, and neonatal specimen, with histopathologic evidence of infection. The results suggest a significant role of A. baumannii infection in adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes. PMID:23943711

  20. A Multimodal Behavioral Intervention to Impact Adherence and Risk Behavior among Perinatally and Behaviorally HIV-Infected Youth: Description, Delivery, and Receptivity of Adolescent Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandwani, Sulachni; Abramowitz, Susan; Koenig, Linda J.; Barnes, William; D'Angelo, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Secondary prevention programs are needed to help HIV-positive youth reduce risk behavior and improve adherence to HIV medications. This article provides an overview of Adolescent Impact, a secondary HIV prevention intervention, including its description, delivery, and receptivity among the two unique groups of participants. Adolescent Impact, a…

  1. Human papillomavirus infections in nonsexually active perinatally HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-02-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy. PMID:24460009

  2. Sexual Health Knowledge in a Sample of Perinatally HIV-infected and Perinatally-exposed Uninfected Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gromadzka, Olga; Santamaria, E. Karina; Benavides, Jessica M.; Dolezal, Curtis; Elkington, Katherine S.; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; McKay, Mary; Abrams, Elaine J.; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Ann Mellins, Claude

    2015-01-01

    This study describes sexual health knowledge in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) and perinatally-exposed uninfected (PHIV-) ethnic-minority youth, ages 9–16 years, residing in NYC (n=316). Data on youth sexual health knowledge (e.g., pregnancy, STDs, birth control) and caregiver-adolescent communication about sexual health were examined. Participants in both groups answered only 35% of the sexual health knowledge questions correctly (mean=6.6/19). Higher scores were found among youth who reported more communication about sex with caregivers (vs. those who did not report talking about sex with caregivers; 8.54 vs. 5.84, p<.001) and among PHIV+ youth who were aware of their status (vs. PHIV+ youth who were not; 7.27 vs. 4.70, p<.001). Age was positively correlated with sexual health knowledge (beta=.489, p<.001). Both PHIV+ and PHIV− youth had poor sexual health knowledge, suggesting a need for sexual health education for both groups. Data suggest that interventions focused on caregiver-child risk communication may be important for prevention. PMID:26855617

  3. Human trophoblasts confer resistance to viruses implicated in perinatal infection

    PubMed Central

    BAYER, Avraham; DELORME-AXFORD, Elizabeth; SLEIGHER, Christie; FREY, Teryl K.; TROBAUGH, Derek W.; KLIMSTRA, William B.; EMERT-SEDLAK, Lori A.; SMITHGALL, Thomas E.; KINCHINGTON, Paul R.; VADIA, Stephen; SEVEAU, Stephanie; Boyle, Jon P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) Primary human trophoblasts were previously shown to be resistant to viral infection, and able to confer this resistance to non-trophoblast cells. Can trophoblasts protect non-trophoblastic cells from infection by viruses or other intracellular pathogens that are implicated in perinatal infection? Study Design Isolated primary term human trophoblasts were cultured for 72 h. Diverse non-placental human cell lines (U2OS, HFF, TZM-bl, MeWo, and Caco-2) were pre-exposed to either trophoblast conditioned, non-conditioned medium, or miR-517-3p for 24 h. Cells were infected with several viral and non-viral pathogens known to be associated with perinatal infections. Cellular infection was defined and quantified by plaque assays, luciferase assays, microscopy, and/or colonization assays. Differences in infection were assessed by Student's t-test or ANOVA with Bonferroni's correction. Results Infection by rubella and other togaviruses, HIV-1, and varicella zoster, was attenuated in cells pre-exposed to trophoblast conditioned medium (p <0.05), and a partial effect by the Ch.19 microRNA miR-517-3p on specific pathogens. The conditioned medium had no effect on infection by Toxoplasma gondii or Listeria monocytogenes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that medium conditioned by primary human trophoblasts attenuate viral infection in non-trophoblastic cells. Our data point to a trophoblast-specific antiviral effect that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:25108145

  4. Cardiac effects in perinatally HIV-infected and HIV-exposed but uninfected children and adolescents: a view from the United States of America

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Steven E; Miller, Tracie L; Wilkinson, James D; Scott, Gwendolyn B; Somarriba, Gabriel; Cochran, Thomas R; Fisher, Stacy D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a primary cause of acquired heart disease, particularly of accelerated atherosclerosis, symptomatic heart failure, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Cardiac complications often occur in late-stage HIV infections as prolonged viral infection is becoming more relevant as longevity improves. Thus, multi-agent HIV therapies that help sustain life may also increase the risk of cardiovascular events and accelerated atherosclerosis. Discussion Before highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the two-to-five-year incidence of symptomatic heart failure ranged from 4 to 28% in HIV patients. Patients both before and after HAART also frequently have asymptomatic abnormalities in cardiovascular structure. Echocardiographic measurements indicate left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction in 18%, LV hypertrophy in 6.5%, and left atrial dilation in 40% of patients followed on HAART therapy. Diastolic dysfunction is also common in long-term survivors of HIV infection. Accelerated atherosclerosis has been found in HIV-infected young adults and children without traditional coronary risk factors. Infective endocarditis, although rare in children, has high mortality in late-stage AIDS patients with poor nutritional status and severely compromised immune systems. Although lymphomas have been found in HIV-infected children, the incidence is low and cardiac malignancy is rare. Rates of congenital cardiovascular malformations range from 5.6 to 8.9% in cohorts of HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected children with HIV-infected mothers. In non-HIV-infected infants born to HIV-infected mothers, foetal exposure to ART is associated with reduced LV dimension, LV mass, and septal wall thickness and with higher LV fractional shortening and contractility during the first two years of life. Conclusions Routine, systematic, and comprehensive cardiac evaluation, including a thorough history and directed laboratory assays, is essential for

  5. Dynamics of perinatal bovine leukemia virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is highly endemic in many countries, including Argentina. As prevention of the spread from infected animals is of primary importance in breaking the cycle of BLV transmission, it is important to know the pathophysiology of BLV infection in young animals, as they are the main source of animal movement. In this work, we determined the proviral load and antibody titers of infected newborn calves from birth to first parturition (36 months). Results All calves under study were born to infected dams with high proviral load (PVL) in blood and high antibody titers and detectable provirus in the colostrum. The PVL for five out of seven calves was low at birth. All animals reached PVLs of more than 1% infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), three at 3 months, one at 6 months, and one at 12 months. High PVLs persisted until the end of the study, and, in two animals, exceeded one BLV copy per cell. Two other calves maintained a high PVL from birth until the end of the study. Antibody titers were 32 or higher in the first sample from six out of seven calves. These decayed at 3–6 months to 16 or lower, and then increased again after this point. Conclusions Calves infected during the first week of life could play an active role in early propagation of BLV to susceptible animals, since their PVL raised up during the first 12 months and persist as high for years. Early elimination could help to prevent transmission to young susceptible animals and to their own offspring. To our knowledge, this is the first study of the kinetics of BLV proviral load and antibody titers in newborn infected calves. PMID:24708791

  6. Exposure to Perinatal Infections and Bipolar Disorder: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Barichello, T; Badawy, M; Pitcher, M R; Saigal, P; Generoso, J S; Goularte, J A; Simões, L R; Quevedo, J; Carvalho, A F

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating psychiatric disorder and a growing global public health issue. Notwithstanding BD has been conceptualized as a neuroprogressive illness, there are some evidences to suggest a role for neurodevelopmental pathways in the patho-etiology of this disorder. Evidences on the associations between perinatal infections and risk for bipolar disorder have been inconsistent across studies. Here, we performed a systematic review of observational studies on the relationship between exposure to perinatal pathogens and bipolar disorder. A computerized literature search of the PubMed, Embase, and PsyINFO databases till January 31(st), 2015 was performed. Twenty-three studies ultimately met inclusion criteria. Studies investigated exposure to several pathogens namely Cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), Toxoplasma gondii, Influenza, and Varicella zoster virus (VZV). Overall, studies provided mixed evidences. Thus, contrary to schizophrenia, the role of perinatal infections as risk factors for BD remain inconclusive. Larger studies with a prospective design would be necessary to elucidate the role of previous exposure to infectious agents as a potential risk factor for BD. PMID:26812921

  7. Contraception for HIV-Infected Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Athena P; Mirza, Ayesha

    2016-09-01

    Access to high-quality reproductive health care is important for adolescents and young adults with HIV infection to prevent unintended pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and secondary transmission of HIV to partners and children. As perinatally HIV-infected children mature into adolescence and adulthood and new HIV infections among adolescents and young adults continue to occur in the United States, medical providers taking care of such individuals often face issues related to sexual and reproductive health. Challenges including drug interactions between several hormonal methods and antiretroviral agents make decisions regarding contraceptive options more complex for these adolescents. Dual protection, defined as the use of an effective contraceptive along with condoms, should be central to ongoing discussions with HIV-infected young women and couples wishing to avoid pregnancy. Last, reproductive health discussions need to be integrated with discussions on HIV care, because a reduction in plasma HIV viral load below the level of detection (an "undetectable viral load") is essential for the individual's health as well as for a reduction in HIV transmission to partners and children. PMID:27573084

  8. Sexual behavior and perceived peer norms: Comparing perinatally infected and affected youth

    PubMed Central

    Bauermeister, Jose A.; Elkington, Katherine; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Dolezal, Curtis; Mellins, Claude

    2009-01-01

    A large proportion of perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children are becoming adolescents and exploring their sexuality. This study explored the prevalence of sexual behaviors (kissing, touching, engaging in oral sex, or having vaginal/anal intercourse) in a sample of predominantly ethnic minority youths (N = 339; 54.1% Black and 30.4% Latino; 51% female; ages 9–16) perinatally exposed to HIV (61% HIV+). Using logistic regression, we tested the association between sexual behavior and HIV status, demographic characteristics, and peer influences regarding sexual behavior. PHIV youth were less likely to be sexually active. Among sexually active youth, PHIV youth were more likely to engage in touching behavior than HIV-negative youth and were less likely to engage in penetrative sex. Youths reporting that a greater number of their peers believed that sexually active boys were “cool” or “popular” were more likely to report sexual behavior. The association between sexual behavior and peers believing sexually active girls were “cool” or “popular” varied by age, gender, and HIV status. Furthermore, friends’ sexual activity was associated with sexual intercourse. Prevention programs should strengthen messages addressing peer norms regarding sexuality, as well as address specific issues related to adolescent HIV. PMID:19636775

  9. Gag-Specific CD4 and CD8 T-Cell Proliferation in Adolescents and Young Adults with Perinatally Acquired HIV-1 Infection Is Associated with Ethnicity — The ANRS-EP38-IMMIP Study

    PubMed Central

    Le Chenadec, Jérôme; Scott-Algara, Daniel; Blanche, Stéphane; Didier, Céline; Montange, Thomas; Viard, Jean-Paul; Dollfus, Catherine; Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique; Rouzioux, Christine; Warszawski, Josiane; Buseyne, Florence

    2015-01-01

    The ANRS-EP38-IMMIP study aimed to provide a detailed assessment of the immune status of perinatally infected youths living in France. We studied Gag-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell proliferation and the association between the proliferation of these cells, demographic factors and HIV disease history. We included 93 youths aged between 15 and 24 years who had been perinatally infected with HIV. Sixty-nine had undergone valid CFSE-based T-cell proliferation assays. Gag-specific proliferation of CD4 and CD8 T cells was detected in 12 (16%) and 30 (38%) patients, respectively. The Gag-specific proliferation of CD4 and CD8 T cells was more frequently observed in black patients than in patients from other ethnic groups (CD4: 32% vs. 4%, P = 0.001; CD8: 55% vs. 26%, P = 0.02). Among aviremic patients, the duration of viral suppression was shorter in CD8 responders than in CD8 nonresponders (medians: 54 vs. 20 months, P = 0.04). Among viremic patients, CD8 responders had significantly lower plasma HIV RNA levels than CD8 nonresponders (2.7 vs. 3.7 log10 HIV-RNA copies/ml, P = 0.02). In multivariate analyses including sex and HIV-1 subtype as covariables, Gag-specific CD4 T-cell proliferation was associated only with ethnicity, whereas Gag-specific CD8 T-cell proliferation was associated with both ethnicity and the duration of viral suppression. Both CD4 and CD8 responders reached their nadir CD4 T-cell percentages at younger ages than their nonresponder counterparts (6 vs. 8 years, P = 0.04 for both CD4 and CD8 T-cell proliferation). However, these associations were not significant in multivariate analysis. In conclusion, after at least 15 years of HIV infection, Gag-specific T-cell proliferation was found to be more frequent in black youths than in patients of other ethnic groups, despite all the patients being born in the same country, with similar access to care. PMID:26650393

  10. Resilience in perinatal HIV+ adolescents in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bhana, Arvin; Mellins, Claude A.; Small, Latoya; Nestadt, Danielle F.; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Petersen, Inge; Machanyangwa, Sphindile; McKay, Mary

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Increasing numbers of perinatally HIV (PHIV+)-infected youth are surviving into adulthood with better access to treatment. However, few studies examine positive outcomes in the face of adversity (resilience) for PHIV+ youth. Social Action Theory (SAT) provided the theoretical framework for this study of PHIV + youth in South Africa (SA), allowing examination of contextual, social, and self-regulatory factors that influence behavioral health. Data were from youth and caregiver baseline interviews, simply pooled from a pilot (N=66) and larger (n=111) randomized control trial (RCT) of the VUKA Family program. For this analysis, outcomes included emotional and behavioral functioning (total difficulties), and prosocial behaviors. Potential SAT correlates included socio-demographics; caregiver health and mental health; parent-child relationship factors; stigma, and child coping, support; and self-esteem. Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, and study revealed significant associations at the contextual, social, and self-regulation level. Lower total child difficulties scores were associated with lower caregiver depression (β = 3.906,p < .001), less caregiver-reported communication about difficult issues (β = 1.882, p = .009) and higher youth self-esteem (β = -0.119, p = .020). Greater prosocial behaviors were associated with greater caregiver-reported communication (β = 0.722, p = .020) and child use of wishful thinking for coping (β = 5.532, p = .009). Less youth depression was associated with higher caregiver education (β =−0.399, p = .010), greater caregiver supervision (β = −1.261, p = .012), more social support seeking (β = −0.453, p = .002), higher youth self-esteem (β = −0.067, p < .001), lower internalized stigma (β = 0.608, p = .040), and child use of resignation for coping (β = 1.152, p = .041). Our data support evidence-based family interventions that also promote youth self-regulation skills to enhance the health and mental

  11. Resilience in perinatal HIV+ adolescents in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bhana, Arvin; Mellins, Claude A; Small, Latoya; Nestadt, Danielle F; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Petersen, Inge; Machanyangwa, Sphindile; McKay, Mary

    2016-03-01

    Increasing numbers of perinatally HIV (PHIV+)-infected youth are surviving into adulthood with better access to treatment. However, few studies examine positive outcomes in the face of adversity (resilience) for PHIV+ youth. Social Action Theory (SAT) provided the theoretical framework for this study of PHIV + youth in South Africa (SA), allowing examination of contextual, social, and self-regulatory factors that influence behavioral health. Data were from youth and caregiver baseline interviews, simply pooled from a pilot (N=66) and larger (n=111) randomized control trial (RCT) of the VUKA Family program. For this analysis, outcomes included emotional and behavioral functioning (total difficulties), and prosocial behaviors. Potential SAT correlates included socio-demographics; caregiver health and mental health; parent-child relationship factors; stigma, and child coping, support; and self-esteem. Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, and study revealed significant associations at the contextual, social, and self-regulation level. Lower total child difficulties scores were associated with lower caregiver depression (β = 3.906,p < .001), less caregiver-reported communication about difficult issues (β = 1.882, p = .009) and higher youth self-esteem (β = -0.119, p = .020). Greater prosocial behaviors were associated with greater caregiver-reported communication (β = 0.722, p = .020) and child use of wishful thinking for coping (β = 5.532, p = .009). Less youth depression was associated with higher caregiver education (β =-0.399, p = .010), greater caregiver supervision (β = -1.261, p = .012), more social support seeking (β = -0.453, p = .002), higher youth self-esteem (β = -0.067, p < .001), lower internalized stigma (β = 0.608, p = .040), and child use of resignation for coping (β = 1.152, p = .041). Our data support evidence-based family interventions that also promote youth self-regulation skills to enhance the health and mental health of PHIV

  12. HIV treatment adherence measurement and reporting concordance in youth with perinatally acquired HIV infection and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Evans, Shenell D; Mellins, Claude Ann; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Warne, Patricia; Elkington, Katherine S; Dolezal, Curtis; Santamaria, E Karina; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Jurgrau-Voulgari, Andrea S; Abrams, Elaine J

    2015-01-01

    We examined youth-caregiver adherence report concordance and association of different adherence self-report items with HIV RNA viral load (VL) in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents assessed in 2003-2008. Youth (n=194; 9-19 years) and their caregivers completed a multi-step 2-day recall, one item on last time medications were missed, and one item on responsibility for managing youths' medications. Across early (9-12 years), middle (13-15 years), and late (16+years) adolescence, both youth and caregivers reported having primary responsibility for youths' medication regimens and demonstrated poor to moderate youth-caregiver concordance on adherence items. Responses to the last-time-missed item had greater association with VL than did the 2-day recall, particularly for longer times (e.g., past month). By age group, significant associations with VL were found for caregiver reports in early adolescence, caregiver and youth reports in middle adolescence, and youth reports in late adolescence, suggesting that caregivers offer better reports of youth adherence during early adolescence, but by later adolescence, youth are better informants. Although design limitations preclude definitive conclusions about the reliability and validity of specific adherence items, this study suggests important issues related to age group, caregiver vs. youth informants of adherence, and recall periods for child adherence assessment that warrant further research. PMID:25372391

  13. Birthing experience of adolescents at the Ottawa General Hospital Perinatal Centre.

    PubMed Central

    Lena, S M; Marko, E; Nimrod, C; Merritt, L; Poirier, G; Shein, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the experiences of prenatal care, prenatal classes and birthing among adolescents. DESIGN: Anonymous self-report questionnaire survey. SETTING: Ottawa General Hospital Perinatal Centre. PATIENTS: A total of 100 adolescents (aged less than 20 years) and 100 control subjects (aged over 19 years) who gave birth at the Perinatal Centre from June 1989 to August 1990. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prenatal experiences, attendance at prenatal classes, experiences in labour and delivery, postpartum care. RESULTS: Only 26% of the adolescent patients sought prenatal care in the first trimester, and only 27% attended prenatal classes, as compared with 87% and 91% of the control subjects (p < 0.001). Most of the adolescents felt uncomfortable in the same waiting room as adult women. During labour and delivery 50% of the adolescents had their mothers with them for support, whereas 83% of the adults had their husbands with them (p < 0.001). Over half (59%) of the adolescents stated that they were not prepared for labour and delivery, as compared with 26% of the adults (p < 0.001). Of the adolescents 85% opted to care for their babies after birth. CONCLUSION: Pregnant adolescents do not avail themselves adequately of the medical and psychosocial services available to them through the health care system. Our findings suggest features of prenatal clinics that would make them attractive and accessible to such patients. PMID:8324689

  14. Enhancing the Emotional Wellbeing of Perinatally HIV Infected Youth across Global Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Small, Latoya; Mercado, Micaela; Gopalan, Priya; Pardo, Gisselle; Ann Mellins, Claude; McKay, Mary McKernan

    2014-01-01

    Increased access to antiretroviral treatment worldwide makes it more possible for children diagnosed with HIV before their 15th birthday to age into adolescence and beyond. Many HIV+ youth navigate stressors including poverty and resource scarcity, which may converge to produce emotional distress. For over a decade, CHAMP (Collaborative HIV Prevention and Adolescent Mental Health Project) investigators partnered with youth, caregivers, providers and community stakeholders to address the health, mental health and risk taking behaviors of perinatally HIV-infected youth. This paper explores the mental health needs of aging cohorts of HIV+ youth, across three global contexts, New York (U.S.), Buenos Aires (Argentina), and KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa), to inform the development and implementation of combination HIV care and prevention supports for HIV+ youth. Methods Analysis of data pooled across three countries involving HIV+ early adolescents and their caregivers over time (baseline and three month follow-up) was conducted. Univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to data from standardized measures used across sites to identify mental health needs of youth participants. The impact of the site specific versions of a family-strengthening intervention, CHAMP+U.S., CHAMP+Argentina, CHAMP+SA, was also examined relative to a randomized standard of care (SOC) comparison condition. Results Analyses revealed mental health resilience in a large proportion of HIV+ youth, particularly behavioral functioning and overall mental health. Yet, significant numbers of caregivers across country contexts reported impaired child emotional and prosocial wellbeing. Significant site differences emerged at baseline. Involvement in the CHAMP+ Family Program was related to significant improvement in emotional wellbeing and a trend towards enhanced prosocial behavior relative to SOC across global sites. Conclusions Ongoing partnerships with youth, family and provider stakeholders across

  15. Sexually transmitted infections and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Ljubojević, Suzana; Lipozenčić, Jasna

    2010-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remain a public health problem of major significance in most of the world. Adolescents make up about 20% of the world population, of whom 85% live in developing countries. They are at a greater risk of STIs because they frequently have unprotected intercourse, biologically may be more susceptible to infection, often are engaged in multiple monogamous relationships of limited duration, and face multiple obstacles in accessing confidential health care services. Young people who begin to have sexual intercourse in early or middle adolescence are more likely to develop an STI than those who postpone intercourse until later adolescence or adulthood. The most common STIs among adolescents are chlamydia, gonorrhea, human papillomavirus infection, and trichomoniasis. Unfortunately, lately the incidence of HIV/AIDS and syphilis among adolescents is growing. Comprehensive sex education programs in schools can increase STI knowledge and prevent risky sexual behaviors. Health care providers can promote STI prevention methods, including counseling about safe sex. PMID:21251451

  16. Troubled Adolescents and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, John O., Ed.; And Others

    This report on adolescents, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and Human Immune Virus (HIV) infection had its beginning in the Knowledge Development Workshop "Issues in the Prevention and Treatment of AIDS Among Adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbance," held June 9-10, 1988 in the District of Columbia. These papers are included:…

  17. [The influence of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic disorders of central nervous system on adolescent academic achievements and behavioural deviations].

    PubMed

    Ukleba, K O; Pavlenishvili, I V; Zurabashvili, D Z

    2013-05-01

    The objective of our research was to study long-term influence of hypoxic-ischemic disorders of central nervous system on adolescent academic achievements and behavioural deviations. It was found that perinatal pathologies highly determine the deviant behaviour. The conducted research revealed law intellectual capacity (IQ) in youth with perinatal pathology--2.26. The majority of youths involved in adolescent antisocial behavior suffered from hypoxic-ischemic disorders of central nervous system during perinatal period (76%--tend to narcotic and toxic substance addictions; 82%--to criminal behaviour). PMID:23787509

  18. Mental Health Treatment Patterns in Perinatally HIV-Infected Youth and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Chernoff, Miriam; Nachman, Sharon; Williams, Paige; Brouwers, Pim; Heston, Jerry; Hodge, Janice; Di Poalo, Vinnie; Deygoo, Nagamah Sandra; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Youths perinatally infected with HIV often receive psychotropic medication and behavioral treatment for emotional and behavioral symptoms. We describe patterns of intervention for HIV-positive youth and youth in a control group in the United States. METHODS Three hundred nineteen HIV-positive youth and 256 controls, aged 6 to 17 years, enrolled in the International Maternal Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials 1055, a prospective, 2-year observational study of psychiatric symptoms. One hundred seventy-four youth in the control group were perinatally exposed to HIV, and 82 youth were uninfected children living in households with HIV-positive members. Youth and their primary caregivers completed Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition-referenced symptom-rating scales. Children's medication and behavioral psychiatric intervention histories were collected at entry. We evaluated the association of past or current psychiatric treatment with HIV status, baseline symptoms, and impairment by using multiple logistic regression, controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS HIV-positive youth and youth in the control group had a similar prevalence of psychiatric symptoms (61%) and impairment (14% to 15%). One hundred four (18%) participants received psychotropic medications (stimulants [14%], antidepressants [6%], and neuroleptic agents [4%]), and 127 (22%) received behavioral treatment. More HIV-positive youth than youth in the control group received psychotropic medication (23% vs 12%) and behavioral treatment (27% vs 17%). After adjusting for symptom class and confounders, HIV-positive children had twice the odds of children in the control group of having received stimulants and >4 times the odds of having received antidepressants. Caregiver-reported symptoms or impairment were associated with higher odds of intervention than reports by children alone. CONCLUSIONS HIV-positive children are more likely to receive mental health

  19. Urinary tract infection during pregnancy: its association with maternal morbidity and perinatal outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Schieve, L A; Handler, A; Hershow, R; Persky, V; Davis, F

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The effects of antepartum urinary tract infection on adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes were examined. Antepartum urinary tract infection has been previously implicated as a risk factor for numerous outcomes. METHODS. Crude and multivariable analyses were performed with a perinatal registry cohort of 25,746 mother/infant pairs. RESULTS. Elevated risks were observed for exposure to urinary tract infection and low birthweight, prematurity, preterm low birthweight, premature labor, hypertension/preeclampsia, maternal anemia, and amnionitis. Urinary tract infection was associated with perinatal death only among subjects 20 to 29 years of age. CONCLUSIONS. These findings underscore the importance of antepartum urine screening to identify patients at risk for adverse outcomes. PMID:8129056

  20. Understanding the mental health of youth living with perinatal HIV infection: lessons learned and current challenges

    PubMed Central

    Mellins, Claude A; Malee, Kathleen M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Across the globe, children born with perinatal HIV infection (PHIV) are reaching adolescence and young adulthood in large numbers. The majority of research has focused on biomedical outcomes yet there is increasing awareness that long-term survivors with PHIV are at high risk for mental health problems, given genetic, biomedical, familial and environmental risk. This article presents a review of the literature on the mental health functioning of perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) adolescents, corresponding risk and protective factors, treatment modalities and critical needs for future interventions and research. Methods An extensive review of online databases was conducted. Articles including: (1) PHIV+ youth; (2) age 10 and older; (3) mental health outcomes; and (4) mental health treatment were reviewed. Of 93 articles identified, 38 met inclusion criteria, the vast majority from the United States and Europe. Results These studies suggest that PHIV+ youth experience emotional and behavioural problems, including psychiatric disorders, at higher than expected rates, often exceeding those of the general population and other high-risk groups. Yet, the specific role of HIV per se remains unclear, as uninfected youth with HIV exposure or those living in HIV-affected households displayed similar prevalence rates in some studies, higher rates in others and lower rates in still others. Although studies are limited with mixed findings, this review indicates that child-health status, cognitive function, parental health and mental health, stressful life events and neighbourhood disorder have been associated with worse mental health outcomes, while parent–child involvement and communication, and peer, parent and teacher social support have been associated with better function. Few evidence-based interventions exist; CHAMP+, a mental health programme for PHIV+ youth, shows promise across cultures. Conclusions This review highlights research limitations that

  1. [Human papillomavirus infection and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Sam Soto, Selene; de la Peña y Carranza, Alejandro Ortiz; Plascencia, Josefina Lira

    2011-04-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus has increased dramatically in recent years. The highest prevalence rates are among adolescents and young women, reflecting changes in sexual behavior associated with biological factors in adolescent development. Adolescents who begin sexual activity early are at greater risk of precursor lesions and cervical cancer. There are adolescents with special circumstances, where no early decision should be delayed cervical cytology and in whom it is important to initiate consultations and periodic reviews with a preventive approach. Cervical cancer can be avoided when the diagnosis and treatment of precursor lesions is early. Despite efforts at sex education based on "safe sex" with the correct use of condoms has not been able to reduce the incidence of infections with human papillomavirus in adolescents. While better than nothing, condom use is not 100% reliable. Studies show that consistent and correct use provides protection against the human papillomavirus only 70%. In Mexico, reported an overall ratio of actual use of condoms from 24.6%. It is clear that the physician who provides care for adolescents plays a fundamental role in sex education. The key to future prevention of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions could be the vaccination. PMID:21966809

  2. HIV-1 Encephalopathy among Perinatally Infected Children: Neuropathogenesis and Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 encephalopathy among perinatally infected children in the United States was initially defined by a classic triad of findings that included: (1) developmental delay, (2) secondary or acquired microcephaly, and (3) pyramidal tract neuromotor deficits. The most severe form of this disorder typically occurred among young children who developed…

  3. Sexual and Drug Use Behavior in Perinatal HIV-Infected Youth: Mental Health and Family Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellins, Claude A.; Elkington, Katherine S.; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Dolezal, Curtis; McKay, Mary; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2009-01-01

    A study found that youth and caregiver mental health problem have greater impact than key environmental factors and family functioning on sex and drug use risk behaviors in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (PHIV+) and PHIV- youths. No differences in the rates of sexual risk behavior and substance use were observed between…

  4. Factors Associated with the Academic Achievement of Perinatally HIV-Infected Elementary and Middle School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Walter L.

    2004-01-01

    It is well documented that perinatally HIV-infected children experience difficulty in learning as well as behavioral and social problems in the school setting. While the research is mixed on the effect of the HIV virus on behavioral and social problems, it is much clearer on the effect of this virus on learning. This exploratory study identifies…

  5. Quality of Life among Ghanaian Adolescents Living with Perinatally Acquired HIV: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Enimil, Anthony; Nugent, Nicole; Amoah, Christian; Norman, Betty; Antwi, Sampson; Ocran, Joseph; Kwara, Awewura; Barker, David H.

    2016-01-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, increasing numbers of children with perinatally acquired HIV (PAHIV) are living into adolescence. These adolescents face numerous unique challenges such as parent illness/death and years of medication use. Optimizing care for these youth requires an understanding of the factors that contribute to physical health, psychological wellbeing, social relationships, and quality of life. This mixed methods study collected quantitative questionnaire data from 40 Ghanaian adolescents with PAHIV (50% female, 12–19 years old) who received care through an adolescent HIV clinic in Kumasi, Ghana. The study also presents results from qualitative interviews conducted with 20 adolescents. Results from quantitative analyses suggested that a significant number of participants were not virally suppressed (67%) and participants reported barriers to treatment adherence, limited social support, concerns about disclosure and HIV-related stigma, limited resources, and lower than expected quality of life (QOL). Salient themes from the qualitative analyses included limited understanding of how HIV is transmitted, the interplay between food insecurity and treatment adherence and the need for developing safe relationships through which adolescents can discuss their illness without fear of accidental disclosure of their HIV status. PMID:26643735

  6. Long-term consequences of perinatal and adolescent cannabinoid exposure on neural and psychological processes.

    PubMed

    Higuera-Matas, Alejandro; Ucha, Marcos; Ambrosio, Emilio

    2015-08-01

    Marihuana is the most widely consumed illicit drug, even among adolescents and pregnant women. Given the critical developmental processes that occur in the adolescent and fetal nervous system, marihuana consumption during these stages may have permanent consequences on several brain functions in later adult life. Here, we review what is currently known about the long-term consequences of perinatal and adolescent cannabinoid exposure. The most consistent findings point to long-term impairments in cognitive function that are associated with structural alterations and disturbed synaptic plasticity. In addition, several neurochemical modifications are also evident after prenatal or adolescent cannabinoid exposure, especially in the endocannabinoid, glutamatergic, dopaminergic and opioidergic systems. Important sexual dimorphisms are also evident in terms of the long-lasting effects of cannabinoid consumption during pregnancy and adolescence, and cannabinoids possibly have a protective effect in adolescents who have suffered traumatic life challenges, such as maternal separation or intense stress. Finally, we suggest some future research directions that may encourage further advances in this exciting field. PMID:25960036

  7. Adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in adolescent pregnancies: The Global Network’s Maternal Newborn Health Registry study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Adolescent girls between 15 and 19 years give birth to around 16 million babies each year, around 11% of births worldwide. We sought to determine whether adolescent mothers are at higher risk of maternal and perinatal adverse outcomes compared with mothers aged 20–24 years in a prospective, population-based observational study of newborn outcomes in low resource settings. Methods We undertook a prospective, population-based multi-country research study of all pregnant women in defined geographic areas across 7 sites in six low-middle income countries (Kenya, Zambia, India, Pakistan, Guatemala and Argentina). The study population for this analysis was restricted to women aged 24 years or less, who gave birth to infants of at least 20 weeks’ gestation and 500g or more. We compared adverse pregnancy maternal and perinatal outcomes among pregnant adolescents 15-19 years, <15 years, and adults 20-24 years. Results A total of 269,273 women were enrolled from January 2010 to December 2013. Of all pregnancies 11.9% (32,097/269,273) were in adolescents 15-19 years, while 0.14% (370/269,273) occurred among girls <15 years. Pregnancy among adolescents 15-19 years ranged from 2% in Pakistan to 26% in Argentina, and adolescent pregnancies <15 year were only observed in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. Compared to adults, adolescents did not show increased risk of maternal adverse outcomes. Risks of preterm birth and LBW were significantly higher among both early and older adolescents, with the highest risks observed in the <15 years group. Neonatal and perinatal mortality followed a similar trend in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America, with the highest risk in early adolescents, although the differences in this age group were not significant. However, in South Asia the risks of neonatal and perinatal death were not different among adolescents 15-19 years compared to adults. Conclusions This study suggests that pregnancy among adolescents is not associated

  8. Seroprevalence and vaccination coverage of vaccine-preventable diseases in perinatally HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sticchi, Laura; Bruzzone, Bianca; Caligiuri, Patrizia; Rappazzo, Emanuela; Lo Casto, Michele; De Hoffer, Laura; Gustinetti, Giulia; Viscoli, Claudio; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2014-08-27

    Background Even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV-infected subjects are at higher risk of complications from vaccine-preventable diseases than those uninfected. The current international guidelines strongly recommend that these patients should receive all the routine childhood vaccinations. Although these children represent an appropriate target for immunization, the available data indicate suboptimal coverage rates. Methods To evaluate seroprotection/seropositivity rates and vaccination coverage against the common vaccine-preventable diseases, all patients with vertically transmitted HIV-1 infection who attended San Martino Hospital were enrolled. Blood samples were collected for testing antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus, hepatitis A and B viruses by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay and polioviruses by microneutralization test. In order to assess immunization coverage, retrospectively was recorded the vaccination history collecting data from Regional Immunization Database. Results A total of 39 perinatally HIV-1 infected patients were included in the study. At the time of serum was obtained, the mean age was 18,1 years (range: 6-28). The median CD4+ T-lymphocyte count was 702 cells/mm (3) (2-1476 cells/mm (3)). Twenty-nine (74.4%) patients were found with HIV RNA load<50 copies/mL. The proportion of subjects with protective anti-tetanus and anti-HBs were 43.6% and 30.8%, respectively. Seroprotection rates about 20% against rubella and measles were found, less than 20% against all the other antigens investigated. In particular, all patients resulted susceptible to mumps. High immunization rates were observed for polio and HBV (100% and 92.3%, respectively) and suboptimal for diphtheria-tetanus (84.6%). For the other recommended vaccines the rates were generally low. None of the patients received varicella vaccine doses. Conclusions As in the HAART era the vertically acquired HIV infection has become a chronic treatable disease

  9. Neurometabolite Alterations Associated With Cognitive Performance in Perinatally HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Van Dalen, Yvonne W; Blokhuis, Charlotte; Cohen, Sophie; Ter Stege, Jacqueline A; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Kuhle, Jens; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Scherpbier, Henriette J; Kuijpers, Taco W; Reiss, Peter; Majoie, Charles B L M; Caan, Matthan W A; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2016-03-01

    Despite treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), cognitive impairment is still observed in perinatally HIV-infected children. We aimed to evaluate potential underlying cerebral injury by comparing neurometabolite levels between perinatally HIV-infected children and healthy controls. This cross-sectional study evaluated neurometabolites, as measured by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), in perinatally HIV-infected children stable on cART (n = 26) and healthy controls (n = 36).Participants were included from a cohort of perinatally HIV-infected children and healthy controls, matched group-wise for age, gender, ethnicity, and socio-economic status. N-acetylaspartate (NAA), glutamate (Glu), myo-inositol (mI), and choline (Cho) levels were studied as ratios over creatine (Cre). Group differences and associations with HIV-related parameters, cognitive functioning, and neuronal damage markers (neurofilament and total Tau proteins) were determined using age-adjusted linear regression analyses.HIV-infected children had increased Cho:Cre in white matter (HIV-infected = 0.29 ± 0.03; controls = 0.27 ± 0.03; P value = 0.045). Lower nadir CD4+ T-cell Z-scores were associated with reduced neuronal integrity markers NAA:Cre and Glu:Cre. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stage C diagnosis was associated with higher glial markers Cho:Cre and mI:Cre. Poorer cognitive performance was mainly associated with higher Cho:Cre in HIV-infected children, and with lower NAA:Cre and Glu:Cre in healthy controls. There were no associations between neurometabolites and neuronal damage markers in blood or CSF.Compared to controls, perinatally HIV-infected children had increased Cho:Cre in white matter, suggestive of ongoing glial proliferation. Levels of several neurometabolites were associated with cognitive performance, suggesting that MRS may be a useful method to assess cerebral changes potentially linked to cognitive outcomes

  10. Effects of Perinatal HIV Infection and Early Institutional Rearing on Physical and Cognitive Development of Children in Ukraine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrova-Krol, Natasha A.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Juffer, Femmie

    2010-01-01

    To study the effects of perinatal HIV-1 infection and early institutional rearing on the physical and cognitive development of children, 64 Ukrainian uninfected and HIV-infected institutionalized and family-reared children were examined (mean age = 50.9 months). Both HIV infection and institutional care were related to delays in physical and…

  11. Potential neuroprotective strategies for perinatal infection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ranchhod, S M; Gunn, K C; Fowke, T M; Davidson, J O; Lear, C A; Bai, J; Bennet, L; Mallard, C; Gunn, A J; Dean, J M

    2015-10-01

    Preterm born infants have high rates of brain injury, leading to motor and neurocognitive problems in later life. Infection and resulting inflammation of the fetus and newborn are highly associated with these disabilities. However, there are no established neuroprotective therapies. Microglial activation and expression of many cytokines play a key role in normal brain function and development, as well as being deleterious. Thus, treatment must achieve a delicate balance between possible beneficial and harmful effects. In this review, we discuss potential neuroprotective strategies targeting systemic infection or the resulting systemic and central inflammatory responses. We highlight the central importance of timing of treatment and the critical lack of studies of delayed treatment of infection/inflammation. PMID:25702527

  12. Severe Primary HSV-2 in a Perinatal HIV-Infected Woman with Advanced Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lana; Agwu, Allison; Hutton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is most commonly associated with mucocutaneous manifestations; however, coinfections with HIV may be associated with atypical and more severe presentations of clinical disease. We present a case of a young woman with advanced perinatally acquired AIDS presenting with severe purulent pharyngitis, fevers, and toxic appearance with a subsequent diagnosis of disseminated primary HSV-2 infection in multiple noncontiguous mucocutaneous sites. This case highlights an unusual presentation of the protean nature of primary HSV infection and the potential severity of illness in patients with advanced immunosuppression. PMID:22899940

  13. Perinatal hepatitis B virus infection caused by antihepatitis Be positive maternal mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Mitsuda, T; Fujita, S; Yokota, S

    1991-06-01

    To investigate the infectivity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) from mothers to their newborn offspring, HBV-DNA in plasma and peripheral mononuclear cells from 28 antihepatitis Be positive, hepatitis B surface antigen positive carrier mothers was examined by a highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction/Southern hybridisation technique. HBV specific DNA was detected in three maternal mononuclear cell samples, but was absent in plasma. Two of four infants born to the three mothers with HBV-DNA positive mononuclear cells developed acute or fulminant hepatitis within three months after birth. Two infants were effectively prevented from infection with HBV by combined hepatitis B immunoglobulin/HBV vaccine administration. The 25 infants born to the HBV-DNA negative mothers were free of HBV infection within the next seven months to 3.5 years. These results suggest that latent infection with HBV in maternal mononuclear cells is responsible for perinatal HBV infection. PMID:2053794

  14. Perinatal characteristics among early (10–14 years old) and late (15–19 years old) pregnant adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pregnancy in adolescents is a worldwide health problem and has been mostly common in poor populations. It is not clear if socioeconomic or biological factors are the main determinants of perinatal adverse outcomes in pregnant adolescents. Adolescents under 15 years old may present a high growth rate which may contribute to impair fetal growth. Our aim is to compare perinatal characteristics among early (aged 10 to 14 years) and late (aged 15 to 19 years) pregnant adolescents. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed using data from Pernambuco State 2009, obtained from DATASUS/SISNAC, a Brazilian Government, open-access public health database. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared between early (aged 10–14 years) and late (aged 15–19 years) pregnant adolescents. Family income was compared between early and late pregnant adolescents using a sample of 412 subjects evaluated at Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP) during 2011. Statistical comparisons were made using the chi-square test was used with a significant level of 0.05; bivariate and multivariate analysis were performed. This project was approved by the Institutional Ethics Review Board. Results Data from 31,209 pregnant adolescents were analyzed. 29,733 (95.2%) were aged 15 to 19 years and 1,476 (4.7%) were aged 10 to 14 years. There were significant differences with respect to marital status, education level and number of prenatal visits of mothers aged 10 to 14 years compared to 15 to 19 years. Of importance, early adolescents had a greater rate of neonates born premature and with low birth weight. Prematurity and low birth weight remained statistically significant after multivariate analysis. Conclusions Early aged adolescents may have an increased risk of prematurity and low birth weight. These findings highlight the potential role of biological factors in newborn outcomes in pregnant adolescents. PMID:23009715

  15. The influences of perinatal challenge persist into the adolescent period in socially housed bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata).

    PubMed

    Laudenslager, Mark L; Natvig, Crystal; Corcoran, Christopher A; Blevins, Maria W; Pierre, Peter J; Bennett, Allyson J

    2013-04-01

    Social challenges during the perinatal period influence the mother-infant relationship in nonhuman primates and may affect the offspring's response to later social challenge(s). Relocation of a breeding colony of monkeys (Macaca radiata) created two groups of infants: one group experienced social group relocation to a new housing facility during the perinatal period (ATYPICAL) and the second group developed within a constant environment (TYPICAL). At a mean age of 25 months, all animals were removed from their natal group and placed in same sex adolescent social groups. Behavioral observations were collected after group formation or introduction to a new group. ATYPICAL subjects showed increased aggression and reduced affiliation compared to TYPICAL subjects. Hair cortisol in male subjects collected 6 months after introduction was elevated in the ATYPICAL subjects compared to TYPICAL subjects. These findings demonstrate that early life challenges affect behavior as well as stress hormone responses to social challenge in adolescence. PMID:22488164

  16. Perinatal echovirus infection: insights from a literature review of 61 cases of serious infection and 16 outbreaks in nurseries.

    PubMed

    Modlin, J F

    1986-01-01

    A review of literature published before June 1985 revealed 61 reported cases of neonatal echovirus infection at a nonmucosal site, including 43 cases (70%) due to echovirus 11. Onset of disease occurred between the third and fifth days of life in 63% of cases, indicating that most infections are acquired in the immediate perinatal period rather than in utero. Mortality was higher in infants with severe hepatitis (83%) than in infants with infection of the central nervous system (19%). Acute illness occurred within one week before delivery in 68% of the mothers of nonnosocomially infected infants. There was a trend (P = .11) towards a higher mortality rate for infants born by cesarian section than for those delivered vaginally. In the 11 nosocomially acquired cases, the onset of infection was later and the mortality rate lower. In 16 outbreaks in nurseries, 206 infants developed illness attributed to echovirus infection. Attack rates of clinical disease were 22%-52% and illness was generally mild. In four outbreaks, six index cases were identified as infants who had acquired infection from their mothers; five of these infants had severe disease and three died. The 24 infants subsequently infected by nosocomial spread in these outbreaks had milder disease; three (12%) died. Thus, whereas acute illness in the mother before birth often precedes neonatal echovirus infection and infections transmitted vertically from mother to infant may be severe, postnatal transmission of the same serotype results in milder disease. PMID:3541126

  17. Adolescents and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J R

    1992-12-01

    As of March 31, 1992, individuals 13 to 19 years of age had been diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; over one third were diagnosed in the past 2 years alone. Because of the long incubation period from initial infection to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosis, the majority of young adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were probably initially infected as adolescents. In 1991, 34% of adolescents with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were female, and their predominant mode of transmission was heterosexual contact. Human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence studies of adolescents show a male-to-female ratio approaching 1:1, with many human immunodeficiency virus-infected adolescent women identifying none of the standard risk. Factors such as sexual and drug experimentation, risk taking, and sense of invulnerability so characteristic of adolescence put adolescents at special risk for human immunodeficiency virus. There is no published information on if or how clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus disease in adolescents might differ from those seen in adults. Medical care should be broad-based and should include access to clinical trials for new drug treatments. General knowledge levels about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are high among US adolescents, but behavioral changes have lagged behind. All adolescents should be targeted for intensive education about human immunodeficiency virus along with interventions designed to enhance their general coping, communication, and decision-making skills. PMID:1450349

  18. Obstetrician-Gynecologists and Perinatal Infections: A Review of Studies of the Collaborative Ambulatory Research Network (2005–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, Meaghan A.; Gonik, Bernard; Schulkin, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Background. Maternal infection is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and ob-gyns are in a unique position to help prevent and treat infections. Methods. This paper summarizes studies completed by the Research Department of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists regarding perinatal infections that were published between 2005 and 2009. Results. Obstetrician-gynecologists are routinely screening for hepatitis B and HIV, and many counsel prenatal patients regarding hepatitis B and toxoplasmosis. However, other infections are not regularly discussed, and many cited time constraints as a barrier to counseling. A majority discusses the transmission of giardiasis and toxoplasmosis, but few knew the source of cryptosporidiosis or cyclosporiasis. Conclusions. Many of the responding ob-gyns were unaware of or not adhering to infection management guidelines. Obstetrician-gynecologists are knowledgeable regarding perinatal infections; however, guidelines must be better disseminated perhaps via a single infection management summary. This paper identified knowledge gaps and areas in which practice can be improved and importantly highlights the need for a comprehensive set of management guidelines for a host of infections, so that physicians can have an easy resource when encountering perinatal infections. PMID:21113289

  19. Perinatal HIV Status and Executive Function During School-Age and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Ezeamama, Amara E.; Kizza, Florence N.; Zalwango, Sarah K.; Nkwata, Allan K.; Zhang, Ming; Rivera, Mariana L.; Sekandi, Juliet N.; Kakaire, Robert; Kiwanuka, Noah; Whalen, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether perinatal HIV infection (PHIV), HIV-exposed uninfected (PHEU) versus HIV-unexposed (PHU) status predicted long-term executive function (EF) deficit in school-aged Ugandan children. Perinatal HIV status was determined by 18 months via DNA polymerase chain reaction test and confirmed at cognitive assessment between 6 and 18 years using HIV rapid-diagnostic test. Primary outcome is child EF measured using behavior-rating inventory of executive function questionnaire across 8 subscales summed to derive the global executive composite (GEC). EF was proxy-reported by caregivers and self-reported by children 11 years or older. Descriptive analyses by perinatal HIV status included derivation of mean, standard deviations (SD), number, and percent (%) of children with EF deficits warranting clinical vigilance. Raw scores were internally standardized by age and sex adjustment. EF scores warranting clinical vigilance were defined as ≥ mean + 1.5∗SD. t Tests for mean score differences by perinatal HIV status and linear-regression models were implemented in SAS version 9.4 to derive HIV status-related EF deficits (β) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Proxy-reported and self-reported EF were assessed in 166 and 82 children, respectively. GEC deficit was highest for PHIV (mean = 121.9, SD = 29.9), intermediate for PHEU (mean = 107.5, SD = 26.8), and lowest for PHU (mean = 103.4, SD = 20.7; P-trend < 0.01). GEC deficit levels warranting clinical vigilance occurred in 9 (15.8%), 5 (9.3%) and 0 (0%) PHIV, PHEU, and PHU children, respectively (P-trend = 0.01). Nineteen percent (n = 32) children had deficits requiring clinical vigilance in ≥2 proxy-reported EF subscales. Of these, multisubscale deficits occurred in 35.1%, 13.0%, and 9.3% of PHIV, PHEU, and PHU respectively (P-trend = 0.001). Multivariable analyses find significantly higher GEC deficits for PHIV compared with PHU

  20. Perinatal acquisition of drug-resistant HIV-1 infection: mechanisms and long-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Delaugerre, Constance; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Blanche, Stephane; Warszawski, Josiane; Cornet, Dorine; Dollfus, Catherine; Schneider, Veronique; Burgard, Marianne; Faye, Albert; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Tubiana, Roland; Rouzioux, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Background Primary-HIV-1-infection in newborns that occurs under antiretroviral prophylaxis that is a high risk of drug-resistance acquisition. We examine the frequency and the mechanisms of resistance acquisition at the time of infection in newborns. Patients and Methods We studied HIV-1-infected infants born between 01 January 1997 and 31 December 2004 and enrolled in the ANRS-EPF cohort. HIV-1-RNA and HIV-1-DNA samples obtained perinatally from the newborn and mother were subjected to population-based and clonal analyses of drug resistance. If positive, serial samples were obtained from the child for resistance testing. Results Ninety-two HIV-1-infected infants were born during the study period. Samples were obtained from 32 mother-child pairs and from another 28 newborns. Drug resistance was detected in 12 newborns (20%): drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was seen in 10 cases, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in two cases, and protease inhibitors in one case. For 9 children, the detection of the same resistance mutations in mothers' samples (6 among 10 available) and in newborn lymphocytes (6/8) suggests that the newborn was initially infected by a drug-resistant strain. Resistance variants were either transmitted from mother-to-child or selected during subsequent temporal exposure under suboptimal perinatal prophylaxis. Follow-up studies of the infants showed that the resistance pattern remained stable over time, regardless of antiretroviral therapy, suggesting the early cellular archiving of resistant viruses. The absence of resistance in the mother of the other three children (3/10) and neonatal lymphocytes (2/8) suggests that the newborns were infected by a wild-type strain without long-term persistence of resistance when suboptimal prophylaxis was stopped. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of early resistance genotyping of HIV-1-infected newborns. In most cases (75%), drug resistance was archived in

  1. The "moral career" of perinatally HIV-infected children: revisiting Goffman's concept.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Maria Letícia Santos; Bastos, Francisco Inácio; Darmont, Mariana; Dickstein, Paulo; Monteiro, Simone

    2015-01-01

    HIV-infected children usually live in vulnerable situations, experiencing discrimination and stigma commonly felt by other people living with HIV/AIDS. The present study aims to analyse primary socialisation of HIV-infected children and adolescents recruited from a public health service in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) as a social process that shapes a new generation of stigmatised and vulnerable persons. Research was informed by an interactionist perspective, focusing on key aspects of HIV-infected children and adolescents life histories under the conceptual frame of Erving Goffman's theories regarding "moral careers". Goffman defines the making of a moral career as the process through which a person learns that she/he possesses a particular attribute, which may lead her/him to be discredited by members of the surrounding society. We have identified aspects of life histories of HIV-vertically infected children and adolescents for each aspect of "moral career" as described by Goffman, relating them to as family structure, the experience of living HIV within the family, and the position and family role of a given subject. The patterns of "moral career" proposed by Goffman in 1963 were useful in identifying components of HIV-related stigma among children and adolescents. These include gender and social disadvantages, difficulty in coping with a child with a potentially severe disease, orphanhood, abandonment, adoption and disclosure of one's HIV serostatus. Primary socialisation of HIV-infected children and adolescents is a key piece of the complex HIV/AIDS-labelling process that could be targeted by interventions aiming to decrease stigma and marginalisation. Health care workers and stakeholders should be committed to ensuring education and guaranteeing the legal rights of this specific population, including the continuous provision of quality health care, full access to school and support to full disclosure of HIV diagnosis. PMID:25054808

  2. Behavioural profiles of children and adolescents after pre- or perinatal unilateral brain damage.

    PubMed

    Trauner, D A; Nass, R; Ballantyne, A

    2001-05-01

    Recent case reports of individuals with early-onset damage to the prefrontal cortex have suggested that such early insults could result in severely impaired social behaviour in later childhood and adolescence. The investigators speculated that the acquisition of complex social conventions and moral rules had been impaired. In a large cohort of children, we sought to determine whether early focal brain insults might result in clinically significant behavioural or emotional problems. This study reports on 39 children with pre- or perinatal-onset unilateral brain damage (focal lesion) from cerebral infarction or intraparenchymal haemorrhage, using the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist to assess the presence or absence of behavioural and emotional difficulties. Two-thirds of the subjects had left hemisphere (LH) lesions and one-third had right hemisphere (RH) lesions. Age range was 4.0-15.4 years at the time of questionnaire completion. Their results were compared with those of 54 control children. Analyses were conducted on focal lesion versus controls, RH versus LH lesion, frontal versus non-frontal lesion, and seizure versus non-seizure groups. When the effect of IQ was partialled out, there were no significant differences on the nine Behavior Problem scales, the Internalizing-Externalizing dichotomy or the Total Problem score for any of the group comparisons. Our subjects showed no evidence of clinically significant behavioural or emotional problems, even when the frontal lobe was involved. Individuals with more extensive and bilateral damage may be at higher risk of significant behavioural and emotional dysfunction than were those in our study population. In future studies of brain-behaviour relationships in developing children, all potential causes for any observed behavioural abnormalities, such as genetic and environmental factors and toxin exposure, must be considered before concluding that specific anatomical lesions are causally related to specific

  3. Study of oxidative, enzymatic mitochondrial respiratory chain function and apoptosis in perinatally HIV-infected pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Morén, Constanza; Garrabou, Glòria; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Rovira, Núria; Catalán, Marc; Hernández, Sandra; Tobías, Ester; Cardellach, Francesc; Fortuny, Clàudia; Miró, Òscar

    2013-10-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pediatric patients has been scarcely investigated. Limited data are available about HIV or antiretroviral (ARV)-mediated mitochondrial damage in this population group, specifically, regarding oxygen consumption and apoptosis approach. We aimed to elucidate whether a given mitochondrial DNA depletion is reflected at downstream levels, to gain insight on the pathology of HIV and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in perinatally HIV-infected pediatric patients. We studied 10 healthy control participants and 20 perinatally HIV-infected pediatric patients (10 under ARV treatment and 10 off treatment). We determined mitochondrial mass, subunits II and IV of complex IV, global and specific mitochondrial enzymatic and oxidative activities, and apoptosis from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Global oxygen consumption was significantly compromised in HIV-infected untreated patients, compared to the control group (0.76 ± 0.01 versus 1.59 ± 0.15; P = 0.014). Apoptosis showed a trend to increase in untreated patients as well. The overall complex (C) CI-III-IV activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) was significantly decreased in HIV-infected treated patients with respect to the control group (1.52 ± 0.38 versus 6.38 ± 1.53; P = 0.02). No statistically significant differences were found between untreated and HAART-treated patients. These findings suggest the pathogenic role of both HIV and HAART in mitochondrial dysfunction in vertical infection. The abnormalities in mitochondrial genome may be downstream reflected through a global alteration of the MRC. Mitochondrial impairment associated with HIV and HAART was generalized, rather than localized, in this series of perinatally HIV-infected patients. PMID:23534415

  4. Longitudinal Study of Emerging Mental Health Concerns in Youth Perinatally Infected With HIV and Peer Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Angelidou, Konstantia; Chernoff, Miriam; Williams, Paige L.; Heston, Jerry; Hodge, Janice; Nachman, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cross-sectional research indicates high rates of mental health concerns among youth with perinatal HIV infection (PHIV), but few studies have examined emerging psychiatric symptoms over time. Methods Youth with PHIV and peer comparisons who were HIV-exposed but uninfected or living in house-holds with HIV-infected family members (HIV-affected) and primary caregivers participated in a prospective, multisite, longitudinal cohort study. Groups were compared for differences in the incidence of emerging psychiatric symptoms during 2 years of follow-up and for differences in psychotropic drug therapy. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of emerging symptoms with HIV status and psychosocial risk factors. Results Of 573 youth with study entry assessments, 92% attended at least 1 annual follow-up visit (PHIV: 296; comparisons: 229). A substantial percentage of youth who did not meet symptom criteria for a psychiatric disorder at study entry did so during follow-up (PHIV = 36%; comparisons = 42%). In addition, those who met criteria at study entry often met criteria during follow-up (PHIV = 41%; comparisons = 43%). Asymptomatic youth with PHIV were significantly more likely to receive psychotropic medication during follow-up than comparisons. Youth with greater HIV disease severity (entry CD4% <25% vs 25% or more) had higher probability of depression symptoms (19% vs 8%, respectively). Conclusions Many youth in families affected by HIV are at risk for development of psychiatric symptoms. PMID:22772819

  5. Antiretroviral Resistance and Pregnancy Characteristics of Women with Perinatal and Nonperinatal HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Lazenby, Gweneth B; Mmeje, Okeoma; Fisher, Barbra M; Weinberg, Adriana; Aaron, Erika K; Keating, Maria; Luque, Amneris E; Willers, Denise; Cohan, Deborah; Money, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare HIV drug resistance in pregnant women with perinatal HIV (PHIV) and those with nonperinatal HIV (NPHIV) infection. Methods. We conducted a multisite cohort study of PHIV and NPHIV women from 2000 to 2014. Sample size was calculated to identify a fourfold increase in antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance in PHIV women. Continuous variables were compared using Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Categorical variables were compared using χ (2) and Fisher's exact tests. Univariate analysis was used to determine factors associated with antiretroviral drug resistance. Results. Forty-one PHIV and 41 NPHIV participants were included. Women with PHIV were more likely to have drug resistance than those with NPHIV ((55% versus 17%, p = 0.03), OR 6.0 (95% CI 1.0-34.8), p = 0.05), including multiclass resistance (15% versus 0, p = 0.03), and they were more likely to receive nonstandard ARVs during pregnancy (27% versus 5%, p = 0.01). PHIV and NPHIV women had similar rates of preterm birth (11% versus 28%, p = 0.08) and cesarean delivery (47% versus 46%, p = 0.9). Two infants born to a single NPHIV woman acquired HIV infection. Conclusions. PHIV women have a high frequency of HIV drug resistance mutations, leading to nonstandard ARVs use during pregnancy. Despite nonstandard ARV use during pregnancy, PHIV women did not experience increased rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27413359

  6. Antiretroviral Resistance and Pregnancy Characteristics of Women with Perinatal and Nonperinatal HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mmeje, Okeoma; Fisher, Barbra M.; Weinberg, Adriana; Aaron, Erika K.; Keating, Maria; Luque, Amneris E.; Willers, Denise; Cohan, Deborah; Money, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare HIV drug resistance in pregnant women with perinatal HIV (PHIV) and those with nonperinatal HIV (NPHIV) infection. Methods. We conducted a multisite cohort study of PHIV and NPHIV women from 2000 to 2014. Sample size was calculated to identify a fourfold increase in antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance in PHIV women. Continuous variables were compared using Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Categorical variables were compared using χ2 and Fisher's exact tests. Univariate analysis was used to determine factors associated with antiretroviral drug resistance. Results. Forty-one PHIV and 41 NPHIV participants were included. Women with PHIV were more likely to have drug resistance than those with NPHIV ((55% versus 17%, p = 0.03), OR 6.0 (95% CI 1.0–34.8), p = 0.05), including multiclass resistance (15% versus 0, p = 0.03), and they were more likely to receive nonstandard ARVs during pregnancy (27% versus 5%, p = 0.01). PHIV and NPHIV women had similar rates of preterm birth (11% versus 28%, p = 0.08) and cesarean delivery (47% versus 46%, p = 0.9). Two infants born to a single NPHIV woman acquired HIV infection. Conclusions. PHIV women have a high frequency of HIV drug resistance mutations, leading to nonstandard ARVs use during pregnancy. Despite nonstandard ARV use during pregnancy, PHIV women did not experience increased rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27413359

  7. Co-Occuring Psychiatric Symptoms in Children Perinatally Infected With HIV and Peer Comparison Sample

    PubMed Central

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Chernoff, Miriam; Williams, Paige L.; Brouwers, Pim; Morse, Edward; Heston, Jerry; Hodge, Janice; Di Poalo, Vinnie; Deygoo, Nagamah S.; Nachman, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the rates of psychopathology in youths perinatally infected with HIV (N = 319) with a comparison sample of peers (N = 256) either HIV-exposed or living in households with HIV-infected family members. Method Participants were randomly recruited from 29 sites in the United States and Puerto Rico and completed an extensive battery of measures including standardized DSM-IV-referenced ratings scales. Results The HIV+ group was relatively healthy (73% with CD4% >25%), and 92% were actively receiving antiretroviral therapy. Youths with HIV (17%) met symptom and impairment criteria for the following disorders: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (12%), oppositional defiant disorder (5%), conduct disorder (1%), generalized anxiety disorder (2%), separation anxiety disorder (1%), depressive disorder (2%), or manic episode (1%). Many youths with HIV (27%) and peers (26%) were rated (either self- or caregiver report) as having psychiatric problems that interfered with academic or social functioning. With the exception of somatization disorder, the HIV+ group did not evidence higher rates or severity of psychopathology than peers, although rates for both groups were higher than the general population. Nevertheless, self-awareness of HIV infection in younger children was associated with more severe symptomatology, and youths with HIV had higher lifetime rates of special education (44 vs 32%), psychopharmacological (23 vs 12%), or behavioral (27 vs 17%) interventions. Youth-caregiver agreement was modest, and youths reported more impairment. Conclusion HIV infection was not associated with differentially greater levels of current psychopathology; nevertheless, investigation of relations with developmental changes and specific illness parameters and treatments are ongoing. PMID:20110828

  8. The Burden of Oral Disease among Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Exposed Uninfected Youth

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Ryder, Mark I.; Russell, Jonathan S.; Dominy, Stephen S.; Patel, Kunjal; McKenna, Matt; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Seage, George R.; Hazra, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare oral health parameters in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) and perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected youth (PHEU). Methods In a cross-sectional substudy within the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, participants were examined for number of decayed teeth (DT), Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT), oral mucosal disease, and periodontal disease (PD). Covariates for oral health parameters were examined using zero-inflated negative binomial regression and ordinal logistic regression models. Results Eleven sites enrolled 209 PHIV and 126 PHEU. Higher DT scores were observed in participants who were PHIV [Adjusted Mean Ratio (aMR) = 1.7 (95% CI 1.2–2.5)], female [aMR = 1.4 (1.0–1.9)], had no source of regular dental care [aMR = 2.3 (1.5–3.4)], and had a high frequency of meals/snacks [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.9 (1.1–3.1)] and juice/soda [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.6 (1.1–2.4)]. Higher DMFT scores were observed in participants who were older [≥19, aMR = 1.9 (1.2–2.9)], had biological parent as caregiver [aMR = 1.2 (1.0–1.3)], had a high frequency of juice/soda [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.4 (1.1–1.7)] and a low saliva flow rate [mL/min, aMR = 0.8 per unit higher (0.6–1.0)]. Eighty percent had PD; no differences were seen by HIV status using the patient-based classifications of health, gingivitis or mild, moderate, or severe periodontitis. No associations were observed of CD4 count and viral load with oral health outcomes after adjustment. Conclusions Oral health was poor in PHIV and PHEU youth. This was dismaying since most HIV infected children in the U.S. are carefully followed at medical health care clinics. This data underscore the need for regular dental care. As PHIV youth were at higher risk for cavities, it will be important to better understand this relationship in order to develop targeted interventions. PMID:27299992

  9. An analysis of select emerging executive skills in perinatally HIV-1-infected children.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Antolin M; Brouwers, Pim; Leighty, Robert; Malee, Kathleen; Smith, Renee; Harris, Lynnette; Serchuck, Leslie K; Blasini, Ileana; Chase, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of perinatal HIV-1 infection on emerging executive skills in children (n = 161) ages 8 to 12 years. HIV-positive (n = 76) and HIV-negative (n = 85) children were eligible to participate. The HIV-positive children included those who had experienced a CDC Class C event (greater severity, n = 22) and those who were HIV-positive but who had not experienced a CDC Class C event (less severity, n = 54). Measures of emerging executive functions completed by the children included subtests from the Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment (NEPSY), the Trail-Making Test-Part B, and a subtest from the Woodcock-Johnson Battery-Revised. Ratings of executive functions were obtained from caretakers using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functions. Generalized estimating equations methods, discriminate analyses, and global deficit score analyses were performed to determine whether differences emerged between the three clinical groups while using strict controls. The present results revealed significant group differences in unadjusted mean scores measuring executive functioning. However, such differences did not remain statistically significant when moderating variables were taken into consideration in the models. The apparent deficit in executive functioning for the HIV-positive children was found to be largely due to differential psychosocial and environmental factors rather than HIV disease and its severity, and in this cohort, the effects of HIV-1 infection on emerging executive functions appeared to be negligible when controlling for treatment and moderating psychosocial variables. PMID:24236937

  10. Association of Hypercholesterolemia Incidence With Antiretroviral Treatment, Including Protease Inhibitors, Among Perinatally HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Tassiopoulos, Katherine; Williams, Paige L.; Seage, George R.; Crain, Marilyn; Oleske, James; Farley, John

    2011-01-01

    Context Antiretroviral therapy has been associated with hypercholesterolemia in HIV-infected children. Few longitudinal studies have been conducted to examine this association, however. Objective To evaluate the incidence of and risk factors for development of hypercholesterolemia in a large pediatric study. Design Prospective cohort study (Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group 219C). Participants A total of 2122 perinatally HIV-infected children free of hypercholesterolemia at entry. Outcome Development of hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol ≥220 mg/dL at 2 consecutive visits). Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate risk factors. Results Thirteen percent of children had hypercholesterolemia at entry, and an additional 13% developed hypercholesterolemia during follow-up for an incidence rate of 3.4 cases per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.0 to 3.9). After adjustment for age, boosted protease inhibitor (PI) use (hazard ratio [HR] = 13.9, 95% CI: 6.73 to 28.6), nonboosted PI use (HR = 8.65, 95% CI: 4.19 to 17.9), and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor use (HR = 1.33, 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.71) were associated with increased risk of hypercholesterolemia, and higher viral load was protective (>50,000 vs. ≤400 copies/mL; HR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.90). Self-reported adherent subjects had higher risk. Conclusions PIs were significant risk factors for hypercholesterolemia. Higher viral load was protective and may reflect non-adherence. Further follow-up is critical to evaluate long-term consequences of chronic PI exposure and hypercholesterolemia. PMID:18209684

  11. Effect of HIV diagnosis disclosure on psychosocial outcomes in Thai children with perinatal HIV-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Boon-yasidhi, V; Naiwatanakul, T; Chokephaibulkit, K; Lolekha, R; Leowsrisook, P; Chotpitayasunond, T; Wolfe, M

    2015-01-01

    Summary A provider-assisted, counseling-based, pediatric HIV disclosure model was developed and implemented at two tertiary-care hospitals in Bangkok, Thailand. All undisclosed perinatally acquired HIV-infected children, ages 7–18 years, and their caretakers were offered the four-step disclosure service, including: screening, readiness assessments and preparation, disclosure sessions, and follow-up evaluations. To assess psychosocial outcomes of disclosure, we compared the scores of the Children Depression Inventory and the PedsQL 4.0™ at baseline and at 2-month and 6-month follow-up visits, and compared the scores of the Child Behavioral Checklist at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. Disclosure was made to 186 children, 160 of whom completed post-disclosure assessments. The median Children’s Depression Inventory score in 135 children decreased significantly from 11 at baseline to 8 at 2-month and 6-month follow-up (p < 0.01). The median PedsQL 4.0™ scores in 126 children increased significantly from 78 at baseline to 80 at 2-month and 84 at 6-month follow-up (p = 0.04). The median Child Behavioral Checklist scores were not significantly changed. In conclusion, pediatric HIV diagnosis disclosure using this model was found to have positive effect on the children’s mood and quality of life, and no negative effect on children’s behaviours. This disclosure program should be expanded to improve psychosocial health of HIV-infected children. PMID:25829519

  12. "I don't feel shy because I will be among others who are just like me…": The role of support groups for children perinatally infected with HIV in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mupambireyi, Zivai; Bernays, Sarah; Bwakura-Dangarembizi, Mutsa; Cowan, Frances M

    2014-10-01

    As access to paediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART) continues to improve in sub-Saharan Africa, a new historically specific cohort of HIV-perinatally infected children surviving into adolescent has emerged. Although remarkable successes have been made clinically in keeping this cohort alive and in reasonable health, their social support experiences are still unknown. The research being reported here sought to explore peer social support experiences of HIV-perinatally infected children in Harare, Zimbabwe. In this article, we draw on 56 repeat in-depth interviews (IDIs) conducted in three phases and two focus group discussions (FGDs) with HIV-infected children (11-13 years). Additional interviews were held with 10 carers. Study findings suggested that both children and carers perceive support groups as a safe social space for learning and acquiring HIV information as well as gaining confidence. Additionally, findings highlighted the importance of consistency of participation. Structural and personal barriers to access and participation in support group were also identified. We conclude that support groups are a useful resource for HIV-infected children and therefore should be supported by stable funding. PMID:25284920

  13. Viral Suppression and Resistance in a Cohort of Perinatally-HIV Infected (PHIV+) Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Letícia; Santos, Edwiges; Benamor Teixeira, Maria de Lourdes; Poletti, Monica; Sousa, Carolina; Gouvea, Maria Isabel; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; João, Esaú

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to describe viral suppression and antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutations in an ongoing cohort of perinatally-infected HIV+ (PHIV+) pregnant women. Descriptive analysis was performed using SPSS 18.0. From 2011 to 2014, we followed 22 PHIV+ pregnant women. Median age at prenatal entry was 19 years (Interquartile range (IQR) 17.6–21.0); 86% had an AIDS diagnosis; 81% had disclosed their HIV status to partner 11. The median age at HIV diagnosis was 8.3 y (IQR 4.0–13.6), the median age at sexual debut was 16 years (IQR 14–18). At the time of prenatal care initiation, four (18%) were on their first antiretroviral treatment (ART), eight (36%) in their second regimen and nine (41%) in their third regimen or beyond, and one had no data. Seventeen of 22 (77%) had HIV-viral load (VL) > 50 copies/mL at prenatal care entry, 16 had a genotyping exam performed. Seventeen of 22 PHIV+ had VL results near delivery: 7/17 (41%) had VL < 50 copies/mL. Among those who had genotyping at prenatal entry, 11/16 (69%) had mutations associated with ARV resistance. The most frequent major mutations were K103N, M184V, T215, M41L, D67N at reverse transcriptase gene and M46, I54V and V82A at protease gene. No vertical transmissions occurred. Management of pregnancy among PHIV+ is challenging. Individualized ART are needed to achieve viral suppression in a highly ART-exposed subpopulation. PMID:27338425

  14. Viral Suppression and Resistance in a Cohort of Perinatally-HIV Infected (PHIV+) Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Maria Letícia; Santos, Edwiges; Benamor Teixeira, Maria de Lourdes; Poletti, Monica; Sousa, Carolina; Gouvea, Maria Isabel; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; João, Esaú

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to describe viral suppression and antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutations in an ongoing cohort of perinatally-infected HIV+ (PHIV+) pregnant women. Descriptive analysis was performed using SPSS 18.0. From 2011 to 2014, we followed 22 PHIV+ pregnant women. Median age at prenatal entry was 19 years (Interquartile range (IQR) 17.6-21.0); 86% had an AIDS diagnosis; 81% had disclosed their HIV status to partner 11. The median age at HIV diagnosis was 8.3 y (IQR 4.0-13.6), the median age at sexual debut was 16 years (IQR 14-18). At the time of prenatal care initiation, four (18%) were on their first antiretroviral treatment (ART), eight (36%) in their second regimen and nine (41%) in their third regimen or beyond, and one had no data. Seventeen of 22 (77%) had HIV-viral load (VL) > 50 copies/mL at prenatal care entry, 16 had a genotyping exam performed. Seventeen of 22 PHIV+ had VL results near delivery: 7/17 (41%) had VL < 50 copies/mL. Among those who had genotyping at prenatal entry, 11/16 (69%) had mutations associated with ARV resistance. The most frequent major mutations were K103N, M184V, T215, M41L, D67N at reverse transcriptase gene and M46, I54V and V82A at protease gene. No vertical transmissions occurred. Management of pregnancy among PHIV+ is challenging. Individualized ART are needed to achieve viral suppression in a highly ART-exposed subpopulation. PMID:27338425

  15. Net survival of perinatally and postnatally HIV-infected children: a pooled analysis of individual data from sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Milly; Becquet, Renaud; Zaba, Basia; Moulton, Lawrence H; Gray, Glenda; Coovadia, Hoosen; Essex, Max; Ekouevi, Didier K; Jackson, Debra; Coutsoudis, Anna; Kilewo, Charles; Leroy, Valériane; Wiktor, Stefan; Nduati, Ruth; Msellati, Philippe; Dabis, François; Newell, Marie-Louise; Ghys, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    Background Previously, HIV epidemic models have used a double Weibull curve to represent high initial and late mortality of HIV-infected children, without distinguishing timing of infection (peri- or post-natally). With more data on timing of infection, which may be associated with disease progression, a separate representation of children infected early and late was proposed. Methods Paediatric survival post-HIV infection without anti-retroviral treatment was calculated using pooled data from 12 studies with known timing of HIV infection. Children were grouped into perinatally or post-natally infected. Net mortality was calculated using cause-deleted life tables to give survival as if HIV was the only competing cause of death. To extend the curve beyond the available data, children surviving beyond 2.5 years post infection were assumed to have the same survival as young adults. Double Weibull curves were fitted to both extended survival curves to represent survival of children infected perinatally or through breastfeeding. Results Those children infected perinatally had a much higher risk of dying than those infected through breastfeeding, even allowing for background mortality. The final-fitted double Weibull curves gave 75% survival at 5 months after infection for perinatally infected, and 1.1 years for post-natally infected children. An estimated 25% of the early infected children would still be alive at 10.6 years compared with 16.9 years for those infected through breastfeeding. Conclusions The increase in available data has enabled separation of child mortality patterns by timing of infection allowing improvement and more flexibility in modelling of paediatric HIV infection and survival. PMID:21247884

  16. Children Who Acquire HIV Infection Perinatally Are at Higher Risk of Early Death than Those Acquiring Infection through Breastmilk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Becquet, Renaud; Marston, Milly; Dabis, François; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Gray, Glenda; Coovadia, Hoosen M.; Essex, Max; Ekouevi, Didier K.; Jackson, Debra; Coutsoudis, Anna; Kilewo, Charles; Leroy, Valériane; Wiktor, Stefan Z.; Nduati, Ruth; Msellati, Philippe; Zaba, Basia; Ghys, Peter D.; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background Assumptions about survival of HIV-infected children in Africa without antiretroviral therapy need to be updated to inform ongoing UNAIDS modelling of paediatric HIV epidemics among children. Improved estimates of infant survival by timing of HIV-infection (perinatally or postnatally) are thus needed. Methodology/Principal Findings A pooled analysis was conducted of individual data of all available intervention cohorts and randomized trials on prevention of HIV mother-to-child transmission in Africa. Studies were right-censored at the time of infant antiretroviral initiation. Overall mortality rate per 1000 child-years of follow-up was calculated by selected maternal and infant characteristics. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival curves by child's HIV infection status and timing of HIV infection. Individual data from 12 studies were pooled, with 12,112 children of HIV-infected women. Mortality rates per 1,000 child-years follow-up were 39.3 and 381.6 for HIV-uninfected and infected children respectively. One year after acquisition of HIV infection, an estimated 26% postnatally and 52% perinatally infected children would have died; and 4% uninfected children by age 1 year. Mortality was independently associated with maternal death (adjusted hazard ratio 2.2, 95%CI 1.6–3.0), maternal CD4<350 cells/ml (1.4, 1.1–1.7), postnatal (3.1, 2.1–4.1) or peri-partum HIV-infection (12.4, 10.1–15.3). Conclusions/Results These results update previous work and inform future UNAIDS modelling by providing survival estimates for HIV-infected untreated African children by timing of infection. We highlight the urgent need for the prevention of peri-partum and postnatal transmission and timely assessment of HIV infection in infants to initiate antiretroviral care and support for HIV-infected children. PMID:22383946

  17. An Exploratory Study of Spirituality in HIV Infected Adolescents and their Families: FAmily CEntered Advance Care Planning and Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Maureen E.; Garvie, Patricia A.; Kao, Ellin; Briggs, Linda; He, Jianping; Malow, Robert; D’Angelo, Lawrence J.; McCarter, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To explore the impact of spirituality and religious beliefs on FAmily CEntered (FACE) Advance Care Planning and medication adherence in HIV+ adolescents and their surrogate decision-makers. Methods A sample of HIV+ adolescents (n=40) and their surrogates, age 21 or older, (n=40) was randomized to an active Healthy Living Control group or the FACE Advance Care Planning intervention, guided by transactional stress and coping theory. Adolescents’ spirituality was assessed at baseline and 3 months post-intervention, using the FACIT-SP-4-EX, as was the belief that HIV is a punishment from God. Results Control adolescents increased faith and meaning/purpose more so than FACE adolescents (p=0.02). At baseline more behaviorally (16%) vs. perinatally (8%) infected adolescents believed HIV was a punishment from God, but not at 3-months post-intervention. Adolescents endorsing HIV was a punishment scored lower on spirituality (p=.05) and adherence to HAART (p= .04). Surrogates were more spiritual than adolescents (p=<.0001). Conclusion Providing family support in a friendly, facilitated, environment enhanced adolescents’ spirituality. Facilitated family conversations had an especially positive effect on behaviorally infected adolescents’ medication adherence and spiritual beliefs. PMID:21575826

  18. Language Impairment in Children Perinatally Infected with HIV Compared to Children Who Were HIV-Exposed and Uninfected

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Mabel L.; Buchanan, Ashley L.; Siberry, George K; Malee, Kathleen M.; Zeldow, Bret; Frederick, Toni; Purswani, Murli U.; Hoffman, Howard J.; Sirois, Patricia A.; Smith, Renee; Torre, Peter; Allison, Susannah M; Williams, Paige L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk for language impairment in children perinatally infected or exposed to HIV. Methods We evaluated the prevalence of language impairment (LI) in 7–16 year old children with perinatal HIV infection (HIV+) compared to children HIV-exposed and uninfected (HEU), using a comprehensive standardized language test (CELF-4). LI was classified as primary LI (Pri-LI) (monolingual English exposure and no cognitive or hearing impairment), concurrent LI (Con-LI) (cognitive or hearing impairment), or no LI. Associations of demographic, caregiver, HIV disease and antiretroviral treatment (ART) factors with LI category were evaluated using univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Results Of 468 children with language assessments, 184 (39%) had LI. No difference was observed by HIV infection status for overall LI or for Pri-LI or Con-LI; mean (SD) CELF-4 scores were 88.5 (18.4) for HIV+ vs 87.5 (17.9) for HEU. After adjustment, Black children had higher odds of Pri-LI vs no LI (aOR=2.43, p=0.03). Children who were Black, Hispanic, had a caregiver with low education or low IQ, or a non-biological parent as caregiver had higher odds of Con-LI vs no LI. Among HIV+ children, viral load >400 copies/ml (aOR=3.04, p<0.001), CDC Class C (aOR=2.19, p=0.02) and ART initiation <6 months of age (aOR=2.12, p=0.02) were associated with higher odds of Con-LI vs. no LI. Conclusions Children perinatally exposed to HIV are at high risk for LI, but such risk was not increased for youth with HIV. Risk factors differed for Pri-LI and Con-LI. PMID:22179050

  19. Perinatal depression

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Alvarez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Perinatal depression is a common condition with significant adverse maternal, fetal, neonatal, and early childhood outcomes. The perinatal period is an opportune time to screen, diagnose, and treat depression. Improved recognition of perinatal depression, particularly among low-income women, can lead to improved perinatal health outcomes. PMID:26934457

  20. Elimination of perinatal HIV infection in the United States and other high-income countries: achievements and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Nesheim, Steven; Harris, Lauren Fitz; Lampe, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe progress and challenges to elimination of mother-to-child HIV transmission (EMCT) in high-income countries. Recent findings Despite ongoing declines in the number of perinatally HIV-infected infants in most high-income countries, the number of HIV-infected women delivering may be increasing, accompanied by apparent changes in this population, including higher percentages with antiretroviral “pre-treatment” (with possible antiretroviral resistance), other co-infections, mental health diagnoses, and recent immigration. The impact of antiretroviral resistance on mother-to-child transmission is yet to be defined. A substantial minority of infant HIV acquisitions occur in the context of maternal acute HIV infection during pregnancy. Some infant infections occur after pregnancy, e.g., by premastication of food, or breastfeeding (perhaps by an uninfected woman who acquires HIV while breastfeeding). Summary The issues of EMCT are largely those of providing proper care for HIV-infected women. Use of combination antiretroviral therapy by increasing proportions of the infected population may function as a structural intervention important to achieving this goal. Providers and public health systems need to be alert for HIV-serodiscordant couples in which the woman is uninfected and for changes in the population of HIV-infected pregnant women. Accurate data about HIV-exposed pregnancies is vital to monitor progress toward EMCT. PMID:23925002

  1. Individual and Contextual Factors of Sexual Risk Behavior in Youth Perinatally Infected with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bauermeister, José A.; Robbins, Reuben N.; Gromadzka, Olga; Abrams, Elaine J.; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Mellins, Claude A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This study prospectively examines the effects of maternal and child HIV infection on youth penetrative and unprotected penetrative sex, as well as the role of internal contextual, external contextual, social and self-regulatory factors in influencing the sexual behaviors of HIV−infected (PHIV+), HIV−affected (uninfected with an HIV+ caregiver), and HIV unaffected (uninfected with an HIV− caregiver) youth over time. Data (N=420) were drawn from two longitudinal studies focused on the effects of pediatric or maternal HIV on youth (51% female; 39% PHIV+) and their caregivers (92% female; 46% HIV+). PHIV+ youth were significantly less likely to engage in penetrative sex than HIV− youth at follow-up, after adjusting for contextual, social, and self-regulatory factors. Other individual- and contextual-level factors such as youth alcohol and marijuana use, residing with a biological parent, caregiver employment, caregiver marijuana use, and youth self-concept were also associated with penetrative sex. Youth who used alcohol were significantly more likely to engage in unprotected penetrative sex. Data suggest that, despite contextual, social, and self-regulatory risk factors, PHIV+ youth are less likely to engage in sexual behavior compared to HIV− youth from similar environments. Further research is required to understand delays in sexual activity in PHIV+ youth and also to understand potential factors that promote resiliency, particularly as they age into older adolescence and young adulthood. PMID:22694193

  2. Tuberculosis in HIV-infected infants, children, and adolescents in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Margot R; Harris, D Robert; Abreu, Thalita; Ferreira, Fabiana G; Ruz, Noris Pavia; Worrell, Carol; Hazra, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the occurrence, clinical presentations and diagnostic methods for tuberculosis (TB) in a cohort of HIV-infected infants, children and adolescents from Latin America. Methods A retrospective analysis of children with TB and HIV was performed within a prospective observational cohort study conducted at multiple clinical sites in Latin America. Results Of 1114 HIV-infected infants, children, and adolescents followed from 2002-2011, 69 that could be classified as having confirmed or presumed TB were included in this case series; 52.2% (95% CI: 39.8-64.4%) had laboratory-confirmed TB, 15.9% (95% CI: 8.2-26.7%) had clinically-confirmed disease and 31.9% (95% CI: 21.2-44.2%) had presumed TB. Sixty-six were perinatally HIV-infected. Thirty-two (61.5%) children had a history of contact with an adult TB case; however information on exposure to active TB was missing for 17 participants. At the time of TB diagnosis, 39 were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen of these cases may have represented immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Conclusions Our study emphasizes the need for adequate contact tracing of adult TB cases and screening for HIV or TB in Latin American children diagnosed with either condition. Preventive strategies in TB-exposed, HIV-infected children should be optimized. PMID:25307683

  3. Episodic medication adherence in adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired HIV: a within-participants approach.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Amy; Evangeli, Michael; Sturgeon, Kate; Le Prevost, Marthe; Judd, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Due to the success of antiretroviral (ART) medications, young people living with perinatally acquired HIV (PHIV+) are now surviving into adolescence and young adulthood. Understanding factors influencing ART non-adherence in this group is important in developing effective adherence interventions. Most studies of ART adherence in HIV-positive populations assess differences in adherence levels and adherence predictors between participants, over a period of time (global adherence). Many individuals living with HIV, however, including PHIV+ young people, take medication inconsistently. To investigate this pattern of adherence, a within-participants design, focussing on specific episodes of adherence and non-adherence, is suitable (episodic adherence). A within-participants design was used with 29 PHIV+ young people (17 female, median age 17 years, range 14-22 years), enrolled in the UK Adolescents and Adults Living with Perinatal HIV cohort study. Participants were eligible if they could identify one dose of medication taken and one dose they had missed in the previous two months. For each of the two episodes (one adherent, one non-adherent), behavioural factors (whom they were with, location, routine, day, reminders) and psychological factors at the time of the episode (information about medication, adherence motivation, perceived behavioural skills to adhere to medication - derived from the Information-Motivation-Behavioural Skills (IMB) Model - and affect) were assessed in a questionnaire. Non-adherence was significantly associated with weekend days (Friday to Sunday versus Monday to Thursday, p = .001), lack of routine (p = .004), and being out of the home (p = .003), but not with whom the young person was with or whether they were reminded to take medication. Non-adherence was associated with lower levels of behavioural skills (p < .001), and lower positive affect (p = .005). Non-adherence was not significantly associated with negative affect

  4. Episodic medication adherence in adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired HIV: a within-participants approach

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Amy; Evangeli, Michael; Sturgeon, Kate; Le Prevost, Marthe; Judd, Ali

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to the success of antiretroviral (ART) medications, young people living with perinatally acquired HIV (PHIV+) are now surviving into adolescence and young adulthood. Understanding factors influencing ART non-adherence in this group is important in developing effective adherence interventions. Most studies of ART adherence in HIV-positive populations assess differences in adherence levels and adherence predictors between participants, over a period of time (global adherence). Many individuals living with HIV, however, including PHIV+ young people, take medication inconsistently. To investigate this pattern of adherence, a within-participants design, focussing on specific episodes of adherence and non-adherence, is suitable (episodic adherence). A within-participants design was used with 29 PHIV+ young people (17 female, median age 17 years, range 14–22 years), enrolled in the UK Adolescents and Adults Living with Perinatal HIV cohort study. Participants were eligible if they could identify one dose of medication taken and one dose they had missed in the previous two months. For each of the two episodes (one adherent, one non-adherent), behavioural factors (whom they were with, location, routine, day, reminders) and psychological factors at the time of the episode (information about medication, adherence motivation, perceived behavioural skills to adhere to medication – derived from the Information-Motivation-Behavioural Skills (IMB) Model – and affect) were assessed in a questionnaire. Non-adherence was significantly associated with weekend days (Friday to Sunday versus Monday to Thursday, p = .001), lack of routine (p = .004), and being out of the home (p = .003), but not with whom the young person was with or whether they were reminded to take medication. Non-adherence was associated with lower levels of behavioural skills (p < .001), and lower positive affect (p = .005). Non-adherence was not significantly associated with

  5. Establishment and Replenishment of the Viral Reservoir in Perinatally HIV-1-infected Children Initiating Very Early Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Puertas, Maria Carmen; Fortuny, Claudia; Ouchi, Dan; Mellado, Maria José; Rojo, Pablo; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Angeles; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) generally suppresses the replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) but does not cure the infection, because proviruses persist in stable latent reservoirs. It has been proposed that low-level proviral reservoirs might predict longer virologic control after discontinuation of treatment. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of very early initiation of cART and temporary treatment interruption on the size of the latent HIV-1 reservoir in vertically infected children. Methods. This retrospective study included 23 perinatally HIV-1-infected children who initiated very early treatment within 12 weeks after birth (n = 14), or early treatment between week 12 and 1 year (n = 9). We measured the proviral reservoir (CD4+ T-cell–associated HIV-1 DNA) in blood samples collected beyond the first year of sustained virologic suppression. Results. There is a strong positive correlation between the time to initiation of cART and the size of the proviral reservoir. Children who initiated cART within the first 12 weeks of life showed a proviral reservoir 6-fold smaller than children initiating cART beyond this time (P < .01). Rapid virologic control after initiation of cART also limits the size of the viral reservoir. However, patients who underwent transient treatment interruptions showed a dramatic increase in the size of the viral reservoir after discontinuation. Conclusions. Initiation of cART during the first 12 weeks of life in perinatally HIV-1-infected children limits the size of the viral reservoir. Treatment interruptions should be undertaken with caution, as they might lead to fast and irreversible replenishment of the viral reservoir. PMID:26063721

  6. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding antiretroviral management, reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections, and sexual risk behavior among perinatally HIV-infected youth in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Lolekha, Rangsima; Boon-Yasidhi, Vitharon; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri; Naiwatanakul, Thananda; Durier, Yuitiang; Nuchanard, Wipada; Tarugsa, Jariya; Punpanich, Warunee; Pattanasin, Sarika; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of perinatally HIV-infected children in Thailand are 12 years and older. As these youth become sexually active, there is a risk that they will transmit HIV to their partners. Data on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of HIV-infected youth in Thailand are limited. Therefore, we assessed the KAP of perinatally HIV-infected youth and youth reporting sexual risk behaviors receiving care at two tertiary care hospitals in Bangkok, Thailand and living in an orphanage in Lopburi, Thailand. From October 2010 to July 2011, 197 HIV-infected youth completed an audio computer-assisted self-interview to assess their KAP regarding antiretroviral (ARV) management, reproductive health, sexual risk behaviors, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A majority of youth in this study correctly answered questions about HIV transmission and prevention and the importance of taking ARVs regularly. More than half of the youth in this study demonstrated a lack of family planning, reproductive health, and STI knowledge. Girls had more appropriate attitudes toward safe sex and risk behaviors than boys. Although only 5% of the youth reported that they had engaged in sexual intercourse, about a third reported sexual risk behaviors (e.g., having or kissing boy/girlfriend or consuming an alcoholic beverage). We found low condom use and other family planning practices, increasing the risk of HIV and/or STI transmission to sexual partners. Additional resources are needed to improve reproductive health knowledge and reduce risk behavior among HIV-infected youth in Thailand. PMID:25506754

  7. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding antiretroviral management, reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections, and sexual risk behavior among perinatally HIV-infected youth in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lolekha, Rangsima; Boon-Yasidhi, Vitharon; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri; Naiwatanakul, Thananda; Durier, Yuitiang; Nuchanard, Wipada; Tarugsa, Jariya; Punpanich, Warunee; Pattanasin, Sarika; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of perinatally HIV-infected children in Thailand are 12 years and older. As these youth become sexually active, there is a risk that they will transmit HIV to their partners. Data on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of HIV-infected youth in Thailand are limited. Therefore, we assessed the KAP of perinatally HIV-infected youth and youth reporting sexual risk behaviors receiving care at two tertiary care hospitals in Bangkok, Thailand and living in an orphanage in Lopburi, Thailand. From October 2010 to July 2011, 197 HIV-infected youth completed an audio computer-assisted self-interview to assess their KAP regarding antiretroviral (ARV) management, reproductive health, sexual risk behaviors, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A majority of youth in this study correctly answered questions about HIV transmission and prevention and the importance of taking ARVs regularly. More than half of the youth in this study demonstrated a lack of family planning, reproductive health, and STI knowledge. Girls had more appropriate attitudes toward safe sex and risk behaviors than boys. Although only 5% of the youth reported that they had engaged in sexual intercourse, about a third reported sexual risk behaviors (e.g., having or kissing boy/girlfriend or consuming an alcoholic beverage). We found low condom use and other family planning practices, increasing the risk of HIV and/or STI transmission to sexual partners. Additional resources are needed to improve reproductive health knowledge and reduce risk behavior among HIV-infected youth in Thailand. PMID:25506754

  8. Perinatal Exposure to a Low Dose of Bisphenol A Impaired Systemic Cellular Immune Response and Predisposes Young Rats to Intestinal Parasitic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Sandrine; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Lencina, Corinne; Leveque, Mathilde; Naturel, Manon; Sekkal, Soraya; Harkat, Cherryl; Gaultier, Eric; Olier, Maïwenn; Garcia-Villar, Raphael; Theodorou, Vassilia; Houdeau, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to the food contaminant bisphenol A (BPA) in rats induces long lasting adverse effects on intestinal immune homeostasis. This study was aimed at examining the immune response to dietary antigens and the clearance of parasites in young rats at the end of perinatal exposure to a low dose of BPA. Female rats were fed with BPA [5 µg/kg of body weight/day] or vehicle from gestational day 15 to pup weaning. Juvenile female offspring (day (D)25) were used to analyze immune cell populations, humoral and cellular responses after oral tolerance or immunization protocol to ovalbumin (OVA), and susceptibility to infection by the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (N. brasiliensis). Anti-OVA IgG titers following either oral tolerance or immunization were not affected after BPA perinatal exposure, while a sharp decrease in OVA-induced IFNγ secretion occurred in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of OVA-immunized rats. These results are consistent with a decreased number of helper T cells, regulatory T cells and dendritic cells in spleen and MLN of BPA-exposed rats. The lack of cellular response to antigens questioned the ability of BPA-exposed rats to clear intestinal infections. A 1.5-fold increase in N. brasiliensis living larvae was observed in the intestine of BPA-exposed rats compared to controls due to an inappropriate Th1/Th2 cytokine production in infected jejunal tissues. These results show that perinatal BPA exposure impairs cellular response to food antigens, and increases susceptibility to intestinal parasitic infection in the juveniles. This emphasized the maturing immune system during perinatal period highly sensitive to low dose exposure to BPA, altering innate and adaptative immune response capacities in early life. PMID:25415191

  9. Metabolic and renal adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fortuny, Clàudia; Deyà-Martínez, Ángela; Chiappini, Elena; Galli, Luisa; de Martino, Maurizio; Noguera-Julian, Antoni

    2015-05-01

    Worldwide, the benefits of combined antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in morbidity and mortality due to perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection are beyond question and outweigh the toxicity these drugs have been associated with in HIV-infected children and adolescents to date. In puberty, abnormal body fat distribution is stigmatizating and leads to low adherence to ARV treatment. The other metabolic comorbidities (mitochondrial toxicity, dyslipidemias, insulin resistance and low bone mineral density) and renal toxicity, albeit nonsymptomatic in most children, are increasingly being reported and potentially put this population at risk for early cardiovascular or cerebrovascular atherosclerotic disease, diabetes, pathologic fractures or premature renal failure in the third and fourth decades of life. Evidence from available studies is limited because of methodological limitations and also because of several HIV-unrelated factors influencing, to some degree, the development of these conditions. Current recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of metabolic and renal adverse effects in HIV-children and adolescents are based on adult studies, observational pediatric studies and experts' consensus. Healthy lifestyle habits (regarding diet, exercise and refraining from toxic substances) and wise use of ARV options are the only preventive tools for the majority of patients. Should abnormal findings arise, switches in one or more ARV drugs have proved useful. Specific therapies are also available for some of these comorbidities, although the experience in the pediatric age is still very scarce. We aim to summarize the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of metabolic and renal adverse effects in vertically HIV-infected children and adolescents. PMID:25629891

  10. "That's True Love:" Lived Experiences of Puerto Rican Perinatally HIV-Infected Youth within Their Families' Context.

    PubMed

    Silva-Suárez, Georgina; Bastida, Elena; Rabionet, Silvia E; Beck-Sagué, Consuelo; Febo, Irma; Zorrilla, Carmen D

    2016-01-01

    The burden of HIV affects not only HIV-infected patients but also their families and caregivers. It is also known that family support is crucial for people living with HIV. A qualitative study was conducted to explore the life experiences, within the family context, of perinatally HIV-infected (pHIV-I) youth in Puerto Rico. Twenty in-depth interviews were performed and audio-recorded. Within the family context, study participants experienced acceptance, love and support but also stigma and discrimination. They reported that family is an essential component in their lives and treatment. Losing one or both parents at a young age was considered more difficult than having HIV. Most participants who lost their parents lived with other family members. This was a challenging situation for both pHIV-I youth and their caregivers. Participants described their healthcare providers as part of their families and would like to keep in touch as they transition to adult care. Despite the challenges, participants expressed a desire to have children. Services targeted to this population should stress social support, incorporate family members into the medical process, provide special guidance and support while transitioning to adult care, and provide them with the latest information regarding HIV and reproductive options. PMID:26703639

  11. Perinatal inflammation/infection and its association with correction of metabolic acidosis in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, CT; Burd, I; Raghunathan, R; Northington, FJ; Graham, EM

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the decreased response to hypothermia in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and infection, we sought to determine the association of fetal inflammation/infection with perinatal metabolic acidosis. STUDY DESIGN We performed a retrospective cohort study of neonates with suspected HIE started on whole-body hypothermia within 6 h of birth that had a cord gas at delivery and placental pathology performed. Neonates were compared based on the presence of clinical and histologic chorioamnionitis. The cord gas at delivery was compared with the initial arterial gas after birth. RESULTS In all, 50 out of 67 (74.6%) neonates admitted for therapeutic hypothermia met inclusion criteria. Chorioamnionitis did not affect the cord gas at delivery, but both clinical and histologic chorioamnionitis were associated with a significantly increased metabolic acidosis on the initial neonatal arterial gas. CONCLUSION Chorioamnionitis, diagnosed both clinically and histologically, is associated with a persistent state of acidosis in neonates with HIE that may contribute to worse neurologic outcomes. PMID:26796123

  12. Living Situation Affects Adherence to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Adolescents in Rwanda: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Mutwa, Philippe R.; Van Nuil, Jennifer Ilo; Asiimwe-Kateera, Brenda; Kestelyn, Evelyne; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Pool, Robert; Ruhirimbura, John; Kanakuze, Chantal; Reiss, Peter; Geelen, Sibyl; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Boer, Kimberly R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is vital for HIV-infected adolescents for survival and quality of life. However, this age group faces many challenges to remain adherent. We used multiple data sources (role-play, focus group discussions (FGD), and in-depth interviews (IDI)) to better understand adherence barriers for Rwandan adolescents. Forty-two HIV positive adolescents (ages 12–21) and a selection of their primary caregivers were interviewed. All were perinatally-infected and received (cART) for ≥12 months. Topics discussed during FGDs and IDIs included learning HIV status, disclosure and stigma, care and treatment issues, cART adherence barriers. Results Median age was 17 years, 45% female, 45% orphaned, and 48% in boarding schools. We identified three overarching but inter-related themes that appeared to influence adherence. Stigma, perceived and experienced, and inadvertent disclosure of HIV status hampered adolescents from obtaining and taking their drugs, attending clinic visits, carrying their cARTs with them in public. The second major theme was the need for better support, in particular for adolescents with different living situations, (orphanages, foster-care, and boarding schools). Lack of privacy to keep and take medication came out as major barrier for adolescents living in congested households, as well the institutionalization of boarding schools where privacy is almost non-existent. The third important theme was the desire to be ‘normal’ and not be recognized as an HIV-infected individual, and to have a normal life not perturbed by taking a regimen of medications or being forced to disclose where others would treat them differently. Conclusions We propose better management of HIV-infected adolescents integrated into boarding school, orphanages, and foster care; training of school-faculty on how to support students and allow them privacy for taking their medications. To provide better care and support, HIV

  13. CD4+ and viral load outcomes of antiretroviral therapy switch strategies after virologic failure of combination antiretroviral therapy in perinatally HIV-infected youth in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fairlie, Lee; Karalius, Brad; Patel, Kunjal; van Dyke, Russell B.; Hazra, Rohan; Hernán, Miguel A.; Siberry, George K.; Seage, George R.; Agwu, Allison; Wiznia, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study compared 12-month CD4+ and viral load outcomes in HIV-infected children and adolescents with virological failure, managed with four treatment switch strategies. Design: This observational study included perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) and Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials (PACTG) Protocol 219C. Methods: Treatment strategies among children with virologic failure were compared: continue failing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART); switch to new cART; switch to drug-sparing regimen; and discontinue all ART. Mean changes in CD4+% and viral load from baseline (time of virologic failure) to 12 months follow-up in each group were evaluated using weighted linear regression models. Results: Virologic failure occurred in 939 out of 2373 (40%) children. At 12 months, children switching to new cART (16%) had a nonsignificant increase in CD4+% from baseline, 0.59 percentage points [95% confidence interval (95% CI) −1.01 to 2.19], not different than those who continued failing cART (71%) (−0.64 percentage points, P = 0.15) or switched to a drug-sparing regimen (5%) (1.40 percentage points, P = 0.64). Children discontinuing all ART (7%) experienced significant CD4+% decline −3.18 percentage points (95% CI −5.25 to −1.11) compared with those initiating new cART (P = 0.04). All treatment strategies except discontinuing ART yielded significant mean decreases in log10VL by 12 months, the new cART group having the largest drop (−1.15 log10VL). Conclusion: In PHIV children with virologic failure, switching to new cART was associated with the best virological response, while stopping all ART resulted in the worst immunologic and virologic outcomes and should be avoided. Drug-sparing regimens and continuing failing regimens may be considered with careful monitoring. PMID:26182197

  14. Parenting Among Adolescents and Young Adults with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in the United States: Challenges, Unmet Needs, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hatfield-Timajchy, Kendra; Brown, Jennifer L; Haddad, Lisa B; Chakraborty, Rana; Kourtis, Athena P

    2016-07-01

    Given the realistic expectations of HIV-infected adolescents and young adults (AYA) to have children and start families, steps must be taken to ensure that youth are prepared to deal with the challenges associated with their HIV and parenting. Literature reviews were conducted to identify published research and practice guidelines addressing parenting or becoming parents among HIV-infected AYA in the United States. Research articles or practice guidelines on this topic were not identified. Given the paucity of information available on this topic, this article provides a framework for the development of appropriate interventions and guidelines for use in clinical and community-based settings. First, the social, economic, and sexual and reproductive health challenges facing HIV-infected AYA in the United States are summarized. Next, family planning considerations, including age-appropriate disclosure of HIV status to those who are perinatally infected, and contraceptive and preconception counseling are described. The impact of early childbearing on young parents is discussed and considerations are outlined during the preconception, antenatal, and postnatal periods with regard to antiretroviral medications and clinical care guidelines. The importance of transitioning AYA from pediatric or adolescent to adult-centered medical care is highlighted. Finally, a comprehensive approach is suggested that addresses not only medical needs but also emphasizes ways to mitigate the impact of social and economic factors on the health and well-being of these young parents and their children. PMID:27410495

  15. Action plan to reduce perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Bhakoo, O N; Kumar, R

    1990-01-01

    The government of India has set a goal of reducing perinatal mortality from its current rate of 48/1000 to 30-35/1000 by the year 2000. Perinatal deaths result from maternal malnutrition, inadequate prenatal care, complications of delivery, and infections in the postpartum period. Since reductions in perinatal mortality require attention to social, economic, and behavioral factors, as well as improvements in the health care delivery system, a comprehensive strategy is required. Social measures, such as raising the age at marriage to 18 years for females, improving the nutritional status of adolescent girls, reducing the strenuousness of work during pregnancy, improving female literacy, raising women's status in the society and thus in the family, and poverty alleviation programs, would all help eliminate the extent of complications of pregnancy. Measures required to enhance infant survival include improved prenatal care, prenatal tetanus toxoid immunization, use of sterile disposable cord care kits, the provision of mucus extractors and resuscitation materials to birth attendants, the creation of neonatal care units in health facilities, and more efficient referral of high-risk newborns and mothers. Since 90% of births in rural India take place at home priority must be given to training traditional birth attendants in the identification of high risk factors during pregnancy, delivery, and the newborn period. PMID:12316585

  16. Diagnosis of perinatal HIV-1 infection by in-house PCR.

    PubMed

    Vongsheree, S; Ruchusatsawat, N; Saguanwongse, S; Warachit, P

    1997-12-01

    A study on how to apply PCR as a diagnostic test for the infants born to HIV-1 infected mothers is described. All steps including clinical care, blood sampling, specimen processing and PCR analysis were carried out using native facilities and personnel. An open cohort of 130 children was evaluated at birth, 1, 6, 9, 15, and 18 months of age. Definite infection status was assessed by clinical and serological data during an 18 months of follow up period. PCR results were reported as positive or negative when at least 2 concordant data were denoted. This in-house PCR, compared to known infection status, gave 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity within 6 months after birth. On the other hand, clinical diagnosis could identify only the infected infants at 9 months of age. The HIV-1 transmission rate from mother to infant was 23.2%. Though this PCR was not at an optimal level of specificity, it was still beneficial to identify uninfected infants in the first year of their lives and avoid unnecessary medical care. Here, we report an in-house PCR that offers good performance at low cost for the diagnosis of HIV-1 vertical transmission. PMID:9579613

  17. Roles of Perinatal Problems on Adolescent Antisocial Behaviors among Children Born after 33 Completed Weeks: A Prospective Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomura, Yoko; Rajendran, Khushmand; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is uncertainty about the extent to which mildly sub-optimal perinatal characteristics among individuals born near-term (greater than 33 weeks of gestation) are associated with various subsequent childhood problems, including antisocial behavior. There is even more uncertainty about whether the pathway to antisocial behavior…

  18. I wish I could tell you but I can't: adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV and their dilemmas around self-disclosure.

    PubMed

    Hogwood, Jemma; Campbell, Tomás; Butler, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Many young people growing up with HIV are choosing not to disclose their status to others, yet are likely to face difficult decisions and conversations such as explaining school absence, taking medication, coping with physical changes and for many, parental bereavement. This study aims to describe and explore the attitudes and opinions of adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV towards disclosure. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine young people aged 13-19 and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Four themes emerged to illuminate the young people's attitudes towards disclosure. These were 1) myths and assumptions, 2) the disclosure dilemma, 3) fear and 4) keeping HIV in its place. This study confirms that many young people with HIV are choosing not to disclose. However, it appears that it is a complex decision-making process that changes over time and is influenced by developmental factors and societal attitudes towards HIV. Recommendations are suggested for services to better support adolescents growing up with HIV. PMID:22287554

  19. An analysis of timing and frequency of malaria infection during pregnancy in relation to the risk of low birth weight, anaemia and perinatal mortality in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A prospective study aiming at assessing the effect of adding a third dose sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) to the standard two-dose intermittent preventive treatment for pregnant women was carried out in Hounde, Burkina Faso, between March 2006 and July 2008. Pregnant women were identified as earlier as possible during pregnancy through a network of home visitors, referred to the health facilities for inclusion and followed up until delivery. Methods Study participants were enrolled at antenatal care (ANC) visits and randomized to receive either two or three doses of SP at the appropriate time. Women were visited daily and a blood slide was collected when there was fever (body temperature > 37.5°C) or history of fever. Women were encouraged to attend ANC and deliver in the health centre, where the new-born was examined and weighed. The timing and frequency of malaria infection was analysed in relation to the risk of low birth weight, maternal anaemia and perinatal mortality. Results Data on birth weight and haemoglobin were available for 1,034 women. The incidence of malaria infections was significantly lower in women having received three instead of two doses of SP. Occurrence of first malaria infection during the first or second trimester was associated with a higher risk of low birth weight: incidence rate ratios of 3.56 (p < 0.001) and 1.72 (p = 0.034), respectively. After adjusting for possible confounding factors, the risk remained significantly higher for the infection in the first trimester of pregnancy (adjusted incidence rate ratio = 2.07, p = 0.002). The risk of maternal anaemia and perinatal mortality was not associated with the timing of first malaria infection. Conclusion Malaria infection during first trimester of pregnancy is associated to a higher risk of low birth weight. Women should be encouraged to use long-lasting insecticidal nets before and throughout their pregnancy. PMID:22433778

  20. Neurocognitive Outcome of Children Exposed to Perinatal Mother-to-Child Chikungunya Virus Infection: The CHIMERE Cohort Study on Reunion Island

    PubMed Central

    Ramful, Duksha; Boumahni, Brahim; Bintner, Marc; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Carbonnier, Magali; Tiran-Rajaoefera, Isabelle; Beullier, Gilles; Boya, Irénée; Noormahomed, Tahir; Okoï, Jocelyn; Rollot, Olivier; Cotte, Liliane; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie-Christine; Michault, Alain; Favier, François; Kaminski, Monique; Fourmaintraux, Alain; Fritel, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the neurocognitive outcome in children exposed to perinatal mother-to-child Chikungunya virus (p-CHIKV) infection. Methods The CHIMERE ambispective cohort study compared the neurocognitive function of 33 p-CHIKV-infected children (all but one enrolled retrospectively) at around two years of age with 135 uninfected peers (all enrolled prospectively). Psychomotor development was assessed using the revised Brunet-Lezine scale, examiners blinded to infectious status. Development quotients (DQ) with subscores covering movement/posture, coordination, language, sociability skills were calculated. Predictors of global neurodevelopmental delay (GND, DQ≤85), were investigated using multivariate Poisson regression modeling. Neuroradiologic follow-up using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans was proposed for most of the children with severe forms. Results The mean DQ score was 86.3 (95%CI: 81.0–91.5) in infected children compared to 100.2 (95%CI: 98.0–102.5) in uninfected peers (P<0.001). Fifty-one percent (n = 17) of infected children had a GND compared to 15% (n = 21) of uninfected children (P<0.001). Specific neurocognitive delays in p-CHIKV-infected children were as follows: coordination and language (57%), sociability (36%), movement/posture (27%). After adjustment for maternal social situation, small for gestational age, and head circumference, p-CHIKV infection was found associated with GND (incidence rate ratio: 2.79, 95%CI: 1.45–5.34). Further adjustments on gestational age or breastfeeding did not change the independent effect of CHIKV infection on neurocognitive outcome. The mean DQ of p-CHIKV-infected children was lower in severe encephalopathic children than in non-severe children (77.6 versus 91.2, P<0.001). Of the 12 cases of CHIKV neonatal encephalopathy, five developed a microcephaly (head circumference <−2 standard deviations) and four matched the definition of cerebral palsy. MRI scans showed severe

  1. Mycobacterium fortuitum Complex Skin Infection in a Healthy Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Rebecca; Khatami, Ameneh

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum complex skin infection is described in a previously healthy adolescent girl in Sydney, Australia. Mycobacterium fortuitum typically causes superficial skin infections following trauma to the skin and in our patient may have been related to prior leg "waxing". This case highlights common causes for a delay in diagnosis: lack of clinician awareness and inadequate microbiological and histopathological investigations of tissue samples. Due to the size and number of lesions, surgical excision was felt to be a less desirable therapeutic option due to the potential risk of poor cosmetic outcome for our patient. The standard chemotherapeutic approach to M. fortuitum infections involves the use of a combination of at least two antimicrobial agents to which the isolate is susceptible. Despite in vitro susceptibility testing that suggested that the isolate from our patient was resistant to most oral anti-microbial agents, our patient was treated successfully with a 10-week course of oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and moxifloxacin. PMID:25019232

  2. "Payment by Results"--financial incentives and motivational interviewing, adherence interventions in young adults with perinatally acquired HIV-1 infection: a pilot program.

    PubMed

    Foster, Caroline; McDonald, Susan; Frize, Graham; Ayers, Sarah; Fidler, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests financial incentives (FIs) improve medication adherence in select populations. A small proportion of adolescents with perinatal HIV (PaHIV) transfer to adult services with established poor adherence and advanced disease. We describe a single center adherence intervention combining FIs with motivational interviewing (MI). Eligible patients (PaHIV,16-25 years, CD4 count ≤ 200, off ART despite multiple attempts) received MI, and FI dependent on viral load (VL) reduction for 1 year. Outcome measures compared CD4 gain from baseline at 1 year and 12 months post cessation of FI/MI. Eleven young people enrolled; median age 19 years, 8 female. Baseline median CD4 count 30 cells/μL (IQR 10-160), VL 12,870 c/mL. Outcomes at 12 months: 9/11 ever achieved VL < 50, 5 sustained undetectable VL, median CD4 140, mean CD4 gain 90 cells/μL at 1 year. Twelve months post cessation of MI/FI; six VL < 50, median CD4 75, mean CD4 gain 122 cells/μL. Total FI expenditure £1,350: £68 per 50 CD4 cells at 1 year, £55 at 24 months. To prevent death, adolescents with PaHIV require novel interventions to reverse poor patterns of adherence established since childhood. FI/MI improved virological and immunological outcomes with minimal expenditure. Extension of this pilot work for vulnerable individuals is now indicated. PMID:24428797

  3. Body fat distribution in perinatally HIV-infected and HIV-exposed but uninfected children in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy: outcomes from the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Associations between abnormal body fat distribution and clinical variables are poorly understood in pediatric HIV disease. Our objective was to compare total body fat and its distribution in perinatally HIV-infected and HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children and to evaluate associations with clin...

  4. Brief Report: APOL1 Renal Risk Variants Are Associated With Chronic Kidney Disease in Children and Youth With Perinatal HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Purswani, Murli U; Patel, Kunjal; Winkler, Cheryl A; Spector, Stephen A; Hazra, Rohan; Seage, George R; Mofenson, Lynne; Karalius, Brad; Scott, Gwendolyn B; Van Dyke, Russell B; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2016-09-01

    APOL1 renal risk alleles are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults, with the strongest effect being for HIV-associated nephropathy. Their role in youth with perinatal HIV-1 infection (PHIV) has not been studied. In a nested case-control study of 451 PHIV participants in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, we found a 3.5-fold increased odds of CKD in those carrying high-risk APOL1 genotypes using a recessive model [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2 to 10.0]. We report an unadjusted incidence of 1.2 CKD cases/100 person-years (95% CI: 0.5 to 2.5) in PHIV youth carrying APOL1 high-risk genotypes, with important implications for sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27035887

  5. HIV infection in male adolescents: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Taquette, Stella Regina; Rodrigues, Adriana de Oliveira; Bortolotti, Livia Rocha

    2015-07-01

    `The gradual reduction in the incidence of AIDS among men who have sex with men has not occurred in the youngest age group; on the contrary, it is growing. This paper examines the vulnerabilities of adolescent males at risk of HIV infection. This is a qualitative study conducted through interviews with HIV positive young men undergoing treatment, whose diagnosis was made during adolescence. The interviews were recorded and transcribed in full. They were analyzed by intensive reading, classified by issues, and interpreted from a hermeneutic-dialectic perspective in dialogue with the literature. We interviewed 16 young men whose diagnosis occurred between the ages of 11 and 19 and for all of them the method of HIV transmission was sexual; 12 of the men were homosexual and 4 were heterosexual. It was evident that vulnerable situations included disbelief in the possibility of contamination, subjection to sex, homophobia and commercial sexual exploitation. This study demonstrates the importance of the formulation of public policies on sexual and reproductive health, which include adolescents and young men. These policies should embody the perspective of masculinity in all its widest aspects, as well as actions in favor of sexual diversity. PMID:26132259

  6. Trends in the management and outcome of HIV-1-infected women and their infants in the NISDI Perinatal and LILAC cohorts, 2002–2009

    PubMed Central

    Stoszek, Sonia K.; Duarte, Geraldo; Hance, Laura Freimanis; Pinto, Jorge; Gouvea, Maria I.; Cohen, Rachel A.; Santos, Breno; Teles, Elizabete; Succi, Regina; Alarcon, Jorge O.; Read, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe temporal management and outcome trends among HIV-1-infected pregnant women and their infants enrolled in the NISDI Perinatal and LILAC cohorts. Methods A prospective cohort of 1548 HIV-1-infected pregnant women and their 1481 singleton live-born infants was analyzed. Participants were enrolled at 24 Latin American and Caribbean sites and followed-up for at least 6 months postpartum. Variables were compared by 2-year enrollment periods from September 27, 2002, to June 30, 2009, using logistic and linear regression modeling. Results Antiretroviral (ARV) use during pregnancy remained high (99.0%). ARVs became increasingly used for treatment (P<0.001). Regimens containing 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors plus a protease inhibitor became more common in later years (P<0.001). The proportion of women with viral loads below 1000 copies/mL at hospital discharge after delivery (HD) increased over time (P=0.0031). Median CD4 lymphocyte counts also rose at HD, from 441 cell/mm3 to 515 cells/mm3 (P<0.05). Elective cesarean deliveries increased from 30.5% to 42.0% (P=0.018). Most infants received ARV prophylaxis (99.7%). Few infants were breastfed (0.5%) or became infected with HIV-1 (1.2%). Conclusion The results indicate that national HIV-1 treatment and transmission prevention policies are effective among patients with healthcare access in the region. PMID:23566742

  7. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Cytomegalovirus Infections in Adolescent Females

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Laura Patricia; Bernstein, David I.; Callahan, S. Todd; Turley, Christine B.; Munoz, Flor M.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Acharya, Mekhala; Simone, Gina A. Gorgone; Patel, Shital M.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Rosenthal, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading cause of disability, including sensorineural hearing loss, developmental delay, and mental retardation. Understanding risk factors for acquisition of CMV infection in adolescent females will help determine vaccine strategies. Methods Females (12–17 years) were recruited from primary care settings in Cincinnati, Galveston, Houston, and Nashville from June 2006 to July 2010 for a seroepidemiologic study, from which seronegative participants were recruited for a CMV vaccine trial. Participants (n = 1585) responded to questions regarding potential exposures. For those with young children in the home (n = 859), additional questions were asked about feeding and changing diapers, and for those > 14 years of age (n = 1162), questions regarding sexual activity were asked. Serum was evaluated for CMV antibody using a commercial immunoglobulin G assay. Results Cytomegalovirus antibody was detected in 49% of participants. In the univariate analyses, CMV seroprevalence was significantly higher among African Americans, those with children < 3 years of age in the home, and those with a history of oral, anal, or vaginal intercourse. Among those with young children in the home, feeding children and changing diapers further increased the association with CMV infection. However, in the final multivariate analysis, only African Americans and household contact with young children were associated with CMV infection. Conclusions By age 12, evidence of CMV infection was common. Multiple factors regarding race and personal behaviors likely contribute to seroconversion earlier in life. PMID:23687583

  8. High seroprevalence of antibodies against Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) among HIV-1-infected children and adolescents in a non-endemic population.

    PubMed

    Feiterna-Sperling, Cornelia; Königs, Christoph; Notheis, Gundula; Buchholz, Bernd; Krüger, Renate; Weizsäcker, Katharina; Eberle, Josef; Hanhoff, Nikola; Gärtner, Barbara; Heider, Harald; Krüger, Detlev H; Hofmann, Jörg

    2016-10-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), which primarily affects human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults with advanced immunodeficiency. Currently, only limited prevalence data for HHV-8 infection in HIV-infected children living in non-endemic areas are available. This multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted in four university hospitals in Germany specializing in pediatric HIV care. Stored serum specimens obtained from 207 vertically HIV-1-infected children and adolescents were tested for antibodies against lytic and latent HHV-8 antigens. Logistic regression was used to assess independent risk factors associated with HHV-8 seropositivity. The overall HHV-8 seroprevalence was 24.6 % (n = 51/207) without significant differences related to sex, age, or ethnicity. In univariate analysis, HHV-8 seropositivity was significantly associated with a child having being born outside Germany, maternal origin from sub-Saharan Africa, a history of breastfeeding, CDC immunologic category 3, and deferred initiation of antiretroviral therapy (>24 months of age). In multivariate analysis, a child's birth outside Germany was the only significant risk factor for HHV-8 seropositivity (odds ratio 3.98; 95 % confidence interval 1.27-12.42). HHV-8-associated malignancies were uncommon; only one patient had a history of KS. Serum specimen of vertically HIV-infected children and adolescents living in Germany showed a high HHV-8 seroprevalence. These findings suggest that primary HHV-8 infection-a risk factor for KS and other HHV-8-associated malignancies-occurs early in life. Thus, management of perinatally HIV-infected children should include testing for HHV-8 coinfection and should consider future risks of HHV-8-associated malignancies. PMID:27240652

  9. “That’s True Love:” Lived Experiences of Puerto Rican Perinatally HIV-Infected Youth within Their Families’ Context

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Suárez, Georgina; Bastida, Elena; Rabionet, Silvia E.; Beck-Sagué, Consuelo; Febo, Irma; Zorrilla, Carmen D.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of HIV affects not only HIV-infected patients but also their families and caregivers. It is also known that family support is crucial for people living with HIV. A qualitative study was conducted to explore the life experiences, within the family context, of perinatally HIV-infected (pHIV-I) youth in Puerto Rico. Twenty in-depth interviews were performed and audio-recorded. Within the family context, study participants experienced acceptance, love and support but also stigma and discrimination. They reported that family is an essential component in their lives and treatment. Losing one or both parents at a young age was considered more difficult than having HIV. Most participants who lost their parents lived with other family members. This was a challenging situation for both pHIV-I youth and their caregivers. Participants described their healthcare providers as part of their families and would like to keep in touch as they transition to adult care. Despite the challenges, participants expressed a desire to have children. Services targeted to this population should stress social support, incorporate family members into the medical process, provide special guidance and support while transitioning to adult care, and provide them with the latest information regarding HIV and reproductive options. PMID:26703639

  10. Perinatal Screening for Chagas Disease in Southern Texas.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Morven S; Rench, Marcia A; Todd, Charles W; Czaicki, Nancy; Steurer, Francis J; Bern, Caryn; Montgomery, Susan P

    2015-03-01

    Perinatal screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in a cohort of 4000 predominantly Hispanic women in southern Texas revealed that Chagas disease occurs with sufficient frequency (0.25%) that targeted perinatal screening should be considered to identify infected mothers and infants at risk for congenital infection. PMID:26407360

  11. Risk for HIV Infection among Adolescents in the Border City of Tijuana, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Donate, Ana P.; Blumberg, Elaine J.; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Sipan, Carol L.; Zellner, Jennifer A.; Hughes, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested high rates of HIV infection and other sexually transmitted infections in theU.S.-Mexico border region. However, no information is available on the risk for HIV infection among Mexican adolescents living in this geographic area. This study examines the prevalence of HIV risk practices and psychosocial correlates…

  12. Health Promotion Strategies for Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection among Minority Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiClemente, Ralph J.; Houston-Hamilton, Amanda

    1989-01-01

    This article offers a framework for development and implementation of health education strategies for preventing HIV infection and enhancing health promoting attitudes and behaviors among Black and Latino adolescents. Three HIV prevention program components are identified and discussed. (IAH)

  13. Got worms? Perinatal exposure to helminths prevents persistent immune sensitization and cognitive dysfunction induced by early-life infection.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Lauren L; McKenney, Erin A; Holzknecht, Zoie E; Belliveau, Christine; Rawls, John F; Poulton, Susan; Parker, William; Bilbo, Staci D

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases has risen dramatically in post-industrial societies. "Biome depletion" - loss of commensal microbial and multicellular organisms such as helminths (intestinal worms) that profoundly modulate the immune system - may contribute to these increases. Hyperimmune-associated disorders also affect the brain, especially neurodevelopment, and increasing evidence links early-life infection to cognitive and neurodevelopmental disorders. We have demonstrated previously that rats infected with bacteria as newborns display life-long vulnerabilities to cognitive dysfunction, a vulnerability that is specifically linked to long-term hypersensitivity of microglial cell function, the resident immune cells of the brain. Here, we demonstrate that helminth colonization of pregnant dams attenuated the exaggerated brain cytokine response of their offspring to bacterial infection, and that combined with post-weaning colonization of offspring with helminths (consistent with their mothers treatment) completely prevented enduring microglial sensitization and cognitive dysfunction in adulthood. Importantly, helminths had no overt impact on adaptive immune cell subsets, whereas exaggerated innate inflammatory responses in splenic macrophages were prevented. Finally, helminths altered the effect of neonatal infection on the gut microbiome; neonatal infection with Escherichia coli caused a shift from genera within the Actinobacteria and Tenericutes phyla to genera in the Bacteroidetes phylum in rats not colonized with helminths, but helminths attenuated this effect. In sum, these data point toward an inter-relatedness of various components of the biome, and suggest potential mechanisms by which this helminth might exert therapeutic benefits in the treatment of neuroinflammatory and cognitive disorders. PMID:26162711

  14. Perinatal Exposure to Insecticide Methamidophos Suppressed Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines Responding to Virus Infection in Lung Tissues in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Akihiko; Akashi, Toshi; Takeshita, Tomomi; Kuroki, Nao; Shibata, Asami; Hongo, Satoko; Hashiguchi, Seiko; Konno, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Methamidophos, a representative organophosphate insecticide, is regulated because of its severe neurotoxicity, but it is suspected of contaminating agricultural foods in many countries due to illicit use. To reveal unknown effects of methamidophos on human health, we evaluated the developmental immunotoxicity of methamidophos using a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection mouse model. Pregnant mice were exposed to methamidophos (10 or 20 ppm) in their drinking water from gestation day 10 to weaning on postnatal day 21. Offsprings born to these dams were intranasally infected with RSV. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-gamma in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids after infection were significantly decreased in offspring mice exposed to methamidophos. Treatment with methamidophos did not affect the pulmonary viral titers but suppressed moderately the inflammation of lung tissues of RSV-infected offspring, histopathologically. DNA microarray analysis revealed that gene expression of the cytokines in the lungs of offspring mice exposed to 20 ppm of methamidophos was apparently suppressed compared with the control. Methamidophos did not suppress IL-6 production in RSV-infected J774.1 cell cultures. Thus, exposure of the mother to methamidophos during pregnancy and nursing was suggested to cause an irregular immune response in the lung tissues in the offspring mice. PMID:24369005

  15. Participation and Retention of Youth with Perinatal HIV Infection in Mental Health Research Studies: The IMPAACT P1055 Psychiatric Co-Morbidity Study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paige L.; Chernoff, Miriam; Angelidou, Konstantia; Brouwers, Pim; Kacanek, Deborah; Deygoo, Nagamah S.; Nachman, Sharon; Gadow, Kenneth D

    2013-01-01

    Background Obtaining accurate estimates of mental health problems among youth perinatally infected with HIV (PHIV) helps clinicians develop targeted interventions, but requires enrollment and retention of representative youth into research studies. Methods We describe the study design for IMPAACT P1055, a US-based multisite, prospective study of psychiatric symptoms among PHIV youth and uninfected Controls aged 6–17 years old. We compared participants to non-participants by demographic characteristics and summarized reasons for study refusal. We used adjusted logistic regression models to evaluate the association of psychiatric symptoms and other factors with loss to follow-up (LTFU). Results Among 2281 youth screened between 2005–2006 at 29 IMPAACT research sites, 580 (25%) refused to participate, primarily due to time constraints. Among 1162 eligible youth approached, 582 (50%) enrolled (323 PHIV and 259 Control), with higher participation rates for Hispanic youth. Retention at 2 years was significantly higher for PHIV than Controls (84% vs 77%, p=0.03). In logistic regression models adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics and HIV status, youth with any self-assessed psychiatric condition had higher odds of LTFU compared to those with no disorder (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=1.56, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00,2.43). Among PHIV youth, those with any psychiatric condition had 3-fold higher odds of LTFU (aOR=3.11, 95%CI: 1.61,6.01). Conclusions Enrollment and retention of PHIV youth into mental health research studies is challenging for those with psychiatric conditions, and may lead to underestimated risks for mental health problems. Creative approaches for engaging HIV-infected youth and their families are required for ensuring representative study populations. PMID:23714737

  16. Medication Adherence in Children and Adolescents with HIV Infection: Associations with Behavioral Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paige; Montepiedra, Grace; McCabe, Marie; Nichols, Sharon; Sirois, Patricia A.; Storm, Deborah; Farley, John; Kammerer, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The impact of behavioral functioning on medication adherence in children with perinatally acquired HIV infection is not well-explored, but has important implications for intervention. This report addresses the relationship between behavioral functioning and child self-report or caregiver report of medication adherence among children and adolescents enrolled in Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 219C (conducted 2000–2007). A total of 1134 participants, aged 3–17 years, received a behavioral evaluation and adherence assessment. Complete adherence was defined as taking 100% of prescribed antiretroviral medications during three days preceding the study visit. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between adherence and behavioral functioning, adjusting for potential confounders, including demographic, psychosocial, and health factors. Children demonstrated higher than expected rates of behavioral impairment (≈7% expected with T > 65) in the areas of conduct problems (14%, z = 7.0, p < 0.001), learning problems (22%, z = 12.2, p < 0.001), somatic complaints (22%, z = 12.6, p < 0.001), impulsivity-hyperactivity (20%, z = 11.1, p < 0.001), and hyperactivity (19%, z = 10.6, p < 0.001). Children with behavioral impairment in one or more areas had significantly increased odds of nonadherence [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.49, p = 0.04]. The odds of nonadherence were significantly higher for those with conduct problems and general hyperactivity (aOR = 2.03, p = 0.005 and aOR = 1.68, p = 0.02, respectively). Psychosocial and health factors, such as recent stressful life events and higher HIV RNA levels, were also associated with nonadherence. Knowledge of behavioral, health, and social influences affecting the child and family should guide the development of appropriate, evidence-based interventions for medication adherence. PMID:21323533

  17. Medication adherence in children and adolescents with HIV infection: associations with behavioral impairment.

    PubMed

    Malee, Kathleen; Williams, Paige; Montepiedra, Grace; McCabe, Marie; Nichols, Sharon; Sirois, Patricia A; Storm, Deborah; Farley, John; Kammerer, Betsy

    2011-03-01

    The impact of behavioral functioning on medication adherence in children with perinatally acquired HIV infection is not well-explored, but has important implications for intervention. This report addresses the relationship between behavioral functioning and child self-report or caregiver report of medication adherence among children and adolescents enrolled in Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 219C (conducted 2000-2007). A total of 1134 participants, aged 3-17 years, received a behavioral evaluation and adherence assessment. Complete adherence was defined as taking 100% of prescribed antiretroviral medications during three days preceding the study visit. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between adherence and behavioral functioning, adjusting for potential confounders, including demographic, psychosocial, and health factors. Children demonstrated higher than expected rates of behavioral impairment (≈7% expected with T > 65) in the areas of conduct problems (14%, z = 7.0, p < 0.001), learning problems (22%, z = 12.2, p < 0.001), somatic complaints (22%, z = 12.6, p < 0.001), impulsivity-hyperactivity (20%, z = 11.1, p < 0.001), and hyperactivity (19%, z = 10.6, p < 0.001). Children with behavioral impairment in one or more areas had significantly increased odds of nonadherence [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.49, p = 0.04]. The odds of nonadherence were significantly higher for those with conduct problems and general hyperactivity (aOR = 2.03, p = 0.005 and aOR = 1.68, p = 0.02, respectively). Psychosocial and health factors, such as recent stressful life events and higher HIV RNA levels, were also associated with nonadherence. Knowledge of behavioral, health, and social influences affecting the child and family should guide the development of appropriate, evidence-based interventions for medication adherence. PMID:21323533

  18. Adolescent HIV/AIDS: Issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Naswa, Smriti; Marfatia, Y S

    2010-01-01

    Adolescence (10-19 years) is a phase of physical growth and development accompanied by sexual maturation, often leading to intimate relationships. Adolescent HIV/AIDS is a separate epidemic and needs to be handled and managed separately from adult HIV. The adolescents can be subdivided into student, slum and street youth; street adolescents being most vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. Among various risk factors and situations for adolescents contracting HIV virus are adolescent sex workers, child trafficking, child labor, migrant population, childhood sexual abuse, coercive sex with an older person and biologic (immature reproductive tract) as well as psychological vulnerability. The most common mode of transmission is heterosexual, yet increasing number of perinatally infected children are entering adolescence. This is due to "bimodal progression" (rapid and slow progressors) among the vertically infected children. Clinically, the HIV infected adolescents present as physically stunted individuals, with delayed puberty and adrenarche. Mental illness and substance abuse are important co-morbidities. The disclosure and declaration of HIV status to self and family is challenging and guilt in sexually infected adolescents and tendency to blame parents if vertically affected need special consideration and proper counseling. Serodiscordance of the twins and difference in disease progression of seroconcordant twins are added causes of emotional trauma. Treatment related issues revolve around the when and what of initiation of ART; the choice of antiretrovirals and their dosages; issues related to long term ADRs; sense of disinhibition following ART commencement; adherence and resistance. PMID:21808429

  19. Maternal and perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Krishna Menon, M K

    1972-01-01

    A brief analysis of data from the records of the Government Hospital for Women and Children in Madras for a 36-year period (1929-1964) is presented. India with a population of over 550 million has only 1 doctor for each 6000 population. For the 80% of the population which is rural, the doctor ratio is only 88/1 million. There is also a shortage of paramedical personnel. During the earlier years of this study period, abortions, puerperal infections; hemorrhage, and toxemia accounted for nearly 75% of all meternal deaths, while in later years deaths from these causes were 40%. Among associated factors in maternal mortality, anemia was the most frequent, it still accounts for 20% and is a contributory factor in another 20%. The mortality from postpartum hemorrhage was 9.3% but has now decreased to 2.8%. Eclampsia is a preventable disease and a marked reduction in maternal and perinatal mortality from this cause has been achieved. Maternal deaths from puerperal infections have dropped from 25% of all maternal deaths to 7%. Uterine rupture has been reduced from 75% to 9.3% due to modern facilities. Operative deliveries still have an incidence of 2.1% and a mortality rate of 1.4% of all deliveries. These rates would be further reduced by more efficient antenatal and intranatal care. Reported perinatal mortality of infants has been reduced from 182/1000 births to an average of 78/1000 in all areas, but is 60.6/1000 in the city of Madras. Socioeconomic standards play an important role in perinatal mortality, 70% of such deaths occurring in the lowest economic groups. Improvement has been noted in the past 25 years but in rural areas little progress has been made. Prematurity and low birth weights are still larger factors in India than in other countries, with acute infectious diseases, anemia, and general malnutrition among mothers the frequent causes. Problems requiring further efforts to reduce maternal and infant mortality are correct vital statistics, improved

  20. Early antiretroviral therapy in children perinatally infected with HIV: a unique opportunity to implement immunotherapeutic approaches to prolong viral remission.

    PubMed

    Klein, Nigel; Palma, Paolo; Luzuriaga, Katherine; Pahwa, Savita; Nastouli, Eleni; Gibb, Diane M; Rojo, Pablo; Borkowsky, William; Bernardi, Stefania; Zangari, Paola; Calvez, Vincent; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Wahren, Britta; Foster, Caroline; Munoz-Fernández, María Ángeles; De Rossi, Anita; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Pillay, Deenan; Giaquinto, Carlo; Rossi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    From the use of antiretroviral therapy to prevent mother-to-child transmission to the possibility of HIV cure hinted at by the Mississippi baby experience, paediatric HIV infection has been pivotal to our understanding of HIV pathogenesis and management. Daily medication and indefinite antiretroviral therapy is recommended for children infected with HIV. Maintenance of life-long adherence is difficult and the incidence of triple-class virological failure after initiation of antiretroviral therapy increases with time. This challenge shows the urgent need to define novel strategies to provide long-term viral suppression that will allow safe interruption of antiretroviral therapy without viral rebound and any associated complications. HIV-infected babies treated within a few days of birth have a unique combination of a very small pool of integrated viruses, a very high proportion of relatively HIV resistant naive T cells, and an unparalleled capacity to regenerate an immune repertoire. These features make this group the optimum model population to investigate the potential efficacy of immune-based therapies. If successful, these investigations could change the way we manage HIV infection. PMID:26187030

  1. Pretreatment with recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) reduces virus replication and inflammation in a perinatal lamb model of RSV infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is increasingly recognized as a perinatal regulator of lung maturation and surfactant protein expression. Innate immune components including surfactant proteins A and D, and beta defensins have putative antimicrobial activity against pulmonary pathogens incl...

  2. Pretreatment with recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor reduces virus replication and inflammation in a peri-natal lamb model of RSV infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is increasingly recognized as a perinatal regulator of lung maturation and surfactant protein expression. Innate immune components including surfactant proteins A and D, and beta defensins have putative antimicrobial activity against pulmonary pathogens incl...

  3. Polymorphisms in the CCR5 promoter region influence disease progression in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected children.

    PubMed

    Ometto, L; Bertorelle, R; Mainardi, M; Zanchetta, M; Tognazzo, S; Rampon, O; Ruga, E; Chieco-Bianchi, L; De Rossi, A

    2001-03-01

    The effect of CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) promoter polymorphisms on the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease was studied in 73 HIV-1-infected children. The CCR5(59338-59537) promoter haplotype, CCR5-59029A/G polymorphism, and CCR5Delta32 and CCR2-64I alterations were investigated. After exclusion of carriers of CCR5Delta32 or CCR2-64I, Kaplan-Meier analysis disclosed that children with the P1/P1(59353C,59356C,59402A) genotype progressed faster to disease than did children with other haplotypes (P=.016). When CCR2-64I carriers were included, this effect had borderline significance (P=.065) and was lost when CCR5Delta32 carriers were also considered (P=.387). The P1/P1 effect was strongest early after infection, when progression to disease was mainly associated with CCR5 coreceptor-using viruses. These results indicate that the P1/P1 genotype is predictive of rapid progression in HIV-1-infected children lacking CCR5Delta32 or CCR5-64I alleles. The observation of a linkage disequilibrium between P1 and 59029A might explain the previously reported association between 59029A homozygosity and rapid disease progression. PMID:11181160

  4. The Perinatal Period: Early Intervention for Mental Health. Clinical Approaches to Early Intervention in Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalenko, Nick; Barnett, Bryanne; Fowler, Cathrine; Matthey, Stephen

    The perinatal period offers a unique opportunity for enhancing the mental health of women and their families. Women come into frequent contact with health professionals during this time and the enhancement of their emotional well being can promote their own, their infant's, and their partner's health. The aim of this book is to assist health…

  5. Persistence of hepatitis A virus antibodies after primary immunization and response to revaccination in children and adolescents with perinatal HIV exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa, Aída de Fátima Thomé Barbosa; Pinto, Maria Isabel de Moraes; Miyamoto, Maristela; Machado, Daisy Maria; Pessoa, Silvana Duarte; do Carmo, Fabiana Bononi; Beltrão, Suênia Cordeiro de Vasconcelos; Succi, Regina Célia de Menezes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess possible factors associated with the loss of antibodies to hepatitis A 7 years after the primary immunization in children of HIV-infected mothers and the response to revaccination in patients seronegative for hepatitis A. METHODS: Quantification of HAV antibodies by electrochemiluminescence was performed in 39 adolescents followed up at the Pediatric Aids Clinic of Federal University of São Paulo (Unifesp): 29 HIV-infected (HIV group) (median age: 12.8 years) and 10 HIV-exposed but non-infected (ENI group) (median age: 13.4 years). All of them received two doses of HAV vaccine (Havrix(r)) in 2002. RESULTS: The median age at primary immunization (PI) was 5.4 years for HIV group and 6.5 years for ENI group. All children, from both groups, had antibodies to HAV >20 mIU/mL after PI. Seven years later, the ENI group showed a median concentration of antibodies = 253.5 mIU/mL, while the HIV group = 113.0 mIU/mL (Mann-Whitney test, p=0.085). All ENI group and 23/29 (79.3%) from HIV group mantained HAV antibodies 7 years after PI. The levels of hepatitis A antibodies in the primary vaccination were the only factor independently associated with maintaining these antibodies for 7 years. The group that lost HAV seropositivity was revaccinated and 83.3% (5/6) responded with antibodies >20 mUI/mL. CONCLUSIONS: The antibodies levels acquired in the primary vaccination in the HIV group were the main factor associated with antibodies loss after HAV immunization. PMID:25918013

  6. Guidelines for counselling adolescents with haemophilia and HIV infection and their families.

    PubMed

    Miller, R

    1995-01-01

    Adolescents, poised between childhood and adulthood, and their families have many challenges. It is timely to review what these are for those with haemophilia, HIV and HCV (hepatitis C) infection in the 1990s. All three conditions are life long, life threatening and incurable. The main dilemmas facing these families are how, when and who should tell the adolescent about HIV and HCV; getting the right balance between the realities of the infections, the best interests of the adolescent and the risks of transmission of infection to others. HIV interrupts the adolescent's normal life stage expectations and development. How health carers relate to the adolescent is influenced by the split responsibilities to the adolescent and his parents as well as to others who might be at risk of infection. Clarity about the issues related to medical treatment and care, disease progression, and enhancing skills in dealing with families and young people are ways of helping to maintain hope in the face of life threatening illnesses for all concerned. PMID:7578313

  7. Disclosure of their HIV status to perinatally infected youth using the adapted Blasini disclosure model in Haiti and the Dominican Republic: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Sagué, Consuelo M.; Dévieux, Jessy; Pinzón-Iregui, Maria Claudia; Lerebours-Nadal, Leonel; Abreu-Pérez, Rosa; Bertrand, Rachel; Rouzier, Vanessa; Gaston, Stephanie; Ibanez, Gladys; Halpern, Mina; Pape, Jean W.; Dorceus, Patricia; Preston, Sharice M.; Dean, Andrew G.; Nicholas, Stephen W.; Blasini, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the safety, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a culturally-adapted disclosure intervention for perinatally HIV-infected combined antiretroviral therapy patients in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Design A quasi-experimental trial was conducted comparing caregiver–youth pairs who completed the intervention [adapted Blasini disclosure model (aBDM)] to pairs who discontinued aBDM participation before disclosure. aBDM consists of five components: structured healthcare worker training; one-on one pre-disclosure intervention/education sessions for youth (describing pediatric chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes and HIV) and for caregivers (strengthening capacity for disclosure); a scheduled supportive disclosure session; and one-on-one postdisclosure support for caregivers and youth. Methods Caregivers of nondisclosed combined antiretroviral therapy patients aged 10.0–17.8 years were invited to participate. Data were collected by separate one-on-one face-to-face interviews of caregivers and youth by study staff and medical record review by pediatricians at enrollment and 3 months after disclosure or after intervention discontinuation. Results To date, 65 Dominican Republic and 27 Haiti caregiver–youth pairs have enrolled. At enrollment, only 46.4% of youth had viral suppression and 43.4% of caregivers had clinically significant depressive symptomatology. To date, two serious study-related adverse events have occurred. Seven of the 92 (7.6%, 6 in the Dominican Republic) enrolled pairs discontinued participation before disclosure and 39 had completed postdisclosure participation. Median plasma HIV-RNA concentration was lower in youth who completed aBDM than in youth who discontinued participation before aBDM disclosure (<40 versus 8673 copies/ml; P = 0.027). Completers expressed considerable satisfaction with aBDM. Conclusion Preliminary results suggest safety, acceptability, and possible effectiveness of the aBDM. PMID:26049543

  8. Applicability and efficacy of a model for prevention of perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus infection: Single center study in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El-Karaksy, Hanaa M; Mohsen, Lamiaa M; Saleh, Doa’a A; Hamdy, Mona S; Yassin, Noha A; Farouk, Mohamed; Salit, Mohamed E; El-Shabrawi, Mortada H

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To identify possible maternal risk factors for hepatitis B virus (HBV) acquisition and assess the efficacy of immunoprophylaxis given to infants born to hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) positive mothers. METHODS: Screening of 2000 pregnant females was carried out using rapid test and confirmed by enzyme immunoassay. A questionnaire consisting of 20 questions about the possible risk factors for acquisition of HBV infection was filled for every pregnant HBsAg positive female in addition to at least 2 pregnant HBsAg negative females for each positive case. Infants of HBsAg positive women were offered passive and active immunoprophylaxis within the 1st 48 h after birth, in addition to 2nd and 3rd doses of HBV vaccine after 1 and 6 mo respectively. Infants were tested for HBsAg and hepatitis B surface antibodies (HBsAb) at six months of age. RESULTS: HBsAg was confirmed positive in 1.2% of tested pregnant women. Risk factors significantly associated with HBV positivity were; history of injections (OR = 5.65), history of seeking medical advice in a clinic (OR = 7.02), history of hospitalization (OR = 6.82), history of surgery (OR = 4) and family history of hepatitis (OR = 3.89) (P < 0.05). Dropout rate was 28% for HBsAg women whose rapid test was not confirmed and could not be reached to provide immunoprophylaxis for thier newborns. Immunoprophylaxis failure was detected in only one newborn (3.7%) who tested positive for HBsAg at 6 mo of age; and vaccine failure (seronegative to HBsAb after 4 doses of the vaccine) was detected in another one (3.7%). The success rate of the immunoprophylaxis regimen was 92.6%. CONCLUSION: This pilot study shows that a successful national program for prevention of perinatal transmission of HBV needs to be preceded by an awareness campaign to avoid a high dropout rate. PMID:25493019

  9. Perinatal Patient Safety Project

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Julie; McFerran, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    The Perinatal Patient Safety Project (PPSP) was created as a systemic strategy for creating high-reliability perinatal units by preventing identified causes of perinatal events in the clinical setting. With developmental funding from a Garfield grant, implementation of the PPSP has been completed at four pilot sites in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) Region. Its success has resulted in implementation at all perinatal units in the KPNC Region as well as being promoted by National Risk Management for nationwide implementation. PPSP emphasizes structured communication, multidisciplinary rounds, a definition of fetal well-being, and practicing for emergencies. Steps taken to create high reliability perinatal care include improved communication, patient safety focus, and satisfaction among perinatal patients, providers, and staff. PMID:21660157

  10. [Perinatal clomiphene citrate treatment changes sexual orientations of male mice].

    PubMed

    He, Feng-Qin; Zhang, Heng-Rui

    2013-10-01

    Perinatal period and adolescence are critical for brain development, which is the biological basis of an individual's sexual orientation and sexual behavior. In this study, animals were divided into two groups and their sexual orientations were observed: one group experienced drug treatments during the perinatal period, and the other group was castrated at puberty. The results showed that estradiol treatment had no effect on mature male offspring's sexual orientations, but 9 days and 14 days of clomiphene citrate treatment significantly increased the chance of homosexuality and effeminized behavior. In addition, the sexual orientation of mature normal male offspring, which were castrated when they were 21 days old,was not significant different from the control animals. These findings suggest that the inhibition of perinatal estrogen activities could suppress individual male-typical responses, enhance female-typical responses and induce homosexual orientations. Moreover, the masculinizing effects of estrogen were more obvious during perinatal period than adolescence. PMID:24115661

  11. High Frequency of Staphylococcus Saprophyticus Urinary Tract Infections Among Female Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lo, Denise Swei; Shieh, Huei Hsin; Barreira, Eliane Roseli; Ragazzi, Selma Lopes Betta; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a rarely reported agent of urinary tract infection (UTI) in the pediatric population. In our retrospective 3-year study, S. saprophyticus comprised 24.5% of 106 isolates of UTIs in female adolescents 12-15 years of age who attended an emergency department. Clinicians should be aware of the high prevalence of this etiology when empirically treating UTIs in female adolescents. PMID:26075812

  12. Adverse obstetrical and perinatal outcome in adolescent mothers associated with first birth: a hospital-based case-control study in a tertiary care hospital in North-East India

    PubMed Central

    Medhi, Robin; Das, Banani; Das, Arpana; Ahmed, Mansur; Bawri, Sonika; Rai, Suditi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the adverse obstetrical and perinatal outcome of adolescent mothers associated with first birth. Patients and methods This prospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital of North-East India between January 2014 and December 2014. All adolescent primigravidae completing 28 weeks of gestation with singleton pregnancy and delivered at our institution were included in the study group. Primigravidae aged between 20 and 25 years were taken as a control group. Mothers having pregnancy complicated with diabetes mellitus, renal disorder, thyroid disorders, and cardiac diseases were excluded from the study. Demographic data, maternal complications like severe anemia, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, and postpartum complications were compared. Among fetal complications, low-birth weight, preterm birth, neonatal intensive care unit admission, still birth, and early neonatal death were compared. All the patients were interviewed regarding contraceptive knowledge and its use preceding the pregnancy. Results Quality antenatal care was received by 80.6% of adolescent mothers. The adolescent mothers had a higher incidence of pre-eclampsia (odds ratio [OR] 2.017 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.045–3.894, P=0.03), preterm deliveries (OR: 1.655, 95% CI: 1.039–2.636, P=0.03). Among fetal outcomes, the low- birth weight babies (OR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.016–2.478), low mean birth weight (2,544.4±622.09 g versus 2,701.6±582.51 g), and higher admission to neonatal intensive care unit (OR: 1.957, 95% CI: 1.120–3.417) were significantly associated with adolescent mothers. There was no significant difference found regarding the mode of delivery, still birth, and early neonatal death. Moreover, contraceptive knowledge and its use were found to be poor among adolescent mothers. Conclusion With quality antenatal, intranatal, and postnatal care, the obstetric risk of childbirth in adolescent mothers

  13. “Youth friendly” clinics: Considerations for linking and engaging HIV-infected adolescents into care

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Amanda E.; Philbin, Morgan M.; Duval, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Linkage and engagement in care are critical corollaries to the health of HIV-infected adolescents. The adolescent HIV epidemic and adolescents’ unique barriers to care necessitates innovation in the provision of care, including the consideration of the clinical experience. Little research has addressed how “youth friendly” clinics may influence care retention for HIV-infected youth. We conducted 124 interviews with providers, outreach workers, and case managers, at 15 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network clinics. Photographs of each clinic documented the characteristics of the physical space. Constant comparison and content and visual narrative methods were utilized for data analysis. Three elements of youth friendliness were identified for clinics serving HIV-infected youth, including: (1) role of target population (e.g., pediatric, adolescent, HIV); (2) clinics’ physical environment; and (3) clinics’ social environment. Working to create ‘youth friendly’ clinics through changes in physical (e.g., space, entertainment, and educational materials) and social (e.g., staff training related to development, gender, sexual orientation) environments may help reduce HIV-infected adolescents’ unique barriers to care engagement. The integration of clinic design and staff training within the organization of a clinical program is helpful in meeting the specialized needs of HIV-infected youth. PMID:23782040

  14. Social Ecological Predictors of Longitudinal HIV Treatment Adherence in Youth With Perinatally Acquired HIV

    PubMed Central

    Montepiedra, Grace; Garvie, Patricia; Kammerer, Betsy; Malee, Kathleen; Sirois, Patricia A.; Aaron, Lisa; Nichols, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To apply a social ecological model to explore the psychosocial factors prospectively associated with longitudinal adherence to antiretroviral treatment in youth perinatally infected with HIV. Methods Randomly selected youth, age 8 to <19 years old, completed cognitive testing and psychosocial questionnaires at baseline as part of a multisite protocol (N = 138). A validated caregiver-report measure of adherence was completed at baseline and 24 and 48 weeks after baseline. Results In multivariate analysis, youth awareness of HIV status, caregiver not fully responsible for medications, low caregiver well-being, adolescent perceptions of poor caregiver–youth relations, caregiver perceptions of low social support, and African American ethnicity were associated with nonadherence over 48 weeks. Conclusions Interventions focusing on caregivers and their interactions with the individual youth and extrafamilial system should be prioritized for prevention and treatment efforts to address nonadherence during the transition into adolescents. PMID:23629146

  15. Perinatal depression: A clinical update.

    PubMed

    Alhusen, Jeanne L; Alvarez, Carmen

    2016-05-19

    Perinatal depression is a common condition with significant adverse maternal, fetal, neonatal, and early childhood outcomes. The perinatal period is an opportune time to screen, diagnose, and treat depression. Improved recognition of perinatal depression, particularly among low-income women, can lead to improved perinatal health outcomes. PMID:26934457

  16. HTLV-1-associated infective dermatitis and probable HTLV-1- associated myelopathy in an adolescent female*

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Raquel Bisacotti; Tonoli, Renata Elise; Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Pinto, Giselle Martins; Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated infective dermatitis (ID) is a chronic, severe and recurrent eczema occurring during childhood in patients vertically infected with HTLV-1. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesia (HAM/ TSP) is slow and progressive. We report the case of an adolescent female from a non-endemic area for HTLV-1 who presents ID and, most likely, associated HAM/TSP. PMID:26312674

  17. Benefits of Disclosure of HIV Status to Infected Children and Adolescents: Perceptions of Caregivers and Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Gyamfi, Eric; Okyere, Paul; Appiah-Brempong, Emmanuel; Adjei, Rose Odotei; Mensah, Kofi Akohene

    2015-01-01

    The rate of disclosure of HIV status to infected children and adolescents remains low in developing countries. We used a mixed-method approach to determine the perceptions of caregivers and health care providers about the benefits of HIV status disclosure to infected children and adolescents and to assess the support needed by caregivers during disclosure. We recruited a convenience sample of 118 caregivers of HIV-infected children and adolescents for the quantitative component of the study and completed in-depth qualitative interviews with 10 purposefully sampled key informants, including health care providers and volunteer workers. The main benefits of disclosure included improved medication adherence and healthier, more responsible adolescent sexual behavior. The main supports required by caregivers during disclosure included biomedical information, emotional and psychological support, and practical guidelines regarding disclosure. We confirmed the importance of disclosure to HIV-infected children and adolescents and the need to develop culturally specific disclosure guidelines. PMID:26324523

  18. Integrating the Perspective of Vulnerable Heterosexual Male Adolescents to Prevent Premature Paternity and Sexually Transmitted Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manseau, Helene; Blais, Martin; Engler, Kim; Bosse, Marie-Andre

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the perspective of vulnerable Canadian (Quebecker) adolescents defined as such on account of their numerous experiences with potential or actual fatherhood or exposure to sexually transmitted infection. The interviews allowed youth to talk about their experiences with paternity, their sex lives and their views on sex education.…

  19. Long-Term Effects of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on CD4+ Cell Evolution among Children and Adolescents Infected with HIV: 5 Years and Counting

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunjal; Hernán, Miguel A.; Williams, Paige L.; Seeger, John D.; McIntosh, Kenneth; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Seage, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lower percentages of CD4+ T lymphocytes are associated with adverse clinical outcomes among children and adolescents infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). CD4+ lymphocyte percentage generally increases with receipt of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), but long-term follow-up is required to assess whether these increases in CD4+ cell percentage are maintained and whether they lead to normal CD4+ cell percentages in children with severe immunosuppression. Methods The study population included 1236 children and adolescents perinatally infected with HIV who were enrolled in a US-based multicenter prospective cohort study (Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group 219/219C) and who were not receiving HAART at study initiation. We estimated the effects of HAART, HAART with protease inhibitors, and HAART with nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors on CD4+ cell percentage, using marginal structural models to account for confounding by severity. Results Initiation of any type of HAART increased CD4+ cell percentage by 2.34% (95% confidence interval, 1.35%–3.33%) in the first year, relative to noninitiation of HAART. The substantial increases in CD4+ cell percentage observed after the first year of experience with these combination therapies were followed by relatively smaller increases that continued for 5 years after initiation. Although larger increases in CD4+ cell percentage were observed among children with a greater degree of immunosuppression at baseline, the mean CD4+ cell percentage after 5 years of HAART did not reach normal levels. Conclusions Our study supports the initiation of HAART in children before severe immunosuppression occurs for long-term maintenance of normal CD4+ cell percentages. This beneficial result must be weighed against the evidence of potential adverse events associated with the prolonged use of such therapy. PMID:18426371

  20. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infections in Adolescent Males

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Laura Patricia; Bernstein, David I; Callahan, S. Todd; Ferreira, Jennifer; Gorgone Simone, Gina A.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Rosenthal, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading cause of disability, including sensorineural hearing loss, developmental delay, and mental retardation. Although the seroprevalence of CMV and associated exposure and behavioral risk factors have been reported in adolescent females, limited data exists in males. Method Serum was obtained from males (aged 12–17 years) from 6/2006 – 7/2007 in Cincinnati, OH, Galveston, TX, and Nashville, TN and tested for CMV IgG antibody using a commercial assay. Participants completed a computer assisted screening interview to assess seven risk categories. Results A total of 397 adolescent males were screened and 165 (47%) were seropositive. African American race, older age, and exposure to children ≤3 years of age in the home were significant predictors of CMV infection in the univariate analysis. Hispanic ethnicity, group living situations, saliva sharing behaviors, and intimate sexual contact were not associated with CMV infection. However, among those with a history of sexual contact, the number of life time partners was associated with CMV. In the final multivariate model, CMV seroprevalence was significantly higher in African American subjects (OR 1.99 (95% CI [1.27, 2.95]) and subjects >14 years of age (OR 1.1 (95%CI [1.00, 1.28]. With each additional risk factor, males had a 1.6x increased risk of CMV. Conclusions This study indicates that CMV infections are common in adolescent males, increase with age, and are associated with African American race. Further study is needed to understand these risk factors in preparation for a CMV vaccine targeted at both adolescent males and females. Summary This study indicates CMV infections are common in adolescent males, increase with age, and are associated with African Americans. Further study is needed to understand these risk factors in preparation for a CMV vaccine targeted at adolescent males and females. PMID:20936976

  1. Children and young people with perinatal HIV in Europe: epidemiological situation in 2014 and implications for the future.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Accurate ascertainment of the number of children living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is important to plan paediatric and adolescent health services. In Europe, the first generation of perinatally HIV-infected survivors are transferring to adult care and their health needs are unknown. We undertook an online survey of HIV cohort studies participating in the EuroCoord Network of Excellence to ascertain the number of perinatally HIV-infected (pHIV) patients included, to compare it with those published by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) and to assess the ability of countries to follow up pHIV patients after transfer to adult care. At the end of 2013, 16 countries in EuroCoord reported 8,229 pHIV patients in follow-up in cohorts, compared with 5,160 cumulative diagnoses reported by the ECDC in the same area. Follow-up of pHIV patients after transfer to adult care varied. It is likely that the number of diagnoses of perinatal HIV reported to ECDC is an underestimate, although this varies by country. Further work is needed to refine estimates and encourage follow-up in adult HIV cohorts to investigate long-term outcomes and improve the care of the next generation of children with HIV. PMID:26988197

  2. HIV-Infected Adolescent, Young Adult and Pregnant Smokers: Important Targets for Effective Tobacco Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Escota, Gerome; Önen, Nur

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco use is inextricably linked to a number of health risks both in the general and HIV-infected populations. There is, however, a dearth of research on effective tobacco control programs among people living with HIV, and especially among adolescents, young adults and pregnant women, groups with heightened or increased vulnerability secondary to tobacco use. Adolescents and young adults constitute a growing population of persons living with HIV infection. Early and continued tobacco use in this population living with a disease characterized by premature onset multimorbidity and chronic inflammation is of concern. Additionally, there is an increased acuity for tobacco control among HIV-infected pregnant women to reduce pregnancy morbidity and improve fetal outcome. This review will provide an important summary of current knowledge of tobacco use among HIV-infected adolescents, young adults and pregnant women. The effects of tobacco use in these specific populations will be presented and the current state of tobacco control within these populations, assessed. PMID:23778059

  3. Seeking wider access to HIV testing for adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Sam-Agudu, Nadia A; Folayan, Morenike O; Ezeanolue, Echezona E

    2016-06-01

    More than 80% of the HIV-infected adolescents live in sub-Saharan Africa. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related mortality has increased among adolescents 10-19 y old. The impact is highest in sub-Saharan Africa, where >80% of HIV-infected adolescents live. The World Health Organization has cited inadequate access to HIV testing and counseling (HTC) as a contributing factor to AIDS-related adolescent deaths, most of which occur in sub-Saharan Africa. This review focuses on studies conducted in high adolescent HIV-burden countries targeted by the "All In to End Adolescent AIDS" initiative, and describes barriers to adolescent HTC uptake and coverage. Fear of stigma and family reaction, fear of the impact of a positive diagnosis, perceived risk with respect to sexual exposure, poor attitudes of healthcare providers, and parental consent requirements are identified as major impediments. Most-at-risk adolescents for HIV infection and missed opportunities for testing include, those perinatally infected, those with early sexual debut, high mobility and multiple/older partners, and pregnant and nonpregnant females. Regional analyses show relatively low adolescent testing rates and more restrictive consent requirements for HTC in West and Central Africa as compared to East and southern Africa. Actionable recommendations for widening adolescent access to HTC and therefore timely care include minimizing legal consent barriers, healthcare provider training, parental education and involvement, and expanding testing beyond healthcare facilities. PMID:26882367

  4. AFRICAN-AMERICAN AND HISPANIC-AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS, HIV INFECTION, AND PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION

    PubMed Central

    Schinke, Steven P.; Botvin, Gilbert J.; Orlandi, Mario A.; Schilling, Robert F.; Gordon, Adam N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers strategies for preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among African-American and Hispanic-American adolescents. We describe culturally sensitive interventions based on social learning theory. The interventions combine elements of cognitive-behavioral skills for problem solving, coping, and interpersonal communication with elements of ethnic pride and HIV facts. The paper discusses the strengths and limitations of skills intervention for AIDS prevention and concludes with directions for research. PMID:2288812

  5. Perinatal HIV Status and Executive Function During School-Age and Adolescence: A Comparative Study of Long-Term Cognitive Capacity Among Children From a High HIV Prevalence Setting.

    PubMed

    Ezeamama, Amara E; Kizza, Florence N; Zalwango, Sarah K; Nkwata, Allan K; Zhang, Ming; Rivera, Mariana L; Sekandi, Juliet N; Kakaire, Robert; Kiwanuka, Noah; Whalen, Christopher C

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether perinatal HIV infection (PHIV), HIV-exposed uninfected (PHEU) versus HIV-unexposed (PHU) status predicted long-term executive function (EF) deficit in school-aged Ugandan children.Perinatal HIV status was determined by 18 months via DNA polymerase chain reaction test and confirmed at cognitive assessment between 6 and 18 years using HIV rapid-diagnostic test. Primary outcome is child EF measured using behavior-rating inventory of executive function questionnaire across 8 subscales summed to derive the global executive composite (GEC). EF was proxy-reported by caregivers and self-reported by children 11 years or older. Descriptive analyses by perinatal HIV status included derivation of mean, standard deviations (SD), number, and percent (%) of children with EF deficits warranting clinical vigilance. Raw scores were internally standardized by age and sex adjustment. EF scores warranting clinical vigilance were defined as ≥ mean + 1.5SD. t Tests for mean score differences by perinatal HIV status and linear-regression models were implemented in SAS version 9.4 to derive HIV status-related EF deficits (β) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Proxy-reported and self-reported EF were assessed in 166 and 82 children, respectively. GEC deficit was highest for PHIV (mean = 121.9, SD = 29.9), intermediate for PHEU (mean = 107.5, SD = 26.8), and lowest for PHU (mean = 103.4, SD = 20.7; P-trend < 0.01). GEC deficit levels warranting clinical vigilance occurred in 9 (15.8%), 5 (9.3%) and 0 (0%) PHIV, PHEU, and PHU children, respectively (P-trend = 0.01). Nineteen percent (n = 32) children had deficits requiring clinical vigilance in ≥2 proxy-reported EF subscales. Of these, multisubscale deficits occurred in 35.1%, 13.0%, and 9.3% of PHIV, PHEU, and PHU respectively (P-trend = 0.001). Multivariable analyses find significantly higher GEC deficits for PHIV compared with PHU and PHEU

  6. Strategies to reduce perinatal and neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Paul, V K

    1988-06-01

    The perinatal mortality rate in India averages 66.3/1000 live births. 60% of all infant deaths occur during the 1st month, making the neonatal mortality rate 76/1000 in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. These rates have remained static since 1974. Over 90% of all deliveries occur at home and are conducted by untrained birth attendants. The major causes of perinatal deaths are immaturity/low birth weight, birth asphyxia/trauma, neonatal infections, and congenital malformations. Neonatal tetanus alone is responsible for 230,000-280,000 deaths a year. Hypoxia, low birth weight, and tetanus are preventable, if primary perinatal care is provided and high-risk pregnancies are recognized and referred to facilities where fetal monitoring and neonatal care are available. It is proposed to train all of the country's 5 million traditional birth attendants by 1990 to deliver primary perinatal care. By 1990 also there will be 1 village health guide for every 1000 people. All traditional birth attendants must know how to give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, and the infrastructure for an adequate referral system must be established. In order to reduce the incidence of low birth weight, the Integrated Child Development Service Scheme proposes that all pregnant women receive a dietary supplement of 500 calories and 25 gm protein, and that pregnant women be given a 2-hour midday rest period. The control of malaria and intestinal infections with chloroquine and antibiotics would do much to reduce low birth weight. Simple technologies for measuring birth weight indicators, such as chest circumference or mid-arm circumference, require only a tape measure. Finally, technics of mass communication must be utilized to spread knowledge of perinatal and neonatal care. PMID:3069742

  7. Clinical Experience with Daptomycin for the Treatment of Gram-positive Infections in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Syriopoulou, Vassiliki; Dailiana, Zoe; Dmitriy, Nisichenko; Utili, Riccardo; Pathan, Rashidkhan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This subgroup analysis of the European Cubicin Outcomes Registry Experience evaluated the safety and effectiveness of daptomycin in children and adolescent patients (<18 years). Methods: Clinical outcomes at the end of therapy were assessed as success (cured or improved), failure or nonevaluable. Safety was assessed for up to 30 days post treatment. Results: Eighty-one children and adolescent patients were included in this study. The most common primary infections were bacteremia (19.8%), complicated skin and soft-tissue infection (18.5%), osteomyelitis (13.6%), endocarditis (12.3%), foreign body/prosthetic infection (12.3%), uncomplicated skin and soft-tissue infection (9.9%) and other (13.6%). Daptomycin doses ranged from 4 to >10 mg/kg/day. Median duration of therapy was 12.5 (interquartile range, 7–25; mean, 16.7; standard deviation, 12.8) days. Staphylococcus aureus (46.7%) was the most commonly isolated pathogen (23.8% methicillin-resistant S. aureus). Forty-nine (60.5%) patients completed daptomycin therapy without further antibiotics, 27 (33.3%) switched to another antibiotic, 4 (4.9%) discontinued because of adverse events (AEs) and 1 (1.2%) discontinued because of other reason. Overall, 75 (92.6%; 95% confidence interval: 95.2–100.0%) patients achieved clinical success; 39 of 41 (95.1%) patients receiving daptomycin monotherapy and 36 of 40 (90.0%) patients receiving concomitant antibiotics. Six (7.4%) patients reported AEs, including 1 patient with increased blood creatine phosphokinase. Three (3.7%) patients had serious AEs; 1 (1.2%) had a serious AE possibly related to daptomycin. Conclusion: Daptomycin, alone or combined with other antibiotics and/or surgery, demonstrated high clinical success rates against a wide variety of infections and was well tolerated in children and adolescents. PMID:26849158

  8. Factors Contributing to the Risk of HIV Infection in Rural School-Going Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Awotidebe, Adedapo; Phillips, Julie; Lens, Willy

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the factors that increase the risk of HIV infection in rural school-going adolescents and young adults. This was a cross-sectional study of 430 secondary school students (47.4% boys and 52.6% girls) from two rural schools in South Africa. Data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire on demographic information, sources of HIV/AIDS information, HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, communication and negotiation skills, self-efficacy to refuse sex, peer influence and time perspective. Out of 113 (27.2%) participants who reported being sexually active, about 48% reported having had sex before the age of 15 and 42.2% reported penetrative sex with more than one partner in their lifetime. Only 44.8% of them reported consistent and regular use of condoms for every sexual encounter. Peer influence (OR = 3.01 (95% CI = 1.97–4.60)), gender difference (OR = 6.60 (95% CI = 1.62–26.84)) and lack of HIV information (OR = 1.22 (95% CI = 1.03–1.44)) influenced the sexual risk behaviors of the adolescents. Greater numbers of school-going adolescents in rural areas are sexually active. Peer influence, especially in boys, is a factor that increases the preponderance of risky sexual behaviors in adolescents. Positively, adolescents with high knowledge of HIV infection are more likely to use condoms for every sexual encounter. There is a need to strengthen comprehensive sexual health education and youth-friendly HIV prevention strategies to promote abstinence and safe sexual behaviors, especially among boys. PMID:25405598

  9. Factors contributing to the risk of HIV infection in rural school-going adolescents.

    PubMed

    Awotidebe, Adedapo; Phillips, Julie; Lens, Willy

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the factors that increase the risk of HIV infection in rural school-going adolescents and young adults. This was a cross-sectional study of 430 secondary school students (47.4% boys and 52.6% girls) from two rural schools in South Africa. Data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire on demographic information, sources of HIV/AIDS information, HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, communication and negotiation skills, self-efficacy to refuse sex, peer influence and time perspective. Out of 113 (27.2%) participants who reported being sexually active, about 48% reported having had sex before the age of 15 and 42.2% reported penetrative sex with more than one partner in their lifetime. Only 44.8% of them reported consistent and regular use of condoms for every sexual encounter. Peer influence (OR = 3.01 (95% CI = 1.97-4.60)), gender difference (OR = 6.60 (95% CI = 1.62-26.84)) and lack of HIV information (OR = 1.22 (95% CI = 1.03-1.44)) influenced the sexual risk behaviors of the adolescents. Greater numbers of school-going adolescents in rural areas are sexually active. Peer influence, especially in boys, is a factor that increases the preponderance of risky sexual behaviors in adolescents. Positively, adolescents with high knowledge of HIV infection are more likely to use condoms for every sexual encounter. There is a need to strengthen comprehensive sexual health education and youth-friendly HIV prevention strategies to promote abstinence and safe sexual behaviors, especially among boys. PMID:25405598

  10. Gender differences in sexual risk behaviours and sexually transmissible infections among adolescents in mental health treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Puja; Lang, Delia L.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Braxton, Nikia D.; Crosby, Richard A.; Brown, Larry K.; Hadley, Wendy; Donenberg, Geri R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adolescents with a history of psychiatric disorder(s) are particularly vulnerable to contracting sexually transmissible infections (STIs) as a result of psychological and emotional states associated with higher rates of risky sexual behaviour. The present study examined gender differences in sexual risk behaviours and STI among adolescents in mental health treatment. Methods Three hundred and seventy nine sexually active adolescents, aged 13–18 years, from a larger multisite study, who received mental health treatment during the past year, completed an audio computer-assisted self interview assessing sociodemographics, psychiatric symptomatology and HIV/STI risk behaviours, and provided urine specimens tested for STI. Results After controlling for covariates, multivariate logistic regression models indicated that female adolescents were more likely to have had an HIV test (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.2, P = 0.0001), obtain their HIV test results (AOR = 2.9, P = 0.03), refuse sex out of fear for STI acquisition (AOR = 1.7, P = 0.04), or avoid a situation that might lead to sex (AOR = 2.4, P = 0.001), and were less likely to have a casual sex partner (AOR = 0.40, P = 0.002). Additionally, females were more likely to report inconsistent condom use (AOR = 2.60, P = 0.001) and have a STI (AOR = 9.1, P = 0.0001) than their male counterparts. Conclusions Female adolescents receiving mental health treatment were more than nine times as likely to have an STI and more likely to use condoms inconsistently. The standard of care for mental health practice for adolescents should include referrals for STI screening and treatment as well as assessment and discussion of risky sexual behaviours as part of the treatment plan when indicated. Effective programs should address gender-specific communication and behavioural skills. PMID:22697141

  11. Low bone mass in behaviorally HIV-infected young men on antiretroviral therapy: adolescent trials network (ATN) study 021B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peak bone mass is achieved in adolescence/early adulthood and is the key determinant of bone mass in adulthood. We evaluated the association of bone mass with HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) during this critical period among behaviorally HIV infected young men and seronegative control...

  12. Perinatal care in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Basys, V; Liubsys, A

    1997-01-01

    The Preventive Program of Perinatal, Neonatal and Congenital Abnormalities in Lithuania was launched in 1992. That was the beginning of the reorganization of the Soviet maternal and child health care system. The first stage of the Program provided for the years 1992 through 1996 and aimed to create a system of maternal and neonatal care; to create a system of diagnosis and prevention of congenital abnormalities; to collect, process, and analyze maternal and neonatal data (to establish a new database); to evaluate, distribute, and use available resources efficiently; to plan financial and human resources for a perinatal care infrastructure; and to train medical personnel and control the level and quality of their knowledge. The reorganization was based on a three-tiered maternal and neonatal care system. By the end of 1996 the major goal of the Program was achieved successfully (i.e., perinatal, neonatal, and infant mortality rates decreased significantly. During the next 5 years the Program will focus mainly on qualitative aspects of perinatal care. PMID:9210082

  13. Knowledge of HPV among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Adolescent Women in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, David C.; Adler, David; Wallace, Melissa; Bennie, Thola; Abar, Beau; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to examine the knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected female adolescents in South Africa. Methods Subjects were recruited from a parent study of HPV infection comprised of females ages 16-21 in Masiphumelele, Cape Town, South Africa. A total of 30 subjects, 15 HIV-infected and 15 HIV-uninfected, were selected via randomization and completed a measure of HPV knowledge, based on a previously validated instrument. The study took place in May 2013. Results The overall mean score on the measure for all subjects was 43.3% (S.D. 10.9). There was no significant difference in HPV knowledge between the HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected groups. Based on results from a previous large-scale study using the same validated measure, this sample scored significantly worse on general HPV knowledge than samples from the US, UK, and Australia. Conclusion Given the limited knowledge of HPV in this sample, there is greater need for education about the prevention of cervical cancer, specifically among high-risk adolescent women. PMID:26925426

  14. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis mimicking infective endocarditis in an adolescent male.

    PubMed

    Varnier, Giulia Camilla; Sebire, Neil; Christov, Georgi; Eleftheriou, Despina; Brogan, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a rare but serious small vessel vasculitis with heterogeneous clinical presentation ranging from mainly localised disease with a chronic course, to a florid, acute small vessel vasculitic form characterised by severe pulmonary haemorrhage and/or rapidly progressive vasculitis or other severe systemic vasculitic manifestations. Cardiac involvement is, however, uncommon in the paediatric population. We report a case of a 16-year-old male who presented with peripheral gangrene and vegetation with unusual location on the supporting apparatus of the tricuspid valve, initially considered to have infective endocarditis but ultimately diagnosed with GPA. We provide an overview of the limited literature relating to cardiac involvement in GPA, and the diagnostic challenge relating to infective endocarditis in this context, especially focusing on the interpretation of the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and the characteristic clinical features to identify in order to promptly recognise GPA, since timely diagnosis and treatment are essential for this potentially life-threatening condition. PMID:27370964

  15. The changing seroepidemiology of enterovirus 71 infection among children and adolescents in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has caused recurrent epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease among children in Singapore. Between August 2008 and July 2010, we conducted a survey to estimate the seroprevalence of EV71 infection among children and adolescents aged 1-17 years. We compared our EV71 seroepidemiologic findings with a previous study conducted in 1996-1997. Methods The survey involved the prospective collection of 1,200 residual sera from Singapore residents aged 1-17 years in two hospitals. Neutralizing antibodies to EV71 were detected by the microneutralization test. The geometric mean titer (GMT) of EV71 antibodies and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated and compared by age groups. Statistical significance was taken as P < 0.05. Results The overall EV71 antibody prevalence was 26.9% (95% CI: 24.5-29.5%). It increased significantly from 14.3% in children aged 1-6 years to 27.8% in those aged 7-12 years, and reached 38.8% in adolescents aged 13-17 years. The seroconversion rate differed by about 12% between the consecutive age groups. The GMT of EV71 antibodies was higher among primary school children aged 7-12 years in our study than that among the 6-12 year age group in the 1996-1997 study. Conclusions Higher antibody titers were observed in children aged 1-6 years than those in the other two age groups, indicating that most of the infections had been acquired during early childhood. EV71 infection is common among children and adolescents in Singapore, with 39% infected by the time they are in secondary school (13-17 years of age). PMID:21988931

  16. How can we help adolescent girls avoid HIV infection?

    PubMed

    Helitzer-allen, D; Makhambera, M

    1993-05-01

    90% OF Malawi's 9 million inhabitants live in rural areas. Although tradition dictates that young females abstain from engaging in sexual relations until being initiated by a traditional adviser following the initial onset on menses, many preinitiation and premenstrual girls break tradition and say that they receive school fees and gifts in exchange for sex. While these village girls may know that AIDS can kill, most think that they are not at risk. Knowledge, attitude, and behavior were assessed by live-in researchers in a sample of 258 girls aged 10-18 in 2 villages over the period 1991-92. Focus groups were held, in initiations attended and observed, and interviews conducted with girls, mothers, grandmothers, and village leaders. 300 female adolescents were then surveyed in 10 other villages. 70% of the girls had sex before either initiation or menstruation with the average age at first intercourse of 13.6 years. 80% of the girls had heard of AIDS and 14% thought they had a good or moderate chance of contracting it, yet they expressed a far higher perceived risk of contracting other sexually transmitted diseases. These benefits were obtained from radio, church, and word-of-mouth messages that AIDS is transmitted by easy partners, bar girls, and truck drivers, and from someone who looks very ill from AIDS. 55% said they are often forced to have sex; 66% have accepted money or gifts for sex; and 75% would like help in learning how to convince a boy to use a condom. Grandmothers and other elders tell girls about menstruation, hygiene, and illness, while sex education comes largely from peers. Were there widespread motivation to employ condoms, condoms are accessible only in the district hospital which is a 25-mile round trim for many; all surveyed community members favored eventual community-based condom distribution. Study results suggest that disseminating messages through existing communication channels of grandmothers, other elder women, and peers could help

  17. Outcomes of a Comprehensive Youth Program for HIV-infected Adolescents in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Tarugsa, Jariya; Lolekha, Rangsima; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri; Manaboriboon, Boonying; Naiwatanakul, Thananda; Punpanich, Warunee; Nuchanard, Wipada; Pattanasin, Sarika; Boon-yasidhi, Vitharon

    2015-01-01

    We developed an intervention program for HIV-infected Thai adolescents with two group sessions and two individual sessions, focusing on four strategies: health knowledge, coping skills, sexual risk reduction, and life goals. An audio computer-assisted self-interview (ACASI) was administered to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) regarding antiretroviral therapy management, reproductive health, and HIV-associated risk behavior. The program was implemented in two HIV clinics; 165 (84%) adolescents (intervention group) participated in the program; 32 (16%) completed the ACASI without participating in the group or individual sessions (nonintervention group). The median age was 14 years, and 56% were female. Baseline KAP scores of the intervention and nonintervention groups were similar. Two months after the intervention, knowledge and attitude scores increased (p < .01) in the intervention group, and the increase was sustained at 6 months. KAP scores did not change from baseline in the nonintervention group at 6 or 12 months after enrollment. PMID:26363957

  18. Outcomes of a Comprehensive Youth Program for HIV-infected Adolescents in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Tarugsa, Jariya; Lolekha, Rangsima; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri; Manaboriboon, Boonying; Naiwatanakul, Thananda; Punpanich, Warunee; Nuchanard, Wipada; Pattanasin, Sarika; Boon-yasidhi, Vitharon

    2015-01-01

    We developed an intervention program for HIV-infected Thai adolescents with two group sessions and two individual sessions, focusing on four strategies: health knowledge, coping skills, sexual risk reduction, and life goals. An audio computer-assisted self-interview (ACASI) was administered to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) regarding antiretroviral therapy management, reproductive health, and HIV-associated risk behavior. The program was implemented in two HIV clinics; 165 (84%) adolescents (intervention group) participated in the program; 32 (16%) completed the ACASI without participating in the group or individual sessions (nonintervention group). The median age was 14 years, and 56% were female. Baseline KAP scores of the intervention and nonintervention groups were similar. Two months after the intervention, knowledge and attitude scores increased (p <.01) in the intervention group, and the increase was sustained at 6 months. KAP scores did not change from baseline in the nonintervention group at 6 or 12 months after enrollment. PMID:26363957

  19. A flowchart for managing sexually transmitted infections among Nigerian adolescent females.

    PubMed Central

    Obunge, O. K.; Brabin, L.; Dollimore, N.; Kemp, J.; Ikokwu-Wonodi, C.; Babatunde, S.; White, S.; Briggs, N. D.; Hart, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To devise a flowchart suitable for assessing risk of trichomoniasis, chlamydia and gonorrhoea in an adolescent population, not all of whom will be sexually experienced or currently in a relationship. METHODS: The data used to derive the flowchart were generated from cross-sectional microbiological surveys of girls aged 14-19 years in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The flowchart screened on the basis of: (i) sexual experience; (ii) recent sexual activity; (iii) a positive urine leukocyte esterase (LE) test; and (iv) among LE negatives, a history of malodorous/pruritic discharge. FINDINGS: Using this flowchart, we found that 26.2% of all adolescents screened would receive treatment for cervicitis and vaginitis. Chlamydial, gonococcal, and trichomonal infections were correctly diagnosed in 37.5%, 66.7%, and 50% of the cases, respectively. CONCLUSION: Although the flowchart is more suitable for an adolescent population than the vaginal discharge algorithm used in syndromic management protocols, it still lacks precision and needs adapting to local settings. PMID:11357208

  20. Endophenotypes in Schizophrenia for the Perinatal Period: Criteria for Validation

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Randal G.; Freedman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Endophenotypes are disease-associated phenotypes that are thought to reflect the neurobiological or other mechanisms that underlie the more overt symptoms of a psychiatric illness. Endophenotypes have been critical in understanding the genetics, neurobiology, and treatment of schizophrenia. Because psychiatric illnesses have multiple causes, including both genetic and nongenetic risk factors, an endophenotype linked to one of the mechanisms may be expressed more frequently than the disease itself. However, in schizophrenia research, endophenotypes have almost exclusively been studied in older adolescents or adults who have entered or passed through the age of risk for the disorder. Yet, schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder where prenatal development starts a cascade of brain changes across the lifespan. Endophenotypes have only minimally been utilized to explore the perinatal development of vulnerability. One major impediment to the development of perinatally-useful endophenotypes has been the established validity criteria. For example, the criterion that the endophenotype be more frequently present in those with disease than those without is difficult to demonstrate when there can be a decades-long period between endophenotype measurement and the age of greatest risk for onset of the disorder. This article proposes changes to the endophenotype validity criteria appropriate to perinatal research and reviews how application of these modified criteria helped identify a perinatally-usable phenotype of risk for schizophrenia, P50 sensory gating, which was then used to propose a novel perinatal primary prevention intervention. PMID:25943124

  1. Use of Integrase Inhibitors in HIV-Infected Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dehority, Walter; Abadi, Jacobo; Wiznia, Andrew; Viani, Rolando M

    2015-09-01

    Resistance to antiretroviral drugs is an increasingly prevalent challenge affecting both the adult and pediatric HIV-infected populations. Though data on the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of newer antiretroviral agents in children typically lags behind adult data, newer agents are becoming available for use in HIV-infected children who are failing to respond to or are experiencing toxicities with traditional antiretroviral regimens. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors are one such new class of antiretrovirals. Raltegravir has been US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for use in patients over the age of 4 weeks. Elvitegravir is a second member of this class, and has the potential for use in children but does not yet have a Pediatric FDA indication. Dolutegravir, a second-generation integrase inhibitor, is approved for those older than 12 years. This review summarizes the use of integrase inhibitors in children and adolescents, and highlights the results of recent clinical trials. PMID:26242765

  2. Lamivudine in late pregnancy to prevent perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus infection: a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Xu, W-M; Cui, Y-T; Wang, L; Yang, H; Liang, Z-Q; Li, X-M; Zhang, S-L; Qiao, F-Y; Campbell, F; Chang, C-N; Gardner, S; Atkins, M

    2009-02-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated whether lamivudine given during late pregnancy can reduce hepatitis B virus (HBV) perinatal transmission in highly viraemic mothers. Mothers were randomized to either lamivudine 100 mg or placebo from week 32 of gestation to week 4 postpartum. At birth, infants received recombinant HBV vaccine with or without HBIg and were followed until week 52. One hundred and fifty mothers, with a gestational age of 26-30 weeks and serum HBV DNA >1000 MEq/mL (bDNA assay), were treated. A total of 141 infants received immunoprophylaxis at birth. In lamivudine-treated mothers, 56 infants received vaccine + HBIg (lamivudine + vaccine + HBIg) and 26 infants received vaccine (lamivudine + vaccine). In placebo-treated mothers, 59 infants received vaccine + HBIg (placebo + vaccine + HBIg). At week 52, in the primary analyses where missing data was counted as failures, infants in the lamivudine + vaccine + HBIg group had a significant decrease in incidence of HBsAg seropositivity (10/56, 18%vs 23/59, 39%; P = 0.014) and in detectable HBV DNA (11/56, 20%vs 27/59, 46%; P = 0.003) compared to infants in the placebo + vaccine + HBIg group. Sensitivity analyses to evaluate the impact of missing data at week 52 resulting from a high dropout rate (13% in the lamivudine + vaccine + HBIg group and 31% in the placebo + vaccine + HBIg group) remained consistent with the primary analysis in that lower transmission rates were still observed in the infants of lamivudine-treated mothers, but the differences were not statistically significant. No safety concerns were noted in the lamivudine-treated mothers or their infants. Results of this study suggest that lamivudine reduced HBV transmission from highly viraemic mothers to their infants who received passive/active immunization. PMID:19175878

  3. Cytomegalovirus myelitis in perinatally acquired HIV.

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, T; Funk, M; Linde, R; Jacobi, G; Horn, M; Kreuz, W

    1993-01-01

    A 7 year old child perinatally infected with HIV who died from progressive muscular paralysis and central nervous respiratory failure is described. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis with a special intravenous CMV hyper-immunoglobulin had been successfully conducted for more than four years. Macroscopic and microscopic immunohistochemical examination of the spinal cord revealed a diffuse CMV infiltration of the entire myelon. CMV infected cells were identified as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, macrophages, ependymal, endothelial, and Schwann cells. Other organs had no signs of CMV infection. Central nervous spinal CMV infection was most probably due to insufficient penetration of the blood-brain barrier by the CMV hyper-immunoglobulin. In suspicious cases early spinal magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 tesla) combined with an examination of urine and cerebrospinal fluid for CMV is recommended. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8385439

  4. Sexual sensation-seeking and worry about sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Martínez, Olga; Bermúdez, María Paz; Teva, Inmaculada; Buela-Casal, Gualberto

    2007-11-01

    The target of this study is to assess the relationship between sexual sensation-seeking, worry about STD/HIV infection, and risky sexual behaviours among 182 adolescents aged 13-18 years. Results showed that participants who engaged in a wider range of potentially risky behaviours (e.g., sexual experience, higher number of sexual partners in last six months, and the last sexual contact with a casual partner) obtained higher sensation-seeking scores. It was also found that adolescents who engaged in sex with a casual partner in their last sexual contact reported being worried about STD/HIV infection, but adolescents having sex with a steady partner underestimated their risk of STD/HIV infection. These results support the idea that preventive programmes may benefit from including components aimed at teaching adolescents to satisfy their preferences for sexual sensation-seeking through novel and stimulating sexual behaviours involving minimum risk. Similarly, the need to include components aimed at making adolescents become realistically aware of the STD/HIV risk involved in unprotected intercourse with steady love partners is highlighted. PMID:17959123

  5. Reproductive Tract Infections and Treatment Seeking Behavior among Married Adolescent Women 15-19 Years in India

    PubMed Central

    Prusty, Ranjan Kumar; Unisa, Sayeed

    2013-01-01

    Background: India is home to the highest number of adolescents in the world. Adolescents in India suffer from lack of knowledge and empowerment to make informed sexual and reproductive health decisions. This paper analyses the prevalence of reproductive tract infections and sexually transmitted infections (RTI/STI) and treatment seeking behavior among married adolescent women in India aged 15-19 years. Methods: Data from the District Level Household Survey (DLHS, 2007-08) of India were used. The prevalence of RTIs symptoms and treatment seeking behavior among women by different socio-demographic characteristics was analyzed. Factor analysis was utilized to create an index using information about 11 symptoms of RTI/STI collected in the survey. Linear and binary logistic regressions were used to know the association between infections and treatment seeking behavior with socio-demographic factors. Results: About 15 percent of adolescent women reported having any symptoms of RTI/STI. The main symptoms reported were low backache, pain in the lower abdomen, pain during intercourse and itching or irritation around the vulvar region. Factor analysis showed the concentration of diseases in three clusters - infection in around the vulva, other reproductive infection and abnormal discharge; and intercourse related problems. Major predictors of both symptoms of reproductive infections and treatment seeking behavior from multivariate analysis are age, education, wealth, region and awareness about RTI/STI. Conclusions and Public Health Implications: Knowledge and treatment seeking behavior is poor among adolescent women in India. There is need for programmatic and policy emphasis on increasing knowledge and awareness through family life education including in educational curriculum at school level.

  6. Perinatal diseases, a neglected area of the medical sciences.

    PubMed

    Naeye, R L; Kissane, J M

    1981-01-01

    Little is known about the causes of some of the most frequent fetal and placental disorders, and some of these disorders commonly go unrecognized as the underlying causes of premature labor and fetal and neonatal deaths. It is widely known that incompetent cervix, placenta previa, abruptio placentae, and hydramnios shorten pregnancy, yet it is not widely recognized that coitus is a common cause of preterm delivery. The underlying disorders responsible for fetal and neonatal deaths in the US Collaborative Perinatal Project are presented in a table in the order of their frequency. The births of the Collaborative Perinatal Project occurred between 1959-66, and the total perinatal mortality rate for single born infants in the study was 30.4/100 births. The current perinatal mortality rate in the US is about half of that value. Amniotic fluid infections, abruptio placentae, premature rupture of the fetal membranes, and major congenital malformations were responsible for more than half of the perinatal deaths in the study. Prevention would remove a substantial burden from the health care system. The yearly cost of neonatal intensive care in the US was approximately US$462,000,000 in 1980. If these same infants were born at term and were healthy, the cost of their care would have been about US$53,000,000. These figures fail to consider the even greater financial burden, family stress, and nonproductive lives that result from the brain damage and other disabilities produced by the perinatal disorders. The hypoxic damage sometimes caused by abruptio placentae is widely recognized as a cause of disability. The consequences of major congenital malformations are universally recognized. The need to prevent these antenatal disorders is more pressing in the poor nations of the 3rd world. The total perinatal mortality rate in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in 1976 was 69/1000, 5 times the current perinatal mortality rate in the US. High perinatal and infant mortality rates in the 3rd world

  7. Sexual Assault and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Adults, Adolescents, and Children.

    PubMed

    Seña, Arlene C; Hsu, Katherine K; Kellogg, Nancy; Girardet, Rebecca; Christian, Cindy W; Linden, Judith; Griffith, William; Marchant, Anne; Jenny, Carole; Hammerschlag, Margaret R

    2015-12-15

    Survivors of sexual assault are at risk for acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We conducted literature reviews and invited experts to assist in updating the sexual assault section for the 2015 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sexually transmitted diseases (STD) treatment guidelines. New recommendations for STI management among adult and adolescent sexual assault survivors include use of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis by vaginal swabs; NAATs for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis from pharyngeal and rectal specimens among patients with a history of exposure or suspected extragenital contact after sexual assault; empiric therapy for gonorrhea, chlamydia, and trichomoniasis based on updated treatment regimens; vaccinations for human papillomavirus (HPV) among previously unvaccinated patients aged 9-26 years; and consideration for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) nonoccupational postexposure prophylaxis using an algorithm to assess the timing and characteristics of the exposure. For child sexual assault (CSA) survivors, recommendations include targeted diagnostic testing with increased use of NAATs when appropriate; routine follow-up visits within 6 months after the last known sexual abuse; and use of HPV vaccination in accordance with national immunization guidelines as a preventive measure in the post-sexual assault care setting. For CSA patients, NAATs are considered to be acceptable for identification of gonococcal and chlamydial infections from urine samples, but are not recommended for extragenital testing due to the potential detection of nongonococcal Neisseria species. Several research questions were identified regarding the prevalence, detection, and management of STI/HIV infections among adult, adolescent, and pediatric sexual assault survivors. PMID:26602623

  8. Attitudes toward Sexuality and Sexual Behaviors of Asian-American Adolescents. Implications for Risk of HIV Infection. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Connie S.

    There has been a widespread perception that Asian Americans are at lower risk for HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases than the population as a whole. This report assesses the knowledge of Asian American adolescents about AIDS and their sexual behaviors and explores whether there is a difference between a Cambodian group (half the…

  9. What African American Male Adolescents Are Telling Us about HIV Infection among Their Peers: Cultural Approaches for HIV Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voisin, Dexter R.; Bird, Jason D. P.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the beliefs of African American male adolescents concerning the high rates of HIV infection among their peers and their reasons for those beliefs. In-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of 16 male African Americans, and a thematic analysis of the data was conducted. Half of the participants believed that peers were…

  10. Adolescent Inpatient Behavioral Health Clients: Risk Factors and Methods of Preventing an Increase in HIV Infection among Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackerman, Ann E.

    2002-01-01

    There has been a surge in the rates of adolescents who are becoming infected with HIV. This study of 214 at risk clients being treated on an inpatient psychiatric hospitalization basis examines why such clients continue to engage in high-risk behaviors. Results and suggestions for a psychoeducational curriculum for professionals are included.…

  11. Incomplete Immune Reconstitution Despite Virologic Suppression in HIV-1 Infected Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Krogstad, Paul; Patel, Kunjal; Karalius, Brad; Hazra, Rohan; Abzug, Mark J.; Oleske, James; Seage, George R.; Williams, Paige; Borkowsky, William; Wiznia, Andrew; Pinto, Jorge; Van Dyke, Russell B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Some perinatally infected children do not regain normal CD4 T cell counts despite suppression of HIV-1 plasma viremia by antiretroviral therapy (ART), The frequency, severity, and significance of these discordant treatment responses remain unclear. Design We examined the persistence of CD4 lymphocytopenia despite virologic suppression (VS) in 933 children (>5 years of age) in the US, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Methods CD4 T-cell trajectories were examined and Kaplan Meier methods used to estimate median time to CD4 T cell count ≥ 500 cells/μL. Results After 1 year of VS, most (99%) children achieved a CD4 T cell count of ≥200 cells/μl, but CD4 T cell counts remained below 500 cells/μL after 1 and 2 years of VS in 14% and 8%. Median times to first CD4 T cell count ≥ 500 cells/μl were 1.29, 0.78, and 0.46 years for children with <200, 200–349, and 350–499 cells/μL at the start of VS. New AIDS-defining events occurred in 9 children, including 4 in the first 6 months of VS. Other infectious and HIV-related diagnoses occurred more frequently and across a wide range of CD4 counts. Conclusions ART improved CD4 counts in most children, but the time to CD4 count of ≥ 500 cells was highly dependent upon baseline immunological status. Some children did not reach a CD4 T cell count of 500 cells/μl despite 2 years of VS. AIDS defining events occurred in 1% of the population, including children in whom VS and improved CD4 T cell counts were achieved. PMID:25849832

  12. The Importance of Quality of Care: Effects of Perinatal HIV Infection and Early Institutional Rearing on Preschoolers' Attachment and Indiscriminate Friendliness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrova-Krol, Natasha A.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Juffer, Femmie

    2010-01-01

    Background: The rearing environment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children is often compromised, putting these children at additional risks. Positive caregiving may ameliorate the impact of adverse circumstances and promote attachment security. The goal of the present study was to examine the attachment relationships of…

  13. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections including HIV in street-connected adolescents in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Susanna E; Chirchir, Amon K; Muthoni, Lauryn N; Ayuku, David; Koech, Julius; Nyandiko, Winstone; Carter, E Jane; Braitstein, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study were to characterise the sexual health of street-connected adolescents in Eldoret, Kenya, analyse gender disparity of risks, estimate the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and identify factors associated with STIs. Methods A cross-sectional study of street-connected adolescents ages 12–21 years was conducted in Eldoret, Kenya. Participants were interviewed and screened for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, herpes simplex virus-2, syphilis and HIV. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to identify factors associated with having any STI. Results Of the 200 participants, 81 (41%) were female. 70.4% of females and 60.5% of males reported sexual activity. Of those that participated in at least one STI test, 28% (55/194) had ≥1 positive test, including 56% of females; 14% (28/194) had >1 positive test. Twelve females and zero males (6% overall, 14.8% of females) were HIV positive. Among females, those with HIV infection more frequently reported transactional sex (66.7% vs 26.1%, p=0.01), drug use (91.7% vs 56.5%, p=0.02), and reported a prior STI (50.0% vs 14.7%, p<0.01). Having an adult caregiver was less likely among those with HIV infection (33.3% vs 71.0%, p=0.04). Transactional sex (AOR 3.02, 95% CI (1.05 to 8.73)), a previous STI (AOR 3.46 95% CI (1.05 to 11.46)) and ≥2 sexual partners (AOR 5.62 95% (1.67 to 18.87)) were associated with having any STI. Conclusions Street-connected adolescents in Eldoret, Kenya are engaged in high-risk sexual behaviours and females in particular have a substantial burden of STIs and HIV. There is a need for STI interventions targeted to street-connected youth. PMID:25714102

  14. Influence of health behaviours on the incidence of infection and allergy in adolescents: the AFINOS cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Some health behaviours are liable to affect the incidence of allergies and/or common infections in young people; however, the extent and ways in which these might occur are mostly unknown. This study examines the association of health behaviours related to physical activity, sedentariness, diet and sleep with allergy and infection symptoms in adolescents, and also with biological markers that might mediate disease incidence. Methods The study comprised a total of 2054 adolescents (50.7% girls) from the Madrid region of Spain. The incidence of infection and allergy symptoms three months prior to the study was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Physical and sedentary activities, height and weight, food habits and sleep duration were also self-reported and their influence on infection and allergy incidence was assessed by logistic regression analysis. Blood biomarkers (IgE, eosinophil percentage, leptin, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10) were evaluated in a subsample of 198 subjects. Results Adequate sleep duration (OR = 0.79, 95%CI: 0.64 to 0.97) and unhealthy weight status (overweight/obesity) (OR = 1.35, 95%CI: 1.04-1.74) were independently associated with decreased and increased allergy incidence, respectively. No significant association was observed with infection incidence. IgE and leptin differed between adolescents with and without allergy symptoms. In regression models IgE was significantly associated with inadequate sleep duration and leptin with weight status. Conclusion Excess weight and inadequate sleep duration are independently associated with the incidence of allergy symptoms in adolescents. Adequate sleep duration and weight during adolescence might be relevant for a decreased risk of suffering allergy symptoms. PMID:24405509

  15. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa, Aída de Fátima Thomé Barbosa; Machado, Daisy Maria; Beltrão, Suênia Cordeiro de Vasconcelos; do Carmo, Fabiana Bononi; Mattar, Regina Helena Guedes Motta; Succi, Regina Célia de Menezes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To alert the pediatrician who is following up HIV-infected patients about the possibility of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) in this period of life, in order to avoid the catastrophic consequences of this disease as bleeding esophageal varices. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 13 years old HIV-infected patient by vertical route was receiving didanosine (ddI) for 12 years. Although the HIV viral load had been undetectable for 12 years, this patient showed gradual decrease of CD4+ T cells, prolonged thrombocytopenia and high alkaline phosphatase. Physical examination detected splenomegaly, which triggered the investigation that led to the diagnosis of severe liver fibrosis by transient elastography, probably due to hepatic toxicity by prolonged use of ddI. COMMENTS: This is the first case of NCPH in HIV-infected adolescent described in Brazil. Although, the NCPH is a rare disease entity in seropositive patients in the pediatric age group, it should be investigated in patients on long-term ddI or presenting clinical and laboratories indicators of portal hypertension, as splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia and increased alkaline phosphatase. PMID:25913495

  16. [Preventive vaccination strategy during the perinatal period].

    PubMed

    Pinquier, Didier; Gagneur, Amaud; Gaudelus, Joël; Marret, Stéphane

    2010-12-20

    Preventive vaccination strategy around the birth is a global approach requiring the coordination of several actors. To be efficacious, general practitioners are in the front line to provide preventive care and health education. The perinatal period represents a privileged situation from listening to this approach of vaccine prevention. The raising awareness around the birth contains several additional steps to bring to the future mother and child the best protection against infectious diseases with vaccine prevention. By being vaccinated, parents and other family members indirectly provide protection to very young infants until they are old enough to be vaccinated and so directly protected themselves. Numerous opportunities exist to make sensitive the parents in this preventive way, for them and their child, whether it is from the adolescence in the adulthood above all parental project, on the occasion of a pregnancy, at birth, during the stay in maternity hospital, or along the first weeks of the postpartum. The general practitioner is the key actor to coordinate this global approach in perinatal health around the mother, his child and his family. The arrival of the newborn will be the opportunity to update vaccinations of the whole family particularly according chicken pox, measles, rubella, whooping cough and flu vaccines. PMID:21425528

  17. Abacavir pharmacokinetics during chronic therapy in HIV-1-infected adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Sleasman, J W; Robbins, B L; Cross, S J; Lindsey, J C; Kraimer, J M; Heckman, B E; Sprenger, H L; Tustin, N B; Rose, C H; Poston, P A; Neal, E F; Pakes, G E; Nikanjam, M; Capparelli, E V

    2009-04-01

    The pharmacokinetics of abacavir and its metabolites were investigated in 30 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adolescents and young adults 13-25 years of age, equally divided into two groups: <18 years of age and >or=18 years of age. All the subjects received the recommended adult dose of 300 mg twice daily. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and half-life of abacavir did not differ significantly between the age groups or by gender or race, and there were only modest associations of age with apparent abacavir clearance and with volume of distribution. There were no significant correlations of carboxylate or glucuronide metabolite levels with age or gender, although glucuronide AUC was higher in Hispanic subjects than in African-American subjects. Zidovudine and lamivudine concentration profiles were also similar in the two age groups. A novel aspect of the study included an assessment of intracellular carbovir, zidovudine, and lamivudine triphosphate levels, and these were found to be similar in the two age-based groups. Overall, these findings suggest that current recommendations relating to adult dosages are appropriate for adolescents and young adults. PMID:19118380

  18. Perinatal Grief in Latino Parents

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Claudia; Kavanaugh, Karen; Klima, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research exists that describes the meaning of perinatal loss to some parents, but the experience of loss from the perspective of Latino parents is not clearly understood. Additionally, current perinatal bereavement practices used often to facilitate memory-making for parents (such as viewing or holding the baby, taking photographs, or collecting mementos) are based upon research done primarily with non-Latino families. Are these common practices appropriate for this population? Because there is a paucity of research on this topic, this article describes what has been written over the past 30 years on the topic of grief and perinatal loss in Latino culture. PMID:20975393

  19. Epidemiology and characteristics of urinary tract infections in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hanna-Wakim, Rima H.; Ghanem, Soha T.; El Helou, Mona W.; Khafaja, Sarah A.; Shaker, Rouba A.; Hassan, Sara A.; Saad, Randa K.; Hedari, Carine P.; Khinkarly, Rima W.; Hajar, Farah M.; Bakhash, Marwan; El Karah, Dima; Akel, Imad S.; Rajab, Mariam A.; Khoury, Mireille; Dbaibo, Ghassan S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infections in the pediatric population. Over the last two decades, antibiotic resistance is increasing significantly as extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) producing organisms are emerging. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive view of the epidemiologic characteristics of UTIs in hospitalized children, examine the risk factors of UTIs caused by ESBL-producing organisms, and determine the resistance patterns in the isolated organisms over the last 10 years. Methods: Retrospective chart review was conducted at two Lebanese medical centers. Subjects were identified by looking at the following ICD-9 discharge codes: “Urinary tract infection,” “UTI,” “Cystitis,” and/or “Pyelonephritis.” Children less than 18 years of age admitted for UTI between January 1st, 2001 and December 31st, 2011 were included. Cases whose urine culture result did not meet our definition for UTI were excluded. Chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and multivariate logistic regression were used to determine risk factors for ESBL. Linear regression analysis was used to determine resistance patterns. Results: The study included 675 cases with a median age of 16 months and female predominance of 77.7% (525 cases). Of the 584 cases caused by Escherichia coli or Klebsiella spp, 91 cases (15.5%) were found to be ESBL-producing organisms. Vesico-ureteral reflux and previous antibiotics use were found to be independent risk factors for ESBL-producing E. coli and Klebsiella spp. (p < 0.05). A significant linear increase in resistance to all generations of Cephalosporins (r2 = 0.442) and Fluoroquinolones (r2 = 0.698) was found. Conclusion: The recognition of risk factors for infection with ESBL-producing organisms and the observation of increasing overall resistance to antibiotics warrant further studies that might probably lead to new recommendations to guide management of UTIs and antibiotic use in children

  20. Lack of utility of risk score and gynecological examination for screening for sexually transmitted infections in sexually active adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Eleuse MB; Guimarães, Mark DC; Vieira, Maria Aparecida S; Bontempo, Nádia M; Seixas, Mirian SS; Garcia, Mônica SD; Daud, Lyana ES; Côrtes, Rejane LM; Alves, Maria de Fátima C

    2009-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted infections constitute the main health risk among adolescents. In developing countries the diagnosis and treatment of cervical infections is based on the syndromic approach. In this study we estimated the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae among female adolescents from a Health Sector of the city of Goiânia, Brazil, and validated cervicitis diagnosis using World Health Organization/Ministry of Health risk score and gynecological examination. Methods A cross-sectional community-based sample of 914 15- to 19-year-old female teenagers was randomly selected and referred to the local Family Health Program. Of these, 472 (51.6%) were sexually active and gynecological examinations were carried out for 427. Endocervical samples were collected to perform the polymerase chain reaction for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae. Performance of risk score, the presence of mucopurulent discharge, friability, ectopia and pain during cervical maneuver were compared with the presence of C. trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae or both. Results The prevalence of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae was 14.5% and 2.1%, respectively. The risk score had a specificity of 31.9% (95% confidence interval, 21.2 to 44.2) and a positive predictive value of 20.8% (95% confidence interval, 13.5 to 29.7). Friability was the component of the gynecological examination that presented the best performance with a sensitivity of 43.5%, specificity of 81.0%, and 30.6% of positive predictive value. Conclusion The prevalence of infection by C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae was high among these sexually active adolescents. The syndromic approach is clearly inadequate for screening and treating these infections in this population. Therefore, the implantation of other strategies to control these infections among adolescents is urgently required. PMID:19284575

  1. Countrywide analysis of perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Stembera, Z; Kravka, A; Mandys, F

    1988-01-01

    The computer laboratory of the Research Institute for the Care of Mother and Child in Prague performs annually a countrywide analysis of perinatal outcome in order to obtain a background for the preparation of the optimal strategy for improving perinatal care in CSR in the future. The total as well as weight specific perinatal mortality rate further sub-divided into early neonatal death rate and late fetal death rate and differentiated according to the birthweight, was correlated with the incidence of different factors influencing the perinatal mortality rate both countrywide and for each of the eight provinces of CSR. This way a correlation was found between some of the mentioned perinatal outcomes and e.g. instrumental equipment of obstetrical departments and neonatal intensive care units, frequency of caesarean sections, or transport of LBW newborns in incubators or "in utero" etc. The results of this analysis have proved that there still remain in some provinces opportunity for further decrease in perinatal mortality due to the incomplete observance of the two intervention strategies "Risk approach" and "New technology" which were introduced in the whole country during the last 10 years. PMID:3221298

  2. The effect of peers on HIV infection expectations among Malawian adolescents: Using an instrumental variables/school fixed effect approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho

    2016-03-01

    Malawian adolescents overestimate their HIV infection risk. Understanding why they do so is important since such overestimation is likely to be linked to later-life outcomes. This study focuses on the influence peers have on HIV infection expectations. I use novel school-based survey data collected in Malawi between October 2011 and March 2012 (n = 7910), which has more reliable measures of peers' HIV infection expectations than other studies. I employ a combined instrumental variables/fixed effects methodology designed to addresses several methodological challenges in estimating peer effects, including self-selection of friends, the issue of unobserved environmental confounders, and the bi-directionality of peer effects. Several tests are conducted in order to assess the robustness of the specifications. Results suggest that a one-percentage-point increase in the mean probabilistic expectation of HIV infection among peers increases an adolescent's own subjective expectation of infection by an average of 0.65 percentage points. This paper shows that peer influence is greater for males than for females. Results also suggest that the peer effects on HIV infection expectations are only statistically significant among those lacking more complete knowledge of HIV/AIDS. PMID:26840771

  3. Perinatal reduction of functional serotonin transporters results in developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Kroeze, Yvet; Dirven, Bart; Janssen, Stefan; Kröhnke, Marijke; Barte, Ramona M; Middelman, Anthonieke; van Bokhoven, Hans; Zhou, Huiqing; Homberg, Judith R

    2016-10-01

    While there is strong evidence from rodent and human studies that a reduction in serotonin transporter (5-HTT) function in early-life can increase the risk for several neuropsychiatric disorders in adulthood, the effects of reduced 5-HTT function on behavior across developmental stages are underinvestigated. To elucidate how perinatal pharmacological and lifelong genetic inactivation of the 5-HTT affects behavior across development, we conducted a battery of behavioral tests in rats perinatally exposed to fluoxetine or vehicle and in 5-HTT(-/-) versus 5-HTT(+/+) rats. We measured motor-related behavior, olfactory function, grooming behavior, sensorimotor gating, object directed behavior and novel object recognition in the first three postnatal weeks and if possible the tests were repeated in adolescence and adulthood. We also measured developmental milestones such as eye opening, reflex development and body weight. We observed that both pharmacological and genetic inactivation of 5-HTT resulted in a developmental delay. Except for hypo-locomotion, most of the observed early-life effects were normalized later in life. In adolescence and adulthood we observed object directed behavior and decreased novel object recognition in the 5-HTT(-/-) rats, which might be related to the lifelong inactivation of 5-HTT. Together, these data provide an important contribution to the understanding of the effects of perinatal and lifelong 5-HTT inactivation on behavior across developmental stages. PMID:27208789

  4. Poor Outcomes in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Adolescents Undergoing Treatment for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Isaakidis, Petros; Paryani, Roma; Khan, Samsuddin; Mansoor, Homa; Manglani, Mamta; Valiyakath, Asmaa; Saranchuk, Peter; Furin, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in HIV-co-infected adolescents. This study aimed to present the intermediate outcomes of HIV-infected adolescents aged 10–19 years receiving second-line anti-TB treatment in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) project in Mumbai, India. Methods A retrospective review of medical records of 11 adolescents enrolled between July 2007 and January 2013 was undertaken. Patients were initiated on either empirical or individualized second-line ambulatory anti-TB treatment under direct observation. Results The median age was 16 (IQR 14–18) years and 54% were female. Five (46%) adolescents had pulmonary TB (PTB), two (18%) extrapulmonary disease (EPTB) and four (36%) had both. Median CD4 count at the time of MDR-TB diagnosis was 162.7 cells/µl (IQR: 84.8–250.5). By January 2013, eight patients had final and 3 had interim outcomes. Favourable results were seen in four (36.5%) patients: one was cured and three were still on treatment with negative culture results. Seven patients (64%) had poor outcomes: four (36.5%) died and three (27%) defaulted. Three of the patients who died never started on antiretroviral and/or TB treatment and one died 16 days after treatment initiation. Two of the defaulted died soon after default. All patients (100%) on-treatment experienced adverse events (AEs): two required permanent discontinuation of the culprit drug and two were hospitalized due to AEs. No patient required permanent discontinuation of the entire second-line TB or antiretroviral regimens. Conclusions Early mortality and mortality after default were the most common reasons for poor outcomes in this study. Early mortality suggests the need for rapid diagnosis and prompt treatment initiation, and adolescents might benefit from active contact-tracing and immediate referral. Default occurred at different times, suggesting the need for continuous, intensified and individualized psychosocial

  5. OBESITY AND DYSLIPIDEMIA IN BEHAVIORALLY HIV-INFECTED YOUNG WOMEN: ADOLESCENT TRIALS NETWORK (ATN) STUDY 021

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Kathleen; Harris, D. Robert; Monte, Dina; Stoszek, Sonia; Emmanuel, Patricia; Hardin, Dana S.; Kapogiannis, Bill G.; Worrell, Carol; Meyer, William A.; Sleasman, John; Wilson, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to determine the nature and prevalence of abnormalities in lipids, glucose metabolism, and body composition in behaviorally HIV-infected young women and their relationship to different classes of antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional multicenter study in behaviorally infected women ages 12-24 years (HIVpos; N=173) and seronegative controls (HIVneg; N=61). HIVpos women were categorized as ART-naïve (N=85), on a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-containing regimen (NNRTI; N=33), on a protease inhibitor-containing regimen (PI; N=36), or on a non-NNRTI/non-PI containing regimen (N=19). Measurements included fasting lipids; glucose and insulin before and 2 hours after an oral glucose challenge; high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP); anthropometry; fat distribution (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry); and ART and medical histories. Race-adjusted results were compared across groups and within HIVpos groups. Results The median age was 20 (range 14-24) years. 77% of HIVpos were African American, 35% smoked cigarettes, and 32% reported exercising regularly. More than 40% had a BMI ≥25 kg/m2. Triglycerides; total, HDL, and non-HDL cholesterol; and hsCRP differed significantly among groups, with higher levels most common among those on ART. Indices of glucose metabolism did not differ among groups. In general, cholesterol, hsCRP, and indices of glucose metabolism worsened as BMI increased. Conclusions Obesity, dyslipidemia, and inflammation were prominent in HIV-infected adolescent women and, coupled with other risk factors, may accelerate the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease and other adverse events. These results underscore the need for a multifaceted approach to addressing risk reduction in this population. PMID:19947855

  6. Use of Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Only Regimens in HIV-infected Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Michael; Rutstein, Richard; Del Bianco, Gabriela; Heresi, Gloria; Barton, Theresa; Wiznia, Andrew; Wiegand, Ryan; Wheeling, Travis; Bohannon, Beverly; Dominguez, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    In adults, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-only antiretroviral regimens (NOARs) with ≥ three NRTIs are less potent than highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). However published pediatric experience with NOARs is limited. Methods We analyzed data from NOAR-treated participants in LEGACY, a multicenter observational cohort study of HIV-infected children and adolescents. NOAR-treated case-participantswere matched to participantswithout prior NOAR who initiated HAART during the same year for comparison. Results Of 575 participants with data from time of HIV diagnosis through 2006, 67 (12%) received NOARs for at least 24 weeks; most (46%) received the fixed dose combination of zidovudine/lamivudine/abacavir. NOAR use peaked in 2001-2002. NOAR-treated participants were significantly older and more treatment-experienced than HAART-treated participants. Virologic outcomes, including the percentage of participants with a plasma HIV RNA viral load <400 copies/mL at week 24 (47% vs. 34%) and the mean 24-week change in log10 plasma HIV RNA viral load from baseline (−0.63 vs. −1.02) were similar between NOAR- and HAART-treated participants, but virologic rebound was more likely in NOAR-treated participants (77% vs. 54%, P = 0.02). Increase in CD4 percentage points from baseline to 24 weeks was negligible in NOAR-treated participants compared with HAART-treated participants (0.95% vs. 10.1%, P <0.001). Anemia and leukopenia were more commonly reported with NOARs than HAART. Discussion Week 24 virologic outcomes were similar between NOAR- and HAART-treated participants, but NOAR durability was poorer and their use was associated with less immunologic reconstitution. NOARs should play a limited role in pediatric and adolescent ART. PMID:24008749

  7. Pharmacoepidemiology of common colds and upper respiratory tract infections in children and adolescents in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medicines to treat common colds (CC) and upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) are widely used among children, but there are only few data about treatments actually applied for these diseases. In the present study we analyze the prevalence and correlations of self-medicated and prescribed drug use for the treatment of CCs and URTIs among children and adolescents in Germany. Methods Medicine use during the week preceding the interview was recorded among 17,450 children (0–17 years) who participated in the drug interview of the 2003–2006 German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS). The definition of CCs and URTIs in the present study included the WHO-ICD-10 codes J00, J01.0, J01.9, J02.0, J02.9, J03.0, J03.9, J04.0, J06.8, J06.9, J11.1, J11.8, R05 and R07.0. Using the complex sample method, the prevalence and associated socio-demographic factors of self-medication, prescribed medicines and antibiotics were defined. Results 13.8% of the participating girls and boys use drugs to treat a CC or an URTI. About 50% of this group use prescribed medications. Among the users of prescribed medication, 11.5% use antibiotics for the treatment of these diseases. Looking at all prescribed medicines we find associations with younger age, immigration background, and lower social status. Antibiotic use in particular is associated with female sex, higher age, residency in the former East Germany and immigration background. Conclusions The use of medicines to treat CCs or URTIs is widespread among children and adolescents in Germany. Thus, longitudinal studies should investigate the risks associated with this drug use. Differences in socio-demographic variables regarding exposure to antibiotic use indicate that there could be an implausible prescribing behavior among physicians in Germany. PMID:25106446

  8. Localized intestinal perforations as a potential complication of brain hypothermic therapy for perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Naoto; Maiguma, Atsuko; Obinata, Kaoru; Okazaki, Tadaharu; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    Brain hypothermic therapy (BHT) is becoming a frequently used standard of care for perinatal asphyxia. Although cardiovascular side effects, coagulation disorders, renal impairment, electrolyte abnormalities, impaired liver function, opportunistic infections, and skin lesions are well-known adverse effects of BHT in newborns, little information is available on the clinical features of intestinal perforation-related BHT. We herein report a case of therapeutic brain cooling for perinatal asphyxia complicated by localized intestinal perforation. In practice, the neonatologist should be aware that intestinal perforation in an infant with perinatal asphyxia is possible, particularly following BHT. PMID:26445344

  9. Relationship of CD4+ T cell counts and HIV type 1 viral loads in untreated, infected adolescents. Adolescent Medicine HIV/AIDS Research Network.

    PubMed

    Holland, C A; Ellenberg, J H; Wilson, C M; Douglas, S D; Futterman, D C; Kingsley, L A; Moscicki, A B

    2000-07-01

    The REACH Project (Reaching for Excellence in Adolescent Care and Health) of the Adolescent Medicine HIV/AIDS Research Network was designed as a study of an adolescent cohort composed of HIV-1-infected and -uninfected subjects. The goal of the analysis presented was to examine the relationship of CD4+ T cell counts and HIV-1 plasma viral loads in adolescents. The CD4+ T cell counts of 84 HIV+ subjects who were 13 to 19 years of age were measured at the clinical sites, using ACTG standardized techniques. HIV-1 viral loads in frozen plasma were determined by the NASBA/NucliSens assay at a central laboratory. Past and current treatment with antiretroviral drugs was determined by medical record abstraction and interview data. The slope of the line generated by regressing log10 HIV-1 RNA (copies/ml) versus CD4+ T cell counts of REACH subjects who are antiretroviral drug naive was negative and significantly different than zero. A negative association has also been reported for antiretroviral drug-naive, adult males in the Pittsburgh Men's Study, a component of MACS (Pitt-MACS) (Mellors J, et al.: Science 1996;272:1167). These data show that in adolescents, as in adults, HIV-1 RNA concentrations are correlated with corresponding absolute CD4+ T cell count. The slopes of the lines generated with data from each cohort were different (p = 0.003). In addition to age, there are sex and racial differences in the makeup of the two cohorts. Any or all of these differences may affect the slopes of the lines. PMID:10890357

  10. Vaccination against Human Papilloma Virus infection in male adolescents: Knowledge, attitudes, and acceptability among parents in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Aida; Pileggi, Claudia; Iozzo, Francesca; Nobile, Carmelo Giuseppe A; Pavia, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To elicit information about parents’ knowledge, attitudes, and acceptability toward HPV infection and vaccination of male adolescents in Italy; to identify subgroups of this population who exhibit poor knowledge about prevention of HPV infection and reveal negative attitudes toward HPV vaccination in relation to their male sons. Study design: Data were collected via self-administered anonymous questionnaire from 1021 parents of males aged 10 to 14 y who were recruited from a random sample of public secondary schools in the South of Italy. Results: Three-quarters (72.6%) reported that the vaccine is a preventive measure for HPV infection and 55.8% that condom use reduces the risk of HPV infection. A high education level, abundant sources of information about HPV infection received from physicians, and knowledge about HPV infection were factors significantly associated with high level of knowledge about preventive measures for HPV infection. 71% revealed their intentions to vaccinate their sons, and this intention was significantly associated with perceived benefits both for HPV vaccination for girls and for childhood recommended vaccinations as well as a need for additional information about HPV vaccination. 53.7% of the eligible parents reported that their daughters had been vaccinated against HPV. Conclusion: Results of the study suggest that the risk of acquiring HPV infection and HPV-related diseases is sorely underestimated. Knowledge on the benefits of adolescents’ HPV vaccination in cancer prevention in both sexes should be improved to maximize uptake of HPV vaccination. PMID:25483471

  11. An intraoperative irrigation regimen to reduce the surgical site infection rate following adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery.

    PubMed

    Herwijnen, B van; Evans, N R; Dare, C J; Davies, E M

    2016-05-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a gentamicin antibiotic intraoperative irrigation regimen (regimen A) with a povidone-iodine intraoperative irrigation regimen (regimen B) and to evaluate the ability of adjunctive local vancomycin powder (regimen C) to reduce the surgical site infection (SSI) rate following idiopathic scoliosis correction. Methods This was a retrospective, single centre, two-surgeon cohort study of paediatric scoliosis procedures involving 118 patients under the age of 18 years who underwent correction for idiopathic scoliosis over a period of 42 months. Patients' baseline characteristics, pseudarthrosis and rates of SSI were compared. Results Baseline characteristics were comparable in all three groups, with the exception of sex distribution. Over a quarter (27%) of patients with regimen B were male compared with 13% and 6% for regimens A and C respectively. Patients were mostly followed up for a minimum of 12 months. The SSI rate for both superficial and deep infections was higher with regimen A (26.7%) than with regimens B and C (7.0% and 6.3% respectively). The SSI rates for regimens B and C were comparable. No patients developed complications related to vancomycin toxicity, metalwork failure or pseudarthrosis. Conclusions Wound irrigation with a povidone-iodine solution reduces SSIs following adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery. The direct application of vancomycin powder to the wound is safe but does not reduce the SSI rate further in low risk patients. Additional studies are needed to elucidate whether it is effective at higher doses and in high risk patient groups. PMID:27087324

  12. Requesting perinatal autopsy: multicultural considerations.

    PubMed

    Chichester, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    The subject of perinatal autopsy is not frequently seen in the literature. Perinatal loss, particularly stillbirth, frequently remains unexplained, despite current technology and diagnostic procedures. Parents may automatically refuse an autopsy, despite the potentially valuable information it could provide about the current pregnancy and subsequent pregnancies and despite the possible comfort the results could provide for relatives. Other reasons for declining an autopsy could be cultural or religious prohibitions. In addition, healthcare providers sometimes lack the knowledge of circumstances under which a postmortem examination is permitted, and fail to use culturally sensitive and culturally competent discussions about the reasons a postmortem examination is important and permissible. This purpose of this article is to provide information on selected cultural and religious groups to assist the nurse who is seeking consent for a perinatal autopsy. PMID:17356412

  13. Behavioral Health Risks in Perinatally HIV-Exposed Youth: Co-Occurrence of Sexual and Drug Use Behavior, Mental Health Problems, and Nonadherence to Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tassiopoulos, Katherine; Malee, Kathleen; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Patton, Doyle; Smith, Renee; Usitalo, Ann; Allison, Susannah M.; Van Dyke, Russell; Seage, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In a sample of perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) and perinatally HIV-exposed, uninfected (PHEU) adolescents, we examined the co-occurrence of behavioral health risks including mental health problems, onset of sexual and drug use behaviors, and (in PHIV+ youth) nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Participants, recruited from 2007 to 2010, included 349 youth, ages 10–16 years, enrolled in a cohort study examining the impact of HIV infection and ART. Measures of the above behavioral health risks were administered to participants and primary caregivers. Nearly half the participants met study criteria for at least one behavioral health risk, most frequently, mental health problems (28%), with the onset of sexual activity and substance use each reported by an average of 16%. Among the sexually active, 65% of PHIV+ and 50% of PHEU youth reported unprotected sex. For PHIV +youth, 34% reported recent ART nonadherence, of whom 45% had detectable HIV RNA levels. Between 16% (PHIV+) and 11% (PHEU) of youth reported at least two behavioral health risks. Older age, but not HIV status, was associated with having two or more behavioral health risks versus none. Among PHIV+ youth, living with a birth mother (versus other caregivers) and detectable viral load were associated with co-occurrence of behavioral health risks. In conclusion, this study suggests that for both PHIV+ and PHEU youth, there are multiple behavioral health risks, particularly mental health problems, which should be targeted by service systems that can integrate prevention and treatment efforts. PMID:21992620

  14. Awareness and Knowledge of Sexually Transmitted Infections among Secondary School Adolescents in Ado Ekiti, South Western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Amu, E O; Adegun, P T

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the awareness and knowledge of sexually transmitted infections among adolescents in Ado, South Western Nigeria. Methods. The study was a descriptive cross-sectional design. Five hundred and fifty adolescents selected from public and private secondary schools in Ado Local Government Area of Ekiti State were recruited using a multistage sampling technique. Results. Four hundred and ninety-nine (92.4%) respondents had heard about sexually transmitted infections before, the three most important sources of information being electronic media (68.7%); teachers (68.1%); and print media (44.9%). Eighty percent of the respondents knew only one STI and the two most commonly mentioned ones were HIV/AIDS (78.0%) and gonorrhea (23.0%). More than 75% of the respondents knew the modes of transmission of STIs while some of them equally had misconceptions. The most important symptoms mentioned were weight loss (77.4%), painful micturition (68.9%), and genital ulcer (54.1%). On the whole, only 6.9% of the respondents had good knowledge of STIs; the rest had fair and poor knowledge. Conclusion. Secondary school adolescents in Ado Local Government Area have only a fair knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases. STI studies should be inculcated into the school curriculum and media publicity/enlightenment campaigns about them should be intensified. PMID:26345225

  15. Awareness and Knowledge of Sexually Transmitted Infections among Secondary School Adolescents in Ado Ekiti, South Western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Amu, E. O.; Adegun, P. T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the awareness and knowledge of sexually transmitted infections among adolescents in Ado, South Western Nigeria. Methods. The study was a descriptive cross-sectional design. Five hundred and fifty adolescents selected from public and private secondary schools in Ado Local Government Area of Ekiti State were recruited using a multistage sampling technique. Results. Four hundred and ninety-nine (92.4%) respondents had heard about sexually transmitted infections before, the three most important sources of information being electronic media (68.7%); teachers (68.1%); and print media (44.9%). Eighty percent of the respondents knew only one STI and the two most commonly mentioned ones were HIV/AIDS (78.0%) and gonorrhea (23.0%). More than 75% of the respondents knew the modes of transmission of STIs while some of them equally had misconceptions. The most important symptoms mentioned were weight loss (77.4%), painful micturition (68.9%), and genital ulcer (54.1%). On the whole, only 6.9% of the respondents had good knowledge of STIs; the rest had fair and poor knowledge. Conclusion. Secondary school adolescents in Ado Local Government Area have only a fair knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases. STI studies should be inculcated into the school curriculum and media publicity/enlightenment campaigns about them should be intensified. PMID:26345225

  16. PeriStats: Perinatal Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... is developed by the March of Dimes Perinatal Data Center and provides access to maternal and infant health ... on PeriStats sometimes different from my health department's data? What should I do if pop-up blocker ... We acknowledge the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for its support ...

  17. The Relationship between Ethnic Identity and Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Infections among Low Income Detained African American Adolescent Females

    PubMed Central

    Voisin, Dexter R.; Salazar, Laura F.; Crosby, Richard; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between ethnic identity and Chlamydia and Gonorrhea infections among detained African American female adolescents. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 123 African American female adolescents within eight detention facilities in Georgia. Using A-CASI technology, data were collected on demographics, ethnic identity, laboratory confirmed Chlamydia and Gonorrhea, and other known correlates for STIs, such as socioeconomic status, parental monitoring and risky sexual behaviors. Rates of Chlamydia and Gonorrhea testing yielded incidence rates of 25.6% and 5.6% respectfully. Findings indicated that controlling for STI correlates, participants who indicated high ethnic identity were 4.3 times more likely to test positive for an STI compared to those scoring low on the measure of ethnic identity. PMID:23075205

  18. Characteristics of HIV-infected adolescents enrolled in a disclosure intervention trial in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Vreeman, Rachel C; Scanlon, Michael L; Marete, Irene; Mwangi, Ann; Inui, Thomas S; McAteer, Carole I; Nyandiko, Winstone M

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of one's own HIV status is essential for long-term disease management, but there are few data on how disclosure of HIV status to infected children and adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa is associated with clinical and psychosocial health outcomes. We conducted a detailed baseline assessment of the disclosure status, medication adherence, HIV stigma, depression, emotional and behavioral difficulties, and quality of life among a cohort of Kenyan children enrolled in an intervention study to promote disclosure of HIV status. Among 285 caregiver-child dyads enrolled in the study, children's mean age was 12.3 years. Caregivers were more likely to report that the child knew his/her diagnosis (41%) compared to self-reported disclosure by children (31%). Caregivers of disclosed children reported significantly more positive views about disclosure compared to caregivers of non-disclosed children, who expressed fears of disclosure related to the child being too young to understand (75%), potential psychological trauma for the child (64%), and stigma and discrimination if the child told others (56%). Overall, the vast majority of children scored within normal ranges on screenings for behavioral and emotional difficulties, depression, and quality of life, and did not differ by whether or not the child knew his/her HIV status. A number of factors were associated with a child's knowledge of his/her HIV diagnosis in multivariate regression, including older age (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.5-2.1), better WHO disease stage (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.4), and fewer reported caregiver-level adherence barriers (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.4). While a minority of children in this cohort knew their HIV status and caregivers reported significant barriers to disclosure including fears about negative emotional impacts, we found that disclosure was not associated with worse psychosocial outcomes. PMID:26616121

  19. Dietary intake and nutritional status of HIV-1-infected children and adolescents in Florianopolis, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hillesheim, Elaine; Lima, Luiz R A; Silva, Rosane C R; Trindade, Erasmo B S M

    2014-05-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the nutritional status and dietary intake of HIV-infected children and adolescents and the relationship between nutritional status and dietary intake and CD4(+) T-cell count and viral load. The sample was composed of 49 subjects aged 7-17 years and living in Florianópolis, Brazil. Nutritional status was assessed by height-for-age and body mass index-for-age. Dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Spearman correlations and multiple linear regressions were used to determine the relationship between energy, nutrient intake and body mass index-for-age and CD4(+) T-cell count and viral load. The mean body mass index-for-age and height-for-age values were -0.26 ± 0.86 and -0.56 ± 0.92, respectively. The energy intake was 50.8% above the estimated energy requirement and inadequate intake of polyunsaturated fat, cholesterol, fibre, calcium and vitamin C was present in 100%, 57.1%, 40.8%, 61.2% and 26.5% of the sample, respectively. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that energy intake was correlated with CD4+ T-cell count (r = 0.33; p = 0.028) and viral load (r = -0.35; p = 0.019). These data showed low body mass index-for-age and height-for-age z-scores, high energy intake and inadequate intake of important nutrients for immune function, growth and control of chronic diseases. A lower energy intake was correlated with viral suppression and immune preservation. PMID:24352121

  20. Characteristics of HIV-infected adolescents enrolled in a disclosure intervention trial in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Vreeman, Rachel C.; Scanlon, Michael L.; Marete, Irene; Mwangi, Ann; Inui, Thomas S.; McAteer, Carole I.; Nyandiko, Winstone M.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of one’s own HIV status is essential for long-term disease management, but there are few data on how disclosure of HIV status to infected children and adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa is associated with clinical and psychosocial health outcomes. We conducted a detailed baseline assessment of the disclosure status, medication adherence, HIV stigma, depression, emotional and behavioral difficulties, and quality of life among a cohort of Kenyan children enrolled in an intervention study to promote disclosure of HIV status. Among 285 caregiver–child dyads enrolled in the study, children’s mean age was 12.3 years. Caregivers were more likely to report that the child knew his/her diagnosis (41%) compared to self-reported disclosure by children (31%). Caregivers of disclosed children reported significantly more positive views about disclosure compared to caregivers of non-disclosed children, who expressed fears of disclosure related to the child being too young to understand (75%), potential psychological trauma for the child (64%), and stigma and discrimination if the child told others (56%). Overall, the vast majority of children scored within normal ranges on screenings for behavioral and emotional difficulties, depression, and quality of life, and did not differ by whether or not the child knew his/her HIV status. A number of factors were associated with a child’s knowledge of his/her HIV diagnosis in multivariate regression, including older age (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.5–2.1), better WHO disease stage (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4–4.4), and fewer reported caregiver-level adherence barriers (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1–3.4). While a minority of children in this cohort knew their HIV status and caregivers reported significant barriers to disclosure including fears about negative emotional impacts, we found that disclosure was not associated with worse psychosocial outcomes. PMID:26616121

  1. Clinician Adherence to Recommendations for Screening of Adolescents for Sexual Activity and Sexually Transmitted Infection/HIV

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Monika K; Witt, Rachel; Hayes, Katie L; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Gerber, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate clinician adherence to guidelines for documentation of sexual history and screening for sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV during routine adolescent well visits. Secondary objectives were to determine patient and clinician factors associated with sexual history documentation and STI/HIV testing. Study design Retrospective, cross-sectional study of 1000 randomly selected 13–19 year old routine well visits at all 29 pediatric primary care practices affiliated with a children’s hospital. We evaluated frequency of documentation of sexual history and testing for gonorrhea/chlamydia (GC/CT) and HIV testing. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with documentation and testing. Results Of the 1000 patient visits reviewed, 212 (21.2%; 95% CI 18.7, 23.7) had a documented sexual history, of which 45 adolescents’ (21.2%; 95% CI 15.7, 26.8) encounters were documented as being sexually active. Overall, 26 (2.6%; 95% CI 1.6, 3.6) patients were tested for GC/CT and 16 (1.6%; 95% CI 0.8, 2.4) for HIV. In multivariable analyses, factors associated with sexual history documentation included older patient age, non-Hispanic Black race/ethnicity, non-private insurance status, and care by female clinician. Factors associated with GC/CT testing included male gender, non-Hispanic Black race/ethnicity, and non-private insurance. HIV testing was more likely to be performed on older adolescents, those of non-Hispanic Black race/ethnicity, and those with non-private insurance. Conclusions Pediatric primary care clinicians infrequently document sexual histories and perform STI and HIV testing on adolescent patients. Future studies should investigate provider beliefs, clinical decision-making principles, and perceived barriers to improve the sexual health care of adolescents and evaluate interventions to increase rates of adolescent sexual health screening. PMID:24840761

  2. Perinatal neuroprotection update

    PubMed Central

    Jelin, Angie C.; Salmeen, Kirsten; Gano, Dawn; Burd, Irina; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Antepartum, intrapartum, and neonatal events can result in a spectrum of long-term neurological sequelae, including cerebral palsy, cognitive delay, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders [1]. Advances in obstetrical and neonatal care have led to survival at earlier gestational ages and consequently increasing numbers of periviable infants who are at significant risk for long-term neurological deficits. Therefore, efforts to decrease and prevent cerebral insults attempt not only to decrease preterm delivery but also to improve neurological outcomes in infants delivered preterm. We recently published a comprehensive review addressing the impacts of magnesium sulfate, therapeutic hypothermia, delayed cord clamping, infections, and prevention of preterm delivery on the modification of neurological risk [2]. In this review, we will briefly provide updates to the aforementioned topics as well as an expansion on avoidance of toxin and infections, specifically the Zika virus. PMID:27606053

  3. Perinatal neuroprotection update.

    PubMed

    Jelin, Angie C; Salmeen, Kirsten; Gano, Dawn; Burd, Irina; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Antepartum, intrapartum, and neonatal events can result in a spectrum of long-term neurological sequelae, including cerebral palsy, cognitive delay, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders [1]. Advances in obstetrical and neonatal care have led to survival at earlier gestational ages and consequently increasing numbers of periviable infants who are at significant risk for long-term neurological deficits. Therefore, efforts to decrease and prevent cerebral insults attempt not only to decrease preterm delivery but also to improve neurological outcomes in infants delivered preterm. We recently published a comprehensive review addressing the impacts of magnesium sulfate, therapeutic hypothermia, delayed cord clamping, infections, and prevention of preterm delivery on the modification of neurological risk [2]. In this review, we will briefly provide updates to the aforementioned topics as well as an expansion on avoidance of toxin and infections, specifically the Zika virus. PMID:27606053

  4. Perinatal and Early Childhood Environmental Factors Influencing Allergic Asthma Immunopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaffin, Jonathan M.; Kanchongkittiphon, Watcharoot; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of asthma has increased dramatically over the past several decades. While hereditary factors are highly important, the rapid rise outstrips the pace of genomic variation. Great emphasis has been placed on potential modifiable early life exposures leading to childhood asthma. Methods We reviewed the recent medical literature for important studies discussing the role of the perinatal and early childhood exposures and the inception of childhood asthma. Results and Discussion Early life exposure to allergens (House dust mite (HDM), furred pets, cockroach, rodent and mold)air pollution (nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and particulate matter (PM)) and viral respiratory tract infections (Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (hRV)) have been implicated in the development of asthma in high risk children. Conversely, exposure to microbial diversity in the perinatal period may diminish the development of atopy and asthma symptoms. PMID:24952205

  5. TORCH infections.

    PubMed

    Neu, Natalie; Duchon, Jennifer; Zachariah, Philip

    2015-03-01

    TORCH infections classically comprise toxoplasmosis, Treponema pallidum, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpesvirus, hepatitis viruses, human immunodeficiency virus, and other infections, such as varicella, parvovirus B19, and enteroviruses. The epidemiology of these infections varies; in low-income and middle-income countries, TORCH infections are major contributors to prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal morbidity and mortality. Evidence of infection may be seen at birth, in infancy, or years later. For many of these pathogens, treatment or prevention strategies are available. Early recognition, including prenatal screening, is key. This article covers toxoplasmosis, parvovirus B19, syphilis, rubella, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:25677998

  6. Spiritual well-being among HIV-infected adolescents and their families.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Maureen E; Garvie, Patricia; He, Jianping; Malow, Robert; McCarter, Robert; D'Angelo, Lawrence J

    2014-06-01

    Congruence in spirituality between HIV+ adolescent (n = 40)/family (n = 40) dyads and psychological adjustment and quality of life were assessed, using the Spiritual Well-Being Scale of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy, Beck Depression Inventory-II, Beck Anxiety Inventory and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory at baseline and 3-month post-intervention. Adolescents were 60 % female and 92 % African American. Congruence in spirituality between adolescent/surrogate dyads remained unchanged at 3 months. High congruence existed for "having a reason for living"; rejection of "life lacks meaning/purpose" and "HIV is a punishment from God." Adolescents were less likely to forgive the harm others caused them than their families. PMID:23104266

  7. Adaptation of an HIV Medication Adherence Intervention for Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Idia B.; Bogart, Laura M.; Wachman, Madeline; Closson, Elizabeth F.; Skeer, Margie R.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Rising rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among adolescents and young adults underscore the importance of interventions for this population. While the morbidity and mortality of HIV has greatly decreased over the years, maintaining high rates of adherence is necessary to receive optimal medication effects. Few studies have developed interventions for adolescents and young adults and none have specifically been developed for sexual minority (lesbian, gay, and bisexual; LGB) youth. Guided by an evidence-based adult intervention and adolescent qualitative interviews, we developed a multicomponent, technology-enhanced, customizable adherence intervention for adolescents and young adults for use in a clinical setting. The two cases presented in this paper illustrate the use of the five-session positive strategies to enhance problem solving (Positive STEPS) intervention, based on cognitive-behavioral techniques and motivational interviewing. We present a perinatally infected heterosexual woman and a behaviorally infected gay man to demonstrate the unique challenges faced by these youth and showcase how the intervention can be customized. Future directions include varying the number of intervention sessions based on mode of HIV infection and incorporating booster sessions. PMID:25452680

  8. “Knowledge and attitudes of Spanish adolescent girls towards human papillomavirus infection: where to intervene to improve vaccination coverage”

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HPV vaccine coverage is far from ideal in Valencia, Spain, and this could be partially related to the low knowledge about the disease and the vaccine, therefore we assessed these, as well as the attitude towards vaccination in adolescent girls, and tried to identify independently associated factors that could potentially be modified by an intervention in order to increase vaccine coverage. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in a random selection of schools of the Spanish region of Valencia. We asked mothers of 1278 girls, who should have been vaccinated in the 2011 campaign, for informed consent. Those that accepted their daughters’ participation, a questionnaire regarding the Knowledge of HPV infection and vaccine was passed to the girls in the school. Results 833 mothers (65.1%) accepted participation. All their daughters’ responded the questionnaire. Of those, 89.9% had heard about HPV and they associated it to cervical cancer. Only 14% related it to other problems like genital warts. The knowledge score of the girls who had heard about HPV was 6.1/10. Knowledge was unrelated to the number of contacts with the health system (Pediatrician or nurse), and positively correlated with the discussions with classmates about the vaccine. Adolescents Spanish in origin or with an older sister vaccinated, had higher punctuation. 67% of the girls thought that the vaccine prevented cancer, and 22.6% felt that although prevented cancer the vaccine had important safety problems. 6.4% of the girls rejected the vaccine for safety problems or for not considering themselves at risk of infection. 71.5% of the girls had received at least one vaccine dose. Vaccinated girls scored higher knowledge (p = 0.05). Conclusion Knowledge about HPV infection and vaccine was fair in adolescents of Valencia, and is independent to the number of contacts with the health system, it is however correlated to the conversations about the vaccine with their peers and the

  9. Absence of occult hepatitis B virus infection in sera of diabetic children and adolescents following hepatitis B vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Elrashidy, Heba; El-Didamony, Gamal; Elbahrawy, Ashraf; Hashim, Alaa; Alashker, Ahmed; Morsy, Mohamed Hanafy; Elwassief, Ahmed; Elmestikawy, Amr; Abdallah, Abdallah Mahmoud; Mohammad, Abdel-Gawad Saeid; Mostafa, Mohamed; George, Nilly M; Abdelhafeez, Hafez

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of occult hepatitis B (HB) infection (OBI) in HB-vaccinated diabetic children has not yet been tested. Here, we aimed to determine the prevalence of OBI among HB-vaccinated children and adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Results Eighty-seven (51.2%) children had a titer for antibodies to HB surface antigen (anti-HBs) of <10 IU/L. These included 44 (70%) IDDM children and 43 (40.2%) healthy children. Eighty-three (48.8%) children had an anti-HBs titer of ≥10 IU/L; they included 19 (30%) with IDDM and 64 (59.8%) healthy children. None of the enrolled children (n = 170) were reactive for total antibody to HB core antigen (anti-HBc) as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HB virus DNA was not detected in HB-vaccinated IDDM or healthy children and adolescents. Method An amount of 170 HBsAg-negative sera samples from HB-vaccinated children and adolescents was included. They were classified into the IDDM group (n = 63) and the healthy control group (n = 107). HBsAg, anti-HBc, and anti-HBs were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and HB virus DNA was tested by nested polymerase chain reaction using 3 pairs of surface, core, and X genes. In Conclusion Primary HB vaccination confers long-term protection against OBI in Egyptian diabetic children and adolescents. However, the number of cases tested in this study was relatively low, and further studies and long-term follow-up of large populations are needed to draw solid and convincing conclusions. PMID:25424940

  10. HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AND PSYCHOSOCIAL CORRELATES AMONG HIV-INFECTED ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT WOMEN IN THE US

    PubMed Central

    Andrinopoulos, Katherine; Clum, Gretchen; Murphy, Debra A.; Harper, Gary; Perez, Lori; Xu, Jiahong; Cunningham, Shayna; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study HIV health-related quality of life (HIV-HRQOL) is examined among 179 behaviorally infected adolescent and young adult women. Modifiable psychosocial variables including depression, stigma, social support, and illness acceptance, and the biological end-points of CD4 cell count and viral load were explored in relation to HIV-HRQOL. The three factors of the HIV-HRQOL measure include current life satisfaction, illness related anxiety and illness burden. Bivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated statistically significant associations for all psychosocial variables and HIV-HRQOL factors (p < .01), but not for biological end-points. In multivariate linear regression analysis significant associations remained between: depression (p = .006), illness acceptance (p < .001), social support (p = .001), and current life satisfaction, and depression (p = .012), illness acceptance (p = .015), and illness burden. A trend in association was noted for HIV stigma, with current life satisfaction and illness related anxiety but did not reach statistical significance (p = .097 and p = .109 respectively). Interventions that effectively decrease stigma and depression and increase social support and illness acceptance will likely improve the well-being and quality of life of HIV-infected adolescent women. PMID:21966746

  11. Quo vadis: perinatal AIDS issues--2004.

    PubMed

    Weiss, S H; Louria, D B

    1994-03-01

    acquisition of active SIV infection, suggesting that any such protection was only partial. It is also possible that cellular immune protection may be of varying efficacy against different types of exposure, particularly parenteral versus mucosal (such as sexual) exposures. There is also reason for specific optimism concerning interventions that might directly reduce the risk of perinatal transmission. Data from studies of twins suggest that a substantial proportion of perinatal transmission does not occur until after labor has commenced. Thus, caesarian sections may potentially reduce the risk of transmission to the fetus in some cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8013184

  12. Ischemic perinatal stroke: challenge and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Raju, Tonse N K

    2008-08-01

    The second highest risk group for developing a cerebral stroke is the perinatal period, generally defined as 20 weeks of gestation through 28th postnatal day of age. In this commentary, a brief overview of ischemic perinatal strokes is presented. Ischemic perinatal stroke (IPS) occurs at a rate of 1 : 2300 to 1 : 5000 births, accounting for 30% of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Thus, IPS is the most common known cause for CP [1-3]. Although they occur frequently, much remains to be studied about perinatal strokes in general and the ischemic variety in particular. PMID:18705894

  13. Allocation of health care resources in the neonatal and perinatal area -CPS Symposium 1996.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D; Lee, S; Serediak, M; Finn, J; Saigal, S; Walker, C

    1999-01-01

    There have been publically expressed concerns about the costs and allocation of neonatal and perinatal health care resources in Canada and elsewhere for the past 15 years. This paper reports information from a symposium held during the 1996 Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS) annual meeting sponsored by the CPS Section on Perinatal Medicine. Experts in perinatal epidemiology, health care economics, public policy and finance, and consumer perspectives on the outcomes of neonatal and perinatal intensive care explored the following questions: How should the need for health care resources in the neonatal and perinatal area be objectively determined? When there are competing needs between the maternal-newborn area and other areas, how should these be rationalized? What evidence should be used (or should be available) to support the present use of resources? What evidence should be available (or is needed) to change or introduce new uses of resources? The conclusions indicated that there are no generally accepted methods to determine the allocation of health care resources but that considerations need to include population characteristics, desired outcomes, achievable results, values, ethics, legalities, cost-benefit analyses and political objectives. Information from families and adolescents who required the use of high technology and/or high cost programs will contribute individual, family and societal values that complement cost-efficacy analyses. PMID:20212990

  14. Psychosocial Implications of HIV Serostatus Disclosure to Youth with Perinatally Acquired HIV

    PubMed Central

    Dolezal, Curtis; Marhefka, Stephanie L.; Hoffman, Susie; Ahmed, Yasmeen; Elkington, Katherine; Mellins, Claude A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recommendations suggest that older children and adolescents perinatally infected with HIV (PHIV+) be informed of their HIV diagnosis; however, delayed disclosure is commonly reported. This study examined the prevalence and timing of HIV disclosure to PHIV+ adolescents and the associations between the timing of disclosure and psychological functioning and other behavioral outcomes. Recruitment took place at four medical centers in New York City between December 2003 and December 2008. This sample included data from 196 PHIV+ youth and their caregivers: 50% of youth were male, 58% African American, 42% Hispanic, with a mean age of 12.71 years. According to caregiver reports, 70% of the PHIV+ youth knew their HIV diagnosis. Youths who had been told were more likely to be older; youths with a Spanish-speaking Latino caregiver and whose caregivers had a grade school education were told at an older age. Youths who had been told their HIV status were significantly less anxious than those who had not been told; there were no other differences in psychological functioning. Youths who knew their status for longer reported higher intentions to self-disclose to potential sex partners. In multivariate analyses only demographic differences associated with timing of disclosure remained. In summary, PHIV+ youth who had been told their HIV status did not show an increase of psychological problems and were more likely to have intentions to self-disclose to sexual partners. Yet, almost one third was entering puberty without important information regarding their illness. Caregivers need support to address factors impeding HIV disclosure. PMID:21323530

  15. Update on Adolescent Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Rebecca; Halady, Tasia; Bishop, Nina; Chatterjee, Archana

    2016-02-01

    Timely and complete adolescent vaccination remains an elusive public health goal. Three infections for which routine adolescent vaccination is recommended in the U.S. are pertussis, meningococcal disease and human papillomavirus (HPV). These infections and the Tdap, meningococcal and HPV vaccines recommended for adolescents are reviewed in this article. PMID:26999915

  16. Community-Based HIV and Health Testing for High-Risk Adolescents and Youth.

    PubMed

    Reif, Lindsey K; Rivera, Vanessa; Louis, Bianca; Bertrand, Rachel; Peck, Mireille; Anglade, Benedict; Seo, Grace; Abrams, Elaine J; Pape, Jean W; Fitzgerald, Daniel W; McNairy, Margaret L

    2016-08-01

    Adolescents account for 40% of new HIV infections, and HIV testing strategies to increase uptake of testing are needed. A community-based adolescent and youth HIV and health testing campaign was conducted in seven slum neighborhoods of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, from December 2014 to September 2015. Community health workers provided community sensitization and recruited 10- to 24-year-olds to test for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea/chlamydia, and to screen for tuberculosis (TB) and pregnancy. HIV-infected individuals were escorted to the GHESKIO HIV clinic for same-day enrollment in care. Among 3425 individuals eligible for testing, 3348 (98%) accepted an HIV test. HIV prevalence was 2.65% (n = 89). Median age was 19 [interquartile range (IQR) 17-20]; 73% were female. HIV prevalence was 0.6-7.4% across slum neighborhoods. All HIV-infected individuals enrolled in care the same day as testing; median CD4 was 529 cells/μL [IQR 363-761]. Syphilis prevalence was 2.60% (65/2536) and gonorrhea/chlamydia prevalence was 6.25% (96/1536). Among 168 (5%) individuals who reported TB symptoms, 7.7% (13/168) had microbiologically confirmed disease. One hundred twenty-nine females (5% of all females) were pregnant. This community-based testing campaign identified an adolescent and youth population with an HIV prevalence six times higher than the estimated national adolescent HIV prevalence (0.4%) in Haiti, including perinatally infected adolescents. This type of community-based campaign for HIV testing within a package of services can serve as a model for other resource-poor settings to identify high-risk adolescents and youth, and curb the global HIV epidemic among adolescents. PMID:27509237

  17. Immunological control of chronic HIV-1 infection: HLA-mediated immune function and viral evolution in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Anju; Yue, Ling; Conway, Joan; Yusim, Karina; Tang, Jianming; Kappes, John; Kaslow, Richard A.; Wilson, Craig M.; Goepfert, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Differential protein targeting by HIV-specific CD8 T cells is associated with disparate plasma viral loads; however, it is unclear if the quality of these responses differs depending upon the specificity of the targeted epitopes. Methods We examined HIV-specific CD8 T-cell responses in HIV-infected adolescents carrying either an HLA class I allele associated with a favorable prognosis (HLA-B*57) or an allele associated with usual disease progression (HLA-B*35 or HLA-B*53) using interferon-γ ELISpot and ICS assays. Results In an interferon-γ ELISpot assay, p24 was the dominant protein targeted by B*57 carriers while responses to Nef dominated in B*35 or B*53 positive carriers. This differential protein targeting did not change during 4 years of follow-up. In these chronically infected adolescents, there were no significant differences in the quality of the immunodominant T-cell responses between the B*57 and B*35/B*53 carriers as measured by peptide avidity, degranulation, and immune memory markers. There was a trend towards higher expression of interleukin-2 from B*57-KF11 restricted CD8 T cells although this difference was not significant. Nevertheless both B*57 and B*35/53-restricted responses were relatively potent as reflected by the propensity of CD8 T cells to escape in p24 and Nef, respectively. Conclusions Differential protein targeting rather than the quality of T-cell responses appears to be a major distinguishing feature of HIV-specific CD8 T cells induced in B*57 carriers. These data suggest that viral fitness costs associated with CD8 T-cell pressure is an important factor determining differences in the viral load among HIV-infected patients. PMID:18025875

  18. Human polyomaviruses JC and BK in the urine of Brazilian children and adolescents vertically infected by HIV.

    PubMed

    Machado, Daisy Maria; Fink, Maria Cristina; Pannuti, Cláudio Sérgio; Succi, Regina Célia de Menezes; Machado, Alessandra Aparecida; Carmo, Fabiana Bononi do; Gouvêa, Aída de Fátima Barbosa; Urbano, Paulo Roberto; Beltrão, Suenia Vasconcelos; Santos, Isabel Cristina Lopes dos; Machado, Clarisse Martins

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the urinary excretion of the BK (BKV) and JC (JCV) human polyomaviruses in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and adolescents. One hundred and fifty-six patients were enrolled: Group I included 116 HIV-infected children and adolescents [median age = 11.4 years (y); range 1-22 y]; Group II included 40 non-HIV-infected healthy controls (median age = 11.37 y; range 7-16 y). Single urine samples from both groups were screened for the presence of JCV and BKV DNA by polymerase chain reaction at enrolment. The overall rate of JCV and BKV urinary excretion was found to be 24.4% and 40.4%, respectively (n = 156). Group I had urinary excretion of JCV and BKV in 27.6% and 54.3% of subjects, respectively. In contrast, Group II showed positive results for JCV in 17.5% of subjects and for BKV in 12.5% of subjects (p Pearson JCV = 0.20; p Pearson BKV < 0.0001). In Group I, there was no association between JCV/BKV shedding and age, gender or CD4 values. Patients with an HIV viral load < 50 copies/mL had a lower excretion of BKV (p < 0.001) and a trend of lower JCV excretion (p = 0.07). One patient in Group I (1/116, 0.9%) showed clinical and radiological features consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, suggesting that children with HIV/polyomavirus coinfection should be kept under surveillance. PMID:22241113

  19. Guidelines for Perinatal Care. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coll. of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.

    The basic concept emphasized in this book is that a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach within a regionalized system of perinatal care is a constant factor improving the quality of pregancy outcomes. This coordinated multidisciplinary approach has had an impact on perinatal care in three important areas: (1) improved and expanded understanding…

  20. Maternal nutrition and perinatal survival.

    PubMed

    Rush, D

    2001-09-01

    This review addresses the relationship between maternal nutrition and the survival of the foetus and infant. This survey was undertaken because wide-scale programmes on maternal feeding are in process, based, not on a critical synthesis of currently-available empirical research, but on a series of nested and, at times, weakly supported, assumptions. It is concluded that: (i) maternal weight and weight gain are remarkably resistant to either dietary advice or supplementation; (ii) nutritionally-induced increased birth-weight does not universally increase the chance of survival of the offspring, since pre-pregnancy weight, at least in affluent, industrialized societies-while associated with increased birth-weight-is also associated with higher perinatal mortality; (iii) while dietary supplements during pregnancy do have a modest effect on birth-weight, in contrast to a large effect in famine or near-famine conditions, this is not mediated by maternal energy deposition; and (iv) declining peripheral fat stores in late pregnancy are associated with accelerated foetal growth, and improved nutrition can lead to lower fat stores. Rather, the component of maternal weight gain associated with accelerated foetal growth is water, and, presumably, plasma volume. In the few studies, large and thorough enough to adequately address the issues, maternal feeding--both in famine and non-famine conditions--has led to lower perinatal, primarily foetal, mortality; the mechanisms are not likely to have been due only to the acceleration of foetal growth. It is concluded that there is currently an inadequate base of secure knowledge to foster improvement in the health and nutrition of poor mothers and children. The public and policy-makers alike must be informed that greater knowledge relating maternal nutrition to perinatal outcome is urgently needed to create sound health advice and to mount effective programmes. PMID:11761778

  1. Perinatal Safety: From Concept to Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Holly Powell

    2010-01-01

    Communication and teamwork problems are leading causes of documented preventable adverse outcomes in perinatal care. An essential component of perinatal safety is the organizational culture in which clinicians work. Clinicians’ individual and collective authority to question the plan of care and take action to change the direction of a clinical situation in the patient’s best interest can be viewed as their “agency for safety.” However, collective agency for safety and commitment to support nurses in their advocacy role is missing in many perinatal care settings. This paper draws from Organizational Accident Theory, High Reliability Theory, and Symbolic Interactionism to describe the nurse’s role in maintaining safety during labor and birth in acute care settings, and suggests actions for supporting the perinatal nurse at individual, group, and systems levels to achieve maximum safety in perinatal care. PMID:20147827

  2. Perinatal Depression: An Update and Overview

    PubMed Central

    Stuart-Parrigon, Kaela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 3 years there have been notable developments in screening and treatment of perinatal depression. Most importantly, the DSM-V has made only minor changes in the diagnostic criteria for perinatal depression as compared to the DSM-IV; “perinatal”, as opposed to “postpartum”, is a specifier for depression with a requirement that the depression onset occurs during pregnancy or the first 4 weeks postpartum. Advances in the treatment of perinatal depression have been made over the last 3 years, including both prevention and acute interventions. Additional support has emerged confirming the primary risk factors for perinatal depression: a personal or family history, low SES, and poor interpersonal support. There is general agreement that universal screening be conducted for all perinatal women, both by the woman’s obstetrician and the baby’s pediatrician. PMID:25034859

  3. Partners in Prevention: Whole School Approaches to Prevent Adolescent Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Marcia A., Ed.; Wooley, Susan F., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This resource describes how pregnancy prevention efforts can be integrated into the various components of a school health program (the linkages between classroom instruction to prevent adolescent pregnancy and the school's health and mental health services, the necessary administrative policies, the type and extent of faculty and staff…

  4. Adolescent pregnancy and loss.

    PubMed

    Bright, P D

    1987-01-01

    Adolescents have a perinatal and infant mortality rate two times as high as that found in the adult population, and yet few have investigated the characteristics of adolescent grief over pregnancy loss. The mourning response of adolescents appears to differ from that of older females: adult signs of depression are either nonexistent or fleeting. Adolescents who are having difficulties moving away from dependence on their mothers may become pregnant in order to demonstrate a semblance of adulthood and also to circumvent the depression common to this phase of development. When reproductive loss occurs, two outcomes often are seen: mother-daughter conflict concerning independence accelerates, which, in turn, provides the impetus for re-impregnation soon afterward. Since pregnancy interferes with mourning, the adolescent may not be able to bond with subsequent children, thus continuing the mother-child conflict into another generation. PMID:3649521

  5. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Varicella Zoster Infection in Iranian Adolescents: A Multilevel Analysis; The CASPIAN-III Study

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, Shervin Ghaffari; Kelishadi, Roya; Kasaeian, Amir; Ataei, Behrooz; Yaran, Majid; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Heshmat, Ramin; Ardalan, Gelayol; Safari, Omid

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the varicella zoster virus (VZV) immunity in Iranian adolescents. It was conducted as a primary study for vaccine implementation, and to investigate the association of climatic and socioeconomic factors with the epidemiology of this infection. In this cross- sectional study, anti VZV antibodies were measured in serum samples obtained in a national school-based health survey (CASPIAN- III). Association of demographic, socio-economic, and climate of the living region with the frequency of VZV was investigated by multivariate multilevel analysis. Overall, sera of 2753 individuals aged 10–18 were tested for VZV antibodies, from those 87.4% were positive. The prevalence was statistically different in four socio-geographic regions (P<0.001), varying between 85.24% in West region (mostly mountainous areas with cold climate) to 94.59% in Southeast region (subtropical climate). Among variables studied, only age and mean daily temperature of the living area were positively associated with the VZV seroprevalence. Our findings show that most Iranians develop immunity to VZV before the age of 10, but a substantial proportion of them are yet susceptible to the infection. Therefore, it seems that the best strategy to reduce the burden of the disease is to vaccinate high- risk adults, i.e. those without a history of varicella infection. The regional temperature might be the only determinant of VZV epidemiology in Iran. PMID:27355931

  6. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Varicella Zoster Infection in Iranian Adolescents: A Multilevel Analysis; The CASPIAN-III Study.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, Shervin Ghaffari; Kelishadi, Roya; Kasaeian, Amir; Ataei, Behrooz; Yaran, Majid; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Heshmat, Ramin; Ardalan, Gelayol; Safari, Omid; Qorbani, Mostafa; Mostafavi, Seyed Naseredin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the varicella zoster virus (VZV) immunity in Iranian adolescents. It was conducted as a primary study for vaccine implementation, and to investigate the association of climatic and socioeconomic factors with the epidemiology of this infection. In this cross- sectional study, anti VZV antibodies were measured in serum samples obtained in a national school-based health survey (CASPIAN- III). Association of demographic, socio-economic, and climate of the living region with the frequency of VZV was investigated by multivariate multilevel analysis. Overall, sera of 2753 individuals aged 10-18 were tested for VZV antibodies, from those 87.4% were positive. The prevalence was statistically different in four socio-geographic regions (P<0.001), varying between 85.24% in West region (mostly mountainous areas with cold climate) to 94.59% in Southeast region (subtropical climate). Among variables studied, only age and mean daily temperature of the living area were positively associated with the VZV seroprevalence. Our findings show that most Iranians develop immunity to VZV before the age of 10, but a substantial proportion of them are yet susceptible to the infection. Therefore, it seems that the best strategy to reduce the burden of the disease is to vaccinate high- risk adults, i.e. those without a history of varicella infection. The regional temperature might be the only determinant of VZV epidemiology in Iran. PMID:27355931

  7. Abandonment of Treatment for Latent Tuberculosis Infection and Socioeconomic Factors in Children and Adolescents: Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Angela Marcia Cabral; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Land, Marcelo Gerardin Poirot; Sant’Anna, Clemax Couto

    2016-01-01

    Background Routine data on the use of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) in children and adolescents are scarce in high tuberculosis (TB) burden countries. Objective To describe the factors related to abandonment of IPT in children and adolescents with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) receiving routine care. Methods Retrospective (2005–2009) descriptive study of 286 LTBI cases with indication of IPT and serviced at a pediatric hospital in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Survival analysis of the risk of abandonment of IPT over six months was performed, including multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Out of the 245 cases of LTBI included, 62 abandoned IPT (25.3%; 95% CI: 20%-31%). On multivariate analysis, the variables related to the IPT abandonment hazard ratio were the Human Development Index (HDI) (hazard ratio—HR: 0.004; 0.000–0.569) of the place of residence and the contact with adults that were not undergoing anti-TB treatment (HR: 7.30; 1.00–53.3). Conclusion This study reveals the relevance of the relation of abandonment of IPT to the socioeconomic conditions at the place of residence and poor adherence to the active TB treatment. Educational measures to stimulate preventive treatment of child contacts and curative treatment of index cases should target the full familial setting. PMID:27149514

  8. [Domestic violence and the adolescent that was infected with HIV through vertical transmission: analysis of protection and vulnerability factors].

    PubMed

    de Barros, Ana Cláudia Mamede Wiering; Bastos, Olga Maria; Pone, Marcos Vinicius da Silva; Deslandes, Suely Ferreira

    2013-05-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze protection and vulnerability factors in physical and psychological domestic violence among adolescents infected with HIV/AIDS through vertical transmission. This group is especially susceptible as they have vulnerability factors such as chronic disease, orphanhood with consequent change of caregivers and impaired body image. The research was conducted in a public hospital. The first stage used the Parent Child Conflict Tactics and the Degree of Psychological Violence Scale to determine what domestic violence occurred. In the second qualitative stage, the adolescents who scored the most or the least for violence in the quantitative instrument were interviewed. The questionnaires and the interviews revealed a high prevalence of physical and psychological violence and abusive domestic dynamics, thereby corroborating the extant literature. In view of the consequences of this kind of violence, it is essential that the health professional should be able to identify violent situations and recognize vulnerability factors and to promote protection factors against ill-treatment. PMID:23670478

  9. [Adherence to an oral health program for HIV infected children and adolescents and the attitudes of their caretakers].

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernanda Campos; de Souza, Ivete Pomarico Ribeiro; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel; Castro, Glória Fernanda

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the adherence to an Oral Health Program (OHP) for HIV infected children and adolescents, as well as the attitudes of their caretakers regarding oral care. A total of 58 caretakers that accompany the children in medical appointments at an AIDS ambulatory were interviewed for collecting personal data and data regarding adherence to the OHP or other odontological treatment and attitudes related to oral care. Approximately 70% of the caretakers stated that their children participated in the OHAP, however 20% of them did not return to the recall appointments; such visits were even less frequent when the caretakers were not the parents themselves (p= 0.036). The adherence of this population to dental treatment outside the OHP was small, 48% of the caretakers stated that the child did not conclude the treatment when referred to another place for treatment. The attitude of the caretakers regarding dental care of HIV+ children was not considered satisfactory. Furthermore, it is very important to have pediatric dentists in the multi-professional teams that attend HIV+ children and adolescents and to promote this program among the parents and all medical teams involved with such patients. PMID:18833362

  10. Infections Caused by Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria spp in Children and Adolescents With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apiwattankul, Nopporn; Flynn, Patricia M.; Hayden, Randall T.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) infections in pediatric oncology patients have not been completely characterized. Methods We reviewed medical records of oncology patients at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (St. Jude) from 1990 to 2010 with RGM infections and summarized the results of previously published cases. Results Twenty-five St. Jude patients had 27 episodes of infection. Approximately half of the cases occurred in patients with hematological malignancies and in males; infections were more common in white patients. Most patients were not neutropenic or lymphopenic. The most common causative species were Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium abscessus, and Mycobacterium fortuitum. Most isolates were susceptible to amikacin and clarithromycin; all were susceptible to at least 1 of these. Treatment regimens varied considerably, particularly with respect to the duration of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Two St. Jude patients died; both had pulmonary infections. The literature search identified an additional 58 cases of infection. Localized catheter-associated infections were more common than bloodstream infections in the current series than in previous reports, and outbreaks were not recognized. Otherwise, the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were similar. Conclusions Localized catheter-associated infections were most common in this largest reported single center experience reported to date. Pulmonary infection is uncommon in children but, as in adults, has a high mortality rate. Relatively short-term antimicrobial treatment and surgical debridement of infected tissue, if present, may be as effective for catheter-associated infections as prolonged antimicrobial use and may reduce adverse drug effects in these patients, who are vulnerable to drug-drug interactions and toxicity. PMID:26407409

  11. Maternal diabetes and perinatal programming.

    PubMed

    Plagemann, A

    2011-11-01

    Alterations of the intrauterine and neonatal environment may predispose for disorders and diseases throughout later life (perinatal programming). Especially, hormones and nutrients are dose-dependent organizers of the developing organism. Studies in offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM) have paradigmatically contributed to the perception of this developmental principle and our understanding of causal mechanisms. Fetal and neonatal hyperinsulinism in consequence of materno-fetal hyperglycaemia is the pathognomic feature in ODM. Epidemiological, clinical, as well as experimental data indicate that both insulin and glucose, when occurring in elevated concentrations during perinatal life, may epigenetically program a predisposition for obesity and diabetes later on. Similar may occur due to pre- and neonatal overfeeding. From a clinical point of view, avoidance of materno-fetal overnutrition, universal diabetes screening in all pregnant women and adequate therapy of all forms of diabetes during pregnancy, as well as avoidance of neonatal overfeeding are therefore recommended. These measures might serve as causal approaches of a genuine prevention to the benefit of long-term offspring health. PMID:21945359

  12. Perinatal Mortality in the United States, 1950-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell-Griner, Eve

    1986-01-01

    This report describes long-term trends in perinatal mortality in the United States in three basic parts: development of perinatal mortality measures, components of fetal and infant mortality, and trends and differentials in perinatal mortality. Perinatal deaths refer to the sum of spontaneous fetal deaths occurring after 20 weeks gestation plus…

  13. Non-Response to Antibiotic Treatment in Adolescents for Four Common Infections in UK Primary Care 1991-2012: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Berni, Ellen; Scott, Laura A; Jenkins-Jones, Sara; De Voogd, Hanka; Rocha, Monica S; Butler, Chris C; Morgan, Christopher Ll; Currie, Craig J

    2016-01-01

    We studied non-response rates to antibiotics in the under-reported subgroup of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years old, using standardised criteria representing antibiotic treatment failure. Routine, primary care data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) were used. Annual, non-response rates by antibiotics and by indication were determined. We identified 824,651 monotherapies in 415,468 adolescents: 368,900 (45%) episodes for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), 89,558 (11%) for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs), 286,969 (35%) for skin/soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and 79,224 (10%) for acute otitis media (AOM). The most frequently prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (27%), penicillin-V (24%), erythromycin (11%), flucloxacillin (11%) and oxytetracycline (6%). In 1991, the overall non-response rate was 9.3%: 11.9% for LRTIs, 9.5% for URTIs, 7.1% for SSTIs, 9.7% for AOM. In 2012, the overall non-response rate was 9.2%. Highest non-response rates were for AOM in 1991-1999 and for LRTIs in 2000-2012. Physicians generally prescribed antibiotics to adolescents according to recommendations. Evidence of antibiotic non-response was less common among adolescents during this 22-year study period compared with an all-age population, where the overall non-response rate was 12%. PMID:27384588

  14. VITAMINS C AND E IN ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH HIV INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Oxidative stress during HIV infection may impair immune function, cause rapid disease progression, and increase requirements for dietary antioxidants such as vitamins C and E. Objective: The study had 2 principal objectives. The first was to ascertain whether HIV infection and immune act...

  15. The Effects of Perinatal Morbidity and Environmental Factors on Health Status of Preterm Children at Age 12

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robin June; Sullivan, Mary C.; Hawes, Katheleen; Marks, Amy Kerivan

    2009-01-01

    Children born prematurely have later morbidity, yet little is known about their health in adolescence. This study examined multiple dimensions of health at age 12 and the predictors of biological, behavioral, social, and physical environmental factors. ANOVA and logistic regression models were tested. Perinatal morbidity predicted health at age 12. Preterm status increases the risk of later alterations in health. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing enterocolitis, intraventricular hemorrhage, small-for-gestational age, parental perception of child health, and parental psychological distress affect later health. Prematurity and perinatal morbidity continue to impact child health 12 years after birth. PMID:19268232

  16. Perinatal Complications and Aging Indicators by Midlife

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Avshalom; Ambler, Antony; Belsky, Daniel W.; Chapple, Simon; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Israel, Salomon; Poulton, Richie; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Rivera, Christine D.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Wolke, Dieter; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal complications predict increased risk for morbidity and early mortality. Evidence of perinatal programming of adult mortality raises the question of what mechanisms embed this long-term effect. We tested a hypothesis related to the theory of developmental origins of health and disease: that perinatal complications assessed at birth predict indicators of accelerated aging by midlife. METHODS: Perinatal complications, including both maternal and neonatal complications, were assessed in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort (N = 1037), a 38-year, prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort. Two aging indicators were assessed at age 38 years, objectively by leukocyte telomere length (TL) and subjectively by perceived facial age. RESULTS: Perinatal complications predicted both leukocyte TL (β = −0.101; 95% confidence interval, −0.169 to −0.033; P = .004) and perceived age (β = 0.097; 95% confidence interval, 0.029 to 0.165; P = .005) by midlife. We repeated analyses with controls for measures of family history and social risk that could predispose to perinatal complications and accelerated aging, and for measures of poor health taken in between birth and the age-38 follow-up. These covariates attenuated, but did not fully explain the associations observed between perinatal complications and aging indicators. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide support for early-life developmental programming by linking newborns’ perinatal complications to accelerated aging at midlife. We observed indications of accelerated aging “inside,” as measured by leukocyte TL, an indicator of cellular aging, and “outside,” as measured by perceived age, an indicator of declining tissue integrity. A better understanding of mechanisms underlying perinatal programming of adult aging is needed. PMID:25349321

  17. Coping strategies of adolescents living with HIV: disease-specific stressors and responses.

    PubMed

    Orban, Lisa A; Stein, Renee; Koenig, Linda J; Conner, Latoya C; Rexhouse, Erika L; Lewis, Jennifer V; LaGrange, Ricardo

    2010-04-01

    This study examined disease-specific stressors and coping responses employed by youth with HIV. Data were analyzed from Adolescent Impact, a multi-site study of 166 adolescents infected with HIV in three major US cities. Participants identified HIV-related stressors during a face-to-face interview. Coping strategies were measured using the adolescent version of the Kidcope. Emotional and behavioral functioning were assessed with the Youth or Adult Self Report symptom checklists. Medication-related stressors were most common (30%) and reported more often by perinatally infected youth, whereas youth infected through risk behaviors reported more disclosure-related stressors. Passive emotional regulation was perceived as the most used and most helpful coping strategy overall. Youth reporting medication adherence-related stressors used resignation most frequently. A two-factor model (Passive and Active Coping) emerged. The Passive Coping factor included strategies that do not directly approach the problem, whereas Active Coping included strategies that involve an active approach. Youth with moderately advanced disease (CD4 200-500 cells/mm(3)) used a Passive Coping style more often than healthier youth (CD4 > 500 cells/mm(3)). Additionally, Passive Coping was associated with greater emotional and behavioral problems. Youth infected with HIV may benefit from interventions promoting adaptive coping responses to HIV-specific stressors, particularly medication adherence. PMID:20146110

  18. [Community education in perinatal health].

    PubMed

    Ortigosa-corona, E; Martinez-sanchez, C

    1990-01-01

    The National Institute of Perinatology develops educational programs for the population using its services in order to promote positive behavior related to reproduction. One of the most frequently observed problems during prenatal control is patient abandonment of the services offered by health institutions. We present an investigation of the relationship between the educational program for pregnant women offered by the Institute and compliance with prenatal care. A group of 215 patients elected to participate in the educational program. The program consisted of themes on the evolution and culmination of the pregnancy, preparation for nursing, nutrition, developmental milestones, and dental health. Another group was selected at the same time, equal in size to the first but without participation in the course, as a control group. Both groups contained patients categorized in the 3 perinatal risk groups accepted by the Institute. PMID:12283076

  19. Perinatal mental illness: definition, description and aetiology.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Michael W; Wisner, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal mental illness is a significant complication of pregnancy and the postpartum period. These disorders include depression, anxiety disorders, and postpartum psychosis, which usually manifests as bipolar disorder. Perinatal depression and anxiety are common, with prevalence rates for major and minor depression up to almost 20% during pregnancy and the first 3 months postpartum. Postpartum blues are a common but lesser manifestation of postpartum affective disturbance. Perinatal psychiatric disorders impair a woman's function and are associated with suboptimal development of her offspring. Risk factors include past history of depression, anxiety, or bipolar disorder, as well psychosocial factors, such as ongoing conflict with the partner, poor social support, and ongoing stressful life events. Early symptoms of depression, anxiety, and mania can be detected through screening in pregnancy and the postpartum period. Early detection and effective management of perinatal psychiatric disorders are critical for the welfare of women and their offspring. PMID:24140480

  20. Perinatal depression treatment preferences among Latina mothers.

    PubMed

    Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz; Wisner, Katherine L; Burns, Rachel M; Chaves-Gnecco, Diego

    2014-02-01

    The study described here was designed to determine treatment preferences among Latinas to identify treatment options that meet their needs and increase their engagement. Focus group interviews were conducted with 22 prenatal and postpartum Latinas at risk for depression. The group interviews were conducted in Spanish and English using a standardized interview protocol. Focus group transcripts were analyzed to identify themes regarding perinatal depression coping strategies, preferred approaches to treating perinatal depression, and recommendations for engaging perinatal Latinas in treatment. The results suggest that Latinas' treatment preferences consist of a pathway (i.e., hierarchical) approach that begins with the use of one's own resources, followed by the use of formal support systems (e.g., home-visiting nurse), and supplemented with the use of behavioral therapy. Antidepressant use was judged to be acceptable only in severe cases or after delivery. The data indicate that to increase health-seeking behaviors among perinatal Latinas, practitioners should first build trust. PMID:24469693

  1. Sex and Pregnancy: A Perinatal Educator's Guide

    PubMed Central

    Polomeno, Viola

    2000-01-01

    This article is a continuation in the author's growing series of articles on intimacy and sexuality in the transition to parenthood and its relationship with perinatal education. So many couples in the author's perinatal education practice feel that health professionals are uncomfortable discussing sex and pregnancy. Indeed, the couples have so many questions and concerns regarding this subject; they are seeking answers so that they may better understand and cope with the changes in this aspect of their relationship. Perinatal education group encounters or special sessions are the ideal setting to discuss intimacy and sexuality during pregnancy. The objectives of this article are to provide the perinatal educator with content for the group sessions and tools for teaching strategies and activities. PMID:17273227

  2. Adapting a Family-Based HIV Prevention Program for HIV-Infected Preadolescents and Their Families: Youth, Families and Health Care Providers Coming Together to Address Complex Needs

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Mary; Block, Megan; Mellins, Claude; Traube, Dorian E.; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Minott, Desiree; Miranda, Claudia; Petterson, Jennifer; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY This article describes a family-based HIV prevention and mental health promotion program specifically designed to meet the needs of perinatally-infected preadolescents and their families. This project represents one of the first attempts to involve perinatally HIV-infected youth in HIV prevention efforts while simultaneously addressing their mental health and health care needs. The program, entitled CHAMP+ (Collaborative HIV Prevention and Adolescent Mental Health Project-Plus), focuses on: (1) the impact of HIV on the family; (2) loss and stigma associated with HIV disease; (3) HIV knowledge and understanding of health and medication protocols; (4) family communication about puberty, sexuality and HIV; (5) social support and decision making related to disclosure; and (6) parental supervision and monitoring related to sexual possibility situations, sexual risk taking behavior and management of youth health and medication. Findings from a preliminary evaluation of CHAMP+ with six families are presented along with a discussion of challenges related to feasibility and implementation within a primary health care setting for perinatally infected youth. PMID:20852676

  3. Genetic and perinatal effects of abused substances

    SciTech Connect

    Brande, M.C.; Zimmerman, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the effects of several abused drugs, including opiates, cannabinoids, alcohol, nicotine, and cocaine, with special emphasis on the actions of these substances at the molecular and cellular levels. The first half deals with genetic effects, including molecular genetics, biochemical genetics, pharmacogenetics, cytogenetics, and genetic toxicity. The second half focuses on perinatal effects and covers: drug abuse during pregnancy; biochemical aspects of marihuana on male reproduction; and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of perinatal alcohol exposure.

  4. Infection caused by Nocardia farcinica mimicking pulmonary metastasis in an adolescent girl.

    PubMed

    Babayigit, Arzu; Olmez, Duygu; Sozmen, Sule C; Makay, Balahan; Uzuner, Nevin; Karaman, Ozkan; Anal, Ozden; Gulay, Zeynep

    2010-03-01

    Nocardia farcinica infections are rare and potentially life threatening. Herein, we describe a case of pulmonary nocardiosis caused by N. farcinica. This 13-year-old girl admitted with 1-year history of cough, intermittent fever, and recurrent hemoptysis. She was examined for multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary metastasis that were detected with chest radiography and computed tomography of the thorax. Eventually, N. farcinica was yielded in culture of sputum and aspiration material of pulmonary nodules. No predisposing factor could be shown for Nocardia infection. Although infections caused by N. farcinica have tendency to disseminate, and are mostly resistant to antibiotics, the patient was successfully treated with prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy followed with oral amoxicillin-clavulanate. PMID:20216281

  5. Seroepidemiology of Coxsackievirus A6, Coxsackievirus A16, and Enterovirus 71 Infections among Children and Adolescents in Singapore, 2008-2010

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Li Wei; Tay, Joanne; Phoon, Meng Chee; Hsu, Jung Pu; Cutter, Jeffery; James, Lyn; Goh, Kee Tai; Chow, Vincent Tak-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Coxsackieviruses A6 (CV-A6) and A16 (CV-A16) and Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) have caused periodic epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) among children in Singapore. We conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate the seroprevalence of these enteroviruses among Singapore children and adolescents. The study was conducted between August 2008 and July 2010. It involved 700 Singapore residents aged 1–17 years whose residual sera were obtained following the completion of routine biochemical investigations in two public acute-care hospitals. The levels of neutralizing antibodies (NtAb) against CV-A6, CV-A16 and EV-A71 were analyzed by the microneutralization test. The age-specific geometric mean titer (GMT) of antibodies against each of the three enteroviruses and the 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The seroprevalence of CV-A6 and CV-A16 was high at 62.7% (95% CI: 59.1–66.2%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 56.9–64.1%), respectively. However, the seroprevalence of EV-A71 was significantly lower at 29.3% (95% CI: 26.0–32.8%). About 89.7% of the children and adolescents had been infected by at least one of the three enteroviruses by 13–17 years of age. About half (52.3%) were seropositive for two or all three enteroviruses, while only 16.1% had no NtAb against any of the three enteroviruses. High NtAb levels were observed in the younger age groups. CV-A6 and CV-A16 infections are very common among Singapore children and adolescents, while EV-A71 infections are less common. Infection is continually acquired from early childhood to adolescent age. PMID:26011735

  6. Contemporary issues on the epidemiology and antiretroviral adherence of HIV-infected adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Adejumo, Olurotimi A; Malee, Kathleen M; Ryscavage, Patrick; Hunter, Scott J; Taiwo, Babafemi O

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adolescents are a unique and sometimes neglected group in the planning of healthcare services. This is the case in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, where more than eight out of ten of the world's HIV-infected adolescents live. Although the last decade has seen a reduction in AIDS-related mortality worldwide, largely due to improved access to effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), AIDS remains a significant contributor to adolescent mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Although inadequate access to ART in parts of the subcontinent may be implicated, research among youth with HIV elsewhere in the world suggests that suboptimal adherence to ART may play a significant role. In this article, we summarize the epidemiology of HIV among sub-Saharan African adolescents and review their adherence to ART, emphasizing the unique challenges and factors associated with adherence behaviour. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of online databases for articles, relevant abstracts, and conference reports from meetings held between 2010 and 2014. Our search terms included “adherence,” “compliance,” “antiretroviral use” and “antiretroviral adherence,” in combination with “adolescents,” “youth,” “HIV,” “Africa,” “interventions” and the MeSH term “Africa South of the Sahara.” Of 19,537 articles and abstracts identified, 215 met inclusion criteria, and 148 were reviewed. Discussion Adolescents comprise a substantial portion of the population in many sub-Saharan African countries. They are at particular risk of HIV and may experience worse outcomes. Although demonstrated to have unique challenges, there is a dearth of comprehensive health services for adolescents, especially for those with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. ART adherence is poorer among older adolescents than other age groups, and psychosocial, socio-economic, individual, and treatment-related factors influence adherence behaviour among adolescents in this region. With

  7. Achieving 90–90–90 in paediatric HIV: adolescence as the touchstone for transition success

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sonia; Hazra, Rohan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The number of children less than 15 years estimated to be living with HIV globally approximated 3.2 million in 2013. Young people aged 15 to 24 years living with HIV approximated 4 million. The survival of these children and adolescents into adulthood poses new and urgent challenges of transition from the paediatric to adolescent to adult healthcare settings due to emerging developmental, psychosocial and comorbid issues. In order to achieve treatment targets of 90–90–90 across the continuum of care for paediatric HIV by 2020, focused efforts on the implementation of appropriate healthcare transition plans across the lifespan, with a focus on adolescence, should be prioritized. Discussion Published data or empirical evidence examining implementation of transition models and association with clinical outcomes are limited. While some guidelines do exist that offer recommendations about how to promote seamless transitions, very few data are available to assess the adequacy of these guidelines and whether they are effectively adhered to in clinical care settings globally. Furthermore, paediatric and adolescent HIV infection, either acquired perinatally or behaviourally, is set apart from other chronic illnesses as a highly stigmatizing disease that disproportionately affects poor, minority and often marginalized populations. Focused efforts on adolescence as the touchstone for transition practices and policies need to be implemented. Conclusions Optimal healthcare for these vulnerable populations, particularly in resource-limited settings, will require HIV-specific transitional care services and programmes that are coordinated, collaborative, integrated and, importantly, evidence-based. PMID:26639113

  8. Safety and immunogenicity of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in HIV-infected and HIV-negative adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Giacomet, Vania; Penagini, Francesca; Trabattoni, Daria; Viganò, Alessandra; Rainone, Veronica; Bernazzani, Giada; Bonardi, Claudia Maria; Clerici, Mario; Bedogni, Giorgio; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2014-09-29

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is highly prevalent and can lead to cancer; the development of safe and efficacious vaccines for HPV is a major public health concern. The two licensed HPV vaccines contain recombinant virus-like particles of HPV 16 and 18; one of such vaccines also protects against HPV types 6 and 11 which cause genital warts. We determined safety and immunogenicity of quadrivalent HPV vaccine in HIV-infected and HIV-negative adolescents and young adults, aged 13-27 years. The seroconversion rate, assessed by antibody titers, 1 month after the administration of the third vaccine dose was 0.85 (95% CI 0.75-0.95) in the HIV-infected group and 0.91 (0.83-0.99) in the HIV-negative subjects (p=0.52). The vaccine was generally safe and well tolerated; the most common side effect was local pain and the most frequent systemic side effect was headache. This is the first report on response to HPV vaccination in both female and male HIV-infected adolescents and young adults and highlights that this population may benefit from HPV immunoprophylaxis. Further studies are needed to examine the long term efficacy of this vaccine in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:25149430

  9. Perinatal risk factors and later social, thought, and attention problems after perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Harbert, Mary J; Jett, Micaela; Appelbaum, Mark; Nass, Ruth; Trauner, Doris A

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Survivors of perinatal stroke may be at risk for behavioral problems. Perinatal risk factors that might increase the likelihood of later behavior problems have not been identified. The goal of this study was to explore whether perinatal factors might contribute to behavior problems after perinatal stroke. Methods. 79 children with unilateral perinatal stroke were studied. Perinatal factors included gender, gestational age, neonatal seizures, instrumented delivery, fetal distress, acute birth problems, birth weight, and time of diagnosis. Subjects with evidence of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were excluded. Parents completed the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) (Achenbach 1985). The CBCL yields T-scores in several symptom scales. We focused on Social, Thought, and Attention Problems scates. Results. Gestational age and the presence of uteroplacental insufficiency were associated with significant differences on the Thought Problems scale; Attention Problems scores approached significance for these variables. Fetal distress, neonatal seizures, or neonatal diagnosis was associated with 25-30% incidence of clinically significant T-scores on Social, Thought, and Attention Problems scales. Conclusions. Several perinatal factors were associated with a high incidence of social, thought, and behavior problems in children with perinatal stroke. These findings may be useful in anticipatory guidance to parents and physicians caring for these children. PMID:22685688

  10. Visual Diagnosis: An Adolescent Male With Severe Facial Swelling and Scalp Infection.

    PubMed

    Riney, Lauren C; Shah, Meera; Lopez Domowicz, Denise A

    2015-11-01

    Scalp eruptions are common in infants, children, and adolescents and the etiology can be broad. Allergic contact dermatitis can result after multiple non eventful uses of a hair care product, including shampoo, relaxers, and coloring agents. Symptoms of allergic contact dermatitis include intense pruritus with weeping, pain, and stinging sensations. Signs on physical examination include swelling with scaly erythematous plaques as well as bullae with vesicles and pustules in severe cases. The forehead, eyelids, and postauricular areas also are subject to swelling. Definitive diagnosis of allergic dermatitis involves patch testing to determine the specific allergen. Education about avoidance of the allergen and recommendations for allergen-free products are the most important aspects of managing patients with allergic contact dermatitis. Treatment depends on the severity and extent of involvement. First-line treatment is topical corticosteroids, followed by topical calcineurin inhibitors. For more extensive dermatitis, systemic corticosteroids are beneficial. PMID:26527634

  11. Paedatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection in an Indian Adolescent--A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Sachin; Vaish, Supriya; Chopra, Saurabh; Singh, Vindyaprakash; Sharma, Priyanka

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS) is a unique constellation of signs and symptoms that exist in a subset of children with rapid onset or exacerbation of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or tic disorders due to an initial autoimmune reaction to a Group A Beta Hemolytic…

  12. Physical activity as a preventive measure against overweight, obesity, infections, allergies and cardiovascular disease risk factors in adolescents: AFINOS Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior studies addressing the impacts of regular physical activity or sedentary habits on the immune system have been conducted in adults and laboratory settings. Thus, it is practically unknown how a healthy active lifestyle could affect low-grade inflammation processes, infections or allergies in young persons. The AFINOS Study was designed to determine the relationship between the regular physical activity levels of adolescents and overweight, infection, and allergies along with the presence of metabolic and immunological biomarkers of a deteriorated health status. A further objective of the AFINOS Study is to assess the health status and lifestyle habits of an adolescent population in an effort to identify any protective factors that could be used as preventive measures, since many chronic diseases and their associated co-morbidities often persist from adolescence into adulthood. Methods/Design This study was conducted as three separate sub-studies in three different populations as follows: (a) Study 1 was performed on a population sample of adolescents; (b) Study 2 on the adolescents' parents; and (c) Study 3 on a subset of the adolescents from Study 1. Study 1 assessed health and lifestyle indicators through a questionnaire administered to a representative sample of adolescents from the Madrid Region (n = 2400) aged 13 to 16 years. In Study 2, the parents of the teenagers participating in Study 1 were required to fill out a questionnaire. Finally in Study 3, body composition, physical activity, health-related physical fitness, and blood measurements were determined in a subset (n = 200) of the individuals included in Study 1. Discussion This paper describes the rationale, design, and methodologies used in the AFINOS Study. This multidisciplinary, multicenter study seeks to evaluate several aspects of existing relationships between routine physical activity/sedentary behaviour and several health status markers, specifically those related to the

  13. "When Should I Tell?": Perspectives on Disclosure to Their Children among Parents with Perinatally Acquired HIV.

    PubMed

    Fair, Cynthia D; Allen, Hannah; Trexler, Constance; Osherow, Janet; D'Angelo, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with perinatally acquired HIV (PHIV) engage in developmentally expected behaviors, such as establishing relationships and having children. Previous research has focused on pregnancy management/outcomes of AYA with PHIV. However, little research has focused on the parenting experiences of this emerging cohort and on their views of disclosure to their offspring. This article examines data from a pilot study of five AYA parents with PHIV on disclosure to their child(ren) (n = 7, 6 HIV-negative). Disclosure of their own HIV status to their children is on the minds of parents with PHIV. However, few currently have children old enough to understand the parent's diagnosis. Three parents indicated they would disclose their HIV status when their child was "old enough to understand" so that their child would be knowledgeable about HIV. One father also noted that he currently had more pressing parenting responsibilities beyond disclosure. When discussing their perspectives on disclosure, many referenced their personal stories indicating a link between their decision to disclose/not disclose to their child and their own disclosure narrative. One mother cited she did not plan to reveal her diagnosis to her son because he was uninfected, while another mother explained she did not want to worry her child. The mother of the only infected child "did not want to wait like my mother did" and planned to tell her son at an earlier age than when she learned of her own diagnosis. Clinical implications related to disclosure will be discussed and future areas of research identified. PMID:27446903

  14. Epidemiological Risk Factors and Perinatal Outcomes of Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Lissa Fernandes Garcia; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Crott, Gerson Claudio; Okido, Marcos Masaru; Berezowski, Aderson Tadeu; Duarte, Geraldo; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Objectives To identify the epidemiological risk factors for congenital anomalies (CAs) and the impact of these fetal malformations on the perinatal outcomes. Methods This prospective cohort study comprised 275 women whose fetuses had CAs. Maternal variables to establish potential risk factors for each group of CA and perinatal outcomes were evaluated. The primary outcome was CA. Secondary outcomes included: fetal growth restriction (FGR); fetal distress (FD); premature rupture of membranes (PROM); oligohydramnios or polyhydramnios; preterm delivery (PTD); stillbirth; cesarean section; low birth weight; Apgar score < 7 at the 1st and 5th minutes; need for assisted ventilation at birth; neonatal infection; need for surgical treatment; early neonatal death; and hospitalization time. Chi-square (χ(2)) test and multilevel regression analysis were applied to compare the groups and determine the effects of maternal characteristics on the incidence of CAs. Results The general prevalence of CAs was of 2.4%. Several maternal characteristics were associated to CAs, such as: age; skin color; level of education; parity; folic acid supplementation; tobacco use; and history of previous miscarriage. There were no significant differences among the CA groups in relation to FGR, FD, PROM, 1-minute Apgar score > 7, and need for assisted ventilation at birth. On the other hand, the prevalence of the other considered outcomes varied significantly among groups. Preterm delivery was significantly more frequent in gastrointestinal tract/abdominal wall defects. The stillbirth rate was increased in all CAs, mainly in isolated fetal hydrops (odds ratio [OR]: 27.13; 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 2.90-253.47). Hospitalization time was higher for the urinary tract and congenital heart disease groups (p < 0.01). Neonatal death was significantly less frequent in the central nervous system anomalies group. Conclusion It was possible to identify several risk factors for CAs

  15. Fourth goal of perinatal medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Ounsted, C; Roberts, J C; Gordon, M; Milligan, B

    1982-01-01

    Reduction in maternal mortality, infant mortality, and infant morbidity have been successively the goals of perinatal medicine. The fourth is to reduce bonding failure. In July 1978 a preventive service was started in the John Radcliffe Maternity Hospital. A twice-weekly round is made. Midwives refer families who cause them concern. In the first year the referral rate ws 20.5 per 1000 liveborn babies. The referred sample differed from the hospital population in terms of maternal psychiatric history, marital state and babies' admission to special care. The main reasons for referral were: doubt about parenting ability (27%), psychiatric history (15%), disturbed behaviour in hospital (14%), and diffuse social and medical problems (17%). Long-term care was needed for only 14% of families. At their first birthdays, six babies were placed away from their natural parents; the sample had had a slightly higher than expected admission rate to hospital; the distribution of weights did not differ from the expected; doctors and health visitors were still concerned about one-quarter of the families. Seven cases of screening failure were found among those not referred to our service, but only one was seriously abused. No child referred in the first year has been seriously neglected or abused. PMID:6802338

  16. Perinatal Practices & Traditions Among Asian Indian Women.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    As the population in the United States grows more diverse, nurses caring for childbearing women must be aware of the many cultural traditions and customs unique to their patients. This knowledge and insight supports women and their families with the appropriate care, information, and resources. A supportive relationship builds trust, offers guidance, and allows for the new family to integrate information from nurses and other healthcare providers with the practice of certain perinatal cultural traditions. The Asian Indian culture is rich in tradition, specifically during the perinatal period. To support the cultural beliefs and practices of Asian Indian women during this time, nurses need to be aware of and consider multiple factors. Many women are navigating the new role of motherhood while making sense of and incorporating important cultural rituals. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of perinatal cultural practices and traditions specific to the Asian Indian culture that perinatal nurses may observe in the clinical setting. Cultural traditions and practices specific to the pregnancy and postpartum period are described together with symbolism and implications for nursing practice. It is important to note that information regarding perinatal customs is provided in an effort to promote culturally sensitive nursing care and may not pertain to all Asian Indian women living in the United States. PMID:26909722

  17. Inflammatory and Epigenetic Pathways for Perinatal Depression.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Lindsey; Mathews, Herbert L; Janusek, Linda Witek

    2016-05-01

    Depression during the perinatal period is common and can have adverse consequences for women and their children. Yet, the biobehavioral mechanisms underlying perinatal depression are not known. Adverse early life experiences increase the risk for adult depression. One potential mechanism by which this increased risk occurs is epigenetic embedding of inflammatory pathways. The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptual model that explicates the linkage between early life adversity and the risk for maternal depression. The model posits that early life adversity embeds a proinflammatory epigenetic signature (altered DNA methylation) that predisposes vulnerable women to depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period. As proposed, women with a history of early life adversity are more likely to exhibit higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and lower levels of oxytocin in response to the demands of pregnancy and new motherhood, both of which are associated with the risk for perinatal depression. The model is designed to guide investigations into the biobehavioral basis for perinatal depression, with emphasis upon the impact of early life adversity. Testing this model will provide a better understanding of maternal depressive risk and improve identification of vulnerable women who would benefit from targeted interventions that can reduce the impact of perinatal depression on maternal-infant health. PMID:26574573

  18. Neonatal-perinatal medicine: Diseases of the fetus and infant

    SciTech Connect

    Fanaroff, A.A.; Martin, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 40 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Perinatal services and resources; Diabetes in pregnancy; Erythroblastosis fetalis; Placental pathology; Genetic disease and chromosomal abnormalities; Perinatal ultrasound; and Diagnostic imaging.

  19. Pregnancy incidence and associated factors among HIV-infected female adolescents in HIV care in urban Côte d'Ivoire, 2009–2013

    PubMed Central

    Arikawa, Shino; Eboua, Tanoh; Kouakou, Kouadio; N'Gbeche, Marie-Sylvie; Amorissani-Folquet, Madeleine; Moh, Corinne; Amoussou-Bouah, Ursula Belinda; Coffie, Patrick Ahuatchi; Becquet, Renaud; Leroy, Valériane

    2016-01-01

    Objective Adolescents living with HIV are sexually active and engaged in risky sexual behaviors. Knowledge on how and to what extent adolescents in HIV care are affected by pregnancy is needed so as to adopt better preventive services. We estimated 4-year pregnancy incidence and correlates among HIV-infected female adolescents in HIV care in urban Côte d'Ivoire. Design We conducted retrospective analysis of a pediatric prospective cohort of the International epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) West Africa Collaboration. Female patients with confirmed HIV infection aged 10–19 years, having at least one clinical visit in 2009 to health facilities participating in the pediatric IeDEA West African cohort in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, were included. Data on incident pregnancies were obtained through medical records and interviews with health professionals. Pregnancy incidence rate was estimated per 100 person-years (PY). Poisson regression models were used to identify factors associated with the first pregnancy and provided incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results In 2009, 266 female adolescents were included, with a median age of 12.8 years (interquartile range, IQR: 10.0–15.0), CD4 cell counts of 506 cells/mm3 (IQR: 302–737), and 80% on antiretroviral treatment. At the 48th month, 17 new pregnancies were reported after 938 PY of follow-up: 13 girls had one pregnancy while 2 had two pregnancies. Overall incidence rate of pregnancy was 1.8/100 PY (95% CI: 1.1–2.9). High incidence was observed among those aged 15–19 years: 3.6/100 PY (95% CI: 2.2–5.9). Role of maternal death in the risk of pregnancy was at the limit of statistical significance (adjusted IRR: 3.1, 95% CI: 0.9–11.0; ref. non-maternal orphans). Conclusions Incidence of pregnancy among HIV-infected adolescents in care aged 15–19 years reached a level observed in adult cohorts in Sub-Saharan Africa. Health personnel in pediatric care have to

  20. Perinatal Health Statistics as the Basis for Perinatal Quality Assessment in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, Urelija; Filipović-Grčić, Boris; Đelmiš, Josip; Glivetić, Tatjana; Juras, Josip; Mustapić, Željka; Grizelj, Ruža

    2015-01-01

    Context. Perinatal mortality indicators are considered the most important measures of perinatal outcome. The indicators reliability depends on births and deaths reporting and recording. Many publications focus on perinatal deaths underreporting and misclassification, disabling proper international comparisons. Objective. Description of perinatal health care quality assessment key indicators in Croatia. Methods. Retrospective review of reports from all maternities from 2001 to 2014. Results. According to reporting criteria for birth weight ≥500 g, perinatal mortality (PNM) was reduced by 31%, fetal mortality (FM) by 32%, and early neonatal mortality (ENM) by 29%. According to reporting criteria for ≥1000 g, PNM was reduced by 43%, FM by 36%, and ENM by 54%. PNM in ≥22 weeks' (wks) gestational age (GA) was reduced by 28%, FM by 30%, and ENM by 26%. The proportion of FM at 32–36 wks GA and at term was the highest between all GA subgroups, as opposed to ENM with the highest proportion in 22–27 wks GA. Through the period, the maternal mortality ratio varied from 2.4 to 14.3/100,000 live births. The process indicators have been increased in number by more than half since 2001, the caesarean deliveries from 11.9% in 2001 to 19.6% in 2014. Conclusions. The comprehensive perinatal health monitoring represents the basis for the perinatal quality assessment. PMID:26693484

  1. Pneumocystis Pneumonia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus–infected Adults and Adolescents: Current Concepts and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Tasaka, Sadatomo

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is one of the most common opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus–infected adults. Colonization of Pneumocystis is highly prevalent among the general population and could be associated with the transmission and development of PCP in immunocompromised individuals. Although the microscopic demonstration of the organisms in respiratory specimens is still the golden standard of its diagnosis, polymerase chain reaction has been shown to have a high sensitivity, detecting Pneumocystis DNA in induced sputum or oropharyngeal wash. Serum β-D-glucan is useful as an adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of PCP. High-resolution computed tomography, which typically shows diffuse ground-glass opacities, is informative for the evaluation of immunocompromised patients with suspected PCP and normal chest radiography. Trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) is the first-line agent for the treatment of mild to severe PCP, although it is often complicated with various side effects. Since TMP-SMX is widely used for the prophylaxis, the putative drug resistance is an emerging concern. PMID:26327786

  2. Substance Use in the Perinatal Period.

    PubMed

    Forray, Ariadna; Foster, Dawn

    2015-11-01

    Perinatal substance use remains a major public health problem and is associated with a number of deleterious maternal and fetal effects. Polysubstance use in pregnancy is common and can potentiate adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Tobacco is the most commonly used substance in pregnancy, followed by alcohol and illicit substances. The treatments for perinatal substance use are limited and consist mostly of behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Of these, contingency management has shown the most efficacy. More recently, novel interventions such as progesterone for postpartum cocaine use have shown promise. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids in the perinatal period, their effects on maternal and fetal health, and current treatments. PMID:26386836

  3. The perinatal assessment of psychosocial risk.

    PubMed

    Haglund, L J; Britton, J R

    1998-06-01

    Although evaluation of psychosocial risk factors prior to perinatal hospital discharge has been advocated, the means for accomplishing such an evaluation are not well established. This article reviews several major psychosocial risk factors together with instruments that have been utilized to assess them during the perinatal period. Formal constructs reviewed include anxiety, depression, self-concept, general attitudes, life events, stress, adaptation, social support, marital and family functioning, and the home environment. Ongoing assessment of psychosocial status using formal instruments during routine perinatal care may provide a more complete picture of the psychosocial needs of the individual mother and her family, allowing for more appropriate, timely intervention and utilization of social and health care resources. PMID:9647002

  4. Perinatal episodes across the mood disorder spectrum.

    PubMed

    Di Florio, Arianna; Forty, Liz; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Heron, Jess; Jones, Lisa; Craddock, Nicholas; Jones, Ian

    2013-02-01

    CONTEXT Affective disorders are common in women, with many episodes having an onset in pregnancy or during the postpartum period. OBJECTIVE To investigate the occurrence and timing of perinatal mood episodes in women with bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and recurrent major depression (RMD). SETTING AND PATIENTS Women were recruited in our ongoing research on the genetic and nongenetic determinants of major affective disorders. Participants were interviewed and case notes were reviewed. Best-estimate diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV criteria. The 1785 parous women identified included 1212 women with bipolar disorder (980 with type I and 232 with type II) and 573 with RMD. Data were available on 3017 live births. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES We report the lifetime occurrence of perinatal mood episodes, the rates of perinatal episodes per pregnancy/postpartum period, and the timing of the onset of episodes in relation to delivery. RESULTS More than two-thirds of all diagnostic groups reported at least 1 lifetime episode of illness during pregnancy or the postpartum period. Women with bipolar I disorder reported an approximately 50% risk of a perinatal major affective episode per pregnancy/postpartum period. Risks were lower in women with RMD or bipolar II disorder, at approximately 40% per pregnancy/postpartum period. Mood episodes were significantly more common in the postpartum period in bipolar I disorder and RMD. Most perinatal episodes occurred within the first postpartum month, with mania or psychosis having an earlier onset than depression. CONCLUSIONS Although episodes of postpartum mood disorder are more common in bipolar I disorder and manic and psychotic presentations occur earlier in the postpartum period, perinatal episodes are highly prevalent across the mood disorder spectrum. PMID:23247604

  5. Essential program components for perinatal home care.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, L

    1994-10-01

    Home care will continue to be a rapidly expanding area of health care. This growth will be evident in the perinatal nursing specialty. There are multiple models for delivery of perinatal home services. In each case, consideration needs to be given to licensing and other standards; to operational areas such as staffing, supplies, equipment, and reimbursement; and to quality issues, such as staff development, internal and external customer service, and a continuous quality improvement program. Successful marketing of the services requires recognition that the product is nursing care. PMID:7836991

  6. Immunogenicity and Safety of Meningococcal C Conjugate Vaccine in Children and Adolescents Infected and Uninfected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Frota, Ana Cristina C.; Milagres, Lucimar G.; Harrison, Lee H; Ferreira, Bianca; Barreto, Daniela Menna; Pereira, Gisele S.; Cruz, Aline C.; Pereira-Manfro, Wania; de Oliveira, Ricardo Hugo; Abreu, Thalita F.; Hofer, Cristina B.

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the Neisseria meningitidis C conjugated vaccine (MCC) seroconversion and adverse events (AE) in HIV-infected and uninfected children and adolescents in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methods HIV-infected or uninfected subjects, 2–18 years old, with CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell (CD4) percentage >15%, without active infection or antibiotic use, were enrolled. All patients were evaluated before and 1–2 months after immunization for seroconversion (defined as ≥4-fold titer increase in human serum bactericidal activity), and for AEs at 20 minutes, 3 and 7 days after immunization. Factors associated with seroconversion among HIV-infected group were studied. Results 204 subjects were enrolled: 154 HIV-infected and 50 HIV-uninfected. Median age was 12 years and 53% were female. Among the HIV-infected group, 82 (53%) had a history of at least one C clinical category Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention event, and 134 (87%) were using combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). The median nadir CD4 percentage was 13% (0%–47%). 76(37.3%) experienced mild AEs. Seroconversion occurred in 46/154 (30%) of the HIV-infected group, and in 38/50 (76%) of the uninfected group (p<0.01). Factors associated with seroconversion in the HIV-infected group were: Never had a C clinical category event (OR=2.1, 95%CI=1.0–4.4); undetectable viral load at immunization (OR=2.4, 95%CI=1.1–5.2), and higher CD4 nadir/100 cells (OR=1.1, 95%CI=1.0–1.2). Conclusion MCC vaccine should be administered to HIV-infected children and adolescents after maximum immunologic and virologic benefit has been achieved with cART. Our data suggest that a single dose of MCC vaccine is insufficient for HIV-infected individuals 2–18 years of age. PMID:25876102

  7. Perinatal inflammation: a common factor in the early origins of cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Maria U; Wallace, Megan J; Pepe, Salvatore; Menheniott, Trevelyan R; Moss, Timothy J; Burgner, David

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of global morbidity and mortality. Traditional risk factors account for only part of the attributable risk. The origins of atherosclerosis are in early life, a potential albeit largely unrecognized window of opportunity for early detection and treatment of subclinical cardiovascular disease. There are robust epidemiological data indicating that poor intrauterine growth and/or prematurity, and perinatal factors such as maternal hypercholesterolaemia, smoking, diabetes and obesity, are associated with adverse cardiovascular intermediate phenotypes in childhood and adulthood. Many of these early-life risk factors result in a heightened inflammatory state. Inflammation is a central mechanism in the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, but few studies have investigated the role of overt perinatal infection and inflammation (chorioamnionitis) as a potential contributor to cardiovascular risk. Limited evidence from human and experimental models suggests an association between chorioamnionitis and cardiac and vascular dysfunction. Early life inflammatory events may be an important mechanism in the early development of cardiovascular risk and may provide insights into the associations between perinatal factors and adult cardiovascular disease. This review aims to summarise current data on the early life origins of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, with particular focus on perinatal inflammation. PMID:26223841

  8. Incidence of Sexually Transmitted Infections After Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Among Adolescent Females

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Anupam B.; Goldman, Dana P.; Seabury, Seth A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates among US females remain low, in part because of concerns that HPV vaccination may promote unsafe sexual activity by lowering perceived risks of acquiring a sexually transmitted infection (STI). OBJECTIVE To study whether HPV vaccination of females is associated with increases in STI rates. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Using a large, longitudinal insurance database of females aged 12 to 18 years insured from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2010, in the United States, we examined whether HPV vaccination was associated with an increase in incident STIs among females who were vaccinated compared with those who were not. We defined STIs as one or more medical claims for any of the following infections in a given quarter: chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, human immunodeficiency virus or AIDS, or syphilis. We used difference-in-difference analysis to compare changes in STI rates among HPV-vaccinated females before and after vaccination (index quarter) to changes among age-matched nonvaccinated females before and after the index quarter. We analyzed whether effects varied according to age and prior contraceptive medication use. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Rates of STIs. RESULTS The rates of STIs in the year before vaccination were higher among HPV-vaccinated females (94 of 21 610, 4.3 per 1000) compared with age-matched nonvaccinated females (522 of 186 501, 2.8 per 1000) (adjusted odds ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.09-1.71; P = .007). The rates of STIs increased for the vaccinated (147 of 21 610, 6.8 per 1000) and nonvaccinated (781 of 186 501, 4.2 per 1000) groups in the year after vaccination (adjusted odds ratio, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.25-1.79; P < .001). The difference-in-difference odds ratio was 1.05 (95% CI, 0.80-1.38; P = .74), implying that HPV vaccination was not associated with an increase in STIs relative to growth among nonvaccinated females. Similar associations held among subgroups aged 12 through 14 years and

  9. A pathologist׳s perspective on the perinatal autopsy.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Linda M

    2015-02-01

    The perinatal autopsy is an important tool in the investigation of fetal and neonatal death, and a complete understanding of its risks and benefits is necessary for providers of perinatal care. This review, from the perspective of a perinatal pathologist, reports the details of the autopsy procedure, its goals, its value to individual patients and the health care system in general, and its alternatives. Even with new emerging technologies, the conventional perinatal autopsy remains the gold standard for determining the cause of death and the final summary of all pathologic findings. Therefore, the information provided in this review can help providers properly convey information about perinatal autopsy to bereaved families. PMID:25511296

  10. Sexually transmitted infection risk behaviors in rural Thai adolescents and young adults: Support for gender- and age-specific interventions

    PubMed Central

    Latimore, Amanda D.; Aramrattana, Apinun; Sherman, Susan G.; Galai, Noya; Srirojn, Bangorn; Thompson, Nick; Ellen, Jonathan M.; Willard, Nancy; Celentano, David D.

    2012-01-01

    STI prevalence and risks in a sample of rural Thai adolescents and young adults (14–29 years old) were examined. Unprotected sex with a casual partner conferred the greatest risk for prevalent STIs, particularly for younger adolescents and alcohol use increased the STI risk for women but not for men. PMID:23403603

  11. Are social organizational factors independently associated with a current bacterial sexually transmitted infection among urban adolescents and young adults?

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Jacky M.; Hensel, Devon J.; Tanner, Amanda E.; Reilly, Meredith L.; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between the social organization of neighborhoods including informal social control and social cohesion and a current bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) among adolescents and young adults in one U.S. urban setting. Data for the current study were collected from April 2004 to April 2007 in a cross-sectional household study. The target population included English-speaking, sexually-active persons between the ages of 15 and 24 years who resided in 486 neighborhoods. The study sample included 599 participants from 63 neighborhoods. A current bacterial STI was defined as diagnosis of a chlamydia and/or gonorrhea infection at the time of study participation. Participants reported on informal social control (i.e. scale comprised of 9 items) and social cohesion (i.e. scale comprised of 5 items) in their neighborhood. In a series of weighted multilevel logistic regression models stratified by gender, greater informal social control was significantly associated with a decreased odds of a current bacterial STI among females (AOR 0.53, 95% CI 0.34, 0.84) after controlling for individual social support and other factors. The association, while in a similar direction, was not significant for males (AOR 0.73, 95% CI 0.48, 1.12). Social cohesion was not significantly associated with a current bacterial STI among females (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.61, 1.19) and separately, males (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.67, 1.44). Greater individual social support was associated with an almost seven-fold increase in the odds of a bacterial STI among males (AOR 6.85, 95% CI 1.99, 23.53), a finding which is in contrast to our hypotheses. The findings suggest that neighborhood social organizational factors such as informal social control have an independent relationship with sexual health among U.S. urban youth. The causality of the relationship remains to be determined. PMID:25089964

  12. Perinatal mortality--an analysis of causes and strategies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neeru

    2011-04-01

    Perinatal mortality is the most sensitive index while imparting healthcare to mother during pregnancy and delivery and also to the baby in perinatal period. Perinatal mortality is higher in rural areas than in urban areas. Worldover perinatal or infant mortality rate is on decline. Developed countries are ahead of developing nations in giving good antenatal, intrapartal as well as neonatal care. Factors responsible for perinatal mortality in Indian context lie in sociodemographic, maternal and foetal aspects. Regional differences also are there in India while assessing perinatal mortality and delivery practices. The lacunae are to be identified while recommending strategies to be taken to lower the perinatal mortality. A community based data system should be developed so that the information should flow from down to above, from village to subcentre to primary health centre and further from district to state. Some newborns need special care. Since newborns need early recognition of danger signs and prompt treatment measures. PMID:22187796

  13. Is there an association between female circumcision and perinatal death?

    PubMed Central

    Essen, Birgitta; Bodker, Birgit; Sjoberg, N-O; Gudmundsson, Saemundur; Ostergren, P-O; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In Sweden, a country with high standards of obstetric care, the high rate of perinatal mortality among children of immigrant women from the Horn of Africa raises the question of whether there is an association between female circumcision and perinatal death. METHOD: To investigate this, we examined a cohort of 63 perinatal deaths of infants born in Sweden over the period 1990-96 to circumcised women. FINDINGS: We found no evidence that female circumcision was related to perinatal death. Obstructed or prolonged labour, caused by scar tissue from circumcision, was not found to have any impact on the number of perinatal deaths. CONCLUSION: The results do not support previous conclusions that genital circumcision is related to perinatal death, regardless of other circumstances, and suggest that other, suboptimal factors contribute to perinatal death among circumcised migrant women. PMID:12219153

  14. The Role of Religiousness/Spirituality in Health-Related Quality of Life Among Adolescents with HIV: A Latent Profile Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Maureen E; Kimmel, Allison L; Cheng, Yao Iris; Wang, Jichuan

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether distinct latent profiles of religiousness/spirituality exist for ALWH, and if so, are latent profile memberships associated with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Latent profile analysis of religiosity identified four profiles/groups. Compared to the other three groups, higher levels of emotional well-being were found among young perinatally infected adolescents who attended religious services, but who did not pray privately, feel God's presence or identify as religious or spiritual. Social HRQoL was significantly higher among the highest overall religious/spiritual group. Understanding adolescent profiles of religiousness/spirituality on HRQoL could inform faith-based interventions. Trial registration NCT01289444. PMID:27071797

  15. Perinatal Major Depression Biomarkers: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Serati, M; Redaelli, M; Buoli, M; Altamura, A C

    2016-03-15

    Postpartum depression, now termed perinatal depression by the DSM-5, is a clinically relevant disorder reaching 15% of incidence. Although it is quite frequent and associated with high social dysfunction, only recently its underpinning biological pathways have been explored, while multiple and concomitant risk factors have been identified (e.g. psychosocial stress). Peripartum depression usually has its onset during the third trimester of pregnancy or in the postpartum, being one of the most common medical complications in new mothers. Purpose of the present review is to summarize the state of art of biological biomarkers involved in the pathogenesis of perinatal depression, in view of the fact that suboptimal prenatal milieu can induce permanent damage in subsequent offspring life and have a negative impact on mother-child relationship. Furthermore, parents' biological changes due to medical/psychiatric disorders or stress exposure could influence offspring life: a concept known as 'intergenerational transmission', acting by variations into gametes and the gestational uterine environment. Given the evidence that perinatal mental disorders involve risks for the mother and offspring, the search for reliable biomarkers in high-risk mothers actually represents a medical priority to prevent perinatal depression. PMID:26802316

  16. DRINKING WATER ARSENIC AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking Water Arsenic and Perinatal Outcomes
    DT Lobdell, Z Ning, RK Kwok, JL Mumford, ZY Liu, P Mendola

    Many studies have documented an association between drinking water arsenic (DWA) and cancer, vascular diseases, and dermatological outcomes, but few have investigate...

  17. Ethical Issues in Perinatal Mental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Anna R.; Shivakumar, Geetha; Lee, Simon Craddock; Inrig, Stephen J.; Sadler, John Z.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of Review To review the background of current ethical standards for the conduct of perinatal mental health research and describe the ethical challenges in this research domain. Recent Findings Current literature reflects a growing sentiment in the scientific community that having no information regarding the impact of psychiatric treatment on the mother and developing fetus/infant poses dangers that may exceed the risks involved in research. However, without sufficient consensus across the scientific community, both regulatory bodies and perinatal researchers find themselves without a framework for decision making that satisfactorily limits the risks and facilitates the benefits of participation of pregnant and lactating women in clinical research. Summary Psychiatric research in perinatal mental health is critically important as it enables clinicians and patients to participate in informed decision-making concerning treatment for psychiatric disorders. Specific areas of concern include fetal safety, maternal risk, the therapeutic misconception, commercial interests, forensic/legal issues, the informed consent process, and study design. Developing guidelines that address ethical challenges and include the views and concerns of multiple stakeholders could improve the access of perinatal women to the benefits of participation in mental health research in addition to providing evidence-based mental health care for this subpopulation. PMID:19734786

  18. Perinatal home care: one entrepreneur's experience.

    PubMed

    Eaton, D G

    1994-10-01

    Nurses have responded to the entrepreneurial movement by entering into various nontraditional roles and starting their own businesses. This article describes the author's experience in establishing a perinatal home-care business. The characteristics of women and nurse entrepreneurs are discussed, as are the components of a business plan and how to manage a business. PMID:7836999

  19. Atazanavir and Atazanavir/Ritonavir Pharmacokinetics in HIV-Infected Infants, Children, and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Jennifer J.; Rutstein, Richard M.; Samson, Pearl; Graham, Bobbie; Aldrovandi, Grace; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Smith, Elizabeth; Schnittman, Steven; Fenton, Terry; Brundage, Richard C.; Fletcher, Courtney V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the pharmacokinetics of atazanavir (ATV) and ritonavir-boosted ATV/r in children ages 91 days to 21 years. Design Phase I/II, open label, multicenter study of once daily ATV and ATV/r as part of combination antiretroviral treatment in HIV-infected treatment experienced and naïve children. Setting Sites in the United States and South Africa. Subjects 195 children enrolled; 172 had evaluable ATV pharmacokinetics on day seven. Intervention Children were entered in age, dose and formulation (powder or capsule) cohorts. Intensive pharmacokinetic sampling occurred seven days after starting ATV. ATV doses were increased or decreased if the 24-hour area under the concentration time curves (AUC0–24hr) were <30 or >90 mcg*hr/mL, respectively. Main outcomes Cohorts satisfied protocol-defined pharmacokinetic criteria if the median ATV AUC0–24hr ≤60 mcg*hr/mL, and AUC0–24hr and ATV concentrations 24 hours post-dose (C24) were >30 mcg*hr/mL and ≥60 ng/mL, respectively, in ≥ 80% of children, with no individual AUC0–24hr <15 mcg*hr/mL. Results Unboosted ATV capsules satisfied pharmacokinetic criteria at a dose of 520 mg/m2 for those >2 to ≤ 13 years and 620 mg/m2 for those >13 to ≤ 21 years. ATV/r capsules satisfied criteria at a dose of 205 mg/m2 for those >2 to ≤ 21 years. ATV/r powder satisfied criteria at a dose of 310 mg/m2 for those >2 to ≤ 13 years, but pharmacokinetics in those ≤ 2 years were highly variable. Conclusions Body surface area-determined doses of ATV capsules and ATV/r powder and capsules provide ATV exposures in children >2 years that approximate values in adults receiving ATV/r. PMID:21610486

  20. Negative life events and depression in adolescents with HIV: a stress and coping analysis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer V; Abramowitz, Susan; Koenig, Linda J; Chandwani, Sulachni; Orban, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of negative life events (NLE) and daily hassles, and their direct and moderated associations with depression, were examined among HIV-infected adolescents. Specifically, we examined whether the negative association with depression of NLE, daily hassles, and/or passive coping were moderated by social support or active coping strategies. Demographic characteristics, depression, coping, social support, NLE, and daily hassles were collected at baseline as part of the Adolescent Impact intervention via face-to-face and computer-assisted interviews. Of 166 HIV-infected adolescents, 53% were female, 72.9% black, 59.6% with perinatally acquired HIV (PIY), the most commonly reported NLE were death in family (81%), violence exposure (68%), school relocation (67%), and hospitalization (61%); and for daily hassles "not having enough money (65%)". Behaviorally infected youth (BIY--acquired HIV later in life) were significantly more likely to experience extensive (14-21) lifetime NLE (38.8% vs. 16.3%, p < .012) than PIY. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, the model accounting for the greatest variability in depression scores (32%) included (in order of entry): daily hassles, low social support, behaviorally acquired HIV, minority sexual orientation, and passive coping. A significant passive coping-by-social support interaction revealed that the association between passive coping and depression was exacerbated when social support was low. Social support moderated the effect of NLE, such that NLE were associated with greater depression when social support was low, although the effect did not remain statistically significant when main effects of other variables were accounted for. Daily hassles, poor coping, and limited social support can adversely affect the psychological well-being of HIV-infected adolescents, particularly sexual minority youth with behaviorally acquired HIV. Multimodal interventions that enhance social support and teach adaptive coping

  1. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  2. Sexual Orientation Disparities in Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk Behaviors and Risk Determinants Among Sexually Active Adolescent Males: Results From a School-Based Sample

    PubMed Central

    Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Rosario, Margaret; Garofalo, Robert; Mustanski, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined disparities in risk determinants and risk behaviors for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) between gay-identified, bisexual-identified, and heterosexual-identified young men who have sex with men (YMSM) and heterosexual-identified young men who have sex with women (YMSW) using a school-based sample of US sexually active adolescent males. Methods. We analyzed a pooled data set of Youth Risk Behavior Surveys from 2005 and 2007 that included information on sexual orientation identity, sexual behaviors, and multiple STI risk factors. Results. Bisexual-identified adolescents were more likely to report multiple STI risk behaviors (number of sex partners, concurrent sex partners, and age of sexual debut) compared with heterosexual YMSW as well as heterosexual YMSM and gay-identified respondents. Gay, bisexual, and heterosexual YMSM were significantly more likely to report forced sex compared with heterosexual YMSW. Conclusions. Our results provide evidence that sexual health disparities emerge early in the life course and vary by both sexual orientation identity and sexual behaviors. In particular, they show that bisexual-identified adolescent males exhibit a unique risk profile that warrants targeted sexual health interventions. PMID:24825214

  3. Primary intestinal mold infection in children with solid tumors: a case report in an adolescent with Ewing sarcoma, and literature review.

    PubMed

    Naselli, Aldo; Garaventa, Alberto; Buffa, Piero; Granata, Claudio; Bandettini, Roberto; Cangemi, Giuliana; Moscatelli, Andrea; Castagnola, Elio

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of primary intestinal infection due to filamentous fungi in an adolescent with Ewing sarcoma. The clinical picture was that of peritonitis secondary to intestinal perforation and the diagnosis was established only on histopathological bases. This condition is very rare, and only one case of primary intestinal mold infection in children with solid tumors has been reported in the literature, although more records can be found describing similar conditions in other cancer patient populations (i.e. adults with solid tumors or children with hematological malignancies or patients receiving hemopoietic stem cell transplant). Clinicians must be aware of this possibility since only an aggressive medical and surgical approach can improve patients' prognosis. PMID:27602424

  4. Family planning and adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Molina, Ramiro Cartes; Roca, Carolina Gonzalez; Zamorano, Jorge Sandoval; Araya, Electra Gonzales

    2010-04-01

    High adolescent fecundity principally affects developing countries. In spite of a decrease in the incidence of pregnancies in the developing countries over the past 13 years, the differences that exist with respect to developed countries turn adolescent fecundity into an indicator of the level of development of countries. The impact of adolescent pregnancy is evident in maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Nonetheless, in addition to the age involved in precocious pregnancy, it also reflects previous conditions such as malnutrition, infectious diseases and deficiencies in the health care given to pregnant adolescents. The most important impact lies in the psychosocial area: it contributes to a loss of self-esteem, a destruction of life projects and the maintenance of the circle of poverty. This affects both adolescent mothers and fathers; the latter have been studied very little. Intervention with comprehensive health services and the maintenance of the education of adolescent mothers and fathers prevents repeat pregnancies. Evidence shows success in the prevention of the first pregnancy when the intervention includes comprehensive sexual education, the existence of preferential sexual and reproductive health services for adolescents, the handout of modern contraceptives gauged to the adolescence stage of the subjects and the existence of an information network. There is little research in contraception for adolescents, and for this reason, the indications given are projections of data obtained from adults. PMID:20167542

  5. Preventing perinatal transmission of HIV--costs and effectiveness of a recommended intervention.

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, R D; Farnham, P G; Straus, W L; Caldwell, B; Holtgrave, D R; Simonds, R J; Rogers, M F; Guinan, M E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To calculate the national costs of reducing perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus through counseling and voluntary testing of pregnant women and zidovudine treatment of infected women and their infants, as recommended by the Public Health Service, and to compare these costs with the savings from reducing the number of pediatric infections. METHOD. The authors analyzed the estimated costs of the intervention and the estimated cost savings from reducing the number of pediatric infections. The outcome measures are the number of infections prevented by the intervention and the net cost (cost of intervention minus the savings from a reduced number of pediatric HIV infections). The base model assumed that intervention participation and outcomes would resemble those found in the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 076. Assumptions were varied regarding maternal seroprevalence, participation by HIV-infected women, the proportion of infected women who accepted and completed the treatment, and the efficacy of zidovudine to illustrate the effect of these assumptions on infections prevented and net cost. RESULTS. Without the intervention, a perinatal HIV transmission rate of 25% would result in 1750 HIV-infected infants born annually in the United States, with lifetime medical-care costs estimated at $282 million. The cost of the intervention (counseling, testing, and zidovudine treatment) was estimated to be $ 67.6 million. In the base model, the intervention would prevent 656 pediatric HIV infections with a medical care cost saving of $105.6 million. The net cost saving of the intervention was $38.1 million. CONCLUSION. Voluntary HIV screening of pregnant women and ziovudine treatment for infected women and their infants resulted in cost savings under most of the assumptions used in this analysis. These results strongly support implementation of the Public Health Service recommendations for this intervention. PMID:8711101

  6. Brief Report: Macrophage Activation in HIV-Infected Adolescent Males Contributes to Differential Bone Loss by Sex: Adolescent Trials Network Study 021.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Alexandra; Tobin, Nicole H; Mulligan, Kathleen; Rollie, Adrienne; Li, Fan; Sleasman, John; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that rates of low bone mass are greater in HIV-infected males than females. Of 11 biomarkers assessed by sex and HIV-status, HIV-infected males had increased levels of soluble CD14 which inversely correlated with bone mineral content and bone mineral density measures, suggesting macrophage activation as a possible mechanism of differential bone loss. PMID:26885808

  7. Importance of Self-Motivation and Social Support in Medication Adherence in HIV-Infected Adolescents in the United Kingdom and Ireland: A Multicentre HYPNet Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hee; McDonald, Susan; Kim, Samuel; Foster, Caroline; Fidler, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Adolescents are a vulnerable population, not only to the acquisition of HIV, but also to poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) associated with disease progression and a increased risk of onward viral transmission. The aim of the study was to examine the factors that aid or act as barriers to adherence in a UK population of adolescents and young adults receiving ART. A cross-sectional survey was completed of 138 adolescents (12-24 years) across 14 clinical and community sites in the UK and Ireland. Analysis of results was undertaken using Chi-square testing in SPSS. Of the 138 patients, 48% were female, and 52% were born outside of the UK. Fifty-two of the 138 (43%) reported being on ART for at least 8 years. More than a third of the patients have ever interrupted treatment since initiating ART. One hundred four of the 138 (75%) patients self-reported being >85% adherent to medication for 7 day recall. Self-motivation (e.g., having a routine, specific goal) was cited as being most helpful in medication compliance (33%), followed by reminders by friends and family (25%), with 20% identifing no specific factor. Only 15% chose interventions such as an adherence diary or mobile phone reminders as helpful factors, and 1% chose healthcare professional input such as home visits. This study highlights the importance of self-motivation and social support in medication adherence in an HIV-infected adolescent population, in preference to healthcare professional input. Education and motivational strategies may confer the biggest impact on sustained ART adherence amongst this vulnerable group. PMID:25825814

  8. Differences between Toxoplasma Gondii Infected and Non-Infected Blind and Partially Sighted Children and Adolescents on WISC and WAIS Verbal Subtests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langset, Marit; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Children and adolescents who had positive Dye Tests for toxoplasmosis had lower performances on all verbal subtests than those with negative Dye Tests. The impairment was comparable to subjects with brain damage. Subjects with congenital sight deficiency and positive Dye Tests showed progressive intellectual impairments. (Author/CM)

  9. Perinatal hepatitis B prevention program in Shandong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Ko, Stephen; Lv, Jingjing; Ji, Feng; Yan, Bingyu; Xu, Fujie; Xu, Aiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis with hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) alone is highly effective in preventing perinatal hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission and the World Health Organization recommends administering HepB to all infants within 24 h after delivery. Maternal screening for HBsAg and administration of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) in addition to HepB for infants born to HBsAg-positive pregnant women can increase the effectiveness of post-exposure prophylaxis for perinatal HBV transmission. In Shangdong Province, China which has a high prevalence of chronic HBV infection, HepB birth dose and HBIG were integrated into the routine childhood immunization program in 2002 and July 2011 respectively. We assessed progress toward implementation of these measures. Hospital-based reporting demonstrated an increase in maternal screening from 70.7% to 96.9% from 2004–2012; HepB birth dose coverage (within 24 h) remained high (96.3–97.1%) during this period. For infants with known HBsAg-positive mothers, the coverage of HBIG increased from 85.0% (before July 2011) to 92.1% (after July 2011). However, HBIG coverage in western areas of Shandong Province remained at 81.1% among infants with known HBsAg-positive mothers. Preterm/low-birth-weight and illness after birth were the most commonly reported reasons for delay in the first dose of HepB to >24 h of birth. Additional education on the safety and immune protection from HepB and HBIG might help to correct delays in administering the HepB birth dose and low HBIG coverage in the western areas of the Shandong Province. PMID:25483482

  10. Perinatal depression: treatment options and dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, Teri

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period raises unique concerns about safety for the developing fetus and the infant. An increasing number of studies suggest adverse effects from untreated stress, anxiety and depression as well as adverse effects from antidepressant and other psychotropic medications. Even when studies suggest a lack of short-term adverse effects with some medications, the paucity of systematic longitudinal follow-up studies investigating the development of children exposed to medications during pregnancy and breastfeeding causes apprehension. This review's objective is to highlight what is currently known about the negative effects of untreated disease and exposure to psychotropic medication, the treatment dilemmas confronting women with perinatal depression and issues that future studies should address so that a woman with perinatal depression can make an optimally informed decision. PMID:18592032

  11. Nutritional Interventions in Depression and Perinatal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Rechenberg, Kaitlyn; Humphries, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Depression is the leading cause of mental disability worldwide. Women who are depressed during pregnancy are at a higher risk for preterm delivery, preeclampsia, birth difficulties, and postpartum depression. The treatment of depression in conventional medicine has focused on physiological factors that lead to impaired neurotransmitter function and treatments to improve neurotransmitter function. Pharmaceutical substances pose risks for pregnant and lactating women, and lower risk options are preferred. Micronutrients, including certain B vitamins, folate, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), play a role in the synthesis and absorption of neurotransmitters. Experimental studies suggest that supplementation with specific micronutrients may alleviate depressive symptoms and improve birth outcomes in patients with perinatal depression. Alternative treatments for depression, including nutritional supplements, are an important treatment option for depressive symptoms while limiting potential side effects and treatment costs. This article explores the biological basis of perinatal depression and reviews the potential benefits of non-pharmacological interventions. PMID:23766734

  12. Bisphenol A: Perinatal exposure and body weight

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Beverly S.; Soto, Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a component of polycarbonate and other plastics including resins that line food and beverage containers. BPA is known to leach from products in contact with food and drink, and is therefore thought to be routinely ingested. In a recent cross sectional study, BPA was detected in urine samples from 92.6% of the US population examined. The potential for BPA to influence body weight is suggested by in vitro studies demonstrating effects of BPA on adipocyte differentiation, lipid accumulation, glucose transport and adiponectin secretion. Data from in vivo studies have revealed dose-dependent and sex dependent effects on body weight in rodents exposed perinatally to BPA. The mechanisms through which perinatal BPA exposure acts to exert persistent effects on body weight and adiposity remain to be determined. Possible targets of BPA action are discussed. PMID:19433248

  13. Etiological analysis of presumed perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Kocaman, Canan; Yilmaz, Yuksel

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the maternal, pre- and perinatal, and prothrombotic factors with congenital hemiparesis due to presumed perinatal stroke (PPS). Prothrombotic risk factors including protein C and S, antithrombin III, lipoprotein (a), homocystein, factor VIII levels; anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant; methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations, factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutations were investigated. Arterial ischemic stroke was detected in 60% and periventricular venous infarction in 40%. At least one prothrombotic risk factor was present in 69%, two in 17%, and three or more in 8.5% of cases. The most common combination was methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and factor V Leiden heterozygosity. The etiology and pathogenesis of PPS is still unclear. According to this study, most of the patients with PPS might have one or more prothrombotic risk factors and certain prenatal risk factors including intrauterine growth retardation, twin gestation and preeclampsia might be related to PPS. PMID:21561729

  14. Perinatal mortality attributable to complications of childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Kusiako, T.; Ronsmans, C.; Van der Paal, L.

    2000-01-01

    Very few population-based studies of perinatal mortality in developing countries have examined the role of intrapartum risk factors. In the present study, the proportion of perinatal deaths that are attributable to complications during childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh, was assessed using community-based data from a home-based programme led by professional midwives between 1987 and 1993. Complications during labour and delivery--such as prolonged or obstructed labour, abnormal fetal position, and hypertensive diseases of pregnancy--increased the risk of perinatal mortality fivefold and accounted for 30% of perinatal deaths. Premature labour, which occurred in 20% of pregnancies, accounted for 27% of perinatal mortality. Better care by qualified staff during delivery and improved care of newborns should substantially reduce perinatal mortality in this study population. PMID:10859856

  15. Sleep and perinatal mood disorders: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Lori E.; Murray, Brian J.; Steiner, Meir

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy and the postpartum period are recognized as times of vulnerability to mood disorders, including postpartum depression and psychosis. Recently, changes in sleep physiology and sleep deprivation have been proposed as having roles in perinatal psychiatric disorders. In this article we review what is known about changes in sleep physiology and behaviour during the perinatal period, with a focus on the relations between sleep and postpartum “blues,” depression and psychosis and on sleep-based interventions for the treatment and prevention of perinatal mood disorders. The interaction between sleep and perinatal mood disorders is significant, but evidence-based research in this field is limited. Studies that measure both sleep and mood during the perinatal period, particularly those that employ objective measurement tools such as polysomnography and actigraphy, will provide important information about the causes, prevention and treatment of perinatal mood disorders. PMID:16049568

  16. Perinatal mortality in Matlab, Bangladesh: a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Fauveau, V; Wojtyniak, B; Mostafa, G; Sarder, A M; Chakraborty, J

    1990-09-01

    Perinatal deaths, comprising stillbirths and deaths during the first week of life, were monitored over the eight-year period 1979 to 1986 in a rural Bangladeshi population of 196,000. The perinatal mortality rate was 75 per 1000 total births. The rate was 13% higher in males than females. Stillbirth and early neonatal mortality rates were 37 and 38 per 1000 total births, respectively. The major causes of perinatal deaths are presented, as well as some of the maternal determinants. During the period under study, perinatal mortality declined regularly and significantly over time in an area covered by an intensive Family Planning and Health Services programme, but not in the adjacent control area. This raises the issue of the impact of such a programme upon perinatal mortality, and the need to include a strong maternity care component into primary healthcare strategies if further reductions of perinatal mortality are to be achieved. PMID:2262255

  17. Specific ultrasonographic features of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Zankl, Andreas; Mornet, Etienne; Wong, Shell

    2008-05-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia (PL-HPH) by ultrasonography is difficult as PL-HPH must be differentiated from other skeletal dysplasias with short long bones and poor mineralization of the skeleton, such as osteogenesis imperfecta type II and achondrogenesis/hypochondrogenesis. Here we present a case of molecularly confirmed PL-HPH and illustrate specific ultrasonographic findings that help to distinguish PL-HPH from similar conditions. PMID:18386808

  18. Perinatal Risk Factors for Mild Motor Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands, Beth; Kendall, Garth; Larkin, Dawne; Parker, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of mild motor disability (MMD) is a complex issue and as yet is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of perinatal risk factors in a cohort of 10-year-old boys and girls with (n = 362) and without (n = 1193) MMD. Among the males with MMD there was a higher prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage,…

  19. Neoplasms in young dogs after perinatal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.A.; Lee, A.C.; Angleton, G.M.; Saunders, W.J.; Miller, G.K.; Williams, J.S.; Brewster, R.D.; Long, R.I.

    1986-08-01

    For a study of the life-time effects of irradiation during development, 1,680 beagles were given single, whole-body exposures to /sup 60/Co gamma-radiation at one of three prenatal (preimplantation, embryonic, and fetal) or at one of three postnatal (neonatal, juvenile, and young adult) ages. Mean doses were 0, 0.16, or 0.83 Gy. For comparison with data on childhood cancer after prenatal irradiation, examination was made of tumors occurring in young dogs in this life-span experiment. Up to 4 years of age, 18 dogs had neoplasms diagnosed, 2 of these being in controls. Four dogs that were irradiated in the perinatal (late fetal or neonatal) period died of cancers prior to 2 years of age. This risk was of significant increase compared to the risks for other experimental groups and for the canine population in general. Overall, 71% (5 of 7) of all cancers and 56% (10 of 18) of all benign and malignant neoplasms seen in the first 4 years of life occurred in 29% (480 of 1680) of the dogs irradiated in the perinatal period. These data suggest an increased risk for neoplasia after perinatal irradiation in dogs.

  20. Behavioural outcomes of perinatal maternal fluoxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    McAllister, B B; Kiryanova, V; Dyck, R H

    2012-12-13

    During and following pregnancy, women are at considerable risk of experiencing depression. For treatment, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, such as fluoxetine, are commonly prescribed, yet the potential effects of perinatal exposure to these drugs on the brain and behaviour have not been examined in humans beyond childhood. This is despite abundant evidence from studies using rodents indicating that altered serotonin levels early in life affect neurodevelopment and behavioural outcomes. These reported effects on behaviour are inconsistent, however, and the testing of females has often been overlooked. In the present study, the behavioural outcomes of female mice perinatally (embryonic day 15 to postnatal day 12) treated with fluoxetine (25mg/kg/day) via a non-stressful method of maternal administration were assessed using a battery of tests. Maternal treatment resulted in subtle alterations in anxiety-like and depression-like behaviour in early adulthood, with a decrease in both types of behaviour as well as body weight. Though altered anxiety and depression have previously been reported in this area of research, decreased anxiety is a novel finding. While there was little effect of perinatal maternal fluoxetine treatment on many of the behaviours assessed, the capacity to alter "emotional" behaviours in mice has implications with regard to research on human infant fluoxetine exposure. PMID:23000627

  1. Fetal and perinatal consequences of maternal obesity.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Chakrapani; Renfrew, Mary; McGuire, William

    2011-09-01

    In many industrialised countries, one in five women booking for antenatal care is obese. As well as affecting maternal health, maternal obesity may have important adverse consequences for fetal, neonatal and long-term health and well-being. Maternal obesity is associated with a higher risk of stillbirth, elective preterm birth and perinatal mortality. The incidence of severe birth defects, particularly neural tube and structural cardiac defects, appears to be higher in infants of obese mothers. Fetal macrosomia associated with maternal obesity and gestational diabetes predisposes infants to birth injuries, perinatal asphyxia and transitional problems such as neonatal respiratory distress and metabolic instability. Maternal obesity may also result in long-term health problems for offspring secondary to perinatal problems and to intrauterine and postnatal programming effects. Currently, the available interventions to prevent and treat maternal obesity are of limited proven utility and further research is needed to define the effects of maternal weight management interventions on fetal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:20530101

  2. Blood Biomarkers for Evaluation of Perinatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Ernest M.; Burd, Irina; Everett, Allen D.; Northington, Frances J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products, and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the “liquid brain biopsy.” A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:27468268

  3. “When Should I Tell?”: Perspectives on Disclosure to Their Children among Parents with Perinatally Acquired HIV

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Cynthia D.; Allen, Hannah; Trexler, Constance; Osherow, Janet; D’Angelo, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with perinatally acquired HIV (PHIV) engage in developmentally expected behaviors, such as establishing relationships and having children. Previous research has focused on pregnancy management/outcomes of AYA with PHIV. However, little research has focused on the parenting experiences of this emerging cohort and on their views of disclosure to their offspring. This article examines data from a pilot study of five AYA parents with PHIV on disclosure to their child(ren) (n = 7, 6 HIV-negative). Disclosure of their own HIV status to their children is on the minds of parents with PHIV. However, few currently have children old enough to understand the parent’s diagnosis. Three parents indicated they would disclose their HIV status when their child was “old enough to understand” so that their child would be knowledgeable about HIV. One father also noted that he currently had more pressing parenting responsibilities beyond disclosure. When discussing their perspectives on disclosure, many referenced their personal stories indicating a link between their decision to disclose/not disclose to their child and their own disclosure narrative. One mother cited she did not plan to reveal her diagnosis to her son because he was uninfected, while another mother explained she did not want to worry her child. The mother of the only infected child “did not want to wait like my mother did” and planned to tell her son at an earlier age than when she learned of her own diagnosis. Clinical implications related to disclosure will be discussed and future areas of research identified. PMID:27446903

  4. New uses of legacy systems: examples in perinatal care.

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, A.; Vázquez, R.; Mendoza, G.; Zignago, A.; López, A.; Lucián, H.

    1999-01-01

    In this article, new uses of the Perinatal Information System at the Uruguayan Social Security health care facilities are described. The perinatal information system has been in place for over 13 years, with about 40 thousand clinical records on electronic files. A newly created Web interface allows a distributed access to existing perinatal information within the National Social Security Wide Area a Network. Perinatal data is also exported to a management information system, allowing to dynamically answer questions and make managerial decisions, and eventually link these data with other sources. Future steps regarding clinical information systems are outlined. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10566481

  5. Dual role of astrocytes in perinatal asphyxia injury and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Romero, J; Muñiz, J; Logica Tornatore, T; Holubiec, M; González, J; Barreto, G E; Guelman, L; Lillig, C H; Blanco, E; Capani, F

    2014-04-17

    Perinatal asphyxia represents an important cause of severe neurological deficits including delayed mental and motor development, epilepsy, major cognitive deficits and blindness. However, at the moment, most of the therapeutic strategies were not well targeted toward the processes that induced the brain injury during perinatal asphyxia. Traditionally, experimental research focused on neurons, whereas astrocytes have been more related with the damage mechanisms of perinatal asphyxia. In this work, we propose to review possible protective as well as deleterious roles of astrocytes in the asphyctic brain with the aim to stimulate further research in this area of perinatal asphyxia still not well studied. PMID:24172702

  6. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ott, Mary A; Sucato, Gina S

    2014-10-01

    A working knowledge of contraception will assist the pediatrician in both sexual health promotion as well as treatment of common adolescent gynecologic problems. Best practices in adolescent anticipatory guidance and screening include a sexual health history, screening for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, counseling, and if indicated, providing access to contraceptives. Pediatricians' long-term relationships with adolescents and families allow them to help promote healthy sexual decision-making, including abstinence and contraceptive use. Additionally, medical indications for contraception, such as acne, dysmenorrhea, and heavy menstrual bleeding, are frequently uncovered during adolescent visits. This technical report provides an evidence base for the accompanying policy statement and addresses key aspects of adolescent contraceptive use, including the following: (1) sexual history taking, confidentiality, and counseling; (2) adolescent data on the use and side effects of newer contraceptive methods; (3) new data on older contraceptive methods; and (4) evidence supporting the use of contraceptives in adolescent patients with complex medical conditions. PMID:25266435

  7. Population-Based Cohort Study of Anti-Infective Medication Use before and after the Onset of Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli Farsani, Soulmaz; Souverein, Patrick C.; van der Vorst, Marja M. J.; Knibbe, Catherijne A. J.; de Boer, Anthonius

    2014-01-01

    A population-based cohort study was conducted in the Dutch PHARMO database to investigate prevalence and patterns of anti-infective medication use in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) before and after the onset of this disease. All patients <19 years with at least 2 insulin prescriptions (1999 to 2009) were identified (T1D cohort) and compared with an age- and sex-matched (ratio: 1 up to 4) diabetes-free reference group. The prevalence and average number of anti-infective use was studied from (up to) 8 years before until a maximum of 4 years after the onset of T1D. A total of 925 patients with T1D and 3,591 children and adolescents in the reference cohort (51% boys, mean age of 10.1 [standard deviation, 4.5] years) were included. The overall prevalence of anti-infective use (62.6 compared to 52.6%, P < 0.001) and average number of prescriptions (2.71 compared to 1.42 per child, P < 0.001) in the T1D cohort were significantly higher than those in the reference cohort after the onset of diabetes. This pattern was consistent across sex and age categories and already observed in the year before the onset of type 1 diabetes. Patients in the T1D cohort received more antibacterials (49.8 compared to 40%, P < 0.001), antimycotics (4.0 compared to 1.3%, P < 0.001), antivirals (2.5 compared to 0.4%, P < 0.001), and second-line antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, quinolones, and third-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems. Our findings that elevated anti-infective use in the T1D cohort exists in the period before the onset of type 1 diabetes and the consumption of more second-line anti-infective compounds in this time period warrant further research. PMID:24890584

  8. Parent-Adolescent Sexual Communication.

    PubMed

    Harris, Allyssa L

    2016-01-01

    Risky sexual behavior among adolescents is a major public health concern with potentially long-lasting consequences, including pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and HIV/AIDS. Researchers have demonstrated that parent-adolescent sexual communication can mitigate adolescent risky sexual behaviors; the development of interventions that support this process are vital. This column examines a recent study that evaluated a parent-adolescent sexual communication intervention. PMID:27067937

  9. Treatment of severe perinatal mood disorders on a specialized perinatal psychiatry inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Mary C; Lara-Cinisomo, S; Melvin, K; Di Florio, A; Brandon, A; Meltzer-Brody, S

    2016-08-01

    Perinatal patients with bipolar and psychotic mood disorder exacerbations are challenging to treat and often receive suboptimal care. We sought to examine the treatment patterns and outcomes on one of the only US-based Perinatal Psychiatry Inpatient Units (PPIU). Perinatal patients admitted to the PPIU completed self-report measures at admission and before discharge. Retrospective chart reviews extracted history, diagnoses (current and past), and medication treatment. Patients who had discharge diagnoses of bipolar disorder, major depression with psychotic features, or postpartum psychosis were included. Forty-seven met the diagnostic inclusion criteria. Over an average length of stay (ALOS) of 9.96 days, there was significant improvement in depressive and anxiety symptoms and daily functioning (Work and Social Adjustment Scale). Psychiatric comorbidity was common. Polypharmacy was utilized in 87 %. The most common medications prescribed at discharge were antipsychotics, alone or in combination with mood stabilizers or antidepressants. ECT was performed in 10 % of cases. The complexity of patients with severe mood disorders or psychosis admitted to the PPIU supports individualized treatment plans that address both primary diagnosis and psychiatric comorbidities. Our results provide important information that can be disseminated to others to improve clinical outcomes for severe perinatal mood disorders. PMID:26802019

  10. Predicting Discordance Between Self-reports of Sexual Behavior and Incident Sexually Transmitted Infections with African American Female Adolescents: Results from a 4-city Study

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Jessica M.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Salazar, Laura F.; Vanable, Peter A.; Carey, Michael P.; Brown, Larry K.; Romer, Daniel; Valois, Robert F.; Stanton, Bonita

    2012-01-01

    This study examined correlates of the discordance between sexual behavior self-reports and Incident Sexually Transmitted Infections. African American adolescent females (N = 964) from four U.S. cities were recruited for an HIV/STI prevention trial. Self-reported sexual behaviors, demographics, and hypothesized psychosocial antecedents of sexual risk behavior were collected at baseline, 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-up assessments. Urine specimens were collected and tested for three prevalent STIs (chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomonas) at each assessment. Seventeen percent of participants with a laboratory-confirmed STI reported either lifetime abstinence or recent abstinence from vaginal sex (discordant self-report). Lower STI knowledge, belief that fewer peers were engaging in sex, and belief that more peers will wait until marriage to have sex were associated with discordant reports. Discordance between self-reported abstinence and incident STIs was marked among African American female adolescents. Lack of STI knowledge and sexual behavior peer norms may result in underreporting of sexual behaviors. PMID:22323006

  11. Correlates of African American female adolescent offenders 3, 4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or “Ecstasy”) use and sexually transmitted infection morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Torrance; Holliday, Rhonda Conerly; Hopkins, Shakita; Rose, Shanhol; Braithwaite, Ronald; Smith, Selina

    2015-01-01

    The current study was designed to determine the extent to which self-reported ecstasy use in a population of juvenile adolescent detainees in a southern state is associated with high-risk health behaviors pertaining to sexually transmitted infection (STI) symptomology and past history of STI occurrence. Participants were 764 African American females extracted from an overall sample of 2,260 juvenile offenders housed at selected Youth Development Campuses in the state of Georgia. Significance tests were conducted using univariate logistic regressions to examine the independent associations of participant’s self-reported ecstasy use and dichotomized HIV risk behavior correlates and history of having a prior STI before the most recent incarceration Participants who reported ecstasy use prior to incarceration were 1.7 (OR = 1.68, 95% CI = 0.78–3.64) and 1.8 times (OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.24–2.81) more likely respectively to indicate having had genital warts or chlamydia, and were more than 1.5 times (OR = 2.21, 95% CI = 0.83–5.44) and two times more likely to report having had gonorrhea or herpes, accordingly. Prevention programs for adolescent offender populations should develop interventions that target adolescents’ substance use behavior as a function of STI risk taking as well as being culturally competent to deal specifically with these problem behaviors. PMID:26834451

  12. Neurosteroid modulation of respiratory rhythm in rats during the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Greer, John J

    2006-07-15

    Neurosteroids regulate neuronal excitability and are expressed at particularly high levels in the CNS during the perinatal period. Further, neurosteroid levels are increased by a variety of stressors including hypoxia, asphyxia, parturition, ethanol exposure and infection. One mechanism by which neurosteroids regulate neuronal activity is by negative or positive modulation of GABA(A) receptor function. Perinatal respiration is strongly modulated by GABAergic synaptic drive, and GABA release is increased during hypoxia to contribute to hypoxia-induced depression of neonatal ventilation. Here, we use in vitro and in vivo rat models to test the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptor-mediated modulation of perinatal respiration is markedly influenced by the presence of neurosteroids. The principal finding of this study was that the efficacy of GABA(A) receptor-mediated modulation of respiratory membrane potential and rhythmogenesis is markedly enhanced by allopregnanolone and depressed by dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate. These data demonstrate that the modulation of breathing via GABA(A) receptor activation will be determined by the overall balance of negative and positive neurosteroid modulators within respiratory nuclei. This adds a level of complexity that must be considered when examining the depression of breathing in mammals associated with various behavioural states and pathogenic conditions such as apnoea and sudden death suspected to be associated with central respiratory dysfunction. PMID:16690709

  13. ETHICAL TRADEOFFS IN TRIAL DESIGN: CASE STUDY OF AN HPV VACCINE TRIAL IN HIV-INFECTED ADOLESCENT GIRLS IN LOWER INCOME SETTINGS

    PubMed Central

    LINDSEY, J. C.; SHAH, S. K.; SIBERRY, G. K.; JEAN-PHILIPPE, P.; LEVIN, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    The Declaration of Helsinki and the Council of the International Organization of Medical Sciences provide guidance on standards of care and prevention in clinical trials. In the current and increasingly challenging research environment, the ethical status of a trial design depends not only on protection of participants, but also on social value, feasibility, and scientific validity. Using the example of a study assessing efficacy of a vaccine to prevent human papilloma virus in HIV-1 infected adolescent girls in low resource countries without access to the vaccine, we compare several trial designs which rank lower on some criteria and higher on others, giving rise to difficult trade-offs. This case demonstrates the need for developing more nuanced guidance documents to help researchers balance these often conflicting criteria. PMID:23725055

  14. Transition of HIV-infected youths from paediatric to adult care, a Swedish single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Westling, Katarina; Navér, Lars; Vesterbacka, Jan; Belfrage, Erik

    2016-06-01

    Background Transition of HIV-infected adolescents from paediatric care to adult care is vulnerable and entails a risk of treatment failure. Therefore, a Transitional Outpatient Clinic for HIV-infected adolescents and young adults was started in 2008. The aims were to describe the transition process and treatment results in a Swedish cohort of adolescents with HIV. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study of the adolescent and young adults with HIV at the clinic was performed in October 2013 and a 2-year follow-up at the end of 2015. Results The 34 patients in care in October 2013 were a median of 19 years, 50% were female. Thirty-one out of 34 (91%) were perinatally infected. In 2013, 88% were on antiretroviral treatment (ART), for a median duration of 9 years, 74% were on a protease inhibitor-based regimen. Twenty-nine patients were followed-up at the end of 2015. Twenty-three were transferred to the Infectious Disease Clinic and the median age for transition was 19 years. At the end of 2015, 90% were treated with ART and 61% had an integrase inhibitor-based treatment. Of those treated with ART for more than 6 months, 90% (2013) and 96% (2015) had a viral load < 50 HIV RNA copies/mL, despite resistance problems and complicating social factors. These figures were higher than reported in other studies and similar to the treatment results in the adult HIV population in Sweden. Conclusions The present study showed that it is possible to achieve good treatment results in adolescents with HIV. PMID:26950534

  15. Cortical Reorganization of Language Functioning Following Perinatal Left MCA Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Byars, Anna W.; Jacola, Lisa M.; Schapiro, Mark B.; Schmithorst, Vince J.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Holland, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Functional MRI was used to determine differences in patterns of cortical activation between children who suffered perinatal left middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and healthy children performing a silent verb generation task. Methods: Ten children with prior perinatal left MCA stroke (age 6-16 years) and ten healthy age matched…

  16. Modifying CBT for Perinatal Depression: What Do Women Want?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mahen, Heather; Fedock, Gina; Henshaw, Erin; Himle, Joseph A.; Forman, Jane; Flynn, Heather A.

    2012-01-01

    The evidence for the efficacy of CBT for depression during the perinatal period is mixed. This was a qualitative study that aimed to understand the perinatal-specific needs of depressed women in an effort to inform treatment modifications that may increase the relevance and acceptability of CBT during this period. Stratified purposeful sampling…

  17. Community Conversations with Parents to Improve Perinatal Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    The state of Indiana took a unique approach to developing a statewide plan to improve perinatal health outcomes by engaging parents in a series of focus groups, called Community Conversations in Perinatal Care (CCPC), to hear directly from consumers about their health care experiences and needs. Recognizing that disparities exist among different…

  18. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand. PMID:26598305

  19. Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abizadeh, Jasmin; Sanders, Shawn; Swift, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Perinatal generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a high prevalence of 8.5%–10.5% during pregnancy and 4.4%–10.8% postpartum. Despite its attendant dysfunction in the patient, this potentially debilitating mental health condition is often underdiagnosed. This overview will provide guidance for clinicians in making timely diagnosis and managing symptoms appropriately. A significant barrier to the diagnosis of GAD in the perinatal population is difficulty in distinguishing normal versus pathological worry. Because a perinatal-specific screening tool for GAD is nonexistent, early identification, diagnosis and treatment is often compromised. The resultant maternal dysfunction can potentially impact mother–infant bonding and influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Comorbid occurrence of GAD and major depressive disorder changes the illness course and its treatment outcome. Psychoeducation is a key component in overcoming denial/stigma and facilitating successful intervention. Treatment strategies are contingent upon illness severity. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), relaxation, and mindfulness therapy are indicated for mild GAD. Moderate/severe illness requires pharmacotherapy and CBT, individually or in combination. No psychotropic medications are approved by the FDA or Health Canada in pregnancy or the postpartum; off-label pharmacological treatment is instituted only if the benefit of therapy outweighs its risk. SSRIs/SNRIs are the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders due to data supporting their efficacy and overall favorable side effect profile. Benzodiazepines are an option for short-term treatment. While research on atypical antipsychotics is evolving, some can be considered for severe manifestations where the response to antidepressants or benzodiazepines has been insufficient. A case example will illustrate the onset, clinical course, and treatment strategies of GAD through pregnancy and the postpartum. PMID:26125602

  20. Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Assessment and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Misri, Shaila; Abizadeh, Jasmin; Sanders, Shawn; Swift, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Perinatal generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a high prevalence of 8.5%-10.5% during pregnancy and 4.4%-10.8% postpartum. Despite its attendant dysfunction in the patient, this potentially debilitating mental health condition is often underdiagnosed. This overview will provide guidance for clinicians in making timely diagnosis and managing symptoms appropriately. A significant barrier to the diagnosis of GAD in the perinatal population is difficulty in distinguishing normal versus pathological worry. Because a perinatal-specific screening tool for GAD is nonexistent, early identification, diagnosis and treatment is often compromised. The resultant maternal dysfunction can potentially impact mother-infant bonding and influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Comorbid occurrence of GAD and major depressive disorder changes the illness course and its treatment outcome. Psychoeducation is a key component in overcoming denial/stigma and facilitating successful intervention. Treatment strategies are contingent upon illness severity. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), relaxation, and mindfulness therapy are indicated for mild GAD. Moderate/severe illness requires pharmacotherapy and CBT, individually or in combination. No psychotropic medications are approved by the FDA or Health Canada in pregnancy or the postpartum; off-label pharmacological treatment is instituted only if the benefit of therapy outweighs its risk. SSRIs/SNRIs are the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders due to data supporting their efficacy and overall favorable side effect profile. Benzodiazepines are an option for short-term treatment. While research on atypical antipsychotics is evolving, some can be considered for severe manifestations where the response to antidepressants or benzodiazepines has been insufficient. A case example will illustrate the onset, clinical course, and treatment strategies of GAD through pregnancy and the postpartum. PMID:26125602

  1. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P < 0.001), with peak risk among persons born in winter. Relative to persons born in summer (June-August), incidence rate ratios for AML were 1.72 (95 % CI 1.25-2.38; P = 0.001) for winter (December-February), 1.37 (95 % CI 0.99-1.90; P = 0.06) for spring (March-May), and 1.27 (95 % CI 0.90-1.80; P = 0.17) for fall (September-November). Other risk factors for AML included high fetal growth, high gestational age at birth, and low maternal education level. These findings did not vary by sex or age at diagnosis. Sex, birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML. PMID:26113060

  2. Incarceration, Maternal Hardship, and Perinatal Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Dora M.; Wildeman, Christopher; Lee, Hedwig; Gjelsvik, Annie; Valera, Pamela A.; Clarke, Jennifer G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Parental incarceration is associated with mental and physical health problems in children, yet little research directly tests mechanisms through which parental incarceration could imperil child health. We hypothesized that the incarceration of a woman or her romantic partner in the year before birth constituted an additional hardship for already-disadvantaged women, and that these additionally vulnerable women were less likely to engage in positive perinatal health behaviors important to infant and early childhood development. Methods We analyzed 2006-2010 data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS) to assess the association between incarceration in the year prior to the birth of a child and perinatal maternal hardships and behaviors. Results Women reporting incarceration of themselves or their partners in the year before birth of a child had 0.86 the odds (95% CI .78-.95) of beginning prenatal care in the first trimester compared to women not reporting incarceration. They were nearly twice as likely to report partner abuse and were significantly more likely to rely on WIC and/or Medicaid for assistance during pregnancy. These associations persist after controlling for socioeconomic measures and other stressors, including homelessness and job loss. Conclusions Incarceration of a woman or her partner in the year before birth is associated with higher odds of maternal hardship and poorer perinatal health behaviors. The unprecedented scale of incarceration in the U.S. simultaneously presents an underutilized public health opportunity and constitutes a social determinant of health that may contribute to disparities in early childhood development. PMID:24615355

  3. Integrating Marriage Education into Perinatal Education

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Alan J.; Gilliland, Tamara; Christiaens, Glenda; Carroll, Jason S.

    2002-01-01

    Couples making the transition to parenthood experience challenges that can threaten the quality and stability of their relationships and the health of family members. Currently, the educational infrastructure to support the delivery of couple-relationship education during the transition to parenthood is limited. Because new-parent couples interact with the health care system at many points during this transition time, an opportunity exists for strengthening couple relationships within the system to improve the well-being of adults and children. In this article, we propose a productive collaboration between marriage/couple educators and health care systems to integrate couple-relationship education into the standard of perinatal care. PMID:17273316

  4. Preventing Workplace Injuries Among Perinatal Nurses.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Laura; Hurst, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of perinatal nursing put nurses at risk for injuries, including frequent repetitive bending, lifting of clients, and exposure to potentially large amounts of body fluids such as blood and amniotic fluid. Violence is also a potential risk with stressful family situations that may arise around childbirth. Workplace injuries put a health care facility at risk for staff turnover, decreases in the number of skilled nurses, client dissatisfaction, workers' compensation payouts, and employee lawsuits. Through the use of safety equipment, improved safety and violence training programs, "no manual lift" policies, reinforcement of personal protective equipment usage, and diligent staff training to improve awareness, these risks can be minimized. PMID:26902445

  5. Perinatal transmission of human papilomavirus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rombaldi, Renato L; Serafini, Eduardo P; Mandelli, Jovana; Zimmermann, Edineia; Losquiavo, Kamille P

    2009-01-01

    The purpose was to study the perinatal transmission of human papillomavirus DNA (HPV-DNA) in 63 mother-newborn pairs, besides looking at the epidemiological factors involved in the viral DNA transmission. The following sampling methods were used: (1) in the pregnant woman, when was recruited, in cervix and clinical lesions of the vagina, vulva and perineal region; (2) in the newborn, (a) buccal, axillary and inguinal regions; (b) nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c) cord blood; (3) in the children, buccal was repeated in the 4th week and 6th and 12th month of life. HPV-DNA was identified using two methodologies: multiplex PCR (PGMY09 and MY11 primers) and nested-PCR (genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58). Perinatal transmission was considered when concordance was found in type-specific HPV between mother/newborn or mother/child. HPV-DNA genital was detected in 49 pregnant women submitted to delivery. Eleven newborns (22.4%, n = 11/49) were HPV-DNA positive. In 8 cases (16.3%, n = 8/49) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. At the end of the first month of life three children (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA positive, while two remained positive from birth. In 3 cases (100%, n = 3/3) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. In the 6th month, a child (2%, n = 1/49) had become HPV-DNA positive between the 1st and 6th month of life, and there was type specific HPV concordance of mother/newborn samples. All the HPV-DNA positive children (22.4%, n = 11/49) at birth and at the end first month of life (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA negative at the age of 6 months. The HPV-DNA positive child (2%, n = 1/49) from 1st to the 6th month of life became HPV-DNA negative between the 6th and 12th month of life and one child had anogenital warts. In the twelfth month all (100%, n = 49/49) the children studied were HPV-DNA negative. A positive and significant correlation was observed between perinatal transmission

  6. Prenatal and perinatal risk factors of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Meli, Giampiero; Ottl, Birgit; Paladini, Angela; Cataldi, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Schizophrenia could be considered the most severe of all psychiatric disorders. It shows a heterogeneous clinical picture and presents an etiopathogenesis that is not cleared sufficiently. Even if the etiopathogenesis remains a puzzle, there is a scientific consensus that it is an expression of interaction between genotype and environmental factors. In the present article, following a study of literature and the accumulated evidence, the role of prenatal and perinatal factors in the development of schizophrenia will be revised and synthesized. We think that better knowledge of the risk factors could be helpful not only for better comprehension of the pathogenesis but especially to optimize interventions for prevention of the disorder. PMID:22646662

  7. Perinatal Asphyxia I: Pathogenesis of Multisystemic Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Fomufod, Antoine K.; Rahbar, Fariborz; White, Penny L.; Holloway, Albert Z.; Rampersaud, Swami R.; Henry, Lionel A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical and pathologic sequelae of perinatal asphyxia manifested by 17 neonates treated at Howard University Hospital over an 18-month period. Multiple systemic complications, occurring in 76.5 percent of the patients, were the rule rather than the exception. All vital organs were involved, singly or in combination. Understanding the pathogenesis and extent of these complications is of utmost importance not only to those rendering health care to acutely ill newborns, but also to those responsible for prenatal and maternal intrapartum care. PMID:537116

  8. [Differences in perinatal mortality between provinces: dependence on many factors].

    PubMed

    Bonsel, Gouke J; Steegers, Eric A P

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch perinatal mortality rate is relatively high when viewed in a European perspective. There appear to be also substantial differences in perinatal mortality between provinces, large cities and even between neighbourhoods. Accumulation of obstetric risk factors as well as socioeconomic and urban risks seems to be involved as well. This should be taken into account in the process of risk selection to define a high risk population needing hospital care. In 85% of all cases of perinatal mortality, one or more of the following perinatal morbidities are present, designated as the 'Big 4': congenital abnormalities, preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction and low Apgar score (< 7; 5 min after birth). Differences in perinatal mortality, the evaluation of organisational features of care and determinants like travel time from home to hospital should always be related to the case mix represented by this 'Big 4'. PMID:21382215

  9. Some observations on perinatal mortality in rural health centre.

    PubMed

    Damodar; Mathur, H N; Sharma, P N

    1983-01-01

    A 4-year study of perinatal mortality in Rural Health Training Centre, Vallabhnagar, affiliated to R.N.T. Medical College, Udaipur was conducted. The chief objective of the study was to analyze underlying causes of perinatal deaths. The perinatal mortality rate was calculated to be 74.19/100 births. Age and parity of mother and sex of the child did not affect perinatal mortality significantly. Antenatal care of mother had a significant role in determining fetal outcome and 1st week survival. Fate of the newborn was substantially affected by birth weight less than 2 kg. Training of "dais" in view of identification of "at risk" cases and nutrition education, better facilities in terms of personnel and equipment, and improvement in referral services emerged as necessary steps needed to plan strategy for lowering perinatal mortaltiy in rural areas. PMID:6680112

  10. Perinatal mortality in a rural district of south India.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, S; Rao, R S; Chakladar, B K; Krishnan, L; Nair, N S

    1998-01-01

    Perinatal mortality is one of the most sensitive indices of maternal and child health. The perinatal mortality rate is an indicator of the extent of pregnancy wastage as well as of the quality and quantity of health care available to the mother and the newborn. A community based prospective study carried out on 13,214 births in South Kanara district between Oct. 1991-Sept. 1992 revealed a perinatal mortality rate (PNMR) of 44.65/1000 births. Among the various factors influencing perinatal mortality, breech deliveries and babies of multiple pregnancies had a very high perinatal mortality rate of 180.81/1000 births (adjusted odd's ratio: 4.90) and 128/1000 births (adjusted odd's ratio: 2.64). The previous bad obstetric history of the mother, parity and sex of the newborn were among the other important factors influencing the PNMR. PMID:10773926

  11. Perinatal depression: a review of US legislation and law.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Ann M; Segre, Lisa S

    2013-08-01

    Accumulating research documenting the prevalence and negative effects of perinatal depression, together with highly publicized tragic critical incidents of suicide and filicide by mothers with postpartum psychosis, have fueled a continuum of legislation. Specialists in perinatal mental health should recognize how their work influences legislative initiatives and penal codes, and take this into consideration when developing perinatal services and research. Yet, without legal expertise, the status of legislative initiatives can be confusing. To address this shortfall, we assembled an interdisciplinary team of academics specializing in law, as well as perinatal mental health, to summarize these issues. This review presents the relevant federal and state legislation and summarizes the criminal codes that governed the court decisions on cases in which a mother committed filicide because of postpartum psychosis. Moreover, the review aims to help researchers and providers who specialize in perinatal depression understand their role in this legal landscape. PMID:23740222

  12. Presumed Perinatal Stroke: Risk Factors, Clinical and Radiological Findings.

    PubMed

    Ilves, Pilvi; Laugesaar, Rael; Loorits, Dagmar; Kolk, Anneli; Tomberg, Tiiu; Lõo, Silva; Talvik, Inga; Kahre, Tiina; Talvik, Tiina

    2016-04-01

    It is unknown why some infants with perinatal stroke present clinical symptoms late during infancy and will be identified as infants with presumed perinatal stroke. The risk factors and clinical and radiological data of 42 infants with presumed perinatal stroke (69% with periventricular venous infarction and 31% with arterial ischemic stroke) from the Estonian Pediatric Stroke Database were reviewed. Children with presumed perinatal stroke were born at term in 95% of the cases and had had no risk factors during pregnancy in 43% of the cases. Children with periventricular venous infarction were born significantly more often (82%) vaginally (P = .0213) compared to children with arterial stroke (42%); nor did they require resuscitation (P = .0212) or had any neurological symptoms after birth (P = .0249). Periventricular venous infarction is the most common type of lesion among infants with the presumed perinatal stroke. Data suggest that the disease is of prenatal origin. PMID:26446909

  13. Rate and Time Trend of Perinatal, Infant, Maternal Mortality, Natality and Natural Population Growth in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Gashi, Sanije; Berisha, Majlinda; Kolgeci, Selim; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work has been the presentation of the rate and time trends of some indicators of the heath condition of mothers and children in Kosovo: fetal mortality, early neonatal mortality, perinatal mortality, infant mortality, natality, natural growth of population etc. The treated patients were the newborn and infants in the post neonatal period, women during their pregnancy and those 42 days before and after the delivery. Methods: The data were taken from: register of the patients treated in the Pediatric Clinic of Prishtina, World Health Organization, Mother and Child Health Care, Reproductive Health Care, Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kosovo, Statistical Department of Kosovo, the National Institute of Public Health and several academic texts in the field of pediatrics. Some indicators were analyzed in a period between year 1945-2010 and 1950-2010, whereas some others were analyzed in a time period between year 2000 and 2011. Results: The perinatal mortality rate in 2000 was 29.1‰, whereas in 2011 it was 18.7‰. The fetal mortality rate was 14.5‰ during the year 2000, whereas in 2011 it was 11.0‰, in 2000 the early neonatal mortality was 14.8‰, in 2011 it was 7.5‰. The infant mortality in Kosovo was 164‰ in 1950, whereas in 2010 it was 20.5‰. The most frequent causes of infant mortality have been: lower respiratory tract infections, acute infective diarrhea, perinatal causes, congenital malformations and unclassified conditions. Maternal death rate varied during this time period. Maternal death in 2000 was 23 whereas in 2010 only two cases were reported. Regarding the natality, in 1950 it reached 46.1 ‰, whereas in 2010 it reached 14‰, natural growth of population rate in Kosovo was 29.1‰ in 1950, whereas in 2011 it was 11.0‰. Conclusion: Perinatal mortality rate in Kosovo is still high in comparison with other European countries (Turkey and Kyrgyzstan have the highest perinatal mortality rate), even though it is in a

  14. Effect of Young Maternal Age on Obstetric and Perinatal Outcomes: Results from the Tertiary Center in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Oya; Yılmaz, Ertuğrul; Tosun, Özgür; Kumru, Pınar; Arınkan, Arzu; Mahmutoğlu, Didar; Selçuk, Selçuk; Dolgun, Zehra Nihal; Arısoy, Resul; Erdoğdu, Emre; Tarhan, Nazan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Young maternal age is variously defined in studies of its effect on obstetrics and perinatal outcomes. Also, pregnancy has been reported as the leading cause of death in adolescent girls in low- and middle-income countries. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate whether young maternal age was associated with an increased risk of obstetrics and perinatal adverse outcomes. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: This case-control study was derived from a database of the medical records between January 2008 and December 2012. In the present study, 1374 teenage pregnancy and 1294 adult pregnancy cases were included. After restriction of analyses to singleton primiparous women, 1282 teenage pregnancy and 735 adult pregnancy cases were analyzed. Maternal age was separated into three groups: 15 and less, 16–19, and 20–34 years. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were derived through logistic regression models for the potential confounding factors. Results: Adolescents aged 15 years and younger had higher risks of preterm delivery, early preterm delivery, intrauterine fetal death and neonatal death compared with women aged 20 to 34 years after adjustment for confounding factors. In addition, both groups of adolescents had higher risks for anemia and episiotomy and lower risk of cesarean delivery. The rates of preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, chronic diseases, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were higher in the adult group. Conclusion: Younger maternal age was correlated with increased risks of preterm delivery, fetal and neonatal death and anemia. PMID:27308080

  15. Perinatal Bereavement: A Principle-based Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    FENSTERMACHER, Kimberly; HUPCEY, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of perinatal bereavement. Background The concept of perinatal bereavement emerged in the scientific literature during the 1970s. Perinatal bereavement is a practice based concept, although it is not well defined in the scientific literature and is often intermingled with the concepts of mourning and grief. Design Concept Analysis. Data Sources Using the term ‘perinatal bereavement’ and limits of only English and human, Pub Med and CINAHL were searched to yield 278 available references dating from 1974 – 2011. Articles specific to the experience of perinatal bereavement were reviewed. The final data set was 143 articles. Review Methods The methods of principle-based concept analysis were used. Results reveal conceptual components (antecedents, attributes and outcomes) which are delineated to create a theoretical definition of perinatal bereavement. Results The concept is epistemologically immature, with few explicit definitions to describe the phenomenon. Inconsistency in conceptual meaning threatens the construct validity of measurement tools for perinatal bereavement and contributes to incongruent theoretical definitions. This has implications for both nursing science (how the concept is studied and theoretically integrated) and clinical practice (timing and delivery of support interventions). Conclusions Perinatal bereavement is a multifaceted global phenomenon that follows perinatal loss. Lack of conceptual clarity and lack of a clearly articulated conceptual definition impede the synthesis and translation of research findings into practice. A theoretical definition of perinatal bereavement is offered as a platform for researchers to advance the concept through research and theory development. PMID:23458030

  16. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Contraception is a pillar in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians develop a working knowledge of contraception to help adolescents reduce risks of and negative health consequences related to unintended pregnancy. Over the past 10 years, a number of new contraceptive methods have become available to adolescents, newer guidance has been issued on existing contraceptive methods, and the evidence base for contraception for special populations (adolescents who have disabilities, are obese, are recipients of solid organ transplants, or are HIV infected) has expanded. The Academy has addressed contraception since 1980, and this policy statement updates the 2007 statement on contraception and adolescents. It provides the pediatrician with a description and rationale for best practices in counseling and prescribing contraception for adolescents. It is supported by an accompanying technical report. PMID:25266430

  17. Therapeutic Targets for Neurodevelopmental Disorders Emerging from Animal Models with Perinatal Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ibi, Daisuke; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2015-01-01

    Increasing epidemiological evidence indicates that perinatal infection with various viral pathogens enhances the risk for several psychiatric disorders. The pathophysiological significance of astrocyte interactions with neurons and/or gut microbiomes has been reported in neurodevelopmental disorders triggered by pre- and postnatal immune insults. Recent studies with the maternal immune activation or neonatal polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid models of neurodevelopmental disorders have identified various candidate molecules that could be responsible for brain dysfunction. Here, we review the functions of several candidate molecules in neurodevelopment and brain function and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets for psychiatric disorders. PMID:26633355

  18. Current concepts in perinatal mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Yasuhisa; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi

    2016-01-01

    The serum levels of calcium (Ca) and phosphate are maintained higher in the fetus than in the pregnant mother, especially in late gestation, to meet the demands of fetal bone development. In order to maintain this fetal stage-specific mineral homeostasis, the placenta plays a critical role through active transcellular mineral transport. Although the molecular mechanism of transplacental Ca transport has been well studied, little is known about the transport mechanism of phosphate and magnesium. Maternal mineral homeostasis is also altered during pregnancy to supply minerals to the fetus. In the lactating mother, osteocytic osteolysis is suggested to be involved in the supply of minerals to the baby. The levels of some calcitropic and phosphotropic (Ca- and phosphate-regulating, respectively) hormones in the fetus are also different from those in the adult. The PTH level in the fetus is lower than that in the mother and nonpregnant adult. It is suggested, however, that low fetal PTH plays an important role in fetal mineral metabolism. The concentration of PTHrP in the fetus is much higher than that of PTH and plays a critical role in perinatal Ca homeostasis. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms for fetal stage-specific mineral metabolism will lead to better management of perinatal patients with mineral abnormalities. PMID:26865750

  19. Current concepts in perinatal mineral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Yasuhisa; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The serum levels of calcium (Ca) and phosphate are maintained higher in the fetus than in the pregnant mother, especially in late gestation, to meet the demands of fetal bone development. In order to maintain this fetal stage-specific mineral homeostasis, the placenta plays a critical role through active transcellular mineral transport. Although the molecular mechanism of transplacental Ca transport has been well studied, little is known about the transport mechanism of phosphate and magnesium. Maternal mineral homeostasis is also altered during pregnancy to supply minerals to the fetus. In the lactating mother, osteocytic osteolysis is suggested to be involved in the supply of minerals to the baby. The levels of some calcitropic and phosphotropic (Ca- and phosphate-regulating, respectively) hormones in the fetus are also different from those in the adult. The PTH level in the fetus is lower than that in the mother and nonpregnant adult. It is suggested, however, that low fetal PTH plays an important role in fetal mineral metabolism. The concentration of PTHrP in the fetus is much higher than that of PTH and plays a critical role in perinatal Ca homeostasis. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms for fetal stage-specific mineral metabolism will lead to better management of perinatal patients with mineral abnormalities. PMID:26865750

  20. Disasters and Perinatal Health: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Harville, EW; Xiong, X; Buekens, P

    2012-01-01

    Background The empirical literature on the effects of disaster on pregnancy and the postpartum period is limited. The objective of this review was to examine the existing evidence on the effect of disasters on perinatal health. Methods A systematic review was conducted by searching electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl, PsycInfo), including literature on disasters and pregnancy outcomes (e.g., preterm birth, low birthweight, congenital anomalies), mental health, and child development. 110 articles were identified, but many published reports were anecdotes or recommendations rather than systematic studies. The final review included 49 peer-reviewed studies that met inclusion criteria. Results Studies addressing the World Trade Center disaster of September 11th and other terrorist attacks, environmental/chemical disasters, and natural disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes were identified. Disasters of various types may reduce fetal growth in some women, though there does not appear to be an effect on gestational age at birth. Severity of exposure is the major predictor of mental health issues among pregnant and postpartum women. The mother's mental health after a disaster may more strongly influence on child development than any direct effect of disaster-related prenatal stress. Conclusions There is evidence that disaster impacts maternal mental health and some perinatal health outcomes, particular among highly-exposed women. Future research should focus on under-studied outcomes such as spontaneous abortion. Relief workers and clinicians should concentrate on the most exposed women, particularly with respect to mental health. PMID:21375788

  1. Perinatal testicular torsion and medicolegal considerations.

    PubMed

    Massoni, F; Troili, G M; Pelosi, M; Ricci, S

    2014-06-01

    Perinatal testicular torsion (PTT) is a very complex condition because of rarity of presentation and diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. In presence of perinatal testicular torsion, the involvement of contralateral testis can be present also in absence of other indications which suggest the bilateral involvement; therefore, occurrences supported by literature do not exclude the use of surgery to avoid the risk of omitted or delayed diagnosis. The data on possible recovery of these testicles are not satisfactory, and treatment consists of an observational approach ("wait-and-see") or an interventional approach. The hypothesis of randomized clinical trials seems impracticable because of rarity of disease. The authors present a case of PTT, analyzing injuries due to clinical and surgical management of these patients, according to medicolegal profile. The delayed diagnosis and the choice of an incorrect therapeutic approach can compromise the position of healthcare professionals, defective in terms of skill, prudence and diligence. Endocrine insufficiency is an unfortunate event. The analysis of literature seems to support, because of high risk, a surgical approach aimed not only at resolution of unilateral pathology or prevention of a relapse, but also at prevention of contralateral testicular torsion. PMID:24826979

  2. [Perinatal corticosteroid therapy: modalities, efficacy, consequences].

    PubMed

    Magny, J F; Rigourd, V; Kieffer, F; Voyer, M

    2001-02-01

    During perinatal period, corticosteroid treatment has two major indications: first antenatally to improve fetal maturity and then to treat postnatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Antenatal corticosteroid treatment is widely proved to be efficient in reducing hyaline membrane disease and perinatal mortality incidence. Moreover, it has positive effects on intraventricular hemorrhage incidence, on hemodynamic failure, on persistent patent ductus arteriosus and on necrotizing enterocolitis. Side-effects are few and mild considering expected benefits and they usually occurs after multiple courses. Contra-indications are rare. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia comes with early, important and prolonged inflammatory processes. Corticotherapy allows decreasing significantly length of mechanical ventilation and oxygenotherapy among ventilated premature infants diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In the meantime, acute side-effects are frequent and benefits on mortality rate and long term outcome are not obvious. Main concern remains on possible long-term deleterious consequences on growth, lung and central nervous system development. In this field, clinical data are still insufficient as animal experimentation data promote caution and search for a minimal efficient therapeutic pathway. PMID:11240516

  3. Vitamin B-12 and Perinatal Health.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Julia L; Layden, Alexander J; Stover, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Vitamin B-12 deficiency (<148 pmol/L) is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, including developmental anomalies, spontaneous abortions, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (<2500 g). The importance of adequate vitamin B-12 status periconceptionally and during pregnancy cannot be overemphasized, given its fundamental role in neural myelination, brain development, and growth. Infants born to vitamin B-12-deficient women may be at increased risk of neural tube closure defects, and maternal vitamin B-12 insufficiency (<200 pmol/L) can impair infant growth, psychomotor function, and brain development, which may be irreversible. However, the underlying causal mechanisms are unknown. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links maternal vitamin B-12 status and perinatal outcomes. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency and associated risk of pregnancy complications, few prospective studies and, to our knowledge, only 1 randomized trial have examined the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of adverse perinatal outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions. PMID:26374177

  4. Implementing a perinatal substance abuse screening tool.

    PubMed

    Wallman, Carol M; Smith, Pat Bohling; Moore, Karen

    2011-08-01

    Newborns exposed to illicit drugs or alcohol in utero can face physical, social, and emotional obstacles. Outcomes for children with fetal alcohol syndrome disorders are well documented in the literature. Data exist on the effects of maternal illicit drug use. Identifying perinatal substance abuse can increase positive outcomes for newborns and create the opportunity for mothers to access assistance through referrals to community resources.This article provides insight on how hospitals can implement an effective screening tool through patient surveying and testing, nurse education, and collaboration with community agencies in a multidisciplinary advisory committee setting.This discussed method of universal perinatal screening results in increased positive screens and increased referrals for care and support. Emphasis is placed on universal screening and testing methods. Nurses are trained in motivational interview techniques that convey empathy, listening, and objectivity. Community agencies partner with hospital staff through onsite meetings with families that determine the best discharge plan for the newborn. The multidisciplinary advisory committee meets continually to discuss future enhancements. PMID:22123347

  5. Default Mode Connectivity in Youth With Perinatally Acquired HIV

    PubMed Central

    Herting, Megan M.; Uban, Kristina A.; Williams, Paige L.; Gautam, Prapti; Huo, Yanling; Malee, Kathleen; Yogev, Ram; Csernansky, John; Wang, Lei; Nichols, Sharon; Van Dyke, Russell; Sowell, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Youth with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus (PHIV+) survive longer with combination antiretroviral therapy, but remain at risk for poor cognitive outcomes. We evaluated whether markers of HIV disease severity relate to default mode resting-state functional connectivity in PHIV+ youth. We conducted resting-state functional neuroimaging and cognitive testing in a subset of 40 PHIV+ youth recruited from a single study site of the Adolescent Master Protocol study conducted by the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) network. Current and past HIV disease severity measures (nadir CD4 lymphocyte percentages and peak HIV RNA plasma levels) were obtained from medical charts. We evaluated associations of both HIV disease severity measures and cognitive functioning with between- and within- default mode network (DMN) connectivity using Analysis of Functional NeuroImaging multiple regression analyses, controlling for multiple comparisons. Of the 40 youth, 31 (mean age = 16.5 years) with minimal motion during scans were included. We observed global alterations in DMN within- and between-network connectivity, with significant associations between disease severity and DMN BOLD correlations. Furthermore, patterns of connectivity with the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that varied as a function of peak HIV RNA were found to predict processing speed ability. Alterations in within- and between-network DMN connectivity in PHIV+ youth may reflect global reorganization of the DMN; this could lead to compensatory alterations in both the within- and between-connectivity of large-scale networks, which may ultimately relate to known cognitive processing difficulties in PHIV+ youth. PMID:26376381

  6. Lack of evidence for perinatal transmission of Cytauxzoon felis in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kristin M; Cohn, Leah A; Birkenheuer, Adam J

    2012-08-13

    Cytauxzoon felis is a hemoprotozoan parasite of cats capable of causing severe, often fatal disease during acute infection, but cats that survive the acute stage of disease become chronic carriers. These otherwise healthy carriers are capable of transmitting the infection to other cats via the bite of a vector tick. A variety of other hematoprotozoan parasites are capable of vertical transmission from mother to offspring. If this were possible for C. felis, it could be an important part of the explanation for the apparent emergence of this disease with an increased incidence in an expanding geographic area. We investigated the possibility of perinatal transmission of C. felis from chronically infected cats to their offspring. Two queens produced a total of 14 healthy kittens in three litters. All kittens tested negative for C. felis by microscopic slide review and PCR until they were adopted to private homes at approximately 12 weeks of age. While this does not rule out the possibility of perinatal transmission, it is unlikely to be a common phenomenon. PMID:22429699

  7. Brief Report: Autistic Disorder in Three Children with Cytomegalovirus Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeten, Thayne L.; Posey, David J.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    Previous research has identified a relationship between autistic disorder (autism) and specific congenital infections. Three cases of congenital or perinatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurring in association with autism are described. Hypothetical mechanisms relating congenital infection, such as CMV, to the development of autism are…

  8. [Parasitic infections in pregnancy and congenital parasitoses. II. Helminth infections].

    PubMed

    Bialek, R; Knobloch, J

    1999-01-01

    The main sequela of helminthic infections is anemia, causing increased perinatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. During pregnancy symptomatic treatment is usually sufficient to control the disease. The specific and very effective treatment with albendazole, mebendazole, ivermectin and praziquantel has embryo-, fetotoxic, mutagenic and teratogenic potential. Therefore, it should be delayed until after delivery. In some cases immediate specific therapy might be mandatory. Congenital helminthic infection in humans is a rarely described event. PMID:10448707

  9. Perinatal and Family Risk Factors for Hodgkin Lymphoma in Childhood Through Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Kristina; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Sundquist, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of Hodgkin lymphoma has increased among adolescents and young adults in recent decades, but the relevant risk factors in early life are still unknown. A national cohort study was conducted of 3,571,574 individuals born in Sweden in 1973–2008 and followed up for Hodgkin lymphoma incidence through 2009, to examine perinatal and family risk factors for Hodgkin lymphoma in childhood through young adulthood (ages 0–37 years). There were 943 Hodgkin lymphoma cases identified in 66.3 million person-years of follow-up. High fetal growth was associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin lymphoma after adjustment for gestational age at birth and other potential confounders (Ptrend = 0.005). Family history of Hodgkin lymphoma in a sibling or parent also was strongly associated with an increased risk, with adjusted hazard ratios = 8.83 (95% confidence interval: 3.67, 21.30) and 7.19 (95% confidence interval: 3.58, 14.44), respectively. No association was found between gestational age at birth, birth order, twinning, parental age, or parental education and Hodgkin lymphoma. These findings did not vary by age at Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis. Similar associations were found for nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity subtypes. These findings suggest that perinatal factors including possible growth factor pathways may contribute to the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma in childhood through young adulthood. PMID:23171883

  10. Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections Among HIV-Exposed and HIV-Infected Children: Recommendations from CDC, the National Institutes of Health, the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and the American Academy of Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Mofenson, Lynne M.; Brady, Michael T.; Danner, Susie P.; Dominguez, Kenneth L.; Hazra, Rohan; Handelsman, Edward; Havens, Peter; Nesheim, Steve; Read, Jennifer S.; Serchuck, Leslie; Van Dyke, Russell

    2010-01-01

    endorsement by NIH, CDC, the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society (PIDS), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The recommendations are rated by a letter that indicates the strength of the recommendation and a Roman numeral that indicates the quality of the evidence supporting the recommendation so readers can ascertain how best to apply the recommendations in their practice environments. An important mode of acquisition of OIs, as well as HIV infection among children, is from their infected mother; HIV-infected women coinfected with opportunistic pathogens might be more likely than women without HIV infection to transmit these infections to their infants. In addition, HIV-infected women or HIV-infected family members coinfected with certain opportunistic pathogens might be more likely to transmit these infections horizontally to their children, resulting in increased likelihood of primary acquisition of such infections in the young child. Therefore, infections with opportunistic pathogens might affect not just HIV-infected infants but also HIV-exposed but uninfected infants who become infected by the pathogen because of transmission from HIV-infected mothers or family members with coinfections. These guidelines for treating OIs in children therefore consider treatment of infections among all children, both HIV-infected and uninfected, born to HIV-infected women. Additionally, HIV infection is increasingly seen among adolescents with perinatal infection now surviving into their teens and among youth with behaviorally acquired HIV infection. Although guidelines for postpubertal adolescents can be found in the adult OI guidelines, drug pharmacokinetics and response to treatment may differ for younger prepubertal or pubertal adolescents. Therefore, these guidelines also apply to treatment of HIV-infected youth who have not yet completed pubertal development. Major changes in the

  11. Adolescent development

    MedlinePlus

    Development - adolescent; Growth and development - adolescent ... During adolescence, children develop the ability to: Understand abstract ideas. These include grasping higher math concepts, and developing moral ...

  12. Adolescent development

    MedlinePlus

    Development - adolescent; Growth and development - adolescent ... rights and privileges. Establish and maintain satisfying relationships. Adolescents will learn to share intimacy without feeling worried ...

  13. Assessment of the magnitude and associated factors of immunological failure among adult and adolescent HIV-infected patients in St. Luke and Tulubolo Hospital, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bayou, Bekelech; Sisay, Abay; Kumie, Abera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has become a standard of care for the treatment of HIV infection. However, cost and resistance to ART are major obstacles for access to treatment especially in resource-limited settings. In this study, we aimed to assess the magnitude and associated factors of Immunological failure among adult and adolescent HIV infected Patients (with age ‘15yrs) on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) in St. Luke and Tulu Bolo Hospitals, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Methods A retrospective follow-up study was conducted among HIV-infected patients initiated 1st line ART at St. Luke and Tulu Bolo Hospitals, South West Shoa Zone, Oromia, Ethiopia. Results A total of 828 patient charts were reviewed. 477(57.6%) were female and the median age was 32 years. The median baseline CD4 count was 148cells/mm3. The most common prescribed ART was TDF based (36.7%). Out of 828 patients chart reviewed 6.8% (56) were developed immunological failure. Out of them only 20 (2.4%) were detected and put on second line regimen. The incidence of immunological failure was 1.8 cases per 100 person years of follow-up. Patients who had not disclosed their HIV status to any one had high risk of immunological failure compared with patients those who had disclosed their HIV status (AHR, 0.429; 95% CI 0.206 - 0.893; P-value=0.024). Conclusion Non disclosures of HIV status and with ambulatory of baseline functional status were found to be predictors of immunological failure. Most of the immunological failure cases were not detected early and not switched to second line ARV regimen. So patients with the above risk factors should be considered for a timely switch to second line HAART. PMID:26587140

  14. [Perinatal Information System. Incorporation latency and impact on perinatal clinical registry].

    PubMed

    Simini, F; Fernández, A; Sosa, C; Díaz Rossello, J L

    2001-10-01

    The Perinatal Information System (SIP) is a clinical record, local management and quality assurance software standard in Latin America and the Caribbean. The time to implement SIP in a Maternity Hospital is evaluated as well as the effect of statistics on perinatal health indicators in subsequent years. In the sample of 20 Maternity Hospitals (5 Countries, 40% Private and 60% Public) 85% had a reliable information system by the third year of use of SIP. 15% of hospitals still had problems at that time that were already clear during the second year, a time corrective measures can still be taken. The evaluation of the impact of yearly reports shows that 58% of recommendations were fulfilled, specially those regarding the complete filling-in of clinical records (62%) and to a lesser extent variables that reflect clinical practices and organization of services (52%). The conclusion is that Maternity Hospitals in Latin America and the Caribbean have the capacity to adopt a complex tool of computerized clinical records for quality assurance of perinatal care and monitoring of health indicators. PMID:11816526

  15. Support after perinatal death: a study of support and counselling after perinatal bereavement.

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, G C; Standish, E; Baum, J D

    1982-01-01

    After an earlier study into the practical aspects of the management of perinatal death, a counselling service was introduced for parents whose baby had died in the perinatal period. The service was monitored, and the parents who received the service were compared with a group that did not. Fifty families were allocated randomly either to the counselling (supported) group or to the contrast group, who received routine hospital care. Assessment was carried out at six and 14 months after the death, using a semi-structured interview and two self-rating scales (the general health questionnaire and the Leeds scales). Two of 16 mothers in the supported group showed psychiatric disorder at six months, compared with 10 of 19 in the contrast group (p less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). There was no significant difference between the two groups at 14 months, when 80% of all the women studied had recovered psychiatric symptoms. Socially isolated women and those who marital relations lacked intimacy had a higher incidence of psychiatric symptoms at six months. Early pregnancy (within six months) was associated with a higher incidence of psychiatric symptoms in the unsupported group. The duration of bereavement reaction after perinatal death was appreciably shortened by support and counselling. PMID:6814610

  16. Recommendations for assisting in the prevention of perinatal transmission of human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    1985-12-01

    The majority of cases of pediatric acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are transmitted perinatally. 165 (76%) of the cases of AIDS in children under 13 years of age reported as of December 1, 1985, in the US had as the only known risk factor a mother from a high-risk group. However, perinatal transmission from an infected mother to her infant is not automatic; studies have placed the rate of transmission from 0%-65%. A concern in addition to the risk posed to infants born to infected mothers is evidence of an increased likelihood of developing full-blown AIDS when infection with the AIDS virus occurs in association in pregnancy. Target groups for counseling and testing for antibodies to the AIDS virus should include pregnant women or those who may become pregnant who already have evidence of AIDS infection, are intravenous drug abusers, were born in countries where there is a high rate of heterosexual transmission of AIDS, are prostitutes, or are the sexual partners of men in high-risk groups. Such counseling and testing should be made available through the settings that women at increased risk frequent, including drug abuse treatment programs and sexually transmitted diseases clinics. Infected women should be advised to delay pregnancy until more is known about the perinatal transmission of AIDS. Pregnancy infected women should be closely monitored for the development of opportunistic infections as well as psychosocial difficulties. Although these recommendations pertain to women, men who are infected with the AIDS virus also should be counseled about risks of perinatal transmission. PMID:2999576

  17. Elevated Risk for HIV-1 Infection in Adolescents and Young Adults in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bassichetto, Katia Cristina; Bergamaschi, Denise Pimentel; Oliveira, Solange Maria; Verri Deienno, Marylei Casteldelli; Bortolato, Reginaldo; de Rezende, Heloíza Vilma; Arthur, Thaís; Tomiyama, Helena; Watkins, Colyn; Mesquita, Fabio; Abbate, Maria Cristina; Kallas, Esper Georges

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent studies have sought to describe HIV infection and transmission characteristics around the world. Identification of early HIV-1 infection is essential to proper surveillance and description of regional transmission trends. In this study we compare people recently infected (RI) with HIV-1, as defined by Serologic Testing Algorithm for Recent HIV Seroconversion (STARHS), to those with chronic infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Subjects were identified from 2002–2004 at four testing sites in São Paulo. Of 485 HIV-1-positive subjects, 57 (12%) were defined as RI. Of the participants, 165 (34.0%) were aware of their serostatus at the time of HIV-1 testing. This proportion was statistically larger (p<0.001) among the individuals without recent infection (n = 158, 95.8%) compared to 7 individuals (4.2%) with recently acquired HIV-1 infection. In the univariate analysis, RI was more frequent in <25 and >59 years-old age strata (p<0.001). The majority of study participants were male (78.4%), 25 to 45 years-old (65.8%), white (63.2%), single (61.7%), with family income of four or more times the minimum wage (41.0%), but with an equally distributed educational level. Of those individuals infected with HIV-1, the predominant route of infection was sexual contact (89.4%), with both hetero (47.5%) and homosexual (34.5%) exposure. Regarding sexual activity in these individuals, 43.9% reported possible HIV-1 exposure through a seropositive partner, and 49.4% reported multiple partners, with 47% having 2 to 10 partners and 37.4% 11 or more; 53.4% of infected individuals reported condom use sometimes; 34.2% reported non-injecting, recreational drug use and 23.6% were reactive for syphilis by VDRL. Subjects younger than 25 years of age were most vulnerable according to the multivariate analysis. Conclusions/Significance In this study, we evaluated RI individuals and discovered that HIV-1 has been spreading among younger individuals in São Paulo and

  18. Training Pediatric Psychologists for Perinatal Behavioral Health Services in a Pediatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Rhonda C; Scharko, Alexander M; Cole, Joanna C M; Patterson, Chavis A; Benton, Tami D; Power, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    Although pediatric hospitals specialize in providing care to children and adolescents, at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), our team has been providing behavioral health services for two unique parent populations-parents with a child in the Newborn Infant Intensive Care Unit and pregnant women carrying fetuses with specific birth defects and receiving prenatal care in the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment. A new training program was developed to expand the scope of pediatric psychologists' practice to include perinatal behavioral health services, specifically for these two unique parent populations served at CHOP. The program includes direct service provision for adult mental health concerns, as well as education and support to help families cope with the existing medical conditions. This article describes the training program and its implementation as a model of training for other pediatric hospitals. The roles of psychologists embedded in these units and hospital privileges are discussed. PMID:26531132

  19. Cytokines in the perinatal period - Part I.

    PubMed

    Chau, A; Markley, J C; Juang, J; Tsen, L C

    2016-05-01

    Successful pregnancy requires a state of immune homeostasis. Maternal tolerance of the genetically distinct fetoplacental unit is in part mediated by maternal and fetal pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines; these cytokines have also been implicated in different pregnancy-related pathologic states. This two-part series seeks to provide anesthesiologists with an overview on selected perinatal cytokines in an effort to identify opportunities for research and improvements in clinical care. In part one, we review basic and pregnancy-related elements of the immune system, with an emphasis on the role of cytokines. From this foundation, we offer a perspective of a unique phenomenon witnessed within obstetric anesthesia - maternal temperature elevation associated with labor epidural analgesia. PMID:26970932

  20. Perinatal mortality at pre-Columbian Teotihuacan.

    PubMed

    Storey, R

    1986-04-01

    The skeletal population of 166 individuals from a low-status apartment compound of the pre-Columbian city of Teotihuacan contained 52 perinatal individuals. The most perilous time of the lifespan was around birth, as revealed by life table analysis. Femur length was not increasing during the last month of gestation, and individuals were probably shorter somatically at birth than modern standards or historic-period Arikara skeletal controls. The possibility of intrauterine growth retardation is investigated through paleo-pathological indicators of prenatal growth arrest. The evidence of prenatal stress and the high rate of mortality at birth seem to indicate that this New World preindustrial urban population faced similar health and nutritional stresses as Old World preindustrial cities. PMID:3521307

  1. Cost-effectiveness of antiviral therapy during late pregnancy to prevent perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Jingjing; Dang, Shuangsuo; Zhuang, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are perinatally transmitted from chronically infected mothers. Supplemental antiviral therapy during late pregnancy with lamivudine (LAM), telbivudine (LdT), or tenofovir (TDF) can substantially reduce perinatal HBV transmission compared to postnatal immunoprophylaxis (IP) alone. However, the cost-effectiveness of these measures is not clear. Aim. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective of supplemental antiviral agents for preventing perinatal HBV transmission in mothers with high viral load (>6 log10 copies/mL). Methods. A systematic review and network meta-analysis were performed for the risk of perinatal HBV transmission with antiviral therapies. A decision analysis was conducted to evaluate the clinical and economic outcomes in China of four competing strategies: postnatal IP alone (strategy IP), or in combination with perinatal LAM (strategy LAM + IP), LdT (strategy LdT + IP), or TDF (strategy TDF + IP). Antiviral treatments were administered from week 28 of gestation to 4 weeks after birth. Outcomes included treatment-related costs, number of infections, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). One- and two-way sensitivity analyses were performed to identify influential clinical and cost-related variables. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to estimate the probabilities of being cost-effective for each strategy. Results. LdT + IP and TDF + IP averted the most infections and HBV-related deaths, and gained the most QALYs. IP and TDF + IP were dominated as they resulted in less or equal QALYs with higher associated costs. LdT + IP had an incremental $2,891 per QALY gained (95% CI [$932-$20,372]) compared to LAM + IP (GDP per capita for China in 2013 was $6,800). One-way sensitivity analyses showed that the cost-effectiveness of LdT + IP was only sensitive to the relative risk of HBV transmission comparing LdT + IP with LAM + IP. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses

  2. Cost-effectiveness of antiviral therapy during late pregnancy to prevent perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Jingjing; Zhuang, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are perinatally transmitted from chronically infected mothers. Supplemental antiviral therapy during late pregnancy with lamivudine (LAM), telbivudine (LdT), or tenofovir (TDF) can substantially reduce perinatal HBV transmission compared to postnatal immunoprophylaxis (IP) alone. However, the cost-effectiveness of these measures is not clear. Aim. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective of supplemental antiviral agents for preventing perinatal HBV transmission in mothers with high viral load (>6 log10 copies/mL). Methods. A systematic review and network meta-analysis were performed for the risk of perinatal HBV transmission with antiviral therapies. A decision analysis was conducted to evaluate the clinical and economic outcomes in China of four competing strategies: postnatal IP alone (strategy IP), or in combination with perinatal LAM (strategy LAM + IP), LdT (strategy LdT + IP), or TDF (strategy TDF + IP). Antiviral treatments were administered from week 28 of gestation to 4 weeks after birth. Outcomes included treatment-related costs, number of infections, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). One- and two-way sensitivity analyses were performed to identify influential clinical and cost-related variables. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to estimate the probabilities of being cost-effective for each strategy. Results. LdT + IP and TDF + IP averted the most infections and HBV-related deaths, and gained the most QALYs. IP and TDF + IP were dominated as they resulted in less or equal QALYs with higher associated costs. LdT + IP had an incremental $2,891 per QALY gained (95% CI [$932–$20,372]) compared to LAM + IP (GDP per capita for China in 2013 was $6,800). One-way sensitivity analyses showed that the cost-effectiveness of LdT + IP was only sensitive to the relative risk of HBV transmission comparing LdT + IP with LAM + IP. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses

  3. Optimizing the treatment of mood disorders in the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Jones, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The perinatal period is a time of high risk for women with unipolar and bipolar mood disorders. We discuss treatment considerations for perinatal mood disorders, including unipolar and bipolar depression as well as postpartum psychosis. We further explore the unique issues faced by women and their families across the full trajectory of the perinatal period from preconception planning through pregnancy and following childbirth. Treatment of perinatal mood disorders requires a collaborative care approach between obstetrics practitioners and mental health providers, to ensure that a thoughtful risk : benefit analysis is conducted. It is vital to consider the risks of the underlying illness versus risks of medication exposure during pregnancy or lactation. When considering medication treatment, attention must be paid to prior medication trials that were most efficacious and best tolerated. Lastly, it is important to assess the impact of individual psychosocial stressors and lifestyle factors on treatment response. PMID:26246794

  4. Disparities in Perinatal Quality Outcomes for Very Low Birth Weight Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Eileen T; Staiger, Douglas; Horbar, Jeffrey; Kenny, Michael J; Patrick, Thelma; Rogowski, Jeannette A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if hospital-level disparities in very low birth weight (VLBW) infant outcomes are explained by poorer hospital nursing characteristics. Data Sources Nurse survey and VLBW infant registry data. Study Design Retrospective study of 8,252 VLBW infants in 98 Vermont Oxford Network hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) nationally. NICUs were classified into three groups based on their percent of infants of black race. Two nurse-sensitive perinatal quality standards were studied: nosocomial infection and breast milk. Data Collection Primary nurse survey (N = 5,773, 77 percent response rate). Principal Findings VLBW infants born in high-black concentration hospitals had higher rates of infection and discharge without breast milk than VLBW infants born in low-black concentration hospitals. Nurse understaffing was higher and practice environments were worse in high-black as compared to low-black hospitals. NICU nursing features accounted for one-third to one-half of the hospital-level health disparities. Conclusions Poorer nursing characteristics contribute to disparities in VLBW infant outcomes in two nurse-sensitive perinatal quality standards. Improvements in nursing have potential to improve the quality of care for seven out of ten black VLBW infants who are born in high-black hospitals in this country. PMID:25250882

  5. Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease presenting as hydrops fetalis

    PubMed Central

    BenHamida, Emira; Ayadi, Imene; Ouertani, Ines; Chammem, Maroua; Bezzine, Ahlem; BenTmime, Riadh; Attia, Leila; Mrad, Ridha; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease is very rare and is considered a variant of type 2 Gaucher disease that occurs in the neonatal period. The most distinct features of perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease are non-immune hydrops fetalis. Less common signs of the disease are hepatosplenomegaly, ichthyosis and arthrogryposis. We report a case of Gaucher's disease (type 2) diagnosed in a newborn who presented with Hydrops Fetalis. PMID:26327947

  6. Effects of an Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health Intervention on Health Service Usage by Young People in Northern Ghana: A Community-Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aninanya, Gifty Apiung; Debpuur, Cornelius Y.; Awine, Timothy; Williams, John E.; Hodgson, Abraham; Howard, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Background While many Ghanaian adolescents encounter sexual and reproductive health problems, their usage of services remains low. A social learning intervention, incorporating environment, motivation, education, and self-efficacy to change behaviour, was implemented in a low-income district of northern Ghana to increase adolescent services usage. This study aimed to assess the impact of this intervention on usage of sexual and reproductive health services by young people. Methods Twenty-six communities were randomly allocated to (i) an intervention consisting of school-based curriculum, out-of-school outreach, community mobilisation, and health-worker training in youth-friendly health services, or (ii) comparison consisting of community mobilisation and youth-friendly health services training only. Outcome measures were usage of sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) management, HIV counselling and testing, antenatal care or perinatal services in the past year and reported service satisfaction. Data was collected, at baseline and three years after, from a cohort of 2,664 adolescents aged 15–17 at baseline. Results Exposure was associated with over twice the odds of using STI services (AOR 2.47; 95%CI 1.78–3.42), 89% greater odds of using perinatal services (AOR 1.89; 95%CI 1.37–2.60) and 56% greater odds of using antenatal services (AOR 1.56; 95%CI 1.10–2.20) among participants in intervention versus comparison communities, after adjustment for baseline differences. Conclusions The addition of targeted school-based and outreach activities increased service usage by young people more than community mobilisation and training providers in youth-friendly services provision alone. PMID:25928562

  7. Correlates of prevalent HIV infection among adults and adolescents in the Kisumu incidence cohort study, Kisumu, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Gumbe, Anne; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Gust, Deborah A; Pals, Sherri L; Gray, Kristen Mahle; Ndivo, Richard; Chen, Robert T; Mills, Lisa A; Thomas, Timothy K

    2015-11-01

    We estimated HIV prevalence and identified correlates of HIV infection among 1106 men and women aged 16-34 years residing in Kisumu, Kenya. Demographic, sexual, and other behavioural data were collected using audio computer-assisted self-interview in conjunction with a medical examination, real-time parallel rapid HIV testing, and laboratory testing for pregnancy, gonorrhoea, chlamydia, syphilis, and herpes simplex virus type 2. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify variables associated with prevalent HIV infection by gender. Overall HIV prevalence was 12.1%. HIV prevalence among women (17.1%) was approximately two-and-one-half times the prevalence among men (6.6%). Odds of HIV infection in men increased with age (aOR associated with one-year increase in age = 1.21, CI = 1.07-1.35) and were greater among those who were uncircumcised (aOR = 4.42, CI = 1.41-13.89) and those who had an herpes simplex virus type 2-positive (aOR = 3.13, CI = 1.12-8.73) test result. Odds of prevalent HIV infection among women also increased with age (aOR associated with one-year increase in age = 1.16, CI = 1.04-1.29). Women who tested herpes simplex virus type 2 positive had more than three times the odds (aOR = 3.85, CI = 1.38-10.46) of prevalent HIV infection compared with those who tested herpes simplex virus type 2 negative. Tailored sexual health interventions and programs may help mitigate HIV age and gender disparities. PMID:25505039

  8. Magnitude of income-related disparities in adverse perinatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess and compare multiple measurements of socioeconomic position (SEP) in order to determine the relationship with adverse perinatal outcomes across various contexts. Methods A birth registry, the Nova Scotia Atlee Perinatal Database, was confidentially linked to income tax and related information for the year in which delivery occurred. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine odds ratios between multiple indicators of SEP and multiple adverse perinatal outcomes in 117734 singleton births between 1988 and 2003. Models for after tax family income were also adjusted for neighborhood deprivation to gauge the relative magnitude of effects related to SEP at both levels. Effects of SEP were stratified by single- versus multiple-parent family composition, and by urban versus rural location of residence. Results The risk of small for gestational age and spontaneous preterm birth was higher across all the indicators of lower SEP, while risk for large for gestational age was lower across indicators of lower SEP. Higher risk of postneonatal death was demonstrated for several measures of lower SEP. Higher material deprivation in the neighborhood of residence was associated with increased risk for perinatal death, small for gestational age birth, and iatrogenic and spontaneous preterm birth. Family composition and urbanicity were shown to modify the association between income and some perinatal outcomes. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of understanding the definitions of SEP and the mechanisms that lead to the association between income and poor perinatal outcomes, and broadening the types of SEP measures used in some cases. PMID:24589212

  9. Agricultural pesticide exposure and perinatal mortality in central Sudan.

    PubMed Central

    Taha, T. E.; Gray, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Hospital- and community-based studies were conducted in central Sudan to investigate the association between pesticide exposure and perinatal mortality. The cases were 197 stillbirths in the hospital and 36 perinatal deaths in the community; the controls were 812 liveborn, normal-birth-weight infants in the hospital, and 1505 liveborn infants who survived for the first 7 days after birth in the community. The odds ratio (OR) of perinatal death associated with pesticide exposure was estimated using multiple logistic regression. There was a consistent and significant association between pesticide exposure and perinatal mortality in the hospital (adjusted OR = 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-2.8) and the community populations (adjusted OR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.1-6.4). The OR was significantly higher among women engaged in farming (3.6; 95% CI: 1.6-8.0), but not among women in nonfarming occupations (1.6; 95% CI: 0.8-3.3). The estimated attributable risks of perinatal death owing to pesticide exposure were 22.6% for hospital stillbirths and 15.7% for community perinatal deaths; but among women engaged in farming in the hospital population the attributable risks were substantially higher (34.5%). PMID:8324850

  10. Spatial Analysis of China Province-level Perinatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    XIANG, Kun; SONG, Deyong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Using spatial analysis tools to determine the spatial patterns of China province-level perinatal mortality and using spatial econometric model to examine the impacts of health care resources and different socio-economic factors on perinatal mortality. Methods: The Global Moran’s I index is used to examine whether the spatial autocorrelation exists in selected regions and Moran’s I scatter plot to examine the spatial clustering among regions. Spatial econometric models are used to investigate the spatial relationships between perinatal mortality and contributing factors. Results: The overall Moran’s I index indicates that perinatal mortality displays positive spatial autocorrelation. Moran’s I scatter plot analysis implies that there is a significant clustering of mortality in both high-rate regions and low-rate regions. The spatial econometric models analyses confirm the existence of a direct link between perinatal mortality and health care resources, socio-economic factors. Conclusions: Since a positive spatial autocorrelation has been detected in China province-level perinatal mortality, the upgrading of regional economic development and medical service level will affect the mortality not only in region itself but also its adjacent regions. PMID:27398334

  11. Mortality Trends in the US Perinatal AIDS Collaborative Transmission Study (1986–2004)

    PubMed Central

    Soe, Minn M.; Nesheim, Steven R.; Abrams, Elaine J.; Carter, Rosalind J.; Farley, John; Palumbo, Paul; Koenig, Linda J.; Bulterys, Marc

    2011-01-01

    (See the Editorial Commentary by Nachman, on pages 1035–6.) Background. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–associated morbidity and mortality. The bimodal mortality distribution in HIV-infected children makes it important to evaluate temporal effects of HAART among a birth cohort with long-term, prospective follow-up. Methods. Perinatal AIDS Collaborative Transmission Study (PACTS)/PACTS–HIV Follow-up of Perinatally Exposed Children (HOPE) study was a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–sponsored multicenter, prospective birth cohort study of HIV-exposed uninfected and infected infants from 1985 until 2004. Mortality was evaluated for the no/monotherapy, mono-/dual-therapy, and HAART eras, that is, 1 January 1986 through 31 December 1990, from 1 January 1991 through 31 December 1996, and 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2004. Results. Among 364 HIV-infected children, 56% were female and 69% black non-Hispanic. Of 98 deaths, 79 (81%) and 61 (62%) occurred in children ≤3 and ≤2 years old, respectively. The median age at death increased significantly across the eras (P < .0001). The average annual mortality rates were 18 (95% confidence interval [CI], 11.6–26.8), 6.9 (95% CI, 5.4–8.8), and 0.8 (95% CI, 0.4–1.5) events per 100 person-years for the no/monotherapy, mono-/dual-therapy and HAART eras, respectively. The corresponding 6-year survival rates for children born in these eras were 57%, 76%, and 91%, respectively (P < .0001). Among children who received HAART in the first 6 months of age, the probability of 6-year survival was 94%. Ten-year survival rates for HAART and non-HAART recipients were 94% and 45% (P < .05). HAART-associated reductions in mortality remained significant after adjustment for confounders (hazard ratio, 0.3; 95% CI, .08–.76). Opportunistic infections (OIs) caused 31.8%, 16.9%, and 9.1% of deaths across the respective eras (P = .051). Conclusions

  12. Etiologies of illness among patients meeting integrated management of adolescent and adult illness district clinician manual criteria for severe infections in northern Tanzania: implications for empiric antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Rubach, Matthew P; Maro, Venance P; Bartlett, John A; Crump, John A

    2015-02-01

    We describe the laboratory-confirmed etiologies of illness among participants in a hospital-based febrile illness cohort study in northern Tanzania who retrospectively met Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness District Clinician Manual (IMAI) criteria for septic shock, severe respiratory distress without shock, and severe pneumonia, and compare these etiologies against commonly used antimicrobials, including IMAI recommendations for emergency antibacterials (ceftriaxone or ampicillin plus gentamicin) and IMAI first-line recommendations for severe pneumonia (ceftriaxone and a macrolide). Among 423 participants hospitalized with febrile illness, there were 25 septic shock, 37 severe respiratory distress without shock, and 109 severe pneumonia cases. Ceftriaxone had the highest potential utility of all antimicrobials assessed, with responsive etiologies in 12 (48%) septic shock, 5 (14%) severe respiratory distress without shock, and 19 (17%) severe pneumonia illnesses. For each syndrome 17-27% of participants had etiologic diagnoses that would be non-responsive to ceftriaxone, but responsive to other available antimicrobial regimens including amphotericin for cryptococcosis and histoplasmosis; anti-tuberculosis therapy for bacteremic disseminated tuberculosis; or tetracycline therapy for rickettsioses and Q fever. We conclude that although empiric ceftriaxone is appropriate in our setting, etiologies not explicitly addressed in IMAI guidance for these syndromes, such as cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, and tetracycline-responsive bacterial infections, were common. PMID:25385866

  13. Genetic variation in the promoter region of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in perinatal HIV transmission from Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Swati; Mania-Pramanik, Jayanti; Chavan, Vijay; Kerkar, Shilpa; Samant-Mavani, Padmaja; Nanavati, Ruchi; Mehta, Preeti

    2015-03-01

    Various host factors such as cytokines and HLA, regulate the immune system and influence HIV transmission to infants exposed to HIV-1 through their mothers. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-α) is a strong pro-inflammatory mediator and thought to influence vulnerability to HIV infection (and/or) transmission. Polymorphisms in regulatory regions are known to govern the production of this cytokine. However, the association of these variations in perinatal HIV transmission is yet to be established. Present study aimed to evaluate if polymorphisms in promoter region of TNF-α gene is associated with perinatal HIV transmission. With informed consent from parents, infants' blood was collected for HIV screening and SNPs analysis at 2 loci: TNF (rs1800629) and TNF (rs361525) using PCR-SSP method. HIV positive (n = 27) and negative (n = 54) children at the end of 18th month follow up were considered for this study. GG genotype, responsible for low expression of TNF (rs1800629) was significantly (p = 0.005) higher in uninfected children, while higher GA genotype frequency was observed in infected children. The 'G' allele frequency was significantly higher in negative children (p = 0.016). We conclude that genotypic variants of TNF (rs1800629) are a likely contributor to perinatal HIV transmission. This provides new insights in markers of differential susceptibility to perinatal HIV transmission. PMID:25544182

  14. Adolescent Behavior Change: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Educational Programs and Studies Information Service.

    This focus paper contains reprints of 11 articles intended to provide an overview of the key issues in the area of adolescent behavior change as it relates to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) education. Included are: (1) "Preventing HIV Infection and AIDS in Children and Adolescents" (J.…

  15. Outbreak of Hepatitis E in Urban Bangladesh Resulting in Maternal and Perinatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Gurley, Emily S.; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Paul, Repon C.; Sazzad, Hossain M. S.; Islam, M. Saiful; Parveen, Shahana; Faruque, Labib I.; Husain, Mushtuq; Ara, Khorshed; Jahan, Yasmin; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes outbreaks of jaundice associated with maternal mortality. Four deaths among pregnant women with jaundice occurred in an urban community near Dhaka, Bangladesh, in late 2008 and were reported to authorities in January 2009. We investigated the etiology and risk factors for jaundice and death. Methods. Field workers identified suspected cases, defined as acute onset of yellow eyes or skin, through house-to-house visits. A subset of persons with suspected HEV was tested for immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to HEV to confirm infection. We used logistic regression analysis to identify risk factors for HEV disease and for death. We estimated the increased risk of perinatal mortality associated with jaundice during pregnancy. Results. We identified 4751 suspected HEV cases during August 2008–January 2009, including 17 deaths. IgM antibodies to HEV were identified in 56 of 73 (77%) case-patients tested who were neighbors of the case-patients who died. HEV disease was significantly associated with drinking municipally supplied water. Death among persons with HEV disease was significantly associated with being female and taking paracetamol (acetaminophen). Among women who were pregnant, miscarriage and perinatal mortality was 2.7 times higher (95% confidence interval, 1.2–6.1) in pregnancies complicated by jaundice. Conclusions. This outbreak of HEV was likely caused by sewage contamination of the municipal water system. Longer-term efforts to improve access to safe water and license HEV vaccines are needed. However, securing resources and support for intervention will rely on convincing data about the endemic burden of HEV disease, particularly its role in maternal and perinatal mortality. PMID:24855146

  16. Incidental Finding of Ebstein’s Anomaly in an Adolescent with an Upper Respiratory Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Rohit; Paul, Premila

    2016-01-01

    Ebstein’s anomaly is a rare congenital heart disorder and has a varied clinical course, with detection as late as the seventh decade. We hereby describe an 11-year-old child in whom Ebstein’s anomaly was diagnosed. The most common presentation in early second decade is due to an arrhythmia; however, the present case report is about a patient who presented with acute congestive heart failure due to decompensation from an acute upper respiratory tract infection, which is a rather uncommon presentation. PMID:27134958

  17. Perinatal Dyadic Psychotherapy: Design, Implementation, and Acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Janice H.; Guarino, AJ.; Prager, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Maternal postpartum depression (PPD) and mother-infant relationship dysfunction have reciprocal effects on each other and thus an integrated approach that addresses both problems simultaneously may lead to improved outcomes. This study aimed to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a new intervention, Perinatal Dyadic Psychotherapy (PDP), for the early treatment of maternal PPD. PDP is designed to promote maternal mental health and facilitate optimal mother-infant relationships via (a) a supportive, relationship-based, mother-infant psychotherapeutic component, and (b) a developmentally-based infant-oriented component focused on promoting positive mother-infant interactions. This paper describes the pilot use of PDP with six acutely depressed postpartum women. Nurses delivered the intervention over eight home visits. Results indicate that PDP is a feasible, acceptable, and safe intervention with this population. All participants achieved remission of depression with significant reduction in of depression and anxiety symptoms, suggesting that PDP is a promising treatment for PPD. PMID:23562990

  18. Perinatal induction of Cre recombination with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Lizen, Benoit; Claus, Melissa; Jeannotte, Lucie; Rijli, Filippo M; Gofflot, Françoise

    2015-12-01

    Temporal control of site-specific recombination is commonly achieved by using a tamoxifen-inducible form of Cre or Flp recombinases. Although powerful protocols of induction have been developed for gene inactivation at adult stages or during embryonic development, induction of recombination at late gestational or early postnatal stages is still difficult to achieve. In this context, using the ubiquitous CMV-CreER(T2) transgenic mice, we have tested and validated two procedures to achieve recombination just before and just after birth. The efficiency of recombination was evaluated in the brain, which is known to be more problematic to target. For the late gestation treatment with tamoxifen, different protocols of complementary administration of progesterone and estrogen were tested. However, delayed delivery and/or mortality of pups due to difficult delivery were always observed. To circumvent this problem, pups were collected from tamoxifen-treated pregnant dams by caesarian section at E18.5 and given to foster mothers. For postnatal treatment, different dosages of tamoxifen were administered by intragastric injection to the pups during 3 or 4 days after birth. The efficiency of these treatments was analyzed at P7 using a transgenic reporter line. They were also validated with the Hoxa5 conditional allele. In conclusion, we have developed efficient procedures that allow achieving efficient recombination of floxed alleles at perinatal stages. These protocols will allow investigating the late/adult functions of many developmental genes, whose characterization has been so far restricted to embryonic development. PMID:26395370

  19. Visual function and perinatal focal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, E; Atkinson, J; Braddick, O; Anker, S; Nokes, L; Cowan, F; Rutherford, M; Pennock, J; Dubowitz, L

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the visual function of infants with perinatal cerebral infarction in whom the site and size of the lesion has been determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Twelve infants with cerebral infarction on MRI were studied with a battery of tests specifically designed to evaluate visual function in infancy. This included tests: for visual attention (fixation shifts); of cerebral asymmetry (optokinetic nystagmus, visual fields); for assessment of acuity (forced choice preferential looking); and neurophysiological measures of vision (phase reversal and orientation reversal visual evoked potential). RESULTS: A considerable incidence of abnormalities on at least one of the tests for visual function used was observed. The presence or severity of visual abnormalities could not always be predicted by the site and extent of the lesion seen on imaging. CONCLUSIONS: Early focal lesions affecting the visual pathway can, to some extent, be compensated for by the immature developing brain. These data suggest that all the infants presenting with focal lesions need to be investigated with a detailed assessment of various aspects of vision. Images PMID:8949687

  20. Behavioral effects of perinatal opioid exposure.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Anna; Tímár, Júlia; Zelena, Dóra

    2014-05-28

    Opioids are among the world's oldest known drugs used mostly for pain relief, but recreational use is also widespread. A particularly important problem is opioid exposure in females, as their offspring can also be affected. Adverse intrauterine and postnatal environments can affect offspring development and may lead to various disabilities later in life. It is clear that repetitive painful experiences, such as randomly occurring invasive procedures during neonatal intensive care, can permanently alter neuronal and synaptic organization and therefore later behavior. At the same time, analgesic drugs can also be harmful, inducing neuronal apoptosis or withdrawal symptoms in the neonate and behavioral alterations in adulthood. Hence, risk-benefit ratios should be taken into consideration when pain relief is required during pregnancy or in neonates. Recreational use of opioids can also alter many aspects of life. Intrauterine opioid exposure has many toxic effects, inducing poor pregnancy outcomes due to underdevelopment, but it is believed that later negative consequences are more related to environmental factors such as a chaotic lifestyle and inadequate prenatal care. One of the crucial components is maternal care, which changes profoundly in addicted mothers. In substance-dependent mothers, pre- and postnatal care has special importance, and controlled treatment with a synthetic opioid (e.g., methadone) could be beneficial. We aimed to summarize and compare human and rodent data, as it is important to close the gap between scientific knowledge and societal policies. Special emphasis is given to gender differences in the sensitivity of offspring to perinatal opioid exposure. PMID:24746901

  1. Cardiotocography in the Prognosis of Perinatal Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanovic, Gordana; Babovic, Adnan; Rizvanovic, Mirzeta; Ljuca, Dzenita; Grgic, Gordana; Djuranovic–Milicic, Jadranaka

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The objective of the study was to examine whether cardiotocography can (CTG) predict asphyxia of the embryo, manifested as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), and to what extent one can rely on CTG record. Material and methods: Retrospective research was carried out at the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics UKC Tuzla and medical documentation from the history of mothers and newborns was used. The study group consisted of 68 pregnancies and newborns who developed HIE. The control group consisted of 40 pregnancies, which resulted in birth of healthy newborns – without signs of asphyxia. CTG records were analyzed, Apgar score, the ways of finishing delivery. Results: Pathological CTG records (bradycardia 100, tachycardia 180, silent type of curve, late decelerations) were found in 45 (66,17%) cases of the study group in comparison to 11 (27,5%) in the control group. In the study group Apgar score in 5th minute lower than 7 had 17,46% newborns and the highest incidence of the normally finished deliveries. We conclude that cardiotocography is one of the reliable methods of fetal monitoring in pregnancy and delivery, and that pathological CTG record very likely indicates the possible presence of perinatal asphyxia. Conclusion: Achieving a low degree of correlation between pathological intrapartum cardiotocography findings and long-term outcome of children can be achieved by rapid and adequate obstetric intervention and the relatively short duration of fetal acidosis, and optimal procedures during intensive care of newborns. PMID:24937932

  2. Smoking and adolescent health.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hee

    2011-10-01

    With the Westernization and opening of our society, adolescents' smoking is increasing and being popularized. Many adolescents start smoking at an early age out of curiosity and venturesomeness, and earlier start of smoking makes it more difficult to quit smoking. Adolescents' habitual smoking not only becomes a gateway to all kinds of substance abuse but also causes various health problems including upper respiratory infection, immature lung development, reduced maximum vital capacity, and lung cancer. Therefore, it is quite important to prevent adolescents from smoking. The lowering of adolescents' smoking rate cannot be achieved only through social restrictions such as stereotyped education on the harms of smoking and ID checking. In order to lower adolescents' smoking rate substantially, each area of society should develop standardized programs and make related efforts. As adolescents' smoking is highly influenced by home environment or school life, it is necessary to make efforts in effective education and social reinforcement in school, to establish related norms, and to execute preventive education using peer groups. When these efforts are spread throughout society in cooperation with homes and communities, they will be helpful to protect adolescents' health and improve their quality of life. PMID:22232621

  3. Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infection seropositivity and risk behavior among sexually active transgender patients at an adolescent and young adult urban community health center.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Sari L; Vetters, Ralph; White, Jaclyn M; Cohen, Elijah L; LeClerc, M; Zaslow, Shayne; Wolfrum, Sarah; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    The sexual health of transgender adolescents and young adults who present for health care in urban community health centers is understudied. A retrospective review of electronic health record (EHR) data was conducted from 180 transgender patients aged 12-29 years seen for one or more health-care visits between 2001 and 2010 at an urban community health center serving youth in Boston, MA. Analyses were restricted to 145 sexually active transgender youth (87.3% of the sample). Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) seroprevalence, demographics, sexual risk behavior, and structural and psychosocial risk indicators were extracted from the EHR. Analyses were descriptively focused for HIV and STIs. Stratified multivariable logistic regression models were fit for male-to-female (MTF) and female-to-male (FTM) patients separately to examine factors associated with any unprotected anal and/or vaginal sex (UAVS). The mean age was 20.0 (SD=2.9); 21.7% people of color, 46.9% white (non-Hispanic), 21.4% race/ethnicity unknown; 43.4% MTF, and 56.6% FTM; and 68.3% were on cross-sex hormones. Prevalence of STIs: 4.8% HIV, 2.8% herpes simplex virus, 2.8% syphilis, 2.1% chlamydia, 2.1% gonorrhea, 2.8% hepatitis C, 1.4% human papilloma virus. Only gonorrhea prevalence significantly differed by gender identity (MTF 2.1% vs. 0.0% FTM; p=0.046). Nearly half (47.6%) of the sample engaged in UAVS (52.4% MTF, 43.9% FTM, p=0.311). FTM more frequently had a primary sex partner compared to MTF (48.8% vs. 25.4%; p=0.004); MTF more frequently had a casual sex partner than FTM (69.8% vs. 42.7% p=0.001). In multivariable models, MTF youth who were younger in age, white non-Hispanic, and reported a primary sex partner had increased odds of UAVS; whereas, FTM youth reporting a casual sex partner and current alcohol use had increased odds of UAVS (all p<0.05). Factors associated with sexual risk differ for MTF and FTM youth. Partner type appears pivotal to understanding

  4. Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infection seropositivity and risk behavior among sexually active transgender patients at an adolescent and young adult urban community health center

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Sari L.; Vetters, Ralph; White, Jaclyn M.; Cohen, Elijah L.; LeClerc, M.; Zaslow, Shayne; Wolfrum, Sarah; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The sexual health of transgender adolescents and young adults who present for health care in urban community health centers is understudied. A retrospective review of electronic health record (EHR) data was conducted from 180 transgender patients aged 12–29 years seen for one or more health-care visits between 2001 and 2010 at an urban community health center serving youth in Boston, MA. Analyses were restricted to 145 sexually active transgender youth (87.3% of the sample). Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) seroprevalence, demographics, sexual risk behavior, and structural and psychosocial risk indicators were extracted from the EHR. Analyses were descriptively focused for HIV and STIs. Stratified multivariable logistic regression models were fit for male-to-female (MTF) and female-to-male (FTM) patients separately to examine factors associated with any unprotected anal and/or vaginal sex (UAVS). The mean age was 20.0 (SD = 2.9); 21.7% people of color, 46.9% white (non-Hispanic), 21.4% race/ethnicity unknown; 43.4% MTF, and 56.6% FTM; and 68.3% were on cross-sex hormones. Prevalence of STIs: 4.8% HIV, 2.8% herpes simplex virus, 2.8% syphilis, 2.1% chlamydia, 2.1% gonorrhea, 2.8% hepatitis C, 1.4% human papilloma virus. Only gonorrhea prevalence significantly differed by gender identity (MTF 2.1% vs. 0.0% FTM; p = 0.046). Nearly half (47.6%) of the sample engaged in UAVS (52.4% MTF, 43.9% FTM, p = 0.311). FTM more frequently had a primary sex partner compared to MTF (48.8% vs. 25.4%; p = 0.004); MTF more frequently had a casual sex partner than FTM (69.8% vs. 42.7% p = 0.001). In multivariable models, MTF youth who were younger in age, white non-Hispanic, and reported a primary sex partner had increased odds of UAVS; whereas, FTM youth reporting a casual sex partner and current alcohol use had increased odds of UAVS (all p < 0.05). Factors associated with sexual risk differ for MTF and FTM youth. Partner type appears pivotal to

  5. Perinatal and sociodemographic factors at birth predicting conduct problems and violence to age 18 years: comparison of Brazilian and British birth cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Joseph; Maughan, Barbara; Menezes, Ana M B; Hickman, Matthew; MacLeod, John; Matijasevich, Alicia; Gonçalves, Helen; Anselmi, Luciana; Gallo, Erika A G; Barros, Fernando C

    2015-01-01

    Background Many low- and middle-income countries have high levels of violence. Research in high-income countries shows that risk factors in the perinatal period are significant precursors of conduct problems which can develop into violence. It is not known whether the same early influences are important in lower income settings with higher rates of violence. This study compared perinatal and sociodemographic risk factors between Brazil and Britain, and their role in explaining higher rates of conduct problems and violence in Brazil. Methods Prospective population-based birth cohort studies were conducted in Pelotas, Brazil (N = 3,618) and Avon, Britain (N = 4,103). Eleven perinatal and sociodemographic risk factors were measured in questionnaires completed by mothers during the perinatal period. Conduct problems were measured in questionnaires completed by mothers at age 11, and violence in self-report questionnaires completed by adolescents at age 18. Results Conduct problems were predicted by similar risk factors in Brazil and Britain. Female violence was predicted by several of the same risk factors in both countries. However, male violence in Brazil was associated with only one risk factor, and several risk factor associations were weaker in Brazil than in Britain for both females and males. Almost 20% of the higher risk for conduct problems in Brazil compared to Britain was explained by differential exposure to risk factors. The percentage of the cross-national difference in violence explained by early risk factors was 15% for females and 8% for males. Conclusions A nontrivial proportion of cross-national differences in antisocial behaviour are related to perinatal and sociodemographic conditions at the start of life. However, risk factor associations are weaker in Brazil than in Britain, and influences in other developmental periods are probably of particular importance for understanding male youth violence in Brazil. PMID:25471542

  6. Fetal distress and in utero pneumonia in perinatal dolphins during the Northern Gulf of Mexico unusual mortality event.

    PubMed

    Colegrove, Kathleen M; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Litz, Jenny; Kinsel, Michael J; Terio, Karen A; Fougeres, Erin; Ewing, Ruth; Pabst, D Ann; McLellan, William A; Raverty, Stephen; Saliki, Jeremiah; Fire, Spencer; Rappucci, Gina; Bowen-Stevens, Sabrina; Noble, Lauren; Costidis, Alex; Barbieri, Michelle; Field, Cara; Smith, Suzanne; Carmichael, Ruth H; Chevis, Connie; Hatchett, Wendy; Shannon, Delphine; Tumlin, Mandy; Lovewell, Gretchen; McFee, Wayne; Rowles, Teresa K

    2016-04-12

    An unusual mortality event (UME) involving primarily common bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus of all size classes stranding along coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, USA, started in early 2010 and continued into 2014. During this northern Gulf of Mexico UME, a distinct cluster of perinatal dolphins (total body length <115 cm) stranded in Mississippi and Alabama during 2011. The proportion of annual dolphin strandings that were perinates between 2009 and 2013 were compared to baseline strandings (2000-2005). A case-reference study was conducted to compare demographics, histologic lesions, and Brucella sp. infection prevalence in 69 UME perinatal dolphins to findings from 26 reference perinates stranded in South Carolina and Florida outside of the UME area. Compared to reference perinates, UME perinates were more likely to have died in utero or very soon after birth (presence of atelectasis in 88 vs. 15%, p < 0.0001), have fetal distress (87 vs. 27%, p < 0.0001), and have pneumonia not associated with lungworm infection (65 vs. 19%, p = 0.0001). The percentage of perinates with Brucella sp. infections identified via lung PCR was higher among UME perinates stranding in Mississippi and Alabama compared to reference perinates (61 vs. 24%, p = 0.01), and multiple different Brucella omp genetic sequences were identified in UME perinates. These results support that from 2011 to 2013, during the northern Gulf of Mexico UME, bottlenose dolphins were particularly susceptible to late-term pregnancy failures and development of in utero infections including brucellosis. PMID:27068499

  7. Mapping Perinatal Nursing Process Measurement Concepts to Standard Terminologies.

    PubMed

    Ivory, Catherine H

    2016-07-01

    The use of standard terminologies is an essential component for using data to inform practice and conduct research; perinatal nursing data standardization is needed. This study explored whether 76 distinct process elements important for perinatal nursing were present in four American Nurses Association-recognized standard terminologies. The 76 process elements were taken from a valid paper-based perinatal nursing process measurement tool. Using terminology-supported browsers, the elements were manually mapped to the selected terminologies by the researcher. A five-member expert panel validated 100% of the mapping findings. The majority of the process elements (n = 63, 83%) were present in SNOMED-CT, 28% (n = 21) in LOINC, 34% (n = 26) in ICNP, and 15% (n = 11) in CCC. SNOMED-CT and LOINC are terminologies currently recommended for use to facilitate interoperability in the capture of assessment and problem data in certified electronic medical records. Study results suggest that SNOMED-CT and LOINC contain perinatal nursing process elements and are useful standard terminologies to support perinatal nursing practice in electronic health records. Terminology mapping is the first step toward incorporating traditional paper-based tools into electronic systems. PMID:27081756

  8. Low perinatal autopsy rate in Malaysia: time for a change.

    PubMed

    Tan, Geok Chin; Hayati, Abdul Rahman; Khong, Teck Yee

    2010-01-01

    Our objectives were to determine the perinatal autopsy rate in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia and to quantify the value of the perinatal autopsy. All stillbirths, miscarriages, therapeutic abortions, and neonatal deaths between January 1, 2004, and August 31, 2009, were identified from the archives. The autopsy findings were compared with the clinical diagnoses. The autopsy reports were also reviewed to determine if it would be possible to improve the quality of the autopsies. There were 807 perinatal deaths, of which 36 (4.5%) included an autopsy. There were ethnic differences in the rate of autopsy, with the lowest rate among the Malays. The autopsy provided the diagnosis, changed the clinical diagnosis, or revealed additional findings in 58.3% of cases. Ancillary testing, such as microbiology, chromosomal analysis, and biochemistry, could improve the quality of the autopsy. This study provides further data on the perinatal autopsy rate from an emerging and developing country. It reaffirms the value of the perinatal autopsy. Attempts must be made to improve on the low autopsy rate while recognizing that the performance of autopsies can be enhanced through the use of ancillary testing. PMID:20367214

  9. Perinatal 192 IgG-Saporin as Neuroteratogen.

    PubMed

    Petrosini, Laura; De Bartolo, Paola; Cutuli, Debora; Gelfo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin selectively destroys basal forebrain cholinergic neurons that provide cholinergic input to the hippocampus, entire cortical mantle, amygdala, and olfactory bulb. Perinatal immunotoxic lesions by 192 IgG-saporin induce long-lasting cholinergic depletion mimicking a number of developmental disorders reported in humans. The perinatal injection of 192 IgG-saporin induces several brain modifications, which are observed in neocortex and hippocampus at short and long term. These plastic changes involve both structural (alterations in brain volume, neuronal morphology, and neurogenesis) and molecular (modulations of the levels of neurotransmitters and other proteins related to neurodegeneration) levels. Moreover, the perinatal injection of 192 IgG-saporin may interact with the brain plastic capacity to react to other injuries. Perinatal 192 IgG-saporin lesions allowed investigating the role of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in modulating behavioral functions in developing as well as adult rats. After perinatal cholinergic depletion, rats display reduced ultrasonic vocalizations as neonates, learning and exploratory deficits as juveniles, altered discriminative abilities, impulsive and perseverative behaviors, and memory deficits as adults. Overall, these findings underline the importance of cholinergic system integrity for the development of specific structural and functional features. PMID:26695170

  10. Provider communication on perinatal depression: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Farr, Sherry L; Ko, Jean Y; Burley, Kim; Gupta, Seema

    2016-02-01

    Women's lack of knowledge on symptoms of perinatal depression and treatment resources is a barrier to receiving care. We sought to estimate the prevalence and predictors of discussing depression with a prenatal care provider. We used the 2011 population-based data from 24 sites participating in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (n = 32,827 women with recent live births) to examine associations between maternal characteristics and report that a prenatal care provider discussed with her what to do if feeling depressed during or after pregnancy. Overall, 71.9 % of women reported discussing perinatal depression with their prenatal care provider (range 60.7 % in New York City to 85.6 % in Maine). Women were more likely to report a discussion on perinatal depression with their provider if they they were 18-29 years of age than over 35 years of age compared to older (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 18 to 19 y = 1.08, 20 to 24 y = 1.10, 25 to 29 y = 1.09), unmarried (aPR = 1.07) compared to married, had <12 years of education (aPR = 1.05) compared to > 12 years, and had no previous live births (aPR = 1.03) compared to ≥ 1 live births. Research is needed on effective ways to educate women about perinatal depression and whether increased knowledge on perinatal depression results in higher rates of treatment and shorter duration of symptoms. PMID:25578631

  11. Intrauterine herpes simplex virus infection presenting with hypopigmented lesions.

    PubMed

    Low, Lynette C M; Carton, James; Walker, Marjorie; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Hardman, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a sexually transmitted infection that can be transmitted from mother to child in utero, perinatally, or postnatally. Cutaneous infection with HSV commonly presents as vesicles affecting the skin, eyes, or mouth. In our case, we report a well child with cutaneous hypopigmented patches at birth that preceded typical blistering. PMID:22010816

  12. Substance Use and the Development of Sexual Risk Behaviors in Youth Perinatally Exposed to HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bauermeister, José A.; Santamaria, E. Karina; Dolezal, Curtis; Mellins, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the longitudinal association between sexual behavior and substance use in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) and perinatally HIV-exposed-but-uninfected (PHIV−) youth. Methods Growth curve modeling was used with data from N = 340 PHIV-exposed youth (60.6% PHIV+; 9–22 years) to estimate the onset of penetrative and unprotected sex across time, adding alcohol and marijuana use trajectories as time-varying covariates and examining HIV-status differences. Results The odds of penetrative or unprotected sex more than doubled across time. Alcohol and marijuana use significantly increased the odds of engaging in sex and unprotected sex, with no HIV-status differences. The association between unprotected sex and alcohol use was less salient for PHIV+ than PHIV− youth. Conclusions Similar to youth from other populations, PHIV+ and PHIV− youth are increasingly engaging in sex and substance use as they age. Targeted interventions to prevent sexual risk behavior and further HIV transmission should address the influence of substance use. PMID:25476800

  13. Prenatal, perinatal and neonatal risk factors of Autism Spectrum Disorder: a comprehensive epidemiological assessment from India.

    PubMed

    Mamidala, Madhu Poornima; Polinedi, Anupama; P T V, Praveen Kumar; Rajesh, N; Vallamkonda, Omsai Ramesh; Udani, Vrajesh; Singhal, Nidhi; Rajesh, Vidya

    2013-09-01

    Incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is increasing across the globe and no data is available from India regarding the risk factors of ASD. In this regard a questionnaire based epidemiological assessment was carried out on prenatal, perinatal and neonatal risk factors of ASD across 8 cities in India. A retrospective cohort of 942 children was enrolled for the study. 471 children with ASD, under age of 10, were analyzed for pre-, peri-, and neonatal factors and were compared with the observations from equal number of controls. The quality control of the questionnaire and data collection was done thoroughly and the observations were computed statistically. A total of 25 factors were evaluated by unadjusted and adjusted analysis in this study. Among the prenatal factors considered, advanced maternal age, fetal distress and gestational respiratory infections were found to be associated with ASD and had an odds ratio of 1.8. Evaluation of perinatal and neonatal risk factors showed labor complications, pre-term birth, neonatal jaundice, delayed birth cry and birth asphyxia to be associated with ASD with an odds ratio greater than 1.5. This important study, first of its kind in Indian population gives a firsthand account of the relation of pre-, peri- and neonatal risk factors on ASD from an ethnically and socially diverse country like India, the impact of which was unknown earlier. This advocates additional focused investigations on physiological and genetic changes contributed by these risk factor inducing environments. PMID:23816633

  14. Bacillus species infections in neonates.

    PubMed

    Patrick, C C; Langston, C; Baker, C J

    1989-01-01

    A case of neonatal meningitis due to Bacillus cereus is presented. Postmortem histopathologic examination revealed an invasive disease involving the brain parenchyma, with a cellular composition consistent with an indolent process indicative of possible perinatally acquired infection. One other neonate from our institution with systemic disease due to a nonanthrax bacillus is described, and a review of the English-language literature since 1900 reveals four additional neonates infected with these unusual pathogens. Such Bacillus species infections are rare but should be suspected when gram-positive bacilli are noted on gram stain, especially in an immunocompromised host. PMID:2505353

  15. Idiopathic Polyhydramnios: Severity and Perinatal Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Samantha L; Beamon, Carmen J; Chescheir, Nancy C; Stamilio, David

    2016-06-01

    Objective To estimate the association between the severity of idiopathic polyhydramnios and adverse outcomes. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of deliveries at one hospital from 2000 to 2012 with an amniotic fluid index (AFI) measurement ≥24 + 0 weeks' gestation. Pregnancies complicated by diabetes, multiples, or fetal anomalies were excluded. Exposure was the degree of polyhydramnios: normal (AFI 5-24 cm), mild (≥ 24-30 cm), and moderate-severe (> 30 cm). Primary outcomes were perinatal mortality, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission, and postpartum hemorrhage. Results There were 10,536 pregnancies: 10,188 with a normal AFI, 274 mild (78.74%), and 74 moderate-severe polyhydramnios (21.26%). Adverse outcomes were increased with idiopathic polyhydramnios: NICU admission (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.77-4.99), postpartum hemorrhage (AOR 15.81, 95% CI 7.82-31.96), macrosomia (AOR 3.41, 95% CI 2.61-4.47), low 5-minute Apgar score (AOR 2.60, 95% CI 1.57-4.30), and cesarean (AOR 2.16, 95% CI 1.74-2.69). There were increasing odds of macrosomia (mild: AOR 3.19, 95% CI 2.36-4.32; moderate-severe: AOR 4.44, 95% CI 2.53-7.79) and low 5-minute Apgar score (mild: AOR 2.24, 95% CI 1.23-4.08; moderate-severe: AOR 3.93, 95% CI 1.62-9.55) with increasing severity of polyhydramnios. Conclusion Idiopathic polyhydramnios is independently associated with increased risks of morbidity. There appears to be a dose-response relationship for neonatal macrosomia and low 5-minute Apgar score risks. PMID:26862725

  16. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Perinatal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Freeman, Marlene P.

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies are increasingly sought out by patients with psychiatric disorders. This article provides a review of the evidence for several commonly utilized CAM therapies (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids, folate, S-adenosyl-methionine (SAMe), St. John’s Wort, bright light therapy, exercise, massage, and acupuncture) in the treatment of perinatal depression. A number of these treatments may be reasonable to consider for women during pregnancy or the postpartum, but the safety and efficacy of these relative to standard treatments must still be systematically determined. Evidence based use of CAM treatments for perinatal depression is discussed. Adequately powered systematic studies are necessary to determine the role of CAM in the treatment of perinatal depression. PMID:24041861

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for perinatal depression.

    PubMed

    Deligiannidis, Kristina M; Freeman, Marlene P

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine therapies are increasingly sought out by people with psychiatric disorders. In this chapter, we review the evidence for several commonly used CAM therapies (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids, folate, S-adenosyl-methionine, St John's Wort, bright light therapy, exercise, massage, and acupuncture) in the treatment of perinatal depression. A number of these treatments may be reasonable to consider for women during pregnancy or postpartum, but the safety and efficacy of these relative to standard treatments must still be systematically determined. Evidence-based use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies treatments for perinatal depression is discussed. Adequately powered systematic studies are necessary to determine the role of complementary and alternative medicine therapies in the treatment of perinatal depression. PMID:24041861

  18. Toxoplasma gondii infection in sheep and cattle.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Redondo, I; Innes, E A

    1997-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that can infect all warm-blooded animals. Sheep and cattle show different susceptibilities to T. gondii infection. Primary infection in pregnant sheep can result in abortion or the birth of weak lambs but they are then protected against further challenge by the development of an effective immunity. Cattle on the other hand can be readily infected, but abortion or perinatal mortality have not been recorded. The evidence suggests that cattle develop a more effective immune response to T. gondii infection than sheep. Potential mechanisms to explain these differences are discussed in this paper. PMID:9208205

  19. Perinatal and Neonatal Health Information Technology: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Patricia Robin; Drake, Emily Eiwen

    2016-01-01

    The 3 decades of The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing history share the same 3 decades as the birth of the information age and health information technology (HIT). This article summarizes the history of HIT and the corresponding publication history of The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing. Health information technology content has evolved from being the "how-to operate" topic of a publication to being integrated within a nursing practice publication. The article concludes with current HIT challenges and implications for the future. PMID:27465451

  20. Perinatal Asphyxia from the Obstetric Standpoint: Diagnosis and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Christina A; Silver, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    Perinatal asphyxia is a general term referring to neonatal encephalopathy related to events during birth. Asphyxia refers to a deprivation of oxygen for a duration sufficient to cause neurologic injury. Most cases of perinatal asphyxia are not necessarily caused by intrapartum events but rather associated with underlying chronic maternal or fetal conditions. Of intrapartum causes, obstetric emergencies are the most common and are not always preventable. Screening high-risk pregnancies with ultrasound, Doppler velocimetry, and antenatal testing can aid in identifying fetuses at risk. Interventions such as intrauterine resuscitation or operative delivery may decrease the risk of severe hypoxia from intrauterine insults and improve long-term neurologic outcomes. PMID:27524445

  1. Impact of an education program on perinatal care practices.

    PubMed

    Harlan, W R; Hess, G E; Borer, R C; Hiss, R G

    1980-12-01

    Education of health professionals has an important role in improving health care. A media-based, self-instructional, perinatal education program was developed and field tested in rural and urban regions of Michigan. Cognitive tests, chart audits, and consultation/referral times were used to measure the impact on education and patient care. The program effectively increased knowledge and improved patient care practices by physicians and nurses. This study presents evidence that a targeted educational program in a media-based format can significantly improve perinatal care. PMID:6161337

  2. Early intervention after perinatal stroke: Opportunities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Anna P

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal stroke is the commonest cause of hemiplegic cerebral palsy. No standardised early intervention exists despite evidence for a critical time window for activity-dependent plasticity to mould corticospinal tract development in the first few years of life. Intervention during this unique period of plasticity could mitigate the consequences of perinatal stroke to an extent not possible with later intervention, by preserving the normal pattern of development of descending motor pathways. This article outlines the broad range of approaches currently under investigation. Improved early detection and outcome prediction remain important goals, despite significant progress in this area. PMID:24528276

  3. Griefwork online: perinatal loss, lifecourse disruption and online support.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Deborah; Letherby, Gayle

    2014-09-01

    The Internet provides new opportunities for accessing and giving support following perinatal loss and in this article we report on a project concerned to explore the use of social networking and online networks following such an experience. Perinatal loss can be defined and perceived as biographical disruption yet this type of loss sometimes lacks social recognition. Our ethnographic study reveals that not only do mothers, and sometimes fathers and grandmothers, seek support on the Internet but they also engage in griefwork (the work the bereaved do with others). PMID:25122092

  4. Rate of tuberculosis infection in children and adolescents with household contact with adults with active pulmonary tuberculosis as assessed by tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, M A G; Spina, F G; Weckx, L Y; Lederman, H M; De Moraes-Pinto, M I

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection was evaluated in Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents exposed and unexposed (control group) to adults with active pulmonary TB. Both groups were analysed by clinical and radiological assessment, TST, QFT-IT and T-SPOT.TB. The three tests were repeated after 8 weeks in the TB-exposed group if results were initially negative. Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) were treated and tests were repeated after treatment. Fifty-nine TB-exposed and 42 controls were evaluated. Rate of infection was 69·5% and 9·5% for the exposed and control groups, respectively. The exposed group infection rate was 61% assessed by TST, 57·6% by T-SPOT.TB, and 59·3%, by QFT-IT. No active TB was diagnosed. Agreement between the three tests was 83·1% and 92·8% in the exposed and control groups, respectively. In the exposed group, T-SPOT.TB added four TB diagnoses [16%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·6-30·4] and QFT-IT added three TB diagnoses (12%, 95% CI 0-24·7) in 25 individuals with negative tuberculin skin test (TST). Risk factors associated to TB infection were contact with an adult with active TB [0-60 days: odds ratio (OR) 6·9; >60 days: OR 27·0] and sleeping in the same room as an adult with active TB (OR 5·2). In Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents, TST had a similar performance to interferon-gamma release assays and detected a high rate of LTBI. PMID:26234295

  5. [Physiological adolescence, pathological adolescence].

    PubMed

    Olié, Jean-Pierre; Gourion, David; Canceil, Olivier; Lôo, Henri

    2006-11-01

    The uncertainties of looming adulthood, nostalgia for childhood, and a general malaise explain the crisis of adolescence. Rebellion, conflict, occasional failure at school or in society, and at-risk behaviors are not always signs of future psychiatric illness. In contrast, the physician must be in a position to identify tell-tale signs such as dysmorphophobia, existential anxiety, a feeling of emptiness, and school or social breakdown. Most psychiatric disorders that begin in adolescence are only diagnosed several years after onset. Yet early diagnosis is of utmost importance, as treatment becomes less effective and the long-term prognosis worsens with time. Suicide is the second cause of death during adolescence. All signs of suicidal behavior require hospitalization and evaluation in a psychiatric unit. Antidepressants may be necessary in adolescence. The recent controversy concerning a possible increase in the suicidal risk during antidepressant treatment should not mask the fact that the real public health issue is depression, and not antidepressants. Eating disorders are especially frequent among adolescent girls; it is important to identify psychiatric comorbidities such as schizophrenia, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorders, and to assess the vital risk. Illicit drug and alcohol consumption are frequent during adolescence; for example, close to half of all French adolescents have tried cannabis at least once. Once again, it is important to detect psychiatric comorbidities in substance-abusing adolescents. Phobia is an underdiagnosed anxiety disorder among adolescents; it may become chronic if proper treatment is not implemented, leading to suffering and disability. Finally, two major psychiatric disorders--schizophrenia and bipolar disorder--generally begin in adolescence. Treatment efficacy and the long-term prognosis both depend on early diagnosis. Treatment must be tailored to the individual patient. "Borderline" states are over

  6. Improving adolescent maternal health.

    PubMed

    Baxter, C; Moodley, D

    2015-11-01

    Each year thousands of adolescent girls and young women in South Africa (SA) become pregnant and many die from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. Although women of all ages are susceptible, girls<15 years of age are five times as likely, and those aged 15-19 years twice as likely, to die from complications related to childbirth than women in their 20s. In SA, non-pregnancy-related infections (e.g. HIV), obstetric haemorrhage and hypertension contributed to almost 70% of avoidable maternal deaths. In addition to the implementation of standardized preventive interventions to reduce obstetric haemorrhage and hypertension, better reproductive health services for adolescents, access to HIV care and treatment for women infected with HIV, and improved access to and uptake of long-acting reversible contraception are important ingredients for reducing maternal mortality among adolescents. PMID:26937508

  7. Horizontal In Utero Acquisition of Cytomegalovirus Infection in a Twin Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Liliana; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Foschini, Maria Pia; Lanari, Marcello; Guerra, Brunella; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Landini, Maria Paola

    2003-01-01

    It is generally accepted that viral infections can be transmitted horizontally by direct or indirect contact with virus-excreting persons, and some viral infections can be transmitted vertically, either prenatally or perinatally, from mother to child. This report presents data strongly supporting a prenatal horizontal acquisition of human cytomegalovirus infection in a twin pregnancy. PMID:12624079

  8. [DOHaD: long-term impact of perinatal diseases (IUGR and prematurity)].

    PubMed

    Storme, Laurent; Luton, Dominique; Abdennebi-Najar, Latifa; Le Huërou-Luron, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The first epidemiological studies showing a link between low birth weight and chronic diseases in adults did not distinguish the origins of low birth weight. A low birth weight may be the result of a premature birth. It can also be caused by an intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). A child can be both preterm and IUGR. It is clear now that prematurity is an independent risk factor for programming chronic adult diseases. However, unlike adults born IUGR, adults born prematurely do not have an increased risk to develop metabolic syndrome (dyslipidemia or obesity). An increased risk of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric morbidity and hypertension is found after a premature birth. Mechanisms of chronic diseases programming are multiple: they involve both the cause of prematurity and IUGR such as infection / inflammation or placental insufficiency, but also consequences for therapeutic or nutritional strategies needed to support these children. This chapter describes the possible prevention of perinatal programming of noncommunicable diseases. PMID:26850610

  9. Association Between Isolated Single Umbilical Artery and Perinatal Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yajuan; Ren, Lidan; Zhai, Shanshan; Luo, Xiaohua; Hong, Teng; Liu, Rui; Ran, Limin; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the association between the isolated single umbilical artery (iSUA) and perinatal outcomes, including pregnancy outcomes and perinatal complications. Material/Methods We performed a meta-analysis of 15 eligible studies regarding the relationship between the iSUA and perinatal outcomes, including gestational age at delivery, nuchal cord, placental weight, small for gestational age (SGA), oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia, and perinatal mortality. The overall odds ratios (OR) or standardized mean difference (SMD) were calculated. Results The occurrence of nuchal cord was not found to be different between an iSUA and a three-vessel cord (TVC) fetus. For perinatal complications, the SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality showed dramatic difference between women with an iSUA and women with a TVC fetus, which implied that the presence of iSUA significantly increased the risk of perinatal complications. For other perinatal complications, such as PIH and preeclampsia, no significant association was detected. Conclusions Our meta-analysis suggests that the presence of iSUA would increase the risk of perinatal complications such as SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality. Therefore, pregnant women with an iSUA fetus have poorer perinatal outcomes and more attention should be given to the management of their pregnancy compared to women with a TVC fetus. PMID:27130891

  10. Association Between Isolated Single Umbilical Artery and Perinatal Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yajuan; Ren, Lidan; Zhai, Shanshan; Luo, Xiaohua; Hong, Teng; Liu, Rui; Ran, Limin; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To evaluate the association between the isolated single umbilical artery (iSUA) and perinatal outcomes, including pregnancy outcomes and perinatal complications. MATERIAL AND METHODS We performed a meta-analysis of 15 eligible studies regarding the relationship between the iSUA and perinatal outcomes, including gestational age at delivery, nuchal cord, placental weight, small for gestational age (SGA), oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia, and perinatal mortality. The overall odds ratios (OR) or standardized mean difference (SMD) were calculated. RESULTS The occurrence of nuchal cord was not found to be different between an iSUA and a three-vessel cord (TVC) fetus. For perinatal complications, the SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality showed dramatic difference between women with an iSUA and women with a TVC fetus, which implied that the presence of iSUA significantly increased the risk of perinatal complications. For other perinatal complications, such as PIH and preeclampsia, no significant association was detected. CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis suggests that the presence of iSUA would increase the risk of perinatal complications such as SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality. Therefore, pregnant women with an iSUA fetus have poorer perinatal outcomes and more attention should be given to the management of their pregnancy compared to women with a TVC fetus. PMID:27130891

  11. Perinatal outcome and antenatal care in a black South African population.

    PubMed Central

    Menown, I. B.; Archbold, J. A.; Wills, C.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between perinatal outcome and antenatal care was investigated at King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban, by a case control retrospective study of pregnancy records in 165 perinatal deaths and 156 infants surviving the perinatal period. 82% of the mothers of live infants had booked for antenatal care compared with only 60% of those who experienced a perinatal death. Hospital booking was associated with a higher infant birthweight. For those who booked earlier there was no reduction in total perinatal mortality or the stillbirth:neonatal death ratio, and many of the mothers of highest risk failed to book. This suggests that the better perinatal outcome in booked mothers may have been secondary to the type of mother who chose to book, rather than the actual antenatal care. To help reduce perinatal mortality, methods must be employed which reach those mothers who are most likely to fail to book. PMID:8516973

  12. Relative Risk of Perinatal Complications in Common Childhood Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Raymond S.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2007-01-01

    Perinatal complications have been associated with a myriad of later-developing behavioral, neurological, and psychological disorders. These have included school-related disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, mood and anxiety disorders, and learning disabilities. This article reviews the research that considers the…

  13. Perinatal Antidepressant Use: Understanding Women’s Preferences and Concerns

    PubMed Central

    BATTLE, CYNTHIA L.; SALISBURY, AMY L.; SCHOFIELD, CASEY A.; ORTIZ-HERNANDEZ, SAMIA

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal depression is prevalent and linked with a host of adverse consequences for women and newborns. Rates of engagement in depression treatment are, however, strikingly low among pregnant and postpartum women, with the majority of affected women receiving no mental health treatment. Research indicates that perinatal women are extremely reluctant to take antidepressant medications, yet the nature of women’s concerns and treatment decisionmaking patterns have not been well documented. Developing a clearer understanding of women’s treatment preferences and behaviors may help identify solutions to the under-treatment of perinatal depression. In this mixed methods study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 61 pregnant women, approximately half of whom were experiencing clinical levels of depression. In addition to assessing psychiatric diagnoses, symptoms, and functional impairment, we conducted qualitative interviews addressing women’s preferences for depression treatment, concerns, and decision-making patterns. Consistent with prior reports, women were significantly more likely to voice a preference for non-pharmacologic depression treatments, as opposed to antidepressant medications. Many depressed women reported a great degree of uncertainty regarding how to treat their depression, and those with more severe depression symptoms were more likely to endorse decisional conflict. Analysis of qualitative comments yielded detailed information about the nature of women’s concerns and preferences related to use of antidepressant medications and other aspects of treatment engagement. We discuss findings in the context of improving patient-centered care for perinatal depression. PMID:24241498

  14. PREGNANCY AND PERINATAL HEALTH, BAMEN, INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    For developing countries, especially in remote rural areas, measures of maternal and perinatal health may be difficult to obtain because it is not systematically collected and/or electronic data is not available. We assisted the public health officials of Bayingnormen (BaMen), In...

  15. Trends in Perinatal Care and Implications for Frontline Nurse Leaders.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, Jeannette T; Adams, Ellise D; Amis, Debby

    2016-01-01

    The perinatal trends presented in this article are based on recent topics from conferences, journals, the media, as well as from input from perinatal nurses. Trends in patient care are influenced by evidence known for decades, new research, emerging and innovative concepts in healthcare, patient and family preferences, and the media. Trends discussed in this article are rethinking the due date, birth outside the hospital setting, obstetric hospitalists as birth attendants, nitrous oxide for pain in childbirth, hydrotherapy and waterbirth in the hospital setting, delayed cord clamping, disrupters of an optimal infant microbiome, skin-to-skin care during cesarean surgery, and breast-sleeping and the breast-feeding dyad. In addition, the authors developed implications for perinatal nurses related to each trend. The goal is to stimulate reflection on evidence that supports or does not support current practice and to stimulate future research by discussing some of the current trends that may influence the care that perinatal nurses provide during the birthing year. PMID:27465460

  16. An Endangered Generation: Impact of Perinatal Drug Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Melanie M.

    This article reviews some of the literature on educational approaches for drug-exposed children. Common effects of prenatal and perinatal drug use on the female user, the developing fetus, and the neonate are reviewed. It is noted that female drug users have an increased incidence of medical complications during pregnancy; that the specific…

  17. Prenatal and Perinatal Factors Associated with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilder, Deborah A.; Pinborough-Zimmerman, Judith; Bakian, Amanda V.; Miller, Judith S.; Dorius, Josette T.; Nangle, Barry; McMahon, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal and perinatal risk factors associated with intellectual disability (ID) were studied in 8-year-old Utah children from a 1994 birth cohort (N = 26,108) using broad ascertainment methods and birth records following the most current recording guidelines. Risk factor analyses were performed inclusive and exclusive of children with a known or…

  18. Perinatal Staff Nurse Medical Device Use and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Edwina A.

    1998-01-01

    Survey responses from 48 perinatal nurses found that most learned about medical devices by reading manuals; 75% had received inservice training; and 95% learned from other staff. Inadequate knowledge was related to fear of causing patient harm. Initial learning method influenced what was learned, and hands-on experience was considered efficacious.…

  19. Prenatal and Perinatal Risk Factors for Autism in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xin; Lv, Cong-Chao; Tian, Jiang; Miao, Ru-Juan; Xi, Wei; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Qi, Lihong

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study using 190 Han children with and without autism to investigate prenatal and perinatal risk factors for autism in China. Cases were recruited through public special education schools and controls from regular public schools in the same region (Tianjin), with frequency matching on sex and birth year. Unadjusted…

  20. Visual Deficits and Improvements in Children after Perinatal Hypoxia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groenendaal, F.; Van Hof-Van Duin, J.

    1992-01-01

    Study of the visual development of 38 infants, children, and youths who were neurologically impaired following perinatal hypoxia found that all children showed impairments of 1 or more visual functions, though visual development continued and visual improvements were demonstrated up to age 16. (Author/JDD)

  1. Perinatal Mental Health: Supporting New Families through Vulnerability and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Zero to Three is a single focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Noting that because the perinatal periodfrom the later stages of pregnancy through the first 6 months of the infants lifeis a period of…

  2. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Monitoring Devices § 884.2740...

  3. Assessing the knowledge of perinatal mental illness among student midwives.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Louise

    2015-11-01

    The experience of perinatal mental illness (mental illness occurring around the time of pregnancy) currently affect 1 in 10 women and can have adverse effects on the mother and her child (Massie and Szajnberg, 2002; O'Connor et al., 2002). The care and effective management of women experiencing perinatal mental illness is therefore an important issue for health care staff, managers, psychiatrists, commissioners and campaigners. Midwives play a significant part in caring for women throughout their pregnancies, during labour and up to the first month after birth. Midwives are in a unique position to assess a woman's well-being and to offer appropriate support. However, previous research has revealed that midwives often have poor understanding and knowledge of perinatal mental health issues and require improved training (Ross-Davie et al, 2006; McCann and Clark, 2010). This research project aims to systematically assess student midwives awareness of perinatal mental illness. The findings of this study will inform curriculum development for graduate and post-graduate midwifery students therefore improving the care and support women with mental illness receive from antenatal services. The findings from this study will also be used for the formation of an educational web-based programme for student and qualified midwives. PMID:25300675

  4. Impaired Lung Mitochondrial Respiration Following Perinatal Nicotine Exposure in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel T; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko; Rossiter, Harry B; Rehan, Virender K

    2016-04-01

    Perinatal smoke/nicotine exposure predisposes to chronic lung disease and morbidity. Mitochondrial abnormalities may contribute as the PPARγ pathway is involved in structural and functional airway deficits after perinatal nicotine exposure. We hypothesized perinatal nicotine exposure results in lung mitochondrial dysfunction that can be rescued by rosiglitazone (RGZ; PPARγ receptor agonist). Sprague-Dawley dams received placebo (CON), nicotine (NIC, 1 mg kg(-1)), or NIC + RGZ (3 mg kg(-1)) daily from embryonic day 6 to postnatal day 21. Parenchymal lung (~10 mg) was taken from adult male offspring for mitochondrial assessment in situ. ADP-stimulated O2 consumption was less in NIC and NIC + RGZ compared to CON (F[2,14] = 17.8; 4.5 ± 0.8 and 4.1 ± 1.4 vs. 8.8 ± 2.5 pmol s mg(-1); p < 0.05). The respiratory control ratio for ADP, an index of mitochondrial coupling, was reduced in NIC and remediated in NIC + RGZ (F[2,14] = 3.8; p < 0.05). Reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity and abnormal coupling were evident after perinatal nicotine exposure. RGZ improved mitochondrial function through tighter coupling of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:26899624

  5. Perinatal Pitocin as an Early ADHD Biomarker: Neurodevelopmental Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurth, Lisa; Haussmann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a potential relationship between coincidental increases in perinatal Pitocin usage and subsequent childhood ADHD onset in an attempt to isolate a specific risk factor as an early biomarker of this neurodevelopmental disorder. Method: Maternal labor/delivery and corresponding childbirth records of 172 regionally diverse,…

  6. Perinatal Substance Abuse: What's Best for the Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulsen, Marie Kanne

    This report, which is based on the work of the Perinatal Substance Exposure Think Tanks, establishes priorities for statewide services in California to young children who are prenatally exposed to alcohol and drugs. Although the report focuses on the developmental needs of children, it also examines efforts to provide prevention and treatment…

  7. [Choosing contraception for adolescents].

    PubMed

    Wemeau-jacquemont, C

    1985-02-01

    -dose combined pill with 50 mcg EE should be selected. Continuous dose progestin minipills depend on peripheral effects such as modifications in the cervical mucus for their contraceptive effects. They are associated with frequent menstrual problems, functional ovarian cysts, and extrauterine pregnancies. They may be indicated for adolescents with regular sexual activity but with contraindications to combined OCs. Trimonthly injections of medroxyprogesterone acetate have major effects on endocrine metabolism and should be used only for adolescents with severe mental problems. IUD efficacy is high but they may be less well tolerated by adolescents than by older women and the risk of infection may be heightened. They should only be used for adolescents with absolute contraindications to use of hormonal contraceptives who have no history of genital infections. PMID:12280585

  8. CLOCK DRAWING IN CHILDREN WITH PERI-NATAL STROKE

    PubMed Central

    Yousefian, Omid; Ballantyne, Angela O.; Doo, Alex; Trauner, Doris A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Children with peri-natal stroke may show evidence of contralateral spatial neglect. The goal of this study was to determine whether a clock drawing task commonly used in adults to identify neglect would be effective in detecting neglect in children with peri-natal stroke. METHODS Thirty-eight individuals (age range 6–21 years) with left hemisphere (LH) or right hemisphere (RH) peri-natal onset unilateral lesions and one hundred seventy-nine age-matched controls were given the free-drawn Clock Drawing Task (CDT) in a cross-sectional design. An adapted scoring system that evaluated right- and left-sided errors separately was developed as part of the investigation. RESULTS Children with LH lesions made a greater number of errors on both the right and left sides of the clock drawings in all age subgroups (6–8 years, 9–14 years, and 15–21 years) compared to controls. Children with RH lesions showed greater left and right errors in the younger groups compared to controls, with significantly poorer performance on the left at 6–8 years, suggestive of contralateral neglect. However, by ages 15–21 years, the RH lesion subjects no longer differed from controls. CONCLUSIONS Clock drawing can identify spatial neglect in children with early hemispheric damage. However, brain development is a dynamic process, and as children age, spatial neglect may no longer be evident. These findings demonstrate the limitations of predicting long-term outcome after peri-natal stroke from early neuro-cognitive data. Children with peri-natal stroke may require different neural pathways to accomplish specific skills or to overcome deficits, but ultimately they may have “typical” outcomes. PMID:26002051

  9. Perinatal factors and the risk of bipolar disorder in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Chudal, Roshan; Sourander, Andre; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Lehti, Venla; Sucksdorff, Dan; Gissler, Mika; Brown, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Complications during the perinatal period have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders like schizophrenia and autism. However, similar studies on bipolar disorder (BPD) have been limited and the findings are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to examine the association between perinatal risk factors and BPD. Methods This nested case-control study, based on the Finnish Prenatal Study of Bipolar Disorders (FIPS-B), identified 724 cases and 1419 matched controls from population based registers. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine the associations between perinatal factors and BPD adjusting for potential confounding due to maternal age, psychiatric history and educational level, place of birth, number of previous births and maternal smoking during pregnancy. Results Children delivered by planned cesarean section had a 2.5-fold increased risk of BPD (95% CI: 1.32–4.78, P <0.01). No association was seen between other examined perinatal risk factors and BPD. Limitations The limitations of this study include: the restriction in the sample to treated cases of BPD in the population, and usage of hospital based clinical diagnosis for case ascertainment. In addition, in spite of the large sample size, there was low power to detect associations for certain exposures including the lowest birth weight category and pre-term birth. Conclusions Birth by planned caesarean section was associated with risk of BPD, but most other perinatal risk factors examined in this study were not associated with BPD. Larger studies with greater statistical power to detect less common exposures and studies utilizing prospective biomarker-based exposures are necessary in the future. PMID:24215899

  10. Approaching the millennium: perinatal problems and software solutions.

    PubMed

    Sokol, R J; Chik, L; Zador, I

    1992-01-01

    Strategic planning for rational development of perinatal computing capabilities for the year 2000 should be driven by anticipated trends in (1) the health care business, (2) computer technology and (3) medicine, as well as (4) the needs of perinatal practitioners. In the USA, health care is the fastest growing segment of the economy. This will produce increasing attention from hardware and software developers, and vendors, and will lead to a proliferation of computing platforms, operating systems and specific medical application software. Desktop computers, already capable of 20 million instructions per second (MIPS) with massive storage capacities, will continue to evolve and fall in price. Increasingly, perinatologists will develop software packages to facilitate patient care in their own environments. All of these trends will lead to severe fragmentation in medical computing. Simultaneously, however, the need for integrated institutional computer-based data access for quality assurance and fiscal and operations management will increase. Perinatal care will be more regionalized, complex and rigorous with new clinical trial- and effectiveness research-based interventions, as well as molecular diagnosis and therapy. To practice appropriately, clinicians will need to be familiar with computer capabilities. Having been exposed to computer-aided instruction (CAI) at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels, they will except on-line access to detailed and accurate patient information with linkage to laboratory, radiology and other medical databases, as well as to reference databases, such as Medlines and the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials. Artificial intelligence (AI) software may support perinatal decision making; computerized professional and facility billing will be available. PMID:1396279

  11. Mozambican midwives' views on barriers to quality perinatal care.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Karen Odberg; Johansson, Eva; Pelembe, Maria de Fatima M; Dgedge, Clemencia; Christensson, Kyllike

    2006-02-01

    Our purpose in this study was to explore the midwives' perception of factors obstructing or facilitating their ability to provide quality perinatal care at a central labor ward in Maputo. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 16 midwives and were analyzed according to grounded theory technique. Barriers to provision of quality perinatal care were identified as follows: (i) the unsupportive environment, (ii) nonempowering and limited interaction with women in labor, (iii) a sense of professional inadequacy and inferiority, and (iv) nonappliance of best caring practices. A model based on the midwives' reflections on barriers to quality perinatal care and responses to these were developed. Actions aimed at overcoming the barriers were improvising and identifying areas in need of change. Identified evading actions were holding others accountable and yielding to dysfunction and structural control. In order to improve perinatal care, the midwives need to see themselves as change agents and not as victims of external and internal causal relationships over which they have no influence. It is moreover essential that the midwives chose actions aiming at overcoming barriers to quality perinatal care instead of choosing evading actions, which might jeopardize the health of the unborn and newborn infant. We suggest that local as well as national education programs need to correspond with existing reality, even if they provide knowledge that surpasses the present possibilities in practice. Quality of intrapartum and the immediate newborn care requires a supportive environment, however, which in the context of this study presented such serious obstacles that they need to be addressed on the national level. Structural and administrative changes are difficult to target as these depend on national organization of maternal health care (MHC) services and national health expenditures. PMID:16484159

  12. Therapeutic Plasma Apheresis as a Treatment for 35 Severely Ill Children and Adolescents with Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, M. Elizabeth; L'Etoile, Nathan; Seidlitz, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Because of its reported similarities to Sydenham chorea, therapeutic plasma apheresis (TPA) has been proposed as a potential treatment of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). To date, support for the use of TPA has been limited to a few anecdotal reports and a small placebo-controlled trial demonstrating dramatic symptom improvements at 1 month and 1 year follow-up. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of TPA further, we undertook a retrospective review of all PANDAS patients treated with TPA at Georgetown University Hospital between August 2009 and October 2013. Methods: Forty patients were identified, and sufficient information was available from medical records and telephone interview for 35 cases (88%). All 35 (23 boys; 12 girls) met diagnostic criteria for PANDAS (Swedo et al. 1998) and had severe symptoms. The TPA procedures were performed at Georgetown University Hospital using a protocol that processes a total of 4.5 blood volumes over 3–5 days (three treatments of 1.5 volumes each). Overall symptom improvements at 6 months post-TPA and long-term follow-up were estimated by parents, who also rated changes in individual symptoms to provide information about patterns of improvement. Results: All patients were reported to have received at least some benefit from TPA, with average improvement of 65% at 6 months post-TPA and 78% at longer-term follow-up. A decrease in the number of reported symptoms also occurred, with particular improvements in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), anxiety, tics, and somatic symptoms, including dysgraphia, sleep difficulties, and urinary urgency or frequency. Contrary to expectations, preceding duration of illness was not correlated with degree of improvement following TPA, suggesting that acuity of illness is not a factor affecting response. Only two adverse events were reported: both involved reopening of the site where the central line had

  13. Applying a science-based method to improve perinatal care: the institute for healthcare improvement perinatal improvement community.

    PubMed

    Bisognano, Maureen; Cherouny, Peter H; Gullo, Sue

    2014-10-01

    The Institute for Healthcare Improvement applies a systems-focused, science-based approach to improving perinatal care. This approach is based on the pioneering work in quality improvement and statistical process control performed by Walter Shewhart and W. Edwards Deming, and it uses the Model for Improvement, a simple and effective tool for accelerating improvement. In 2008, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement articulated a Triple Aim for improvement-better care, better health for populations, and lower per capita costs. The Triple Aim has become a guiding framework throughout health care and also guides much of the work of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement's collaborative effort to improve perinatal care-the Perinatal Improvement Community-is an ideal example of work that pursues all three dimensions of the Triple Aim. The improvement method used in the community creates the foundation for the kind of cultural transformation that Perinatal Improvement Community leaders and participants have learned is necessary to make significant and lasting change. Using a systems-focused and science-based approach to improvement equips obstetricians and gynecologists with the knowledge, skills, and tools they need to improve the systems of care they work in so they can deliver the best evidence-based care to all of their patients, all of the time. PMID:25198257

  14. [Diagnosis of congenital cytomegalovirus infection in newborn dried blood spots on Guthrie cards. A promissory technique].

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Angélica L; González, Cecilia A; Pardón, Fabián; Sarubi, María A; Canero Velazco, Cristina

    2008-04-01

    Laboratories play a crucial role in the diagnosis of congenital and perinatal cytomegalovirus infection, considering that other viral infections in newborn infants have similar clinical characteristics. The objectives of this work are to compare the results of the polymerase reaction in blood spots and urine as well as point out the relevance of the result in the Guthrie cards to differentiate congenital from perinatal infection. A total of 148 patients suspicious of CMVH infections were studied in the Congenital Perinatal Infections and Sexual Transmission Laboratory, at the National Institute "Carlos G. Malbrán". The dry blood samples (Guthrie cards) and urine of all patients were studied through the polymerase chain reaction. From the 148 patients, 3 presented other infections, 95 tested negative and 50 positive for cytomegalovirus: 35 had congenital infection and 15 perinatal. In the congenital cases, the polymerase reaction in dry blood was positive (sensitivity 100%, specificity 98.9%, VPP 98% and VPN 100%). Four of them with tardive symptoms were studied retrospectively. The urine specimens from the remaining 15 patients that were taken 15 days after birth were analyzed through the same methods, showing a sensitivity of 100%, the retrospective analysis of this dry blood group yielded negative results, so the infection was considered perinatal. Thus, the dry blood polymerase reaction of the newborn infants makes it a reliable assay for diagnosing congenital cytomegalovirus infection and could be used as an alternative method to urine polymerase reaction. In addition, this test is able to reveal whether the infection is congenital or perinatal in those cases of late symptom or other cases of controversial origin. PMID:18661038

  15. Autism spectrum disorder in children born preterm—role of exposure to perinatal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Suzanne J.; Strunk, T.; Currie, A.; Prescott, S. L.; Simmer, K.; Whitehouse, A. J. O.

    2013-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is the collective term for neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by qualitative impairments in social interaction, communication, and a restricted range of activities and interests. Many countries, including Australia, have reported a dramatic increase in the number of diagnoses over the past three decades, with current prevalence of ASD at 1 in every 110 individuals (~1%). The potential role for an immune-mediated mechanism in ASD has been implicated by several studies, and some evidence suggests a potential link between prenatal infection-driven inflammation and subsequent development of ASD. Furthermore, a modest number of contemporary studies have reported a markedly increased prevalence of ASD in children born preterm, who are at highest risk of exposure to perinatal inflammation. However, the mechanisms that underpin the susceptibility to infection-driven inflammation during pregnancy and risk of preterm birth, and how these intersect with the subsequent development of ASD in the offspring, is not understood. This review aims to summarize and discuss the potential mechanisms and evidence for the role of prenatal infection on the central nervous system, and how it may increase the susceptibility for ASD pathogenesis in children born preterm. PMID:23885233

  16. Analysis of policy towards improvement of perinatal mortality in the Netherlands (2004-2011).

    PubMed

    Vos, Amber A; van Voorst, Sabine F; Steegers, Eric A P; Denktaş, Semiha

    2016-05-01

    Relatively high perinatal mortality and morbidity rates(2) in the Netherlands resulted in a process which induced policy changes regarding the Dutch perinatal healthcare system. Aims of this policy analysis are (1) to identify actors, context and process factors that promoted or impeded agenda setting and formulation of policy regarding perinatal health care reform and (2) to present an overview of the renewed perinatal health policy. The policy triangle framework for policy analysis by Walt and Gilson was applied(3). Contents of policy, actors, context factors and process factors were identified by triangulation of data from three sources: a document analysis, stakeholder analysis and semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders. Analysis enabled us to chronologically reconstruct the policy process in response to the perinatal mortality rates. The quantification of the perinatal mortality problem, the openness of the debate and the nature of the topic were important process factors. Main theme of policy was that change was required in the entire spectrum of perinatal healthcare. This ranged from care in the preconception phase through to the puerperium. Furthermore emphasis was placed on the importance of preventive measures and socio-environmental determinants of health. This required involvement of the preventive setting, including municipalities. The Dutch tiered perinatal healthcare system and divergent views amongst curative perinatal health care providers were important context factors. This study provides lessons which are applicable to health care professionals and policy makers in perinatal care or other multidisciplinary fields. PMID:27080065

  17. The VUKA Family Program: Piloting a family-based psychosocial intervention to promote health and mental health among HIV infected early adolescents in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bhana, Arvin; Mellins, Claude Ann; Petersen, Inge; Alicea, Stacey; Myeza, Nonhlahla; Holst, Helga; Abrams, Elaine; John, Sally; Chhagan, Meera; Nestadt, Danielle F; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; McKay, Mary

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of adolescents born with HIV in South Africa are on antiretroviral treatment and have to confront complex issues related to coping with a chronic, stigmatizing and transmittable illness. Very few evidence-based mental health and health promotion programs for this population exist in South Africa. This study builds on a previous collaboratively designed and developmentally-timed family-based intervention for early adolescents (CHAMP). The study uses community-based participatory approach as part of formative research to evaluate a pilot randomized control trial at two hospitals. The paper reports on the development, feasibility and acceptability of the VUKA family-based program and its short-term impact on a range of psychosocial variables for HIV+ pre-adolescents and their caregivers. A ten session intervention of approximately 3 months duration was delivered to 65 pre-adolescents aged 10-13 years and their families. VUKA participants were noted to improve on all dimensions, including mental health, youth behaviour, HIV treatment knowledge, stigma, communication and adherence to medication. VUKA shows promise as a family-based mental and HIV prevention program for HIV+ pre-adolescents and which could be delivered by trained lay staff. PMID:23767772

  18. Linkages among reproductive health, maternal health, and perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Lassi, Zohra S; Blanc, Ann; Donnay, France

    2010-12-01

    Some interventions in women before and during pregnancy may reduce perinatal and neonatal deaths, and recent research has established linkages of reproductive health with maternal, perinatal, and early neonatal health outcomes. In this review, we attempted to analyze the impact of biological, clinical, and epidemiologic aspects of reproductive and maternal health interventions on perinatal and neonatal outcomes through an elucidation of a biological framework for linking reproductive, maternal and newborn health (RHMNH); care strategies and interventions for improved perinatal and neonatal health outcomes; public health implications of these linkages and implementation strategies; and evidence gaps for scaling up such strategies. Approximately 1000 studies (up to June 15, 2010) were reviewed that have addressed an impact of reproductive and maternal health interventions on perinatal and neonatal outcomes. These include systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and stand-alone experimental and observational studies. Evidences were also drawn from recent work undertaken by the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG), the interconnections between maternal and newborn health reviews identified by the Global Alliance for Prevention of Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS), as well as relevant work by the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health. Our review amply demonstrates that opportunities for assessing outcomes for both mothers and newborns have been poorly realized and documented. Most of the interventions reviewed will require more greater-quality evidence before solid programmatic recommendations can be made. However, on the basis of our review, birth spacing, prevention of indoor air pollution, prevention of intimate partner violence before and during pregnancy, antenatal care during pregnancy, Doppler ultrasound monitoring during pregnancy, insecticide-treated mosquito nets, birth and newborn care preparedness via community-based intervention

  19. [Recommendations of Polish Gynecological Society concerning perinatal care in obese pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Wender-Ozegowska, Ewa; Bomba-Opoń, Dorota; Brazert, Jacek; Celewicz, Zbigniew; Czajkowski, Krzysztof; Karowicz-Bilińska, Agata; Malinowska-Polubiec, Aneta; Meczekalski, Błazej; Zawiejska, Agnieszka

    2012-10-01

    Maternal obesity (defined as prepregnancy maternal BMI> or = 30 kg/m2) is a risk factor strongly associated with serious perinatal complications and its prevalence has increased rapidly in a general population during the last decades. Therefore, following international approach to regulate perinatal care in this population, Group of Experts of Polish Gynecological Society developed these new guidelines concerning perinatal care in obese pregnant women, including women after bariatric surgery. The recommendations cover detailed information on specific needs and risks associated with obesity in women of reproductive age, pregnancy planning, antenatal care, screening, prophylaxis and treatment for other pregnancy complications characteristic for maternal obesity fetal surveillance, intrapartum care and post-partum follow-up. Pregnancy planning in these patients should involve dietary recommendations aiming at well balanced diet and daily caloric uptake below 2000 kcal and modest but regular physical activity with sessions every two days starting from 15 min and increased gradually to 40 min. Laboratory work-up should include tests recommended in general population plus fasting glycemia and oral glucose tolerance if necessary thyroid function, lipidprofile, blood pressure and ECG. Patients after bariatric surgery should allow at least one year before they conceive and have their diet fortified with iron, folic acid, calcium and vit. B12. Antenatal care should include monitoring body weight gain with a target increase in body weight less than 7 kg, thromboprophylaxis, strict monitoring of blood pressure and diagnostic for gestational diabetes in early pregnancy. Fetal ultrasonic scans should be arranged following protocols recommended by US section of Polish Gynaecological Society with additional scan assessing fetal growth performed within 7 days before delivery and aiming at assessing a risk for shoulder dystocia in a patient. Intrapartum care should be delivered in

  20. Suicide during Perinatal Period: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Clinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Orsolini, Laura; Valchera, Alessandro; Vecchiotti, Roberta; Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice; Fornaro, Michele; De Berardis, Domenico; Perna, Giampaolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Bellantuono, Cesario

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal period may pose a great challenge for the clinical management and treatment of psychiatric disorders in women. In fact, several mental illnesses can arise during pregnancy and/or following childbirth. Suicide has been considered a relatively rare event during the perinatal period. However, in some mental disorders (i.e., postpartum depression, bipolar disorder, postpartum psychosis, etc.) have been reported a higher risk of suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, or suicide. Therefore, a complete screening of mothers’ mental health should also take into account thoughts of suicide and thoughts about harming infants as well. Clinicians should carefully monitor and early identify related clinical manifestations, potential risk factors, and alarm symptoms related to suicide. The present paper aims at providing a focused review about epidemiological data, risk factors, and an overview about the main clinical correlates associated with the suicidal behavior during the pregnancy and postpartum period. Practical recommendations have been provided as well. PMID:27570512

  1. Perinatal Depression and Patterns of Attachment: A Critical Risk Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Meuti, Valentina; Aceti, Franca; Giacchetti, Nicoletta; Carluccio, Giuseppe Mattia; Zaccagni, Michela; Marini, Isabella; Giancola, Orazio; Ciolli, Paola; Biondi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study aims to verify if the presence and severity of perinatal depression are related to any particular pattern of attachment. Methods. The study started with a screening of a sample of 453 women in their third trimester of pregnancy, who were administered a survey data form, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Experience in Close Relationship (ECR). A clinical group of subjects with perinatal depression (PND, 89 subjects) was selected and compared with a control group (C), regarding psychopathological variables and attachment patterns. Results. The ECR showed a prevalence of “Fearful-Avoidant” attachment style in PND group (29.2% versus 1.1%, p < 0.001); additionally, the EPDS average score increases with the increasing of ECR dimensions (Avoidance and Anxiety). Conclusion. The severity of depression increases proportionally to attachment disorganization; therefore, we consider attachment as both an important risk factor as well as a focus for early psychotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26798510

  2. The prevention of psychological morbidity following perinatal death.

    PubMed Central

    Hammersley, L; Drinkwater, C

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, a significant volume of hospital-based literature has been produced about the management of women and their families after a perinatal death. There has also been a considerable amount of work in the voluntary sector which has recognized this as an area of unmet need. The introduction of regional neonatal intensive care units and the shift from secondary to primary care make the development of a structured community-based approach for this group of vulnerable patients increasingly important. This article documents the evidence for high levels of psychological morbidity following perinatal death, reviews a variety of interventions designed to reduce morbidity, and makes some tentative proposals about the key elements of an effective community-based support programme. PMID:9406496

  3. High perinatal and neonatal mortality in rural India.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, N; Hasan, S B

    1993-04-01

    A prospective study conducted in rural India on pregnant women showed poor utilization of primary health services and very poor maternal care receptivity especially in terms of antenatal care. A very high perinatal mortality rate of 81.3/1000 live births and a neonatal mortality rate of 63.7/1000 live births was observed in the present study. Out of 204 live births, 72.05% of newborn developed complications within 6 weeks of the delivery. Most of the complications were of a minor nature and could be attributed to poor environmental conditions, lack of personal hygiene and ignorance. The study highlights the need for training of grass root level workers for the improvement of perinatal and neonatal care in rural India. PMID:8478893

  4. A community based surveillance system for perinatal and neonatal care.

    PubMed

    Dyal Chand, A; Khale, M

    1989-11-01

    The impact of maternal health services on perinatal and neonatal mortality depends on both the quantitative and qualitative coverage of pregnant women with obstetric services. In rural areas this becomes all the more difficult because of the requirement of a large decentralized infrastructure extending from village based health workers and subcentres to the Primary Health Centre and tertiary levels of referral. An effective introduction of socio-cultural, biomedical and managerial interventions is required to reduce perinatal and neonatal mortality. A community based surveillance and monitoring system is central to and facilitates the introduction of all other interventions. Finally, the system operated by grass-root level workers is a motivational tool for achieving expected levels of performance. PMID:2630471

  5. Suicide during Perinatal Period: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Clinical Correlates.

    PubMed

    Orsolini, Laura; Valchera, Alessandro; Vecchiotti, Roberta; Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice; Fornaro, Michele; De Berardis, Domenico; Perna, Giampaolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Bellantuono, Cesario

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal period may pose a great challenge for the clinical management and treatment of psychiatric disorders in women. In fact, several mental illnesses can arise during pregnancy and/or following childbirth. Suicide has been considered a relatively rare event during the perinatal period. However, in some mental disorders (i.e., postpartum depression, bipolar disorder, postpartum psychosis, etc.) have been reported a higher risk of suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, or suicide. Therefore, a complete screening of mothers' mental health should also take into account thoughts of suicide and thoughts about harming infants as well. Clinicians should carefully monitor and early identify related clinical manifestations, potential risk factors, and alarm symptoms related to suicide. The present paper aims at providing a focused review about epidemiological data, risk factors, and an overview about the main clinical correlates associated with the suicidal behavior during the pregnancy and postpartum period. Practical recommendations have been provided as well. PMID:27570512

  6. Building Perinatal Case Manager Capacity Using Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Improving breastfeeding rates among Black women is a potential strategy to address disparities in health outcomes that disproportionately impact Black women and children. This quality improvement (QI) initiative aimed to improve perinatal case manager knowledge and self-efficacy to promote breastfeeding among Black, low-income women who use services through Boston Healthy Start Initiative. QI methodology was used to develop and test a two-part strategy for perinatal case managers to promote and support breastfeeding. A positive change was observed in infant feeding knowledge and case manager self-efficacy to promote breastfeeding. Among the 24 mothers participating in this QI initiative, 100% initiated and continued breastfeeding at 1 week postpartum, and 92% were breastfeeding at 2 weeks postpartum. PMID:26937160

  7. Perinatal data collection: current practice in the Australian nursing and midwifery healthcare context.

    PubMed

    Craswell, Alison; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The collection of perinatal data within Queensland, Australia, has traditionally been achieved via a paper form completed by midwives after each birth. Recently, with an increase in the use of e-health systems in healthcare, perinatal data collection has migrated to an online system. It is suggested that this move from paper to an ehealth platform has resulted in improvement to error rates, completion levels, timeliness of data transfer from healthcare institutions to the perinatal data collection and subsequent publication of data items. Worldwide, perinatal data are collected utilising a variety of methods, but essentially data are used for similar purposes: to monitor outcome patterns within obstetrics and midwifery. This paper discusses current practice in relation to perinatal data collection worldwide and within Australia, with a specific focus on Queensland, highlights relevant issues for midwives, and points to the need for further research into the efficient use of an e-health platform for perinatal data collection. PMID:23640918

  8. Labour complications remain the most important risk factors for perinatal mortality in rural Kenya.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Renay; Ronsmans, Carine; Dorman, Ed; Jilo, Hilton; Muhoro, Anne; Shulman, Caroline

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify and quantify risk factors for perinatal mortality in a Kenyan district hospital and to assess the proportion of perinatal deaths attributable to labour complications, maternal undernutrition, malaria, anaemia and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 910 births was conducted between January 1996 and July 1997 and risk factors for perinatal mortality were analysed. FINDINGS: The perinatal mortality rate was 118 per 1000 births. Complications of labour such as haemorrhage, premature rupture of membranes/premature labour, and obstructed labour/ malpresentation increased the risk of death between 8- and 62-fold, and 53% of all perinatal deaths were attributable to labour complications. Placental malaria and maternal HIV, on the other hand, were not associated with perinatal mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Greater attention needs to be given to the quality of obstetric care provided in the rural district-hospital setting. PMID:14576887

  9. Adolescent health screening and counseling.

    PubMed

    Ham, Peter; Allen, Claudia

    2012-12-15

    Serious health problems, risky behavior, and poor health habits persist among adolescents despite access to medical care. Most adolescents do not seek advice about preventing leading causes of morbidity and mortality in their age group, and physicians often do not find ways to provide it. Although helping adolescents prevent unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, unintentional injuries, depression, suicide, and other problems is a community-wide effort, primary care physicians are well situated to discuss risks and offer interventions. Evidence supports routinely screening for obesity and depression, offering testing for human immunodeficiency virus infection, and screening for other sexually transmitted infections in some adolescents. Evidence validating the effectiveness of physician counseling about unintended pregnancy, gang violence, and substance abuse is scant. However, physicians should use empathic, personal messages to communicate with adolescents about these issues until studies prove the benefits of more specific methods. Effective communication with adolescents requires seeing the patient alone, tailoring the discussion to the individual patient, and understanding the role of the parents and of confidentiality. PMID:23316983

  10. Perinatal asphyxia: CNS development and deficits with delayed onset.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Neira-Pena, Tanya; Rojas-Mancilla, Edgardo; Espina-Marchant, Pablo; Esmar, Daniela; Perez, Ronald; Muñoz, Valentina; Gutierrez-Hernandez, Manuel; Rivera, Benjamin; Simola, Nicola; Bustamante, Diego; Morales, Paola; Gebicke-Haerter, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia constitutes a prototype of obstetric complications occurring when pulmonary oxygenation is delayed or interrupted. The primary insult relates to the duration of the period lacking oxygenation, leading to death if not re-established. Re-oxygenation leads to a secondary insult, related to a cascade of biochemical events required for restoring proper function. Perinatal asphyxia interferes with neonatal development, resulting in long-term deficits associated to mental and neurological diseases with delayed clinical onset, by mechanisms not yet clarified. In the experimental scenario, the effects observed long after perinatal asphyxia have been explained by overexpression of sentinel proteins, such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), competing for NAD(+) during re-oxygenation, leading to the idea that sentinel protein inhibition constitutes a suitable therapeutic strategy. Asphyxia induces transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory factors, in tandem with PARP-1 overactivation, and pharmacologically induced PARP-1 inhibition also down-regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Nicotinamide has been proposed as a suitable PARP-1 inhibitor. Its effect has been studied in an experimental model of global hypoxia in rats. In that model, the insult is induced by immersing rat fetus into a water bath for various periods of time. Following asphyxia, the pups are delivered, treated, and nursed by surrogate dams, pending further experiments. Nicotinamide rapidly distributes into the brain following systemic administration, reaching steady state concentrations sufficient to inhibit PARP-1 activity for several hours, preventing several of the long-term consequences of perinatal asphyxia, supporting the idea that nicotinamide constitutes a lead for exploring compounds with similar or better pharmacological profiles. PMID:24723845

  11. Robotic Quantification of Position Sense in Children With Perinatal Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kuczynski, Andrea M; Dukelow, Sean P; Semrau, Jennifer A; Kirton, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Background Perinatal stroke is the leading cause of hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Motor deficits and their treatment are commonly emphasized in the literature. Sensory dysfunction may be an important contributor to disability, but it is difficult to measure accurately clinically. Objective Use robotics to quantify position sense deficits in hemiparetic children with perinatal stroke and determine their association with common clinical measures. Methods Case-control study. Participants were children aged 6 to 19 years with magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed unilateral perinatal arterial ischemic stroke or periventricular venous infarction and symptomatic hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Participants completed a position matching task using an exoskeleton robotic device (KINARM). Position matching variability, shift, and expansion/contraction area were measured with and without vision. Robotic outcomes were compared across stroke groups and controls and to clinical measures of disability (Assisting Hand Assessment) and sensory function. Results Forty stroke participants (22 arterial, 18 venous, median age 12 years, 43% female) were compared with 60 healthy controls. Position sense variability was impaired in arterial (6.01 ± 1.8 cm) and venous (5.42 ± 1.8 cm) stroke compared to controls (3.54 ± 0.9 cm, P < .001) with vision occluded. Impairment remained when vision was restored. Robotic measures correlated with functional disability. Sensitivity and specificity of clinical sensory tests were modest. Conclusions Robotic assessment of position sense is feasible in children with perinatal stroke. Impairment is common and worse in arterial lesions. Limited correction with vision suggests cortical sensory network dysfunction. Disordered position sense may represent a therapeutic target in hemiparetic cerebral palsy. PMID:26747126

  12. How to establish a perinatal home care program.

    PubMed

    Miller, T H

    1990-09-01

    Current clinical data indicates that despite advances in the obstetric and neonatal arenas, preterm birth and subsequent low birth weight infants continue to be born. Technology-based perinatal home care programs are the fastest growing segment of services available to high-risk pregnant women, recuperating post-partum women, and newborns. It is anticipated that these services will alter forever the traditional measures of care for high-risk pregnant women and newborns. PMID:10107048

  13. Perinatal asphyxia: CNS development and deficits with delayed onset

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Neira-Pena, Tanya; Rojas-Mancilla, Edgardo; Espina-Marchant, Pablo; Esmar, Daniela; Perez, Ronald; Muñoz, Valentina; Gutierrez-Hernandez, Manuel; Rivera, Benjamin; Simola, Nicola; Bustamante, Diego; Morales, Paola; Gebicke-Haerter, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia constitutes a prototype of obstetric complications occurring when pulmonary oxygenation is delayed or interrupted. The primary insult relates to the duration of the period lacking oxygenation, leading to death if not re-established. Re-oxygenation leads to a secondary insult, related to a cascade of biochemical events required for restoring proper function. Perinatal asphyxia interferes with neonatal development, resulting in long-term deficits associated to mental and neurological diseases with delayed clinical onset, by mechanisms not yet clarified. In the experimental scenario, the effects observed long after perinatal asphyxia have been explained by overexpression of sentinel proteins, such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), competing for NAD+ during re-oxygenation, leading to the idea that sentinel protein inhibition constitutes a suitable therapeutic strategy. Asphyxia induces transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory factors, in tandem with PARP-1 overactivation, and pharmacologically induced PARP-1 inhibition also down-regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Nicotinamide has been proposed as a suitable PARP-1 inhibitor. Its effect has been studied in an experimental model of global hypoxia in rats. In that model, the insult is induced by immersing rat fetus into a water bath for various periods of time. Following asphyxia, the pups are delivered, treated, and nursed by surrogate dams, pending further experiments. Nicotinamide rapidly distributes into the brain following systemic administration, reaching steady state concentrations sufficient to inhibit PARP-1 activity for several hours, preventing several of the long-term consequences of perinatal asphyxia, supporting the idea that nicotinamide constitutes a lead for exploring compounds with similar or better pharmacological profiles. PMID:24723845

  14. Successful management of quadruplet pregnancy in a perinatal unit.

    PubMed Central

    Shennan, A T; Milligan, J E; Yeung, P K

    1979-01-01

    A case of quadruplet pregnancy is outlined and the management is described to demonstrate the application of monitoring and therapeutic procedures currently available for a multifetal pregnancy. Recording of the nonstressed fetal heart rate, ultrasound monitoring and glucocorticoid stimulation of pulmonary biochemical maturity were done. A successful outcome was achieved with a combined obstetric-neonatal approach and the experience of a perinatal unit. PMID:519612

  15. Short and long term prognosis in perinatal asphyxia: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ahearne, Caroline E; Boylan, Geraldine B; Murray, Deirdre M

    2016-01-01

    Interruption of blood flow and gas exchange to the fetus in the perinatal period, known as perinatal asphyxia, can, if significant, trigger a cascade of neuronal injury, leading on to neonatal encephalopathy (NE) and resultant long-term damage. While the majority of infants who are exposed to perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia will recover quickly and go on to have a completely normal survival, a proportion will suffer from an evolving clinical encephalopathy termed hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) or NE if the diagnosis is unclear. Resultant complications of HIE/NE are wide-ranging and may affect the motor, sensory, cognitive and behavioural outcome of the child. The advent of therapeutic hypothermia as a neuroprotective treatment for those with moderate and severe encephalopathy has improved prognosis. Outcome prediction in these infants has changed, but is more important than ever, as hypothermia is a time sensitive intervention, with a very narrow therapeutic window. To identify those who will benefit from current and emerging neuroprotective therapies we must be able to establish the severity of their injury soon after birth. Currently available indicators such as blood biochemistry, clinical examination and electrophysiology are limited. Emerging biological and physiological markers have the potential to improve our ability to select those infants who will benefit most from intervention. Biomarkers identified from work in proteomics, metabolomics and transcriptomics as well as physiological markers such as heart rate variability, EEG analysis and radiological imaging when combined with neuroprotective measures have the potential to improve outcome in HIE/NE. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the literature in regards to short and long-term outcome following perinatal asphyxia, and to discuss the prediction of this outcome in the early hours after birth when intervention is most crucial; looking at both currently available tools and introducing

  16. State health agencies and quality improvement in perinatal care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Little, G A

    1999-01-01

    The origin of the federal-state partnership in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) can be traced from the Children's Bureau grants of 1912, through the Sheppard-Towner Act, to the creation of Title V and other programs of today that mandate planning, accountability, and systems development. In the past decade with the transformation of the health care system and the emergence of managed care, there has been a resurgence of interest in public, professional, and governmental interest in quality measurement and accountability. Regional perinatal systems have been implemented in all states with varying levels of involvement by state health agencies and the public sector. This historical framework discusses two primary themes: the decades of evolution in the federal-state partnership, and the emergence in the last three decades of perinatal regional system policy, and suggests that the structure of the federal-state partnership has encouraged state variation. A survey of state MCH programs was undertaken to clarify their operational and perceived role in promoting quality improvement in perinatal care. Data and information from the survey, along with five illustrative state case studies, demonstrate great variation in how individual state agencies function. State efforts in quality improvement, a process to make things better, have four arenas of activity: policy development and implementation, definition and measurement of quality, data collection and analysis, and communication to affect change. Few state health agencies (through their MCH programs and perinatal staff) are taking action in all four arenas. This analysis concludes that there are improvements MCH programs could implement without significant expansion in their authority or resources and points out that there is an opportunity for states to be more proactive as they have the legal authority and responsibility for assuring MCH outcomes. PMID:9917467

  17. Short and long term prognosis in perinatal asphyxia: An update.

    PubMed

    Ahearne, Caroline E; Boylan, Geraldine B; Murray, Deirdre M

    2016-02-01

    Interruption of blood flow and gas exchange to the fetus in the perinatal period, known as perinatal asphyxia, can, if significant, trigger a cascade of neuronal injury, leading on to neonatal encephalopathy (NE) and resultant long-term damage. While the majority of infants who are exposed to perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia will recover quickly and go on to have a completely normal survival, a proportion will suffer from an evolving clinical encephalopathy termed hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) or NE if the diagnosis is unclear. Resultant complications of HIE/NE are wide-ranging and may affect the motor, sensory, cognitive and behavioural outcome of the child. The advent of therapeutic hypothermia as a neuroprotective treatment for those with moderate and severe encephalopathy has improved prognosis. Outcome prediction in these infants has changed, but is more important than ever, as hypothermia is a time sensitive intervention, with a very narrow therapeutic window. To identify those who will benefit from current and emerging neuroprotective therapies we must be able to establish the severity of their injury soon after birth. Currently available indicators such as blood biochemistry, clinical examination and electrophysiology are limited. Emerging biological and physiological markers have the potential to improve our ability to select those infants who will benefit most from intervention. Biomarkers identified from work in proteomics, metabolomics and transcriptomics as well as physiological markers such as heart rate variability, EEG analysis and radiological imaging when combined with neuroprotective measures have the potential to improve outcome in HIE/NE. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the literature in regards to short and long-term outcome following perinatal asphyxia, and to discuss the prediction of this outcome in the early hours after birth when intervention is most crucial; looking at both currently available tools and introducing

  18. Hepatitis B immunization in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, M H; Goldstein, M A

    1995-10-01

    This article reviews the epidemiology of hepatitis B in the United States, previous vaccination strategy, and reasons for its failure and issues leading to the recommendation to vaccinate all adolescents. A review of specific hepatitis B virus risk behaviors of adolescents and barriers to vaccinating adolescents is covered. Strategies that favor successful completion of the immunization series are also examined. Hepatitis B infection is an important public health concern for adolescents. The previous vaccine strategy to immunize only individuals though to be at high risk was unsuccessful, especially because providers of care could not identify these individuals. Furthermore, many individuals thought not to be at high risk for infection were exposed through contacts which could not be identified. Challenges to immunization of adolescents include logistical issues, patient education, cost of the vaccine, and patient compliance. Several of these issues can be addressed by a school-based hepatitis B immunization program. The body of evidence and national policy is rapidly changing to support the recommendation that all adolescents receive the hepatitis B immunization series. The series would be most effective if administered during the middle-school years. A universal adolescent hepatitis B vaccination program would result in the most immediate health benefits and acceleration toward the eradication of hepatitis B in the United States. PMID:8580124

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Adolescent Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Salas-Humara, Caroline; Wood, Sarah M; D'Angelo, Lawrence J; Dowshen, Nadia

    2015-12-01

    Many adolescents are at high risk for HIV infection, and those who are infected or at-risk commonly present to the ED, often as their only or frequent source of care. It is important to consider routine screening and to have a high index of suspicion for AHI in this setting. If a diagnosis of HIV infection is made, immediate linkage to care with a specialist in adolescent and young adult HIV infection should be prioritized. For the known HIV-infected patient, management must consider unique possibilities of OIs, IRIS, and medication side effects. For any patient on ART, drug-drug interactions must be noted as part of any treatment plan. If a young person presents with a recent sexual or needlestick exposure of concern, every effort to prescribe and ensure follow-up for PEP should be made. It is essential for physicians to understand and comply with local regulations regarding HIV testing and adolescents' rights for associated confidential care. Finally, physicians who see adolescents in acute care settings have a tremendous opportunity to make a difference in ensuring improved health outcomes for youth living with HIV and to prevent new infections. PMID:27282015

  20. Perinatal Depression Screening and Intervention: Enhancing Health Provider Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Corder-Mabe, Joan; Austin, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective The authors of this study collaborated in the analysis of public health survey data in order to inform future statewide interventions that could systematically enhance depression screening and mental health service use for women of reproductive age. The primary objective of the study was to empirically inform and test the program theory components of a motivational interviewing intervention that we anticipate will guide statewide practice and policy priorities. Methods Data were examined from a survey of healthcare practitioners statewide (n=1498) regarding their practices with and perceptions of perinatal depression care for women. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to measure two latent constructs: health provider confidence in the ability to diagnose and treat and the importance placed on screening and treatment. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test a program theory supporting motivational interviewing using a model implied relationship between confidence and importance on screening and treatment/referral practices. Results The data fit the model; the model provisionally supports motivational interviewing as an intervention influencing provider attitudes and practices surrounding perinatal depression screening and treatment/referral. Conclusions Ultimately, study findings support statewide public health efforts to expand the role of health providers in recognizing and responding to perinatal depression and suggest that motivational interviewing techniques that augment importance and confidence may lead to enhanced screening and referral/treatment outcomes for pregnant and postpartum women. PMID:22309209

  1. Perinatal taurine exposure affects adult arterial pressure control.

    PubMed

    Roysommuti, Sanya; Wyss, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    Taurine is an abundant, free amino acid found in mammalian cells that contributes to many physiologic functions from that of a simple cell osmolyte to a programmer of adult health and disease. Taurine's contribution extends from conception throughout life, but its most critical exposure period is during perinatal life. In adults, taurine supplementation prevents or alleviates cardiovascular disease and related complications. In contrast, low taurine consumption coincides with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and type II diabetes. This review focuses on the effects that altered perinatal taurine exposure has on long-term mechanisms that control adult arterial blood pressure and could thereby contribute to arterial hypertension through its ability to program these cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms very early in life. The modifications of these mechanisms can last a lifetime and transfer to the next generation, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms underlie the changes. The ability of perinatal taurine exposure to influence arterial pressure control mechanisms and hypertension in adult life appears to involve the regulation of growth and development, the central and autonomic nervous system, the renin-angiotensin system, glucose-insulin interaction and changes to heart, blood vessels and kidney function. PMID:23070226

  2. Infertility and Perinatal Loss: When the Bough Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Byatt, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Infertility and perinatal loss are common, and associated with lower quality of life, marital discord, complicated grief, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Young women, who lack social supports, have experienced recurrent pregnancy loss or a history of trauma and / or preexisting psychiatric illness are at a higher risk of experiencing psychiatric illnesses or symptoms after a perinatal loss or during infertility. It is especially important to detect, assess, and treat depression, anxiety, or other psychiatric symptoms because infertility or perinatal loss may be caused or perpetuated by such symptoms. Screening, psychoeducation, provision of resources and referrals, and an opportunity to discuss their loss and plan for future pregnancies can facilitate addressing mental health concerns that arise. Women at risk of or who are currently experiencing psychiatric symptoms should receive a comprehensive treatment plan that includes the following: (1) proactive clinical monitoring, (2) evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy, and (3) discussion of risks, benefits, and alternatives of medication treatment during preconception and pregnancy. PMID:26847216

  3. Iodine supplementation in pregnancy and its effects on perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, A; Pokhrel, T; Bastola, S P; Banjara, M R; Joshi, A B

    2011-06-01

    Iodine is an important micronutrient for mental growth and development. Limited information is available on the role of iodine supplementation in pregnancy and its effect on perinatal outcome. We designed intervention study to assess the effect of iodine supplementation during seco