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Sample records for adopt effective measures

  1. Measures for Predictors of Innovation Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Wisdom, Jennifer P.; Olin, Su-Chin Serene; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Building on a narrative synthesis of adoption theories by Wisdom et al. (2013), this review identifies 118 measures associated with the 27 adoption predictors in the synthesis. The distribution of measures is uneven across the predictors and predictors vary in modifiability. Multiple dimensions and definitions of predictors further complicate measurement efforts. For state policymakers and researchers, more effective and integrated measurement can advance the adoption of complex innovations such as evidence-based practices. PMID:24740175

  2. Adopting software quality measures for healthcare processes.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ozkan; Demirörs, Onur

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the adoptability of software quality measures for healthcare process measurement. Quality measures of ISO/IEC 9126 are redefined from a process perspective to build a generic healthcare process quality measurement model. Case study research method is used, and the model is applied to a public hospital's Entry to Care process. After the application, weak and strong aspects of the process can be easily observed. Access audibility, fault removal, completeness of documentation, and machine utilization are weak aspects and these aspects are the candidates for process improvement. On the other hand, functional completeness, fault ratio, input validity checking, response time, and throughput time are the strong aspects of the process. PMID:19745339

  3. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... the birth nor adoptive parents know the others' identities. Other adoptions are handled more openly. Open adoptions, ... desire to seek out more information about the identity of the birth family. Most of us (whether ...

  4. [Adoption].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue addresses adoption and the young child's life. Contributors suggest ways in which practitioners in many professions and settings can better understand and support adoptive families. The first article, "Adoption, 1990" by Barbara F. Nordhaus and Albert J. Solnit, reviews the history of adoption and notes obstacles to…

  5. Assessing Integrated Pest Management Adoption: Measurement Problems and Policy Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, Molly; Darnall, Nicole; Forkner, Rebecca E.

    2011-11-01

    For more than a decade, the U.S. government has promoted integrated pest management (IPM) to advance sustainable agriculture. However, the usefulness of this practice has been questioned because of lagging implementation. There are at least two plausible rationales for the slow implementation: (1) growers are not adopting IPM—for whatever reason—and (2) current assessment methods are inadequate at assessing IPM implementation. Our research addresses the second plausibility. We suggest that the traditional approach to measuring IPM implementation on its own fails to assess the distinct, biologically hierarchical components of IPM, and instead aggregates growers' management practices into an overall adoption score. Knowledge of these distinct components and the extent to which they are implemented can inform government officials as to how they should develop targeted assistance programs to encourage broader IPM use. We address these concerns by assessing the components of IPM adoption and comparing our method to the traditional approach alone. Our results indicate that there are four distinct components of adoption—weed, insect, general, and ecosystem management—and that growers implement the first two components significantly more often than the latter two. These findings suggest that using a more nuanced measure to assess IPM adoption that expands on the traditional approach, allows for a better understanding of the degree of IPM implementation.

  6. Measuring and Increasing Adoption Rates of Cookstoves in a Humanitarian Crisis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniel L; Coyle, Jeremy; Kirk, Angeli; Rosa, Javier; Abbas, Omnia; Adam, Mohammed Idris; Gadgil, Ashok J

    2016-08-01

    Traditional smoky cooking fires are one of today's greatest environmental threats to human life. These fires, used by 40% of the global population, cause 3.9 million annual premature deaths. "Clean cookstoves" have potential to improve this situation; however, most cookstove programs do not employ objective measurement of adoption to inform design, marketing, subsidies, finance, or dissemination practices. Lack of data prevents insights and may contribute to consistently low adoption rates. In this study, we used sensors and surveys to measure objective versus self-reported adoption of freely-distributed cookstoves in an internally displaced persons camp in Darfur, Sudan. Our data insights demonstrate how to effectively measure and promote adoption, especially in a humanitarian crisis. With sensors, we measured that 71% of participants were cookstove "users" compared to 95% of respondents reporting the improved cookstove was their "primary cookstove." No line of survey questioning, whether direct or indirect, predicted sensor-measured usage. For participants who rarely or never used their cookstoves after initial dissemination ("non-users"), we found significant increases in adoption after a simple followup survey (p = 0.001). The followup converted 83% of prior "non-users" to "users" with average daily adoption of 1.7 cooking hours over 2.2 meals. This increased adoption, which we posit resulted from cookstove familiarization and social conformity, was sustained for a 2-week observation period post intervention. PMID:27435285

  7. Development of Composite Indices to Measure the Adoption of Pro-Environmental Behaviours across Canadian Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Canuel, Magalie; Abdous, Belkacem; Bélanger, Diane; Gosselin, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objective The adoption of pro-environmental behaviours reduces anthropogenic environmental impacts and subsequent human health effects. This study developed composite indices measuring adoption of pro-environmental behaviours at the household level in Canada. Methods The 2007 Households and the Environment Survey conducted by Statistics Canada collected data on Canadian environmental behaviours at households' level. A subset of 55 retained questions from this survey was analyzed by Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA) to develop the index. Weights attributed by MCA were used to compute scores for each Canadian province as well as for socio-demographic strata. Scores were classified into four categories reflecting different levels of adoption of pro-environmental behaviours. Results Two indices were finally created: one based on 23 questions related to behaviours done inside the dwelling and a second based on 16 questions measuring behaviours done outside of the dwelling. British Columbia, Quebec, Prince-Edward-Island and Nova-Scotia appeared in one of the two top categories of adoption of pro-environmental behaviours for both indices. Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Newfoundland-and-Labrador were classified in one of the two last categories of pro-environmental behaviours adoption for both indices. Households with a higher income, educational attainment, or greater number of persons adopted more indoor pro-environmental behaviours, while on the outdoor index, they adopted fewer such behaviours. Households with low-income fared better on the adoption of outdoors pro-environmental behaviours. Conclusion MCA was successfully applied in creating Indoor and Outdoor composite Indices of pro-environmental behaviours. The Indices cover a good range of environmental themes and the analysis could be applied to similar surveys worldwide (as baseline weights) enabling temporal trend comparison for recurring themes. Much more than voluntary measures, the study shows that

  8. Effects of the history of adoption in the emotional adjustment of adopted adolescents.

    PubMed

    Reppold, Caroline Tozzi; Hutz, Claudio Simon

    2009-11-01

    Since the decade of 1980, the model of stress and coping proposed for the assessment of vulnerability of adoptive families emphasizes that the emotional adjustment of those adopted is moderated by variables such as institutionalization, the manner and age at which the adoption was revealed, the change of first name, and the contact with the biological family. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of these variables to the perceived parenting style, mood, and self-esteem of the adopted adolescents. Participants in the study were 68 adolescents, between the ages of 14 and 15, adopted during infancy through judicial channels. The adolescents responded to a questionnaire about the history of adoption and to scales of Parenting Styles, Depression and Self-esteem. The main results indicated that the late revelation of adoption and the change of the first name are connected to higher levels of depression and low self-esteem and to more frequent perceptions of negligent or authoritarian parenting style. The contact with the biological family was frequently mentioned among those who perceived their parents as authoritative and presented the best indicator of mood and self-esteem. These findings were discussed in light of the necessity for multidisciplinary actions which can improve the psychological adaptation of the adopting families. PMID:19899647

  9. Measuring Outcomes for Children Late Placed for Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Alan

    1998-01-01

    Describes the selection of outcome measures used by the Maudsley Family Research team to assess outcomes--across a broad range of developmental dimensions--of permanent placement for children and adolescents. Developed a package of instruments to examine child emotional, cognitive, social, and academic development; attachment; and self-esteem, for…

  10. The Effect of Family Communication Patterns on Adopted Adolescent Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueter, Martha A.; Koerner, Ascan F.

    2008-01-01

    Adoption and family communication both affect adolescent adjustment. We proposed that adoption status and family communication interact such that adopted adolescents in families with certain communication patterns are at greater risk for adjustment problems. We tested this hypothesis using a community-based sample of 384 adoptive and 208…

  11. Adoption of Agri-Environmental Measures by Organic Farmers: The Role of Interpersonal Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unay Gailhard, Ilkay; Bavorová, Miroslava; Pirscher, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of interpersonal communication on the adoption of agri-environmental measures (AEM) by organic farmers in Germany. Methodology: The study used the logit model to predict the probability of adoption behaviour, and Social Network Analysis (SNA) was conducted to analyse the question of…

  12. Endogenous cost-effectiveness analysis and health care technology adoption.

    PubMed

    Jena, Anupam B; Philipson, Tomas J

    2013-01-01

    Increased health care spending has placed pressure on public and private payers to prioritize spending. Cost-effectiveness (CE) analysis is the main tool used by payers to prioritize coverage of new therapies. We argue that reimbursement based on CE is subject to a form of the "Lucas critique"; the goals of CE policies may not materialize when firms affected by the policies respond optimally to them. For instance, because 'costs' in CE analysis reflect prices set optimally by firms rather than production costs, observed CE levels will depend on how firm pricing responds to CE policies. Observed CE is therefore endogenous. When CE is endogenously determined, policies aimed at lowering spending and improving overall CE may paradoxically raise spending and lead to the adoption of more resource-costly treatments. We empirically illustrate whether this may occur using data on public coverage decisions in the United Kingdom. PMID:23202262

  13. Multiple outcome measures and mixed methods for evaluating the effectiveness of theory-based behaviour-change interventions: a case study targeting health professionals' adoption of a national suicide prevention guideline.

    PubMed

    Hanbury, A; Wallace, L M; Clark, M

    2011-05-01

    Interest in behaviour-change interventions targeting health professionals' adoption of clinical guidelines is growing. Recommendations have been made for interventions to have a theoretical base, explore the local context and to use mixed and multiple methods of evaluation to establish intervention effectiveness. This article presents a case study of a behaviour-change intervention delivered to community mental health professionals in one Primary Care Trust, aimed at raising adherence to a national suicide prevention guideline. A discussion of how the theory-base was selected, the local context explored, and how the intervention was developed and delivered is provided. Time series analysis, mediational analysis and qualitative process evaluation were used to evaluate and explore intervention effectiveness. The time series analysis revealed that the intervention was not effective at increasing adherence to the guideline. The mediational analysis indicates that the intervention failed to successfully target the key barrier to adoption of the guidance, and the qualitative process evaluation identified certain intervention components that were well received by the health professionals, and also identified weaknesses in the delivery of the intervention. It is recommended that future research should seek to further develop the evidence-base for linking specific intervention strategies to specific behavioural barriers, explore the potential of theories that take into account broader social and organisational factors that influence health professionals' practice and focus on the process of data synthesis for identifying key factors to target with tailored interventions. Multiple and mixed evaluation techniques are recommended not only to explore whether an intervention is effective or not but also why it is effective or not. PMID:21491337

  14. The Effect of Family Communication Patterns on Adopted Adolescent Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Rueter, Martha A.

    2008-01-01

    Adoption and family communication both affect adolescent adjustment. We proposed that adoption status and family communication interact such that adopted adolescents in families with certain communication patterns are at greater risk for adjustment problems. We tested this hypothesis using a community-based sample of 384 adoptive and 208 nonadoptive families. Adolescents in these families were, on average, 16 years of age. The results supported our hypothesis. Adopted adolescents were at significantly greater risk for adjustment problems compared to nonadopted adolescents in families that emphasized conformity orientation without conversation orientation and in families that emphasized neither conformity nor conversation orientation. Adolescents in families emphasizing conversation orientation were at lower risk for adjustment problems, regardless of adoption status. PMID:19649145

  15. An Effective Adoption Education Program That Can Be Replicated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlard, Carole R.

    1999-01-01

    Details creation of Adoption Option, Inc., a public adoption agency founded in 1986 in Ohio. Highlights three program areas of agency's mission: (1) training for those who assist pregnant women/teens with unplanned pregnancies; (2) educational programs for school-based health curricula; and (3) media initiative to convey accurate information about…

  16. Adoption of Preventive Measures and Attitudes toward the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pérez, Anna; Rodríguez, Tània; López, Maria José; Continente, Xavier; Nebot, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study describes the perceived impact of H1N1 influenza and the adoption of the recommended measures to address the pandemic in schools. Methods: A cross-sectional self-reported survey was conducted in 433 schools in Barcelona addressed to the school principal or the H1N1 influenza designated person. A descriptive analysis was…

  17. Mitigating Effects of the Adoptive Caregiving Environment on Inattention/Overactivity in Children Adopted from Romanian Orphanages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audet, Karyn; Le Mare, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    We examined inattention/overactivity (I/O) over time and in relation to caregiving in three matched groups: (1) Romanian Orphans (RO) with a minimum of eight months' deprivation prior to adoption, (2) Early Adopted (EA) children adopted from Romania prior to age four months, and (3) Canadian Born (CB) non-adopted children. Comparisons among groups…

  18. Building change: Effects of professional culture and organizational context on energy efficiency adoption in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janda, Kathryn Bess

    1998-12-01

    Despite the apparent benefits of energy-efficient buildings, energy efficiency measures have not been widely adopted by the building industry. My dissertation addresses the question "If energy efficiency is such a good idea, why isn't there more of it?" by studying the two professional groups that have the most influence over building design: architects and engineers. My hypothesis is that the professional cultures and organizational contexts of building designers can and do influence the achievable potential for energy efficiency in buildings. "Professional culture" describes what architects and engineers are generally taught (both directly and indirectly) to want in a building. "Organizational context" refers to where and how an individual architect or engineer does his or her work. Two utility-funded demand-side management projects provide data for this effort. I use technologies, designers, and decisions from these projects to explore the effects of engineering-economic information, professional culture, and organizational context on energy efficiency adoption. My results show that even in situations where cost and information barriers are overcome, professional culture and organizational contexts affect energy efficiency adoption. My conclusions recommend treating energy efficiency in the built environment as a socio-technical problem, not an engineering-economic one. To improve energy efficiency adoption in the short term, efficiency advocates should focus on organizational context, matching efficient technologies with the firm types most likely to adopt them. To generate market transformation in the long term, efficiency advocates should focus on educating future generations of designers to include efficiency in their professional cultures.

  19. The concordance of directly and indirectly measured built environment attributes and physical activity adoption

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) adoption is essential for obesity prevention and control, yet ethnic minority women report lower levels of PA and are at higher risk for obesity and its comorbidities compared to Caucasians. Epidemiological studies and ecologic models of health behavior suggest that built environmental factors are associated with health behaviors like PA, but few studies have examined the association between built environment attribute concordance and PA, and no known studies have examined attribute concordance and PA adoption. Purpose The purpose of this study was to associate the degree of concordance between directly and indirectly measured built environment attributes with changes in PA over time among African American and Hispanic Latina women participating in a PA intervention. Method Women (N = 410) completed measures of PA at Time 1 (T1) and Time 2 (T2); environmental data collected at T1 were used to compute concordance between directly and indirectly measured built environment attributes. The association between changes in PA and the degree of concordance between each directly and indirectly measured environmental attribute was assessed using repeated measures analyses. Results There were no significant associations between built environment attribute concordance values and change in self-reported or objectively measured PA. Self-reported PA significantly increased over time (F(1,184) = 7.82, p = .006), but this increase did not vary by ethnicity or any built environment attribute concordance variable. Conclusions Built environment attribute concordance may not be associated with PA changes over time among minority women. In an effort to promote PA, investigators should clarify specific built environment attributes that are important for PA adoption and whether accurate perceptions of these attributes are necessary, particularly among the vulnerable population of minority women. PMID:21736740

  20. Measuring the post-adoption customer perception of mobile banking services.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tai-Kuei; Fang, Kwoting

    2009-02-01

    With liberalization and internalization in the financial market and progress in information technology, banks face dual competitive pressures to provide service quality and administrative efficiency. That these recent developments are fueled by technology might misleadingly suggest that the adoption of mobile banking is largely based on technological criteria. The purpose of this study is to establish a better measurement model for postadoption user perception of mobile banking services. Based on 458 valid responses of mobile banking users, the results show that the instrument, consisting of 21 items and 6 factors, is a reliable, valid, and useful measurement for assessing the postadoption perception of mobile banking. PMID:19018694

  1. What Can an Adoption Study Tell Us About the Effect of Prenatal Environment on a Trait?

    PubMed

    Loehlin, John C

    2016-05-01

    Adoption studies provide possibilities for estimating the extent to which prenatal environmental events account for individual differences on a trait. Correlations with birth mothers but not adoptive mothers suggest the presence of genetic or prenatal environmental effects; higher correlations with birth mothers than with birth fathers suggest the presence of the latter. Changes over time may also be relevant. The concepts involved are illustrated with parent-child IQ correlations from the Texas and Colorado Adoption Projects. PMID:26210352

  2. Understanding E-Learning Adoption in Brazil: Major Determinants and Gender Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okazaki, Shintaro; dos Santos, Luiz Miguel Renda

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine factors influencing e-learning adoption and the moderating role of gender. This study extends the technology acceptance model (TAM) by adding attitude and social interaction. The new construct of social interaction is applied to the South American context. Gender effects on e-learning adoption from…

  3. Age at Adoption from Institutional Care as a Window into the Lasting Effects of Early Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Megan M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major questions of human development is how early experience impacts the course of development years later. Children adopted from institutional care experience varying levels of deprivation in their early life followed by qualitatively better care in an adoptive home, providing a unique opportunity to study the lasting effects of early…

  4. A Teacher Pair Approach to Adopting Effective Numeracy Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Janeen; Geiger, Vince

    2010-01-01

    While the notion of numeracy as the capacity to make use of mathematics within contexts associated with personal and public life, as distinct from basis mathematical competence, is broadly accepted, forms of professional teacher learning that lead to the effective teaching of numeracy are still the subject of ongoing research. This paper reports…

  5. Incentives to adopt irrigation water saving measures for wetlands preservation: An integrated basin scale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikouei, Alireza; Zibaei, Mansour; Ward, Frank A.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryPreserving natural wetlands is a growing challenge as the world faces increased demand for water. Drought, climate change and growing demands by users aggravate the issue. The conflict between irrigated agriculture and wetland services presents a classic case of competition. This paper examines an institutional mechanism that offers an incentive to farmers to adopt water conservation measures, which in turn could reduce overall water use in irrigated agriculture within a selected basin. Reduced water demands could provide the additional water needed for wetland preservation. We present an analytical empirical model implemented through the development of an integrated basin framework, in which least-cost measures for securing environmental flows to sustain wetlands are examined for the Zayandeh-Rud River Basin of central Iran. To test this idea, two policies - one with and one without an incentive - are analyzed: (a) reduced agricultural diversions without a water conservation subsidy, and (b) reduced agricultural diversions with a water conservation subsidy. The policies are evaluated against a background of two alternative water supply scenarios over a 10-year period. Results reveal that a water conservation subsidy can provide incentives for farmers to shift out of flood irrigation and bring more land into production by adopting water-saving irrigation technologies. The policy increases crop yields, raises profitability of farming, and increases the shadow price of water. Although the conservation subsidy policy incurs a financial cost to the taxpayer, it could be politically and economically attractive for both irrigators and environmental stakeholders. Results open the door for further examination of policy measures to preserve wetlands.

  6. Evaluation of a randomized intervention to increase adoption of comparative effectiveness research by community health organizations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jessica Roberts; Williams, Weston O; Dusablon, Tracy; Blais, Marissa Puckett; Tregear, Stephen J; Banks, Duren; PhD, Kevin D Hennessy

    2014-07-01

    This randomized controlled trial examined the influence of two strategies (informational packets alone and in conjunction with Webinars) aimed at increasing the adoption of motivational interviewing (MI), a patient-centered behavioral health practice supported by evidence from comparative effectiveness studies, among community health organizations responsible for delivering mental and behavioral health services. Data were obtained from 311 directors and staff across 92 community organizations. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine changes in decision to adopt MI. The mediating effects of multiple contextual variables were also examined. Results showed that both strategies positively influenced the decision to adopt. The positive impact on decision to adopt was significantly greater among individuals that received informational packets in conjunction with Webinars. Baseline attitudes toward evidence-based practices and pressures for change appeared to mediate this effect. PMID:24091611

  7. The awareness and want matrix with adoption gap ratio analysis for e-service diffusion effect.

    PubMed

    Liang, Te-Hsin

    2011-03-01

    Since the hierarchical stages of a customer purchasing decision or innovation adoption process are interrelated, an analysis of all their stages, including awareness, want, and adoption, in relation to product or service diffusion, is urgently needed. Therefore, this study proposes the use of an awareness and want matrix, together with an adoption gap ratio analysis, to assess the effectiveness of innovation and technology diffusion for e-services. This study also conducts an empirical test on the promotion performance evaluation of 12 e-services promoted by the Taiwanese government. PMID:21117973

  8. Estimating the environmental and economic effects of widespread residential PV adoption using GIS and NEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, C.; Richey, R.C.; Mahler, S.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes a study of the national effects of widespread adoption of grid-connected residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. A Geographic Information System (GIS) model is used to estimate potential PV system adoption and PV electricity generation and the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used to estimate the national effects of PV electricity generation. Adoption is assumed to occur if levelized PV system cost is less than the local average retail electricity rate at the country level. An estimate of the current {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} scenario (defined by a 6.5% real interest rate, 30-year loan life, $6{sub 1994}/W system cost, and $4{sub 1994}/month voluntary premium) results in no adoption. Several scenarios designed to stimulate PV adoption are modeled. As an example, if PV system costs are instead assumed to be $3{sub 1994}/W, rooftop systems are found to be cost effective in 16% of detached single-family households in the U.S. by 2015 (assuming full adoption of 4-kW systems), this results in 82.1 TWh of annual PV electricity generation, 170 TWh of avoided electricity transmission, distribution, and generation losses, 6 Mt/a of avoided carbon emissions, 50 kt/a of avoided NOx emissions, and 27.3 GW of avoided electricity generating capacity in place.

  9. Estimating the environmental and economic effects of widespread residential PV adoption using GIS and NEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, C.; Richey, R.C.; Mahler, S.A.; Markel, R.J.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes a study of the national effects of widespread adoption of grid-connected residential roof-top photovoltaic (PV) systems. A Geographic Information System (GIS) model is used to estimate potential PV system adoption and PV electricity generation and the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used to estimate the national effects of PV electricity generation. Adoption is assumed to occur if levelized PV system cost is less than the local average retail electricity rate at a county-level. The estimate of the current best scenario (defined in 1994 dollars by a 6.5% real interest rate, 30 year loan life, $6/W system cost, and $4/month voluntary premium) results in no adoption. The authors model several scenarios designed to stimulate PV adoption. As an example, if PV system costs are instead assumed to be $3/W, roof-top systems are found to be cost effective in 16% of detached single-family households in the US. By 2015 (assuming full adoption of 4 kW systems), this results in 82.1 TWh of annual PV electricity generation, 1709 TWh of avoided electricity transmission, distribution, and generation (TD and G) losses, 6 Mt/a of avoided carbon emissions, 50 kt/a of avoided NOx emissions, and 27.3 GW of avoided electricity generating capacity in place.

  10. Scenario analysis of Agro-Environment measure adoption for soil erosion protection in Sicilian vineyard (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Fantappiè, Maria; Costantini, Edoardo

    2014-05-01

    Most of the challenges in designing land use policies that address sustainability issues are inherent to the concept of Agro-Environmental Measures (AEM). Researchers, farmers and mainly policy makers need to evaluate the impact of new and existing policies for soil protection. In Europe, farmers commit themselves, for a minimum period of at least five years, to adopt environmentally-friendly farming techniques that undergone legal obligations. On the other hand, farmers receive payments that provide compensation for additional costs and income foregone resulting from applying those environmentally friendly farming practices in line with the stipulations of agri-environment contracts. In this context we prospect scenarios on soil erosion variations in a detailed case study after the application of Agro-Environmental Measures (AEM). The study area is located in the South part of Sicily. In a district area of 11,588 ha, 35.5 % is devoted to vineyard cultivation, 32.2 % is arable land and only 11.1 % cultivated to olive grow. 2416 ha are urbanized areas and other less important crops. A paired-site approach was chosen to study the difference in soil organic carbon stocks after AEM adoption, following criteria based on Conteh (1999) also applied in several research studies. For the purpose of comparison, the members of a paired site were selected to be similar with respect to the type of soil, slope, elevation, and drainage, but not to AEM. The comparisons were made between adjacent patches of land with different AEM, and a known history of land use and management. 100 paired sites (two adjacent plots) were chosen and three soil samples (0-30 cm depth) were collected in each plot (600 soil samples). The rainfall erosivity (R) factor (Mj mm ha-1 hour-1 year-1) was estimated with the formula specifically proposed for Sicily by Ferro and coauthors in 1999. The soil erodibility factor (K, in tons hour MJ-1 mm-1) was mapped on the base of soil texture and soil organic

  11. The Problem Areas of Adopted Children in Pampanga as Measured by the Mooney Problem Checklists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bustos, Maricel T.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the problem areas of adopted children in Pampanga, Philippines using the Mooney Problem Checklist (MPCL). The participants of this study were 40 adopted children whose ages range from 10 to 15 years of age and who reside in Pampanga, a province in the Philippines. The participants were asked to answer the…

  12. Communication and the adoption of energy conservation measures by the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses a four-wave panel study conducted in a Midwest community to determine the relationship of communication to adoption of energy conservation behavior among homeowners. Special attention was paid to the communication and energy use constraints faced by the elderly. Analysis indicates that younger respondents adopted actions to save energy in the home at a faster rate than did older respondents. This study found that energy-related content in the mass media bears stronger relationships with the perceived importance of the energy problem than with adoption of energy conservation behavior. It is suggested that the role of communicators and educators in encouraging and reinforcing energy conservation remains very important.

  13. The Effect of the Adoption of the Quality Philosophy by Teachers on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandifer, Cody Clark

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the adoption of the Deming philosophy by teachers and use of the LtoJ[R] process resulted in greater academic achievement. Results of internal consistency analysis indicated that the instrument, the "Commitment to Quality Inventory for Educators," was a reliable measure of the Deming philosophy for…

  14. Alternative Student Growth Measures for Teacher Evaluation: Implementation Experiences of Early-Adopting Districts. REL 2015-093

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Moira; English, Brittany; Angus, Megan Hague; Gill, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Alternative student growth measures for teacher evaluation: Implementation experiences of early-adopting districts: State requirements to include student achievement growth in teacher evaluations are prompting the development of alternative ways to measure growth in grades and subjects not covered by state assessments. These alternative growth…

  15. Globalisation, Language Planning and Language Rights: The Recent Script Policy Measures Adopted by Japan and the People's Republic of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Premaratne, Dilhara D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, two significant script policy measures were adopted by Japan and the People's Republic of China (China hereafter), both as a response to national language needs triggered by globalisation. However, the measures chosen by the two countries were very different, Japan choosing to increase and China choosing to standardise the Chinese…

  16. Age at adoption from institutional care as a window into the lasting effects of early experiences

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Megan M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major questions of human development is how early experience impacts the course of development years later. Children adopted from institutional care experience varying levels of deprivation in their early life followed by qualitatively better care in an adoptive home, providing a unique opportunity to study the lasting effects of early deprivation and its timing. The effects of age at adoption from institutional care are discussed for multiple domains of social and behavioral development within the context of several prominent developmental hypotheses about the effects of early deprivation (cumulative effects, experience-expectant developmental programming, and experience-adaptive developmental programming). Age at adoption effects are detected in a majority of studies, particularly when children experienced global deprivation and were assessed in adolescence. For most outcomes, institutionalization beyond a certain age is associated with a step-like increase in risk for lasting social and behavioral problems, with the step occurring at an earlier age for children who experienced more severe levels of deprivation. Findings are discussed in terms of their concordance and discordance with our current hypotheses, and speculative explanations for the findings are offered. PMID:23576122

  17. Quantifying the Effect of Discussion Group Membership on Technology Adoption and Farm Profit on Dairy Farms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Thia; Heanue, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Participatory extension, specifically farm discussion groups, has become a very popular form of agricultural extension in Ireland. The purpose of this article is to assess its effectiveness in promoting the adoption of new technologies and improving farm profit. Design/Methodology/Approach: Following a review of the background and theory…

  18. Broadband in Schools: Effects on Student Performance and Spillovers for Household Internet Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belo, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    This work comprises studies on the effects of broadband Internet in schools at three different levels: student performance, household Internet adoption, and individual computer and Internet use patterns and skill acquisition. I focus in the case of Portugal, where by 2006 the Portuguese government had completed a major initiative that upgraded the…

  19. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Julie; Fan, Huimin; Yan, Chun-Song; Kuang, Jiu-Long; Warburton, David; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Zheng, Song-Guo; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+)FoxP3(+)) and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma. PMID:22792275

  20. A business case for HIT adoption: effects of "meaningful use" EHR financial incentives on clinic revenue.

    PubMed

    Behkami, Nima A; Dorr, David A; Morrice, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to describe a framework that allows decision makers to efficiently evaluate factors that affect Electronic Health Record (EHR) adoption and test suitable interventions; specifically financial incentives. The United States healthcare delivery system is experiencing a transformation to improve population health. There is strong agreement that "meaningful use" of Health Information Technology (HIT) is a major enabler in this effort. However it's also understood that the high cost of implementing an EHR is an obstacle for adoption. To help understand these complexities we developed a simulation model designed to capture the dynamic nature of policy interventions that affect the adoption of EHR. We found that "Effective" use of HIT approaches break-even-point and larger clinic revenue many times faster that "average" or "poor" use of HIT. This study uses a systems perspective to the evaluate EHR adoption process through the "meaningful use" redesign as proposed in the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act 2009 in the United States healthcare industry by utilizing the System Dynamics methodology and Scenario Analysis. PMID:20841792

  1. Does Screen Size Matter for Smartphones? Utilitarian and Hedonic Effects of Screen Size on Smartphone Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Joon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study explores the psychological effects of screen size on smartphone adoption by proposing an extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) that integrates an empirical comparison between large and small screens with perceived control, affective quality, and the original TAM constructs. A structural equation modeling analysis was conducted on data collected from a between-subjects experiment (N=130) in which users performed a web-based task on a smartphone with either a large (5.3 inches) or a small (3.7 inches) screen. Results show that a large screen, compared to a small screen, is likely to lead to higher smartphone adoption by simultaneously promoting both the utilitarian and hedonic qualities of smartphones, which in turn positively influence perceived ease of use of—and attitude toward—the device respectively. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:24694112

  2. Does screen size matter for smartphones? Utilitarian and hedonic effects of screen size on smartphone adoption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Joon; Sundar, S Shyam

    2014-07-01

    This study explores the psychological effects of screen size on smartphone adoption by proposing an extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) that integrates an empirical comparison between large and small screens with perceived control, affective quality, and the original TAM constructs. A structural equation modeling analysis was conducted on data collected from a between-subjects experiment (N=130) in which users performed a web-based task on a smartphone with either a large (5.3 inches) or a small (3.7 inches) screen. Results show that a large screen, compared to a small screen, is likely to lead to higher smartphone adoption by simultaneously promoting both the utilitarian and hedonic qualities of smartphones, which in turn positively influence perceived ease of use of-and attitude toward-the device respectively. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:24694112

  3. Empirical Analysis of Retirement Pension and IFRS Adoption Effects on Accounting Information: Glance at IT Industry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study reviews new pension accounting with K-IFRS and provides empirical changes in liability for retirement allowances with adoption of K-IFRS. It will help to understand the effect of pension accounting on individual firm's financial report and the importance of public announcement of actuarial assumptions. Firms that adopted K-IFRS had various changes in retirement liability compared to the previous financial report not based on K-IFRS. Their actuarial assumptions for pension accounting should be announced, but only few of them were published. Data analysis shows that the small differences of the actuarial assumption may result in a big change of retirement related liability. Firms within IT industry also have similar behaviors, which means that additional financial regulations for pension accounting are recommended. PMID:25013868

  4. Empirical analysis of retirement pension and IFRS adoption effects on accounting information: glance at IT industry.

    PubMed

    Kim, JeongYeon

    2014-01-01

    This study reviews new pension accounting with K-IFRS and provides empirical changes in liability for retirement allowances with adoption of K-IFRS. It will help to understand the effect of pension accounting on individual firm's financial report and the importance of public announcement of actuarial assumptions. Firms that adopted K-IFRS had various changes in retirement liability compared to the previous financial report not based on K-IFRS. Their actuarial assumptions for pension accounting should be announced, but only few of them were published. Data analysis shows that the small differences of the actuarial assumption may result in a big change of retirement related liability. Firms within IT industry also have similar behaviors, which means that additional financial regulations for pension accounting are recommended. PMID:25013868

  5. Differences in the effects of host suppression on the adoptive immunotherapy of subcutaneous and visceral tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A.E.; Shu, S.Y.; Chou, T.; Lafreniere, R.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1986-07-01

    A syngeneic transplantable sarcoma induced in C57BL/6 mice, MCA 105, was used in studies to examine host suppression on the adoptive immunotherapy of established intradermal and experimentally induced pulmonary and hepatic metastases. Fresh immune splenocytes were generated from mice immunized to the MCA 105 tumor by a mixture of viable tumor cells and Corynebacterium parvum. The adoptive immunotherapy of intradermal MCA 105 tumor with immune cells required prior immunosuppression of the recipient by sublethal irradiation with 500 R or T-cell depletion. The effect of whole-body sublethal irradiation appeared to eliminate a systemic host suppression mechanism, since partialbody irradiation involving the tumor-bearing area did not permit successful immunotherapy. Host irradiation was not required to achieve successful immunotherapy of experimentally induced pulmonary or hepatic metastases. In nonirradiated recipients bearing both intradermal and pulmonary tumors, host suppression did not affect the function of transferred immune cells to induce regression of pulmonary metastases. Thus, suppression of adoptive immunotherapy appears to be relevant to tumors confined to the skin and subcutaneous tissue but not to tumor in visceral sites, such as the lung and liver.

  6. Individual differences and workload effects on strategy adoption in a dynamic task.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jungaa; Betts, Shawn; Anderson, John R

    2013-09-01

    The current study investigated the effects of individual differences and workload on strategy adaptivity in a complex, dynamic task called the Space Fortress game (Donchin, 1989). Participants learned to use a strategy of flying a ship in circles around the fortress in a standard game environment. Once they mastered the strategy, they were assigned to different workload conditions and transferred to a nonstandard environment in which a strong wind was introduced that made it more difficult to achieve a circular orbit. About half of the participants continued with their prior circular strategy while the rest adopted a novel strategy that achieved comparable performance with less effort. With this novel strategy, rather than trying to complete orbits they flew into the wind and then allowed the wind to blow them back to achieve a pendulum-like path. Participants without a working-memory load were more likely to adopt the new strategy. Participants were also more likely to adopt the new strategy if their pattern of behavior exposed them more often to the potential of drifting with the wind. The results indicate that spontaneous changes in strategy occur when people are exposed to the potential of a new strategy and have the cognitive resources to understand its potential. PMID:23831665

  7. Effects of adopting new precession, nutation and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S. Y.; Mueller, I. I.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of adopting definitive precession and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame was investigated. It is noted that the effect on polar motion is a diurnal periodic term with an amplitude increasing linearly in time whole on UT1 it is a linear term: general principles are given to determine the effects of small rotations of the frame of a conventional inertial reference system (CIS) on the frame of the conventional terrestrial reference system (CTS); seven CTS options are presented, one of which is necessary to accommodate such rotation. Accommodating possible future changes in the astronomical nutation is discussed. The effects of differences which may exist between the various CTS's and CIS's on Earth rotation parameters (ERP) and how these differences can be determined are examined. It is shown that the CTS differences can be determined from observations made at the same site. The CIS differences by comparing the ERP's are determined by the different techniques during the same time period.

  8. The effects of prospective reimbursement programs on hospital adoption and service sharing.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, J; Kanak, J R

    1982-12-01

    A previous article in this journal (Coelen and Sullivan, 1981) reported new evidence that many State hospital prospective reimbursement (PR) programs have been successful in reducing hospital cost inflation. Limiting proliferation of redundant technologies and community services may be one method of reducing this cost inflation. Data compiled from a sample of over 2,500 hospitals in 15 rate-setting and other States between 1969 and 1978 were used to determine PR's effect on both service adoption and sharing. Evidence indicates a consistent, retarding effect on all services for New York, the country's oldest, most stringent program. Several other States, notably Minnesota, Maryland, New Jersey, Washington, and Wisconsin showed retarding effects on costly rapidly diffusing services such as open heart surgery, intensive care units (ICUs), and social work, as well as accelerating the phasing-out of redundant services, such as the premature nursery. We found no consistent, significant effects on service sharing. PMID:10309912

  9. Effects of depressive symptoms and experimentally adopted schemas on sexual arousal and affect in sexually healthy women.

    PubMed

    Kuffel, Stephanie W; Heiman, Julia R

    2006-04-01

    The present study examined the effects of depressive mood symptoms and experimentally adopted sexual schemas on women's sexual arousal and affect. Women's vaginal response, subjective sexual arousal, and affect were measured in response to sexually explicit visual material in a laboratory setting. At baseline on a self-report measure, women with depressive mood symptoms (n = 28) reported significantly lower sexual desire than women with normal mood (n=28), but no significant differences in arousal, orgasm, satisfaction, or pain. Participants were asked to adopt both a positive and negative sexual self-schema prior to viewing erotic stimuli. Women in both mood groups demonstrated significantly greater subjective sexual arousal, vaginal response, and positive affect in the positive schema condition than in the negative schema condition when controlling for anxiety. There were no main effects for mood symptoms. These findings support an information processing conceptualization of sexual arousal and suggest that an acute dose of cognitive sexual schemas can significantly impact subsequent sexual and affective responses. Implications of findings for the assessment and treatment of sexual dysfunction are noted. PMID:16752119

  10. The Temporal Effect of Training Utility Perceptions on Adopting a Trained Method: The Role of Perceived Organizational Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madera, Juan M.; Steele, Stacey T.; Beier, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the temporal effect of perceived training utility on adoption of a trained method and how perceived organizational support influences the relationship between perceived training utility perceptions and adoption of a trained method. With the use of a correlational-survey-based design, this longitudinal study required…

  11. The Effects of Adopting the Revised New York State Regents Earth Science Syllabus on Selected Teacher and Student Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgren, James; Doran, Rodney L.

    This study investigated the effect voluntary or mandatory adoption of the Earth Science curriculum had on instructional procedures, teacher educational opinion, student achievement in earth science, and student ability to employ the processes of science. Selection of teachers resulted in three groups: (A) those forced to adopt the new syllabus,…

  12. Effects of Prenatal and Postnatal Parent Depressive Symptoms on Adopted Child HPA Regulation: Independent and Moderated Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Leve, Leslie D.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Harold, Gordon T.; Reiss, David

    2013-01-01

    This study used a prospective adoption design to investigate effects of prenatal and postnatal parent depressive symptom exposure on child hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity and associated internalizing symptoms. Birth mother prenatal symptoms and adoptive mother/father postnatal (9-month, 27-month) symptoms were assessed with the Beck…

  13. Adoptive transfer of activated marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes induces measurable antitumor immunity in the bone marrow in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Kimberly A.; Huff, Carol A.; Davis, Janice; Lemas, M. Victor; Fiorino, Susan; Bitzan, Jeffrey; Ferguson, Anna; Emerling, Amy; Luznik, Leo; Matsui, William; Powell, Jonathan; Fuchs, Ephraim; Rosner, Gary L.; Epstein, Caroline; Rudraraju, Lakshmi; Ambinder, Richard F.; Jones, Richard J.; Pardoll, Drew; Borrello, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Successful adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) requires the ability to activate tumor-specific T cells with the ability to traffic to the tumor site and effectively kill their target as well as persist over time. We hypothesized that ACT using marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes (MILs) in multiple myeloma (MM) could impart greater antitumor immunity in that they were obtained from the tumor microenvironment. We describe the results from the first clinical trial using MILs in MM. Twenty-five patients with either newly diagnosed or relapsed disease had their MILs harvested, activated and expanded, and subsequently infused on the third day after myeloablative therapy. Cells were obtained and adequately expanded in all patients with anti-CD3/CD28 beads plus interleukin-2, and a median of 9.5 × 108 MILs were infused. Factors indicative of response to MIL ACT included (i) the presence of measurable myeloma-specific activity of the ex vivo expanded product, (ii) low endogenous bone marrow T cell interferon-γ production at baseline, (iii) a CD8+ central memory phenotype at baseline, and (iv) the generation and persistence of myeloma-specific immunity in the bone marrow at 1 year after ACT. Achieving at least a 90% reduction in disease burden significantly increased the progression-free survival (25.1 months versus 11.8 months; P = 0.01). This study demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of MILs as a form of ACT with applicability across many hematologic malignancies and possibly solid tumors infiltrating the bone marrow. PMID:25995224

  14. Adoptive transfer of activated marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes induces measurable antitumor immunity in the bone marrow in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Kimberly A; Huff, Carol A; Davis, Janice; Lemas, M Victor; Fiorino, Susan; Bitzan, Jeffrey; Ferguson, Anna; Emerling, Amy; Luznik, Leo; Matsui, William; Powell, Jonathan; Fuchs, Ephraim; Rosner, Gary L; Epstein, Caroline; Rudraraju, Lakshmi; Ambinder, Richard F; Jones, Richard J; Pardoll, Drew; Borrello, Ivan

    2015-05-20

    Successful adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) requires the ability to activate tumor-specific T cells with the ability to traffic to the tumor site and effectively kill their target as well as persist over time. We hypothesized that ACT using marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes (MILs) in multiple myeloma (MM) could impart greater antitumor immunity in that they were obtained from the tumor microenvironment. We describe the results from the first clinical trial using MILs in MM. Twenty-five patients with either newly diagnosed or relapsed disease had their MILs harvested, activated and expanded, and subsequently infused on the third day after myeloablative therapy. Cells were obtained and adequately expanded in all patients with anti-CD3/CD28 beads plus interleukin-2, and a median of 9.5 × 10(8) MILs were infused. Factors indicative of response to MIL ACT included (i) the presence of measurable myeloma-specific activity of the ex vivo expanded product, (ii) low endogenous bone marrow T cell interferon-γ production at baseline, (iii) a CD8(+) central memory phenotype at baseline, and (iv) the generation and persistence of myeloma-specific immunity in the bone marrow at 1 year after ACT. Achieving at least a 90% reduction in disease burden significantly increased the progression-free survival (25.1 months versus 11.8 months; P = 0.01). This study demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of MILs as a form of ACT with applicability across many hematologic malignancies and possibly solid tumors infiltrating the bone marrow. PMID:25995224

  15. The Effect of Product Safety Courses on the Adoption and Outcomes of LESS Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, Paul G.; Ross, Sharona B.; Choung, Edward; Donn, Natalie; Vice, Michelle; Luberice, Kenneth; Albrink, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: As technology in surgery evolves, the medical instrument industry is inevitability involved in promoting the use and appropriate (ie, effective and safe) application of its products. This study was undertaken to evaluate industry-supported product safety courses in laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery, by using the metrics of surgeons' adoption of the technique, safety of the procedure, and surgeons' perception of the surgery. Methods: LESS surgery courses that involved didactic lectures, operative videos, operation observation, collaborative learning, and simulation, were attended by 226 surgeons. With Florida Hospital Tampa Institutional Review Board approval, the surgeons were queried before and immediately after the course, to assess their attitudes toward LESS surgery. Then, well after the course, the surgeons were contacted, repeatedly if necessary, to complete questionnaires. Results: Before the course, 82% of the surgeons undertook more than 10 laparoscopic operations per month. Immediately after the course, 86% were confident that they were prepared to perform LESS surgery. Months after the course, 77% of the respondents had adopted LESS surgery, primarily cholecystectomy; 59% had added 1 or more trocars in 0–20% of their procedures; and 73% held the opinion that operating room observation was the most helpful learning experience. Complications with LESS surgery were noted 12% of the time. Advantages of the technique were better cosmesis (58%) and patient satisfaction (38%). Disadvantages included risk of complications (37%) and higher technical demand (25%). Seventy-eight percent viewed LESS surgery as an advancement in surgical technique. Conclusion: In multifaceted product safety courses, operating room observation is thought to provide the most helpful instruction for those wanting to undertake LESS surgery. The procedure has been safely adopted by surgeons who frequently perform laparoscopies. The tradeoff is in

  16. Health effects of adopting low greenhouse gas emission diets in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Milner, James; Green, Rosemary; Dangour, Alan D; Haines, Andy; Chalabi, Zaid; Spadaro, Joseph; Markandya, Anil; Wilkinson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dietary changes which improve health are also likely to be beneficial for the environment by reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). However, previous analyses have not accounted for the potential acceptability of low GHG diets to the general public. This study attempted to quantify the health effects associated with adopting low GHG emission diets in the UK. Design Epidemiological modelling study. Setting UK. Participants UK population. Intervention Adoption of diets optimised to achieve the WHO nutritional recommendations and reduce GHG emissions while remaining as close as possible to existing dietary patterns. Main outcome Changes in years of life lost due to coronary heart disease, stroke, several cancers and type II diabetes, quantified using life tables. Results If the average UK dietary intake were optimised to comply with the WHO recommendations, we estimate an incidental reduction of 17% in GHG emissions. Such a dietary pattern would be broadly similar to the current UK average. Our model suggests that it would save almost 7 million years of life lost prematurely in the UK over the next 30 years and increase average life expectancy by over 8 months. Diets that result in additional GHG emission reductions could achieve further net health benefits. For emission reductions greater than 40%, improvements in some health outcomes may decrease and acceptability will diminish. Conclusions There are large potential benefits to health from adopting diets with lower associated GHG emissions in the UK. Most of these benefits can be achieved without drastic changes to existing dietary patterns. However, to reduce emissions by more than 40%, major dietary changes that limit both acceptability and the benefits to health are required. PMID:25929258

  17. Pubertal Timing as a Potential Mediator of Adoption Effects on Problem Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Berenbaum, Sheri A.; Bricker, Josh; Corley, Robin P.; Wadsworth, Sally A.

    2012-01-01

    Adopted children show more problem behaviors than nonadopted children. Given that internationally adopted individuals show earlier puberty than nonadopted individuals, and early puberty is associated with problem behaviors in nonadopted youth, we analyzed data from adopted domestic adoptees to determine whether problem behaviors could be explained…

  18. Clinical technology assessment, cost-effective adoption, and quality management by hospitals in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Veluchamy, S; Saver, C L

    1990-06-01

    Technology assessment in the 1990s must become an integral part of a hospital's strategic priority goals, with active participation of physicians and top management. Technology assessment should involve a wide range of criteria and health care consumer expectations, so that the appropriateness, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and quality improvement aspects of new technologies are all considered. Mount Carmel Health's Advanced Treatment and Bionics Institute (ATBI), established in 1986, monitors significant developments in new technologies and performs technology and outcomes assessments. ATBI activities, which have facilitated adoption of 35 treatment-based projects, are integrated into the existing QA structure of Mount Carmel hospitals. Through resolution of identified problems, quality care can be promoted, while providing patients innovative medical treatments. PMID:2120659

  19. An innovative container for WEEE collection and transport: Details and effects following the adoption

    SciTech Connect

    Gamberini, Rita Gebennini, Elisa Rimini, Bianca

    2009-11-15

    The content of hazardous components in Waste arising from Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is a major concern that urges governments and industry to take measures to ensure proper treatment and disposal. Thus, the European Union issued directives to encourage reuse, recycling and other proper forms of recovery of such waste while companies and academics are still studying methods and technologies for optimizing recovery processes. This paper presents an analysis of the logistics process assuring the correct collection, handling, transportation and storing of WEEE. The experience comes from an Italian WEEE treatment plant (TRED Carpi S.r.l.) where a new kind of container has been introduced in order to improve the logistics system. An evaluation framework is described and used in order to compare different system configurations and assess the advantages emerging from adopting proper equipments for WEEE transport and handling.

  20. Pubertal Timing as a Potential Mediator of Adoption Effects on Problem Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Berenbaum, Sheri A.; Bricker, Josh; Corley, Robin P.; Wadsworth, Sally J.

    2012-01-01

    Adopted children show more problem behaviors than nonadopted children. Given that internationally-adopted individuals show earlier puberty than non-adopted individuals, and early puberty is associated with problem behaviors in nonadopted youth, we analyzed data from domestic adoptees to determine whether problem behaviors could be explained by differences in pubertal timing. Relative to nonadopted controls (n = 153), domestically-adopted girls (n = 121) had earlier menarche, earlier sexual initiation, and more conduct disorder symptoms. Age at menarche partially mediated the relation of adoptive status to sexual initiation, but not to conduct disorder symptoms. Extending findings from international adoptees, results show that domestic adoption is also linked to earlier puberty, and suggest early puberty as one mechanism linking adoption to problematic outcomes. PMID:23335840

  1. Automatic registration method for multisensor datasets adopted for dimensional measurements on cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, L.; Ettl, S.; Mehari, F.; Weckenmann, A.; Häusler, G.

    2013-04-01

    Multisensor systems with optical 3D sensors are frequently employed to capture complete surface information by measuring workpieces from different views. During coarse and fine registration the resulting datasets are afterward transformed into one common coordinate system. Automatic fine registration methods are well established in dimensional metrology, whereas there is a deficit in automatic coarse registration methods. The advantage of a fully automatic registration procedure is twofold: it enables a fast and contact-free alignment and further a flexible application to datasets of any kind of optical 3D sensor. In this paper, an algorithm adapted for a robust automatic coarse registration is presented. The method was originally developed for the field of object reconstruction or localization. It is based on a segmentation of planes in the datasets to calculate the transformation parameters. The rotation is defined by the normals of three corresponding segmented planes of two overlapping datasets, while the translation is calculated via the intersection point of the segmented planes. First results have shown that the translation is strongly shape dependent: 3D data of objects with non-orthogonal planar flanks cannot be registered with the current method. In the novel supplement for the algorithm, the translation is additionally calculated via the distance between centroids of corresponding segmented planes, which results in more than one option for the transformation. A newly introduced measure considering the distance between the datasets after coarse registration evaluates the best possible transformation. Results of the robust automatic registration method are presented on the example of datasets taken from a cutting tool with a fringe-projection system and a focus-variation system. The successful application in dimensional metrology is proven with evaluations of shape parameters based on the registered datasets of a calibrated workpiece.

  2. Influence of Parental Depressive Symptoms on Adopted Toddler Behaviors: An Emerging Developmental Cascade of Genetic and Environmental Effects

    PubMed Central

    Pemberton, Caroline K.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Leve, Leslie D.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Reiss, David; Ge, Xiaojia

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the developmental cascade of both genetic and environmental influences on toddlers’ behavior problems through the longitudinal and multi-generational assessment of psychosocial risk. We used data from the Early Growth and Development Study, a prospective adoption study, to test the intergenerational transmission of risk through the assessment of adoptive mother, adoptive father, and biological parent depressive symptoms on toddler behavior problems. Given that depression is often chronic, we control for across-time continuity and find that in addition to associations between adoptive mother depressive symptoms and toddler externalizing problems, adoptive father depressive symptoms when the child is 9-months of age were associated with toddler problems and associated with maternal depressive symptoms. Findings also indicated that a genetic effect may indirectly influence toddler problems through prenatal pregnancy risk. These findings help to describe how multiple generations are linked through genetic (biological parent), timing (developmental age of the child), and contextual (marital partner) pathways. PMID:20883583

  3. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobo, Amber Leann

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has shown that there is a correlation between teacher characteristics (e.g., pedagogical knowledge, teacher preparation/certification) and student achievement. Current political contexts call for the utilization of student achievement data to measure the effectiveness of our education systems. A solid research base of how teacher…

  4. Effects of adopting new precession, nutation and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S. Y.; Mueller, I. I.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of adopting new definitive precession and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame was investigated. It is noted that: (1) the effect on polar motion is a diurnal periodic term with an amplitude increasing linearly in time whole on UT1 it is a linear term; (2) general principles are given to determine the effects of small rotations of the frame of a conventional inertial reference system (CIS) on the frame of the conventional terrestrial reference system (CTS); (3) seven CTS options are presented, one of which is necessary to accommodate such rotation. Accommodating possible future changes in the astronomical nutation is discussed. The effects of differences which may exist between the various CTS's and CIS's on Earth rotation parameters (ERP) and how these differences can be determined are examined. It is shown that the CTS differences can be determined from observations made at the same site, while the CIS differences by comparing the ERP's determined by the different techniques during the same time period.

  5. The effects of individual and nursing-unit characteristics on willingness to adopt an innovation. A multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, I; Kim, M I

    1996-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigate the effects of efficacy and cooperativeness on willingness to adopt an innovation at the individual and nursing-unit levels. The results of a field report showed that efficacy was significantly associated with willingness to adopt an innovation at both the individual and nursing-unit levels, whereas cooperativeness was significant only at the individual level. These results suggest that examining innovation adoption at multiple levels provides more valid information than does examining it at a single level. PMID:8681212

  6. The Effect of Placement Instability on Adopted Children's Inhibitory Control Abilities and Oppositional Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Erin E.; Dozier, Mary; Ackerman, John; Sepulveda-Kozakowski, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed relations among placement instability, inhibitory control, and caregiver-rated child behavior. The sample included 33 adopted children who had experienced placement instability, 42 adopted children who had experienced 1 stable placement, and 27 children never placed in foster care. Five- and 6-year-old children completed the…

  7. Critique and Complexity: Presenting a More Effective Way to Conceptualise the Knowledge Adoption Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The process of "knowledge adoption" is defined as the means through which policy-makers digest, accept then "take on board" research findings. It is argued in Brown, however, that current models designed to explain knowledge adoption activity fail to fully account for the complexities that affect its operation. Within this paper, existing…

  8. A Comparative Study of the Effects of Cultural Differences on the Adoption of Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arpaci, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to understand the impact of cultural differences on mobile learning adoption through identifying key adoption characteristics in Canada and Turkey, which have markedly different cultural backgrounds. A multi-group analysis was employed to test the hypothesised relationships based on the data collected by means of…

  9. Heilougjiang adopts measures to strengthen land management-each square millimeter of land is utterly cherished and rationally used

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Peiquan; Liu, Y.

    1983-07-30

    This article reports on how a Chinese province with a large area of land and a small population has adopted a series of measures to strengthen land management, to stop the illegal occupying of land, and to protect land resources. Investigations of land resources and of the state of land use, as well as soil surveys, have been launched in order to determine the rights of land ownership and use. Many counties and cities have experimented with dividing farm areas into districts and comprehensive land planning, established land files, trained key personnel in land management skills, and have launched scientific land research. Illegal occupation, waste and destruction of land have risen with the increase in population and construction. Per capita cultivated acreage has declined to 4.1 mu. An effort has been made to reach the people in urban and rural areas with this message: ''Cherish every square millimeter of land utterly and use it rationally''.

  10. Encouraging small businesses to adopt effective technologies to prevent exposure to health hazards.

    PubMed

    Leviton, L C; Sheehy, J W

    1996-04-01

    Small businesses are heterogeneous and the prospects are low for direct OSHA inspection and enforcement. Opportunities are explored to encourage voluntary adoption of new technology to reduce workplace exposures. The case of radiator repair shops is used in this paper to illustrate an approach to the dissemination of control technology to small businesses that will encourage these companies to adopt controls. Several behavioral theories are applied to the case. PMID:8728149

  11. Michigan State Code Adoption Analysis: Cost-Effectiveness of Lighting Requirements - ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, Eric E.

    2006-09-29

    This report documents PNNL's analysis of the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 if this energy code is adopted in the state of Michigan, instead of the current standard.

  12. The effects of innovation factors on smartphone adoption among nurses in community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Putzer, Gavin J; Park, Yangil

    2010-01-01

    A relatively new mobile technological device is the smartphone-a phone with advanced features such as Windows Mobile software, access to the Internet, and other computer processing capabilities. This article investigates the decision to adopt a smartphone among healthcare professionals, specifically nurses. The study examines constructs that affect an individual's decision to adopt a smartphone by employing innovation attributes leading to perceived attitudes. We hypothesize that individual intentions to use a smartphone are mostly determined by attitudes toward using a smartphone, which in turn are affected by innovation characteristics. Innovation characteristics are factors that help explain whether a user will adopt a new technology. The study consisted of a survey disseminated to 200 practicing nurses selected from two community hospitals in the southeastern United States. In our model, the innovation characteristics of observability, compatibility, job relevance, internal environment, and external environment were significant predictors of attitude toward using a smartphone. PMID:20697467

  13. The Effect of Software Features on Software Adoption and Training in the Audit Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyo-Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Although software has been studied with technology adoption and training research, the study of specific software features for professional groups has been limited. To address this gap, I researched the impact of software features of varying complexity on internal audit (IA) professionals. Two studies along with the development of training…

  14. Unemployment, measured and perceived decline of economic resources: contrasting three measures of recessionary hardships and their implications for adopting negative health behaviors.

    PubMed

    Kalousova, Lucie; Burgard, Sarah A

    2014-04-01

    Economic downturns could have long-term impacts on population health if they promote changes in health behaviors, but the evidence for whether people are more or less likely to adopt negative health behaviors in economically challenging times has been mixed. This paper argues that researchers need to draw more careful distinctions amongst different types of recessionary hardships and the mechanisms that may underlie their associations with health behaviors. We focus on unemployment experience, measured decline in economic resources, and perceived decline in economic resources, all of which are likely to occur more often during recessions, and explore whether their associations with health behaviors are consistent or different. We use population-based longitudinal data collected by the Michigan Recession and Recovery Study in the wake of the Great Recession in the United States. We evaluate whether those who had experienced each of these three hardships were more likely to adopt new negative health behaviors, specifically cigarette smoking, harmful and hazardous alcohol consumption, or marijuana consumption. We find that, net of controls and the other two recessionary hardships, unemployment experience was associated with increased hazard of starting marijuana use. Measured decline in economic resources was associated with increased hazard of cigarette smoking and lower hazard of starting marijuana use. Perceived decline in economic resources was linked to taking up harmful and hazardous drinking. Our results suggest heterogeneity in the pathways that connect hardship experiences and different health behaviors. They also indicate that relying on only one measure of hardship, as many past studies have done, could lead to an incomplete understanding of the relationship between economic distress and health behaviors. PMID:24530614

  15. Effect of adopting a new histological grading system of acute rejection after heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Balk, A.; Zondervan, P.; van der Meer, P.; van Gelder, T.; Mochtar, B.; Simoons, M.; Weimar, W.

    1997-01-01

    Background—Treatment policy of acute rejection after heart transplantation has been changed after adopting the ISHLT endomyocardial biopsy grading system in 1991.
Objective—To determine the effect of this policy change on clinical outcome after transplantation.
Methods—The outcome of 147 patients who had a transplant before (early group, median follow up 96 months) and 114 patients who had a transplant after (late group, median follow up 41 months) the introduction of the ISHLT biopsy grading system was studied retrospectively. Initially "moderate rejection" according to Billingham's conventional criteria was treated. From January 1991 grade 3A and higher was considered to require intensification of immunosuppression.
Results—There were some differences between the two groups: recipients (50 v 44 years) as well as donors (28 v 24 years) were older in the "late group" and more patients of this group received early anti-T cell prophylaxis (92% v 56%). Despite more extensive use of early prophylaxis more rejection episodes were diagnosed (2.4 v 1.4) and considerably more courses of rejection treatment were instituted in the late compared with the early group (3.2 v 1.5). There were no deaths because of rejection in the late group, however, more infections occurred within the first year (mean 1.8 v 1.4) and more non-skin malignancies within the first 41 months were diagnosed (8 of 57 v 6 of 147, 95% CIs of difference includes 0). The incidence of graft vascular disease in the late group has been comparable to the early group until now. 
Conclusion—The interpretation of the ISHLT grading system resulted in lowering of the threshold for the diagnosis of rejection thereby increasing the number of rejections and subsequently the immunosuppressive load and its complications.

 Keywords: transplantation;  biopsy grading system;  rejection PMID:9470880

  16. The effects of shared environment on adult intelligence: a critical review of adoption, twin, and MZA studies.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Jack S

    2012-09-01

    There has been a vigorous debate for decades concerning the heritability of intelligence. In recent years, the debate has been focused on whether the components of IQ variability change with age and on separating environmental effects into shared and unshared components. Citing evidence from adoption studies, studies comparing identical and fraternal twins, and studies of identical twins raised apart, some prominent psychologists have concluded that the shared environment has a significant effect on the intelligence of children but little or no effect on the intelligence of adults. In this article, the evidence from such studies is reviewed. The article reaches the conclusion that while there is some evidence from adoption studies supporting the claim that shared environment has little or no effect on adult intelligence, that evidence is inconclusive and is inconsistent with evidence from twin studies and from studies of identical twins reared apart. PMID:22746221

  17. Effect of Adoptive Transfer or Depletion of Regulatory T Cells on Triptolide-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinzhi; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Luyong; Jiang, Zhenzhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to clarify the role of regulatory T cell (Treg) in triptolide (TP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Female C57BL/6 mice received either adoptive transfer of Tregs or depletion of Tregs, then underwent TP administration and were sacrificed 24 h after TP administration. Liver injury was determined according to alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels in serum and histopathological change in liver tissue. Hepatic frequencies of Treg cells and the mRNA expression levels of transcription factor Forkhead box P3 and retinoid orphan nuclear receptor γt (RORγt), interleukin-10 (IL-10), suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS), and Notch/Notch ligand were investigated. Results: During TP-induced liver injury, hepatic Treg and IL-10 decreased, while T helper 17 cells cell-transcription factor RORγt, SOCS and Notch signaling increased, accompanied with liver inflammation. Adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated the severity of TP-induced liver injury, accompanied with increased levels of hepatic Treg and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs remarkably inhibited the expression of RORγt, SOCS3, Notch1, and Notch3. On the contrary, depletion of Treg cells in TP-administered mice resulted in a notable increase of RORγt, SOCS1, SOCS3, and Notch3, while the Treg and IL-10 of liver decreased. Consistent with the exacerbation of liver injury, higher serum levels of ALT and AST were detected in Treg-depleted mice. Conclusion: These results showed that adoptive transfer or depletion of Tregs attenuated or aggravated TP-induced liver injury, suggesting that Tregs could play important roles in the progression of liver injury. SOCS proteins and Notch signaling affected Tregs, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of TP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:27148057

  18. Language and memory abilities of internationally adopted children from China: evidence for early age effects.

    PubMed

    Delcenserie, Audrey; Genesee, Fred

    2014-11-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine if internationally adopted (IA) children from China (M = 10;8) adopted by French-speaking families exhibit lags in verbal memory in addition to lags in verbal abilities documented in previous studies (Gauthier & Genesee, 2011). Tests assessing verbal and non-verbal memory, language, non-verbal cognitive ability, and socio-emotional development were administered to thirty adoptees. Their results were compared to those of thirty non-adopted monolingual French-speaking children matched on age, gender, and socioeconomic status. The IA children scored significantly lower than the controls on language, verbal short-term memory, verbal working memory, and verbal long-term memory. No group differences were found on non-verbal memory, non-verbal cognitive ability, and socio-emotional development, suggesting language-specific difficulties. Despite extended exposure to French, adoptees may experience language difficulties due to limitations in verbal memory, possibly as a result of their delayed exposure to that language and/or attrition of the birth language. PMID:24168794

  19. The Effect of Race-Ethnicity and Geography on Adoption of Innovations in the Treatment of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Horvitz-Lennon, Marcela; Alegria, Margarita; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effect of race-ethnicity and geography on the adoption of a pharmacological innovation (long-acting injectable risperidone, LAIR) among Medicaid beneficiaries with schizophrenia, and also evaluated the contribution of geographic location to observed racial-ethnic disparities. Methods Data source was a claims dataset from the Florida Medicaid program for the 2.5 year period that followed the launch of LAIR in the US market. Study participants were beneficiaries with schizophrenia who had filled at least 1 antipsychotic prescription during the study period. Outcome variable was any use of LAIR; model variables were need indicators and random effects for 11 Medicaid areas, multi-county units used by the Medicaid program to administer benefits. Adjusted probability of use of LAIR for blacks and Latinos versus whites was estimated with logistic regression models. Results The study cohort included 13,992 Medicaid beneficiaries: 25% blacks, 37% Latinos, and 38% whites. Unadjusted probability of LAIR use was lower for Latinos than whites and it varied across the state’s geographic areas. Adjustment for need confirmed the unadjusted finding of a Latino-white disparity (OR = .58, 95% CI = .49–.70). While the inclusion of geographic location in the model eliminated the Latino-white disparity, doing so confirmed the unadjusted finding of geographic variation in adoption. Conclusions Within a state Medicaid program, the initial finding of a Latino-white adoption disparity was driven by geographic disparities in adoption rates and the geographic concentration of Latinos in a low-adoption area. Possible contributors and implications of these results are discussed. PMID:23026838

  20. The effect of personal characteristics on the relationship between diffusion and adoption of telecentre with value creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahalin, Zulkhairi Md.

    2016-08-01

    This paper examines personal characteristics of respondents in the rural areas and the extent of its effect on the diffusion and adoption of the telecentre. Understanding the personal characteristics of the participants is needed in order to encourage better participation. A survey was conducted among participants of telecentres situated in rural areas in the northern states of Malaysia. Results showed that whilst family size had a significant effect on the relationships between diffusion and adoption with value creation, other personal characteristics were found not to affect the relationships. The results have important implications to sustainability of the telecentre, in which focus should be placed in small-sized families rather than based on background and other demographic profile of participants.

  1. Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A microgrid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The microgrid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (< 500 kW), such as reciprocating engines, microturbines, and fuel cells, with or without combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, such as water and space heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the microgrid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean central station generation in California.

  2. Combining Antiangiogenic Therapy with Adoptive Cell Immunotherapy Exerts Better Antitumor Effects in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shujing; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yitian; Song, Haizhu; Chen, Longbang; Huang, Guichun

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK cells) are a heterogeneous subset of ex-vivo expanded T lymphocytes which are characterized with a MHC-unrestricted tumor-killing activity and a mixed T-NK phenotype. Adoptive CIK cells transfer, one of the adoptive immunotherapy represents a promising nontoxic anticancer therapy. However, in clinical studies, the therapeutic activity of adoptive CIK cells transfer is not as efficient as anticipated. Possible explanations are that abnormal tumor vasculature and hypoxic tumor microenvironment could impede the infiltration and efficacy of lymphocytes. We hypothesized that antiangiogenesis therapy could improve the antitumor activity of CIK cells by normalizing tumor vasculature and modulating hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Methods We combined recombinant human endostatin (rh-endostatin) and CIK cells in the treatment of lung carcinoma murine models. Intravital microscopy, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to investigate the tumor vasculature and hypoxic microenvironment as well as the infiltration of immune cells. Results Our results indicated that rh-endostatin synergized with adoptive CIK cells transfer to inhibit the growth of lung carcinoma. We found that rh-endostatin normalized tumor vasculature and reduced hypoxic area in the tumor microenvironment. Hypoxia significantly inhibited the proliferation, cytotoxicity and migration of CIK cells in vitro and impeded the homing of CIK cells into tumor parenchyma ex vivo. Furthermore, we found that treatment with rh-endostatin significantly increased the homing of CIK cells and decreased the accumulation of suppressive immune cells in the tumor tissue. In addition, combination therapy produced higher level of tumor-infiltration lymphocytes compared with other treatments. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that rh-endostatin improves the therapeutic effect of adoptive CIK cells therapy against lung

  3. Effects of a carbon tax on combined heat and power adoption by a microgrid

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Siddidqui, Afzal S.; Stadler, Michael

    2002-10-01

    This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid ((mu)Grid) consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A (mu)Grid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The (mu)Grid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (< 500 kW), such as reciprocating engines, microturbines, and fuel cells, with or without CHP equipment, such as water- and space-heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the (mu)Grid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean generation in California.

  4. Implementation factors and their effect on e-Health service adoption in rural communities: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An ageing population is seen as a threat to the quality of life and health in rural communities, and it is often assumed that e-Health services can address this issue. As successful e-Health implementation in organizations has proven difficult, this systematic literature review considers whether this is so for rural communities. This review identifies the critical implementation factors and, following the change model of Pettigrew and Whipp, classifies them in terms of “context”, “process”, and “content”. Through this lens, we analyze the empirical findings found in the literature to address the question: How do context, process, and content factors of e-Health implementation influence its adoption in rural communities? Methods We conducted a systematic literature review. This review included papers that met six inclusion and exclusion criteria and had sufficient methodological quality. Findings were categorized in a classification matrix to identify promoting and restraining implementation factors and to explore whether any interactions between context, process, and content affect adoption. Results Of the 5,896 abstracts initially identified, only 51 papers met all our criteria and were included in the review. We distinguished five different perspectives on rural e-Health implementation in these papers. Further, we list the context, process, and content implementation factors found to either promote or restrain rural e-Health adoption. Many implementation factors appear repeatedly, but there are also some contradictory results. Based on a further analysis of the papers’ findings, we argue that interaction effects between context, process, and content elements of change may explain these contradictory results. More specifically, three themes that appear crucial in e-Health implementation in rural communities surfaced: the dual effects of geographical isolation, the targeting of underprivileged groups, and the changes in ownership required

  5. The Effect of Adoption of an Electronic Health Record on Duplicate Testing

    PubMed Central

    Kerwin, Todd C.; Leighton, Harmony; Buch, Kunal; Avezbadalov, Azriel; Kianfar, Hormoz

    2016-01-01

    Background. The electronic health record (EHR) has been promoted as a tool to improve quality of patient care, reduce costs, and improve efficiency. There is little data to confirm that the use of EHR has reduced duplicate testing. We sought to evaluate the rate of performance of repeat transthoracic echocardiograms before and after the adoption of EHR. Methods. We retrospectively examined the rates of repeat echocardiograms performed before and after the implementation of an EHR system. Results. The baseline rate of repeat testing before EHR was 4.6% at six months and 7.6% at twelve months. In the first year following implementation of EHR, 6.6% of patients underwent a repeat study within 6 months, and 12.9% within twelve months. In the most recent year of EHR usage, 5.7% of patients underwent repeat echocardiography at six months and 11.9% within twelve months. All rates of duplicate testing were significantly higher than their respective pre-EHR rates (p < 0.01 for all). Conclusion. Our study failed to demonstrate a reduction in the rate of duplicate echocardiography testing after the implementation of an EHR system. We feel that this data, combined with other recent analyses, should promote a more rigorous assessment of the initial claims of the benefits associated with EHR implementation. PMID:27088033

  6. The effect of hospital-physician integration on health information technology adoption.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Eric

    2013-10-01

    The US federal government has recently made a substantial investment to enhance the US health information technology (IT) infrastructure. Previous literature on the impact of IT on firm performance across multiple industries has emphasized the importance of a process of co-invention whereby organizations develop complementary practices to achieve greater benefit from their IT investments. In health care, employment of physicians by hospitals can confer greater administrative control to hospitals over physicians' actions and resources and thus enable the implementation of new technology and initiatives aimed at maximizing benefit from use of the technology. In this study, I tested for the relationship between hospital employment of physicians and hospitals' propensity to use health IT. I used state laws that prohibit hospital employment of physicians as an instrument to account for the endogenous relationship with hospital IT use. Hospital employment of physicians is associated with significant increases in the probability of hospital health IT use. Therefore, subsidization of health IT among hospitals not employing physicians may be less efficient. Furthermore, state laws prohibiting hospitals from employing physicians may inhibit adoption of health IT, thus working against policy initiatives aimed at promoting use of the technology. PMID:23055450

  7. Improving performance of CFB boiler by adopting end effect of bed exit of CFB combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Q.Y.; Jin, Y.

    1997-12-31

    Experiments indicate that the end effect of the bed exit of a CFB strongly influences the bulk density profile and internal circulation of bed materials in a CFB combustor. A well designed geometry of the bed exit of CFBC can create abundant internal circulation of bed materials in furnace and reduce external circulation in circulating loop of CFBC, then consequently improves the comprehensive performance of CFB boiler. This paper is devoted to analyzing the mechanism of the end effect of the bed exit on the hydrodynamics in a CFB by presenting test results. Design criteria and a suggestion for getting the end effect will also be presented.

  8. Principles of effective performance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.F.

    1996-07-01

    As with any endeavor connected with trendy words and phrases, {open_quotes}performance measurement{close_quotes} means different things to different people. To some, performance means {open_quotes}customer satisfaction{close_quotes}, and little, if anything, else. To others, it is productivity; to still others, it is procedural. In most real-world situations there are elements of all three of these dimensions. Whatever your definition of performance, it is important that it be clear in your own mind what you are trying to achieve, and that you make sure that those working with and for you have the same understanding. This paper is written from the point of view that performance is primarily productivity; after acceptable productivity is achieved, performance is customer satisfaction. I consider performance to be procedural only insofar as necessary to maintain legality and propriety. Rather than adopting the standard bureaucratic approach to procedure (i.e., everything not required is forbidden), I believe that consistently excellent performance demands the complementary philosophy: everything not forbidden is permitted. Remember: wars are won by the general who knows when to break the rules. The principles enunciated below are not unique to DOE or to the office environment: They are applicable to any performance measurement program. I have tried, however, to provide examples that apply to the office or that are likely to be familiar to those of us working with office information technology today.

  9. Adoption and Perceived Effectiveness of Financial Improvement Strategies in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, George M.; Pink, George H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the use and perceived success of strategies to improve the financial performance of Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs). Methods: Information about the use and perceived effectiveness of 44 specific strategies to improve financial performance was collected from an online survey of 291 CAH Chief Executive Officers and Chief…

  10. The Effects of Locus of Control on University Students' Mobile Learning Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsia, Jung-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Since mobile devices have become cheaper, easily accessible, powerful, and popular and the cost of wireless access has declined gradually, mobile learning (m-learning) has begun to spread rapidly. To further improve the effectiveness and efficiency of m-learning for university students, it is critical to understand whether they use m-learning.…

  11. Measuring the Effects of Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John

    1992-01-01

    A simple statistical model to measure the effects of innovation and schooling is proposed. Synthesis of 134 meta-analyses revealed that educational innovations can be expected to change average achievement by 0.4 standards deviations and affective outcomes by 0.2 standard deviations. Innovation and feedback appear to enhance effects;…

  12. Strengthening Adoption Practice, Listening to Adoptive Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Anne; Gonet, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    In-depth interviews with 500 adoptive families who received postadoption services through Virginia's Adoptive Family Preservation (AFP) program paint a richly detailed picture of the challenges adoptive families face and what they need to sustain adoption for many years after finalization. Findings document the need for support in a variety of…

  13. Genetic and environmental effects on openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness: an adoption/twin study.

    PubMed

    Bergeman, C S; Chipuer, H M; Plomin, R; Pedersen, N L; McClearn, G E; Nesselroade, J R; Costa, P T; McCrae, R R

    1993-06-01

    Previous research has indicated that extraversion and neuroticism are substantially affected both by genotype and environment. This study assesses genetic and environmental influences on the other three components of the five-factor model of personality: Openness to Experience, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. An abbreviated version of the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI) was administered to 82 pairs of identical twins and 171 pairs of fraternal twins reared apart and 132 pairs of identical twins and 167 pairs of fraternal twins reared together. Estimates of genetic and environmental effects for Openness and Conscientiousness were similar to those found in other studies of personality: Genetic influence was substantial and there was little evidence of shared rearing environment. Results for Agreeableness were different: Genetic influence accounted for only 12% of the variance and shared rearing environment accounted for 21% of the variance. Few significant gender or age differences for genetic and environmental parameters were found in model-fitting analyses. PMID:8345444

  14. The effect of late adoption of Canadian innovations: a case for implantable cardiac monitors.

    PubMed

    Sadri, Hamid; Winsor, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Syncope is a sudden and generally momentary loss of consciousness, which can have serious adverse events. The outcomes of the syncope episode can vary from a fall to fatal accidents. Syncope has a major negative effect on the patient's health-related quality of life. The economic burden of syncope on healthcare systems is considerable. There are no clear diagnostic pathways for identifying the cause of syncope; patients can be admitted to hospital and undergo expensive and often repeated and inconclusive diagnostic tests. Implantable cardiac monitors have been available for more than a decade to help early diagnosis of syncope in unexplained cases. However, despite being a Canadian invention, the use of the implantable cardiac monitors has been suboptimal in the Canadian healthcare system. This study provides an overview of syncope, its management, and presents the estimated potential cost savings per diagnosis of systematic use of implantable cardiac monitors in Ontario. PMID:25046970

  15. A polarization independent liquid crystal phase modulation adopting surface pinning effect of polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsin; Tsou, Yu-Shih

    2011-12-01

    A polarization-independent liquid crystal (LC) phase modulation using the surface pinning effect of polymer dispersed liquid crystals (SP-PDLC) is demonstrated. In the bulk region of the SP-PDLC, the orientations of LC directors are randomly dispersed; thus, any polarization of incident light experiences the same averaged refractive index. In the regions near glass substrates, the LC droplets are pinned. The orientations of top and bottom droplets are orthogonal. Two eigen-polarizations of an incident light experience the same phase shift. As a result, the SP-PDLC is polarization independent. Polarizer-free microlens arrays of SP-PDLC are also demonstrated. The SP-PDLC has potential for application in spatial light modulators, laser beam steering, and electrically tunable microprisms.

  16. The effect of adopting new storage methods for extending product validity periods on manufacturers expected inventory costs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The validness of the expiration dates (validity period) that manufacturers provide on food product labels is a crucial food safety problem. Governments must study how to use their authority by implementing fair awards and punishments to prompt manufacturers into adopting rigorous considerations, such as the effect of adopting new storage methods for extending product validity periods on expected costs. Assuming that a manufacturer sells fresh food or drugs, this manufacturer must respond to current stochastic demands at each unit of time to determine the purchase amount of products for sale. If this decision maker is capable and an opportunity arises, new packaging methods (e.g., aluminum foil packaging, vacuum packaging, high-temperature sterilization after glass packaging, or packaging with various degrees of dryness) or storage methods (i.e., adding desiccants or various antioxidants) can be chosen to extend the validity periods of products. To minimize expected costs, this decision maker must be aware of the processing costs of new storage methods, inventory standards, inventory cycle lengths, and changes in relationships between factors such as stochastic demand functions in a cycle. Based on these changes in relationships, this study established a mathematical model as a basis for discussing the aforementioned topics. PMID:25302332

  17. Enhancing the effectiveness of media messages promoting regular breast self-examination: messages based on innovation adoption principles.

    PubMed

    Howe, H L

    1981-01-01

    As public health departments have come to rely more and more on the mass media for the promotion of healthful behavior, it has become increasingly desirable to determine the motivating capability of the messages used in this promotion. A fact that is well understood is that many times any message at all is better than none. However, the effectiveness of various media health messages has not been well researched.A study was therefore undertaken of the comparative effectiveness of two different messages describing how to do a breast self-examination. An "experimental message" for the study was designed by applying the principles that facilitate innovation adoption to the message's format and presentation. This message's impact was then compared with that of the American Cancer Society's pamphlet "How To Examine Your Breasts." This pamphlet had been mailed to a sample of women similar to those receiving the experimental message, but who lived in a different geographic area. The use in each area of control groups who had received no messages afforded an opportunity to study maturation effects (other factors than the mailings that might have influenced study results).The experimental message proved more successful in persuading women to adopt breast self-examination than the comparison message. The women who reported a change in breast self-examination practice following the mailing could be characterized as having a more extensive social support system to promote breast examinations and as having a pre-experiment perception that breast self-examination was a complex practice to perform repeatedly at regular intervals. PMID:7208797

  18. Obstacles to Interstate Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Roberta

    A documentation of the obstacles in law, policy and administrative procedure that interfere with effecting adoptions across State lines is presented. Major problems include: (1) Nonjudicial termination or relinquishment proceedings, although legal in many States, do not satisfy the courts in other states on the issue of the child's freedom for…

  19. Medical Issues in Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Medical Issues in Adoption KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Issues in Adoption Print ... or emotional abuse of the child continue Agency Adoptions If you adopt through an agency, you might ...

  20. Can Coolness Predict Technology Adoption? Effects of Perceived Coolness on User Acceptance of Smartphones with Curved Screens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Joon; Shin, Dong-Hee; Park, Eunil

    2015-09-01

    This study proposes an acceptance model for curved-screen smartphones, and explores how the sense of coolness induced by attractiveness, originality, subcultural appeal, and the utility of the curved screen promotes smartphone adoption. The results of structural equation modeling analyses (N = 246) show that these components of coolness (except utility) increase the acceptance of the technology by enhancing the smartphones' affectively driven qualities rather than their utilitarian ones. The proposed coolness model is then compared with the original technology acceptance model to validate that the coolness factors are indeed equally effective determinants of usage intention, as are the extensively studied usability factors such as perceived ease of use and usefulness. PMID:26348813

  1. Alternative Student Growth Measures for Teacher Evaluation: Profiles of Early-Adopting Districts. REL 2014-016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Brian; English, Brittany; Furgeson, Joshua; McCullough, Moira

    2014-01-01

    States and districts are beginning to use student achievement growth--as measured by state assessments (often using statistical techniques known as value-added models or student growth models)--as part of their teacher evaluation systems. But this approach has limited application in most states, because their assessments are typically administered…

  2. Alternative Student Growth Measures for Teacher Evaluation: Profiles of Early-Adopting Districts. Summary. REL 2014-016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Brian; English, Brittany; Furgeson, Joshua; McCullough, Moira

    2014-01-01

    States and districts are beginning to use student achievement growth--as measured by state assessments (often using statistical techniques known as value-added models or student growth models)--as part of their teacher evaluation systems. But this approach has limited application in most states, because their assessments are typically administered…

  3. Remote surface pollutant measurement by adopting a variable stand-off distance based laser induced spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiesh Kumar, V.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Sarathi, R.

    2015-11-01

    In an offshore environment, measurement of surface pollutants on rotating wind turbine blades is necessary to protect the blades from lightning damage. A remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique combined with a photometric device is proposed and demonstrated at the laboratory scale for remote sensing and quantification of surface pollutants such as salt deposits on the wind turbine blade material from different standoff distances. A telescope-based photometric device consisting of a translation stage coupled with an optical fiber is designed for acquiring the optical emissions from the laser-induced plasma at different standoff distances ranging from 1 to 100 m. The experimental studies clearly demonstrate the use of the photometric device in obtaining LIBS spectra for identifying and quantifying the salt deposits by temporal measurements of the optical emissions of a plasma from standoff distances between 1 and 40 m.

  4. Effects of experimentally adopted sexual schemas on vaginal response and subjective sexual arousal: a comparison between women with sexual arousal disorder and sexually healthy women.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Laura S; Kuffel, Stephanie W; Heiman, Julia R

    2008-12-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the effects of experimentally adopted sexual schemas on vaginal response, subjective sexual arousal, and affect in 17 women with Female Sexual Arousal Disorder (FSAD) and 17 sexually healthy women. Positive and negative cognitive schemas were presented to participants before viewing sexually explicit video segments. They were asked to temporarily adopt both schemas, and vaginal response, subjective sexual arousal, and affect were measured in each schema condition. Participants in both groups had significantly greater vaginal response and reported more subjective sexual arousal in the positive schema condition than in the negative schema condition. Sexually healthy women demonstrated significantly higher subjective sexual arousal than women with FSAD, but there were no significant group differences in vaginal response. Moreover, participants in both groups reported higher levels of Positive Affect and Vigor in the positive schema condition than in the negative schema condition but higher levels of Negative Affect, Tension-Anxiety, and Anger-Hostility in the negative schema condition than in the positive schema condition. These findings demonstrate the impact of cognitions on sexual arousal, which has important implications for addressing cognitions in the treatment of FSAD. Moreover, these findings have implications for the conceptualization of FSAD, which may be best characterized as a complex, heterogeneous cluster of symptoms. PMID:18256919

  5. Language Abilities of Internationally Adopted Children from China during the Early School Years: Evidence for Early Age Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delcenserie, Audrey; Genesee, Fred; Gauthier, Karine

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the language, cognitive, and socioemotional abilities of 27 internationally adopted children from China, adopted by French-speaking parents, 12 of whom had been assessed previously by Gauthier and Genesee. The children were on average 7 years, 10 months old and were matched to nonadopted monolingual French-speaking children on age,…

  6. Calibration method of laser plane equation for vision measurement adopting objective function of uniform horizontal height of feature points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Hao, Zhaobing; Li, Xiaotao; Su, Jian; Liu, Huanping; Zhang, Xinyuan

    2016-02-01

    A calibration method with an objective function generated from a uniform horizontal height is presented in this work for the laser plane in active vision measurement. A height target is developed with a center mark as the initial point of the uniform height. The height target is located on the horizontal plane of the 3D calibration board so that the horizontal plane is considered as the terminal of the uniform horizontal height. Based on the pinhole model of the camera and the laser plane equation, we model the objective function to find the optimal coefficients of the laser plane equation. The goal of the objective function is the smallest difference of the uniform height and the reconstructed height according to the feature points of the target. The objective function is optimized by the local particle swarm optimization. The calibrated global equation of a laser plane is obtained from the optimal value 1.153 × 103 of the objective function in the experiments. Two projective laser lines of the calibration laser plane cover the original laser lines in the image. The reconstruction errors of the calibration plane are also analyzed in discussions.

  7. Local cascades induced global contagion: How heterogeneous thresholds, exogenous effects, and unconcerned behaviour govern online adoption spreading.

    PubMed

    Karsai, Márton; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Kikas, Riivo; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2016-01-01

    Adoption of innovations, products or online services is commonly interpreted as a spreading process driven to large extent by social influence and conditioned by the needs and capacities of individuals. To model this process one usually introduces behavioural threshold mechanisms, which can give rise to the evolution of global cascades if the system satisfies a set of conditions. However, these models do not address temporal aspects of the emerging cascades, which in real systems may evolve through various pathways ranging from slow to rapid patterns. Here we fill this gap through the analysis and modelling of product adoption in the world's largest voice over internet service, the social network of Skype. We provide empirical evidence about the heterogeneous distribution of fractional behavioural thresholds, which appears to be independent of the degree of adopting egos. We show that the structure of real-world adoption clusters is radically different from previous theoretical expectations, since vulnerable adoptions-induced by a single adopting neighbour-appear to be important only locally, while spontaneous adopters arriving at a constant rate and the involvement of unconcerned individuals govern the global emergence of social spreading. PMID:27272744

  8. Adoption and Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, Byung Hoon

    1989-01-01

    Because of Korean attitudes towards adoption and other reasons, attempts to promote intracountry adoption have met with limited success, and intercountry adoption is used as an alternative way of meeting children's needs. (RJC)

  9. Adopted Children and Discipline

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families Media ... Your Community Healthy Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Adoption & Foster Care > Adopted Children & Discipline Family Life Listen ...

  10. Adoption & Foster Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Adoption & Foster Care Adoption & Foster Care Article Body ​Each year, many children join families through adoption and foster care. These families may face unique ...

  11. Green roof adoption in atlanta, georgia: the effects of building characteristics and subsidies on net private, public, and social benefits.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Jeffrey D; Lamsal, Madhur; Colson, Greg

    2013-10-01

    This research draws on and expands previous studies that have quantified the costs and benefits associated with conventional roofs versus green roofs. Using parameters from those studies to define alternative scenarios, we estimate from a private, public, and social perspective the costs and benefits of installing and maintaining an extensive green roof in Atlanta, GA. Results indicate net private benefits are a decreasing function of roof size and vary considerably across scenarios. In contrast, net public benefits are highly stable across scenarios, ranging from $32.49 to $32.90 m(-2). In addition, we evaluate two alternative subsidy regimes: (i) a general subsidy provided to every building that adopts a green roof and (ii) a targeted subsidy provided only to buildings for which net private benefits are negative but net public benefits are positive. In 6 of the 12 general subsidy scenarios the optimal public policy is not to offer a subsidy; in 5 scenarios the optimal subsidy rate is between $20 and $27 m(-2); and in 1 scenario the optimal rate is $5 m(-2). The optimal rate with a targeted subsidy is between $20 and $27 m(-2) in 11 scenarios and no subsidy is optimal in the twelfth. In most scenarios, a significant portion of net public benefits are generated by buildings for which net private benefits are positive. This suggests a policy focused on information dissemination and technical assistance may be more cost-effective than direct subsidy payments. PMID:23991671

  12. Effects of graphene plates’ adoption on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility of calcium silicate coating

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Youtao; Li, Hongqin; Ding, Chuanxian; Zheng, Xuebin; Li, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Calcium silicate (CS) ceramic is a good coating candidate for biomedical implants to improve biocompatibility and accelerate early osseointegration. However, the poor fracture toughness and wear resistance of this ceramic material restricts the long-term performance of implants. In this study, graphene plates (GPs) were used as reinforcement to improve the mechanical properties of CS coating. Composite coating containing 1.5 weight % GPs was prepared by vacuum plasma spraying technology. The good survival of the GPs in the composite coating was demonstrated by Raman analysis, although the defects of the GPs were increased after plasma spraying. Effects of the GPs’ adoption on the microstructure of the coating were studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Results showed that the GPs were homogenously distributed in the CS grains interface or enwrapped on the particles, and exhibited good wetting behavior with the CS matrix. The wear properties of the composite coating were obviously enhanced by the reinforcement of GPs. The reinforcement mechanism was attributed to the enhanced micro-hardness and interfacial bonding of the particles in the coating. In vivo experiments demonstrated that the composite coating possessed similarly good biocompatibility compared to pure CS coating. The bone-implant contact ratio reached 84.3%±7.4% for GPs/CS coating and 79.6%±9.4% for CS coating after 3 months’ implantation. PMID:26089662

  13. Process and Effects Evaluation of a Digital Mental Health Intervention Targeted at Improving Occupational Well-Being: Lessons From an Intervention Study With Failed Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Ermes, Miikka

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital interventions have the potential to serve as cost-effective ways to manage occupational stress and well-being. However, little is known about the adoption of individual-level digital interventions at organizations. Objectives The aim of this paper is to study the effects of an unguided digital mental health intervention in occupational well-being and the factors that influence the adoption of the intervention. Methods The intervention was based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and its aim was to teach skills for stress management and mental well-being. It was delivered via a mobile and a Web-based app that were offered to employees of two information and communication technology (ICT) companies. The primary outcome measures were perceived stress and work engagement, measured by a 1-item stress questionnaire (Stress) and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9). The intervention process was evaluated regarding the change mechanisms and intervention stages using mixed methods. The initial interviews were conducted face-to-face with human resource managers (n=2) of both companies in August 2013. The participants were recruited via information sessions and email invitations. The intervention period took place between November 2013 and March 2014. The participants were asked to complete online questionnaires at baseline, two months, and four months after the baseline measurement. The final phone interviews for the volunteer participants (n=17) and the human resource managers (n=2) were conducted in April to May 2014, five months after the baseline. Results Of all the employees, only 27 (8.1%, 27/332) took the app into use, with a mean use of 4.8 (SD 4.7) different days. In the beginning, well-being was on good level in both companies and no significant changes in well-being were observed. The activities of the intervention process failed to integrate the intervention into everyday activities at the workplace. Those who took the app into

  14. Atmospheric effects on radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurica, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Two essentially distinct regions of the electromagnetic spectrum are discussed: (1) the scattering region in which the radiation energy is provided by the incident solar flux; and (2) the infrared region in which emission by the earth's surface and atmospheric gases supply radiative energy. In each of these spectral regions the atmosphere performs its dual function with respect to a remote sensing measurement of surface properties. The atmosphere acts both as a filter and as a noise generator removing and obscuring sought after information. Nevertheless, with proper application of concepts such as have been considered, it will be possible to remove these unwanted atmospheric effects and to improve identification techniques being developed.

  15. Local cascades induced global contagion: How heterogeneous thresholds, exogenous effects, and unconcerned behaviour govern online adoption spreading

    PubMed Central

    Karsai, Márton; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Kikas, Riivo; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2016-01-01

    Adoption of innovations, products or online services is commonly interpreted as a spreading process driven to large extent by social influence and conditioned by the needs and capacities of individuals. To model this process one usually introduces behavioural threshold mechanisms, which can give rise to the evolution of global cascades if the system satisfies a set of conditions. However, these models do not address temporal aspects of the emerging cascades, which in real systems may evolve through various pathways ranging from slow to rapid patterns. Here we fill this gap through the analysis and modelling of product adoption in the world’s largest voice over internet service, the social network of Skype. We provide empirical evidence about the heterogeneous distribution of fractional behavioural thresholds, which appears to be independent of the degree of adopting egos. We show that the structure of real-world adoption clusters is radically different from previous theoretical expectations, since vulnerable adoptions—induced by a single adopting neighbour—appear to be important only locally, while spontaneous adopters arriving at a constant rate and the involvement of unconcerned individuals govern the global emergence of social spreading. PMID:27272744

  16. Local cascades induced global contagion: How heterogeneous thresholds, exogenous effects, and unconcerned behaviour govern online adoption spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsai, Márton; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Kikas, Riivo; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2016-06-01

    Adoption of innovations, products or online services is commonly interpreted as a spreading process driven to large extent by social influence and conditioned by the needs and capacities of individuals. To model this process one usually introduces behavioural threshold mechanisms, which can give rise to the evolution of global cascades if the system satisfies a set of conditions. However, these models do not address temporal aspects of the emerging cascades, which in real systems may evolve through various pathways ranging from slow to rapid patterns. Here we fill this gap through the analysis and modelling of product adoption in the world’s largest voice over internet service, the social network of Skype. We provide empirical evidence about the heterogeneous distribution of fractional behavioural thresholds, which appears to be independent of the degree of adopting egos. We show that the structure of real-world adoption clusters is radically different from previous theoretical expectations, since vulnerable adoptions—induced by a single adopting neighbour—appear to be important only locally, while spontaneous adopters arriving at a constant rate and the involvement of unconcerned individuals govern the global emergence of social spreading.

  17. Mechanisms of immunological eradication of a syngeneic guinea pig tumor. II. Effect of methotrexate treatment and T cell depletion of the recipient on adoptive immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, S.; Fonseca, L.S.; Hunter, J.T.; Rapp, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of methotrexate on the development of immunity to the line 10 hepatoma was studied in guinea pigs. Chronic methotrexate treatment had no apparent effect on the ability of immune guinea pigs to suppress the growth of inoculated tumor cells. In contrast, the same methotrexate regimen inhibited the development of tumor immunity if started before the 8th day after immunization with a vaccine containing viable line 10 cells admixed with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) cell walls. Thus, methotrexate selectively inhibited the afferent limb of the immune response. In adoptive transfer experiments, methotrexate-treated recipient guinea pigs were capable of being passively sensitized with immune spleen cells, indicating that the primary cell-mediated immune response of the recipient was not required for adoptive immunity. The contribution of recipient T cells in adoptive immunity was further investigated in guinea pigs deleted of T cells by thymectomy, irradiation, and bone marrow reconstitution. Despite demonstrable deficiency in T lymphocyte reactions, B animals were fully capable of rejecting tumors after transfer of immune cells. These results suggest that the expression of adoptive immunity was independent of recipient T cell participation. In addition, sublethal irradiation of immune spleen cells prior to adoptive transfer abolished their efficacy. Proliferation of transferred immune cells in the recipient may be essential for expression of adoptive immunity.

  18. Herd-level risk factors for bovine tuberculosis and adoption of related biosecurity measures in Northern Ireland: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, M J H; Matthews, D I; Laird, C; McDowell, S W J

    2016-07-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a zoonotic disease which is endemic in Northern Ireland. As it has proven difficult to eradicate this disease, partly due to a wildlife reservoir being present in the European badger (Meles meles), a case-control study was conducted in a high incidence area in 2010-2011. The aim was to identify risk factors for bTB breakdown relating to cattle and badgers, and to assess the adoption of bTB related biosecurity measures on farms. Face-to-face questionnaires with farmers and surveys of badger setts and farm boundaries were conducted on 117 farms with a recent bTB breakdown (cases) and 75 farms without a recent breakdown (controls). On logistic regression at univariable and multivariable levels, significant risk factors associated with being a case herd included having an accessible badger sett within the farm boundaries in a field grazed in the last year (odds ratio, OR, 4.14; 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.79, 9.55), observation of live badgers (OR 4.14; 95% CI 1.79, 9.55), purchase of beef cattle (OR 4.60; 95% CI 1.61, 13.13), use of contractors to spread slurry (OR 2.83; 95% CI 1.24, 6.49), feeding meal on top of silage (OR 3.55; 95% CI 1.53, 8.23) and feeding magnesium supplement (OR = 3.77; 95% CI 1.39, 10.17). The majority of setts within the farm boundary were stated to be accessible by cattle (77.1%; 95% CI 71.2, 83.0%) and 66.8% (95% CI 63.8, 69.7%) of farm boundaries provided opportunities for nose-to-nose contact between cattle. Adoption of bTB related biosecurity measures, especially with regards to purchasing cattle and badger-related measures, was lower than measures related to disinfection and washing. PMID:27240911

  19. Modeling technology adoption in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Besley, T.; Case, A. )

    1993-05-01

    An analysis of technology adoption decisions by poor farmers is provided. Some possible empirical models for studying technology adoption are reviewed. The issue of theoretical consistency is dealt with in terms of the costs of such consistency, measured in data needs and model complexity, and the benefits, measured in terms of understanding the micro-economic foundations of adoption.

  20. The Family of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavao, Joyce Maguire

    This book aims to provide a broad framework within which to think about adoption as a whole system, so that everyone involved will learn to feel some empathy for the other members of the adoption process. The book, written by a family and adoption therapist who was adopted as an infant, describes predictable developmental stages and challenges for…

  1. Neurodevelopmental and Psychological Assessment of Adolescents Born to Drug-Addicted Parents: Effects of SES and Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornoy, Asher; Daka, Lulu; Goldzweig, Gil; Gil, Yoni; Mjen, Ludmila; Levit, Shabtai; Shufman, Emi; Bar-Hamburger, Rachel; Greenbaum, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Prenatal exposure to heroin may have long-term consequences for development during early and middle childhood. The present research studied the cognitive, social, and emotional functioning of adolescents exposed to drugs prenatally, and investigated the extent to which the early adoption of children exposed prenatally to drugs would…

  2. Measurement of Effectiveness of Public Library Service Study. A Report on Phases I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeProspo, Ernest R.; And Others

    The basic rationale for this study was that attempts to measure the service capabilities of public libraries, either in relation to the needs of their communities or to the standards adopted by the profession, are hampered by the lack of criteria of quality or effectiveness. It was recognized that new measures were needed to gauge effectiveness…

  3. Precise Measurement of Effective Focal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.; Young, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Computerized instrument measures effective focal lengths to 0.01 percent accuracy. Laser interferometers measure mirror angle and stage coordinate y in instrument for accurate measurment of focal properties of optical systems. Operates under computer control to measure effective focal length, focal surface shape, modulation transfer function, and astigmatism.

  4. Questions about Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Questions About Adoption Page Content Article Body What's the best way to handle my child's questions about her adoption? Many parents want to know when is the ...

  5. What's Happening in Adoption?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Ursula M.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews current issues in adoption: termination of parental rights, rights of unwed fathers, subsidized adoption, the recent influx of Vietnamese children, black market babies, agency accountability in placing children, the right of the adoptee to know his biological parents. (ED)

  6. Single Parent Adoptive Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shireman, Joan F.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews research and reports on a longitudinal study of 15 single-parent adoptive homes over a 14-year period that demonstrated that these homes have the capacity to be successful adoptive placements. Identifies unique characteristics of single-parent adoptive homes, and notes the need for additional research to identify children for whom these…

  7. Adoption and Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, E. James

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how adoption responds to ancient questions about origins. Maintains that one's identity hinges on actual relationships more than on pedigree and genes. Discusses reasons for informing a child about his or her adoption. Suggests that adoption is a constructive process involving too many worrisome warnings and anxiety-raising advice by the…

  8. IMPROVING MEASURES OF BIOLOGIC EFFECT: MEASURING EFFECTS IN HUMAN MALES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animal toxicology studies have demonstrated spermatogenesis and sperm quality effects after exposure to DCA, BDCM, chloral hydrate and DBA. Population-based field studies to identify human male reproductive risks of DBPs require preliminary work to develop specific epidemiologi...

  9. IMPROVING MEASURES OF BIOLOGIC EFFECT: MEASURING EFFECTS IN HUMAN MALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animal toxicology studies have demonstrated spermatogenesis and sperm quality effects after exposure to several drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including DCA, BDCM, chloral hydrate and DBA. Population-based field studies to identify human male reproductive risks o...

  10. The Transracial Adoption Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    The number of transracial adoptions in the United States, particularly international adoptions, is increasing annually. Counseling psychology as a profession, however, is a relatively silent voice in the research on and practice of transracial adoption. This article presents an overview of the history and research on transracial adoption to inform counseling psychologists of the set of racial and ethnic challenges and opportunities that transracial adoptive families face in everyday living. Particular attention is given to emergent theory and research on the cultural socialization process within these families. PMID:18458794

  11. The effects of techno-economic and organizational factors on the adoption of NASA-innovations by commercial firms in the U.S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    The present work reports on the effects of several organizational and techno-economic factors which tend to facilitate or inhibit the successful transfer and commercial utilization of technology generated outside the organizational setting of a potential industrial user. Innovations were regarded as either product cases or process cases, and successful adoption of these innovations was related to systematic data on the relation between innovator and user and on channels of communication.

  12. Companion animal adoption study.

    PubMed

    Neidhart, Laura; Boyd, Renee

    2002-01-01

    To better understand the outcomes of companion animal adoptions, Bardsley & Neidhart Inc. conducted a series of 3 surveys over a 1-year period with dog and cat owners who had adopted their pet through either a (a) Luv-A-Pet location, (b) Adopt-a-thon, or (c) traditional shelter. This article suggests opportunities to improve owners' perceptions of their pets and the adoption process through (a) providing more information before adoption about pet health and behaviors, (b) providing counseling to potential adopters to place pets appropriately, and (c) educating adopters to promote companion animal health and retention. Results demonstrate that the pet's relationship to the family unit, such as where the pet sleeps and how much time is spent with the pet, is related to the amount of veterinary care the companion animal receives, and to long-term retention. Satisfaction and retention are attributed to the pet's personality, compatibility, and behavior, rather than demographic differences among adopters or between adoption settings. The age of the companion animal at adoption, the intended recipient, and presence of children in the home also play a role. Health problems were an issue initially for half of all adopted pets, but most were resolved within 12 months. Roughly one fourth of adopters who no longer have their companion animal said their pet died. Characteristics of pets that died support the contention that spaying and neutering profoundly affects a companion animal's life span. Although retention is similar for dogs and cats, mortality is higher among cats in the first year after adoption. PMID:12578739

  13. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Daniel L; O'Neil, Richard T; Foster, Aaron E; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M; Wilson, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans. PMID:26473608

  14. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Aaron E.; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M.; Wilson, Matthew H.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans. PMID:26473608

  15. Macro influencers of electronic health records adoption.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Vijay V; Chinta, Ravi; Zhirkin, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    While adoption rates for electronic health records (EHRs) have improved, the reasons for significant geographical differences in EHR adoption within the USA have remained unclear. To understand the reasons for these variations across states, we have compiled from secondary sources a profile of different states within the USA, based on macroeconomic and macro health-environment factors. Regression analyses were performed using these indicator factors on EHR adoption. The results showed that internet usage and literacy are significantly associated with certain measures of EHR adoption. Income level was not significantly associated with EHR adoption. Per capita patient days (a proxy for healthcare need intensity within a state) is negatively correlated with EHR adoption rate. Health insurance coverage is positively correlated with EHR adoption rate. Older physicians (>60 years) tend to adopt EHR systems less than their younger counterparts. These findings have policy implications on formulating regionally focused incentive programs. PMID:26559074

  16. Quantum Zeno Effect in the Measurement Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namiki, Mikio; Pasaczio, Saverio

    1996-01-01

    Critically analyzing the so-called quantum Zeno effect in the measurement problem, we show that observation of this effect does not necessarily mean experimental evidence for the naive notion of wave-function collapse by measurement (the simple projection rule). We also examine what kind of limitation the uncertainty relation and others impose on the observation of the quantum Zeno effect.

  17. Speed of Dog Adoption: Impact of Online Photo Traits.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Rachel; Witte, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has radically changed how dogs are advertised for adoption in the United States. This study was used to investigate how different characteristics in dogs' photos presented online affected the speed of their adoptions, as a proof of concept to encourage more research in this field. The study analyzed the 1st images of 468 adopted young and adult black dogs identified as Labrador Retriever mixed breeds across the United States. A subjective global measure of photo quality had the largest impact on time to adoption. Other photo traits that positively impacted adoption speed included direct canine eye contact with the camera, the dog standing up, the photo being appropriately sized, an outdoor photo location, and a nonblurry image. Photos taken in a cage, dogs wearing a bandana, dogs having a visible tongue, and some other traits had no effect on how fast the dogs were adopted. Improving the quality of online photos of dogs presented for adoption may speed up and possibly increase the number of adoptions, thereby providing a cheap and easy way to help fight the homeless companion animal population problem. PMID:25495493

  18. Using stated preference methods to design cost-effective subsidy programs to induce technology adoption: an application to a stove program in southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Walter; Salgado, Hugo; Vásquez, Felipe; Chávez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    We study the design of an economic incentive based program - a subsidy - to induce adoption of more efficient technology in a pollution reduction program in southern Chile. Stated preferences methods, contingent valuation (CV), and choice experiment (CE) are used to estimate the probability of adoption and the willingness to share the cost of a new technology by a household. The cost-effectiveness property of different subsidy schemes is explored numerically for different regulatory objectives. Our results suggest that households are willing to participate in voluntary programs and to contribute by paying a share of the cost of adopting more efficient technologies. We find that attributes of the existing and the new technology, beyond the price, are relevant determinant factors of the participation decision and payment. Limited access to credit markets for low income families can be a major barrier for an effective implementation of these types of programs. Variations in the design of the subsidy and on the regulator's objective and constraints can have significant impact on the level and the cost of reduction of aggregate emissions achieved. PMID:24362316

  19. Single Parent Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Presenting two views of the single-parent family, this pamphlet includes an article by two researchers (William Feigelman and Arnold R. Silverman) and a short statement by a single adoptive parent (Amanda Richards). The first paper summarizes earlier research on single-parent adoptions and discusses the results of a nationwide survey of 713…

  20. Measurement of effectiveness of software testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Shen, Xiangheng; Wang, Junjie; Chen, Yuan

    2013-03-01

    In order to detect the errors in the software as much as possible and produce the software products with high quality, it is particularly important to do the quality evaluation of software testing work. In this paper the author did research of measurement of effectiveness of software testing from three aspects of testing method, testing process and testing result. Summarized the present technology condition of measurement of effectiveness of software testing at home and abroad, improved model of measurement of process of effectiveness of software testing, did the experiment of white box testing coverage rate and got the rough measurement value. The use of the proposed measure the effectiveness of software testing methods, analysis of data collected metrics, and then proposed to improve software testing techniques and software testing methods, so that make software testing effectively exert its positive function.

  1. Adopt to sustain: The effect of biophysical and socioeconomic context on the ability of two contrasting U.S. agroecosystems to respond to changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, T.

    2015-12-01

    Increased demand for food, feed, fuel and fiber in U.S. agroecosystems has deleterious effects on the environment. Gauging the responses of these agroecosystems in the presence of extreme events and new market demands requires a fresh approach. This approach requires better comprehension of the interactions and feedback processes that either sustain or deplete both natural (e.g., soil productivity) and human (e.g., net income) capital. Because soil quality defines land productivity and long-term prosperity, we focus on the cascading effects that soil quality has on other ecosystem properties, profit, farmer decision making in mitigating soil degradation, and development of environmental policies. We argue that land use decision-making must not only be strictly based on socioeconomic and environmental criteria, but should also consider farmer/ farm characteristics, personal beliefs, and the support network that is needed for promoting and implementing conservation practices. Current approaches for adopting conservation do not fit into this paradigm. We develop an Agent Based Model Framework that incorporates novel aspects of ecological, socioeconomic and behavioral modeling to facilitate interactions of the farmer and its land through a multi-objective, maximization utility function. This function is continuously informed and updated by the improved modeling framework. This study is developing measures of sustainability for lags, hysteresis, tipping points, and adaptive capacity. We examine the complex relationship between farmer decision-making and the landscape in two contrasting systems in Iowa and Tennessee with unique distributions of characteristics in terms of climate, soil properties, and landscape patterns that regulate not only the type of farming practiced, but also the degree of soil erosion in each system. Central to this investigation is identifying and quantifying trade-offs among non-pecuniary and pecuniary objectives given alternative scenarios

  2. Dryland degradation: Measurement and effects on ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noojipady, P.; Prince, S. D.; Rishmawi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Land degradation is frequently described as a global crisis, affecting large areas globally and large numbers of people. Nevertheless, the location and severity of degradation globally with a resolution relevant to human activities is unknown. Beyond the direct stress of degradation on human livelihoods, there are important effects on the physical and biological environment. Examples include loss of potential primary production, changes in the surface water and energy balances, erosion, sediment transport and lofting of dust aerosols. Globally , degradation is mainly associated with drylands, such as the US dustbowl of the 1930s and, supposedly, ongoing loss of crop and livestock production in desert margins on all continents. The alarm over loss of land to deserts, particularly early 1980s in the African Sahel, led to the adoption of the term "desertification". Such degradation is said to have two components; a physical environment that reduces productivity; and human land use that exceeds the resilience of the land. Ecological theory suggests that land can exist in multiple stable states with transitions between them. Some experimental evidence suggests that one such state is degradation from which there can be no recovery. Clearly the occurrence of such stable degradation, where land is unable to recover when the physical conditions such as rainfall and human land use are ameliorated, is of theoretical and practical importance. The aim of this work is to contribute to the resolution of two issues: (i) are there significant areas in which land has been degraded by human actions and, (ii), have any of these areas entered a stable degraded state? Detection of the human component necessarily requires control of the physical component of degradation. We have developed a technique to detect areas that are at their potential production and to assess other areas relative to these. Satellite measurements of vegetation indices are used as a surrogate for Net Primary

  3. Who's Calling the Shots? Decision-Makers and the Adoption of Effective School-Based Substance Use Prevention Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringwalt, Chris; Ennett, Susan T.; Vincus, Amy A.; Rohrbach, Louise Ann; Simons-Rudolph, Ashley

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the relative roles of school district and school-level decision-makers in the implementation of effective substance use prevention curricula. Drawing on a "Site-Based Management" approach to effective decision-making, we hypothesized that schools whose personnel played active decision-making roles would be more likely to…

  4. Method Effects and the Meaning of Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Although the idea of a method effect in psychological measurement seems intuitively straightforward – that is, it is said to occur when any characteristic of a measurement procedure contributes variance to scores beyond what is attributable to variance in the attribute of interest – much of the surrounding conceptual vocabulary remains confused. In part, these confusions can be traced to deeper confusion in the human science literature regarding the meaning of measurement. In particular, the thinking of human scientists about method effects has been shaped by (a) received wisdom regarding why method effects are problematic to begin with, and, therefore, what corrective measures are appropriate, (b) the formal and implied semantics of psychometric techniques that have been developed to model method effects, and (c) general philosophical undercurrents that have contributed to the collective understanding of psychological measurement. Notably, tensions between lines of thought that can be broadly characterized as empiricist and realist have contributed to uneven thinking surrounding the concept of a method effect. In this paper, it is argued that it may be possible to formulate an account of what method effects are that is coherent not only across different research traditions in the human sciences, but also with thinking found in other scientific disciplines; however, doing so requires a more explicit commitment to a realist position on measurement than is generally forthcoming from human scientists. By examining these issues, this paper hopes to contribute to semantic clarity regarding not just method effects, but also the meaning of measurement in psychology. PMID:23596427

  5. Parenting Your Adopted Teenager

    MedlinePlus

    ... https: / / www. childwelfare. gov/ pubs/ f- openadopt/ .) The Internet and the explosion of social media sites (e. ... 4 Howard, J. (2012). Untangling the web: The Internet’s transformative impact on adoption . New York, NY: Evan ...

  6. Adoption and Sibling Rivalry

    MedlinePlus

    ... child in your family should understand her own origins, and those of her brothers and sisters. But ... children can seem exaggerated because of their different origins. For instance, i f your adoptive child does ...

  7. Travelers' Health: International Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... preadoption living standards, varying disease epidemiology in the countries of origin, the presence of previously unidentified medical problems, and ... know the disease risks in the adopted child’s country of origin and the medical and social histories of the ...

  8. Genetic Risks and ADHD Symptomatology: Exploring the Effects of Parental Antisocial Behaviors in an Adoption-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Kevin M.; Nedelec, Joseph L.; Rowland, Meghan W.; Schwartz, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    A great deal of research has examined the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and ADHD symptomatologies. Genetic factors are consistently shown to explain a significant proportion of variance in measures of ADHD. The current study adds to this body of research by examining whether genetic liabilities for criminality and…

  9. Persuasion stage in adoption theory: a cognitive response-cognitive structure assessment of source credibility and tax-incentive effects on consumer decision making for residential solar systems. [Suburbs of Baltimore

    SciTech Connect

    Batory, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The research objective was to learn more about the consumer's acceptance or rejection process toward a major residential energy innovation, a solar-generated water heating system. An experiment was conducted that evaluated one aspect of solar's commercialization, the persuasion stage in new-product-adoption decision making. A test of source credibility and monetary incentive effects on the consumer's decision-making processes was carried out. The experiment contained two message sources: the Department of Energy (a high credibility source) and a homebuilder (a moderate credibility source), and three levels of incentives, a tax credit equal to 40% of the solar unit purchase price, a 20% tax credit, and no tax credit. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a control group or one of six experimental treatments in a 2 x 3 fixed-effects factorial design. Subjects were 226 adult homeowners drawn from the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland. The research postulated and tested a process of acceptance or rejection of innovations which was based on a cognitive-response/cognitive-structure paradigm of decision making. This process is called the persuasion stage by adoption theorists. Cognitive responses, beliefs, attitudes, and behavioral measures were the dependent variables. Consumers were shown to confront or debate incoming information by comparing it to their existing cognitive structure. This comparison process generated cognitive responses which led to changes in beliefs, attitudes, and behavior toward the innovation. The findings confirm that the federal government's intervention in the marketplace is having a favorable effect on the adoption decision process toward solar-generated water heating.

  10. The Effect of Training and Consultation Condition on Teachers' Self-Reported Likelihood of Adoption of a Daily Report Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdaway, Alex S.; Owens, Julie Sarno

    2015-01-01

    Using a within-subjects design and validated vignettes, this study examined the relative effects of four training and consultation conditions (i.e., consultation with key opinion leaders, consultation with observation and performance feedback, consultation with motivational interviewing, and professional development-as-usual) on teachers' (N =…

  11. Measuring Effectiveness: What Will It Take?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stumbo, Circe; McWalters, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Federal policy now focuses on teacher "effectiveness" rather than teacher "quality" as its central policy concern. Rather than measuring inputs, the new focus looks to measure the outcomes of a teacher's work--that is, the extent to which the educator has met crucial student needs, such as improved student achievement. As states move to take a…

  12. Adolescents' Feelings about Openness in Adoption: Implications for Adoption Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Jerica M.; Mendenhall, Tai J.; Wrobel, Gretchen M.; Grotevant, Harold D.; McRoy, Ruth G.

    2006-01-01

    Adoption research commonly uses parents' reports of satisfaction when examining openness in adoption arrangements. This qualitative study aimed to fill a gap in the adoption research by using adolescents' voices to gain a better understanding of their adoption experiences. Adopted adolescents (n = 152) were interviewed concerning their…

  13. An effective thermal conductivity measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, F.; Jordà, X.; Vellvehi, M.; Guraya, C.; Coleto, J.; Rebollo, J.

    2004-11-01

    In the technical literature, there is a lack of reliable thermal parameters and, often, it is necessary to do in situ measurements for every particular material. An effective thermal conductivity measurement system has been designed and implemented to provide reliable and accurate values for that thermal parameter. The thermal conductivity of a given material is deduced from thermal resistance differential measurements of two samples. All parts of the implemented system as well as practical and theoretical solutions are described, including a power controller circuit exclusively conceived for this application. Experimental considerations to reduce the measurement error are exposed, as well as some results obtained for three different materials.

  14. High temperature hall effect measurement system design, measurement and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkun, Isil

    A reliable knowledge of the transport properties of semiconductor materials is essential for the development and understanding of a number of electronic devices. In this thesis, the work on developing a Hall Effect measurement system with software based data acqui- sition and control for a temperature range of 300K-700K will be described. A system was developed for high temperature measurements of materials including single crystal diamond, poly-crystalline diamond, and thermoelectric compounds. An added capability for monitor- ing the current versus voltage behavior of the contacts was used for studying the influence of ohmic and non-ohmic contacts on Hall Effect measurements. The system has been primar- ily used for testing the transport properties of boron-doped single crystal diamond (SCD) deposited in a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor [1]. Diamond has several outstanding properties that are of high interest for its development as an electronic material. These include a relatively wide band gap of 5.5 (eV), high thermal conductivity, high mobility, high saturation velocity, and a high breakdown voltage. For a temperature range of 300K-700K, IV curves, Hall mobilities and carrier concentrations are shown. Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements have shown carrier concentrations from below 1017cm --3 to approximately 1021 cm--3 with mobilities ranging from 763( cm2/V s) to 0.15(cm 2/V s) respectively. Simulation results have shown the effects of single and mixed carrier models, activation energies, effective mass and doping concentrations. These studies have been helpful in the development of single crystal diamond for diode applications. Reference materials of Ge and GaAs were used to test the Hall Effect system. The system was also used to characterize polycrystalline diamond deposited on glass for electrochemical applications, and Mg2(Si,Sn) compounds which are promising candidates of low-cost, light weight and non

  15. Toddler Adoption: The Weaver's Craft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins-Best, Mary

    Based on concern about the lack of information on adopting toddlers, this book examines the special needs of adopted toddlers and their adoptive parents. Chapter 1, "Why Write a Book on Toddler Adoption?" details the lack of information on the difficulties of adopted toddlers in forming attachments and parents' child rearing difficulties. Chapter…

  16. CERTS customer adoption model

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, F. Javier; Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi,Kristina S.

    2000-03-01

    This effort represents a contribution to the wider distributed energy resources (DER) research of the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS, http://certs.lbl.gov) that is intended to attack and, hopefully, resolve the technical barriers to DER adoption, particularly those that are unlikely to be of high priority to individual equipment vendors. The longer term goal of the Berkeley Lab effort is to guide the wider technical research towards the key technical problems by forecasting some likely patterns of DER adoption. In sharp contrast to traditional electricity utility planning, this work takes a customer-centric approach and focuses on DER adoption decision making at, what we currently think of as, the customer level. This study reports on Berkeley Lab's second year effort (completed in Federal fiscal year 2000, FY00) of a project aimed to anticipate patterns of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER). Marnay, et al., 2000 describes the earlier FY99 Berkeley Lab work. The results presented herein are not intended to represent definitive economic analyses of possible DER projects by any means. The paucity of data available and the importance of excluded factors, such as environmental implications, are simply too important to make such an analysis possible at this time. Rather, the work presented represents a demonstration of the current model and an indicator of the potential to conduct more relevant studies in the future.

  17. Development and Validation of the "Attitudes toward Adoption Scale" and the "Gay and Lesbian Parents' Adoption Scale."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley-Sireci, Lynn M.; Ciano-Boyce, Claudia

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate newly developed measures of attitudes about adoption. The Attitudes toward Adoption Scale was developed, based on research literature, to investigate the attitudes of people with and without experience with adoption toward adoption. Eighty-six college students completed this scale and made open-ended comments…

  18. The Effects of Landslides on Gravity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, Savas; Ozturkan, Hasan; Cengiz Cinku, Mualla; Avcı, Kerim

    2016-04-01

    Microgravimetry is a very useful tool used by engineering geologists to examine various problems in predicting location of voids, size and depth of mining, determination and monitoring basin structures and faults. In landslides where the down slope of soils are under the influence of gravity, it should be noted that the gravity measurements on a landslide should be influenced. To test the slope effect ingravity measurements of a landslide we selected the area in Küçükçekmece, Avcilar located in the north-west of Marmara region. The slope geometry was determined by using 2-D Multi-channel analysis of Surface Wave (MASW-REMI), while single station microtremor measurements were applied to determine the fundamental frequency on the slope. To test the effect of the slope in microgravity measurements we employed daily gravity measurements with 50 meter interval in one profile line, afterwards countinues measurements were applied on the slope in an interval during 2 hours. As a result, we found some small anomalies on the slope differently from its adjacent area. This affect has to be removed from gravity measurements, especially in mining investigation like chrome where small anomaly differences are considered as an important factor.

  19. Aerosol Delivery of Interleukin-2 in Combination with Adoptive Transfer of Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of Lung Metastasis: Methodology and Effect.

    PubMed

    Kiany, Simin; Gordon, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a subtype of lymphocytes with a major role as a host defense mechanism against tumor cells. Allogeneic NK cell therapy is being used as an alternative promising therapy for many different cancers. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a critical cytokine for NK cell proliferation, survival, and effector functions. Cytokine support is essential to activate, expand, and increase the life span of NK cells. Aerosol delivery of IL-2 in combination with adoptive transfer of NK cells offers a reasonable approach for the treatment of lung metastases as it avoids the deleterious side effects of systemic IL-2. Using a human OS mouse model, we demonstrated the efficacy of this approach. Combination therapy of aerosol IL-2 with NK cells resulted in a better therapeutic effect against OS lung metastases as compared with each therapy alone. Aerosol IL-2 selectively increased infiltration, retention, and proliferation of infused NK cells in the lung, and there was no local inflammation or toxicity in the lungs or any other organ. Our results demonstrate that delivery of IL-2 via the aerosol route offers a feasible and innovative approach to enhance the immunotherapeutic effect of NK cells against pulmonary metastases. In the following chapter, we describe the methodology and effect of this innovative therapeutic approach. PMID:27177675

  20. The precaution adoption process.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, N D

    1988-01-01

    This article presents a critique of current models of preventive behavior. It discusses a variety of factors that are usually overlooked-including the appearance of costs and benefits over time, the role of cues to action, the problem of competing life demands, and the ways that actual decision behavior differs from the rational ideal implicit in expectancy-value and utility theories. Such considerations suggest that the adoption of new precautions should be viewed as a dynamic process with many determinants. The framework of a model that is able to accommodate these additional factors is described. This alternative model portrays the precaution adoption process as an orderly sequence of qualitatively different cognitive stages. Data illustrating a few of the suggestions made in the article are presented, and implications for prevention programs are discussed. PMID:3049068

  1. Report on Instruments for Measuring School Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzzetti, Barbara J.

    An extensive search of the literature and existing programs was undertaken to identify instruments that were being used to measure school effectiveness. Twenty-four instruments are currently available and are critiqued in this publication. Each critique reports the format and components of the instrument, its intended purpose and uses, reliability…

  2. Effectiveness of a Graduate Measurement Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadston, Pamela M.; Kennedy, Robert L.

    To determine the effectiveness of a graduate educational assessment course in measurement processes, this study compared test scores from the beginning and from the end of the course. The three sections that were the focus of the study were offered in 2002 and 2003 by the same instructor. The course was offered as a traditional face-to-face class…

  3. Open Adoption: Adoptive Parents' Reactions Two Decades Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah H.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike in the past, most adoption agencies today offer birth parents and adoptive parents the opportunity to share identifying information and have contact with each other. To understand the impacts of different open adoption arrangements, a qualitative descriptive study using a snowball sample of 44 adoptive parents throughout New England began…

  4. Hospitious Adoption: How Hospitality Empowers Children and Transforms Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gritter, James L.

    2009-01-01

    Building on previous books by the author, "Hospitious Adoption: How Hospitality Empowers Children and Transforms Adoption" examines the next step after open adoption. Gritter takes the approach that practicing goodwill, respect, and courage within the realm of adoption makes the process move smoother and enriches children's lives. Following a…

  5. Assessing access for prospective adoptive parents living with HIV: an environmental scan of Ontario's adoption agencies.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Angela A; Kennedy, V Logan; Lewis, Johanna; Ross, Lori E; Loutfy, Mona

    2016-10-01

    Work has been underway to increase the availability of parenting options for people living with and affected by HIV. One option, adoption, has not yet been explored in the literature. The study aimed to gain a better understanding of the potential of adoption for individuals/couples living with HIV in Ontario, and to assess potential structural barriers or facilitators that may impact their experience navigating the adoption system by conducting an environmental scan of adoption service providers in Ontario. A list of adoption service providers was compiled using the Ontario government's website. Information relevant to the study's measures was collected using service providers' websites. Service providers without websites, or with websites that did not address all of the research measures, were contacted via telephone to complete a structured interview. Online data extraction was possible for 2 and telephone surveys were completed with 75 adoption service providers (total n = 77). Most service providers reported that HIV status is not an exclusion criterion for prospective parents (64%). However, more than one-fifth of the participants acknowledged they were not sure if people with HIV were eligible to adopt. Domestic service providers were the only providers who did not report knowledge of restrictions due to HIV status. Private domestic adoption presented social barriers as birth parent(s) of a child can access health records of a prospective parent and base their selection of an adoptive parent based on health status. Adoption practitioners and licensees involved in international adoptions reported the most structural barriers for prospective parent(s) living with HIV, attributed to the regulations established by the host country of the child(ren) eligible for adoption. Although international adoptions may present insurmountable barriers for individuals living with HIV, public and private domestic adoption appears to be a viable option. PMID:27136971

  6. Measuring Campus Portal Effectiveness and the Contributing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masrek, Mohamad Noorman bin

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the effectiveness or success of universities' portal implementation from the perspective of students as users. Adopting the model developed by Delone and McLean, portal effectiveness is defined as being composed of information quality, systems quality and service quality. In addition, the paper also…

  7. Measuring engagement effectiveness in social media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Sun, Tong; Peng, Wei; Li, Tao

    2012-03-01

    Social media is becoming increasingly prevalent with the advent of web 2.0 technologies. Popular social media websites, such as Twitter and Facebook, are attracting a gigantic number of online users to post and share information. An interesting phenomenon under this trend involves that more and more users share their experiences or issues with regard to a product, and then the product service agents use commercial social media listening and engagement tools (e.g. Radian6, Sysomos, etc.) to response to users' complaints or issues and help them tackle their problems. This is often called customer care in social media or social customer relationship management (CRM). However, all these existing commercial social media tools only provide an aggregated level of trends, patterns and sentiment analysis based on the keyword-centric brand relevant data, which have little insights for answering one of the key questions in social CRM system: how effective is our social customer care engagement? In this paper, we focus on addressing the problem of how to measure the effectiveness of engagement for service agents in customer care. Traditional CRM effectiveness measurements are defined under the scenario of the call center, where the effectiveness is mostly based on the duration time per call and/or number of answered calls per day. Different from customer care in a call center, we can obtain detailed conversations between agents and customers in social media, and therefore the effectiveness can be measured by analyzing the content of conversations and the sentiment of customers.

  8. [The outcomes of Adoption in the Case of the "British Chinese Adoption Study"].

    PubMed

    Rushton, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Practitioners can over-estimate the incidence of problems in adopted children and adults because they do not see those who make good psychological and social adjustments. Research into adoption outcomes can be hard to interpret without information about differing pre-adoption histories. Examples are given of research into three types of adoption: domestic infant adoption, adoptions from public care of maltreated children and international adoption of ex-orphanage children. Although negative outcomes are indisputably evident for some, recovery from adversity is more common than many would predict. It is important to recognize that subsequent nurturing in consistent and stimulating environments can build a platform for effective adaptations to challenges in the future. However, a proper understanding of the consequences of adoption has been limited by the fact that follow-up studies have rarely extended beyond adolescence and early adulthood. The British Chinese Adoption Study is a 50 year follow-up of orphanage girls internationally adopted into the United Kingdom, and is given as an example of good outcomes despite early years of adversity. Scores on mental health assessments were equivalent to the non-adopted, age-matched comparison group of UK women. Most of the women were rated as "good functioning" and educational achievements were many times higher than the comparison women. Life-long adverse effects are not inevitable following early adversity. Improved circumstances can promote recovery and good adult adjustment. Practice and research implications are discussed. PMID:26645770

  9. The Effect of an Educational Intervention Program on the Adoption of Low Back Pain Preventive Behaviors in Nurses: An Application of the Health Belief Model.

    PubMed

    Sharafkhani, Naser; Khorsandi, Mahboobeh; Shamsi, Mohsen; Ranjbaran, Mehdi

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of a theory-based educational intervention program on the level of knowledge and Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs among nurses in terms of the adoption of preventive behaviors. Methods This pretest/posttest quasi-experimental study was conducted on 100 nurses who were recruited through the multistage sampling method. The nurses were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The participants were evaluated before and 3 months after the educational intervention. A multidimensional questionnaire was prepared based on the theoretical structures of the HBM to collect the data. Data analysis was performed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results There was no significant difference in the mean values of HBM constructs prior to the intervention between the intervention and control groups. However, after the administration of the educational program, the mean scores of knowledge and HBM constructs significantly increased in the intervention group when compared with the control group (p < 0.0001). Conclusion The results of the current study revealed that the educational intervention based on the HBM was effective in improving the nurses' scores of knowledge and HBM constructs; therefore, theory-based health educational strategies are suggested as an effective alternative to traditional educational interventions. PMID:26835199

  10. Council Adopts Two Major Statements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    On 27 May, the AGU Council approved an update to the Union's vision statement and adopted a position statement concerning the U.S. plans for a Moon-Mars initiative. The vision statement, which is reproduced in this section of Eos, describes what the AGU is expected to look like 10 years in the future. The Planning Committee, under the chairmanship of President-elect Tim Killeen, and with input from the policy committees, Sections, and Focus Groups, is updating AGU's strategic plan, which is intended to move measurably toward the vision.

  11. Adoption Research: Trends, Topics, Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palacios, Jesus; Brodzinsky, David

    2010-01-01

    The current article provides a review of adoption research since its inception as a field of study. Three historical trends in adoption research are identified: the first focusing on risk in adoption and identifying adoptee-nonadoptee differences in adjustment; the second examining the capacity of adopted children to recover from early adversity;…

  12. The Development of Adoption Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussiere, Alice

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the evolution of U.S. adoption law since 1851. Recounts changes in the perceived "best interests" of all members of the adoption triad over time, and growing recognition of links between adoption and child welfare policy. Discusses current controversies including open adoption, birth parents' rights, unmarried fathers, and the role of…

  13. Adopting Biophysics Methods in Pursuit of Biogeophysical Research: Advancing the measurement and modeling of electrical signatures of microbe-mineral transformations impacting contaminant transport

    SciTech Connect

    Prodan, Camelia

    2013-06-14

    This exploratory project involved laboratory experiments to investigate three hypotheses: (H1) Physics-based modeling of low-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as alpha) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy (DS) data can quantify pore-scale geometric changes impacting contaminant transport resulting from biomineralization; (H2) Physics-based modeling of high-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as beta) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy data can quantify rates of mineral growth in/on the cell wall; (H3) Application of this measurement and modeling approach can enhance geophysical interpretation of bioremediation experiments conducted at the RIFLE IFC by providing constraints on bioremediation efficiency (biomass concentration, mineral uptake within the cell wall, biomineralization rate). We tested H1 by performing DS measurements (alpha and beta range) on iron (Fe) particles of dimensions similar to microbial cells, dispersed within agar gels over a range of Fe concentrations. We have tested the ability of the physics-based modeling to predict volume concentrations of the Fe particles by assuming that the Fe particles are polarizable inclusions within an otherwise nonpolarizable medium. We evaluated the smallest volume concentration that can be detected with the DS method. Similar experiments and modeling have been performed on the sulfate-reducing bacteria D. vulgaris. Synchrotron x-ray absorption measurements were conducted to determine the local structure of biominerals coatings on D. vulgaris which were grown in the presence of different Fe concentrations. We imaged the mineral growth on cell wall using SEM. We used dielectric spectroscopy to differentiate between iron sulfide precipitates of biotic and abiotic nature. Biotic measurements were made on D. vulgaris bacteria grown in the presence of different concentrations of iron to form different thicknesses of iron sulfide precipitates around themselves and abiotic

  14. FINAL REPORT: Adopting Biophysics Methods in Pursuit of Biogeophysical Research: Advancing the Measurement and Modeling of Electrical Signatures of Microbe-Mineral Transformations Impacting Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect

    PRODAN, CAMELIA; SLATER, LEE; NTARLAGIANNIS, DIMITRIOS

    2012-09-01

    This exploratory project involved laboratory experiments to investigate three hypotheses: (H1) Physics-based modeling of low-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as alpha) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy (DS) data can quantify pore-scale geometric changes impacting contaminant transport resulting from biomineralization; (H2) Physics-based modeling of high-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as beta) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy data can quantify rates of mineral growth in/on the cell wall; (H3) Application of this measurement and modeling approach can enhance geophysical interpretation of bioremediation experiments conducted at the RIFLE IFC by providing constraints on bioremediation efficiency (biomass concentration, mineral uptake within the cell wall, biomineralization rate). We tested H1 by performing DS measurements (alpha and beta range) on iron (Fe) particles of dimensions similar to microbial cells, dispersed within agar gels over a range of Fe concentrations. We have tested the ability of the physics-based modeling to predict volume concentrations of the Fe particles by assuming that the Fe particles are polarizable inclusions within an otherwise nonpolarizable medium. We evaluated the smallest volume concentration that can be detected with the DS method. Similar experiments and modeling have been performed on the sulfate-reducing bacteria D. vulgaris. Synchrotron x-ray absorption measurements were conducted to determine the local structure of biominerals coatings on D. vulgaris which were grown in the presence of different Fe concentrations. We imaged the mineral growth on cell wall using SEM. We used dielectric spectroscopy to differentiate between iron sulfide precipitates of biotic and abiotic nature. Biotic measurements were made on D. vulgaris bacteria grown in the presence of different concentrations of iron to form different thicknesses of iron sulfide precipitates around themselves and abiotic

  15. Adoption: biological and social processes linked to adaptation.

    PubMed

    Grotevant, Harold D; McDermott, Jennifer M

    2014-01-01

    Children join adoptive families through domestic adoption from the public child welfare system, infant adoption through private agencies, and international adoption. Each pathway presents distinctive developmental opportunities and challenges. Adopted children are at higher risk than the general population for problems with adaptation, especially externalizing, internalizing, and attention problems. This review moves beyond the field's emphasis on adoptee-nonadoptee differences to highlight biological and social processes that affect adaptation of adoptees across time. The experience of stress, whether prenatal, postnatal/preadoption, or during the adoption transition, can have significant impacts on the developing neuroendocrine system. These effects can contribute to problems with physical growth, brain development, and sleep, activating cascading effects on social, emotional, and cognitive development. Family processes involving contact between adoptive and birth family members, co-parenting in gay and lesbian adoptive families, and racial socialization in transracially adoptive families affect social development of adopted children into adulthood. PMID:24016275

  16. Current measurement by Faraday effect on GEPOPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, Correa; H, Chuaqui; E, Wyndham; F, Veloso; J, Valenzuela; M, Favre; H, Bhuyan

    2014-05-01

    The design and calibration of an optical current sensor using BK7 glass is presented. The current sensor is based on the polarization rotation by Faraday effect. GEPOPU is a pulsed power generator, double transit time 120ns, 1.5 Ohm impedance, coaxial geometry, where Z pinch experiment are performed. The measurements were performed at the Optics and Plasma Physics Laboratory of Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. The verdet constant for two different optical materials was obtained using He-Ne laser. The values obtained are within the experimental error bars of measurements published in the literature (less than 15% difference). Two different sensor geometries were tried. We present the preliminary results for one of the geometries. The values obtained for the current agree within the measurement error with those obtained by means of a Spice simulation of the generator. Signal traces obtained are completely noise free.

  17. Effectiveness of nonporous windscreens for infrasonic measurements.

    PubMed

    Dauchez, Nicolas; Hayot, Maxime; Denis, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with nonporous windscreens used for reducing noise in infrasonic measurements. A model of sound transmission using a modal approach is derived. The system is a square plate coupled with a cavity. The model agrees with finite element simulations and measurements performed on two windscreens: a cubic windscreen using a material recommended by Shams, Zuckerwar, and Sealey [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 1335-1340 (2005)] and an optimized flat windscreen made out of aluminum. Only the latter was found to couple acoustical waves below 10 Hz without any attenuation. Moreover, wind noise reduction measurements show that nonporous windscreens perform similarly as a pipe array by averaging the pressure fluctuations. These results question the assumptions of Shams et al. and Zuckerwar [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 3327-3334 (2010)] about compact nonporous windscreens design and effectiveness. PMID:27369141

  18. Effect of an Ergonomics-Based Educational Intervention Based on Transtheoretical Model in Adopting Correct Body Posture Among Operating Room Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Moazzami, Zeinab; Dehdari, Tahere; Taghdisi, Mohammad Hosein; Soltanian, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the preventive strategies for chronic low back pain among operating room nurses is instructing proper body mechanics and postural behavior, for which the use of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) has been recommended. Methods: Eighty two nurses who were in the contemplation and preparation stages for adopting correct body posture were randomly selected (control group = 40, intervention group = 42). TTM variables and body posture were measured at baseline and again after 1 and 6 months after the intervention. A four-week ergonomics educational intervention based on TTM variables was designed and conducted for the nurses in the intervention group. Results: Following the intervention, a higher proportion of nurses in the intervention group moved into the action stage (p < 0.05). Mean scores of self-efficacy, pros, experimental processes and correct body posture were also significantly higher in the intervention group (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found in the cons and behavioral processes, except for self-liberation, between the two groups (p > 0.05) after the intervention. Conclusions: The TTM provides a suitable framework for developing stage-based ergonomics interventions for postural behavior.

  19. Measuring gravitational effects on antimatter in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacentino, G. M.; Palladino, A.; Venanzoni, G.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an experimental test of the gravitational interaction with antimatter by measuring the branching fraction of the CP violating decay KL →π+π- in space. We show that at the altitude of the International Space Station, gravitational effects may change the level of CP violation such that a 5 σ discrimination may be obtained by collecting the KL produced by the cosmic proton flux within a few years.

  20. Adopting Integrated Pest Management in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, William E.

    1991-01-01

    The development of an effective Integrated Pest Management program is discussed. Provided are the common goals and procedures involved in adopting an Integrated Pest Management program for schools. (CW)

  1. Intercountry Adoption and the Family Life Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deacon, Sharon A.

    1997-01-01

    Provides family therapists with an understanding of intercountry adoption. The special life-cycle issues of multinational families and the challenges intercountry adoptees face are discussed to help therapists treat such families more empathically and effectively. (Author/MKA)

  2. Modelling respiratory infection control measure effects

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, C. M.; CHEN, S. C.; CHANG, C. F.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the most pressing issues in facing emerging and re-emerging respiratory infections is how to bring them under control with current public health measures. Approaches such as the Wells–Riley equation, competing-risks model, and Von Foerster equation are used to prioritize control-measure efforts. Here we formulate how to integrate those three different types of functional relationship to construct easy-to-use and easy-to-interpret critical-control lines that help determine optimally the intervention strategies for containing airborne infections. We show that a combination of assigned effective public health interventions and enhanced engineering control measures would have a high probability for containing airborne infection. We suggest that integrated analysis to enhance modelling the impact of potential control measures against airborne infections presents an opportunity to assess risks and benefits. We demonstrate the approach with examples of optimal control measures to prioritize respiratory infections of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), influenza, measles, and chickenpox. PMID:17475088

  3. Hall Effect Measured Using a Waveguide Tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Joyce; Anderson, James; Johnson, William

    2014-03-01

    We describe a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. The advantage of this technique is that it does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing the semiconductor wafer into a slot cut in an X-band waveguide tee, which lies in the center of an electromagnet, injecting power into the two opposing arms of the tee, and measuring the output at the third arm. Application of a magnetic field gives a Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. This method yields the semiconductor mobility, which we can compare for calibration purposes with mobility data from direct-current (Van der Pauw1) measurements. We are in the process of modeling the system using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation to better understand the behavior of the electric fields inside the sample. Resistivity data is obtained by measuring the microwave reflection coefficient of the sample. This talk presents data for silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. Measured mobilities ranged from 270-3000 cm2/V.s . 1L. J. van der Pauw, PhilipsResearchReports 13, 1 (1958)

  4. Becoming Lesbian Adoptive Parents: An Exploratory Study of Lesbian Adoptive, Lesbian Birth, and Heterosexual Adoptive Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley-Sireci, Lynn M.; Ciano-Boyce, Claudia

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed lesbian adoptive parents, heterosexual adoptive parents, and lesbian parents who had used assisted fertilization, regarding the adoption process. Found that the process was similar for both heterosexual and lesbian parents, but lesbian adoptive parents perceived more discrimination and were more inclined to omit information during the…

  5. EHR adopters vs. non-adopters: Impacts of, barriers to, and federal initiatives for EHR adoption

    PubMed Central

    Jamoom, Eric W.; Patel, Vaishali; Furukawa, Michael F.; King, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    While adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems has grown rapidly, little is known about physicians’ perspectives on its adoption and use. Nationally representative survey data from 2011 are used to compare the perspectives of physicians who have adopted EHRs with those that have yet to do so across three key areas: the impact of EHRs on clinical care, practice efficiency and operations; barriers to EHR adoption; and factors that influence physicians to adopt EHRs. Despite significant differences in perspectives between adopters and non-adopters, the majority of physicians perceive that EHR use yields overall clinical benefits, more efficient practices and financial benefits. Purchase cost and productivity loss are the greatest barriers to EHR adoption among both adopters and non-adopters; although non-adopters have significantly higher rates of reporting these as barriers. Financial incentives and penalties, technical assistance, and the capability for electronic health information exchange are factors with the greatest influence on EHR adoption among all physicians. However, a substantially higher proportion of non-adopters regard various national health IT policies, and in particular, financial incentives or penalties as a major influence in their decision to adopt an EHR system. Contrasting these perspectives provides a window into how national policies have shaped adoption thus far; and how these policies may shape adoption in the near future. PMID:26250087

  6. Measuring the effectiveness of faculty mentoring relationships.

    PubMed

    Berk, Ronald A; Berg, Janet; Mortimer, Rosemary; Walton-Moss, Benita; Yeo, Theresa P

    2005-01-01

    "Mentor" is a term widely used in academic medicine but for which there is no consensus on an operational definition. Further, criteria are rarely reported for evaluating the effectiveness of mentoring. This article presents the work of an Ad Hoc Faculty Mentoring Committee whose tasks were to define "mentorship," specify concrete characteristics and responsibilities of mentors that are measurable, and develop new tools to evaluate the effectiveness of the mentoring relationship. The committee developed two tools: the Mentorship Profile Questionnaire, which describes the characteristics and outcome measures of the mentoring relationship from the perspective of the mentee, and the Mentorship Effectiveness Scale, a 12-item six-point agree-disagree-format Likert-type rating scale, which evaluates 12 behavioral characteristics of the mentor. These instruments are explained and copies are provided. Psychometric issues, including the importance of content-related validity evidence, response bias due to acquiescence and halo effects, and limitations on collecting reliability evidence, are examined in the context of the mentor-mentee relationship. Directions for future research are suggested. PMID:15618097

  7. Adoptive cell therapy for sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Melinda; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for sarcomas, though effective in treating local disease, is often ineffective for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. To improve outcomes, novel approaches are needed and cell therapy has the potential to meet this need since it does not rely on the cytotoxic mechanisms of conventional therapies. The recent successes of T-cell therapies for hematological malignancies have led to renewed interest in exploring cell therapies for solid tumors such as sarcomas. In this review, we will discuss current cell therapies for sarcoma with special emphasis on genetic approaches to improve the effector function of adoptively transferred cells. PMID:25572477

  8. Amplification effects in optomechanics via weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Tao; Song, He-Shan

    2014-07-01

    We revisit the scheme of single-photon weak-coupling optomechanics using postselection, proposed by Pepper, Ghobadi, Jeffrey, Simon, and Bouwmeester [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 023601 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.023601], by analyzing the exact solution of the dynamical evolution. Positive and negative amplification effects of the displacement of the mirror's position can be generated when the Kerr phase is considered. This effect occurs when the postselected state of the photon is orthogonal to the initial state, which cannot be explained by the usual weak measurement results. The amplification effect can be further modulated by a phase shifter, and the maximal displacement state can appear within a short evolution time.

  9. Special topics in international adoption.

    PubMed

    Jenista, Jerri Ann

    2005-10-01

    As international adoption has become more "mainstream," the issues recently addressed in domestic adoption have become more important in adoptions involving children originating in other countries. Certain groups of prospective adoptive parents, such as gay or lesbian couples, single parents, and parents with disabilities, have begun to apply to adopt in ever increasing numbers. Children who may have been considered unadoptable in the past are now routinely being offered to prospective adoptive parents. The numbers and ages of the children placed and the spacing between adoptions have come under scrutiny. The rates of adoption dissolutions and disruptions are being examined carefully by the receiving and sending countries. There is a pressing need for research into numerous social aspects of adoption. PMID:16154473

  10. Permeabilization and fusion of uncharged lipid vesicles induced by the HIV-1 fusion peptide adopting an extended conformation: dose and sequence effects.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, F B; Goñi, F M; Muga, A; Nieva, J L

    1997-01-01

    The peptide HIV(arg), corresponding to a sequence of 23 amino acid residues at the N-terminus of HIV-1 gp41 (LAV1a strain), has the capacity to destabilize negatively charged large unilamellar vesicles. As revealed by infrared spectroscopy, the peptide associated with those vesicles showed conformational polymorphism: in the absence of cations the main structure was a pore-forming alpha-helix, whereas in the presence of Ca2+ the conformation switched to a fusogenic, predominantly extended beta-type structure. Here we show that an extended structure can also be involved in electrically neutral vesicle destabilization induced by the HIV-1 fusion peptide when it binds the vesicle from the aqueous phase. In the absence of cations, neutral liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol (molar ratio 1:1:1) selected for an extended structure that became fusogenic in a dose-dependent fashion. At subfusogenic doses this structure caused the release of trapped 8-aminonaphtalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid sodium salt/p-xylenebis(pyridinium)bromide from liposomes, indicating the existence of a peptide-mediated membrane destabilizing process before and independent of the development of fusion. When compared to HIV(arg), the fusion activity of HIV(ala) (bearing the R22 --> A substitution) was reduced by 70%. Fusogenicity was completely abolished when a second substitution (V2 --> E) was included to generate HIV(ala-E2), a sequence representing the N-terminus of an inactive gp41. However, the three sequences associated with vesicles to the same extent, and the three adopted a similar extended structure in the membrane. Whereas 1-(4-trimethylaminophenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene emission anisotropy was unaffected by the three peptides, DPH emission anisotropy in membranes was increased only by the fusogenic sequences. Taken together, our observations strongly argue that it is not an alpha-helical but an extended structure adopted by the HIV-1

  11. Measurement of fluorescent white effects and whiteness.

    PubMed

    Anders, G

    1975-01-01

    This report surveys the literature and describes various techniques of whiteness measurement and evaluation in current use. Measuring techniques are described for dealing separately with the effects obtained by bleaching, blueing and fluorescent whitening, and an example is given of the direct quantitative estimation of a fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) on a substrate by measuring reflectance in the ultraviolet region. Another chapter deals with the colorimetric estimation of the whiteness and the shade of a fluorescent white using modern apparatus in conjunction with a programmable minicomputer. A new simple and universally applicab,e formula was worked out: W=D-Y+P-x+Q-y+C which has been successfully used in routine tests and which for the first time gives different weight to whiteness values corresponding to all shade preferences existing in theory. Each user can match the formula to his own preference by appropriate adjustment of the D, P, Q andC values. Y,x and y are the customary colorimetric values as standardized by the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage). It was also found that with another formula the shades of fluorescent whitening effects (green to red tints) may be defined in a simple way. PMID:1064551

  12. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  13. The emotional aftermath of adoption.

    PubMed

    Nadelson, C C

    1976-09-01

    Adopted children are emotionally vulnerable. Adoptive parents must cope with more complex problems than biologic parents. The family physician can provide valuable counseling. Preadoption counseling focuses on motivation and ambivalence. After adoption, however, serious, sometimes predictable, issues arise, such as: how and when to tell the child he is adopted; the child's search for knowledge; the problem of subsequent divorce; the birth of a natural sibling, and the involvement of other family members. New concepts include "open adoption" and "single parent adoption." PMID:961560

  14. Adoptions Without Agencies: A Study of Independent Adoptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meezan, William; And Others

    The purposes of this national study of independent, nonagency adoptions were: (1) to determine the experience of the parties involved (biological parents, adoptive parents, agencies, intermediaries, and law enforcement agents); (2) to identify agency policies, procedures and resources that deter agency adoptions and thus encourage independent…

  15. Parents' Feelings towards Their Adoptive and Non-Adoptive Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Marshaun B.; Mullineaux, Paula Y.; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Petrill, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, we examined parent gender differences in feelings (negativity and positivity) and perceptions of child behavioural and emotional problems in adoptive and biological parent-child dyads. In a sample of 85 families, we used a novel within-family adoption design in which one child was adopted and one child was a biological child…

  16. 14 CFR 221.204 - Adoption of provisions of one carrier by another carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adoption of provisions of one carrier by... Adoption of provisions of one carrier by another carrier. When one carrier adopts the tariffs of another... of the adopting carrier and the effective date of the adoption. Further, each adopted fare shall...

  17. Pricing Health Behavior Interventions to Promote Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Ribisl, Kurt M.; Leeman, Jennifer; Glasser, Allison M.

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high cost of delivering many public health interventions limits their potential for broad public impact by reducing their likelihood of adoption and maintenance over time. Practitioners identify cost as the primary factor for which interventions they select to implement, but researchers rarely disseminate cost information or consider its importance when developing new interventions. A new approach is proposed, whereby intervention developers assess what individuals and agencies adopting their interventions are willing to pay and then design interventions that are responsive to this price range. The ultimate goal is to develop effective and affordable interventions, called lean interventions, which are widely adopted and have greater public health impact. PMID:24842743

  18. [Differential effectiveness of youth welfare measures: a comparative study on the effectiveness of day care measures].

    PubMed

    Rücker, Stefan; Petermann, Ulrike; Büttner, Peter; Petermann, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Single parent families not only differ from traditional families regarding socioeconomic problems and missing a parent, but also concerning the duration of using youth welfare measures, psychological problems in single parents, and the way youth welfare measures are ended. Due to different basic parameters in these two family settings, this study investigates the differential effectiveness of youth day care measures. In total, 55 children and adolescents (aged 6 to 14 years) and their parents were involved. Using axis I, II and V, ICD-10 multiaxial presentation, data on the general burden of problems, externalizing problems, emotional problems, and parenting skills were recorded before care measures began and again after they had ended. Although day care measures were very effective in both family settings, traditional families showed a significantly stronger decline of externalizing problems than single parent families, exceptions being emotional problems and burdens. PMID:20491426

  19. Continuous measurement: Watchdog effect versus golden rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, E.

    1984-04-01

    Conditions which may lead to a freezing of the motion of a system under continuous observation (the so-called "Zeno paradox" or "watchdog effect") are examined. The measurement process is treated phenomenologically by the usual wave-packet reduction as well as in a more realistic way by including the measuring apparatus. For this purpose a model for an ideal measurement process is employed, following an example given by von Neumann. The resulting behavior varies between complete freezing and a mere suppression of interference terms and constant transition rates as represented by a master equation (rate equation). The most familiar example of the latter is Fermi's golden rule, with integration leading to exponential decay. Reviewing and extending the derivation of the Pauli master equation, the conditions leading to constant transition rates are discussed. The importance of the interaction with the natural environment for establishing a master equation is emphasized. Some consequences for the derivation of macroscopic equations of motion and for the physical foundations of superselection rules are pointed out.

  20. A Phenomenological Exploration of Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltimore, Diana L.; Crase, Sedahlia Jasper

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative analysis explored children's and adults' experiences with adoption. We used phenomenological methodology and individually interviewed 25 participants and included adoptive mothers and fathers, and their children, each adopted before 18 months of age. Two research questions guided the data analysis: (a) What are children's and…

  1. Dogmatism and Attitudes Toward Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembroski, Betty G.; Johnson Dale L.

    1969-01-01

    Using Rokeach's Dogmatism Scale and an Adoption Attitude Scale administered to 113 college students study supports hypothesis that among males dogmatism and intolerance toward areas relating to adoption would be positively correlated. Negative correlation for females suggests that emphasis on maternal role makes adoption attitudes exception to…

  2. Adoption Resources for Black Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Ursula M.

    1971-01-01

    The growing number of adoptions in this country, including racially mixed adoptions, attest to the general acceptance of adoption as a way of bringing love to children in need of families of their own and the satisfactions of parenthood to childless couples, single men and women, and families who have room for one more. (Author/AJ)

  3. Reliability and Validity of the Transracial Adoption Parenting Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massatti, Richard R.; Vonk, M. Elizabeth; Gregoire, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    The present study provides information on the reliability and validity of the Transracial Adoption Parenting Scale (TAPS), a multidimensional 36-item Likert-type scale that measures cultural competence among transracial adoptive (TRA) parents. The TAPS was theoretically developed and refined through feedback from experts in TRA adoption. A…

  4. Electric Field Effects in RUS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Timothy W; Ten Cate, James A; Allured, Bradley; Carpenter, Michael A

    2009-09-21

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material - a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the 'statistical residual' strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods.

  5. Electric field effects in RUS measurements.

    PubMed

    Darling, Timothy W; Allured, Bradley; Tencate, James A; Carpenter, Michael A

    2010-02-01

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material--a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the "statistical residual" strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods. PMID:19850314

  6. Effect of hospital ownership status and payment structure on the adoption and use of drug-eluting stents for percutaneous coronary interventions

    PubMed Central

    Grilli, Roberto; Guastaroba, Paolo; Taroni, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Background The impact of the use of drug-eluting stents in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on cardiac care is still uncertain. We examined the influence of systemic factors, such as hospital ownership status, organizational characteristics and payment structure, on the use of drug-eluting stents in PCI and the effect on cardiac surgery volume. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of drug-eluting stent use in 12 993 patients undergoing PCI with stenting (drug-eluting or bare-metal) and time-series regression analyses of the monthly number of cardiac surgery and PCI procedures performed using data collected from 1998 to 2004 at 13 public and private hospitals in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. Results Public hospitals used drug-eluting stents more selectively than private hospitals, targeting the new device to patients at high risk of adverse events. The time-series regression analyses showed that the number of PCI procedures performed per year increased during this period, both in public (slope coefficient 36.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 30.2 to 43.1) and private centres (slope coefficient 6.4, 95% CI 3.1 to 9.2 ). Concurrently, there was a reduction in the number of isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgeries, although the degree of change was higher in public than in private hospitals (coefficient –16.1 v. –6.2 respectively ). The number of CABG procedures associated with valve surgery decreased in public hospitals (coefficient –5.0, 95% CI –6.1 to –3.8) but increased in private hospitals (coefficient 4.1, 95% CI 2.0 to 6.1). Interpretation Public and private hospitals behaved differently in adopting drug-eluting stents and in using PCI with drug-eluting stents as a substitute for surgical revascularization. PMID:17179220

  7. Microgravity effects on standardized cognitive performance measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiflett, Samuel G.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment, selected to fly on the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) Spacelab mission, is to determine the effects of microgravity upon the cognitive skills which are critical to successful performance of many tasks on board the Space Shuttle. Six tests from the Unified Tri-service Cognitive Performance Assessment Battery (UTC-PAB) will be administered to the Mission Specialists to fulfill the goals of this experiment. These tests are based upon current theoretical models of human performance and the hypothesized effects of microgravity. The principle objective is the identification of the effects of microgravity upon specific information processing skills affecting performance from those of fatigue and shifts in work/rest cycles. Multiple measures of both short and long term fatigue will be obtained and used as a major independent variable for the analysis of these performance data. Scientific supporting studies will determine optimum practice and performance testing schedules for the astronauts. The same tests will be used post-flight to collect data on the recovery of any cognitive performance impairment compared with pre-flight, baseline levels.

  8. Ethnic and adoption attitudes among Guatemalan University students.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Judith L; González-Oliva, Ana Gabriela; Mylonas, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    Intercountry adoptions from Guatemala were highly controversial, because of the large numbers of children being adopted to the USA, along with evidence of corruption and child theft. Since the implementation of the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption in 2008, Guatemala's central authority for adoption has prioritized domestic placements for children over intercountry adoption. A possible attitudinal barrier to domestic adoption in Guatemala-negative attitudes and prejudice against Indigenous people-was investigated through questionnaires measuring attitudes toward adoption and attitudes toward and social distance from the two major ethnic groups (Ladino and Indigenous). Guatemalan university students (N = 177, 61 % men) were recruited from basic required courses at a private university. Results showed that attitudes toward adoption in general were more favorable than toward interethnic adoption, with the most negative attitudes toward adoption of Ladino children by Indigenous parents. Multiple regression and analysis of covariance models revealed that female gender, experience with adoption and more positive attitudes about Indigenous persons were associated with more positive attitudes toward adoption. The findings imply that negative attitudes toward Indigenous persons are associated with negative attitudes toward adoption, and serve as barriers to promoting domestic adoption in Guatemala. PMID:26702374

  9. Technology Adoption: an Interaction Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitorus, Hotna M.; Govindaraju, Rajesri; Wiratmadja, I. I.; Sudirman, Iman

    2016-02-01

    The success of a new technology depends on how well it is accepted by its intended users. Many technologies face the problem of low adoption rate, despite the benefits. An understanding of what makes people accept or reject a new technology can help speed up the adoption rate. This paper presents a framework for technology adoption based on an interactive perspective, resulting from a literature study on technology adoption. In studying technology adoption, it is necessary to consider the interactions among elements involved in the system, for these interactions may generate new characteristics or new relationships. The interactions among elements in a system adoption have not received sufficient consideration in previous studies of technology adoption. Based on the proposed interaction perspective, technology adoption is elaborated by examining interactions among the individual (i.e. the user or prospective user), the technology, the task and the environment. The framework is formulated by adopting several theories, including Perceived Characteristics of Innovating, Diffusion of Innovation Theory, Technology Acceptance Model, Task-Technology Fit and usability theory. The proposed framework is illustrated in the context of mobile banking adoption. It is aimed to offer a better understanding of determinants of technology adoption in various contexts, including technology in manufacturing systems.

  10. Intercountry versus Transracial Adoption: Analysis of Adoptive Parents' Motivations and Preferences in Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yuanting; Lee, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    The United States is one of the major baby-receiving countries in the world. Relatively little research has focused on why there is such a high demand for intercountry adoption. Using in-depth qualitative interviews with adoptive parents, the authors explored the reasons why Americans prefer to adopt foreign-born children instead of adopting…

  11. Measures of effectiveness:an annotated bibliography.

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Philip LaRoche

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide guidance, from the open literature, on developing a set of ''measures of effectiveness'' (MoEs) and using them to evaluate a system. Approximately twenty papers and books are reviewed. The papers that provide the clearest understanding of MoEs are identified (Sproles [46], [48], [50]). The seminal work on value-focused thinking (VFT), an approach that bridges the gap between MoEs and a system, is also identified (Keeney [25]). And finally three examples of the use of VFT in evaluating a system based on MoEs are identified (Jackson et al. [21], Kerchner & Deckro [27], and Doyle et al. [14]). Notes are provided of the papers and books to pursue in order to take this study to the next level of detail.

  12. Awareness and pro-active adoption of surface water BMPs.

    PubMed

    Hadrich, Joleen C; Van Winkle, Andrea

    2013-09-30

    Beef cow operators were surveyed to determine the effect of cost-share awareness and farm management characteristics on the adoption of surface water best management practices (BMPs) in a state without defined BMPs. Results demonstrated that farm management characteristics determined nutrient management adoption, farm characteristics determined filter strip adoption, and human capital and farm characteristics played the largest role with streambank fencing adoption. Cost-share awareness was not found to increase the probability of adopting any BMPs and Extension education was found to positively and significantly increase the adoption of all three BMPs. PMID:23764472

  13. Drivers and Barriers in Health IT Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Avgar, A.C.; Litwin, A.S.; Pronovost, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite near (and rare) consensus that the adoption and diffusion of health information technology (health IT) will bolster outcomes for organizations, individuals, and the healthcare system as a whole, there has been surprisingly little consideration of the structures and processes within organizations that might drive the adoption and effective use of the technology. Management research provides a useful lens through which to analyze both the determinants of investment and the benefits that can ultimately be derived from these investments. This paper provides a conceptual framework for understanding health IT adoption. In doing so, this paper highlights specific organizational barriers or enablers at different stages of the adoption process – investment, implementation, and use – and at different levels of organizational decision-making – strategic, operational, and frontline. This framework will aid both policymakers and organizational actors as they make sense of the transition from paper-based to electronic systems. PMID:23646093

  14. Effective Adoption of Tablets in Post-Secondary Education: Recommendations Based on a Trial of iPads in University Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mang, Colin F.; Wardley, Leslie J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the integration of tablets, such as the Apple iPad, in university classes and provides recommendations for other instructors to consider when adopting tablet technology. During the trial conducted in the summer of 2011 using iPads, we found that tablets had both academic and social uses, which should be considered when using…

  15. Adoption of intensive care unit telemedicine in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Cicero, Brandon D.; Wallace, David J.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intensive care unit (ICU) telemedicine is a novel approach for providing critical care services from a distance. We sought to study the extent of use and patterns of adoption of this technology in United States ICUs. Design Retrospective study combining a systematic listing of ICU telemedicine installations with hospital characteristic data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. We examined adoption over time and compared hospital characteristics between facilities that have adopted ICU telemedicine and those that have not. Setting United States hospitals from 2003 to 2010. Measurements and main results The number of hospitals using ICU telemedicine increased from 16 (0.4% of total) to 213 (4.6% of total) between 2003 and 2010. The number of ICU beds covered by telemedicine increased from 598 (0.9% of total) to 5,799 (7.9% of total). The average annual rate of ICU bed coverage growth was 101% per year in the first four study years but slowed to 8.1% per year over the last four study years (p<0.001 for difference in linear trend). Compared to non-adopting hospitals, hospitals adopting ICU telemedicine were more likely to be large (percentage with >400 beds: 11.1% vs. 3.7%, p<0.001), teaching (percentage with resident coverage: 31.4% vs. 21.9%, p=0.003) and urban (percentage located in metropolitan statistical areas with over one million residents: 45.3% vs. 30.1%, p<0.001). Conclusions ICU telemedicine adoption was initially rapid but recently slowed. Efforts are needed to uncover the barriers to future growth, particularly regarding the optimal strategy for using this technology most effectively and efficiently. PMID:24145839

  16. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed themore » statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.« less

  17. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed the statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.

  18. Investigating expectation effects using multiple physiological measures

    PubMed Central

    Siller, Alexander; Ambach, Wolfgang; Vaitl, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed at experimentally investigating whether the human body can anticipate future events under improved methodological conditions. Previous studies have reported contradictory results for the phenomenon typically called presentiment. If the positive findings are accurate, they call into doubt our views about human perception, and if they are inaccurate, a plausible conventional explanation might be based on the experimental design of the previous studies, in which expectation due to item sequences was misinterpreted as presentiment. To address these points, we opted to collect several physiological variables, to test different randomization types and to manipulate subjective significance individually. For the latter, we combined a mock crime scenario, in which participants had to steal specific items, with a concealed information test (CIT), in which the participants had to conceal their knowledge when interrogated about items they had stolen or not stolen. We measured electrodermal activity, respiration, finger pulse, heart rate (HR), and reaction times. The participants (n = 154) were assigned randomly to four different groups. Items presented in the CIT were either drawn with replacement (full) or without replacement (pseudo) and were either presented category-wise (cat) or regardless of categories (nocat). To understand how these item sequences influence expectation and modulate physiological reactions, we compared the groups with respect to effect sizes for stolen vs. not stolen items. Group pseudo_cat yielded the highest effect sizes, and pseudo_nocat yielded the lowest. We could not find any evidence of presentiment but did find evidence of physiological correlates of expectation. Due to the design differing fundamentally from previous studies, these findings do not allow for conclusions on the question whether the expectation bias is being confounded with presentiment. PMID:26500600

  19. Investigating expectation effects using multiple physiological measures.

    PubMed

    Siller, Alexander; Ambach, Wolfgang; Vaitl, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed at experimentally investigating whether the human body can anticipate future events under improved methodological conditions. Previous studies have reported contradictory results for the phenomenon typically called presentiment. If the positive findings are accurate, they call into doubt our views about human perception, and if they are inaccurate, a plausible conventional explanation might be based on the experimental design of the previous studies, in which expectation due to item sequences was misinterpreted as presentiment. To address these points, we opted to collect several physiological variables, to test different randomization types and to manipulate subjective significance individually. For the latter, we combined a mock crime scenario, in which participants had to steal specific items, with a concealed information test (CIT), in which the participants had to conceal their knowledge when interrogated about items they had stolen or not stolen. We measured electrodermal activity, respiration, finger pulse, heart rate (HR), and reaction times. The participants (n = 154) were assigned randomly to four different groups. Items presented in the CIT were either drawn with replacement (full) or without replacement (pseudo) and were either presented category-wise (cat) or regardless of categories (nocat). To understand how these item sequences influence expectation and modulate physiological reactions, we compared the groups with respect to effect sizes for stolen vs. not stolen items. Group pseudo_cat yielded the highest effect sizes, and pseudo_nocat yielded the lowest. We could not find any evidence of presentiment but did find evidence of physiological correlates of expectation. Due to the design differing fundamentally from previous studies, these findings do not allow for conclusions on the question whether the expectation bias is being confounded with presentiment. PMID:26500600

  20. Openness in Adoption: Research with the Adoption Kinship Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotevant, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes current research on the outcomes of open adoption. Discusses issues involved in conducting research on openness and offers methodological recommendations. Provides examples from one research program with adoptive kinship networks. Concludes that psychological outcomes were less related to the level of openness than to the dynamics of…

  1. Adoption and Assisted Reproduction. Adoption and Ethics, Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freundlich, Madelyn

    The controversies in adoption have extended across a spectrum of policy and practice issues, and although the issues have become clear, resolution has not been achieved nor has consensus developed regarding a framework on which to improve the quality of adoption policy and practice. This book is the fourth in a series to use an ethics-based…

  2. Homosexuality and adoption in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Uziel, A P

    2001-11-01

    Western societies are undergoing legal and policy changes in relation to laws governing the family, marital status, sexual orientation and the welfare of children, including in Brazil where, in the 1990s, the rights of homosexuals were incorporated into ongoing debates about what constitutes a family. This paper discusses the issue of adoption of children by homosexual men in Brazil, using information from court records from 1995-2000 in Rio de Janeiro, and from interviews with two judges, five psychologists and four social workers who evaluate those wishing to adopt. It uses the case records of one man's application to adopt, in which homosexuality became a central issue. Both the construction of masculinity in relation to parenting and concepts of the family were the parameters upon which the decision to allow him to adopt or not depended. Because the legislation does not specify what the sexual orientation of would-be adoptive parents should be, it is possible for single persons to adopt if they show they can be good parents. As more single people, alone or in couples, seek to adopt, it is important to clarify the criteria for judicial decisions on adoption applications. A dialogue is therefore needed on the meaning of family and whether and how it relates to sexual orientation. It is only on this basis that the courts can take a clear decision as to whether being homosexual is a relevant issue in regard to applications to adopt or not. PMID:11765396

  3. Stories of Aboriginal Transracial Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttgens, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Despite the significant number of transracial Aboriginal adoptions that have taken place in Canada, little research is available that addresses the psychological and psychosocial ramifications for the children involved. The scant literature that does exist raises concerns about the psychological impact of this type of adoption. The present…

  4. Faculty Adoption of Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Franziska Zellweger

    2007-01-01

    Although faculty support has been identified as a critical factor in the success of educational-technology programs, many people involved in such efforts underestimate the complexities of integrating technology into teaching. In this article, the author proposes an adoption cycle to help tackle the complex issue of technology adoption for…

  5. The Temporal Context of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontius, Steven K.

    This paper analyzes the amount of time required by farmers in four villages on the western edge of the central plain of Thailand to adopt four agricultural innovations--fertilizer, herbicide, insecticide, and fungicide. The general objective is to help researchers interested in the relationship of the adoption of new ideas to economic development…

  6. Demagnetizing effect in local magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bo; Subedi, Pradeep; Yeshurun, Yosi; Sarachik, Myriam; Kent, Andrew; Millis, Andrew; Pardo, Enric; Mukherjee, Shreya; Christou, George

    2012-02-01

    It is well-known that magnetic measurements need to be corrected for the presence of demagnetizing fields that depend on both χ and the sample shape. Calculated demagnetization factors are generally available in tabular form for standard shapes, such as ellipsoids, spheres, and parallelopipeds, thereby providing corrections for measurements of the magnetization of the entire sample. However, appropriate corrections are not available for measurements obtained by local probes, such as micron-size Hall sensors. In this talk we present calculations of the local demagnetizing field profile and show how these results can be applied to interpret local magnetization measurements in Mn12-ac.

  7. Characteristics of adopted juvenile delinquents.

    PubMed

    Kim, W J; Zrull, J P; Davenport, C W; Weaver, M

    1992-05-01

    There have been many reports describing the uniqueness of adopted children and adolescents' delinquent behaviors in terms of both their delinquent characteristics and courts' treatment of them. A total of 43 adopted juveniles, 32 extrafamilial (1.0%) and 11 intrafamilial (0.3%) adoptions were initially identified out of 3,280 juvenile delinquents. The adopted subjects were then compared with the demographically matched and offense matched nonadopted subjects. The family variables, such as marital and employment status of parents, were significantly different. However, there were only a few discernible trends, and in general there were no significant differences between the adopted and nonadopted juveniles in terms of their offense characteristics and dispositions. PMID:1592787

  8. Lidar measurements of refractive propagation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philbrick, C. R.; Blood, D. W.

    1995-02-01

    A multi-wavelength Raman lidar has been developed and used to measure the profiles of atmospheric properties in the troposphere under a wide range of geophysical conditions. The instrument measures the two physical properties which contribute to the refractive index at radio frequencies, water vapor concentration profiles from vibrational Raman measurements and neutral density determined from rotational Raman temperature profiles and surface pressure. The LAMP lidar instrument is transportable and has been used to make measurements at several locations in addition to our local Penn State University site, including shipboard measurements between Arctic and Antarctic and in the coastal environment at Point Mugu, CA. Lidar measurements of the atmospheric refractive environment, which are of particular interest, were made during 1993 at Point Mugu, CA, including the period of Project VOCAR (Variability of Coastal Atmospheric Refractivity). Both the lidar and balloon tropospheric measurements have been used for analyses of the propagation conditions by employing th Navy's RPO, IREPS and EREPS PC programs and comparisons have been made with the measured propagation conditions. On the short term (hour-to-hour throughout the day), the lidar derived profiles permit the examination of refractive layer stratification for guided-wave mode propagation.

  9. What's in a Name? Effect of Breed Perceptions & Labeling on Attractiveness, Adoptions & Length of Stay for Pit-Bull-Type Dogs.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Lisa M; Barber, Rebecca T; Wynne, Clive D L

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that certain breeds of dogs stay longer in shelters than others. However, exactly how breed perception and identification influences potential adopters' decisions remains unclear. Current dog breed identification practices in animal shelters are often based upon information supplied by the relinquishing owner, or staff determination based on the dog's phenotype. However, discrepancies have been found between breed identification as typically assessed by welfare agencies and the outcome of DNA analysis. In Study 1, the perceived behavioral and adoptability characteristics of a pit-bull-type dog were compared with those of a Labrador Retriever and Border Collie. How the addition of a human handler influenced those perceptions was also assessed. In Study 2, lengths of stay and perceived attractiveness of dogs that were labeled as pit bull breeds were compared to dogs that were phenotypically similar but were labeled as another breed at an animal shelter. The latter dogs were called "lookalikes." In Study 3, we compared perceived attractiveness in video recordings of pit-bull-type dogs and lookalikes with and without breed labels. Lastly, data from an animal shelter that ceased applying breed labeling on kennels were analyzed, and lengths of stay and outcomes for all dog breeds, including pit bulls, before and after the change in labeling practice were compared. In total, these findings suggest that breed labeling influences potential adopters' perceptions and decision-making. Given the inherent complexity of breed assignment based on morphology coupled with negative breed perceptions, removing breed labels is a relatively low-cost strategy that will likely improve outcomes for dogs in animal shelters. PMID:27008213

  10. What’s in a Name? Effect of Breed Perceptions & Labeling on Attractiveness, Adoptions & Length of Stay for Pit-Bull-Type Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Lisa M.; Barber, Rebecca T.; Wynne, Clive D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that certain breeds of dogs stay longer in shelters than others. However, exactly how breed perception and identification influences potential adopters' decisions remains unclear. Current dog breed identification practices in animal shelters are often based upon information supplied by the relinquishing owner, or staff determination based on the dog's phenotype. However, discrepancies have been found between breed identification as typically assessed by welfare agencies and the outcome of DNA analysis. In Study 1, the perceived behavioral and adoptability characteristics of a pit-bull-type dog were compared with those of a Labrador Retriever and Border Collie. How the addition of a human handler influenced those perceptions was also assessed. In Study 2, lengths of stay and perceived attractiveness of dogs that were labeled as pit bull breeds were compared to dogs that were phenotypically similar but were labeled as another breed at an animal shelter. The latter dogs were called "lookalikes." In Study 3, we compared perceived attractiveness in video recordings of pit-bull-type dogs and lookalikes with and without breed labels. Lastly, data from an animal shelter that ceased applying breed labeling on kennels were analyzed, and lengths of stay and outcomes for all dog breeds, including pit bulls, before and after the change in labeling practice were compared. In total, these findings suggest that breed labeling influences potential adopters' perceptions and decision-making. Given the inherent complexity of breed assignment based on morphology coupled with negative breed perceptions, removing breed labels is a relatively low-cost strategy that will likely improve outcomes for dogs in animal shelters. PMID:27008213

  11. Faster Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullender, Craig C.; Johnson, Daniel D.; Walker, Daniel D.

    1993-01-01

    Current-measuring circuit operates on Hall-effect-sensing and magnetic-field-nulling principles similar to those described in article, "Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit" (LEW-15023), but simpler and responds faster. Designed without feedback loop, and analog pulse-width-modulated output indicates measured current. Circuit measures current at frequency higher than bandwidth of its Hall-effect sensor.

  12. Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullender, Craig C.; Vazquez, Juan M.; Berru, Robert I.

    1993-01-01

    Circuit measures electrical current via combination of Hall-effect-sensing and magnetic-field-nulling techniques. Known current generated by feedback circuit adjusted until it causes cancellation or near cancellation of magnetic field produced in toroidal ferrite core by current measured. Remaining magnetic field measured by Hall-effect sensor. Circuit puts out analog signal and digital signal proportional to current measured. Accuracy of measurement does not depend on linearity of sensing components.

  13. Effects of scale on internal blast measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, R.; Sandusky, H.; Lee, R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a comparative study between large and small-scale internal blast experiments with the goal of using the small-scale analog for energetic performance evaluation. In the small-scale experiment, highly confined explosive samples <0.5 g were subjected to the output from a PETN detonator while enclosed in a 3-liter chamber. Large-scale tests up to 23 kg were unconfined and released in a chamber with a factor of 60,000 increase in volume. The comparative metric in these experiments is peak quasi-static overpressure, with the explosive sample expressed as sample energy/chamber volume, which normalizes measured pressures across scale. Small-scale measured pressures were always lower than the large-scale measurements, because of heat-loss to the high confinement inherent in the small-scale apparatus. This heat-loss can be quantified and used to correct the small-scale pressure measurements. In some cases the heat-loss was large enough to quench reaction of lower energy samples. These results suggest that small-scale internal blast tests do correlate with their large-scale counterparts, provided that heat-loss to confinement can be measured, and that less reactive or lower energy samples are not quenched by heat-loss.

  14. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rink, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the research base on teacher effectiveness in physical education from a historical perspective and explores the implications of the recent emphasis on student performance and teacher observation systems to evaluate teachers for physical education. The problems and the potential positive effects of using student performance…

  15. Evaluating Collaboration for Effectiveness: Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marek, Lydia I.; Brock, Donna-Jean P.; Savla, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Although collaboration is recognized as an effective means to address multifaceted community issues, successful collaboration is difficult to achieve and failure is prevalent. To effectively collaborate, collaborators must recognize the strengths and weaknesses within their own efforts. Using Mattessich and colleagues' work as a springboard,…

  16. Measuring Effectiveness in a Virtual Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Jannette L.

    2010-01-01

    Measuring quality of service in academic libraries traditionally includes quantifiable data such as collection size, staff counts, circulation numbers, reference service statistics, qualitative analyses of customer satisfaction, shelving accuracy, and building comfort. In the libraries of the third millennium, virtual worlds, Web content and…

  17. Measuring the effectiveness of targeted interventions.

    PubMed

    Hassig, S

    1991-06-01

    Considered opinion is that multiple indicators must be used to evaluate a project's success in slowing HIV transmission. There may be difference only over which is the best measure. The 4 indicators recommended for availability, accuracy, and usefulness are 1) reported condom use, 2) reported number of sexual partners, 3) condom sales, and 4) incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STD's). These measures are workable during program start-up, ongoing program implementation, and concurrent with evaluation. Methodologies employed for data collection are quantitative methods such as surveys and qualitative methods such as in-depth interviews or focus groups, direct observation or medical data from clinical exams, tests, or medical records. Reported condom use, albeit a surrogate measure, may be more valid when the questions asked about condom use during the last sex act, or a 1-week recall. Another reliability check would be to compare consistency with actual use in a focus group or reports from peer educators. Change in number of partners is important for intervention projects in STD clinics, workplace, or other social settings. The example given is for Trinidad's KAP surveys which measure changes in numbers of partners, condom use, and condom sales or distribution figures. Condom sales data, rather than free distribution figures, reflect a commitment to using condoms, and frequently condom use is already part of AIDS campaigns. Free condoms if part of a peer education project are more useful. In Mali, 82 prostitutes reported using 62,000 condoms while 58,000 were distributed in a month period. This is close enough to validate the data. STD rates are important measures because of the finding that STD's can increase the chance of HIV transmission by up to 100 times in a single act of intercourse. The number of STD cases can be substituted for costly incidence data. PMID:12316889

  18. Assessing access for prospective adoptive parents living with HIV: an environmental scan of Ontario’s adoption agencies

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Angela A.; Kennedy, V. Logan; Lewis, Johanna; Ross, Lori E.; Loutfy, Mona

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Work has been underway to increase the availability of parenting options for people living with and affected by HIV. One option, adoption, has not yet been explored in the literature. The study aimed to gain a better understanding of the potential of adoption for individuals/couples living with HIV in Ontario, and to assess potential structural barriers or facilitators that may impact their experience navigating the adoption system by conducting an environmental scan of adoption service providers in Ontario. A list of adoption service providers was compiled using the Ontario government’s website. Information relevant to the study’s measures was collected using service providers’ websites. Service providers without websites, or with websites that did not address all of the research measures, were contacted via telephone to complete a structured interview. Online data extraction was possible for 2 and telephone surveys were completed with 75 adoption service providers (total n = 77). Most service providers reported that HIV status is not an exclusion criterion for prospective parents (64%). However, more than one-fifth of the participants acknowledged they were not sure if people with HIV were eligible to adopt. Domestic service providers were the only providers who did not report knowledge of restrictions due to HIV status. Private domestic adoption presented social barriers as birth parent(s) of a child can access health records of a prospective parent and base their selection of an adoptive parent based on health status. Adoption practitioners and licensees involved in international adoptions reported the most structural barriers for prospective parent(s) living with HIV, attributed to the regulations established by the host country of the child(ren) eligible for adoption. Although international adoptions may present insurmountable barriers for individuals living with HIV, public and private domestic adoption appears to be a viable option. PMID

  19. Tunnel effect measuring systems and particle detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Waltman, Steven B. (Inventor); Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for measuring gravitational and inertial forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on an object or fluid in space provide an electric tunneling current through a gap between an electrode and that object or fluid in space and vary that gap with any selected one of such forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on that object or fluid. These methods and apparatus sense a corresponding variation in an electric property of that gap and determine the latter force, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy in response to that corresponding variation, and thereby sense or measure such parameters as acceleration, position, particle mass, velocity, magnetic field strength, presence or direction, or wave or radiant energy intensity, presence or direction.

  20. Tunnel effect measuring systems and particle detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Waltman, Steven B. (Inventor); Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for measuring gravitational and inertial forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on an object or fluid in space provide an electric tunneling current through a gap between an electrode and that object or fluid in space and vary that gap with any selected one of such forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on that object or fluid. These methods and apparatus sense a corresponding variation in an electric property of that gap and determine the latter force, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy in response to that corresponding variation, and thereby sense or measure such parameters as acceleration, position, particle mass, velocity, magnetic field strength, presence or direction, or wave or radiant energy intensity, presence or direction.

  1. Bioelectromagnetic effects measurements - SAR and induced current.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses several theoretical and practical aspects of the application of currents flowing through the body of a radiotelephone operator and Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR is known as the physical quantity which is a perfect solution for biological experiments. Unfortunately, SAR cannot be measured directly. Contrary to SAR, which is limited to the penetration depth, a current induced in a point of a body is measurable in any other point of the body. The main objective of this paper is to show that the current induced in a human body when using a radiotelephone or mobile phone is significant and should be analyzed as widely as SAR is. Computer simulations of a human's hand with a radiotelephone were made. Experiments were also conducted. The results of the experiments show that induced current is also as important as SAR and it cannot be omitted in bioelectromagnetic experiments. In biomedical studies both parameters: induced current and SAR play a major role. PMID:25585976

  2. Diagnosis before treatment: Identifying dairy farmers' determinants for the adoption of sustainable practices in gastrointestinal nematode control.

    PubMed

    Vande Velde, F; Claerebout, E; Cauberghe, V; Hudders, L; Van Loo, H; Vercruysse, J; Charlier, J

    2015-09-15

    Anthelmintic resistance is emerging in dairy cattle and this can result in a lack of effective control and production losses. Therefore, sustainable control strategies, such as targeted treatments (TT) and targeted selected treatments (TST), should be adopted by the industry. TT and TST approaches require the use of diagnostic methods to take informed treatment decisions. To understand the factors affecting the farmers' intention to adopt diagnostic methods before implementing anthelmintic drugs ('adoption intention'), a cross-sectional survey was carried out in dairy farms in Belgium (Flanders). A framework was constructed to predict adoption intentions based on two fundamental theories in the field of behavioural psychology and health psychology: the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Health Belief Model. In the tested model, adoption intentions were predicted based on attitudes towards anthelminthics, attitudes towards diagnostic methods, subjective norms, behavioural control and perceived risk. Structural equation modelling was used for analyses. The model fitted the data well and explained 46% of the variance in adoption intention of diagnostics. The factors 'attitude towards diagnostic methods' and 'subjective norm'; i.e. the influence of significant others, had the strongest, positive influence on adoption intention of diagnostic methods. 'Perceived behavioural control' had a weak, positive effect on intention. Further, 'attitude towards the use of anthelmintic drugs' had a negative effect on adoption intention of the diagnostic methods. This implicates an effect of current behaviour on future adoption, which should be considered in future research. Factors measuring risk perception of anthelmintic resistance; perceived severity and perceived susceptibility, had no effect on the adoption intention of diagnostic methods. The threat of anthelmintic resistance is perceived to be low for dairy herds. The study further did not find any differences in the effects

  3. Understanding the effect size and its measures

    PubMed Central

    Ialongo, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    The evidence based medicine paradigm demands scientific reliability, but modern research seems to overlook it sometimes. The power analysis represents a way to show the meaningfulness of findings, regardless to the emphasized aspect of statistical significance. Within this statistical framework, the estimation of the effect size represents a means to show the relevance of the evidences produced through research. In this regard, this paper presents and discusses the main procedures to estimate the size of an effect with respect to the specific statistical test used for hypothesis testing. Thus, this work can be seen as an introduction and a guide for the reader interested in the use of effect size estimation for its scientific endeavour. PMID:27346958

  4. On the possibility of measuring the Lense Thirring effect with a LAGEOS LAGEOS II OPTIS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo; Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Schiller, Stephan; Dittus, Hansjörg; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2004-04-01

    A space mission, OPTIS, has been proposed for testing the foundations of special relativity and post-Newtonian gravitation in the field of the Earth. The constraints posed on the original OPTIS orbital geometry would allow for a rather wide range of possibilities for the final OPTIS orbital parameters. This freedom could be exploited for further tests of post-Newtonian gravity. In this paper, we wish to preliminarily investigate if it would be possible to use the orbital data from OPTIS together with those from the existing geodetic passive laser-ranged LAGEOS and LAGEOS II satellites in order to perform precise measurements of the Lense Thirring effect. With regard to this possibility, it is important to note that the drag-free technology which should be adopted for the OPTIS mission would yield a lifetime of many years for this satellite. It turns out that the best choice would probably be to adopt the same orbital configuration as the proposed LAGEOS-like LARES satellite and, for testing, select a linear combination including the nodes of LAGEOS, LAGEOS II and OPTIS and the perigee of OPTIS. The total systematic error should be of the order of 1%. The LARES orbital geometry should not be too much in conflict with the original specifications of the OPTIS mission. However, a compromise solution could also be adopted. A comparison with the new perspectives of measuring the Lense Thirring effect with the existing laser-tracked satellites opened by the new gravity models from CHAMP and, especially, GRACE is made. It turns out that an OPTIS/LARES mission would still be of great significance because the obtainable accuracy would be better than that offered by a reanalysis of the currently existing satellites.

  5. Measuring the Effectiveness of Professional Development Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Patricia; Kline, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    When it comes to professional development, state and local education institutions frequently support the priorities of determining content area needs and organizing the delivery of the professional development, but less often comprehensively evaluate the training's overall effectiveness. Taking current research and practical application into…

  6. Measuring Fidelity to Improve Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, John W.; Flower, Andrea; Ciullo, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Teachers are responsible for using evidence-based practices to improve students' academic and behavioral outcomes. Although teachers have access to a variety of resources on evidence-based practices, poor implementation can adversely affect their effectiveness. However, an inadequate student response to intervention may also be the result of…

  7. A Model for Measuring Puffery Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanden Bergh, Bruce G.; Reid, Leonard N.

    The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss a conceptual model for experimentally investigating the effects of advertising puffery. The various sections contain a discussion of puffery as a legal concept, a description and discussion of the proposed model, research support for the model, and implications for future research on puffery.…

  8. Identification of cost effective energy conservation measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bierenbaum, H. S.; Boggs, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In addition to a successful program of readily implemented conservation actions for reducing building energy consumption at Kennedy Space Center, recent detailed analyses have identified further substantial savings for buildings representative of technical facilities designed when energy costs were low. The techniques employed for determination of these energy savings consisted of facility configuration analysis, power and lighting measurements, detailed computer simulations and simulation verifications. Use of these methods resulted in identification of projected energy savings as large as $330,000 a year (approximately two year break-even period) in a single building. Application of these techniques to other commercial buildings is discussed

  9. Cost-effective and full-field method for measuring vibration of loudspeaker membrane using fringe projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Li, Yong; Zhang, Zhiliang; Gao, Peng

    2014-11-01

    We proposed a cost-effective and full-field method for measuring vibration of loudspeaker using general industrial camera and fringe projection. The loudspeaker is excited by a sinusoidal signal. The fringe pattern is projected on the measured loudspeaker membrane that is dynamically deformed. Then the deformed fringes are captured by a camera. A trigger generation circuit is designed to control the camera. The Fourier Transform Profilometry (FTP) is adopted for 3D shape reconstruction. The validity of this method is approved by experiments. The cost of proposed measurement system is dramatically lower than that using high-speed camera.

  10. Improved measurement of thermal effects on microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastani, Mansur

    1993-01-01

    The objectives were to introduce a simple methodology which could be used to replace the time-consuming and expensive conventional methods of metallographic and quantitative analysis of thermal treatment effect on microstructure. Metallurgical analysis continually calls for the evaluation of thermal treatment effects on microstructure. This commonly demands metallographic sample preparation and microscopic examination, which are time absorbing and costly. These drawbacks are burdensome when large numbers of samples must be levied fast. Mechanical testing can sometimes be substituted, but sample size and shape frequently make these methods impractical. The experiment described here is ideal for the microstructural evaluation of lamp filaments and other wire samples such as copper wire which can be conveniently coiled.

  11. Effect of telehealth on hospital utilisation and mortality in routine clinical practice: a matched control cohort study in an early adopter site

    PubMed Central

    Steventon, Adam; Ariti, Cono; Fisher, Elizabeth; Bardsley, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effects of a home-based telehealth intervention on the use of secondary healthcare and mortality. Design Observational study of a mainstream telehealth service, using person-level administrative data. Time to event analysis (Cox regression) was performed comparing telehealth patients with controls who were matched using a machine-learning algorithm. Setting A predominantly rural region of England (North Yorkshire). Participants 716 telehealth patients were recruited from community, general practice and specialist acute care, between June 2010 and March 2013. Patients had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure or diabetes, and a history of associated inpatient admission. Patients were matched 1:1 to control patients, also selected from North Yorkshire, with respect to demographics, diagnoses of health conditions, previous hospital use and predictive risk score. Interventions Telehealth involved the remote exchange of medical data between patients and healthcare professionals as part of the ongoing management of the patient's health condition. Monitoring centre staff alerted healthcare professionals if the telemonitored data exceeded preset thresholds. Control patients received usual care, without telehealth. Primary and secondary outcome measures Time to the first emergency (unplanned) hospital admission or death. Secondary metrics included time to death and time to first admission, outpatient attendance and emergency department visit. Results Matched controls and telehealth patients were similar at baseline. Following enrolment, telehealth patients were more likely than matched controls to experience emergency admission or death (adjusted HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.56, p<0.001). They were also more likely to have outpatient attendances (adjusted HR=1.25, 1.11 to 1.40, p<0.001), but mortality rates were similar between groups. Sensitivity analyses showed that we were unlikely to have missed reductions in the

  12. Behavioral interventions--rationale, measurement, and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2005-06-01

    Effective STD and HIV prevention requires synergism of individual-based prevention behaviors and societal/structural supports that will promote and maintain these behaviors. We should also expect the unexpected. STD rates in gay men have risen after effective prevention of HIV/STD in gay men and effective antiretroviral therapy. New drugs of abuse, such as methamphetamine ("crystal meth"), have induced risky sexual behaviors in gay and heterosexual communities. Economic dislocation in Eastern Europe has resulted in trafficking of commercial sex workers to Europe, the Mideast, and Asia, all with the potential for STD and HIV spread. James Curran, formerly director of the HIV epidemiology and prevention effort at the CDC, has written: It is ironic that the two clearest examples of large-scale success in HIV prevention-reduction in HIV transmission in gay men in the United States and national declines in HIV incidence in Thailand-arise in societies/communities known in their own way for sexual openness....the openness in both communities provided the environment to make the powerful revolutionary changes needed. In Africa, the powerful voice of President Museveni of Uganda has also encouraged candor about sexual risk-taking and facilitated that nation's encouraging early success in reducing HIV prevalence...Unfortunately, most of the world remains unable or unwilling to deal frankly and consistently with sexuality despite the considerable risks of HIV infection in many communities. There is a worldwide sexual hangup hampering HIV prevention efforts. PMID:15963887

  13. Surface coating effects in remote sensing measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Robert D.

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of the infrared spectra of a liquid-(water) coated quartz substrate and a solid-(pyrophyllite) coated quartzite are compared to theoretical values. Results demonstrate that in the case of the water-coated quartz, a loss in spectral contrast of the quartz emission occurs at the principal restrahlen wavelengths of 8.5, 9.0, and 12.5 µ but is most pronounced at 12.5 µ. In the case of pyrophyllite-coated quartzite, additional spectral features appear between 8.0 and 10.0 µ as the exposure of quartzite through the pyrophyllite coating is increased. Addition of the pure quartzite and pyrophyllite spectra, weighted by exposed area, is shown to satisfactorily describe the composite spectra.

  14. Observation assistants: sitter effectiveness and industry measures.

    PubMed

    Harding, Andrew D

    2010-01-01

    Patient safety remains a strategic goal and of societal importance for better health care. Direct observation remains an ineffective and expensive means of providing for patient safety. The nursing quality team found that using assessment tools helped to objectively categorize which patients are at risk. Defining patient volume, actual productive sitter usage, and assessing demand for patients in psychiatric crisis and patients at high risk to fall in the form of average daily census provided an easy-to-translate, familiar unit of measure to compare patient volume to demand and utilization. The sitter utilization case was unable to provide correlation of sitter use to decreased fall rates, elopement, or assault behaviors. Currently, there is no research to suggest the use of constant observation reduces the risk of patient harm related to their risk for falling or harming themselves. PMID:21158254

  15. From awareness to adoption: the effect of AIDS education and condom social marketing on condom use in Tanzania (1993-1996).

    PubMed

    Eloundou-Enyegue, Parfait M; Meekers, Dominique; Calvès, Anne Emmanuèle

    2005-05-01

    This paper uses retrospective event-history data covering a four-year period to examine the timing of exposure to HIV/AIDS education and social marketing condom promotion campaigns, relative to the timing of changes in sexual risk behaviour in Tanzania. Analysis of the event-history data shows that the process of exposure to AIDS education messages and exposure to brand advertising for Salama brand condoms was very different. While exposure to AIDS education was early and gradual, exposure to Salama brand condoms started later, but was much more rapid. After one year of advertising, over half of the target population had been reached by the Salama advertising campaign, mostly through newspapers, radio and television. During the study period, condom use increased from 15% at the beginning of 1993 to 42% at the end of 1996. Increases in condom use were driven both by men who became sexually active, and by men who were not yet protected, or not fully protected. The results further show that it is uncommon for men who adopted condom use to return to more risky behaviour, which suggests that behaviour change in the study population is permanent. PMID:15906883

  16. Neurodevelopment of adopted children exposed in utero to cocaine.

    PubMed Central

    Nulman, I; Rovet, J; Altmann, D; Bradley, C; Einarson, T; Koren, G

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the neurodevelopment of adopted children who had been exposed in utero to cocaine. DESIGN: A case-control observational study. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-three children aged 14 months to 6.5 years exposed in utero to cocaine and their adoptive mothers, and 23 age-matched control children not exposed to cocaine and their mothers, matched with the adoptive mothers for IQ and socioeconomic status. SETTING: The Motherisk Programme at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, a consultation service for chemical exposure during pregnancy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Height, weight and head circumference at birth and at follow-up, and achievement on standard tests of cognitive and language development. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, children exposed in utero to cocaine had an 8-fold increased risk for microcephaly (95% confidence interval 1.5 to 42.3); they also had a lower mean birth weight (p = 0.005) and a lower gestational age (p = 0.002). In follow-up the cocaine-exposed children caught up with the control subjects in weight and stature but not in head circumference (mean 31st percentile v. 63rd percentile) (p = 0.001). Although there were no significant differences between the two groups in global IQ, the cocaine-exposed children had significantly lower scores than the control subjects on the Reynell language test for both verbal comprehension (p = 0.003) and expressive language (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to document that intrauterine exposure to cocaine is associated with measurable and clinically significant toxic neurologic effects, independent of postnatal home and environmental confounders. Because women who use cocaine during pregnancy almost invariably smoke cigarettes and often use alcohol, it is impossible to attribute the measured toxic effects to cocaine alone. PMID:7954158

  17. Factors Affecting the Adoption of an E-Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Ann L.

    2010-01-01

    A case study was conducted in 2006-07 to explore how one US campus implemented a centralised e-assessment system. The study specifically measured the extent of adoption by faculty members, identified their reasons for adoption and evaluated the impact on teaching and learning. The purposes of the system, entitled researching learning (REAL, a…

  18. Personality disorders in adopted versus non-adopted adults.

    PubMed

    Westermeyer, Joseph; Yoon, Gihyun; Amundson, Carla; Warwick, Marion; Kuskowski, Michael A

    2015-04-30

    The goal of this epidemiological study was to investigate lifetime history and odds ratios of personality disorders in adopted and non-adopted adults using a nationally representative sample. Data, drawn from the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), were compared in adopted (n=378) versus non-adopted (n=42,503) adults to estimate the odds of seven personality disorders using logistic regression analyses. The seven personality disorders were histrionic, antisocial, avoidant, paranoid, schizoid, obsessive-compulsive, and dependent personality disorder. Adoptees had a 1.81-fold increase in the odds of any personality disorder compared with non-adoptees. Adoptees had increased odds of histrionic, antisocial, avoidant, paranoid, schizoid, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder compared with non-adoptees. Two risk factors associated with lifetime history of a personality disorder in adoptees compared to non-adoptees were (1) being in the age cohort 18-29 years (but no difference in the age 30-44 cohort), using the age 45 or older cohort as the reference and (2) having 12 years of education (but no difference in higher education groups), using the 0-11 years of education as the reference. These findings support the higher rates of personality disorders among adoptees compared to non-adoptees. PMID:25752207

  19. Adoption in Eastern Grey Kangaroos: A Consequence of Misdirected Care?

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy J.; Forsyth, David M.; Coulson, Graeme; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Adoption is rare in animals and is usually attributed to kin selection. In a 6-year study of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 11 of 326 juveniles were adopted. We detected eight adoptions by observing behavioural associations and nursing between marked mothers and young and three more by analysing the relatedness of mothers and young using microsatellite DNA. Four adoptions involved reciprocal switches and three were by mothers whose own pouch young were known to subsequently disappear. Adoptive mothers were not closely related to each other or to adoptees but adoptive mothers and young associated as closely as did biological pairs, as measured by half-weight indices. Switch mothers did not associate closely. Maternal age and body condition did not influence the likelihood of adoption but females were more likely to adopt in years with high densities of females with large pouch young. Adoption did not improve juvenile survival. We conclude that adoptions in this wild population were potentially costly and likely caused by misdirected care, suggesting that eastern grey kangaroos may have poorly developed mother-offspring recognition mechanisms. PMID:25970624

  20. Re an Adoption Application (Surrogacy)

    PubMed

    1987-03-01

    In England, it is illegal under the Adoption Act 1958 to pay or reward anyone in an effort to adopt a child. A family court was asked in this case whether a surrogacy arrangement involving the payment of 5,000 pounds violated the Act. The applicants, a husband and wife, were unable to have children and had entered into an informal arrangement with a woman who agreed to engage in sexual intercourse with the husband and bear a child for the couple in exchange for 10,000 pounds. Because the surrogate wrote a book about her experience from which she made money, and sincerely wanted to help out the childless couple, she accepted only half of her fee. Convinced that the surrogate arrangement was not commercial in nature, the court found no violation of English law, authorized the payment to the mother, and authorized adoption of the child by the father and his wife. PMID:11648176

  1. Attitudes of European farmers towards GM crop adoption.

    PubMed

    Areal, Francisco J; Riesgo, Laura; Rodríguez-Cerezo, Emilio

    2011-12-01

    This article analyses European Union (EU) farmers' attitudes towards adoption of genetically modified crops by identifying and classifying groups of farmers. Cluster analysis provided two groups of farmers allowing us to classify farmers into potential adopters or rejecters of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) crops. Results showed that economic issues such as the guarantee of a higher income and the reduction of weed control costs are the most encouraging reasons for potential adopters and rejecters of GMHT crops. This article also examines how putting in place measures to ensure coexistence between GM and non-GM crops may influence farmers' attitudes towards GMHT crop adoption. Results show that the implementation of a coexistence policy would have a negative impact on farmers' attitudes on adoption and consequently may hamper GMHT adoption in the EU. PMID:21923717

  2. Innovation Adoption: A Review of Theories and Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Many theoretical frameworks seek to describe the dynamic process of the implementation of innovations. Little is known, however, about factors related to decisions to adopt innovations and how the likelihood of adoption of innovations can be increased. Using a narrative synthesis approach, this paper compared constructs theorized to be related to adoption of innovations proposed in existing theoretical frameworks in order to identify characteristics likely to increase adoption of innovations. The overall goal was to identify elements across adoption frameworks that are potentially modifiable and, thus, might be employed to improve the adoption of evidence-based practices. The review identified 20 theoretical frameworks that could be grouped into two broad categories: theories that mainly address the adoption process (N = 10) and theories that address adoption within the context of implementation, diffusion, dissemination, and/or sustainability (N = 10). Constructs of leadership, operational size and structure, innovation fit with norms and values, and attitudes/motivation toward innovations each are mentioned in at least half of the theories, though there were no consistent definitions of measures for these constructs. A lack of precise definitions and measurement of constructs suggests further work is needed to increase our understanding of adoption of innovations. PMID:23549911

  3. Innovation adoption: a review of theories and constructs.

    PubMed

    Wisdom, Jennifer P; Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Horwitz, Sarah M

    2014-07-01

    Many theoretical frameworks seek to describe the dynamic process of the implementation of innovations. Little is known, however, about factors related to decisions to adopt innovations and how the likelihood of adoption of innovations can be increased. Using a narrative synthesis approach, this paper compared constructs theorized to be related to adoption of innovations proposed in existing theoretical frameworks in order to identify characteristics likely to increase adoption of innovations. The overall goal was to identify elements across adoption frameworks that are potentially modifiable and, thus, might be employed to improve the adoption of evidence-based practices. The review identified 20 theoretical frameworks that could be grouped into two broad categories: theories that mainly address the adoption process (N = 10) and theories that address adoption within the context of implementation, diffusion, dissemination, and/or sustainability (N = 10). Constructs of leadership, operational size and structure, innovation fit with norms and values, and attitudes/motivation toward innovations each are mentioned in at least half of the theories, though there were no consistent definitions of measures for these constructs. A lack of precise definitions and measurement of constructs suggests further work is needed to increase our understanding of adoption of innovations. PMID:23549911

  4. Public Policy, Technology Adoption, and Aggregate Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, W.; Kopp, R.J.; Morgenstern, R.D.; Pizer, W.A.; Shih, J.S.

    1999-04-01

    This research examines the factors that influence the adoption of new energy-saving technologies among U.S. manufacturing plants and explores their potential impact on aggregate energy efficiency. We conduct this analysis using two models: a conventional diffusion model and a stand-alone model of new technology adoption we develop in this paper. The latter model allows us to compute effects on aggregate efficiency based solely on adoption data.

  5. Determinants of internet poker adoption.

    PubMed

    Philander, Kahlil S; Abarbanel, B Lillian

    2014-09-01

    In nearly all jurisdictions, adoption of a new form of gambling has been a controversial and contentious subject. Online gambling has been no different, though there are many aspects that affect online gambling that do not appear in the brick and mortar environment. This study seeks to identify whether demographic, economic, political, technological, and/or sociological determinants contribute to online poker gambling adoption. A theoretical discussion of these categories' importance to online poker is provided and exploratory empirical analysis is used to examine their potential validity. The analysis revealed support for all of the proposed categories of variables thought to be predictive of online gambling legality. PMID:23661279

  6. Communication Development and Differences in Children Adopted from China and Eastern Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwa-Froelich, Deborah A.; Matsuo, Hisako

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The communication development of children adopted from China and Eastern Europe was compared by region of origin at 6 and 12 months after adoption. Method: Twenty children, recruited before or immediately following their adoption, participated in the study. Measures were collected between 2 and 6 months after adoption (Time 1) and between…

  7. Ionization effect on arc plasma's optical diagnosis by the measurement of the refractive index.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-yun; Zhang, Cheng-yi; Gu, Fang; Wang, Qing-hua; Li, Zhen-hua

    2012-06-01

    The effect of arc plasma ionization on its temperature diagnosis by the measurement of the refractive index is discussed. The refractive index of arc plasma in two conditions is compared: 1) only the first ionization is considered and 2) both the first and second ionizations are considered. In order to facilitate plasma temperature reconstruction, two corresponding refractive index models are deduced. For the sake of making this study universal, both the monatomic and dual-atomic molecule arc plasmas are chosen as typical examples for theoretical deduction and analysis. A condition, which can be adopted to estimate whether the second ionization should be considered in temperature reconstruction, is proposed. Finally, an argon arc plasma is chosen as an example for experiment, and the experimental results match well with the theoretical analysis. This study is crucial to arc plasma's optical diagnosis, which is based on the measurement of the refractive index. PMID:22695575

  8. Valuation effects of health cost containment measures.

    PubMed

    Strange, M L; Ezzell, J R

    2000-01-01

    This study reports the findings of research into the valuation effects of health cost containment activities by publicly traded corporations. The motivation for this study was employers' increasing cost of providing health care insurance to their employees and employers' efforts to contain those costs. A 1990 survey of corporate health benefits indicated that these costs represented 25 percent of employers' net earnings and this would rise by the year 2000 if no actions were taken to reduce cost. Health cost containment programs that are implemented by firms should be seen by shareholders as a wealth maximizing effort. As such, this should be reflected in share price. This study employed standard event study methodology where the event is a media announcement or report regarding an attempt by a firm to contain the costs of providing health insurance and other health related benefits to employees. It examined abnormal returns on a number of event days and for a number of event intervals. Of the daily and interval returns that are least significant at the 10 percent level, virtually all are negative. Cross-sectional analysis shows that the abnormal returns are related negatively to a unionization variable. PMID:10961833

  9. Adoption Failure: A Social Work Postmortem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadushin, Alfred; Seidl, Frederick W.

    1971-01-01

    Failed adoption is defined as removal of the adoptive child at any time between placement and legal adoption. A study of failed adoptions in a statewide adoption agency found a failure rate of less than 3 percent. Reasons for failure are analyzed and implications for practice are suggested. (Author)

  10. Canadian Adoption Statistics: 1981-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobol, Michael P.; Daly, Kerry J.

    1994-01-01

    Obtained data on Canadian adoptions (1981-90) from adoption coordinators of all 10 provinces and 2 territories. Found downward trends in use of adoption as means of family formation across decade. By 1990, most infant adoptions were facilitated by private practitioners and agencies whereas older children were primarily adopted through public…

  11. Acceptance Effects in the Hyperons Global Polarization Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Selyuzhenkov, Ilya

    2006-11-17

    The possible sources of systematic uncertainties in the hyperons global polarization measurement are discussed. The equation with detector acceptance effects taken into account is provided. Contribution of the hyperons directed flow into the hyperons global polarization measurement is shown. The systematic uncertainties of the {lambda} hyperons global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions with the STAR detector at RHIC are calculated.

  12. Assessing Organizational Effectiveness: The Role of Performance Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview of the challenges associated with demonstrating organizational effectiveness and the role of performance measures as surrogates for demonstrating effectiveness are provided. The complexity of analysis and the importance of use of performance measures provide a way to review the strengths and weakness of eight different ways to…

  13. Instruments Developed in the Head Start Program Effects Measurement Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mediax Associates, Inc., Westport, CT.

    A test battery was prepared for use in assessing the effectiveness of Head Start and similar programs in fostering young children's development. The instruments were designed to measure program effects on several dimensions of the cognitive, social-emotional, and applied strategies domains. Specific competencies measured are presumed to define in…

  14. Measuring the effectiveness of scientific gatekeeping.

    PubMed

    Siler, Kyle; Lee, Kirby; Bero, Lisa

    2015-01-13

    Peer review is the main institution responsible for the evaluation and gestation of scientific research. Although peer review is widely seen as vital to scientific evaluation, anecdotal evidence abounds of gatekeeping mistakes in leading journals, such as rejecting seminal contributions or accepting mediocre submissions. Systematic evidence regarding the effectiveness--or lack thereof--of scientific gatekeeping is scant, largely because access to rejected manuscripts from journals is rarely available. Using a dataset of 1,008 manuscripts submitted to three elite medical journals, we show differences in citation outcomes for articles that received different appraisals from editors and peer reviewers. Among rejected articles, desk-rejected manuscripts, deemed as unworthy of peer review by editors, received fewer citations than those sent for peer review. Among both rejected and accepted articles, manuscripts with lower scores from peer reviewers received relatively fewer citations when they were eventually published. However, hindsight reveals numerous questionable gatekeeping decisions. Of the 808 eventually published articles in our dataset, our three focal journals rejected many highly cited manuscripts, including the 14 most popular; roughly the top 2 percent. Of those 14 articles, 12 were desk-rejected. This finding raises concerns regarding whether peer review is ill--suited to recognize and gestate the most impactful ideas and research. Despite this finding, results show that in our case studies, on the whole, there was value added in peer review. Editors and peer reviewers generally--but not always-made good decisions regarding the identification and promotion of quality in scientific manuscripts. PMID:25535380

  15. Why farmers adopt best management practice in the United States: A meta-analysis of the adoption literature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baumgart-Getz, Adam; Stalker Prokopy, Linda; Floress, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis of both published and unpublished studies assesses factors believed to influence adoption of agricultural Best Management Practices in the United States. Using an established statistical technique to summarize the adoption literature in the United States, we identified the following variables as having the largest impact on adoption: access to and quality of information, financial capacity, and being connected to agency or local networks of farmers or watershed groups. This study shows that various approaches to data collection affect the results and comparability of adoption studies. In particular, environmental awareness and farmer attitudes have been inconsistently used and measured across the literature. This meta-analysis concludes with suggestions regarding the future direction of adoption studies, along with guidelines for how data should be presented to enhance the adoption of conservation practices and guide research.

  16. Why Adoption of Standards Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Staff Development, 2016

    2016-01-01

    A total of 39 states have adopted, adapted, or endorsed the Standards for Professional Learning, including the standards issued in 2011 (labeled in red) and those published earlier (labeled in blue). Making a commitment to the standards is a commitment to continuous learning for all educators in a school.

  17. Internet Adoption: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Junzhao

    2011-01-01

    The Internet has brought significant changes to the retail industry because it revolutionizes how information is transmitted and accessed. The main objective of this research is to enhance our understanding of people's adoption of the Internet and its implications for retail competition. This dissertation consists of two essays. The first essay…

  18. Has the Academy Adopted TQM?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Robert; Deshotels, Judy

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 469 colleges and universities assessed the degree to which colleges and universities have adopted total quality management (TQM) or continuous quality improvement (CQI) techniques. Results suggest use of TQM/CQI is lower than predicted, at about 13% of institutions. Variations in extent of use of the approach are discussed. (MSE)

  19. Adoptive immunotherapy against ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mittica, Gloria; Capellero, Sonia; Genta, Sofia; Cagnazzo, Celeste; Aglietta, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The standard front-line therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is combination of debulking surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Nevertheless, the majority of patients experience disease recurrence. Although extensive efforts to find new therapeutic options, cancer cells invariably develop drug resistance and disease progression. New therapeutic strategies are needed to improve prognosis of patients with advanced EOC.Recently, several preclinical and clinical studies investigated feasibility and activity of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC. Our aim is to highlight prospective of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC, focusing on HLA-restricted Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs), and MHC-independent immune effectors such as natural killer (NK), and cytokine-induced killer (CIK). Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has shown activity in several pre-clinical models. Available preclinical and clinical data suggest that adoptive cell therapy may provide the best benefit in settings of low tumor burden, minimal residual disease, or maintenance therapy. Further studies are needed to better define the optimal clinical setting. PMID:27188274

  20. Adoption Issues, Trends and Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, William L.

    Teenage women with unplanned pregnancies constitute one of America's greatest challenges in terms of providing good services and sound counseling on options. Only about 7% of teenagers having babies make alternate childrearing plans either through formal adoption or informally with members of their families. The emphasis on making teenagers good…

  1. Evaluating IPv6 Adoption in the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colitti, Lorenzo; Gunderson, Steinar H.; Kline, Erik; Refice, Tiziana

    As IPv4 address space approaches exhaustion, large networks are deploying IPv6 or preparing for deployment. However, there is little data available about the quantity and quality of IPv6 connectivity. We describe a methodology to measure IPv6 adoption from the perspective of a Web site operator and to evaluate the impact that adding IPv6 to a Web site will have on its users. We apply our methodology to the Google Web site and present results collected over the last year. Our data show that IPv6 adoption, while growing significantly, is still low, varies considerably by country, and is heavily influenced by a small number of large deployments. We find that native IPv6 latency is comparable to IPv4 and provide statistics on IPv6 transition mechanisms used.

  2. Adopting a direction. Forum of Parliamentarians.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, S

    1999-01-01

    National security, poverty alleviation, and refugees are global issues which all urgently need to be addressed. However, no major issue will be resolved until the population problem is solved. Humankind needs to find a way to live in harmony with the earth and its natural environment. The 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) adopted a program of action outlining practical measures to be taken with regard to population and development. The concepts of reproductive health and women's empowerment were also adopted. The ICPD was in many ways an historic conference which set the future direction for the issues of population and development. The conference program of action must be fully implemented to ensure a healthy future for humankind and the earth. Elected officials must do their best to ensure that the ICPD program of action is successfully implemented. PMID:12322180

  3. Statistical analysis of effects of measures against agricultural pollution.

    PubMed

    Sæbø, H V

    1991-01-01

    The Norwegian Government has initiated a plan to reduce agricultural pollution. One of the projects in this plan is aimed at investigating the effects of different measures in order to evaluate their effects and costs.A set of experiments has been designed to estimate the effects of measures to reduce or control the use of fertilizers and erosion. The project started in 1985. It comprises continuous measurements in two water courses in each of four counties: one test drainage area where the relevant measures were implemented at the end of 1986, and one reference area where no specific measures are carried out. A series of chemical parameters are measured together with runoff and other hydrological and meteorogical data.The paper provides a preliminary analysis of the data collected in one of the counties during the period June 1985 to April 1988. It contains examples of analysis of covariance to show possible effects of the measures carried out in the test area.Natural variations in precipitation and pollution are large, making it difficult to see the effects of the measures without using statistical techniques to take the multivariability of the problem into account. Some effects can be shown with analysis of covariance. However, the relatively short measurement period makes it neccessary to be careful when interpreting the results. PMID:24233499

  4. Intention to adopt clinical decision support systems in a developing country: effect of Physician’s perceived professional autonomy, involvement and belief: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computer-based clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are regarded as a key element to enhance decision-making in a healthcare environment to improve the quality of medical care delivery. The concern of having new CDSS unused is still one of the biggest issues in developing countries for the developers and implementers of clinical IT systems. The main objectives of this study are to determine whether (1) the physician’s perceived professional autonomy, (2) involvement in the decision to implement CDSS and (3) the belief that CDSS will improve job performance increase the intention to adopt CDSS. Four hypotheses were formulated and tested. Methods A questionnaire-based survey conducted between July 2010 and December 2010. The study was conducted in seven public and five private hospitals in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Before contacting the hospitals, necessary permission was obtained from the Ministry of Health, Malaysia and the questionnaire was vetted by the ethics committee of the ministry. Physicians working in 12 hospitals from 10 different specialties participated in the study. The sampling method used was stratified random sampling and the physicians were stratified based on the specialty. A total of 450 physicians were selected using a random number generator. Each of these physicians was given a questionnaire and out of 450 questionnaires, 335 (response rate – 74%) were returned and 309 (69%) were deemed usable. Results The hypotheses were tested using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Salient results are: (1) Physicians’ perceived threat to professional autonomy lowers the intention to use CDSS (p < 0.01); (2) Physicians involvement in the planning, design and implementation increases their intention to use CDSS (p < 0.01); (3) Physicians belief that the new CDSS will improve his/her job performance increases their intention to use CDSS (p < 0.01). Conclusion The proposed model with the three main constructs (physician’s professional

  5. Adoption of telemedicine: from pilot stage to routine delivery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Today there is much debate about why telemedicine has stalled. Teleradiology is the only widespread telemedicine application. Other telemedicine applications appear to be promising candidates for widespread use, but they remain in the early adoption stage. The objective of this debate paper is to achieve a better understanding of the adoption of telemedicine, to assist those trying to move applications from pilot stage to routine delivery. Discussion We have investigated the reasons why telemedicine has stalled by focusing on two, high-level topics: 1) the process of adoption of telemedicine in comparison with other technologies; and 2) the factors involved in the widespread adoption of telemedicine. For each topic, we have formulated hypotheses. First, the advantages for users are the crucial determinant of the speed of adoption of technology in healthcare. Second, the adoption of telemedicine is similar to that of other health technologies and follows an S-shaped logistic growth curve. Third, evidence of cost-effectiveness is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the widespread adoption of telemedicine. Fourth, personal incentives for the health professionals involved in service provision are needed before the widespread adoption of telemedicine will occur. Summary The widespread adoption of telemedicine is a major -- and still underdeveloped -- challenge that needs to be strengthened through new research directions. We have formulated four hypotheses, which are all susceptible to experimental verification. In particular, we believe that data about the adoption of telemedicine should be collected from applications implemented on a large-scale, to test the assumption that the adoption of telemedicine follows an S-shaped growth curve. This will lead to a better understanding of the process, which will in turn accelerate the adoption of new telemedicine applications in future. Research is also required to identify suitable financial and

  6. National Foster Care and Adoption Directory Search

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adoption Directory Search National Foster Care & Adoption Directory Search Many concerned individuals have expressed the desire to ... how to become a foster or adoptive parent. Search results for this category include contact information for: ...

  7. Associations between Discussions of Racial and Ethnic Differences in Internationally Adoptive Families and Delinquent Behavior among Korean Adopted Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kayla N.; Lee, Richard M.; Rueter, Martha A.; Kim, Oh Myo

    2015-01-01

    Internationally adopted adolescents may have more delinquent behavior than non-adopted adolescents. One explanation is these adolescents experience discrimination and loss of culture, and adoptive parents are not adequately addressing these experiences. However, studies have not examined the effects of family discussions of racial and ethnic differences within adoptive families on adopted adolescents’ delinquent behavior. To test this relationship, this study utilized data from 111 U.S. internationally adoptive families with 185 South Korean adopted adolescents (55% female, M age = 17.75). During an observational assessment, families discussed the importance of their racial and ethnic differences, and adolescents completed a delinquent behavior questionnaire. Analysis of covariance showed differences in adolescent delinquent behavior across three ways adoptive families discussed racial and ethnic differences; adolescents whose families acknowledged differences had the fewest mean delinquent behaviors. There were no significant differences in delinquent behavior between adolescents whose families acknowledged or rejected the importance of racial and ethnic differences. However, adopted adolescents whose families held discrepant views of differences had significantly more problem behavior than adolescents whose families either acknowledged or rejected the importance of racial and ethnic differences. Clinicians, adoption professionals, and other parenting specialists should focus on building cohesive family identities about racial and ethnic differences, as discrepant views of differences are associated with the most adoptee delinquent behavior. PMID:25729119

  8. Associations between Family Communication Patterns, Sibling Closeness, and Adoptive Status

    PubMed Central

    Samek, Diana R.; Rueter, Martha A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the protective effect of family and sibling closeness on child adjustment, but fewer studies have investigated how closeness is promoted within families. Guided by Family Communication Patterns Theory, we tested the association between family communication and sibling emotional and behavioral closeness, and whether adoptive status moderated this relationship. Participating families included 616 adoptive and non-adoptive families with two adolescent children. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. Sibling closeness was highest in families that emphasized both conversation and conformity and lowest in families that emphasized only conversation or neither conversation nor conformity. Emotional and behavioral closeness were differentially associated with adoption status, sibling age, and sibling gender. Few moderating effects of adoption status were found. Post hoc analyses showed moderating effects of sibling gender composition. PMID:21984844

  9. Risk of Suicide Attempt in Adopted and Nonadopted Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Stephen M.; Sharma, Anu; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We asked whether adoption status represented a risk of suicide attempt for adopted and nonadopted offspring living in the United States. We also examined whether factors known to be associated with suicidal behavior would mediate the relationship between adoption status and suicide attempt. METHODS: Participants were drawn from the Sibling Interaction and Behavior Study, which included 692 adopted and 540 nonadopted offspring and was conducted at the University of Minnesota from 1998 to 2008. Adoptees were systematically ascertained from records of 3 large Minnesota adoption agencies; nonadoptees were ascertained from Minnesota birth records. Outcome measures were attempted suicide, reported by parent or offspring, and factors known to be associated with suicidal behavior including psychiatric disorder symptoms, personality traits, family environment, and academic disengagement. RESULTS: The odds of a reported suicide attempt were ∼4 times greater in adoptees compared with nonadoptees (odds ratio: 4.23). After adjustment for factors associated with suicidal behavior, the odds of reporting a suicide attempt were reduced but remained significantly elevated (odds ratio: 3.70). CONCLUSIONS: The odds for reported suicide attempt are elevated in individuals who are adopted relative to those who are not adopted. The relationship between adoption status and suicide attempt is partially mediated by factors known to be associated with suicidal behavior. Continued study of the risk of suicide attempt in adopted offspring may inform the larger investigation of suicidality in all adolescents and young adults. PMID:24019414

  10. The Texas Adoption Project: Adopted Children and Their Intellectual Resemblance to Biological and Adoptive Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Joseph M.

    1983-01-01

    Intelligence test scores were obtained from parents and children in 300 adoptive families and compared with similar data available from the children's biological mothers. Results support the hypothesis that genetic variability is an important influence in the development of individual differences in intelligence. (Author/RH)

  11. Characterization of probe contact effects on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, Nina; Mayjonade, Mallory; Ahadi, Aylin; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a rapid, non-invasive optical method widely adopted to gain diagnostic information of tissue. The most flexible approach to this method is a fiber-optic contact-probe used with a spectroscopy system. A challenge of this method is that the external pressure brought by the probe can significantly affect the tissue optical properties as well as the light coupling into the probe, and thus influence the collected DRS-spectrum. In this study we investigate and characterize the effect of probe pressure on DRS-spectra obtained with a calibrated loaded-spring system used with a fiber optic probe in the range (400 - 1600) nm. A multilayer FE-model of the indentation is developed to get a better insight of the distribution of pressure and stresses inside the skin under indentation.

  12. The Evaluation of an Instrument to Measure Counselor Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charles W.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Techniques for evaluating counselor effectiveness have been less than definitive in the past, and the profession has need for a scientific method of measuring counselor effectiveness. Results are reported of research conducted to determine the reliability of the Kelz Rating Scale for counselor effectiveness with noncoached clients. (Author)

  13. Measurements of shielding effectiveness and cavity characteristics of airplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. A.; Crawford, M. L.; Johnk, R. T.; Ondrejka, A. R.; Camell, D. G.

    1994-07-01

    We present measured data for shielding effectiveness, cavity Q, and cavity time constant of three small (twin-engine) airplanes for frequencies from 400 MHz to 18 GHz. Both CW and time-domain measurement methods were used, and the time-domain method yields higher values of cavity Q. Both methods yield Q values below a theoretical upper bound determined by window leakage losses. The measured shielding effectiveness is quite variable, but averages about 15 dB. The measured time constants are also variable and average about 15 ns. This short time constant is a result of the low Q of the aircraft cavities.

  14. The British Chinese Adoption Study: Orphanage Care, Adoption and Mid-Life Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Alan; Grant, Margaret; Feast, Julia; Simmonds, John

    2013-01-01

    Background: While studies of ex-orphanage care show adverse effects on development, the longer-term impact on mid-life psychosocial functioning and physical health has not been established. Methods: Orphanage records provided baseline data on a sample of 100 Hong Kong Chinese girls who were subsequently adopted into the UK. A mid-life follow-up…

  15. Embryo adoption: Some further considerations.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Colin

    2015-02-01

    Recent discussions of embryo adoption have sought to make sense of the teaching of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae which appeared to provide a negative judgment on such a practice. This article aims to provide a personalist account of the process of fertilization and implantation that might serve as the basis for the negative judgment of the CDF document. In doing so, it relies upon the idea that a person, including an embryo, is not to be considered in isolation, but always in relation to God and to others. This approach extends the substantialist conceptualizations commonly employed in discussions of this issue. More generally, the article seeks to highlight the value of a personalist re-framing for an understanding of the moral questions surrounding the beginning of life. Lay summary: This article seeks to make sense of what appears to be a clear-cut rejection, set out in the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae, of the proposal for women to "adopt" surplus frozen embryos. It draws upon more recently developed modes of philosophical/theological reasoning to argue that, in human procreation, both fertilization and implantation represent constitutive dimensions of divine creative activity and so must be protected from manipulative technological intervention. Since embryo adoption requires this kind of technology, it makes sense for the Church document not to approve it. PMID:25698841

  16. Experimental verification of depolarization effects in bioelectrical impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Lv, Xinqiang; Du, Meng

    2014-01-01

    The electrode polarization effects on bioelectrical impedance measurement at low-frequency cannot be ignored. In this paper, the bioelectrical data of mice livers are measured to specify the polarization effects on the bio-impedance measurement data. We firstly introduce the measurement system and methodology. Using the depolarization method, the corrected results are obtained. Besides, the specific effects of electrode polarization on bio-impedance measurement results are investigated using comparative analysis of the previous and posterior correction results from dielectric spectroscopy, Cole-Cole plot, conductivity and spectroscopy of dissipation tangent. Experimental results show that electrode polarization has a significant influence on the characteristic parameters of mouse liver tissues. To be specific, we see a low-frequency limit resistance R0 increase by 19.29%, a reactance peak XP increase by 8.50%, a low-frequency limit conductivity Kl decrease by 17.65% and a dissipation peak tangent decrease by 160%. PMID:25227082

  17. Cultural stereotypes die hard: the case of transracial adoption.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Ezra E H; Bergeron, Rachel L

    2006-01-01

    Transracial adoption (commonly understood as the adoption of black children by white families) has been the subject of a persistent debate among adoption specialists, legal advocates, mental health professionals, and even civil rights advocates in this country for a long time. This has been so despite cumulative research evidence indicating that transracial adoptees can thrive and develop into confident adults with strong senses of identity and self-esteem. We contend that the evidence undergirding transracial adoption has not been effectively persuasive because of the tenacious and ubiquitous cultural belief that children and their potential adoptive parents should be matched along racial lines. However, the cultural principle of racial matching has also been diluted by judicial decisions that have narrowly allowed the use of race as one factor rather than as the controlling factor in adoption decisions. This article focuses on the use of a third element--federal statutory attempts intended to remove race as a controlling factor in child placement decisions. We will show how as a matter of public policy, the statutory efforts were meant to promote race-neutral approaches to adoption and to support transracial adoptions. However, in practice, the statutory attempts may still leave the door open to continued race-matching, which suggests that the cultural preference for race-matching in the construction of families remains powerfully ingrained and difficult to eradicate. As a consequence, transracial adoption appears to maintain its status as a culturally suspect phenomenon. PMID:17032953

  18. New measurements of the EMC effect in light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    A. Daniel

    2009-12-01

    Modifications of structure functions in nuclei (EMC effect) suggest that the nuclear quark distribution function is not just the incoherent sum of the proton and neutron distributions, and made clear the importance of nuclear effects even in high energy measurements. Jefferson Lab experiment E03-103 made precise measurements of the EMC effect in few-body and heavy nuclei with emphasis on the large x region. Data from the light nuclei suggests that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the nucleon's local environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect.

  19. An assessment of urban heat island effect adopting urban parameterizations in COSMO-CLM simulations over big cities in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesarchio, Myriam; Rianna, Guido; Mercogliano, Paola; Castellari, Sergio; Schiano, Pasquale

    2015-04-01

    In Europe, about 80% of people live in urban areas, which most of them can be particularly vulnerable to climate impacts (e.g. high air temperatures along with heat waves, flooding due to intense precipitation events, water scarcity and droughts). In fact, the density of people and assets within relatively small geographic areas, such as an urban settlements, mean more risk exposure than in rural areas. Therefore, reliable numerical climate models are needed for elaborating climate risk assessment at urban scale. These models must take into account the effects of the complex three-dimensional structure of urban settlements, combined with the mixture of surface types with contrasting radiative, thermal and moisture characteristics. In this respect, previous studies (e.g. Trusilova et al., 2013) have already assessed the importance to consider urban properties in very high resolution regional climate modeling to better reproduce the features of urban climate, especially in terms of urban heat island effect. In this work, two different configurations of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM at the horizontal resolution of 0.02° (about 2.2km), one including urban parameterization scheme and another without including them, have been applied in order to perform two different climate simulations covering the entire northern Italy. In particular, the present study is focused on large urban settlements such as Milan and Turin. Due to high computational cost required to run very high resolution simulations, the results of the two simulations have been compared over a period of ten years, from 1980 to 1989. Preliminary results indicate that the modification of climate conditions, due to the presence of urban areas, is present mainly in the areas covered by big cities and surrounding them, or rather the presence of urban areas induces modification mainly in their local climate. Other evidences are that the simulation including urban parameterization scheme shows, in general

  20. Effects of yaw and pitch motion on model attitude measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Tripp, John S.; Finley, Tom D.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents a theoretical analysis of the dynamic effects of angular motion in yaw and pitch on model attitude measurements in which inertial sensors were used during wind tunnel tests. A technique is developed to reduce the error caused by these effects. The analysis shows that a 20-to-1 reduction in model attitude measurement error caused by angular motion is possible with this technique.

  1. A Perspective on the Measurement of Retrieval Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, William S.

    1978-01-01

    Uses an historical analogy with Archimedes' problem concerning the volume of his king's golden crown to illustrate the evaluation problem for document and reference retrieval systems. Various methods that have been developed since 1950 to measure retrieval effectiveness are described, and utility measure formulas are provided. (JD)

  2. Effectiveness Monitoring Report, MWMF Tritium Phytoremediation Interim Measures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, Dan; Blake, John, I.

    2003-02-10

    This report describes and presents the results of monitoring activities during irrigation operations for the calendar year 2001 of the MWMF Interim Measures Tritium Phytoremediation Project. The purpose of this effectiveness monitoring report is to provide the information on instrument performance, analysis of CY2001 measurements, and critical relationships needed to manage irrigation operations, estimate efficiency and validate the water and tritium balance model.

  3. An analysis of source structure effects in radio interferometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    To begin a study of structure effects, this report presents a theoretical framework, proposes an effective position approach to structure corrections based on brightness distribution measurements, and analyzes examples of analytical and measured brightness distributions. Other topics include the effect of the frequency dependence of a brightness distribution on bandwidth synthesis (BWS) delay, the determination of the absolute location of a measured brightness distribution, and structure effects in dual frequency calibration of charged particle delays. For the 10 measured distributions analyzed, it was found that the structure effect in BWS delay at X-band (3.6 cm) can reach 30 cm, but typically falls in the range of 0 to 5 cm. A trial limit equation that is dependent on visibility was successfully tested against the 10 measured brightness distributions (seven sources). If the validity of this particular equation for an upper limit can be established for nearly all sources, the structure effect in BWS delay could be greatly reduced without supplementary measurements of brightness distributions.

  4. 18 CFR 341.6 - Adoption rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adoption rule. 341.6... SUBJECT TO SECTION 6 OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 341.6 Adoption rule. (a) Change in name of carrier... such occurrence. The filing of adoption notices and adoption supplements requires no notice period....

  5. 33 CFR 230.21 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR IMPLEMENTING NEPA § 230.21 Adoption. See 40 CFR 1506.3. A district commander will normally adopt... recirculated as provided in 40 CFR 1506.3 (b) or (c), the adopted EIS with the supplement, if any, will be... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adoption. 230.21 Section...

  6. 33 CFR 230.21 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOR IMPLEMENTING NEPA § 230.21 Adoption. See 40 CFR 1506.3. A district commander will normally adopt... recirculated as provided in 40 CFR 1506.3 (b) or (c), the adopted EIS with the supplement, if any, will be... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adoption. 230.21 Section...

  7. 18 CFR 341.6 - Adoption rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adoption rule. 341.6... SUBJECT TO SECTION 6 OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 341.6 Adoption rule. (a) Change in name of carrier... such occurrence. The filing of adoption notices and adoption supplements requires no notice period....

  8. 33 CFR 230.21 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR IMPLEMENTING NEPA § 230.21 Adoption. See 40 CFR 1506.3. A district commander will normally adopt... recirculated as provided in 40 CFR 1506.3 (b) or (c), the adopted EIS with the supplement, if any, will be... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adoption. 230.21 Section...

  9. 18 CFR 341.6 - Adoption rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adoption rule. 341.6... SUBJECT TO SECTION 6 OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 341.6 Adoption rule. (a) Change in name of carrier... such occurrence. The filing of adoption notices and adoption supplements requires no notice period....

  10. 33 CFR 230.21 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR IMPLEMENTING NEPA § 230.21 Adoption. See 40 CFR 1506.3. A district commander will normally adopt... recirculated as provided in 40 CFR 1506.3 (b) or (c), the adopted EIS with the supplement, if any, will be... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adoption. 230.21 Section...

  11. 18 CFR 341.6 - Adoption rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adoption rule. 341.6... SUBJECT TO SECTION 6 OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 341.6 Adoption rule. (a) Change in name of carrier... such occurrence. The filing of adoption notices and adoption supplements requires no notice period....

  12. 33 CFR 230.21 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR IMPLEMENTING NEPA § 230.21 Adoption. See 40 CFR 1506.3. A district commander will normally adopt... recirculated as provided in 40 CFR 1506.3 (b) or (c), the adopted EIS with the supplement, if any, will be... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adoption. 230.21 Section...

  13. Experiences of Black Families as Adoptive Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prater, Gwendolyn S.; King, Lula T.

    1988-01-01

    Conducted descriptive study in which 12 Black families shared their ideas about adoptive parenthood. Found most common reason for adopting was inability to have children biologically. Found need for post-adoptive services for Black families on an as-needed basis. Recommends adoption agencies and communities build on positive experiences of Black…

  14. Policy Issues in Gay and Lesbian Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Notes that adoption agencies have developed few specific policies on the issue of lesbian and gay adoption. Provides an overview of key considerations about homosexual adopters, including beliefs and values of agency professionals, the legal and social ramifications of adoption into a relationship not based on marriage, and possible consequences…

  15. Adoption and Single Parents: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groze, Vic

    1991-01-01

    Examines the literature about people who choose to become single adoptive parents. Reviews the demographic and personal characteristics of single parents who adopt, and summarizes the experiences of single parents with the children they adopt. Calls for further research on single parents who adopt special needs children. (GH)

  16. Adoption: Pediatric, Legislative and Social Issues

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph H.; Brown, Dirck W.

    1981-01-01

    Physicians may find themselves involved in many phases of the adoption process, ranging from advising infertile couples who wish to adopt a child to caring for adopted children, adolescents or adults. Recent legislation has been aimed at making it possible for children to be adopted who have been receiving foster care and at providing financial assistance to implement the adoption of children with handicaps and with medical problems. The adoption process is becoming more open. Adoptees are searching for and finding their biological parents and all parties in the “adoption triangle” are developing relationships with one another. PMID:7257384

  17. A Longitudinal Adoption Study of Substance Use Behavior in Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Huibregtse, Brooke M; Corley, Robin P; Wadsworth, Sally J; Vandever, Joanna M; DeFries, John C; Stallings, Michael C

    2016-08-01

    Although cross-sectional twin studies have assessed the genetic and environmental etiologies of substance use during adolescence and early adulthood, comparisons of results across different samples, measures, and cohorts are problematic. While several longitudinal twin studies have investigated these issues, few corroborating adoption studies have been conducted. The current study is the first to estimate the magnitude of genetic, shared environmental, and non-shared environmental influences on substance use (cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana) from ages 14 to 18 years, using a prospective longitudinal adoption design. Adoptive and control sibling correlations provided substantial evidence for early genetic effects on cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use/no use. Shared environmental effects were relatively modest, except for alcohol use, which showed increases in late adolescence (age 17 to 18 years). Sibling similarity for quantity/frequency of use also support additive genetic influences across adolescence, with some shared environmental influences for all three substances. To test the stability of these influences across time, a series of independent pathway models were run to explore common and age-specific influences. For all substances, there were minimal age-specific additive genetic and shared environmental influences on quantity/frequency of use. Further, there was a trend toward increasing genetic influences on cigarette and alcohol use across ages. Genetic influences on marijuana were important early, but did not contribute substantially at age 17 and 18 years. Overall, the findings indicate that genetic influences make important contributions to the frequency/quantity of substance use in adolescence, and suggest that new genetic influences may emerge in late adolescence for cigarette and alcohol use. PMID:27161024

  18. Combined effects of solvation and aggregation propensity on the final supramolecular structures adopted by hydrophobic, glycine-rich, elastin-like polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Anna M; Moscarelli, Pasquale; Bochicchio, Brigida; Lanza, Giuseppe; Castle, James E

    2013-05-01

    Previous work on elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) made of hydrophobic amino acids of the type XxxGlyGlyZzzGly (Xxx, Zzz = Val, Leu) has consistently shown that differing dominant supramolecular structures were formed when the suspending media were varied: helical, amyloid-like fibers when suspended in water and globules evolving into "string of bead" structures, poly(ValGlyGlyValGly), or cigar-like bundles, poly(ValGlyGlyLeuGly), when suspended in methyl alcohol. Comparative experiments with poly(LeuGlyGlyValGly) have further indicated that the interface energy plays a significant role and that solvation effects act in concomitance with the intrinsic aggregation propensity of the repeat sequence. Continuing our investigation on ELPs using surface (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy) and bulk (circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) techniques for their characterization, here we have compared the effect of suspending solvents (H(2)O, dimethylsulfoxide, ethylene glycol, and MeOH) on poly(ValGlyGlyValGly), the polypeptide most inclined to form long and well-refined helical fibers in water, searching for the signature of intermolecular interactions occurring between the polypeptide chains in the given suspension. The influence of sequence specificities has been studied by comparing poly(ValGlyGlyValGly) and poly(LeuGlyGlyValGly) with a similar degree of polymerization. Deposits on substrates of the polypeptides were characterized taking into account the differing evaporation rate of solvents, and tests on their stability in ultra high vacuum were performed. Finally, combining experimental and computational studies, we have revaluated the three-dimensional modeling previously proposed for the supramolecular assembly in water of poly(ValGlyGlyValGly). The results were discussed and rationalized also in the light of published data. PMID:23426573

  19. Combinatorial measurements of Hall effect and resistivity in oxide films.

    PubMed

    Clayhold, J A; Kerns, B M; Schroer, M D; Rench, D W; Logvenov, G; Bollinger, A T; Bozovic, I

    2008-03-01

    A system for the simultaneous measurement of the Hall effect in 31 different locations as well as the measurement of the resistivity in 30 different locations on a single oxide thin film grown with a composition gradient is described. Considerations for designing and operating a high-throughput system for characterizing highly conductive oxides with Hall coefficients as small as 10(-10) m3/C are discussed. Results from measurements on films grown using combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy show the usefulness of characterizing combinatorial libraries via both the resistivity and the Hall effect. PMID:18377026

  20. Using the Rasch Measurement Model in Psychometric Analysis of the Family Effectiveness Measure

    PubMed Central

    McCreary, Linda L.; Conrad, Karen M.; Conrad, Kendon J.; Scott, Christy K; Funk, Rodney R.; Dennis, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Valid assessment of family functioning can play a vital role in optimizing client outcomes. Because family functioning is influenced by family structure, socioeconomic context, and culture, existing measures of family functioning--primarily developed with nuclear, middle class European American families--may not be valid assessments of families in diverse populations. The Family Effectiveness Measure was developed to address this limitation. Objectives To test the Family Effectiveness Measure with data from a primarily low-income African American convenience sample, using the Rasch measurement model. Method A sample of 607 adult women completed the measure. Rasch analysis was used to assess unidimensionality, response category functioning, item fit, person reliability, differential item functioning by race and parental status, and item hierarchy. Criterion-related validity was tested using correlations with five other variables related to family functioning. Results The Family Effectiveness Measure measures two separate constructs: The effective family functioning construct was a psychometrically sound measure of the target construct that was more efficient due to the deletion of 22 items. The ineffective family functioning construct consisted of 16 of those deleted items but was not as strong psychometrically. Items in both constructs evidenced no differential item functioning by race. Criterion-related validity was supported for both. Discussion In contrast to the prevailing conceptualization that family functioning is a single construct, assessed by positively and negatively worded items, use of the Rasch analysis suggested the existence of two constructs. While the effective family functioning is a strong and efficient measure of family functioning, the ineffective family functioning will require additional item development and psychometric testing. PMID:23636342

  1. Bridging the Divide: Openness in Adoption and Post-adoption Psychosocial Adjustment among Birth and Adoptive Parents

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiaojia; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Martin, David; Leve, Leslie; Neiderhiser, Jenae; Shaw, Daniel S.; Villareal, Georgette; Scaramella, Laura; Reid, John; Reiss, David

    2008-01-01

    Using 323 matched parties of birth mothers and adoptive parents, this study examined the association between the degree of adoption openness (e.g., contact and knowledge between parties) and birth and adoptive parents’ post-adoption adjustment shortly after the adoption placement (6 to 9 months). Data from birth fathers (N=112), an understudied sample, also were explored. Openness was assessed by multiple informants. Results indicated that openness was significantly related to satisfaction with adoption process among adoptive parents and birth mothers. Increased openness was positively associated with birth mothers’ post-placement adjustment as indexed by birth mothers’ self reports and the interviewers’ impression of birth mothers’ adjustment. Birth fathers’ report of openness was associated with their greater satisfaction with the adoption process and better post-adoption adjustment. PMID:18729667

  2. Measures to Evaluate the Effects of DBS on Speech Production

    PubMed Central

    Weismer, Gary; Yunusova, Yana; Bunton, Kate

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate measures of speech production that could be used to document effects of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) on speech performance, especially in persons with Parkinson disease (PD). A small set of evaluative criteria for these measures is presented first, followed by consideration of several speech physiology and speech acoustic measures that have been studied frequently and reported on in the literature on normal speech production, and speech production affected by neuromotor disorders (dysarthria). Each measure is reviewed and evaluated against the evaluative criteria. Embedded within this review and evaluation is a presentation of new data relating speech motions to speech intelligibility measures in speakers with PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and control speakers (CS). These data are used to support the conclusion that at the present time the slope of second formant transitions (F2 slope), an acoustic measure, is well suited to make inferences to speech motion and to predict speech intelligibility. The use of other measures should not be ruled out, however, and we encourage further development of evaluative criteria for speech measures designed to probe the effects of DBS or any treatment with potential effects on speech production and communication skills. PMID:24932066

  3. Effects of measuring positions on the measured aerodynamic performance of a centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongwei; Zhang, Jun

    2010-04-01

    This paper performs a numerical simulation of three-dimensional flow field in a centrifugal compressor with long inlet and outlet pipes using CFX software. By arranging virtual probes at different positions in both inlet and outlet planes, the aerodynamic performance of the centrifugal compressor is measured and compared with each other. Then effects of measuring positions on measurement results are discussed. The results show that it will generate notable measuring errors of the pressure ratio and efficiency if the inlet total pressure is measured using a single-point probe. The inlet total pressure data can be accurate when they are measured using a 3-point rake. The outlet total pressure and total temperature data can not be accurate if they are respectively measured at one circumferential position even using a multi-point rake. Increasing tangential measuring positions at the outlet is effective to improve the test accuracy. When the outlet total pressure and total temperature are respectively measured at 3 tangential positions, the data can be almost accurate.

  4. Turbulence excited frequency domain damping measurement and truncation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soovere, J.

    1976-01-01

    Existing frequency domain modal frequency and damping analysis methods are discussed. The effects of truncation in the Laplace and Fourier transform data analysis methods are described. Methods for eliminating truncation errors from measured damping are presented. Implications of truncation effects in fast Fourier transform analysis are discussed. Limited comparison with test data is presented.

  5. Effective UV radiation from model calculations and measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feister, Uwe; Grewe, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Model calculations have been made to simulate the effect of atmospheric ozone and geographical as well as meteorological parameters on solar UV radiation reaching the ground. Total ozone values as measured by Dobson spectrophotometer and Brewer spectrometer as well as turbidity were used as input to the model calculation. The performance of the model was tested by spectroradiometric measurements of solar global UV radiation at Potsdam. There are small differences that can be explained by the uncertainty of the measurements, by the uncertainty of input data to the model and by the uncertainty of the radiative transfer algorithms of the model itself. Some effects of solar radiation to the biosphere and to air chemistry are discussed. Model calculations and spectroradiometric measurements can be used to study variations of the effective radiation in space in space time. The comparability of action spectra and their uncertainties are also addressed.

  6. Spatial compatibility interference effects: a double dissociation between two measures

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, Alexander J.; Tipper, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In spatial compatibility tasks, when the spatial location of a stimulus is irrelevant it nevertheless interferes when a response is required in a different spatial location. For example, response with a left key-press is slowed when the stimulus is presented to the right as compared to the left side of a computer screen. However, in some conditions this interference effect is not detected in reaction time (RT) measures. It is typically assumed that the lack of effect means the irrelevant spatial code was not analysed or that the information rapidly decayed before response. However, we show that even in conditions where there appears to be no spatial interference when measuring RTs, effects can nevertheless be detected after response when recording facial electromyography responses. This dissociation between two measures highlights the importance of diverging methods to investigate visuomotor processes as conclusions based on only one measure can be misleading. PMID:26924937

  7. Direct measurement of the magnetocaloric effect in cementite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeswurm, B.; Friemert, K.; Gürsoy, M.; Skokov, K. P.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of the magnetocaloric effect of cementite at its Curie temperature of 475 K are presented. An adiabatic temperature change of 1.76±0.01 K was measured using a direct measurement technique. The isothermal entropy change was determined from measurements of magnetisation isotherms and was shown to be 3.07 J K-1 kg-1 in a field change of 2 T. The field dependencies of both magnetocaloric properties follow the H2/3 dependence typical for ferromagnetic materials with a second order phase transition. The material may be of interest in magnetocaloric applications such as magnetic refrigeration or thermomagnetic power generation.

  8. Effect of 1-methyl-D-tryptophan and adoptive transfer of dendritic cells on polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal content injection.

    PubMed

    Yim, Hong Soon; Choi, Kyung Min; Kim, Byoungjae; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Kang, Yoon Kyu; Lee, Min-Goo

    2013-09-01

    A mouse model of polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal content injection (CCI) was developed with the aim of gaining a better understanding of the mechanism of sepsis. This model has a similar survival pattern to the conventional model with the added benefits of ability to vary the severity of sepsis and greater consistency. Administration of 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1-MT) to inhibit indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in mice with CCI-induced sepsis increased the survival rate and tended to up-regulate IL-10/IL-12 serum concentrations. The effectiveness of 1-MT was confirmed by increases in IL-10 over IL-12 in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) treated with LPS and 1-MT and a superior survival rate 24 hr after injection of these double treated BMDCs in the CCI-induced sepsis model. Therefore, CCI is both a useful and reliable technique for investigating polymicrobial sepsis. The present findings using this newly developed model suggest that inhibition of IDO alleviates the severity of polymicrobial sepsis and modulates the immune response even in cases of severe systemic septic inflammation. PMID:23841524

  9. Effect of borehole design on electrical impedance tomography measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari, Amirpasha; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Treichel, Andrea; Zimmermann, Egon; Kelter, Matthias; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a sophisticated non-invasive tool to investigate the subsurface in engineering and environmental studies. To increase the depth of investigation, EIT measurements can be made in boreholes. However, the presence of the borehole may affect EIT measurements. Here, we aim to investigate the effect of different borehole components on EIT measurements using 2,5-D and 3D finite element modeling and unstructured meshes. To investigate the effect of different borehole components on EIT measurements, a variety of scenarios were designed. In particular, the effect of the water-filled borehole, the PVC casing, and the gravel filter were investigated relative to complex resistivity simulations for a homogenous medium with chain and electrode modules. It was found that the results of the complex resistivity simulations were best understood using the sensitivity distribution of the electrode configuration under consideration. In all simulations, the sensitivity in the vicinity of the borehole was predominantly negative. Therefore, the introduction of the water-filled borehole caused an increase in the real part of the impedance, and a decrease (more negative) in the imaginary part of the simulated impedance. The PVC casing mostly enhanced the effect of the water-filled borehole described above, although this effect was less clear for some electrode configuration. The effect of the gravel filter mostly reduced the effect of the water-filled borehole with PVC casing. For EIT measurements in a single borehole, the highest simulated phase error was 12% for a Wenner configuration with electrode spacing of 0.33 m. This error decreased with increasing electrode spacing. In the case of cross-well configurations, the error in the phase shit was as high as 6%. Here, it was found that the highest errors occur when both current electrodes are located in the same borehole. These results indicated that cross-well measurements are less affected by the

  10. Adoptive T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Lokhorst, H M; Liebowitz, D

    1999-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy, or the transfer of immunocompetent cells, has been shown to be a promising new strategy for treatment of a variety of malignancies, including leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The possibility that it may likewise benefit patients with multiple myeloma is now being explored by researchers in Europe and the United States. Two alternatives, one using donor leukocyte infusions (DLIs) and the other using autologous T cells, are described. In the Netherlands, researchers studied the use of DLIs in 17 patients with multiple myeloma who relapsed after bone marrow transplant (BMT). Of 16 evaluable patients, 10 (62%) responded, with six (37%) achieving a complete response (CR). After a median follow-up duration of 28 months, five patients relapsed and five remained in remission. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in nine patients. In the United States, adoptive immunotherapy is currently being tested in eight patients with chemotherapy-resistant lymphoma. Autologous T cells were obtained prior to BMT and expanded using an anti-CD3/CD28 culture system. After BMT, the cells were reinfused into the patient. At approximately day 14, granulocyte levels began to recover in the six evaluable patients, and levels remained relatively stable over the posttreatment course. Two patients developed severe autoimmune toxicity, which responded to treatment in one and resolved spontaneously in the other. PMID:9989486

  11. Embryo adoption: Some further considerations

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Recent discussions of embryo adoption have sought to make sense of the teaching of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae which appeared to provide a negative judgment on such a practice. This article aims to provide a personalist account of the process of fertilization and implantation that might serve as the basis for the negative judgment of the CDF document. In doing so, it relies upon the idea that a person, including an embryo, is not to be considered in isolation, but always in relation to God and to others. This approach extends the substantialist conceptualizations commonly employed in discussions of this issue. More generally, the article seeks to highlight the value of a personalist re-framing for an understanding of the moral questions surrounding the beginning of life. Lay summary: This article seeks to make sense of what appears to be a clear-cut rejection, set out in the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae, of the proposal for women to “adopt” surplus frozen embryos. It draws upon more recently developed modes of philosophical/theological reasoning to argue that, in human procreation, both fertilization and implantation represent constitutive dimensions of divine creative activity and so must be protected from manipulative technological intervention. Since embryo adoption requires this kind of technology, it makes sense for the Church document not to approve it. PMID:25698841

  12. The Place of Adoption in the NIDA Clinical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Jessup, Martha A.; Guydish, Joseph; Manser, Sarah Turcotte; Tajima, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) was established in 1999 to determine effectiveness of drug abuse treatment interventions among diverse client populations and settings. To address dissemination of research findings, the CTN also has as its mission the transfer of research findings to treatment providers. In a qualitative study of adoption of evidence based practice in the context of two CTN clinical trials, we interviewed 29 participants from seven organizational levels of the multisite study organization about post-trial adoption, their role in the clinical trial, and interactions between the research initiative and clinic staff and setting. Analysis of interview data revealed a range of opinion among participants on the place of adoption within the CTN. Innovation within the CTN to support adoption and further observational research on dynamics of adoption within the CTN can increase dissemination of evidence-based drug abuse treatment interventions in the future. PMID:20126428

  13. [Measure of sunscreen cream transmittance in UV wave range and analysis of sun protection effect].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiao-Hua; Xiao, Duo

    2013-11-01

    SPF and PA index present the resistance ability of sunscreen to UVA (Ultraviolet A) and UVB (Ultraviolet B) respectively. The present article focuses on the research on the relationship between ultraviolet transmittance and sunscreen ability based on definition of sunscreen efficiency and a simple and significant result was obtained by deducing. The technique we applied is spectral analysis dealing with ethanol-ethyl ether mixed solvent by ultraviolet and visible light spectrophotometer. We measured the UVA and UVB transmittance of 69 common sunscreen samples. The measurement result shows that spectral analysis method could differentiate sunscreens with different SPF and PA and identify whether the parameter value marked is accurate. So, an effective method is provided for the measurement of SPF and PA value. If different types of ultraviolet absorbent or UV scattering dose is added in sunscreen, the authors can distinguish them easily through the shape of the transmittance curve. In our sunscreen samples measured, domestic brands and imported brands are classified into two categories. By comparing the experimental results, the authors found that the domestic sunscreen and import sunscreen have no significant difference in sun block efficiency as long as the authors adopt the product of qualified manufacturer. PMID:24555389

  14. How adoption speed affects the abandonment of cultural tastes

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Jonah; Le Mens, Gaël

    2009-01-01

    Products, styles, and social movements often catch on and become popular, but little is known about why such identity-relevant cultural tastes and practices die out. We demonstrate that the velocity of adoption may affect abandonment: Analysis of over 100 years of data on first-name adoption in both France and the United States illustrates that cultural tastes that have been adopted quickly die faster (i.e., are less likely to persist). Mirroring this aggregate pattern, at the individual level, expecting parents are more hesitant to adopt names that recently experienced sharper increases in adoption. Further analysis indicate that these effects are driven by concerns about symbolic value: Fads are perceived negatively, so people avoid identity-relevant items with sharply increasing popularity because they believe that they will be short lived. Ancillary analyses also indicate that, in contrast to conventional wisdom, identity-relevant cultural products that are adopted quickly tend to be less successful overall (i.e., reduced cumulative adoption). These results suggest a potential alternate way to explain diffusion patterns that are traditionally seen as driven by saturation of a pool of potential adopters. They also shed light on one factor that may lead cultural tastes to die out. PMID:19416813

  15. Correcting electrode impedance effects in broadband SIP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Johan Alexander; Zimmermann, Egon; Esser, Odilia; Haegel, Franz-Hubert; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of the complex electrical resistivity can be affected by the contact impedance of the potential electrodes above 100 Hz. In this study, we present a correction procedure to remove electrode impedance effects from SIP measurements. The first step in this correction procedure is to estimate the electrode impedance using a measurement with reversed current and potential electrodes. In a second step, this estimated electrode impedance is used to correct SIP measurements based on a simplified electrical model of the SIP measurement system. We evaluated this new correction procedure using SIP measurements on water because of the well-defined dielectric properties. It was found that the difference between the corrected and expected phase of the complex electrical resistivity of water was below 0.1 mrad at 1 kHz for a wide range of electrode impedances. In addition, SIP measurements on a saturated unconsolidated sediment sample with two types of potential electrodes showed that the measured phase of the electrical resistivity was very similar (difference <0.2 mrad) up to a frequency of 10 kHz after the effect of the different electrode impedances was removed. Finally, SIP measurements on variably saturated unconsolidated sand were made. Here, the plausibility of the phase of the electrical resistivity was improved for frequencies up to 1 kHz, but errors remained for higher frequencies due to the approximate nature of the electrode impedance estimates and some remaining unknown parasitic capacitances that led to current leakage. It was concluded that the proposed correction procedure for SIP measurements improved the accuracy of the phase measurements by an order of magnitude in the kHz frequency range. Further improvement of this accuracy requires a method to accurately estimate parasitic capacitances in situ.

  16. Alignment techniques required by precise measurement of effective focal length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of false color imagery produced by instrumentation on earth resource mapping satellites are examined. The spatial fidelity of the imagery is dependent upon the geometric accuracy (GA) and the band-to-band registration (BBR) with which the telescope instrument is assembled. BBR and GA require knowledge of telescope effective focal length (EFL) to one part in 10,000 in order that the next generation of earth mappers be able to carry out their missions. The basis for this level of precision is briefly considered, and a description is given of the means by which such precise EFL measurements have been carried out. Attention is given to accuracy requirements, the technique used to measure effective focal length, possible sources of error in the EFL measurement, approaches for eliminating errors, and the results of the efforts to control measurement errors in EFL determinations.

  17. Design and construction of a Hall Effect Measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully, Ethan; Little, Travis; Requena, Sebastian; Sauncy, Toni

    2010-10-01

    We have constructed a Hall Effect sample holder that facilitates quick sample change and insures that the sample is uniformly located for each measurement. The 4 point off-the-shelf sample card was integrated into an existing floor magnet with custom designed and constructed mounts. The sample holder is well suited for these measurements, allowing for adjustments in all three of the coordinate axes directions so that even small samples can be accurately positioned for measurement between the poles of the magnet. The sample holder is interfaced and controlled with LABView software. The measurements are made using a suite of Keithley instruments. The design and construction will be discussed and preliminary calibration of the Hall Effect system will be presented.

  18. Mobile home weatherization measures: A study of their effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Hancock, E.; Franconi, E.; Hanger, R.; Weiger, J.

    1988-12-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) was funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Buildings and Community Systems (DOE OBCS) in FY 1987 and 1988 to investigate cost effective ways to weatherize mobile homes constructed prior to the enactment of HUD Thermal Standards in 1976. In FY 1987 SERI studied the effectiveness of a variety of infiltration-reducing retrofits by monitoring 20 units in the field before, during, and after applications of air tightening measures. In FY 1988 we began studying measures intended to reduce envelope conduction losses. These measures included storm windows, insulated skirting, and wall, roof, and floor insulation. This part of the project resulted in the development of a short-term testing method for measuring the thermal impact of individual conduction-reducing retrofits.

  19. Multipath Effects on Phase Measurements with Continuous Terahertz Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, A. H.; Albarracin, M. G.; Thomas, D. H.; von der Weid, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We evaluate the effect of multipath waves on terahertz phase measurements due to multiple reflections between the transmitter antenna and the sample. We show that the phase shift introduced by the sample will be biased by a value which depends on the sample position in the terahertz path. We show how to remove the bias and use the technique in the measurement of the index of refraction of Mylar at 194.4 GHz.

  20. Another Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibodeau, Phillip E.; Sullender, Craig C.

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power circuit provides noncontact measurement of alternating or direct current of many ampheres in main conductor. Advantages of circuit over other nulling Hall-effect current-measuring circuits is stability and accuracy increased by putting both analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters in nulling feedback loop. Converters and rest of circuit designed for operation at sampling rate of 100 kHz, but rate changed to alter time or frequency response of circuit.

  1. Effects of measurement errors on microwave antenna holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1991-01-01

    The effects of measurement errors appearing during the implementation of the microwave holographic technique are investigated in detail, and many representative results are presented based on computer simulations. The numerical results are tailored for cases applicable to the utilization of the holographic technique for the NASA's Deep Space Network antennas, although the methodology of analysis is applicable to any antenna. Many system measurement topics are presented and summarized.

  2. Electronic Dental Records System Adoption.

    PubMed

    Abramovicz-Finkelsztain, Renata; Barsottini, Claudia G N; Marin, Heimar Fatima

    2015-01-01

    The use of Electronic Dental Records (EDRs) and management software has become more frequent, following the increase in prevelance of new technologies and computers in dental offices. The purpose of this study is to identify and evaluate the use of EDRs by the dental community in the São Paulo city area. A quantitative case study was performed using a survey on the phone. A total of 54 offices were contacted and only one declinedparticipation in this study. Only one office did not have a computer. EDRs were used in 28 offices and only four were paperless. The lack of studies in this area suggests the need for more usability and implementation studies on EDRs so that we can improve EDR adoption by the dental community. PMID:26262001

  3. Evaluation of egg production after adoption of biosecurity strategies by backyard poultry farmers in West Bengal

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, I.; Joardar, S. N.; Ganguli, D.; Das, P. K.; Sarkar, U.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: On the basis of identified source of major bacterial infections at four agro-climatic zones in West Bengal the cost-effective biosecurity strategy was formulated for backyard poultry farmers. The aim of the present study was to assess the adoption. So, the study was aimed to detect the adoption level of the formulated biosecurity strategy to mitigate the Salmonella and Escherichia coliweek post-hatch period chicks were contamination level in the sources and its correlation with egg production in West Bengal. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was prepared querying regarding the biosecurity measures presently followed by the farmers, if any and egg production of their birds. Subsequent to the interview the formulated biosecurity strategy was conveyed. After 3 months, the interview with the same questionnaire was conducted to the same farmers to detect their adoption level. Results: The change in practices were noted in certain parameters which differs significantly (p<0.01 or p<0.05). As a consequence, the average egg production/flock was increased in 3 months after adoption of the strategy (618.2±37.77/flock) in comparison to last 3 months average before adoption of the strategy (495.3±30.00/flock) which also differs significantly (p<0.01). Conclusion: The present study detected the implementation of the biosecurity strategy in backyard poultry farming in West Bengal can substantially benefit the farmers in terms of increased egg production. PMID:27047068

  4. In Their Own Words: Adopted Persons' Experiences of Adoption Disclosure and Discussion in Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wydra, Maria; O'Brien, Karen M.; Merson, Erica S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored adoption disclosure in a sample of 18 adult adoptees who were adopted as infants. A qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews with adoptees was used to learn about participants' experiences of adoption disclosure. The majority always knew they were adopted, were able to talk openly with parents about adoption, and had…

  5. Adoption of Children with Disabilities: An Exploration of the Issues for Adoptive Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Gretchen A.

    2016-01-01

    This systematic literature review is an exploration of issues for adoptive families throughout the adoption process and into the various phases of the life of the adoptive family. Although there has been much recent research related to adoption, in general, very little adoption literature addresses the often unspoken needs of families who want to…

  6. The Greenhouse Effect - Determination From Accurate Surface Longwave Radiation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipona, R.

    Longwave radiation measurements have been drastically improved in recent years. Uncertainty levels down to s2 Wm-2 are realistic and achieved during long-term ´ longwave irradiance measurements. Longwave downward irradiance measurements together with temperature and humidity measurements at the station are used to sepa- rate clear-sky from cloudy-sky situations. Longwave net radiation separated between clear-sky and all-sky situations allows to determine the longwave cloud radiative forc- ing at the station. For clear-sky situations radiative transfer models demonstrate a lin- ear relation between longwave downward radiation and the greenhouse radiative flux. Clear-sky longwave radiation, temperature and humidity for different atmospheres and different altitudes were modeled with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code and compared to longwave radiation, temperature and humidity measured at 4 radiation stations of the Alpine Surface Radiation Budget (ASRB) network at similar altitude and with corresponding atmospheres. At the 11 ASRB stations the clear-sky green- house effect was determined by using clear-sky longwave downward measurements and MODTRAN model calculations. The all-sky greenhouse effect was determined by adding the longwave cloud radiative forcing to the clear-sky greenhouse radiative flux. The altitude dependence of annual and seasonal mean values of the greenhouse effect will be shown for the altitude range of 400 to 3600 meter a.s.l. in the Alps.

  7. Measurement of two-photon exchange effect with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Raue, Brian A

    2010-08-01

    The structure of the proton is one the most important and most studied topics in nuclear physics. However, discrepant measurements of the proton's electromagnetic form factor ratio, GE/GM, seriously jeopardize a definitive understanding of the proton's structure. Measurements of GEGM using the Rosenbluth separation technique disagree with those using polarization transfer methods by about a factor of three at Q2~5.6 GeV2. It has been hypothesized that this discrepancy is due to two-photon exchange (TPE) effects that are not part of the usual radiative corrections. Theoretical corrections for the TPE effect are difficult due to the fact that a large number of excited nucleon states can contribute to the process. However, the TPE effect can be directly determined by measuring the ratio of the positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, R = sigma(e+)/sigma(e-), as the TPE effect changes sign with respect to the charge of the incident particle. A brief test run of a modified beamline and the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has resulted in the most precise measurements of the R to date. We will present results from the test run covering Q2<0.8 GeV2 and 0.78<=epsilon<=0.97. In addition, the test run demonstrated the feasibility of producing a mixed electron/positron beam of good quality so that the measurements can be extended up to Q2~3.0 GeV2.

  8. Measurement of quadratic electrogyration effect in castor oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izdebski, Marek; Ledzion, Rafał; Górski, Piotr

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a detailed analysis of electrogyration measurement in liquids with the usage of an optical polarimetric technique. Theoretical analysis of the optical response to an applied electric field is illustrated by experimental data for castor oil which exhibits natural optical activity, quadratic electro-optic effect and quadratic electrogyration effect. Moreover, the experimental data show that interaction of the oil with a pair of flat electrodes induces a significant dichroism and natural linear birefringence. The combination of these effects occurring at the same time complicates the procedure of measurements. It has been found that a single measurement is insufficient to separate the contribution of the electrogyration effect, but it is possible on the basis of several measurements performed with various orientations of the polarizer and the analyser. The obtained average values of the quadratic electrogyration coefficient β13 in castor oil at room temperature are from - 0.92 ×10-22 to - 1.44 ×10-22m2V-2 depending on the origin of the oil. Although this study is focused on measurements in castor oil, the presented analysis is much more general.

  9. The effect of measurement error on surveillance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Brian Phillip; Hamada, Michael S.

    2012-04-24

    The purpose of this manuscript is to describe different simulation studies that CCS-6 has performed for the purpose of understanding the effects of measurement error on the surveillance metrics. We assume that the measured items come from a larger population of items. We denote the random variable associate with an item's value of an attribute of interest as X and that X {approx} N({mu}, {sigma}{sup 2}). This distribution represents the variability in the population of interest and we wish to make inference on the parameters {mu} and {sigma} or on some function of these parameters. When an item X is selected from the larger population, a measurement is made on some attribute of it. This measurement is made with error and the true value of X is not observed. The rest of this section presents simulation results for different measurement cases encountered.

  10. Effective gain measurements in chromium-doped forsterite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petricevic, V.; Seas, A.; Alfano, R. R.

    1991-01-01

    Effective gain cross section in tetravalent chromium-doped forsterite laser crystal was measured over the 1180-1330 nm spectral range. The experiment was performed using two collinear laser beams in a pump-and-probe arrangement. The peak-gain cross section from this measurement is estimated to be 1.9 x 10 to the -19th sq cm at 1215 nm, which is comparable to the value of about 2 x 10 to the -19th sq cm predicted by fluorescence linewidth and lifetime measurements. These results indicate that excited-state absorption is not a major loss mechanism in tetravalent chromium-doped forsterite.

  11. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-08-10

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  12. MEASURING BULK FLOW OF GALAXY CLUSTERS USING KINEMATIC SUNYAEV-ZELDOVICH EFFECT: PREDICTION FOR PLANCK

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, D. S. Y.; Pierpaoli, E.; Osborne, S. J.

    2011-08-01

    We predict the performance of the Planck satellite in determining the bulk flow through kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) measurements. As velocity tracers, we use ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) clusters as well as expected cluster catalogs from the upcoming missions Planck and eRosita (All-Sky Survey: EASS). We implement a semi-analytical approach to simulate realistic Planck maps as well as Planck and eRosita cluster catalogs. We adopt an unbiased kSZ filter (UF) and matched filter (MF) to maximize the cluster kSZ signal-to-noise ratio. We find that the use of Planck cosmic microwave background maps in conjunction with the currently existing ROSAT cluster sample improves current upper limits on the bulk flow determination by a factor {approx}5 ({approx}10) when using the MF (UF). The accuracy of bulk flow measurement increases with the depth and abundance of the cluster sample: for an input bulk velocity of 500 km s{sup -1}, the UF recovered velocity errors decrease from 94 km s{sup -1} for RASS, to 73 km s{sup -1} for Planck, and to 24 km s{sup -1} for EASS; while the systematic bias decreases from 44% for RASS, 5% for Planck, to 0% for EASS. The 95% upper limit for the recovered bulk flow direction {Delta}{alpha} ranges between 4{sup 0} and 60{sup 0} depending on cluster sample and adopted filter. The kSZ dipole determination is mainly limited by the effects of thermal SZ emission in all cases but the one of EASS clusters analyzed with the unbiased filter. This fact makes the UF preferable to the MF when analyzing Planck maps.

  13. [Effects of land management measures on nutrients emission].

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi-Gong; Xi, Bei-Dou; Yu, Hui-Bin; Tang, Zhen-Wu; Gao, Ru-Tai; Xia, Xun-Feng

    2009-11-01

    The SWAT model, coupled with a GIS, was applied to simulate the effects of fertilizer application, contour planting and returning land for farming to forestry on nutrients discharges. The results showed that when nitrogen fertilizer of agricultural land increased from 630 to 955 kg/hm2, and phosphorus fertilizer increased from 200 to 300 kg/hm2, nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient emissions have shown a growing trend. Nitrate nitrogen loads reached to 3 776.59 kg which increased 19.7% and the rate of changes was the largest. The change rate of inorganic phosphorus was the smallest which increased only 2.7%. The impact of emission loads on nitrogen and phosphorus was the smallest if contour planting was adopted. When slope farmland which slope is greater than 25% all returned land for farming to forestry, the emission loads of various forms of nitrogen and phosphorus decreased, organic phosphorus decreased 16.3% among them. Organic nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen and inorganic phosphorus compared with before returning land for farming to forestry, decreased 22.7%, 25.4% and 27.9% respectively. In small basin of Zhangjiachong, returning farmlands to forests and reducing the amount of chemical fertilizer on the slope farmlands which slopes are larger than 25% have played a prominent role. PMID:20063735

  14. Hall effect in electrolyte flow measurements: introduction to blood flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Szwast, Maciej; Piatkiewicz, Wojciech

    2012-06-01

    The Hall effect has been applied to electrolyte flow measurement. It has been proven that Hall voltage does not depend on electrolyte concentration; however, there is a linear relationship between Hall voltage and flow velocity. Obtained results for electrolyte allow us to suppose that Hall effect can be used to determine blood flow. Research on blood will be conducted as the next step. PMID:22145845

  15. Measurements and simulations of seeded electron microbunches with collective effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, K.; Molo, R.; Khan, S.; Lazzarino, L. L.; Lechner, C.; Maltezopoulos, Th.; Plath, T.; Rossbach, J.; Ackermann, S.; Bödewadt, J.; Dohlus, M.; Ekanayake, N.; Laarmann, T.; Schlarb, H.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal phase-space distributions of electron bunches seeded with an external laser were done in order to study the impact of collective effects on seeded microbunches in free-electron lasers. When the collective effects of Coulomb forces in a drift space and coherent synchrotron radiation in a chicane are considered, velocity bunching of a seeded microbunch appears to be a viable alternative to compression with a magnetic chicane under high-gain harmonic generation seeding conditions. Measurements of these effects on seeded electron microbunches were performed with a rf deflecting structure and a dipole magnet which streak out the electron bunch for single-shot images of the longitudinal phase-space distribution. Particle tracking simulations in 3D predicted the compression dynamics of the seeded microbunches with collective effects.

  16. Determinants of HMO Formulary Adoption Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Dranove, David; Hughes, Edward FX; Shanley, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify economic and organizational characteristics that affect the likelihood that health maintenance organizations (HMOs) include new drugs on their formularies. Data Sources We administered an original survey to directors of pharmacy at 75 HMOs, of which 41 returned usable responses. We obtained drug-specific data from an industry trade journal. Study Design We performed multivariate logistic regression analysis, adjusting for fixed-drug effects and random-HMO effects. We used factor analysis to limit the number of predictors. Data Collection Methods We held initial focus groups to help with survey design. We administered the survey in two waves. We asked respondents to report on seven popular new drugs, and to describe a variety of HMO organizational characteristics. Principal Findings Several HMO organizational characteristics, including nonprofit status, the incentives facing the director of the pharmacy, size and make-up of the pharmacy and therapeutics committee, and relationships with drugs makers, all affect formulary adoption. Conclusions There are many organizational factors that may cause HMOs to make different formulary adoption decisions for certain prescription drugs. PMID:12650387

  17. Impact of Adoption on Birth Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... This relationship, as well as the birth parent’s perception of his or her identity, may change over ... McRoy, R. G., & Grotevant, H. D. (2000). Birthmother perceptions of the psychologically present adopted child: Adoption openness ...

  18. The Place of Genetic Counselling in Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockey, Athel; Bain, Jill

    1982-01-01

    An approach combining social worker and geneticist expertise in adoption is outlined in the study involving 180 families. Genetic counseling has shown to be an essential safeguard to the preservation of the adoptive family unit. (Author/SW)

  19. When to Tell Your Child About Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... adopted youngsters need to be told about their origins, ideally even before middle childhood. Introducing the Information ... needs to have an honest understanding of his origin. Adopted children who have not been told seem ...

  20. Innovation Type, Radicalness, and the Adoption Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damanpour, Fariborz

    1988-01-01

    Reviews studies on the impact of organizational factors on the adoption of innovations along three dimensions (innovation type, innovation radicalness, and stages of adoption), finding considerable agreement. Proposes a research agenda for future studies. (SR)

  1. Comparison of Perception toward the Adoption and Intention to Use Smart Education between Elementary and Secondary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sang-Yon; Kim, Mi-Ryang

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to investigate the attitudes and perceptions of teachers toward the adoption of and intention to use Smart Education, to examine empirically the relationship between intention to use Smart Education and the consequential effect factors, and to obtain measures for revitalizing Smart Education. In order to accomplish…

  2. Effect of microphone type and placement on voice perturbation measurements.

    PubMed

    Titze, I R; Winholtz, W S

    1993-12-01

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of microphone type (dynamic vs. condenser) and pattern (omnidirectional vs. cardioid) on the extraction of voice perturbation measures for sustained phonation. Also of interest were the effects of distance and angle between the source and the microphone. Four professional-grade and two consumer-grade microphones were selected for analysis. Synthesized phonation with different amplitude and frequency modulations at fundamental frequencies of 100 Hz and 300 Hz were presented over a loudspeaker. Human phonation was also included to test the validity of loudspeaker presentations. Three microphone distances (4 cm, 30 cm, 1 m) and three angles (0 degree, 45 degrees, 90 degrees) were used for microphone placement. Among the professional grade microphones, the cardioid condenser type had the smallest effect on perturbation measures. In general, condenser types gave better results than dynamic types. Microphones with an unbalanced output did not perform as well as those with balanced outputs. Microphone sensitivity and distance had the largest effect on perturbation measures, making it difficult to resolve normal vocal jitter at anything but a few centimeters from the mouth. Angle had little effect for short distances, but a greater effect for longer distances. These conclusions are preliminary because the sampling of microphones, distances, and signal types was very coarse. The study serves only to chart the course for future work. PMID:8114484

  3. Effects of measurement unobservability on neural extended Kalman filter tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubberud, Stephen C.; Kramer, Kathleen A.

    2009-05-01

    An important component of tracking fusion systems is the ability to fuse various sensors into a coherent picture of the scene. When multiple sensor systems are being used in an operational setting, the types of data vary. A significant but often overlooked concern of multiple sensors is the incorporation of measurements that are unobservable. An unobservable measurement is one that may provide information about the state, but cannot recreate a full target state. A line of bearing measurement, for example, cannot provide complete position information. Often, such measurements come from passive sensors such as a passive sonar array or an electronic surveillance measure (ESM) system. Unobservable measurements will, over time, result in the measurement uncertainty to grow without bound. While some tracking implementations have triggers to protect against the detrimental effects, many maneuver tracking algorithms avoid discussing this implementation issue. One maneuver tracking technique is the neural extended Kalman filter (NEKF). The NEKF is an adaptive estimation algorithm that estimates the target track as it trains a neural network on line to reduce the error between the a priori target motion model and the actual target dynamics. The weights of neural network are trained in a similar method to the state estimation/parameter estimation Kalman filter techniques. The NEKF has been shown to improve target tracking accuracy through maneuvers and has been use to predict target behavior using the new model that consists of the a priori model and the neural network. The key to the on-line adaptation of the NEKF is the fact that the neural network is trained using the same residuals as the Kalman filter for the tracker. The neural network weights are treated as augmented states to the target track. Through the state-coupling function, the weights are coupled to the target states. Thus, if the measurements cause the states of the target track to be unobservable, then the

  4. Can Teachers Be Evaluated by Their Students' Test Scores? Should They Be? The Use of Value-Added Measures of Teacher Effectiveness in Policy and Practice. Education Policy for Action Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    Value-added measures of teacher effectiveness are the centerpiece of a national movement to evaluate, promote, compensate, and dismiss teachers based in part on their students' test results. Federal, state, and local policy-makers have adopted these methods en masse in recent years in an attempt to objectively quantify teaching effectiveness and…

  5. Exploratory study on performance measures as indicators of IS effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.; Yoes, Cissy

    1992-01-01

    The Information Systems Directorate at JSC/NASA has undertaken the reevaluation of its performance measures process and measures. Under the direction of a quality approach it is essential to identify an external perspective of how well an organization is performing. This study was conducted with two major objectives: (1) survey and summarize the academic literature on performance measures as indicators of information systems (IS) effectiveness; and (2) survey organizations for their experience in measuring for IS effectiveness. Four approaches to measuring the effectiveness of IS performance were identified: (1) listen to the customer for the things they need; (2) align with corporate goals; (3) benchmark against well-respected organizations; and (4) ask yourself what critical factors lead to success. The list of known methods for soliciting customer feedback are as follows: (1) executive visit; (2) survey, interview, and focus group; (3) complaints and compliments; and (4) service level agreements. A common set of characteristics that satisfy customers was identified from the literature. The list includes elements such as the following: accuracy, timeliness, relevance, understandability, reliability, and completeness. Future research in this topic area should prove beneficial to determine the metrics for external validity.

  6. Optimal measurement strategies for effective suppression of drift errors.

    PubMed

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V

    2009-11-01

    Drifting of experimental setups with change in temperature or other environmental conditions is the limiting factor of many, if not all, precision measurements. The measurement error due to a drift is, in some sense, in-between random noise and systematic error. In the general case, the error contribution of a drift cannot be averaged out using a number of measurements identically carried out over a reasonable time. In contrast to systematic errors, drifts are usually not stable enough for a precise calibration. Here a rather general method for effective suppression of the spurious effects caused by slow drifts in a large variety of instruments and experimental setups is described. An analytical derivation of an identity, describing the optimal measurement strategies suitable for suppressing the contribution of a slow drift described with a certain order polynomial function, is presented. A recursion rule as well as a general mathematical proof of the identity is given. The effectiveness of the discussed method is illustrated with an application of the derived optimal scanning strategies to precise surface slope measurements with a surface profiler. PMID:19947751

  7. Optimal measurement strategies for effective suppression of drift errors

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2009-04-16

    Drifting of experimental set-ups with change of temperature or other environmental conditions is the limiting factor of many, if not all, precision measurements. The measurement error due to a drift is, in some sense, in-between random noise and systematic error. In the general case, the error contribution of a drift cannot be averaged out using a number of measurements identically carried out over a reasonable time. In contrast to systematic errors, drifts are usually not stable enough for a precise calibration. Here a rather general method for effective suppression of the spurious effects caused by slow drifts in a large variety of instruments and experimental set-ups is described. An analytical derivation of an identity, describing the optimal measurement strategies suitable for suppressing the contribution of a slow drift described with a certain order polynomial function, is presented. A recursion rule as well as a general mathematical proof of the identity is given. The effectiveness of the discussed method is illustrated with an application of the derived optimal scanning strategies to precise surface slope measurements with a surface profiler.

  8. Border effect-based precise measurement of any frequency signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Li-Na; Ye, Bo; Xuan, Mei-Na; Jin, Yu-Zhen; Zhou, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Limited detection resolution leads to fuzzy areas during the measurement, and the discrimination of the border of a fuzzy area helps to use the resolution stability. In this way, measurement precision is greatly improved, hence this phenomenon is named the border effect. The resolution fuzzy area and its application should be studied to realize high-resolution measurement. During the measurement of any frequency signal, the fuzzy areas of phase-coincidence detection are always discrete and irregular. In this paper the difficulty in capturing the border information of discrete fuzzy areas is overcome and extra-high resolution measurement is implemented. Measurement precision of any frequency-signal can easily reach better than 1 × 10-11/s in a wide range of frequencies, showing the great importance of the border effect. An in-depth study of this issue has great significance for frequency standard comparison, signal processing, telecommunication, and fundamental subjects. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10978017 and 61201288), the Natural Science Foundation of Research Plan Projects of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM2-6128), and the Sino-Poland Science and Technology Cooperation Projects (Grant No. 36-33).

  9. Multiparametric MRI biomarkers for measuring vascular disrupting effect on cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaijun; Marchal, Guy; Ni, Yicheng

    2011-01-01

    Solid malignancies have to develop their own blood supply for their aggressive growth and metastasis; a process known as tumor angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is largely involved in tumor survival, progression and spread, which are known to be significantly attributed to treatment failures. Over the past decades, efforts have been made to understand the difference between normal and tumor vessels. It has been demonstrated that tumor vasculature is structurally immature with chaotic and leaky phenotypes, which provides opportunities for developing novel anticancer strategies. Targeting tumor vasculature is not only a unique therapeutic intervention to starve neoplastic cells, but also enhances the efficacy of conventional cancer treatments. Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) have been developed to disrupt the already existing neovasculature in actively growing tumors, cause catastrophic vascular shutdown within short time, and induce secondary tumor necrosis. VDAs are cytostatic; they can only inhibit tumor growth, but not eradicate the tumor. This novel drug mechanism has urged us to develop multiparametric imaging biomarkers to monitor early hemodynamic alterations, cellular dysfunctions and metabolic impairments before tumor dimensional changes can be detected. In this article, we review the characteristics of tumor vessels, tubulin-destabilizing mechanisms of VDAs, and in vivo effects of the VDAs that have been mostly studied in preclinical studies and clinical trials. We also compare the different tumor models adopted in the preclinical studies on VDAs. Multiparametric imaging biomarkers, mainly diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging from magnetic resonance imaging, are evaluated for their potential as morphological and functional imaging biomarkers for monitoring therapeutic effects of VDAs. PMID:21286490

  10. Measuring Effectiveness of TQM Training: An Indian Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palo, Sasmita; Padhi, Nayantara

    2003-01-01

    Responses from 372 employees of a steel manufacturer in India were analyzed to measure effectiveness of total quality management training. Training created awareness, built commitment to quality, facilitated teamwork, and enhanced professional standards. However, communication competencies and customer value training needed improvement. (Contains…

  11. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlemann, H.; Koch, M.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE) for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005). Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  12. Doing an Effective Job? Measuring the Impact of Casework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Susannah; Randall, Leisa; Mohammed, Azra

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an initiative to evaluate the impact of educational psychologists' (EPs') casework. Previous studies have often focussed on evaluating processes or reducing outcomes to measurable units. The authors argue that qualitative research methods can be used to illuminate EP effectiveness. They describe a real world and…

  13. The Disequalizing Effects of Expenditure Levels Upon School Quality Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William J., Jr.; Furno, Orlando F.

    School finance reform plans have not been accompanied by research demonstrating that they will result in fundamental changes in educational quality. The objective of this study was to quantify school district quality measures and to assess the effects of expenditure levels on these factors. The source of data was the New York State Department of…

  14. Measuring Institutional Effectiveness through the Strategic Planning Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunder, Patricia

    Designed to assist faculty, staff, and administrators in understanding the strategic planning process at Florida's Santa Fe Community College (SFCC) and to help them develop guidelines to measure the effectiveness of their unit, department, or administrative area, this report outlines the key missions of the community college, presents sample…

  15. Alternate Assessments as One Measure of Teacher Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Jacqueline F.; Kleinert, Harold L.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Gong, Brian; Quenemoen, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) flexibility requires states to develop and implement teacher effectiveness measures that consider student assessment results, including assessment results for students with disabilities participating in general and alternate assessments. We describe how alternate assessment results for students with…

  16. 10 CFR 436.18 - Measuring cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... water system, considered in determining such matters as the optimal size of a solar energy system, the... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Measuring cost-effectiveness. 436.18 Section 436.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Methodology...

  17. 10 CFR 436.18 - Measuring cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... water system, considered in determining such matters as the optimal size of a solar energy system, the... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Measuring cost-effectiveness. 436.18 Section 436.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Methodology...

  18. 10 CFR 436.18 - Measuring cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... water system, considered in determining such matters as the optimal size of a solar energy system, the... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Measuring cost-effectiveness. 436.18 Section 436.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Methodology...

  19. 10 CFR 436.18 - Measuring cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... water system, considered in determining such matters as the optimal size of a solar energy system, the... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Measuring cost-effectiveness. 436.18 Section 436.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Methodology...

  20. 10 CFR 436.18 - Measuring cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... water system, considered in determining such matters as the optimal size of a solar energy system, the... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Measuring cost-effectiveness. 436.18 Section 436.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Methodology...

  1. Systematic Effects on Duration Measurements of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshut, Thomas M.; Paciesas, William S.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    The parameters T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) have recently been introduced as a measurement of the duration of gamma-ray bursts. We present here a description of the method of measuring T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) and its application to gamma-ray bursts observed with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). We use simulated as well as observed time profiles to address some of the possible systematic effects affecting individual T(sub 90) (T(sub 50)) measurements. We show that these systematic effects do not mimic those effects that would result from time dilation if the burst sources are at distances of several Gpc. We discuss the impact of these systematic effects on the T(sub 90) (T(sub 50)) distributions for the gamma-ray bursts observed with BATSE. We distinguish between various types of T(sub 90) (T(sub 50)) distributions, and discuss the ways in which distributions observed with different experiments can vary, even though the measurements for commonly observed bursts may be the same. We then discuss the distributions observed with BATSE and compare them to those observed with other experiments.

  2. Using Performance Measurement To Evaluate Teams and Organizational Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Carrie

    1998-01-01

    Describes the assumptions and goals of the Performance Effectiveness Management System (PEMS) of the University of Arizona Library and explains how to integrate performance measurement with a new system that focuses on teams and organizational outcomes. Phases of PEMS include: mission-critical services, programs, and activities; setting quality…

  3. Measuring Information Technology Performance: Operational Efficiency and Operational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Annette G.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation provides a practical approach for measuring operational efficiency and operational effectiveness for IT organizations introducing the ITIL process framework. The intent of the study was to assist Chief Information Officers (CIOs) in explaining the impact of introducing the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL)…

  4. 7 CFR 1484.72 - How is program effectiveness measured?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How is program effectiveness measured? 1484.72 Section 1484.72 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP...

  5. 7 CFR 1484.72 - How is program effectiveness measured?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How is program effectiveness measured? 1484.72 Section 1484.72 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP...

  6. Effect of radon measurement methods on dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Kávási, Norbert; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Kovács, Tibor; Somlai, János; Jobbágy, Viktor; Nagy, Katalin; Deák, Eszter; Berhés, István; Bender, Tamás; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Vaupotic, Janja; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2011-05-01

    Different radon measurement methods were applied in the old and new buildings of the Turkish bath of Eger, Hungary, in order to elaborate a radon measurement protocol. Besides, measurements were also made concerning the radon and thoron short-lived decay products, gamma dose from external sources and water radon. The most accurate results for dose estimation were provided by the application of personal radon meters. Estimated annual effective doses from radon and its short-lived decay products in the old and new buildings, using 0.2 and 0.1 measured equilibrium factors, were 0.83 and 0.17 mSv, respectively. The effective dose from thoron short-lived decay products was only 5 % of these values. The respective external gamma radiation effective doses were 0.19 and 0.12 mSv y(-1). Effective dose from the consumption of tap water containing radon was 0.05 mSv y(-1), while in the case of spring water, it was 0.14 mSv y(-1). PMID:21450699

  7. Effects of Methylphenidate on Working Memory Components: Influence of Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Anne-Claude; Jain, Umesh; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Tannock, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    Background: To investigate the effects of methylphenidate (MPH) on components of working memory (WM) in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and determine the responsiveness of WM measures to MPH. Methods: Participants were a clinical sample of 50 children and adolescents with ADHD, aged 6 to 16 years old, who participated in an acute…

  8. Report of the Task Force on Institutional Effectiveness Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Board of Directors for Community Colleges, Phoenix.

    The Task Force on Institutional Effectiveness Measures was formed by the State Board of Directors for Community Colleges of Arizona to develop a statewide plan for systematically demonstrating the degree to which community colleges accomplish their diverse missions. Two subgroups were formed in the Task Force on transfer and college programs and…

  9. Measuring the Distributional Effects of Public Education in Peru.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selden, Thomas M.; Wasylenko, Michael J.

    Data from the 1985-86 Peru Living Standards Survey were used to analyze the targeting of public education expenditures and the effects on enrollment of public school fees and reduced travel time to secondary schools. This chapter also focuses on strengths and weaknesses of using either an estimation-based measure of benefit or a…

  10. 7 CFR 1484.72 - How is program effectiveness measured?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How is program effectiveness measured? 1484.72 Section 1484.72 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORT PROGRAMS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN MARKETS...

  11. 7 CFR 1484.72 - How is program effectiveness measured?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false How is program effectiveness measured? 1484.72 Section 1484.72 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORT PROGRAMS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN MARKETS...

  12. Optical Kerr-effect measurement for a series of alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Neil J.; Jennings, Barry R.

    1993-06-01

    Nanosecond optical Kerr-effect (OKE) measurements are reported using a modified apparatus, designed to enable rapid and precise data recording in pure liquids. Careful design of the apparatus enables measurements to be made at several inducing wavelengths without substantial apparatus modifications. The first measurement of the optical Kerr effect for benzene at an inducing wavelength of 532 nm is presented together with novel OKE data for the hitherto unstudied homologous alcohol series from methanol to 1-dodecanol. Analysis of the results indicates for this series the existence of a linear relationship between the carbon chain length and the optically induced Kerr constant somewhat similar to the behavior previously observed in the n-alkanes.

  13. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, A.; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck SSSE coefficient of 2.8 × 10 - 7 V K-1.

  14. The consequences of pairing questions: context effects in personality measurement.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, L

    2001-08-01

    The effect of context on responses to questions has been a prominent focus in social and political survey research. However, little investigation of context effects has been done for the measurement of psychological constructs. A measure of anger experience and expression in development uses vignettes describing interpersonal situations that provoke varying degrees of anger and require respondents to indicate their affective and/or expressive response to the situation. In this study, the consequences of pairing the two questions for each vignette are investigated. Pairing the anger-experience and likelihood-of-expression questions changes the item's context. Item response theory analysis similar to that used to detect differential item functioning was performed. For some of the items, responding to a single or paired question affected the extremity of responses. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for personality measurement. PMID:11519936

  15. Effective ultraviolet irradiance measurements from artificial tanning devices in Greece.

    PubMed

    Petri, Aspasia; Karabetsos, Efthymios

    2015-12-01

    Artificial tanning remains very popular worldwide, despite the International Agency for Research on Cancer classification of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunbeds as 'carcinogenic to humans'. Greek Atomic Energy Commission has initiated a surveillance action of the artificial tanning devices in Greece in order to record the effective irradiance levels from the sunbeds and to inform and synchronise the domestic artificial tanning business sector with the requirements of the European Standard EN 60335-2-27:2010. In this direction, in situ measurements of UV emissions from sunbeds in solaria businesses all over Greece were performed from October 2013 until July 2014, with a radiometer and a portable single-monochromator spectrophotometer. Analysis of the measurements' results revealed that effective irradiance in ∼60 % of the measured sunbeds exceeded the 0.3 W m(-2) limit value set by EN 60335-2-27:2010 and only 20 % of the devices could be categorised as UV type 3. PMID:25468991

  16. The Adopted Adolescent. Selected Papers Number 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, Anne

    This review of studies on clinical and nonclinical populations explores outcomes of adoption and developmental issues for adolescents, and in particular, developmental problems for adopted adolescents. Studies on nonclinical populations demonstrate that adoption is a highly successful form of substitute care. Prospective longitudinal studies show…

  17. 47 CFR 61.171 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adoption notice. 61.171 Section 61.171 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) TARIFFS Adoption of Tariffs and Other Documents of Predecessor Carriers § 61.171 Adoption notice. When a...

  18. 47 CFR 61.171 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adoption notice. 61.171 Section 61.171 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) TARIFFS Adoption of Tariffs and Other Documents of Predecessor Carriers § 61.171 Adoption notice. When a...

  19. 14 CFR 221.160 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adoption notice. 221.160 Section 221.160... REGULATIONS TARIFFS Adoption Publications Required To Show Change in Carrier's Name or Transfer of Operating Control § 221.160 Adoption notice. (a) When the name of a carrier is changed or when its operating...

  20. 32 CFR 584.4 - Adoption proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Adoption proceedings. 584.4 Section 584.4... CUSTODY, AND PATERNITY § 584.4 Adoption proceedings. (a) General. This chapter does not apply to those... normally may not be put up for adoption without the consent of the parents. Therefore, communications...

  1. 40 CFR 1506.3 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adoption. 1506.3 Section 1506.3 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OTHER REQUIREMENTS OF NEPA § 1506.3 Adoption. (a) An agency may adopt a Federal draft or final environmental impact statement or portion...

  2. 40 CFR 1506.3 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adoption. 1506.3 Section 1506.3 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OTHER REQUIREMENTS OF NEPA § 1506.3 Adoption. (a) An agency may adopt a Federal draft or final environmental impact statement or portion...

  3. 14 CFR 221.160 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adoption notice. 221.160 Section 221.160... REGULATIONS TARIFFS Adoption Publications Required To Show Change in Carrier's Name or Transfer of Operating Control § 221.160 Adoption notice. (a) When the name of a carrier is changed or when its operating...

  4. 32 CFR 584.4 - Adoption proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adoption proceedings. 584.4 Section 584.4... CUSTODY, AND PATERNITY § 584.4 Adoption proceedings. (a) General. This chapter does not apply to those... normally may not be put up for adoption without the consent of the parents. Therefore, communications...

  5. 47 CFR 61.171 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adoption notice. 61.171 Section 61.171 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) TARIFFS Adoption of Tariffs and Other Documents of Predecessor Carriers § 61.171 Adoption notice. When a...

  6. 14 CFR 221.160 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adoption notice. 221.160 Section 221.160... REGULATIONS TARIFFS Adoption Publications Required To Show Change in Carrier's Name or Transfer of Operating Control § 221.160 Adoption notice. (a) When the name of a carrier is changed or when its operating...

  7. 25 CFR 75.18 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adoption. 75.18 Section 75.18 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.18 Adoption. The Tribal Council of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shall be empowered to enact ordinances governing the adoption of new members....

  8. 32 CFR 584.4 - Adoption proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adoption proceedings. 584.4 Section 584.4... CUSTODY, AND PATERNITY § 584.4 Adoption proceedings. (a) General. This chapter does not apply to those... normally may not be put up for adoption without the consent of the parents. Therefore, communications...

  9. 40 CFR 1506.3 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adoption. 1506.3 Section 1506.3 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OTHER REQUIREMENTS OF NEPA § 1506.3 Adoption. (a) An agency may adopt a Federal draft or final environmental impact statement or portion...

  10. 25 CFR 75.18 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adoption. 75.18 Section 75.18 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.18 Adoption. The Tribal Council of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shall be empowered to enact ordinances governing the adoption of new members....

  11. 14 CFR 221.160 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adoption notice. 221.160 Section 221.160... REGULATIONS TARIFFS Adoption Publications Required To Show Change in Carrier's Name or Transfer of Operating Control § 221.160 Adoption notice. (a) When the name of a carrier is changed or when its operating...

  12. 47 CFR 61.171 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption notice. 61.171 Section 61.171 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) TARIFFS Adoption of Tariffs and Other Documents of Predecessor Carriers § 61.171 Adoption notice. When a...

  13. A Narrative Inquiry of International Adoption Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Christin; Pettinelli, J. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The international adoption entrance story is an unexplored topic in the adoption literature. The stories that families tell of beginning life with their new children has important implications for the development of an autobiographical narrative of an adopted child. A coherent autobiographical narrative is vital for healthy childhood development.…

  14. 25 CFR 75.18 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adoption. 75.18 Section 75.18 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.18 Adoption. The Tribal Council of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shall be empowered to enact ordinances governing the adoption of new members....

  15. 25 CFR 75.18 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adoption. 75.18 Section 75.18 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.18 Adoption. The Tribal Council of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shall be empowered to enact ordinances governing the adoption of new members....

  16. 40 CFR 1506.3 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adoption. 1506.3 Section 1506.3 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OTHER REQUIREMENTS OF NEPA § 1506.3 Adoption. (a) An agency may adopt a Federal draft or final environmental impact statement or portion...

  17. 47 CFR 61.171 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adoption notice. 61.171 Section 61.171 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) TARIFFS Adoption of Tariffs and Other Documents of Predecessor Carriers § 61.171 Adoption notice. When a...

  18. 32 CFR 584.4 - Adoption proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Adoption proceedings. 584.4 Section 584.4... CUSTODY, AND PATERNITY § 584.4 Adoption proceedings. (a) General. This chapter does not apply to those... normally may not be put up for adoption without the consent of the parents. Therefore, communications...

  19. 40 CFR 1506.3 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adoption. 1506.3 Section 1506.3 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OTHER REQUIREMENTS OF NEPA § 1506.3 Adoption. (a) An agency may adopt a Federal draft or final environmental impact statement or portion...

  20. 25 CFR 75.18 - Adoption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Adoption. 75.18 Section 75.18 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.18 Adoption. The Tribal Council of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shall be empowered to enact ordinances governing the adoption of new members....

  1. 14 CFR 221.160 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adoption notice. 221.160 Section 221.160... REGULATIONS TARIFFS Adoption Publications Required To Show Change in Carrier's Name or Transfer of Operating Control § 221.160 Adoption notice. (a) When the name of a carrier is changed or when its operating...

  2. Adoption Bibliography and Multi-Ethnic Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Why, Elizabeth Wharton, Comp.

    Designed for parents who have adopted or who contemplate adoption, and for educational, legal, medical, social, and theological professionals, this bibliography and source book contains over 1250 citations relating to adoption. The book is divided into two parts. The first section is a bibliography of articles, personal narratives, dissertations,…

  3. Child Adoption in Contemporary Rural China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Weiguo

    2006-01-01

    Based on qualitative information from in-depth interviews and quantitative data from a survey of 425 adoptive families conducted in summer 2001 in rural China, this study attempts to explain the social and demographic patterns of adoption and investigate the roles of the State and families in adoption processes in contemporary rural China. Within…

  4. International Adoption: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholet, Elizabeth

    1993-01-01

    Laws regulating adoption are varied and complex in countries that offer children for international adoption (IA), while United States Immigration laws pose additional obstacles to Americans wishing to adopt foreign-born children. Declarations by the United Nations and the development of a convention on IA by the Hague Conference offer some hope…

  5. Temperature and Slant Path Effects in Dobson and Brewer Total Ozone Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarnato, B.; Staehelin, J.; Peter, T.; Groebner, J.; Stuebi, R.

    2009-12-01

    There is a worldwide tendency to replace Dobson spectrophotometers in ground-based total ozone (TOZ) measurements by more advanced Brewer spectrophotometers. Ensuring the homogeneity of these datasets is of utmost importance if changes in TOZ of few percent over long time periods are to be diagnosed accurately. Previous studies have identified a seasonal bias of few percent between mid-latitude Brewer and Dobson measurements. At Arosa (Switzerland), two Dobson and three Brewer instruments are co-located since 1998, providing a unique dataset of quasi-simultaneous observations, invaluable to study systematic differences between these measurements. The differences are partially attributed to the seasonal variability in atmospheric temperatures and ozone slant paths (OSP). The sensitivity to the temperature dependence of the ozone absorption cross-section are calculated for each operational Brewer spectrophotometers at Arosa by using different high and low resolution reference spectra appropriately weighted with the instruments' slit functions, whereas the information of the primary standard instruments are used for all the Dobson instruments. The Brewer retrieval algorithm reveals a higher sensitivity to the reference spectra applied than the Dobson. When adopting the Bass and Paur (1985) or Malicet et al. (1995) ozone absorption spectra with their specific temperature dependence, and correcting for the OSP effect, the seasonal bias between Dobson and Brewer TOZ measurements is reduced to 0.6%. Conversely these differences increase using the spectral data of Burrows (1999). This finding illustrates, that the accuracy of ground-based spectrophotometric TOZ measurements is limited by the uncertainty in the ozone cross-sections measured by different internationally leading laboratories.

  6. Temperature and slant path effects in Dobson and Brewer total ozone measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarnato, B.; Staehelin, J.; Peter, T.; GröBner, J.; Stübi, R.

    2009-12-01

    There is a worldwide tendency to replace Dobson spectrophotometers in ground-based total ozone (TOZ) measurements by more advanced Brewer spectrophotometers. Ensuring the homogeneity of these data sets is of utmost importance if changes in TOZ of a few percent over long time periods are to be diagnosed accurately. Previous studies have identified a seasonal bias of a few percent between midlatitude Brewer and Dobson measurements. At Arosa (Switzerland), two Dobson and three Brewer instruments have been colocated since 1998, providing a unique data set of quasi-simultaneous observations, invaluable to study systematic differences between these measurements. The differences are partially attributed to the seasonal variability in atmospheric temperatures and ozone slant paths (OSP). The sensitivity to the temperature dependence of the ozone absorption cross section is calculated for each operational Brewer spectrophotometers at Arosa by using different high- and low-resolution reference spectra appropriately weighted with the instruments' slit functions, whereas the information on the primary standard instruments is used for all the Dobson instruments. The Brewer retrieval algorithm reveals a higher sensitivity to the reference spectra applied than the Dobson. When adopting the Bass and Paur (1985) or Malicet et al. (1995) ozone absorption spectra with their specific temperature dependence, and correcting for the OSP effect, the seasonal bias between Dobson and Brewer TOZ measurements is reduced to 0.6%. Conversely, these differences increase when using the spectral data of Burrows et al. (1999). This finding illustrates that the accuracy of ground-based spectrophotometric TOZ measurements is limited by the uncertainty in the ozone cross sections measured by different internationally leading laboratories.

  7. A Longitudinal Study of Language and Speech in Children Who Were Internationally Adopted at Different Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennen, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The author followed 56 internationally adopted children during the first 3 years after adoption to determine how and when they reached age-expected language proficiency in Standard American English. The influence of age of adoption was measured, along with the relationship between early and later language and speech outcomes. Method:…

  8. The measurement of surface heat flux using the Peltier effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shewen, E.C. ); Hollands, K.G.T., Raithby, G.D. )

    1989-08-01

    Calorimetric methods for measuring surface heat flux use Joulean heating to keep the surface isothermal. This limits them to measuring the heat flux of surfaces that are hotter than their surroundings. Presented in this paper is a method whereby reversible Peltier effect heat transfer is used to maintain this isothermality, making it suitable for surfaces that are either hotter or colder than the surroundings. The paper outlines the theory for the method and describes physical models that have been constructed, calibrated, and tested. The tested physical models were found capable of measuring heat fluxes with an absolute accuracy of 1 percent over a wide range of temperature (5-50C) and heat flux (15-500 W/m{sup 2}), while maintaining isothermality to within 0.03 K. A drawback of the method is that it appears to be suited only for measuring the heat flux from thick metallic plates.

  9. Health effects associated with energy conservation measures in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Stenner, R.D.; Baechler, M.C.

    1990-09-01

    Indoor air quality can be impacted by hundreds of different chemicals. More than 900 different organic compounds alone have been identified in indoor air. Health effects that could arise from exposure to individual pollutants or mixtures of pollutants cover the full range of acute and chronic effects, including largely reversible responses, such as rashes and irritations, to the irreversible toxic and carcinogenic effects. These indoor contaminants are emitted from a large variety of materials and substances that are widespread components of everyday life. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with indoor air contaminants for the Bonneville Power Administration to aid the agency in the preparation of environmental documents. Results are reported in two volumes. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the search of the peer-reviewed literature on health effects associated with a selected list of indoor air contaminants. In addition, the report discusses potential health effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorofluorocarbons. All references to the literature reviewed are found in this document Volume 2. Volume 2 provides detailed information from the literature reviewed, summarizes potential health effects, reports health hazard ratings, and discusses quantitative estimates of carcinogenic risk in humans and animals. Contaminants discussed in this report are those that; have been measured in the indoor air of a public building; have been measured (significant concentrations) in test situations simulating indoor air quality (as presented in the referenced literature); and have a significant hazard rating. 38 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs.

  10. Nonlinearity of resistive impurity effects on van der Pauw measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Koon, D. W.

    2006-09-15

    The dependence of van der Pauw resistivity measurements on local macroscopic inhomogeneities is shown to be nonlinear. A resistor grid network models a square laminar specimen, enabling the investigation of both positive and negative local perturbations in resistivity. The effect of inhomogeneity is measured both experimentally, for an 11x11 grid, and computationally, for both 11x11 and 101x101 grids. The maximum 'shortlike' perturbation produces 3.1{+-}0.2 times the effect predicted by the linear approximation, regardless of its position within the specimen, while all 'openlike' perturbations produce a smaller effect than predicted. An empirical nonlinear correction for f(x,y) is presented which provides excellent fit over the entire range of both positive and negative perturbations for the entire specimen.

  11. Influence of speckle effect on doppler velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Changming, Zhao; Haiyang, Zhang; Suhui, Yang; Dehua, Zhang; Xingyuan, Zheng; Hongzhi, Yang

    2016-06-01

    In a coherent Lidar system, velocity measurement of a target is achieved by measuring Doppler frequency shift between the echo and local oscillator (LO) signals. The measurement accuracy is proportional to the spectrum width of Doppler signal. Actually, the speckle effect caused by the scattering of laser from a target will broaden the Doppler signal's spectrum and bring uncertainty to the velocity measurement. In this paper, a theoretical model is proposed to predict the broadening of Doppler spectrum with respect to different target's surface and motion parameters. The velocity measurement uncertainty caused by the broadening of spectrum is analyzed. Based on the analysis, we design a coherent Lidar system to measure the velocity of the targets with different surface roughness and transverse velocities. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical analysis. It is found that the target's surface roughness and transverse velocity can significantly affect the spectrum width of Doppler signal. With the increase of surface roughness and transverse velocity, the measurement accuracy becomes worse. However, the influence of surface roughness becomes weaker when the spot size of laser beam on the target is smaller.

  12. Effects of measurement error on estimating biological half-life

    SciTech Connect

    Caudill, S.P.; Pirkle, J.L.; Michalek, J.E. )

    1992-10-01

    Direct computation of the observed biological half-life of a toxic compound in a person can lead to an undefined estimate when subsequent concentration measurements are greater than or equal to previous measurements. The likelihood of such an occurrence depends upon the length of time between measurements and the variance (intra-subject biological and inter-sample analytical) associated with the measurements. If the compound is lipophilic the subject's percentage of body fat at the times of measurement can also affect this likelihood. We present formulas for computing a model-predicted half-life estimate and its variance; and we derive expressions for the effect of sample size, measurement error, time between measurements, and any relevant covariates on the variability in model-predicted half-life estimates. We also use statistical modeling to estimate the probability of obtaining an undefined half-life estimate and to compute the expected number of undefined half-life estimates for a sample from a study population. Finally, we illustrate our methods using data from a study of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure among 36 members of Operation Ranch Hand, the Air Force unit responsible for the aerial spraying of Agent Orange in Vietnam.

  13. A Welfare Measure of "Offset Effects" in Health Insurance.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Jacob; McGuire, Thomas G

    2012-06-01

    Changing health insurance coverage for one service may affect use of other insured services. When improving coverage for one service reduces use of another, the savings are referred to as "offset effects." For example, costs of better coverage for prescription drugs may be partly "offset" by reductions in hospital costs. Offset effects have welfare implications but it has not been clear how to value these impacts in design of health insurance. We show that plan-paid - rather than total -- spending is the right welfare measure of the offset effect, and go on to develop a "sufficient statistic" for evaluating the welfare effects of change in coverage in the presence of multiple goods. We derive a simple rule for when a coverage improvement increases welfare due to offset effects. PMID:22544983

  14. Effectively classically correlated state of a measured system and a bosonic measurement apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Camalet, S.

    2011-04-15

    We consider a multilevel system coupled to a bosonic measurement apparatus. We derive exact expressions for the time-dependent expectation values of a large class of physically relevant observables that depend on degrees of freedom of both systems. We find that, for this class, though the two systems become entangled as a result of their interaction, they appear classically correlated for long enough times. The unique corresponding time-dependent separable state is determined explicitly. To better understand the physical parameters that control the time scale of this effective disentanglement process, we study a one-dimensional measurement apparatus.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements of Film Cooling Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, Christopher; Alley, Marcus; Eaton, John

    2009-11-01

    Film cooling through holes and slots is used extensively in gas turbine engines to protect combustor walls, stator vanes, and turbine blades. Film cooling effectiveness has been shown to depend on myriad geometrical and flow parameters. Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) and Concentration (MRC) measurements efficiently acquire entire 3D velocity and scalar information making them well suited to investigate the large design parameter space. In addition, MRV and MRC provide information in the film supply plenum and hole which is traditionally unobtainable. Here, MRC is extended to near wall measurements to determine film cooling effectiveness. Measurements are made for a single film hole (d=5.8 mm, l/d=4 and α=30 ) in the wall of a square channel. Velocity and scalar concentration data are presented for multiple blowing ratios. The data show the evolution of vortices around the jets, the coolant mixing, and the 2D film cooling effectiveness distribution. Measurements within the plenum and injection hole show the origin of specific flow structures.

  16. Atmospheric effect on spectral signature - Measurements and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric effect on the spectral signature of surface cover were conducted during hazy conditions over the Chesapeake Bay and its eastern shore. In the experiment the upward radiance was measured by an airborne scanning radiometer in nine spectral bands between 465 and 773 nm, above and below the haze layer. Simultaneous measurements of the aerosol optical thickness and its vertical distribution were conducted. The results of the measurements are used to study the spectral dependence of the atmospheric effect on remote sensing of water bodies and vegetated fields (forest, corn field, and pasture), and to verify theoretical predictions. It is suggested that the radiances over dark areas (e.g., water in the near IR and forest in the visible) can be used to derive the aerosol optical thickness as is done over oceans with the CZCS satellite images. Combined with climatological information, the derived optical thickness can be used to perform corrections of the atmospheric effect. Examples of the derivation of the aerosol optical thickness and correction of the upward radiances are given.

  17. Parent-Offspring Resemblance for Cognitive Abilities in the Colorado Adoption Project: Biological, Adoptive, and Control Parents and One-Year-Old Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFries, J. C.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Results from the Colorado Adoption Project, a longitudinal study initiated in 1975, are reported. The cognitive ability of parents and measures of one-year olds' mental development were significantly correlated for all three parent/child comparisons. Caldwell's HOME Responsibility measure was correlated with infant intelligence in adoptive and…

  18. Measurement of two-photon exchange effect with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Raue, Brian A.

    2010-08-05

    The structure of the proton is one the most important and most studied topics in nuclear physics. However, discrepant measurements of the proton's electromagnetic form factor ratio, G{sub E}/G{sub M}, seriously jeopardize a definitive understanding of the proton's structure. Measurements of G{sub E}G{sub M} using the Rosenbluth separation technique disagree with those using polarization transfer methods by about a factor of three at Q{sup 2{approx}}5.6 GeV{sup 2}. It has been hypothesized that this discrepancy is due to two-photon exchange (TPE) effects that are not part of the usual radiative corrections. Theoretical corrections for the TPE effect are difficult due to the fact that a large number of excited nucleon states can contribute to the process. However, the TPE effect can be directly determined by measuring the ratio of the positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, R = {sigma}(e{sup +})/{sigma}(e{sup -}), as the TPE effect changes sign with respect to the charge of the incident particle. A brief test run of a modified beamline and the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has resulted in the most precise measurements of the R to date. We will present results from the test run covering Q{sup 2}<0.8 GeV{sup 2} and 0.78{<=}{epsilon}{<=}0.97. In addition, the test run demonstrated the feasibility of producing a mixed electron/positron beam of good quality so that the measurements can be extended up to Q{sup 2{approx}}3.0 GeV{sup 2}.

  19. Atmospheric Effects on InSAR Measurements and Their Mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiao-li; Li, Zhi-wei; Zhu, Jian-jun; Feng, Guang-cai; Long, Jiang-ping

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful technology for observing the Earth surface, especially for mapping the Earth's topography and deformations. InSAR measurements are however often significantly affected by the atmosphere as the radar signals propagate through the atmosphere whose state varies both in space and in time. Great efforts have been made in recent years to better understand the properties of the atmospheric effects and to develop methods for mitigating the effects. This paper provides a systematic review of the work carried out in this area. The basic principles of atmospheric effects on repeat-pass InSAR are first introduced. The studies on the properties of the atmospheric effects, including the magnitudes of the effects determined in the various parts of the world, the spectra of the atmospheric effects, the isotropic properties and the statistical distributions of the effects, are then discussed. The various methods developed for mitigating the atmospheric effects are then reviewed, including the methods that are based on PSInSAR processing, the methods that are based on interferogram modeling, and those that are based on external data such as GPS observations, ground meteorological data, and satellite data including those from the MODIS and MERIS. Two examples that use MODIS and MERIS data respectively to calibrate atmospheric effects on InSAR are also given.

  20. [Attachment and Adoption: Diagnostics, Psychopathology, and Therapy].

    PubMed

    Brisch, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes the development of attachment between adopted children and their adoptive parents with a focus on the particular issues seen in international adoptions. The questions of settling in, trauma in the country of origin, and the motivations of the adoptive parents will be discussed. Diagnosis and various psychopathological manifestations will be examined, as will outpatient and inpatient modes of therapy. The treatment of children of various ages will be covered along with the necessity for intensive counseling and psychotherapy for the adoptive parents. This will enable the parents to work through early trauma, which will give them and their adopted child the basis for developing healthy attachment patterns. This in turn will enable the child to mature and integrate into society. Possibilities of prevention are discussed. Many of the approaches discussed here regarding attachment and adoption may be applied to foster children and their foster parents. PMID:26645775

  1. Entanglement Measures for Single- and Multireference Correlation Effects.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Tecmer, Pawel̷; Legeza, Örs; Reiher, Markus

    2012-11-01

    Electron correlation effects are essential for an accurate ab initio description of molecules. A quantitative a priori knowledge of the single- or multireference nature of electronic structures as well as of the dominant contributions to the correlation energy can facilitate the decision regarding the optimum quantum chemical method of choice. We propose concepts from quantum information theory as orbital entanglement measures that allow us to evaluate the single- and multireference character of any molecular structure in a given orbital basis set. By studying these measures we can detect possible artifacts of small active spaces. PMID:26296018

  2. Toward the Effective and Efficient Measurement of Implementation Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Garland, Ann F.; Chapman, Jason E.; Frazier, Stacy L.; Sheidow, Ashli J.; Southam-Gerow, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Implementation science in mental health is informed by other academic disciplines and industries. Conceptual and methodological territory charted in psychotherapy research is pertinent to two elements of the conceptual model of implementation posited by Aarons and colleagues (2010)—implementation fidelity and innovation feedback systems. Key characteristics of scientifically validated fidelity instruments, and of the feasibility of their use in routine care, are presented. The challenges of ensuring fidelity measurement methods are both effective (scientifically validated) and efficient (feasible and useful in routine care) are identified as are examples of implementation research attempting to balance these attributes of fidelity measurement. PMID:20957425

  3. Vectorial second-harmonic magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabos, P.; Kos, A. B.; Silva, T. J.

    2000-05-01

    A significant modification of an existing experimental technique based on the second-harmonic magneto-optical Kerr effect (SH-MOKE) is introduced. With a p-polarized pumping optical wave incident upon a magnetic film, the transverse component of magnetization causes a change in the second-harmonic generation efficiency of the material and the longitudinal component of the magnetization produces a change in the polarization rotation and/or ellipticity of the second-harmonic signal. This permits simultaneous vectorial measurement of the in-plane magnetization components. Examples of measured hysteresis loops from 50 nm thick permalloy films and procedures for SH-MOKE signal calibration are presented.

  4. Non-stationary measurements of Chiral Magnetic Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, V.I.

    2013-12-15

    We discuss the Chiral Magnetic Effect from the quantum theory of measurements point of view for non-stationary measurements. The effect of anisotropy for fluctuations of electric currents in a magnetic field is addressed. It is shown that anisotropy caused by nonzero axial chemical potential is indistinguishable in this framework from anisotropy caused by finite measurement time or finite lifetime of the magnetic field, and in all cases it is related to abelian triangle anomaly. Possible P-odd effects in central heavy-ion collisions (where the Chiral Magnetic Effect is absent) are discussed in this context. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Mikhail Polikarpov (1952–2013). -- Highlights: •Asymmetry in the response function for vector currents of massless fermions in the magnetic field is computed. •Asymmetry caused by axial chemical potential is practically indistinguishable from the one caused by non-stationarity. •The CME current is non-dissipative in the stationary case and dissipative in the non-stationary case. •Importance of studies of P-odd signatures in central collisions is emphasized.

  5. Peripheral vascular effects on auscultatory blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Rabbany, S Y; Drzewiecki, G M; Noordergraaf, A

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the accuracy of the conventional auscultatory method of blood pressure measurement. The influence of the physiologic state of the vascular system in the forearm distal to the site of Korotkoff sound recording and its impact on the precision of the measured blood pressure is discussed. The peripheral resistance in the arm distal to the cuff was changed noninvasively by heating and cooling effects and by induction of reactive hyperemia. All interventions were preceded by an investigation of their effect on central blood pressure to distinguish local effects from changes in central blood pressure. These interventions were sufficiently moderate to make their effect on central blood pressure, recorded in the other arm, statistically insignificant (i.e., changes in systolic [p < 0.3] and diastolic [p < 0.02]). Nevertheless, such alterations were found to modify the amplitude of the Korotkoff sound, which can manifest itself as an apparent change in arterial blood pressure that is readily discerned by the human ear. The increase in diastolic pressure for the cooling experiments was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Moreover, both measured systolic (p < 0.004) and diastolic (p < 0.001) pressure decreases during the reactive hyperemia experiments were statistically significant. The findings demonstrate that alteration in vascular state generates perplexing changes in blood pressure, hence confirming experimental observations by earlier investigators as well as predictions by our model studies. PMID:8463815

  6. Shanghai adopts family planning regulations.

    PubMed

    1990-04-01

    These Regulations, adopted by the Municipal People's Congress of Shanghai on 14 March 1990, do the following: a) strictly prohibit any units and individuals from identifying the sex of a fetus without medical reasons; b) add 1 additional week to the marriage leave of couples who marry at the age set for late marriage (25 for males and 23 for females); c) add 15 days of maternity leave for women who give birth at the age set for late birth (24) and 3 days for their spouses; d) impose a fine equal to 3 to 6 times their average annual income if a couple have an unplanned birth (calculated on the basis of their income 2 years before the birth); and e) subject a couple who have an unplanned birth to disciplinary action by their working units if they work for others or by the administrative department of industry and commerce if they are self employed. Second births are allowed if a first child "can not become normal because of nonhereditary diseases," if both husband and wife are single children, or if a "remarried couple had only one child before their remarriage." The Regulations provide that "the improvement of birth quality and good upbringing of children should be promoted, advice on heredity should be provided, and premarital examinations [should] be conducted." They also stipulate that "A woman should terminate her pregnancy or undergo a sterilization operation if both husband and wife (or either of them) have [a] hereditary or other disease not medically suitable for birth." The provisions of these Regulations prohibiting prenatal sex selection were reported in Annual Review of Population Law, Vol. 17, 1990, Section 240. PMID:12348767

  7. Relativistic effects on information measures for hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katriel, Jacob; Sen, K. D.

    2010-01-01

    Position and momentum information measures are evaluated for the ground state of the relativistic hydrogen-like atoms. Consequences of the fact that the radial momentum operator is not self-adjoint are explicitly studied, exhibiting fundamental shortcomings of the conventional uncertainty measures in terms of the radial position and momentum variances. The Shannon and Rényi entropies, the Fisher information measure, as well as several related information measures, are considered as viable alternatives. Detailed results on the onset of relativistic effects for low nuclear charges, and on the extreme relativistic limit, are presented. The relativistic position density decays exponentially at large r, but is singular at the origin. Correspondingly, the momentum density decays as an inverse power of p. Both features yield divergent Rényi entropies away from a finite vicinity of the Shannon entropy. While the position space information measures can be evaluated analytically for both the nonrelativistic and the relativistic hydrogen atom, this is not the case for the relativistic momentum space. Some of the results allow interesting insight into the significance of recently evaluated Dirac-Fock vs. Hartree-Fock complexity measures for many-electron neutral atoms.

  8. Effects of equipment and technique on peak flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bongers, Thomas; O'Driscoll, B Ronan

    2006-01-01

    Background Different lung function equipment and different respiratory manoeuvres may produce different Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) results. Although the PEF is the most common lung function test, there have been few studies of these effects and no previous study has evaluated both factors in a single group of patients. Methods We studied 36 subjects (PEF range 80–570 l/min). All patients recorded PEF measurements using a short rapid expiration following maximal inspiration (PEF technique) or a forced maximal expiration to residual volume (FVC technique). Measurements were made using a Wright's peak flow meter, a turbine spirometer and a Fleisch pneumotachograph spirometer. Results The mean PEF was 8.7% higher when the PEF technique was used (compared with FVC technique, p < 0.0001). The mean PEF recorded with the turbine spirometer was 5.5% lower than the Wright meter reading. The Fleisch spirometer result was 19.5% lower than the Wright reading. However, adjustment of the Wrights measurements from the traditional Wright's scale to the new EU Peak Flow scale produced results that were only 7.2% higher than the Fleisch pneumotachograph measurements. Conclusion Peak flow measurements are affected by the instruction given and by the device and Peak Flow scale used. Patient management decisions should not be based on PEF measurement made on different instruments. PMID:16787543

  9. Regional variation in physician adoption of antipsychotics: Impact on US Medicare expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Julie M.; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Horvitz-Lennon, Marcela; Men, Aiju; Berndt, Ernst R.; Huskamp, Haiden A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Regional variation in US Medicare prescription drug spending is driven by higher prescribing of costly brand-name drugs in some regions. This variation likely arises from differences in the speed of diffusion of newly-approved medications. Second-generation antipsychotics were widely adopted for treatment of severe mental illness and for several off-label uses. Rapid diffusion of new psychiatric drugs likely increases drug spending but its relationship to non-drug spending is unclear. The impact of antipsychotic diffusion on drug and medical spending is of great interest to public payers like Medicare, which finance a majority of mental health spending in the U.S. Aims We examine the association between physician adoption of new antipsychotics and antipsychotic spending and non-drug medical spending among disabled and elderly Medicare enrollees. Methods We linked physician-level data on antipsychotic prescribing from an all-payer dataset (IMS Health's Xponent™) to patient-level data from Medicare. Our physician sample included 16,932 U.S. psychiatrists and primary care providers with ≥10 antipsychotic prescriptions per year from 1997-2011. We constructed a measure of physician adoption of 3 antipsychotics introduced during this period (quetiapine, ziprasidone and aripiprazole) by estimating a shared frailty model of the time to first prescription for each drug. We then assigned physicians to one of 306 U.S. hospital referral regions (HRRs) and measured the average propensity to adopt per region. Using 2010 data for a random sample of 1.6 million Medicare beneficiaries, we identified 138,680 antipsychotic users. A generalized linear model with gamma distribution and log link was used to estimate the effect of region-level adoption propensity on beneficiary-level antipsychotic spending and non-drug medical spending adjusting for patient demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health status, eligibility category, and whether the antipsychotic was

  10. Monitoring of herbicide effect in maize based on electrical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseresnyés, I.; Fekete, G.; Végh, K.; Székács, A.; Mörtl, M.; Rajkai, K.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the herbicide acetochlor on root growth was studied by a non-destructive electrical impedance and capacitance method in pot experiments on maize. Acetochlor was applied both as single active ingredient and mixed with safener AD-67 in two dosages. Without safener addition, acetochlor had a permanent inhibiting effect on plant root expansion. The safener AD-67 was capable of providing protective effect against herbicide application. High correlations between root electrical impedance or capacitance and the root dry mass or surface area under our laboratory conditions were confirmed by plant harvest method. Root electrical impedance and capacitance measurements proved to be valid for monitoring the effect of the herbicide influencing root development and for distinguishing plant groups subjected to different stress conditions.

  11. Effect of Helium Elasticity on Torsional Oscillator Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Balibar, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 Kim and Chan performed a torsional oscillator measurement of the rotational inertia of solid helium-4. They found frequency changes which were interpreted in terms of a non-classical rotational inertia, that is a partial superfluidity or "supersolidity" of solid helium-4. Since then there have been many further studies using various versions of this technique. One important question that arises in these experiments is the possible effect on the oscillator frequency of changes in the elasticity of the solid helium; this can produce a change in frequency that adds to any effect due to superfluidity. In this paper we give a general discussion of the effect of changes in elasticity on the oscillator frequency and consider how the magnitude of the effect is influenced by the oscillator design. Our results should help make it possible to discriminate between frequency changes due to changes in elasticity and changes due to supersolidity.

  12. Effective length measurements of prototype Main Injector Dipole endpacks

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, H.D.; Brown, B.C.; Harding, D.J.

    1993-03-03

    An endpack design has been developed for the Fermilab Main Injector Dipole. A major part of the design process was the testing of a series of prototype removable endpacks. The magnetic parameters that were tested included the effective length and the field shape variation. This report presents a description of the measurement techniques and the results for the effective length. The final endpack has an effective length at 1500 A (0.29T) of 2.6 {plus_minus} 0.3 mm greater than the steel length, and the change in effective length from 1500 A to maximum current of 9500 A (1.74T) is {minus}1.88 {plus_minus} 0.05 mm.

  13. Investigation of bias radiation effect on PV cell measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuebo; Quan, Chenggen; Chan, Joanne; Ng, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells are photo-electrical devices that convert light energy directly into electricity through the photovoltaic effect. PV cell assemblies are used to make solar modules employed in a variety of ways ranging from space applications to domestic energy consumption. Characterisation and performance testing of PV cells are critical to the development of PV technologies and growth of the solar industry. As new solar products are being developed, its energy conversion efficiency and other critical parameters must be accurately measured and tested against globally recognised metrological standards. The differential spectral responsivity (DSR) measurement is one of the primary methods for calibrating reference PV cells. This is done by calculating its spectral responsivities through measuring the AC short-circuit current produced by a PV cell under a modulated monochromatic radiation and different levels of steady-state broadband bias light radiation. It is observed that different types of bias light source will produce different signal-to-noise levels and significantly influence measurement accuracy. This paper aims to investigate the noise sources caused by different types of bias light sources (e.g. xenon arc and tungsten-halogen lamps) and the relevant measurement uncertainties so as to propose a guideline for selection of bias light source which can improve the signal-to-noise level and measurement uncertainty. The DSRs of the PV cells are measured using a commercial DSR measurement system under different levels of bias radiation from 0 to 1 kWm-2. The data analysis and uncertainty evaluation are presented in this paper using experimental data and mathematical tools.

  14. Drivers and barriers in health IT adoption: a proposed framework.

    PubMed

    Avgar, A C; Litwin, A S; Pronovost, P J

    2012-01-01

    Despite near (and rare) consensus that the adoption and diffusion of health information technology (health IT) will bolster outcomes for organizations, individuals, and the healthcare system as a whole, there has been surprisingly little consideration of the structures and processes within organizations that might drive the adoption and effective use of the technology. Management research provides a useful lens through which to analyze both the determinants of investment and the benefits that can ultimately be derived from these investments. This paper provides a conceptual framework for understanding health IT adoption. In doing so, this paper highlights specific organizational barriers or enablers at different stages of the adoption process - investment, implementation, and use - and at different levels of organizational decision-making - strategic, operational, and frontline. This framework will aid both policymakers and organizational actors as they make sense of the transition from paper-based to electronic systems. PMID:23646093

  15. Preliminary measurements of thermal effects in the dust acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-11-01

    A complex (dusty) plasma (CDP) is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of the microparticles gives rise to new plasma phenomena, including collective modes such as the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements of the dispersion relationship of this wave mode [E. Thomas, Jr., et. al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007), J.D. Williams, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008)] have shown that, over a range of neutral gas pressures, it is necessary to include thermal effects to accurately fit the measured dispersion relations. In this work, initial measurements of the dispersion relation in a new dusty plasma experiment, the Wittenberg University DUsty Plasma Experiment (WUDUPE), will be presented. In particular, the dependence of the kinetic dust temperature on the neutral gas pressure will be presented.

  16. Effect of filament supports on emissive probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Howes, C. T.; Horányi, M.; Robertson, S.

    2013-01-01

    We have constructed an emissive probe with a thin tungsten filament spot-welded across two nickel wires insulated with ceramic paint. We show that the ceramic supports covering the nickel wires have a large effect on the potential measurements in low-density plasmas. It is found that the potential measured by the emissive probe is more negative than the potential derived from a Langmuir probe current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve when the plasma density is so low that the emitting filament remains immersed in the sheaths of the ceramic supports. The length of the filament L needs to be larger than about 2 Debye lengths (L > 2λDe) in order to avoid the influence of the ceramic supports and to achieve reliable plasma potential measurements using emissive probes.

  17. Effect of filament supports on emissive probe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Howes, C. T.; Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.

    2013-01-15

    We have constructed an emissive probe with a thin tungsten filament spot-welded across two nickel wires insulated with ceramic paint. We show that the ceramic supports covering the nickel wires have a large effect on the potential measurements in low-density plasmas. It is found that the potential measured by the emissive probe is more negative than the potential derived from a Langmuir probe current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve when the plasma density is so low that the emitting filament remains immersed in the sheaths of the ceramic supports. The length of the filament L needs to be larger than about 2 Debye lengths (L > 2{lambda}{sub De}) in order to avoid the influence of the ceramic supports and to achieve reliable plasma potential measurements using emissive probes.

  18. Measurement of two-photon exchange effects in CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimal, Dipak; Raue, Brian; Adikaram, Dasuni; Weinstein, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    There is a significant discrepancy between the Rosenbluth and the polarization transfer measurements of the proton's electric to magnetic form factor ratio GEp/GEp. One possible explanation of this discrepancy is the contribution from two-photon exchange (TPE) effects, which are not typically accounted for in standard radiative corrections. The ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, R =σ/(e+ p) σ (e- p) , provides a model independent measurement of the TPE contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering. We measured this ratio at Jefferson Lab using a mixed electron-positron beam. Both electrons and positrons were elastically scattered from a liquid hydrogen target. The resulting scattered particles were detected in CLAS. The experimental details and results will be discussed. U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  19. Effects of non-Lambertian surfaces on integrating sphere measurements.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, L M

    1996-07-01

    The effects of non-Lambertian scattering of the interior wall of an integrating sphere are examined through a sphere simulation model. The model employs Monte Carlo techniques. A sphere used for measurement of directional-hemispherical reflectance is modeled. The simulation allows sphere wall scattering to vary from perfectly Lambertian to perfectly specular in steps. The results demonstrate that significant measurement error can result as the scattering deviates from the Lambertian ideal. The error is found to be a strong function of the wall reflectance value as well: it is minimized for reflectances approaching 1.0 and increases as the reflectance value decreases to the minimum value examined of 0.5. The magnitudes of the errors associated with non-Lambertian scattering are also shown to be relatively independent of the specific field of view of the detector used in the measurement. PMID:21102753

  20. International Workshop on Stratospheric Aerosols: Measurements, Properties, and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Following a mandate by the International Aerosol Climatology Program under the auspices of International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics International Radiation Commission, 45 scientists from five nations convened to discuss relevant issues associated with the measurement, properties, and effects of stratospheric aerosols. A summary is presented of the discussions on formation and evolution, transport and fate, effects on climate, role in heterogeneous chemistry, and validation of lidar and satellite remote sensing of stratospheric aerosols. Measurements are recommended of the natural (background) and the volcanically enhanced aerosol (sulfuric acid and silica particles), the exhaust of shuttle, civil aviation and supersonic aircraft operations (alumina, soot, and ice particles), and polar stratospheric clouds (ice, condensed nitric and hydrochloric acids).

  1. Refraction effects of atmosphere on geodetic measurements to celestial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    The problem is considered of obtaining accurate values of refraction corrections for geodetic measurements of celestial bodies. The basic principles of optics governing the phenomenon of refraction are defined, and differential equations are derived for the refraction corrections. The corrections fall into two main categories: (1) refraction effects due to change in the direction of propagation, and (2) refraction effects mainly due to change in the velocity of propagation. The various assumptions made by earlier investigators are reviewed along with the basic principles of improved models designed by investigators of the twentieth century. The accuracy problem for various quantities is discussed, and the conclusions and recommendations are summarized.

  2. Rotational Raman scattering (Ring effect) in satellite backscatter ultraviolet measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; Joiner, Joanna; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Hilsenrath, Ernest; McPeters, Richard D.; Park, Hongwoo

    1995-07-01

    A detailed radiative transfer calculation has been carried out to estimate the effects of rotational Raman scattering (RRS) on satellite measurements of backscattered ultraviolet radiation. Raman-scattered light is shifted in frequency from the incident light, which causes filling in of solar Fraunhofer lines in the observed backscattered spectrum (also known as the Ring effect). The magnitude of the rotational Raman scattering filling in is a function of wavelength, solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, surface pressure, and instrument spectral resolution. The filling in predicted by our model is found to be in agreement with observations from the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer and the Nimbus-7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer.

  3. New measurements of the EMC effect in very light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J; Gaskell, D; Arrington, J; Fomin, N; Solvignon, P; Asaturyan, R; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Boillat, B; Bosted, P; Bruell, A; Bukhari, M.H.S.; Christy, M E; Clasie, B; Connell, S; Dalton, M; Day, D; Dunne, J; Dutta, D; El Fassi, L; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Filippone, B W; Gao, H; Hill, C; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Hungerford, E; Jones, M K; Jourdan, J; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kiselev, D; Kotulla, K; Lee, C; Lung, A F; Malace, S; Meekins, D G; Mertens, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Nomura, H; Okayasu, Y; Opper, A K; Perdrisat, C; Potterveld, D H; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Reimer, P E; Roche, J; Rodriguez, V M; Rondon, O; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Slifer, K; Smith, G R; Tadevosyan, V; Tajima, S; Tang, L; Testa, G; Trojer, R; Tvaskis, V; Villano, A

    2009-11-01

    New Jefferson Lab data are presented on the nuclear dependence of the inclusive cross section from 2H, 3He, 4He, 9Be and 12C for 0.3measurement of the EMC effect for 3He at large x and a significant improvement for 4He. The data do not support previous A-dependent or density-dependent fits to the EMC effect and suggest that the nuclear dependence of the quark distributions may depend on the local nuclear environment.

  4. Impact of Atmospheric Chromatic Effects on Weak Lensing Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Joshua E.; Burchat, Patricia R.

    2015-07-01

    Current and future imaging surveys will measure cosmic shear with statistical precision that demands a deeper understanding of potential systematic biases in galaxy shape measurements than has been achieved to date. We use analytic and computational techniques to study the impact on shape measurements of two atmospheric chromatic effects for ground-based surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST): (1) atmospheric differential chromatic refraction and (2) wavelength dependence of seeing. We investigate the effects of using the point-spread function (PSF) measured with stars to determine the shapes of galaxies that have different spectral energy distributions than the stars. We find that both chromatic effects lead to significant biases in galaxy shape measurements for current and future surveys, if not corrected. Using simulated galaxy images, we find a form of chromatic “model bias” that arises when fitting a galaxy image with a model that has been convolved with a stellar, instead of galactic, PSF. We show that both forms of atmospheric chromatic biases can be predicted (and corrected) with minimal model bias by applying an ordered set of perturbative PSF-level corrections based on machine-learning techniques applied to six-band photometry. Catalog-level corrections do not address the model bias. We conclude that achieving the ultimate precision for weak lensing from current and future ground-based imaging surveys requires a detailed understanding of the wavelength dependence of the PSF from the atmosphere, and from other sources such as optics and sensors. The source code for this analysis is available at https://github.com/DarkEnergyScienceCollaboration/chroma.

  5. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bayle, H.; Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O.

    2014-02-15

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  6. Metrics. [measurement for effective software development and management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, Frank

    1991-01-01

    A development status evaluation is presented for practical software performance measurement, or 'metrics', in which major innovations have recently occurred. Metrics address such aspects of software performance as whether a software project is on schedule, how many errors can be expected from it, whether the methodology being used is effective and the relative quality of the software employed. Metrics may be characterized as explicit, analytical, and subjective. Attention is given to the bases for standards and the conduct of metrics research.

  7. Effect of Feeding and Suction on Gastric Impedance Spectroscopy Measurements.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Nohra E; Sánchez-Miranda, Gustavo; Sacristan, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    A specific device and system has been developed and tested for clinical monitoring of gastric mucosal reactance in the critically ill as an early warning of splanchnic hypoperfusion associated with shock and sepsis. This device has been proven effective in clinical trials and is expected to become commercially available next year. The system uses a combination nasogastric tube and impedance spectroscopy probe as a single catheter. Because this device has a double function, the question is: Does enteral feeding or suction affect the gastric reactance measurements? This study was designed to evaluate the effect of feeding and suction on the measurement of gastric impedance spectroscopy in healthy volunteers. Impedance spectra were obtained from the gastric wall epithelia of 18 subjects. The spectra were measured for each of the following conditions: postinsertion of gastric probe, during active suction, postactive suction, and during enteral feeding (236 ml of nutritional supplement). Impedance spectra were reproducible in all volunteers under all conditions tested. There was a slight increase in impedance parameters after suction, and a decrease in impedance after feeding; however, these observed differences were insignificant compared to patient-to-patient variability, and truly negligible compared with previously observed changes associated with splanchnic ischemia in critically ill patients. Our results demonstrate that suction or feeding when using the impedance spectro-metry probe/nasogastric tube does not significantly interfere with gastric impedance spectrometer measurements. PMID:26226020

  8. Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix the air thus the indoor conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of exposure depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on field measurements using a unique multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The paper will derive seven different metrics for the evaluation of air distribution. Measured data from two homes with different levels of natural infiltration will be used to evaluate these metrics for three different ASHRAE Standard 62.2 compliant ventilation systems. Such information can be used to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

  9. Parent-Offspring Similarity for Drinking: A Longitudinal Adoption Study

    PubMed Central

    McGue, Matt; Malone, Steve; Keyes, Margaret; Iacono, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Parent-offspring resemblance for drinking was investigated in a sample of 409 adopted and 208 non-adopted families participating in the Sibling Interaction and Behavior Study (SIBS). Drinking data was available for 1229 offspring, assessed longitudinally up to three times in the age range from 10 to 28 years. A single drinking index was computed from four items measuring quantity, frequency and density of drinking. As expected, the mean drinking index increased with age, was greater in males as compared to females (although not at the younger ages), but did not vary significantly by adoption status. Parent-offspring correlation in drinking did not vary significantly by either offspring or parent gender but did differ significantly by adoption status. In adopted families, the parent-offspring correlation was statistically significant at all ages but decreased for the oldest age group (age 22–28). In non-adopted families, the parent-offspring correlation was statistically significant at all ages and increased in the oldest age group. Findings imply that genetic influences on drinking behavior increase with age while shared family environment influences decline, especially during the transition from late-adolescence to early adulthood. PMID:25224596

  10. Parent-offspring similarity for drinking: a longitudinal adoption study.

    PubMed

    McGue, Matt; Malone, Steve; Keyes, Margaret; Iacono, William G

    2014-11-01

    Parent-offspring resemblance for drinking was investigated in a sample of 409 adopted and 208 non-adopted families participating in the Sibling Interaction and Behavior Study. Drinking data was available for 1,229 offspring, assessed longitudinally up to three times in the age range from 10 to 28 years. A single drinking index was computed from four items measuring quantity, frequency and density of drinking. As expected, the mean drinking index increased with age, was greater in males as compared to females (although not at the younger ages), but did not vary significantly by adoption status. Parent-offspring correlation in drinking did not vary significantly by either offspring or parent gender but did differ significantly by adoption status. In adopted families, the parent-offspring correlation was statistically significant at all ages but decreased for the oldest age group (age 22-28). In non-adopted families, the parent-offspring correlation was statistically significant at all ages and increased in the oldest age group. Findings imply that genetic influences on drinking behavior increase with age while shared family environment influences decline, especially during the transition from late-adolescence to early adulthood. PMID:25224596

  11. Measurement of the thermo-optical effect of integrated waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremmel, Johannes; Lamprecht, Tobias; Michler, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Thermo-optical switches are widely used in integrated optics and various types of integrated optical structures have been reported in literature. These structures include, but are not limited to Mach-Zehnder-Interferometer (MZI) switches and digital optical switches. The thermo-optical effect depends on the refractive index, the polarizability and the density of a material. The polarizability effect can often be neglected and the change of refractive index is dominated by a density change due to the thermal expansion of the material. We report herein a new method to measure the thermo-optical effect of waveguides directly, using integrated MZIs fabricated in polymer waveguide technology. Common methods rely on macroscopic samples, but the properties can differ significantly for micro-structured waveguides. Using a floodlight halogen rod lamp and metal-shields, we realized a radiation heater with a trapezoidal-shaped heating pattern. While the heating occurred from the bottom side, a thermocouple was placed on top of the sample. By dynamically measuring the temperature and the corresponding output-power of the MZI, the temperature difference between constructive and destructive interference can be determined. Multiple measurements of different sample MZIs exhibit an average thermo-optical coefficient (TOC) of 1.6 ∗ 10-4 1/K .

  12. Effects of Middle Ear Pressure on Otoacoustic Emission Measures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming

    1995-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are used extensively in hearing evaluations. Changes in middle ear pressure may have an effect on both forward and backward transmission of signals through the middle ear. The effect that such changes have on OAEs may depend on extent of pressure change, stimulus frequency, and stimulus level. This study quantitatively evaluates the effects of these variables on distortion product OAEs (DPOAEs) and cochlear microphonic distortion products (CMDPs) for a wide range of stimuli. Pigmented adult guinea pigs were experimental subjects. An animal surgical model was established to manipulate pressure in the middle ear and CMDP and DPOAE were simultaneously measured. The effects on forward transmission were determined from the CMDP data. It was assumed that the DPOAE measures were affected by changes in both forward and backward transmission. The effects on backward transmission were determined from the DPOAE data after the effect on forward transmission were subtracted out. For all conditions the frequency ratio rm f_2/f_1 was held at 1.2 and the level ratio rm L_1/L_2 was 10 dB. The effects on forward transmission were similar to those for backward transmission in all experimental conditions. Negative pressure had a greater effect than positive pressure. Positive pressures of +10 and +20 cmH_2O affected transmission for low frequency stimuli (f_2 = 1620 and 2680 Hz) but had little effect for high frequency stimuli (f_2 = 6980 and 10250 Hz). Negative pressures of -2.5 to -10 cmH_2O affected transmission across all frequencies tested. The effect at low frequencies is hypothesized to be related to tympanic membrane stiffness. The effect of negative pressure at high frequencies may be related to change in the incudostapedial joint. The slope of growth function decreased with the pressure change for DPOAEs but changed little for CMDPs. The decrease in slope for DPOAEs suggests that the level chosen for analysis can influence the result of the

  13. Enhancing prescription drug innovation and adoption.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G Caleb; O'Connor, Alec B; Stafford, Randall S

    2011-06-21

    The adoption and use of a new drug would ideally be guided by its innovation and cost-effectiveness. However, information about the relative efficacy and safety of a drug is typically incomplete even well after market entry, and various other forces create a marketplace in which most new drugs are little better than their older counterparts. Five proposed mechanisms are considered for promoting innovation and reducing the use of therapies ultimately found to offer poor value or have unacceptable risks. These changes range from increasing the evidence required for U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to modifying the structure of drug reimbursement. Despite the challenges of policy implementation, the United States has a long history of successfully improving the societal value and safe use of prescription medicines. PMID:21690598

  14. Home Energy Displays. Consumer Adoption and Response

    SciTech Connect

    LaMarche, Janelle; Cheney, K.; Akers, C.; Roth, K.; Sachs, O.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of this project was to investigate the factors influencing consumer adoption of Home Energy Displays (HEDs) and to evaluate electricity consumption in households with basic HEDs versus enhanced feedback methods - web portals or alerts. The team hypothesized that providing flexible and relatable information to users, in addition to a basic HED, would make feedback more effective and achieve persistent energy savings. In Phase I, Fraunhofer conducted three user research studies and found preferences for aesthetically pleasing, easy to understand feedback that is accessible through multiple media and offered free of charge. The deployment of HEDs in 150 households planned for Phase II encountered major recruitment and HED field deployment problems. In light of these challenges, the team is pursuing a modified study investigating the energy savings of a web portal versus alert-based energy feedback instead of a physical HED.

  15. Magneto Optical Kerr Effect Measurement of Double Exchange Spring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hanming; Gu, Jiyeong

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic property of the symmetric Double Exchange Spring System, soft(S)/hard(H)/soft(S) magnetic layers Glass/NiFe (bottom Py)/SmFe/NiFe (top Py), was investigated using Magneto Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE) measurement. In order to produce a symmetric non-collinearity in magnetization, the thicknesses of the two Py layers are controlled to be the same during the deposition. Due to the finite skin depth of the laser used in MOKE measurement magnetic hysteresis loop for each Py layer can be measured separately by adjusting the right thickness of the layers. First of all, we found the magnetic hysteresis loops for the bottom and the top Py layers are not the same. Moreover, we found that the coercivity of the bottom Py measured from MOKE is closer to the coercivity of the first switching measured from Alternating Gradient Magnetometer (AGM) and is much smaller than that of the top Py from MOKE; the coercivity of the top Py from MOKE is closer to that of the second switching from AGM. These show that the non-collinearity provided by the two soft layers is not symmetric in reality even with a symmetric structure. The experimental observations might be due to the difference in the growing environment between the bottom Py layer and the top Py layer.

  16. The Microwave Hall Effect Measured Using a Waveguide Tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William; Coppock, Joyce; Anderson, J. Robert

    We describe a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. This technique does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing a semiconductor wafer into a slot in an X-band (8 - 12 GHz) waveguide series tee, injecting microwave power into the two opposite arms of the tee, and measuring the microwave output at the third arm. A magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the wafer and produces a microwave Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. The microwave Hall signal is proportional to the semiconductor mobility, which we compare for calibration purposes with d. c. mobility measurements obtained using the van der Pauw method. We obtain the resistivity by measuring the microwave reflection coefficient of the sample. We determine a calibration constant as a function of the ratio of thickness to skin depth for two and three inch silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. The measured mobilities ranged from 270 to 3000 cm2 / (Vsec)

  17. The microwave Hall effect measured using a waveguide tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, J. E.; Anderson, J. R.; Johnson, W. B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. The advantage of this technique is that it does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing the semiconductor wafer into a slot cut in an X-band (8-12 GHz) waveguide series tee, injecting microwave power into the two opposite arms of the tee, and measuring the microwave output at the third arm. A magnetic field applied perpendicular to the wafer gives a microwave Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. The microwave Hall signal is proportional to the semiconductor mobility, which we compare for calibration purposes with d.c. mobility measurements obtained using the van der Pauw method. We obtain the resistivity by measuring the microwave reflection coefficient of the sample. This paper presents data for silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. The measured mobilities ranged from 270 to 3000 cm2/(V s).

  18. Effect of multiple scattering on depolarization measurements with spaceborne lidars.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Susanne; Reichardt, Jens

    2003-06-20

    An analytical model based on the integration of the scattering-angle and light-path manifold has been developed to quantify the effect of multiple scattering on cirrus measurements obtained with elastic polarization lidars from space. Light scattering by molecules and by a horizontally homogeneous cloud is taken into account. Lidar parameter, including laser beam divergence, can be freely chosen. Up to 3 orders of scattering are calculated. Furthermore, an inversion technique for the retrieval of cloud extinction profiles from measurements with elastic-backscatter lidars is proposed that explicitly takes multiple scattering into account. It is found that for typical lidar system parameters such as those of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) instrument multiple scattering does not significantly affect depolarization-ratio measurements in cirrus clouds with small to moderate optical depths. For all simulated clouds, the absolute value of the difference between measured and single-scattering volume depolarization ratio is < 0.006. The particle depolarization ratio can be calculated from the measured volume depolarization ratio and the retrieved backscatter ratio without degradation of accuracy; thus characterization of the various cirrus categories in terms of the particle depolarization ratio and retrieval of cloud microphysical properties is feasible from space. The results of this study apply to polar stratospheric clouds as well. PMID:12833968

  19. 42 CFR 436.224 - Individuals under age 21 who are under State adoption assistance agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... parent(s) is in effect; (2) Who, the State agency responsible for adoption assistance has determined... methodologies of the foster care program were used without employing the threshold title IV-A eligibility... adoption assistance agreement between the State and the adoptive parent(s). (2) The agency must deem...

  20. Timing Is Everything: An Analysis of the Time to Adoption and Legalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Richard P.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Used data on 496 children who had been in foster care before adoption to examine effects of child characteristics on odds that child would remain in long-term foster care and length of time for adoption agreement to be legalized. Age, history of abuse/neglect, ethnicity, and planned foster parent adoption program were major determinants of…

  1. Spectral measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Bradford Adam

    2004-12-01

    This thesis describes spectral measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect from clusters of galaxies using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Infrared Experiment (SuZIE II). SuZIE II is a 12 element 300 mK bolometer array which observes in three frequency bands between 150 and 350 GHz. Simultaneous multi- frequency measurements have been used to distinguish between thermal and kinematic components of the SZ effect, and to significantly reduce the effects of variations in atmospheric emission which can otherwise dominate the noise. We report significant detections of the SZ effect in 15 clusters of galaxies. For a sub-sample of these clusters we have set limits to their peculiar velocities with respect to the Hubble flow, and have used the cluster sample to set a 95% confidence limit of <1260 km s -1 to the bulk flow of the intermediate-redshift universe in the direction of the CMB dipole. This is the first time that SZ measurements have been used to constrain bulk flows. We show that systematic uncertainties in peculiar velocity determinations from the SZ effect are likely to be dominated by sub-millimeter point sources and we discuss the level of this contamination. We also calculate the central Comptonization, yo, the integrated SZ flux decrement, S, and the gas mass, M gas , of each cluster. We use these measurements to construct y 0 - T, S-T , and M gas - T scaling relations, where T is the X-ray temperature of the intra-cluster (IC) gas. The y 0 - T scaling relation is inconsistent with what we would expect for self-similar clusters; however this result is questionable because of a large systematic uncertainty in y 0 due to the spatial modelling of the IC gas. In general, this systematic uncertainty makes the y 0 - T relation difficult to measure. The S-T scaling relation has a slope and redshift evolution consistent with what we expect for self-similar clusters with a characteristic density that scales with the mean density of the universe. We rule out zero

  2. Spectrally resolved motional Stark effect measurements on ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, R.; Dinklage, A.; Wolf, R.; Fischer, R.; Hobirk, J.; Löbhard, T.; Mlynek, A.; Reich, M.; Sawyer, L.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade

    2013-11-15

    A spectrally resolved Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic has been installed at ASDEX Upgrade. The MSE data have been fitted by a forward model providing access to information about the magnetic field in the plasma interior [R. Reimer, A. Dinklage, J. Geiger et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 50, 731–735 (2010)]. The forward model for the beam emission spectra comprises also the fast ion D{sub α} signal [W. W. Heidbrink and G. J. Sadler, Nucl. Fusion 34, 535–615 (1994)] and the smearing on the CCD-chip. The calculated magnetic field data as well as the revealed (dia)magnetic effects are consistent with the results from equilibrium reconstruction solver. Measurements of the direction of the magnetic field are affected by unknown and varying polarization effects in the observation.

  3. Effects of ingested atmospheric turbulence on measured tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signor, David B.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Mosher, Marianne; Hagen, Martin J.; George, Albert R.

    1992-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. Turbulence ingestion noise is found to be the dominant noise mechanism at locations near the rotor axis. At these locations, the sound radiated by the hovering rotor increases with both increasing atmospheric wind speed and ingested rms turbulent velocity.

  4. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence effects on tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, Martin J.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Signor, David B.; Mosher, Marianne

    1994-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of atmospheric turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. In contradiction to current theories, increasing rotor inflow and rotor thrust were found to increase turbulence ingestion noise. This is the final report of Task 13A--Helicopter Tail Rotor Noise, of the NASA/United Kingdom Defense Research Agency cooperative Aeronautics Research Program.

  5. Effective crack lengths by compliance measurement for ARALL-2 laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.; Wilson, Dale A.

    1991-01-01

    As a means of determining a stress intensity factor solution, the compliance properties of an ARALL-2 laminated-sheet composite were investigated. Fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) tests were conducted on middle crack tension (MT) specimens fabricated from a layup consisting of three sheets of 2024-T3 aluminum bonded together with unidirectional aramid fibers embedded in epoxy. Excellent fatigue crack growth properties are obtained by the presence of unbroken aramid fibers in the wake of the crack tip. These unbroken fibers act as a bridging mechanism to inhibit further crack growth. To quantify the effect of maximum fatigue load on compliance, a series of FCGR tests were performed. Effective crack lengths were determined to be at least 10 mm shorter than surface measured crack lengths for a 76-mm-wide specimen. The bridging zone was estimated to be at least 5 mm. Compliance and stress intensity factor as functions of effective crack length were determined.

  6. Nondipole Effects in Chiral Systems Measured with Linearly Polarized Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, K. P.; Hemmers, O.; Guillemin, R.; Stolte, W. C.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Lindle, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    With the advent of third-generation synchrotron light sources, it has been demonstrated that higher-order corrections to the dipole approximation are necessary for the description of light-matter interactions in the soft x-ray range. These effects, known as 'nondipole effects', present themselves as asymmetries in the angular distributions of photoelectrons. Chiral molecules, known to have asymmetries in photoelectron angular distributions when exposed to circularly polarized light, have been proposed to demonstrate a chiral-specific nondipole effect when exposed to linearly polarized light. We present the first-ever measurement of nondipole chiral angular distributions for the case of each enantiomer of camphor in the photon energy range 296-343eV.

  7. Building Adoption of Visual Analytics Software

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchor, Nancy; Cook, Kristin A.; Scholtz, Jean

    2012-01-05

    Adoption of technology is always difficult. Issues such as having the infrastructure necessary to support the technology, training for users, integrating the technology into current processes and tools, and having the time, managerial support, and necessary funds need to be addressed. In addition to these issues, the adoption of visual analytics tools presents specific challenges that need to be addressed. This paper discusses technology adoption challenges and approaches for visual analytics technologies.

  8. Magnetospheric Effects on High Energy Solar Particles: PAMELA Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nolfo, G. A.; Boezio, M.; Ryan, J. M.; Christian, E. R.; Stochaj, S.; Bruno, A.; Mergè, M.; Martucci, M.; Ricci, M.; Mocchiutti, E.; Munini, R.; Bazilevskaya, G.; Bravar, U.

    2015-12-01

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) are thought to be accelerated at the Sun by solar flares or by the shocks formed by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Even more elusive is the origin of the highest energy SEPs in so-called Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). At these energies, the effects of transport are often minimal, providing an opportunity to investigate the problem of particle acceleration. However, the effects of transport en route to Earth often obscure the acceleration process(es). The Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) instrument provides new data that aid in separating the effects of acceleration and transport. Furthermore, PAMELA bridges a critical gap in energy between the low-energy space-based and highest-energy ground-based measurements. We report on recent PAMELA observations of high-energy SEPs and illustrate some of the governing effects of acceleration and transport with the first GLE of solar cycle 24, i.e., 2012 May 17. The PAMELA data of 2012 May 17 reveal two distinct spectral components, a low-energy SEP component that exhibits significant scattering or redistribution, accompanied by a high-energy component that reaches the Earth relatively unaffected by dispersive transport effects. We postulate that the scattering or redistribution at low energies takes place locally providing one of the first opportunities to witness the effects of SEP transport in the Earth's magnetosheath.

  9. Memory recall in a process control system: a measure of expertise and display effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Vicente, K J

    1992-07-01

    Previous research has shown that memory-recall performance is correlated with domain expertise. In this study, a process control system was selected as a vehicle for conducting research on memory recall. The primary purposes of the present work were to determine if the classic expertise effects originally obtained in chess generalize to this novel domain and to evaluate the validity of memory recall as a measure of display effectiveness. Experts and novices viewed dynamic event sequences showing the behavior of a thermal-hydraulic system with two different displays, one that only contained information about the physical components in the system (P) and another that also contained information about higher order functional variables (P+F). There were three types of trials: normal, where the system was operating correctly; fault, where a single fault was introduced; and random, where the system's behavior did not obey physical laws. On each trial, subjects were asked to recall the final state of the system and to diagnose the system state. The P+F display resulted in superior diagnosis performance compared with the P display. With regard to memory, there was some evidence of an interaction between trial type and expertise, with experts outperforming novices but primarily on meaningful trials. In addition, memory for the subset of variables most critical to diagnosis was better with the P+F display than with the P display, thereby indicating that memory recall can be a sensitive measure of display effectiveness. The results also clarify a theoretical problem that has existed for some time in the literature, namely, the conditions under which expertise advantages are to be expected in memory-recall tasks. Collectively, these findings point to the potential benefits of adopting an applied context as a test bed for basic research issues. PMID:1495398

  10. Measuring Young’s modulus the easy way, and tracing the effects of measurement uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, John

    2015-09-01

    The speed of sound in a solid is determined by the density and elasticity of the material. Young’s modulus can therefore be calculated once the density and the speed of sound in the solid are measured. The density can be measured relatively easily, and the speed of sound through a rod can be measured very inexpensively by setting up a longitudinal standing wave and using a microphone to record its frequency. This is a simplified version of a technique called ‘impulse excitation’. It is a good educational technique for school pupils. This paper includes the description and the free provision of custom software to calculate the frequency spectrum of a recorded sound so that the resonant peaks can be readily identified. Discussion on the effect of measurement uncertainties is included to help the more thorough experimental student improve the accuracy of his method. The technique is sensitive enough to be able to detect changes in the elasticity modulus with a temperature change of just a few degrees.

  11. [Health-related problems in adopted children].

    PubMed

    Laubjerg, Merete; Petersson, Birgit H

    2006-10-01

    International research shows that the standard of health among children adopted from abroad, especially those adopted by single parents, is not as good as that of other children. Danish studies indicate similar problems. The causes could be several, such as poor development in the embryonic and fetal stages, low birth weight, starvation, neglect, infections, and the lack of the natural bonds between mother and child. Surveys indicate that many adoptive parents, single parents in particular, receive children with health problems. There is no Danish research available, but it is important to be aware of these issues in order for both adoptees and adoptants to receive the most support. PMID:17059801

  12. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sola, A. Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-07

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck S{sub SSE} coefficient of 2.8×10{sup −7} V K{sup −1}.

  13. In Situ Magnetic Field Measurement using the Hanle Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a simple method of in situ magnetic field mapping near zero points in magnetic fields. It is ideal for measuring trapping parameters such the field gradient and curvature, and should be applicable in most experiments with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or similar setup. This method works by probing atomic transitions in a vacuum, and is based on the Hanle effect, which alters the polarization of spontaneous emission in the presence of a magnetic field. Unlike most techniques based on the Hanle effect, however, we look only at intensity. Instead of measuring polarization we use the change in directional radiation patterns caused by a magnetic field. Using one of the cooling beams for our MOT, along with a linear polarizer, a narrow slit, and an inexpensive webcam, we measure the three dimensional position of a magnetic field zero point within our vacuum to within +/-1 mm and the gradient through the zero point to an accuracy of 4%. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  14. Measurement of the dynamo effect in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Almagri, A.F.; Sarff, J.S.; Hirano, Y.; Toyama, H.

    1995-11-01

    A series of the detailed experiments has been conducted in three laboratory plasma devices to measure the dynamo electric field along the equilibrium field line (the {alpha} effect) arising from the correlation between the fluctuating flow velocity and magnetic field. The fluctuating flow velocity is obtained from probe measurement of the fluctuating E x B drift and electron diamagnetic drift. The three major findings are (1) the {alpha} effect accounts for the dynamo current generation, even in the time dependence through a ``sawtooth`` cycle; (2) at low collisionality the dynamo is explained primarily by the widely studied pressureless Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, i.e., the fluctuating velocity is dominated by the E x B drift; (3) at high collisionality, a new ``electron diamagnetic dynamo`` is observed, in which the fluctuating velocity is dominated by the diamagnetic drift. In addition, direct measurements of the helicity flux indicate that the dynamo activity transports magnetic helicity from one part of the plasma to another, but the total helicity is roughly conserved, verifying J.B. Taylor`s conjecture.

  15. Borehole Measurements of Interfacial and Co-seismic Seismoelectric Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, K. E.; Dupuis, J. C.; Kepic, A. W.; Harris, B. D.

    2006-12-01

    We have recently carried out a series of seismoelectric field experiments employing various hammer seismic sources on surface and a multi-electrode `eel' lowered into slotted PVC-cased boreholes penetrating porous sediments. Deploying grounded dipole receivers in boreholes has a number of advantages over surface-based measurements. Ambient noise levels are reduced because earth currents from power lines and other sources tend to flow horizontally, especially near the surface. The earth also provides natural shielding from higher frequency spherics and radio frequency interference while the water-filled borehole significantly decreases the electrode contact impedance which in turn reduces Johnson noise and increases resilience to capacitively- coupled noise sources. From a phenomenological point of view, the potential for measuring seismoelectric conversions from various geological or pore fluid contacts at depth can be assessed by lowering antennas directly through those interfaces. Furthermore, co-seismic seismoelectric signals that are normally considered to be noise in surface measurements are of interest for well logging in the borehole environment. At Fredericton, Canada, broadband co-seismic effects, having a dominant frequency of 350-400 Hz were measured at quarter meter intervals in a borehole penetrating glacial sediments including tills, sands, and a silt/clay aquitard. Observed signal strengths of a few microvolts/m were found to be consistent with the predictions of a simplified theoretical model for the co-seismic effect expected to accompany the regular `fast' P-wave. In Australia we have carried out similar vertical profiling experiments in hydrogeological monitoring boreholes that pass through predominantly sandy sediments containing fresh to saline water near Ayr, QLD and Perth, WA. While co-seismic effects are generally seen to accompany P-wave and other seismic arrivals, the most interesting result has been the observation, at three sites, of

  16. Social networks and physician adoption of electronic health records: insights from an empirical study

    PubMed Central

    Padman, Rema; Krackhardt, David; Johnson, Michael P; Diamond, Herbert S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study how social interactions influence physician adoption of an electronic health records (EHR) system. Design A social network survey was used to delineate the structure of social interactions among 40 residents and 15 attending physicians in an ambulatory primary care practice. Social network analysis was then applied to relate the interaction structures to individual physicians' utilization rates of an EHR system. Measurements The social network survey assessed three distinct types of interaction structures: professional network based on consultation on patient care-related matters; friendship network based on personal intimacy; and perceived influence network based on a person's perception of how other people have affected her intention to adopt the EHR system. EHR utilization rates were measured as the proportion of patient visits in which sentinel use events consisting of patient data documentation or retrieval activities were recorded. The usage data were collected over a time period of 14 months from computer-recorded audit trail logs. Results Neither the professional nor the perceived influence network is correlated with EHR usage. The structure of the friendship network significantly influenced individual physicians' adoption of the EHR system. Residents who occupied similar social positions in the friendship network shared similar EHR utilization rates (p<0.05). In other words, residents who had personal friends in common tended to develop comparable levels of EHR adoption. This effect is particularly prominent when the mutual personal friends of these ‘socially similar’ residents were attending physicians (p<0.001). Conclusions Social influence affecting physician adoption of EHR seems to be predominantly conveyed through interactions with personal friends rather than interactions in professional settings. PMID:20442152

  17. Physical effects on visible temperature measurements of shocked foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, J.; Falk, K.; Fryer, C.; Greef, C.; Williams, J.; Schmidt, D.; McCoy, C.; Boehly, T.

    2013-10-01

    We have conducted a series of experiments measuring the temperature of shock compressed foams at pressures from ~ 50 to >300 GPA. These experiments were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility and utilized the streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) to measure the optical emission from the shocked foam targets and infer the temperature. A comparison of our results to both standard equation of state (EOS) tables and to quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations result in temperatures that are below these theoretical predictions, especially at the higher pressures. This indicates either an error in these models or a limitation with this type of measurement technique. In order to estimate whether the emission from the shock front is consistent with the bulk temperature of the shocked material, a series of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations were performed. We find these simulations predict emission more consistent with the measurements at high pressures, similar to previous results for shocked Silicon. The effect of specific physics issues at the shock front, including temperature relaxation, electron thermal conduction, and radiation transport are evaluated to determine the magnitude of their affect on the emission. Both experimental and simulations results will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of the NNSA/DOE.

  18. Measuring the Second Chern Number from Nonadiabatic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodrubetz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The geometry and topology of quantum systems have deep connections to quantum dynamics. In this Letter, I show how to measure the non-Abelian Berry curvature and its related topological invariant, the second Chern number, using dynamical techniques. The second Chern number is the defining topological characteristic of the four-dimensional generalization of the quantum Hall effect and has relevance in systems from three-dimensional topological insulators to Yang-Mills field theory. I illustrate its measurement using the simple example of a spin-3 /2 particle in an electric quadrupole field. I show how one can dynamically measure diagonal components of the Berry curvature in an overcomplete basis of the degenerate ground state space and use this to extract the full non-Abelian Berry curvature. I also show that one can accomplish the same ideas by stochastically averaging over random initial states in the degenerate ground state manifold. Finally, I show how this system can be manufactured and the topological invariant measured in a variety of realistic systems, from superconducting qubits to trapped ions and cold atoms.

  19. Measuring the Second Chern Number from Nonadiabatic Effects.

    PubMed

    Kolodrubetz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The geometry and topology of quantum systems have deep connections to quantum dynamics. In this Letter, I show how to measure the non-Abelian Berry curvature and its related topological invariant, the second Chern number, using dynamical techniques. The second Chern number is the defining topological characteristic of the four-dimensional generalization of the quantum Hall effect and has relevance in systems from three-dimensional topological insulators to Yang-Mills field theory. I illustrate its measurement using the simple example of a spin-3/2 particle in an electric quadrupole field. I show how one can dynamically measure diagonal components of the Berry curvature in an overcomplete basis of the degenerate ground state space and use this to extract the full non-Abelian Berry curvature. I also show that one can accomplish the same ideas by stochastically averaging over random initial states in the degenerate ground state manifold. Finally, I show how this system can be manufactured and the topological invariant measured in a variety of realistic systems, from superconducting qubits to trapped ions and cold atoms. PMID:27419575

  20. Early deprivation and home basal cortisol levels: a study of internationally adopted children.

    PubMed

    Kertes, Darlene A; Gunnar, Megan R; Madsen, Nicole J; Long, Jeffrey D

    2008-01-01

    Animal studies reveal that early deprivation impairs regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, potentially increasing vulnerability to stressors throughout life. To examine early deprivation effects on basal HPA axis activity in humans, basal cortisol levels were examined in 164 internationally adopted children who had experienced varying degrees of preadoption deprivation. Duration of institutional care, age at adoption, and parent ratings of preadoption neglect indexed a latent factor of Deprived Care. Adoption measures of height and weight standardized to World Health Organisation norms indexed a latent factor of Growth Delay that was viewed as another reflection of deprivation. Cortisol samples were collected 3.3-11.6 years postadoption (Md = 7.3 years) at home on 3 days approximately 30 min after wakeup and before bedtime. Both early a.m. levels and the decrease in cortisol across the day were examined. A structural equation model revealed that preadoption Deprived Care predicted Growth Delay at adoption and Growth Delay predicted higher morning cortisol levels and a larger diurnal cortisol decrease. PMID:18423090