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Sample records for adopt electronic health

  1. Adoption of Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Grabenbauer, L; Fraser, R.; McClay, J.; Woelfl, N.; Thompson, C.B.; Cambell, J.; Windle, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Less than 20% of hospitals in the US have an electronic health record (EHR). In this qualitative study, we examine the perspectives of both academic and private physicians and administrators as stakeholders, and their alignment, to explore their perspectives on the use of technology in the clinical environment. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 74 participants who were asked a series of open-ended questions. Grounded theory was used to analyze the transcribed data and build convergent themes. The relevance and importance of themes was constructed by examining frequency, convergence, and intensity. A model was proposed that represents the interactions between themes. Results Six major themes emerged, which include the impact of EHR systems on workflow, patient care, communication, research/outcomes/billing, education/learning, and institutional culture. Academic and private physicians were confident of the future benefits of EHR systems, yet cautious about the current implementations of EHR, and its impact on interactions with other members of the healthcare team and with patients, and the amount of time necessary to use EHR’s. Private physicians differed on education and were uneasy about the steep learning curve necessary for use of new systems. In contrast to physicians, university and hospital administrators are optimistic, and value the availability of data for use in reporting. Conclusion The results of our study indicate that both private and academic physicians concur on the need for features that maintain and enhance the relationship with the patient and the healthcare team. Resistance to adoption is related to insufficient functionality and its potential negative impact on patient care. Integration of data collection into clinical workflows must consider the unexpected costs of data acquisition. PMID:23616868

  2. Macro influencers of electronic health records adoption.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Vijay V; Chinta, Ravi; Zhirkin, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    While adoption rates for electronic health records (EHRs) have improved, the reasons for significant geographical differences in EHR adoption within the USA have remained unclear. To understand the reasons for these variations across states, we have compiled from secondary sources a profile of different states within the USA, based on macroeconomic and macro health-environment factors. Regression analyses were performed using these indicator factors on EHR adoption. The results showed that internet usage and literacy are significantly associated with certain measures of EHR adoption. Income level was not significantly associated with EHR adoption. Per capita patient days (a proxy for healthcare need intensity within a state) is negatively correlated with EHR adoption rate. Health insurance coverage is positively correlated with EHR adoption rate. Older physicians (>60 years) tend to adopt EHR systems less than their younger counterparts. These findings have policy implications on formulating regionally focused incentive programs.

  3. Adoption Factors of the Electronic Health Record: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) was a significant piece of legislation in America that served as a catalyst for the adoption of health information technology. Following implementation of the HITECH Act, Health Information Technology (HIT) experienced broad adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHR), despite skepticism exhibited by many providers for the transition to an electronic system. A thorough review of EHR adoption facilitator and barriers provides ongoing support for the continuation of EHR implementation across various health care structures, possibly leading to a reduction in associated economic expenditures. Objective The purpose of this review is to compile a current and comprehensive list of facilitators and barriers to the adoption of the EHR in the United States. Methods Authors searched Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and MEDLINE, 01/01/2012–09/01/2015, core clinical/academic journals, MEDLINE full text, and evaluated only articles germane to our research objective. Team members selected a final list of articles through consensus meetings (n=31). Multiple research team members thoroughly read each article to confirm applicability and study conclusions, thereby increasing validity. Results Group members identified common facilitators and barriers associated with the EHR adoption process. In total, 25 adoption facilitators were identified in the literature occurring 109 times; the majority of which were efficiency, hospital size, quality, access to data, perceived value, and ability to transfer information. A total of 23 barriers to adoption were identified in the literature, appearing 95 times; the majority of which were cost, time consuming, perception of uselessness, transition of data, facility location, and implementation issues. Conclusions The 25 facilitators and 23 barriers to the adoption of the EHR continue to reveal a preoccupation on cost, despite

  4. Adoption of Electronic Health Records: A Roadmap for India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the study was to create a roadmap for the adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) in India based an analysis of the strategies of other countries and national scenarios of ICT use in India. Methods The strategies for adoption of EHR in other countries were analyzed to find the crucial steps taken. Apart from reports collected from stakeholders in the country, the study relied on the experience of the author in handling several e-health projects. Results It was found that there are four major areas where the countries considered have made substantial efforts: ICT infrastructure, Policy & regulations, Standards & interoperability, and Research, development & education. A set of crucial activities were identified in each area. Based on the analysis, a roadmap is suggested. It includes the creation of a secure health network; health information exchange; and the use of open-source software, a national health policy, privacy laws, an agency for health IT standards, R&D, human resource development, etc. Conclusions Although some steps have been initiated, several new steps need to be taken up for the successful adoption of EHR. It requires a coordinated effort from all the stakeholders. PMID:27895957

  5. 77 FR 1555 - Administrative Simplification: Adoption of Standards for Health Care Electronic Funds Transfers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... and 162 Administrative Simplification: Adoption of Standards for Health Care Electronic Funds... Health Care Electronic Funds Transfers (EFTs) and Remittance Advice AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS... facilitate health care EFT transmissions. DATES: Effective Date: These regulations are effective on...

  6. The Relationship Between Magnet Designation, Electronic Health Record Adoption, and Medicare Meaningful Use Payments.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, Christine; Foronda, Cynthia; Zdanowicz, Martin; McCabe, Brian E; Ambrosia, Todd

    2017-03-02

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between nursing excellence and electronic health record adoption. Of 6582 US hospitals, 4939 were eligible for the Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program, and 6419 were eligible for evaluation on the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model. Of 399 Magnet hospitals, 330 were eligible for the Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program, and 393 were eligible for evaluation in the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model. Meaningful use attestation was defined as receipt of a Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program payment. The adoption electronic health record was defined as Level 6 and/or 7 on the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model. Logistic regression showed that Magnet-designated hospitals were more likely attest to Meaningful Use than non-Magnet hospitals (odds ratio = 3.58, P < .001) and were more likely to adopt electronic health records than non-Magnet hospitals (Level 6 only: odds ratio = 3.68, P < .001; Level 6 or 7: odds ratio = 4.02, P < .001). This study suggested a positive relationship between Magnet status and electronic health record use, which involves earning financial incentives for successful adoption. Continued investigation is needed to examine the relationships between the quality of nursing care, electronic health record usage, financial implications, and patient outcomes.

  7. Pre-implementation investigation of the readiness of allied health professionals to adopt electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Hailey, David; Yu, Ping; Munyisia, Esther

    2014-01-01

    There has been limited uptake of electronic health records (EHR) by allied health professionals. Yet, not much attention has been given to their information needs. For EHR to work for these health professionals, it is essential to understand their current practice of information management and their perceptions towards EHR. A qualitative interview study was thus conducted with four managers in four allied health practices in Sydney to understand their perceptions for the adoption and use of a new Australian e-health standards compliant EHR system. We found that these allied health professionals were highly confident with the use of electronic information system and were enthusiastically expecting the introduction of the EHR system to support their information management and practice. A number of issues related to the use of EHR in practice for small, independent allied health practices were also discussed. It appears that allied health professionals today are information technology (IT) savvy and ready to adopt EHR. EHR for allied health practices in Australia are long overdue. The health informatics community can no longer ignore the need and want of allied health professionals for EHR that are tailored and built to support their information and practice management.

  8. Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Health Care Consumers: An Acceptance Model and Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The future of health care delivery is becoming more citizen centered, as today’s user is more active, better informed, and more demanding. Worldwide governments are promoting online health services, such as electronic health record (EHR) patient portals and, as a result, the deployment and use of these services. Overall, this makes the adoption of patient-accessible EHR portals an important field to study and understand. Objective The aim of this study is to understand the factors that drive individuals to adopt EHR portals. Methods We applied a new adoption model using, as a starting point, Ventkatesh's Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology in a consumer context (UTAUT2) by integrating a new construct specific to health care, a new moderator, and new relationships. To test the research model, we used the partial least squares (PLS) causal modelling approach. An online questionnaire was administrated. We collected 360 valid responses. Results The statistically significant drivers of behavioral intention are performance expectancy (beta=.200; t=3.619), effort expectancy (beta=.185; t=2.907), habit (beta=.388; t=7.320), and self-perception (beta=.098; t=2.285). The predictors of use behavior are habit (beta=0.206; t=2.752) and behavioral intention (beta=0.258; t=4.036). The model explained 49.7% of the variance in behavioral intention and 26.8% of the variance in use behavior. Conclusions Our research helps to understand the desired technology characteristics of EHR portals. By testing an information technology acceptance model, we are able to determine what is more valued by patients when it comes to deciding whether to adopt EHR portals or not. The inclusion of specific constructs and relationships related to the health care consumer area also had a significant impact on understanding the adoption of EHR portals. PMID:26935646

  9. Electronic Health Record Adoption as a Function of Success: Implications for Meaningful Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naser, Riyad J.

    2012-01-01

    Successful electronic health records (EHR) implementation has the potential to transform the entire care delivery process across the enterprise. However, the rate of EHR implementation and use among physicians has been slow. Different factors have been reported in the literature that may hinder adoption of EHR. Identifying and managing these…

  10. Hospital Electronic Health Record Adoption and Its Influence on Postoperative Sepsis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fareed, Naleef

    2013-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems could make healthcare delivery safer by providing benefits such as timely access to accurate and complete patient information, advances in diagnosis and coordination of care, and enhancements for monitoring patient vitals. This study explored the nature of EHR adoption in U.S. hospitals and their patient…

  11. Electronic Health Record Adoption In US Hospitals: Progress Continues, But Challenges Persist.

    PubMed

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; DesRoches, Catherine M; Kralovec, Peter; Foster, Gregory; Worzala, Chantal; Charles, Dustin; Searcy, Talisha; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-12-01

    Achieving nationwide adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) remains an important policy priority. While EHR adoption has increased steadily since 2010, it is unclear how providers that have not yet adopted will fare now that federal incentives have converted to penalties. We used 2008-14 national data, which includes the most recently available, to examine hospital EHR trends. We found large gains in adoption, with 75 percent of US hospitals now having adopted at least a basic EHR system--up from 59 percent in 2013. However, small and rural hospitals continue to lag behind. Among hospitals without a basic EHR system, the function most often not yet adopted (in 61 percent of hospitals) was physician notes. We also saw large increases in the ability to meet core stage 2 meaningful-use criteria (40.5 percent of hospitals, up from 5.8 percent in 2013); much of this progress resulted from increased ability to meet criteria related to exchange of health information with patients and with other physicians during care transitions. Finally, hospitals most often reported up-front and ongoing costs, physician cooperation, and complexity of meeting meaningful-use criteria as challenges. Our findings suggest that nationwide hospital EHR adoption is in reach but will require attention to small and rural hospitals and strategies to address financial challenges, particularly now that penalties for lack of adoption have begun.

  12. Assessing Readiness for Meeting Meaningful Use: Identifying Electronic Health Record Functionality and Measuring Levels of Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Bowes, Watson A.

    2010-01-01

    With the passage, in 2009, of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH),part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), over 19 Billion dollars was targeted for healthcare information technology (HIT) projects to accelerate the adoption of electronic Health Records (EHR)s. Intermountain Healthcare facilities and providers are eligible for approximately $93 million in incentives from HITECH, if we use a “certified EHR” in a “meaningful way”. This paper describes the current state of our EHR functions and EHR adoption compared to those required by the HITECH act. We describe the method used to determine the gaps between our EHR functions and EHR adoption. Our analysis identified 17 significant EHR enhancements needed to become certified and identified 42 meaningful use workflow gaps. PMID:21346942

  13. Adoption factors associated with electronic health record among long-term care facilities: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Mileski, Michael; Alaytsev, Vyachelslav; Carol, Elizabeth; Williams, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act created incentives for adopting electronic health records (EHRs) for some healthcare organisations, but long-term care (LTC) facilities are excluded from those incentives. There are realisable benefits of EHR adoption in LTC facilities; however, there is limited research about this topic. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to identify EHR adoption factors for LTC facilities that are ineligible for the HITECH Act incentives. Setting We conducted systematic searches of Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) Complete via Ebson B. Stephens Company (EBSCO Host), Google Scholar and the university library search engine to collect data about EHR adoption factors in LTC facilities since 2009. Participants Search results were filtered by date range, full text, English language and academic journals (n=22). Interventions Multiple members of the research team read each article to confirm applicability and study conclusions. Primary and secondary outcome measures Researchers identified common themes across the literature: specifically facilitators and barriers to adoption of the EHR in LTC. Results Results identify facilitators and barriers associated with EHR adoption in LTC facilities. The most common facilitators include access to information and error reduction. The most prevalent barriers include initial costs, user perceptions and implementation problems. Conclusions Similarities span the system selection phases and implementation process; of those, cost was the most common mentioned. These commonalities should help leaders in LTC facilities align strategic decisions to EHR adoption. This review may be useful for decision-makers attempting successful EHR adoption, policymakers trying to increase adoption rates without expanding incentives and vendors that produce EHRs. PMID:25631311

  14. Adoption of Electronic Personal Health Records in Canada: Perceptions of Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Breton, Erik; Fortin, Jean-Paul; Khoury, Lara; Dolovich, Lisa; Price, David; Wiljer, David; Bartlett, Gillian; Archer, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Healthcare stakeholders have a great interest in the adoption and use of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) because of the potential benefits associated with them. Little is known, however, about the level of adoption of ePHRs in Canada and there is limited evidence concerning their benefits and implications for the healthcare system. This study aimed to describe the current situation of ePHRs in Canada and explore stakeholder perceptions regarding barriers and facilitators to their adoption. Methods: Using a qualitative descriptive study design, we conducted semi-structured phone interviews between October 2013 and February 2014 with 35 individuals from seven Canadian provinces. The participants represented six stakeholder groups (patients, ePHR administrators, healthcare professionals, organizations interested in health technology development, government agencies, and researchers). A detailed summary of each interview was created and thematic analysis was conducted. Results: We observed that there was no consensual definition of ePHR in Canada. Factors that could influence ePHR adoption were related to knowledge (confusion with other electronic medical records [EMRs] and lack of awareness), system design (usability and relevance), user capacities and attitudes (patient health literacy, education and interest, support for professionals), environmental factors (government commitment, targeted populations) and legal and ethical issues (information control and custody, confidentiality, privacy and security). Conclusion: ePHRs are slowly entering the Canadian healthcare landscape but provinces do not seem well-prepared for the implementation of this type of record. Guidance is needed on critical issues regarding ePHRs, such as ePHR definition, data ownership, access to information and interoperability with other electronic health records (EHRs). Better guidance on these issues would provide a greater awareness of ePHRs and inform stakeholders

  15. Adoption and utilization of electronic health record systems by long-term care facilities in Texas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiankai; Biedermann, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Long-term care (LTC) is an important sector in the healthcare industry; however, the adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems in LTC facilities lags behind that in other sectors of healthcare. This study examines the adoption and utilization of EHRs in LTC facilities in Texas and identifies the barriers preventing implementation of EHRs. A survey instrument was mailed to all Texas LTC facilities between October 2010 and March 2011. The survey found that in Texas, 39.5 percent of LTC facilities have fully or partially implemented EHR systems and 15 percent of LTC facilities have no plans to adopt EHRs yet. There is significant variation in the use of EHR functionalities across the LTC facilities in Texas. In the LTC facilities, the administrative functions of EHRs have been more widely adopted and are more widely utilized than the clinical functions of EHRs. Among the clinical functions adopted, the resident assessment, physician orders, care management plan, and census management are the leading functions used by the LTC facilities in Texas. Lack of capital resources is still the greatest barrier to EHR adoption and implementation. Policy makers, vendors, LTC administrators, educators, and researchers should make more effort to improve EHR adoption in LTC facilities.

  16. Adoption and Barriers to Adoption of Electronic Health Records by Nurses in Three Governmental Hospitals in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mahalli, Azza El.

    2015-01-01

    Although electronic health records (EHRs) have been implemented in many hospitals and healthcare providers benefit from their effective and efficient data processing, their evaluation from nurses has received little attention. This project aimed to assess the adoption and barriers to the use of an EHR system by nurses at three governmental hospitals implementing the same EHR software and functionalities in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. The study was a cross-sectional, paper-based questionnaire study. SPSS version 20 was used for data entry and analysis, and descriptive statistics were calculated. The study found underutilization of almost all functionalities among all hospitals and no utilization of any communication tools with patients. In addition, there were no instances of “allowing patients to use the Internet to access parts of their health records.” The most frequently cited barrier among all hospitals was “loss of access to medical records transiently if computer crashes or power fails” (88.6 percent). This was followed by “lack of continuous training/ support from information technology staff in hospital” (85.9 percent), “additional time required for data entry” (84.9 percent), and “system hanging up problem” (83.8 percent). Complexity of technology (81.6 percent) and lack of system customizability (81.1 percent) were also frequently reported problems. The formation of an EHR committee to discuss problems with the system in Saudi hospitals is recommended. PMID:26604875

  17. Florida doctors seeing Medicaid patients show broad interest in federal incentives for adopting electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Menachemi, Nir; Yeager, Valerie A; Bilello, Lori; Harle, Christopher A; Sullivan, Christopher B; Siler-Marsiglio, Kendra I

    2011-08-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 aims to expand the use of electronic health records by offering financial incentives to physicians to fully adopt and implement them. We surveyed Florida physicians who deliver care to Medicaid participants to identify their interest in participating in the incentive program. More than 60 percent of all respondents expressed interest in applying for the incentives; of those already using electronic health record systems, 86 percent intend to apply for funding. This relatively high proportion of physicians creates the potential to reach the overall policy goals of the law. Among those not planning to seek incentives, common barriers--especially among nonusers of electronic health records--were "costs involved" (69 percent), "need more information about incentive program" (42 percent), and uncertainty about what system to purchase (42 percent). We suggest that these findings hold implications for the Regional Extension Centers working to help physicians achieve the federal meaningful-use criteria that are a condition of receiving the incentives. In particular, the centers should focus on providing physicians with information about costs of electronic health record systems.

  18. The consumer's view of the electronic health record: engaging patients in EHR adoption.

    PubMed

    Cox, Barbara; Thornewill, Judah

    2008-01-01

    The consumer/patient perspective is often forgotten as it pertains to the electronic health record. This paper focused on engaging the patient in the adoption of EHRs. The Louisville Health Information Exchange (LouHIE) recently completed an extensive research study on this topic, using several data gathering techniques to capture the interest, benefits, concerns and payment choices of the community. This article focuses on the findings of the study and the steps LouHIE will take to ensure consumer perspectives are being heard. Specific elements of the article include explaining the consumer research study and results; discussing the patient-related benefits of an EHR, the barriers, interests and the payment choices as described by the research group; and discussing action steps needed to continue engaging the consumer/patient in the adoption process.

  19. Exploring the business case for ambulatory electronic health record system adoption.

    PubMed

    Song, Paula H; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Robbins, Julie; McCullough, Jeffrey S

    2011-01-01

    Widespread implementation and use of electronic health record (EHR) systems has been recognized by healthcare leaders as a cornerstone strategy for systematically reducing medical errors and improving clinical quality. However, EHR adoption requires a significant capital investment for healthcare providers, and cost is often cited as a barrier. Despite the capital requirements, a true business case for EHR system adoption and implementation has not been made. This is of concern, as the lack of a business case can influence decision making about EHR investments. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of business case analysis in healthcare organizations' decisions to invest in ambulatory EHR systems, and to identify what factors organizations considered when justifying an ambulatory EHR. Using a qualitative case study approach, we explored how five organizations that are considered to have best practices in ambulatory EHR system implementation had evaluated the business case for EHR adoption. We found that although the rigor of formal business case analysis was highly variable, informants across these organizations consistently reported perceiving that a positive business case for EHR system adoption existed, especially when they considered both financial and non-financial benefits. While many consider EHR system adoption inevitable in healthcare, this viewpoint should not deter managers from conducting a business case analysis. Results of such an analysis can inform healthcare organizations' understanding about resource allocation needs, help clarify expectations about financial and clinical performance metrics to be monitored through EHR systems, and form the basis for ongoing organizational support to ensure successful system implementation.

  20. Quality Measure Performance in Small Practices Before and After Electronic Health Record Adoption

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Colleen M.; Wang, Jason J.; Parsons, Amanda S.; Shih, Sarah C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To date, little research has been published on the impact that the transition from paper-based record keeping to the use of electronic health records (EHR) has on performance on clinical quality measures. This study examines whether small, independent medical practices improved in their performance on nine clinical quality measures soon after adopting EHRs. Methods: Data abstracted by manual review of paper and electronic charts for 6,007 patients across 35 small, primary care practices were used to calculate rates of nine clinical quality measures two years before and up to two years after EHR adoption. Results: For seven measures, population-level performance rates did not change before EHR adoption. Rates of antithrombotic therapy and smoking status recorded increased soon after EHR adoption; increases in blood pressure control occurred later. Rates of hemoglobin A1c testing, BMI recorded, and cholesterol testing decreased before rebounding; smoking cessation intervention, hemoglobin A1c control and cholesterol control did not significantly change. Discussion: The effect of EHR adoption on performance on clinical quality measures is mixed. To improve performance, practices may need to develop new workflows and adapt to different documentation methods after EHR adoption. Conclusions: In the short term, EHRs may facilitate documentation of information needed for improving the delivery of clinical preventive services. Policies and incentive programs intended to drive improvement should include in their timelines consideration of the complexity of clinical tasks and documentation needed to capture performance on measures when developing timelines, and should also include assistance with workflow redesign to fully integrate EHRs into medical practice. PMID:25848635

  1. An Analysis of the External Environmental and Internal Organizational Factors Associated with Adoption of the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Clemens Scott

    2013-01-01

    Despite a Presidential Order in 2004 that launched national incentives for the use of health information technology, specifically the Electronic Health Record (EHR), adoption of the EHR has been slow. This study attempts to quantify factors associated with adoption of the EHR and Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) by combining multiple…

  2. Legal, Ethical, and Financial Dilemmas in Electronic Health Record Adoption and Use

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate several innovations capable of reforming health care. Despite their promise, many currently unanswered legal, ethical, and financial questions threaten the widespread adoption and use of EHRs. Key legal dilemmas that must be addressed in the near-term pertain to the extent of clinicians' responsibilities for reviewing the entire computer-accessible clinical synopsis from multiple clinicians and institutions, the liabilities posed by overriding clinical decision support warnings and alerts, and mechanisms for clinicians to publically report potential EHR safety issues. Ethical dilemmas that need additional discussion relate to opt-out provisions that exclude patients from electronic record storage, sale of deidentified patient data by EHR vendors, adolescent control of access to their data, and use of electronic data repositories to redesign the nation's health care delivery and payment mechanisms on the basis of statistical analyses. Finally, one overwhelming financial question is who should pay for EHR implementation because most users and current owners of these systems will not receive the majority of benefits. The authors recommend that key stakeholders begin discussing these issues in a national forum. These actions can help identify and prioritize solutions to the key legal, ethical, and financial dilemmas discussed, so that widespread, safe, effective, interoperable EHRs can help transform health care. PMID:21422090

  3. Electronic Health Records: Applying Diffusion of Innovation Theory to the Relationship between Multifactor Authentication and EHR Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Daeron C.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are increasingly becoming accepted as future direction of medical record management systems. Programs such as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have provided incentives to hospitals that adopt EHR systems. In spite of these incentives, the perception of EHR adoption is that is has not achieved the…

  4. Factors Associated With Adoption of the Electronic Health Record System Among Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Clement SK; Tong, Ellen LH; Cheung, Ngai Tseung; Chan, Wai Man; Wang, Harry HX; Kwan, Mandy WM; Fan, Carmen KM; Liu, Kirin QL

    2013-01-01

    Background A territory-wide Internet-based electronic patient record allows better patient care in different sectors. The engagement of private physicians is one of the major facilitators for implementation, but there is limited information about the current adoption level of electronic medical record (eMR) among private primary care physicians. Objective This survey measured the adoption level, enabling factors, and hindering factors of eMR, among private physicians in Hong Kong. It also evaluated the key functions and the popularity of electronic systems and vendors used by these private practitioners. Methods A central registry consisting of 4324 private practitioners was set up. Invitations for self-administered surveys and the completed questionnaires were sent and returned via fax, email, postal mail, and on-site clinic visits. Current users and non-users of eMR system were compared according to their demographic and practice characteristics. Student’s t tests and chi-square tests were used for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Results A total of 524 completed surveys (response rate 524/4405 11.90%) were collected. The proportion of using eMR in private clinics was 79.6% (417/524). When compared with non-users, the eMR users were younger (users: 48.4 years SD 10.6 years vs non-users: 61.7 years SD 10.2 years, P<.001); more were female physicians (users: 80/417, 19.2% vs non-users: 14/107, 13.1%, P=.013); possessed less clinical experience (with more than20 years of practice: users: 261/417, 62.6% vs non-user: 93/107, 86.9%, P<.001); fewer worked under a Health Maintenance Organization (users: 347/417, 83.2% vs non-users: 97/107, 90.7%, P<.001) and more worked with practice partners (users: 126/417, 30.2% vs non-users: 4/107, 3.7%, P<.001). Efficiency (379/417, 90.9%) and reduction of medical errors (229/417, 54.9%) were the major enabling factors, while patient-unfriendliness (58/107, 54.2%) and limited consultation time (54/107, 50

  5. 77 FR 48007 - Administrative Simplification: Adoption of Operating Rules for Health Care Electronic Funds...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... Spending Projections Through 2020: Economic Recovery and Reform drive faster Spending Growth,'' Health..., ``The achievement of the vision of seamless electronic flow of information in a confidential and...

  6. The Study of Electronic Medical Record Adoption in a Medicare Certified Home Health Agency Using a Grounded Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Joy L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study was to examine the experiences of clinicians in the adoption of Electronic Medical Records in a Medicare certified Home Health Agency. An additional goal for this study was to triangulate qualitative research between describing, explaining, and exploring technology acceptance. The experiences…

  7. Travelers' Health: International Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... a malaria-endemic area (See Chapter 3, Malaria ). Tuberculosis All internationally adopted children should be screened for tuberculosis (TB) after arriving in the United States. Internationally ...

  8. Administrative simplification: adoption of operating rules for health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transactions. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2012-08-10

    This interim final rule with comment period implements parts of section 1104 of the Affordable Care Act which requires the adoption of operating rules for the health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction.

  9. Health care information technology in rural America: electronic medical record adoption status in meeting the national agenda.

    PubMed

    Bahensky, James A; Jaana, Mirou; Ward, Marcia M

    2008-01-01

    Continuing is a national political drive for investments in health care information technology (HIT) that will allow the transformation of health care for quality improvement and cost reduction. Despite several initiatives by the federal government to spur this development, HIT implementation has been limited, particularly in the rural market. The status of technology use in the transformation effort is reviewed by examining electronic medical records (EMRs), analyzing the existing rural environment, identifying barriers and factors affecting their development and implementation, and recommending needed steps to make this transformation occur, particularly in rural communities. A review of the literature for HIT in rural settings indicates that very little progress has been made in the adoption and use of HIT in rural America. Financial barriers and a large number of HIT vendors offering different solutions present significant risks to rural health care providers wanting to invest in HIT. Although evidence in the literature has demonstrated benefits of adopting HIT such as EMRs, important technical, policy, organizational, and financial barriers still exist that prevent the implementation of these systems in rural settings. To expedite the spread of HIT in rural America, federal and state governments along with private payers, who are important beneficiaries of HIT, must make difficult decisions as to who pays for the investment in this technology, along with driving standards, simplifying approaches for reductions in risk, and creating a workable operational plan.

  10. Chief Information Officer's Role in Adopting an Interoperable Electronic Health Record System for Medical Data Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akpabio, Akpabio Enebong Ema

    2013-01-01

    Despite huge growth in hospital technology systems, there remains a dearth of literature examining health care administrator's perceptions of the efficacy of interoperable EHR systems. A qualitative research methodology was used in this multiple-case study to investigate the application of diffusion of innovations theory and the technology…

  11. Electronic health records, adoption, quality of care, legal and privacy issues and their implementation in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Ben-Assuli, Ofir

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the healthcare sector has shown a growing interest in information technologies. Two popular health IT (HIT) products are the electronic health record (EHR) and health information exchange (HIE) networks. The introduction of these tools is believed to improve care, but has also raised some important questions and legal and privacy issues. The implementation of these systems has not gone smoothly, and still faces some considerable barriers. This article reviews EHR and HIE to address these obstacles, and analyzes the current state of development and adoption in various countries around the world. Moreover, legal and ethical concerns that may be encountered by EHR users and purchasers are reviewed. Finally, links and interrelations between EHR and HIE and several quality of care issues in today's healthcare domain are examined with a focus on EHR and HIE in the emergency department (ED), whose unique characteristics makes it an environment in which the implementation of such technology may be a major contributor to health, but also faces substantial challenges. The paper ends with a discussion of specific policy implications and recommendations based on an examination of the current limitations of these systems.

  12. Building a house on shifting sand: methodological considerations when evaluating the implementation and adoption of national electronic health record systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A commitment to Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems now constitutes a core part of many governments’ healthcare reform strategies. The resulting politically-initiated large-scale or national EHR endeavors are challenging because of their ambitious agendas of change, the scale of resources needed to make them work, the (relatively) short timescales set, and the large number of stakeholders involved, all of whom pursue somewhat different interests. These initiatives need to be evaluated to establish if they improve care and represent value for money. Methods Critical reflections on these complexities in the light of experience of undertaking the first national, longitudinal, and sociotechnical evaluation of the implementation and adoption of England’s National Health Service’s Care Records Service (NHS CRS). Results/discussion We advance two key arguments. First, national programs for EHR implementations are likely to take place in the shifting sands of evolving sociopolitical and sociotechnical and contexts, which are likely to shape them in significant ways. This poses challenges to conventional evaluation approaches which draw on a model of baseline operations → intervention → changed operations (outcome). Second, evaluation of such programs must account for this changing context by adapting to it. This requires careful and creative choice of ontological, epistemological and methodological assumptions. Summary New and significant challenges are faced in evaluating national EHR implementation endeavors. Based on experiences from this national evaluation of the implementation and adoption of the NHS CRS in England, we argue for an approach to these evaluations which moves away from seeing EHR systems as Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) projects requiring an essentially outcome-centred assessment towards a more interpretive approach that reflects the situated and evolving nature of EHR seen within multiple specific settings and

  13. Drivers and Barriers in Health IT Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Avgar, A.C.; Litwin, A.S.; Pronovost, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite near (and rare) consensus that the adoption and diffusion of health information technology (health IT) will bolster outcomes for organizations, individuals, and the healthcare system as a whole, there has been surprisingly little consideration of the structures and processes within organizations that might drive the adoption and effective use of the technology. Management research provides a useful lens through which to analyze both the determinants of investment and the benefits that can ultimately be derived from these investments. This paper provides a conceptual framework for understanding health IT adoption. In doing so, this paper highlights specific organizational barriers or enablers at different stages of the adoption process – investment, implementation, and use – and at different levels of organizational decision-making – strategic, operational, and frontline. This framework will aid both policymakers and organizational actors as they make sense of the transition from paper-based to electronic systems. PMID:23646093

  14. Reproductive health professionals' adoption of emerging technologies for health promotion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peggy B; Buzi, Ruth S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess reproductive health professionals' familiarity with and use of various electronic technologies to support health promotion. The study also examined the relationship between demographic characteristics and attitudes and beliefs of the effectiveness of new technologies and perceived barriers for usage. A total of 165 reproductive health professionals at two conferences related to reproductive health in the United States completed the study survey. Personal and organizational factors affected the adoption of electronic technologies for health promotion. This included lack of knowledge, skills, and confidence as well as privacy concerns. The results of the study also suggested that being from an older generation was associated with having lower levels of knowledge, skills, and confidence in using new media. These findings highlight the importance of creating learning opportunities on the use of new technology for health promotion as well as addressing specific perceived barriers among reproductive health professionals in order to promote the adoption of these technologies.

  15. Health Information Technology Adoption in California Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Katherine K.; Rudin, Robert S.; Wilson, Machelle D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives National and state initiatives to spur adoption of electronic health record (EHR) use and health information exchange (HIE) among providers in rural and underserved communities have been in place for 15 years. Our goal was to systematically assess the impact of these initiatives by quantifying the level of adoption and key factors associated with adoption among community health centers (CHCs) in California. Study Design Cross-sectional statewide survey. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of all California primary care CHCs from August to September 2013. Multiple logistic regressions were fit to test for associations between various practice characteristics and adoption of EHRs, Meaningful Use (MU)–certified EHRs, and HIE. For the multivariable model, we included those variables which were significant at the P = .10 level in the univariate tests. Results We received responses from 194 CHCs (73.5% response rate). Adoption of any EHRs (80.3%) and MU–certified EHRs (94.6% of those with an EHR) was very high. Adoption of HIE is substantial (48.7%) and took place within a few years (mean = 2.61 years; SD = 2.01). More than half (54.7%) of CHCs are able to receive data into the EHR, indicating some level of interoperability. Patient engagement capacity is moderate, with 21.6% offering a personal health record, and 55.2% electronic visit summaries. Rural location and belonging to a multi-site clinic organization both increase the odds of adoption of EHRs, HIE, and electronic visit summary, with odds ratios ranging from 0.63 to 3.28 (all P values <.05). Conclusions Greater adoption of health information technology (IT) in rural areas may be the result of both federal and state investments. As CHCs lack access to capital for investments, continued support of technology infrastructure may be needed for them to further leverage health IT to improve healthcare. PMID:26760431

  16. Implementation and adoption of nationwide electronic health records in secondary care in England: qualitative analysis of interim results from a prospective national evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Ann; Cresswell, Kathrin; Takian, Amirhossein; Petrakaki, Dimitra; Crowe, Sarah; Cornford, Tony; Barber, Nicholas; Avery, Anthony; Fernando, Bernard; Jacklin, Ann; Prescott, Robin; Klecun, Ela; Paton, James; Lichtner, Valentina; Quinn, Casey; Ali, Maryam; Morrison, Zoe; Jani, Yogini; Waring, Justin; Marsden, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To describe and evaluate the implementation and adoption of detailed electronic health records in secondary care in England and thereby provide early feedback for the ongoing local and national rollout of the NHS Care Records Service. Design A mixed methods, longitudinal, multisite, socio-technical case study. Setting Five NHS acute hospital and mental health trusts that have been the focus of early implementation efforts and at which interim data collection and analysis are complete. Data sources and analysis Dataset for the evaluation consists of semi-structured interviews, documents and field notes, observations, and quantitative data. Qualitative data were analysed thematically with a socio-technical coding matrix, combined with additional themes that emerged from the data. Main results Hospital electronic health record applications are being developed and implemented far more slowly than was originally envisioned; the top-down, standardised approach has needed to evolve to admit more variation and greater local choice, which hospital trusts want in order to support local activity. Despite considerable delays and frustrations, support for electronic health records remains strong, including from NHS clinicians. Political and financial factors are now perceived to threaten nationwide implementation of electronic health records. Interviewees identified a range of consequences of long term, centrally negotiated contracts to deliver the NHS Care Records Service in secondary care, particularly as NHS trusts themselves are not party to these contracts. These include convoluted communication channels between different stakeholders, unrealistic deployment timelines, delays, and applications that could not quickly respond to changing national and local NHS priorities. Our data suggest support for a “middle-out” approach to implementing hospital electronic health records, combining government direction with increased local autonomy, and for restricting

  17. Health Care Information Technology in Rural America: Electronic Medical Record Adoption Status in Meeting the National Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahensky, James A.; Jaana, Mirou; Ward, Marcia M.

    2008-01-01

    Continuing is a national political drive for investments in health care information technology (HIT) that will allow the transformation of health care for quality improvement and cost reduction. Despite several initiatives by the federal government to spur this development, HIT implementation has been limited, particularly in the rural market. The…

  18. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Adoption KidsHealth > For Teens > Adoption Print A A A ... of Adoption en español La adopción What Is Adoption? Caz knew she'd been adopted as a ...

  19. The Consumer Health Information System Adoption Model.

    PubMed

    Monkman, Helen; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2015-01-01

    Derived from overlapping concepts in consumer health, a consumer health information system refers to any of the broad range of applications, tools, and educational resources developed to empower consumers with knowledge, techniques, and strategies, to manage their own health. As consumer health information systems become increasingly popular, it is important to explore the factors that impact their adoption and success. Accumulating evidence indicates a relationship between usability and consumers' eHealth Literacy skills and the demands consumer HISs place on their skills. Here, we present a new model called the Consumer Health Information System Adoption Model, which depicts both consumer eHealth literacy skills and system demands on eHealth literacy as moderators with the potential to affect the strength of relationship between usefulness and usability (predictors of usage) and adoption, value, and successful use (actual usage outcomes). Strategies for aligning these two moderating factors are described.

  20. Progress in electronic medical record adoption in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng; Gupta, Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the rate of adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) by physicians across Canada, provincial incentives, and perceived benefits of and barriers to EMR adoption. Data sources Data on EMR adoption in Canada were collected from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Health Council of Canada, Canada Health Infoway, government websites, regional EMR associations, and health professional association websites. Study selection After removal of duplicate articles, 236 documents were found matching the original search. After using the filter Canada, 12 documents remained. Additional documents were obtained from each province’s EMR website and from the Canada Health Infoway website. Synthesis Since 2006, Canadian EMR adoption rates have increased from about 20% of practitioners to an estimated 62% of practitioners in 2013, with substantial regional disparities ranging from roughly 40% of physicians in New Brunswick and Quebec to more than 75% of physicians in Alberta. Provincial incentives vary widely but appear to have only a weak relationship with the rate of adoption. Many adopters use only a fraction of their software’s available functions. User-cited benefits to adoption include time savings, improved record keeping, heightened patient safety, and confidence in retrieved data when EMRs are used efficiently. Barriers to adoption include financial and time constraints, lack of knowledgeable support personnel, and lack of interoperability with hospital and pharmacy systems. Conclusion Canadian physicians remain at the stage of EMR adoption. Progression in EMR use requires experienced, knowledgeable technical support during implementation, and financial support for the transcription of patient data from paper to electronic media. The interoperability of EMR offerings for hospitals, pharmacies, and clinics is the rate-limiting factor in achieving a unified EMR solution for Canada. PMID:27035020

  1. Pricing Health Behavior Interventions to Promote Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Ribisl, Kurt M.; Leeman, Jennifer; Glasser, Allison M.

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high cost of delivering many public health interventions limits their potential for broad public impact by reducing their likelihood of adoption and maintenance over time. Practitioners identify cost as the primary factor for which interventions they select to implement, but researchers rarely disseminate cost information or consider its importance when developing new interventions. A new approach is proposed, whereby intervention developers assess what individuals and agencies adopting their interventions are willing to pay and then design interventions that are responsive to this price range. The ultimate goal is to develop effective and affordable interventions, called lean interventions, which are widely adopted and have greater public health impact. PMID:24842743

  2. Managing the Challenges of Adopting Electronic Medical Records: An Exploratory Study of the Challenges Faced by African American Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddick, William P.

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of technology within the health care industry is viewed as a possible solution for lowering costs and improving health care delivery to patients. Electronic medical record system(s) (EMRS) are information technology tools viewed within the health care industry as a possible solution for aiding improvements in health care…

  3. [International adoption: children's health risk evolution].

    PubMed

    Dartiguenave, C

    2012-05-01

    The socioeconomic and sanitary conditions in many countries make it necessary to weigh as precisely as possible the uncertainties which might affect the health of internationally adopted children, which is one of the key drivers to adoption decision. Indeed, health troubles are more and more frequent among children proposed by countries, at a time when there are fewer children to be adopted. Hence the institutions and the actors in the field of international adoption are compelled to frequently update their professional practices, so as to cope both with the declining offer for adoptable children and with the increasing pressure from the birth countries of children to make host countries adopt children with high age or with special needs. It also requires from the administrations the will to provide better initial information and to implement the demand for an agreement. Meanwhile, in spite of those growing constraints, adopting families have been more and more risk adverse during the latest decades, this being a common trend in our developed countries.

  4. Drivers and barriers in health IT adoption: a proposed framework.

    PubMed

    Avgar, A C; Litwin, A S; Pronovost, P J

    2012-01-01

    Despite near (and rare) consensus that the adoption and diffusion of health information technology (health IT) will bolster outcomes for organizations, individuals, and the healthcare system as a whole, there has been surprisingly little consideration of the structures and processes within organizations that might drive the adoption and effective use of the technology. Management research provides a useful lens through which to analyze both the determinants of investment and the benefits that can ultimately be derived from these investments. This paper provides a conceptual framework for understanding health IT adoption. In doing so, this paper highlights specific organizational barriers or enablers at different stages of the adoption process - investment, implementation, and use - and at different levels of organizational decision-making - strategic, operational, and frontline. This framework will aid both policymakers and organizational actors as they make sense of the transition from paper-based to electronic systems.

  5. Exploring factors related to the adoption and acceptance of an internet-based electronic personal health management tool (EPHMT) in a low income, special needs population of people living with HIV and AIDS in New York City.

    PubMed

    Odlum, Michelle; Gordon, Peter; Camhi, Eli; Valdez, Esmerlin; Bakken, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Access to personal health information assists efforts to improve health outcomes and creates a population of active and informed health consumers. Understanding this significance, Healthy People 2020 retained, as a Focus Area, the need for improved interactive Health Communication and HIT. Attainment of this goal includes increasing the use of Internet-based electronic personal health management tools (EPHMT). Health information management, essential for favorable health outcomes, can be problematic in low income, special needs populations with complex chronic illnesses such as HIV/AIDS. Furthermore, barriers to the adoption and acceptance of an EPHMT in such populations have not been well explored. The current study seeks to explore the usability of an EPHMT entitled MyHealthProfile and to identify perceived health information needs in a vulnerable population of people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWH) that have access to an EPHMT through their Medicaid Special Needs Plan.

  6. Quality and Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesh, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Adoption and use of health information technology, the electronic health record (EHR) in particular, has the potential to help improve the quality of care, increase patient safety, and reduce health care costs. Unfortunately, adoption and use of health information technology has been slow, especially when compared to the adoption and use of…

  7. Key success factors behind electronic medical record adoption in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Narattharaksa, Kanida; Speece, Mark; Newton, Charles; Bulyalert, Damrongsak

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the elements that health care personnel in Thailand believe are necessary for successful adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Design/methodology/approach Initial qualitative in-depth interviews with physicians to adapt key elements from the literature to the Thai context. The 12 elements identified included things related to managing the implementation and to IT expertise. The nationwide survey was supported by the Ministry of Public Health and returned 1,069 usable questionnaires (response rate 42 percent) from a range of medical personnel. Findings The key elements clearly separated into a managerial dimension and an IT dimension. All were considered fairly important, but managerial expertise was more critical. In particular, there should be clear EMR project goals and scope, adequate budget allocation, clinical staff must be involved in implementation, and the IT should facilitate good electronic communication. Research limitations/implications Thailand is representative of middle-income developing countries, but there is no guarantee findings can be generalized. National policies differ, as do economic structures of health care industries. The focus is on management at the organizational level, but future research must also examine macro-level issues, as well as gain more depth into thinking of individual health care personnel. Practical implications Technical issues of EMR implementation are certainly important. However, it is clear actual adoption and use of the system also depends very heavily on managerial issues. Originality/value Most research on EMR implementation has been in developed countries, and has often focussed more on technical issues rather than examining managerial issues closely. Health IT is also critical in developing economies, and management of health IT implementation must be well understood.

  8. The Adoption and Diffusion of an Electronic Network for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Julie; Thompson, Ann

    Adoption diffusion theory was used as the theoretical base to study early adopters' use of an electronic communication network for teachers developed at the College of Education at Iowa State University, i.e., the Electronic Educational Exchange (EEE). The EEE is designed to provide a convenient method for the exchange of ideas between student…

  9. To Promote Adoption of Household Health Technologies, Think Beyond Health

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Christina; Platt, Lauren; Slaski, Alexander; Gupta, Rajesh; Miller, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Health risks from poor malaria control, unsafe water, and indoor air pollution are responsible for an important share of the global disease burden—and they can be addressed by efficacious household health technologies that have existed for decades. However, coverage rates of these products among populations at risk remain disappointingly low. We conducted a review of the medical and public health literatures and found that health considerations alone are rarely sufficient motivation for households to adopt and use these technologies. In light of these findings, we argue that health education and persuasion campaigns by themselves are unlikely to be adequate. Instead, health policymakers and professionals must understand what users value beyond health and possibly reengineer health technologies with these concerns in mind. PMID:23948003

  10. To promote adoption of household health technologies, think beyond health.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Mark C; Warner, Christina; Platt, Lauren; Slaski, Alexander; Gupta, Rajesh; Miller, Grant

    2013-10-01

    Health risks from poor malaria control, unsafe water, and indoor air pollution are responsible for an important share of the global disease burden-and they can be addressed by efficacious household health technologies that have existed for decades. However, coverage rates of these products among populations at risk remain disappointingly low. We conducted a review of the medical and public health literatures and found that health considerations alone are rarely sufficient motivation for households to adopt and use these technologies. In light of these findings, we argue that health education and persuasion campaigns by themselves are unlikely to be adequate. Instead, health policymakers and professionals must understand what users value beyond health and possibly reengineer health technologies with these concerns in mind.

  11. International adoption families: a unique health care journey.

    PubMed

    Smit, Eileen M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the health care experiences of families with an internationally adopted child. Content analysis of data from 107 adoptive parents was used to identify themes that characterized health care experiences of the families. Four themes were identified: a) Coming home: Like a lobster thrown into a boiling pot; b) Vigilance: Is my child healthy today? Will my child be healthy tomorrow?; c) Unique health care needs of international adoption families: We are different; and d) Importance of support by health care providers: Do they know or care? Health care providers need to be aware of the unique experiences of the increasing number of international adoption families. The themes identified provide insight into the health care experiences of international adoption families and the crucial role of health care providers in helping international adoption families feel supported on their journey.

  12. Investment subsidies and the adoption of electronic medical records in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dranove, David; Garthwaite, Craig; Li, Bingyang; Ody, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    In February 2009 the U.S. Congress unexpectedly passed the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH). HITECH provides up to $27 billion to promote adoption and appropriate use of Electronic Medical Records (EMR) by hospitals. We measure the extent to which HITECH incentive payments spurred EMR adoption by independent hospitals. Adoption rates for all independent hospitals grew from 48 percent in 2008 to 77 percent by 2011. Absent HITECH incentives, we estimate that the adoption rate would have instead been 67 percent in 2011. When we consider that HITECH funds were available for all hospitals and not just marginal adopters, we estimate that the cost of generating an additional adoption was $48 million. We also estimate that in the absence of HITECH incentives, the 77 percent adoption rate would have been realized by 2013, just 2 years after the date achieved due to HITECH.

  13. Personal health records: key adoption issues and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Raisinghani, Mahesh S; Young, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Electronic Personal Health Records (PHRs) has been perceived as the tool to empower consumers to become active decision-makers of their healthcare instead of leaving the decision to providers. However, there has been the lack of enthusiasm and adoption of PHRs. This paper examines the current healthcare climate and attempts to understand the major challenges associated with PHRs adoption. The paper-based and fragmented healthcare system is no longer appropriate for the digital economy of the 21st century. The integrated health information technology system is the solution to transform clinical practice to consumer centric and information driven. Tools such as PHRs are means to an end that provide better, safer and more affordable healthcare for consumers. However, there has been little research conducted to demonstrate PHR's tangible value, despite the widespread perceived value of these technologies. Although survey data reveals that there is a lack of awareness among the public, consumers are receptive to this concept, especially when a physician recommends it. Key issues in adopting PHRs and strategies for successful implementation of PHRs are discussed.

  14. Electronic Medical Records Adoption and Usage among Osteopathic Physicians in New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Jon I.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology reported a slow rate of adoption of electronic medical records. The present research sought to explore possible reasons for this situation by examining factors that distinguished between users and nonusers of electronic…

  15. Implementation and adoption of nationwide electronic health records in secondary care in England: final qualitative results from prospective national evaluation in “early adopter” hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Cornford, Tony; Barber, Nicholas; Avery, Anthony; Takian, Amirhossein; Lichtner, Valentina; Petrakaki, Dimitra; Crowe, Sarah; Marsden, Kate; Robertson, Ann; Morrison, Zoe; Klecun, Ela; Prescott, Robin; Quinn, Casey; Jani, Yogini; Ficociello, Maryam; Voutsina, Katerina; Paton, James; Fernando, Bernard; Jacklin, Ann; Cresswell, Kathrin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the implementation and adoption of the NHS detailed care records service in “early adopter” hospitals in England. Design Theoretically informed, longitudinal qualitative evaluation based on case studies. Setting 12 “early adopter” NHS acute hospitals and specialist care settings studied over two and a half years. Data sources Data were collected through in depth interviews, observations, and relevant documents relating directly to case study sites and to wider national developments that were perceived to impact on the implementation strategy. Data were thematically analysed, initially within and then across cases. The dataset consisted of 431 semistructured interviews with key stakeholders, including hospital staff, developers, and governmental stakeholders; 590 hours of observations of strategic meetings and use of the software in context; 334 sets of notes from observations, researchers’ field notes, and notes from national conferences; 809 NHS documents; and 58 regional and national documents. Results Implementation has proceeded more slowly, with a narrower scope and substantially less clinical functionality than was originally planned. The national strategy had considerable local consequences (summarised under five key themes), and wider national developments impacted heavily on implementation and adoption. More specifically, delays related to unrealistic expectations about the capabilities of systems; the time needed to build, configure, and customise the software; the work needed to ensure that systems were supporting provision of care; and the needs of end users for training and support. Other factors hampering progress included the changing milieu of NHS policy and priorities; repeatedly renegotiated national contracts; different stages of development of diverse NHS care records service systems; and a complex communication process between different stakeholders, along with contractual arrangements that largely excluded NHS

  16. Information Technology Adoption and Procedural Performance in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Yunfeng

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation studies two specific topics on information technologies in health care industry. (1) The status and change of integrated health care delivery system level IT spending and hospital level IT adoption between 1999 and 2006. (2) The potential link between hospital level IT adoptions and quality as quantified by procedural performance…

  17. International and Transracial Adoptions: A Mental Health Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Christopher; And Others

    The key dependent variable in adoption research is the child's mental health, in the short and the long term. Defining mental health as the development of basic ego strength and a feeling of self-worth, which enable an individual to cope with stresses later in life, this book focuses on how well adolescents and young adults have fared in adoption.…

  18. [Adoption].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue addresses adoption and the young child's life. Contributors suggest ways in which practitioners in many professions and settings can better understand and support adoptive families. The first article, "Adoption, 1990" by Barbara F. Nordhaus and Albert J. Solnit, reviews the history of adoption and notes obstacles to…

  19. Electronic Textbooks: Antecedents of Students' Adoption and Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terpend, Regis; Gattiker, Thomas F.; Lowe, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Faculty and students are increasingly faced with the opportunity to use electronic versions of textbooks (e-texts). Despite the advantages of e-texts and recent advances in technology, evidence suggests that students are still reluctant to adopt and use e-texts. This situation leads us to investigate two research questions: What factors contribute…

  20. Adopting feminist strategies to improve women's health.

    PubMed

    James, T

    The new public health movement offers community nurses a context in which to address the continuing inequalities faced by women in society. This paper explores the use of feminism as a tool for this. It considers some of the constraints on feminist nursing practice and offers some ways forward.

  1. Privacy Attitudes among Early Adopters of Emerging Health Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Cynthia; Bietz, Matthew J.; Patrick, Kevin; Bloss, Cinnamon S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Advances in health technology such as genome sequencing and wearable sensors now allow for the collection of highly granular personal health data from individuals. It is unclear how people think about privacy in the context of these emerging health technologies. An open question is whether early adopters of these advances conceptualize privacy in different ways than non-early adopters. Purpose This study sought to understand privacy attitudes of early adopters of emerging health technologies. Methods Transcripts from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with early adopters of genome sequencing and health devices and apps were analyzed with a focus on participant attitudes and perceptions of privacy. Themes were extracted using inductive content analysis. Results Although interviewees were willing to share personal data to support scientific advancements, they still expressed concerns, as well as uncertainty about who has access to their data, and for what purpose. In short, they were not dismissive of privacy risks. Key privacy-related findings are organized into four themes as follows: first, personal data privacy; second, control over personal information; third, concerns about discrimination; and fourth, contributing personal data to science. Conclusion Early adopters of emerging health technologies appear to have more complex and nuanced conceptions of privacy than might be expected based on their adoption of personal health technologies and participation in open science. Early adopters also voiced uncertainty about the privacy implications of their decisions to use new technologies and share their data for research. Though not representative of the general public, studies of early adopters can provide important insights into evolving attitudes toward privacy in the context of emerging health technologies and personal health data research. PMID:27832194

  2. The State and Pattern of Health Information Technology Adoption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Innovations in information technology (IT) have improved efficiency and quality in many industries. Healthcare has not been one of them. Although...has been called for to speed the adoption process for Health Information Technology (HIT), based on the widespread belief that its adoption, or

  3. Factors influencing the adoption of health information technologies: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Garavand, Ali; Mohseni, Mohammah; Asadi, Heshmatollah; Etemadi, Manal; Moradi-Joo, Mohammad; Moosavi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The successful implementation of health information technologies requires investigating the factors affecting the acceptance and use of them. The aim of this study was to determine the most important factors affecting the adoption of health information technologies by doing a systematic review on the factors affecting the acceptance of health information technology. Methods This systematic review was conducted by searching the major databases, such as Google Scholar, Emerald, Science Direct, Web of Science, Pubmed, and Scopus. We used various keywords, such as adoption, use, acceptance of IT in medicine, hospitals, and IT theories in health services, and we also searched on the basis of several important technologies, such as Electronic Health Records (HER), Electronic Patient Records (EPR), Electronic Medical Records (EMR), Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE), Hospital Information System (HIS), Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), and others in the 2004–2014 period. Results The technology acceptance model (TAM) is the most important model used to identify the factors influencing the adoption of information technologies in the health system; also, the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model has had a lot of applications in recent years in the health system. Ease of use, usefulness, social impact, facilitating conditions, attitudes and behavior of users are effective in the adoption of health information technologies. Conclusion By considering various factors, including ease of use, usefulness, and social impact, the rate of the adoption of health information technology can be increased. PMID:27757179

  4. Nurses' Perceptions of the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawley, Rocquel Devonne

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of electronic health records (EHR) by health care organizations has been limited. Despite the broad consensus on the potential benefits of EHRs, health care organizations have been slow to adopt the technology. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore licensed practical and registered nurses'…

  5. The adoption of mobile health management services: an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Chien; Jen, Wen-Yuan

    2012-06-01

    As their populations age, many countries are facing the increasing economic pressure of providing healthcare to their people. In Taiwan, this problem is exacerbated by an increasing rate of obesity and obesity-related conditions. Encouraging the adoption of personal health management services is one way to maintain current levels of personal health and to efficiently manage the distribution of healthcare resources. This study introduces Mobile Health Management Services (MHMS) and employs the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to explore the intention of students in Executive Master of Business Management programs to adopt mobile health management technology. Partial least squares (PLS) was used to analyze the collected data, and the results revealed that "perceived usefulness" and "attitude" significantly affected the behavioral intention of adopting MHMS. Both "perceived ease of use" and "perceived usefulness," significantly affected "attitude," and "perceived ease of use" significantly affected "perceived usefulness" as well. The results also show that the determinants of intention toward MHMS differed with age; young adults had higher intention to adopt MHMS to manage their personal health. Therefore, relevant governmental agencies may profitably promote the management of personal health among this population. Successful promotion of personal health management will contribute to increases in both the level of general health and the efficient management of healthcare resources.

  6. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... biological families) and where they came from. This curiosity often becomes more intense as part of the ... adoptive family or feel close to them. This curiosity, which can feel quite intense, is a normal ...

  7. Health information systems adoption: findings from a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Maryati Mohd; Stergioulas, Lampros; Zugic, Jasmina

    2007-01-01

    Earlier evaluation studies on Health Information Systems (HIS) adoption have highlighted a large number of adoption problems that were attributed to the lack of fit between technology, human and organisation factors. Lessons can be learned from these evaluation studies by identifying the most important factors of HIS adoption. In order to study the adoption issue, a qualitative systematic review has been performed using a recently introduced framework, known as HOT-fit (Human, Organisation and Technology fit). The paper identifies and highlights the following critical adoption factors: technology (ease of use, system usefulness, system flexibility, time efficiency, information accessibility and relevancy); human (user training, user perception, user roles, user skills, clarity of system purpose, user involvement); organisation (leadership and support, clinical process, user involvement, internal communication, inter organisational system, as well as the fit between them. The findings can be used to guide future system development and inform relevant decision making.

  8. Understanding Electronic Medical Record Adoption in the United States: Communication and Sociocultural Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kreps, Gary L; Polit, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper adopts a communication and sociocultural perspective to analyze the factors behind the lag in electronic medical record (EMR) adoption in the United States. Much of the extant research on this topic has emphasized economic factors, particularly, lack of economic incentives, as the primary cause of the delay in EMR adoption. This prompted the Health Information Technology on Economic and Clinical Health Act that allow financial incentives through the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services for many health care organizations planning to adopt EMR. However, financial incentives alone have not solved the problem; many new innovations do not diffuse even when offered for free. Thus, this paper underlines the need to consider communication and sociocultural factors to develop a better understanding of the impediments of EMR adoption. Objective The objective of this paper was to develop a holistic understanding of EMR adoption by identifying and analyzing the impact of communication and sociocultural factors that operate at 3 levels: macro (environmental), meso (organizational), and micro (individual). Methods We use the systems approach to focus on the 3 levels (macro, meso, and micro) and developed propositions at each level drawing on the communication and sociocultural perspectives. Results Our analysis resulted in 10 propositions that connect communication and sociocultural aspects with EMR adoption. Conclusions This paper brings perspectives from the social sciences that have largely been missing in the extant literature of health information technology (HIT) adoption. In doing so, it implies how communication and sociocultural factors may complement (and in some instances, reinforce) the impact of economic factors on HIT adoption. PMID:23612390

  9. Health care technology adoption and diffusion in a social context.

    PubMed

    Coyte, Peter C; Holmes, Dave

    2007-02-01

    This article highlights mechanisms that may further sustainable technological development for the 21st century. The distributional effects associated with the adoption and diffusion of health care technologies are addressed wherein the capacity to capitalize on the health gains from the adoption of technology varies in society. These effects are caused by the actions of individuals as they segment themselves into distinct social groups. The circumstances under which social institutions are further segmented are explored and may motivate public sector limits on the funding for and diffusion of health care technologies. Safety and efficacy benchmarks are necessary but insufficient conditions for sustainability as product advantage on grounds of cost-effectiveness must also be demonstrated. Furthermore, given the substantial role played by public sector decision makers in purchasing health care technologies, the distributional consequences associated with the uptake and diffusion of technology need to be gauged by product designers and those responsible for marketing.

  10. Variation In Rural Health Information Technology Adoption And Use.

    PubMed

    Heisey-Grove, Dawn M

    2016-02-01

    While rural hospitals and physicians have adopted health information technology at the same, or greater, rates as their urban counterparts, meaningful-use attestation varies dramatically among rural providers. Also, rural providers are more likely to skip a year of declaring that they have met meaningful-use requirements, putting them at a financial disadvantage compared to urban providers.

  11. Health information technology adoption in U.S. acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Seblega, Binyam; Wan, Thomas; Unruh, Lynn; Agiro, Abiy; Miao, Li

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies show that the healthcare industry lags behind many other economic sectors in the adoption of information technology. The purpose of this study is to understand differences in structural characteristics between providers that do and that do not adopt Health Information Technology (HIT) applications. Publicly available secondary data were used from three sources: American Hospital Association (AHA) annual survey, Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) analytics annual survey, and Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) databases. Fifty-two information technologies were grouped into three clusters: clinical, administrative, and strategic decision making ITs. Negative binomial regression was applied with adoption of technology as the dependent variables and eight organizational and contextual factors as the independent variables. Hospitals adopt a relatively larger proportion of administrative information technology as compared to clinical and strategic IT. Large size, urban location and HMO penetration were found to be the most influential hospital characteristics that positively affect information technology adoption. There are still considerable variations in the adoption of information technology across hospitals and in the type of technology adopted. Organizational factors appear to be more influential than market factors when it comes to information technology adoption. The future research may examine whether the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program in 2011 would increase the information technology uses in hospitals as it provides financial incentives for HER adoptions and uses among providers.

  12. What Constitutes Adoption of the Web: A Methodological Problem in Assessing Adoption of the World Wide Web for Electronic Commerce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn Domas; Abels, Eileen G.; Gordon-Murnane, Laura

    1998-01-01

    Reports on methodological developments in a project to assess the adoption of the Web by publishers of business information for electronic commerce. Describes the approach used on a sample of 20 business publishers to identify five clusters of publishers ranging from traditionalist to innovator. Distinguishes between adopters and nonadopters of…

  13. Health Literacy and Health Information Technology Adoption: The Potential for a New Digital Divide

    PubMed Central

    Mabry-Flynn, Amanda; Champlin, Sara; Donovan, Erin E; Pounders, Kathrynn

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately one-half of American adults exhibit low health literacy and thus struggle to find and use health information. Low health literacy is associated with negative outcomes including overall poorer health. Health information technology (HIT) makes health information available directly to patients through electronic tools including patient portals, wearable technology, and mobile apps. The direct availability of this information to patients, however, may be complicated by misunderstanding of HIT privacy and information sharing. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether health literacy is associated with patients’ use of four types of HIT tools: fitness and nutrition apps, activity trackers, and patient portals. Additionally, we sought to explore whether health literacy is associated with patients’ perceived ease of use and usefulness of these HIT tools, as well as patients’ perceptions of privacy offered by HIT tools and trust in government, media, technology companies, and health care. This study is the first wide-scale investigation of these interrelated concepts. Methods Participants were 4974 American adults (n=2102, 42.26% male, n=3146, 63.25% white, average age 43.5, SD 16.7 years). Participants completed the Newest Vital Sign measure of health literacy and indicated their actual use of HIT tools, as well as the perceived ease of use and usefulness of these applications. Participants also answered questions regarding information privacy and institutional trust, as well as demographic items. Results Cross-tabulation analysis indicated that adequate versus less than adequate health literacy was significantly associated with use of fitness apps (P=.02), nutrition apps (P<.001), activity trackers (P<.001), and patient portals (P<.001). Additionally, greater health literacy was significantly associated with greater perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness across all HIT tools after controlling for demographics

  14. Adoption of Clinical Information Systems in Health Services Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Charles J.; Holland, Gloria J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual model of factors which influence organizational decisions to invest in the installation of clinical information systems. Using results of previous research as a framework, the relative influence of clinical, fiscal, and strategic-institutional decision structures are examined. These adoption decisions are important in health services organizations because clinical information is essential for managing demand and allocating resources, managing quality of care, and controlling costs.

  15. Adopting electronic medical records: what do the new federal incentives mean to your individual physician practice?

    PubMed

    Neclerio, John M; Cheney, Kathleen; Goldman, C Mitchell; Clark, Lisa W

    2009-01-01

    Under President Obama's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the federal government is offering incentives to physicians to adopt electronic health records. The goal is to improve quality of care and constrain costs. Higher incentive payments are available for those physicians who act quickly to meet the government's standards. Physicians who practice in "health professional shortage areas" and who serve mainly Medicaid recipients may qualify for additional incentives. Although compliance is "voluntary, "physicians who have not met the standards by 2015 will face reductions in their Medicare reimbursements unless they can show a significant hardship. Physicians can get started by contacting hospitals with which they are affiliated and professional associations to find out what vendors are being used in their service area. Agreements for electronic health records should be reviewed carefully to ensure that physicians' interests are protected.

  16. Physician Use of Outpatient Electronic Health Records to Improve Care

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Adam; Bowes, Watson A.; Thornton, Sidney N.; Narus, Scott P.

    2008-01-01

    We applied a model of usage categories of electronic health records for outpatient physicians to a large population of physicians, using an established electronic health record. This model categorizes physician users according to how extensively they adopt the various capabilities of electronic health records. We identified representative indicators from usage statistics for outpatient physician use of the HELP-2 outpatient electronic medical record, in use at Intermountain Healthcare. Using these indicators, we calculated the relative proportion of users in each category. These proportions are useful for predicting the expected benefits of electronic health record adoption. PMID:18999307

  17. Influences on physicians' adoption of electronic detailing (e-detailing).

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Fadi M; Doucette, William R

    2009-01-01

    E-detailing means using digital technology: internet, video conferencing and interactive voice response. There are two types of e-detailing: interactive (virtual) and video. Currently, little is known about what factors influence physicians' adoption of e-detailing. The objectives of this study were to test a model of physicians' adoption of e-detailing and to describe physicians using e-detailing. A mail survey was sent to a random sample of 2000 physicians practicing in Iowa. Binomial logistic regression was used to test the model of influences on physician adoption of e-detailing. On the basis of Rogers' model of adoption, the independent variables included relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, peer influence, attitudes, years in practice, presence of restrictive access to traditional detailing, type of specialty, academic affiliation, type of practice setting and control variables. A total of 671 responses were received giving a response rate of 34.7%. A total of 141 physicians (21.0%) reported using of e-detailing. The overall adoption model for using either type of e-detailing was found to be significant. Relative advantage, peer influence, attitudes, type of specialty, presence of restrictive access and years of practice had significant influences on physician adoption of e-detailing. The model of adoption of innovation is useful to explain physicians' adoption of e-detailing.

  18. Incremental adoption of information security in health-care organizations: implications for document management.

    PubMed

    Lorence, Daniel P; Churchill, Richard

    2005-06-01

    The incremental adoption of electronic media in U.S. health care has created increased risk of security and privacy violations in provider organizations. Protective regulatory efforts have been proposed to address ineffective security of patient information, with severe noncompliance penalties. Using data from a nationwide survey of health information managers, this study examines how industry-wide knowledge management trends may influence the degree of security program adoption in health-care organizations. Results suggest that significant nonadoption of mandated security measures continues to occur across the health-care industry. Paper-based systems still prevail, and computerized settings tend to have less security measures. Implications for document management and knowledge policy are discussed.

  19. Perceived challenges for adopting the Personal Health Record (PHR) at Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs (MNGHA)- Riyadh

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The Personal Health Record (PHR) is an electronic record that allows patients to maintain, manage and access their health information in one secure location. However, despite these potential capabilities, the adoption rate of the PHR has been slow due to various challenges. Objectives This study, being the first of its kind in Saudi Arabia, investigates the perceived barriers and /or challenges for PHR adoption in the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs (MNGHA). The study explored perceived barriers and /or challenges from two different perspectives; a technical perspective and a social perspective. Methods The study was conducted using a mixed methods approach. A cross-sectional study design using a questionnaire was used to measure patients' perceptions of the PHR and a qualitative approach through focus groups was used to capture comments and opinions from technical personnel for perceived technical barriers to PHR adoption. Result Results from 424 patients revealed a positive perception for PHR adoption with almost all of the participants (96.7%) indicating interest in using the PHR and the majority (73.3%) expressing no confidentiality concerns for the online accessibility of their health information. Patients with higher levels of education indicated higher interest in using the PHR and expressed more concern with confidentiality than patients with lower levels of education. However, the majority of patients (78.3%) expressed their lack of awareness of existing patient e-services on the MNGHA website. The themes that emerged from the focus groups reinforced lack of awareness of e-services as a potential barrier for PHR adoption as well as the role of policy in the regulation and business process for PHR adoption. Conclusion This study has highlighted the perceived challenges and barriers for adoption of the PHR in MNGHA-Riyadh. In order to ensure an efficient PHR with a strong adoption rate, effective steps need to be undertaken by building

  20. "Willing but unwilling": attitudinal barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology among older adults.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Willis, Erin; Cameron, Glen; Geana, Mugur

    2014-06-01

    While much research focuses on adoption of electronic health-care records and other information technology among health-care providers, less research explores patient attitudes. This qualitative study examines barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology, particularly personal electronic health records, among older adults. We conducted in-depth interviews (30-90 min duration) with 35 American adults, aged 46-72 years, to determine their perceptions of and attitudes toward home-based health information technology. Analysis of interview data revealed that most barriers to adoption fell under four themes: technological discomfort, privacy or security concerns, lack of relative advantage, and perceived distance from the user representation. Based on our findings, systems to promote home-based health information technology should incorporate familiar computer applications, alleviate privacy and security concerns, and align with older adults' active and engaged self-image.

  1. Adoption and use of social media among public health departments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Effective communication is a critical function within any public health system. Social media has enhanced communication between individuals and organizations and has the potential to augment public health communication. However, there is a lack of reported data on social media adoption within public health settings. The purposes of this study were to assess: 1) the extent to which state public health departments (SHDs) are using social media; 2) which social media applications are used most often; and 3) how often social media is used interactively to engage audiences. Methods This was a non-experimental, cross sectional study of SHD social media sites. Screen capture software Snag-It® was used to obtain screenshots of SHD social media sites across five applications. These sites were coded for social media presence, interactivity, reach, and topic. Results Sixty percent of SHDs reported using at least one social media application. Of these, 86.7% had a Twitter account, 56% a Facebook account, and 43% a YouTube channel. There was a statistically significant difference between average population density and use of social media (p = .01). On average, SHDs made one post per day on social media sites, and this was primarily to distribute information; there was very little interaction with audiences. SHDs have few followers or friends on their social media sites. The most common topics for posts and tweets related to staying healthy and diseases and conditions. Limitations include the absence of a standard by which social media metrics measure presence, reach, or interactivity; SHDs were only included if they had an institutionally maintained account; and the study was cross sectional. Conclusions Social media use by public health agencies is in the early adoption stage. However, the reach of social media is limited. SHDs are using social media as a channel to distribute information rather than capitalizing on the interactivity available to create

  2. The use of governance tools in promotion of health care information technology adoption by physicians.

    PubMed

    Noblin, Alice M; Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Liu, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records are important technology for health care with promises of streamlining and improving care. However, physicians have been slow to adopt the technology usually because of financial constraints. Third-party payers, including Medicare and Medicaid, are coming forward with solutions and funding. While payers have the most to gain in terms of cost savings, they have been slow to provide a solution to the financial dilemmas posed by the new technology. This article details some governance tools that are frequently used to alleviate the financial concerns. Grants, loans, and tax expenditures are some of the options available to physicians to purchase electronic health records and other types of health care information technology.

  3. Diffusion theory and telemedicine adoption by Kansas health-care providers: critical factors in telemedicine adoption for improved patient access.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Ryan J; Russo, Tracy; Cook, David J; Doolittle, Gary C

    2005-01-01

    Twenty counties in Kansas were randomly selected from those designated as rural on the basis of their populations. A sample of 356 physicians and physicians' assistants in these counties was chosen. A postal survey was sent to the identified providers up to three times. One hundred and eighty-six of the questionnaires were returned (a response rate of 52%). In all, 76% of the respondents were physicians, 76% were men and 42% were family practitioners. Practitioners were classified as adopters or non-adopters of telemedicine, based on their report of whether they had ever referred one or more patients for a health-care consultation via telemedicine. Of the 167 participants who marked this item, 30 (18%) were adopters and 137 (82%) were non-adopters. Among the adopters, 16 (53%) said that they expected to use telemedicine with about the same frequency or more often in the future. In contrast, 61 (45%) non-adopters reported that they did not expect to refer patients by telemedicine in the future and 51 (37%) were unsure. Neither age (r = 0.16, P = 0.44) nor gender (chi2 = 2.35, P = 0.13) was related to the adoption variable or the number of referrals made to telemedicine clinics. The results suggest that adopters and non-adopters of telemedicine perceive its value very differently, and that an opportunity exists to promote the concept to non-adopters more effectively.

  4. Electronic Learning Systems in Hong Kong Business Organizations: A Study of Early and Late Adopters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Simon C. H.; Ngai, Eric W. T.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the diffusion of innovation theory (E. M. Rogers, 1983, 1995), the authors examined the antecedents of the adoption of electronic learning (e-learning) systems by using a time-based assessment model (R. C. Beatty, J. P. Shim, & M. C. Jones, 2001), which classified adopters into categories upon point in time when adopting e-learning…

  5. Health information technology and electronic health records in neurologic practice.

    PubMed

    Esper, Gregory J; Drogan, Oksana; Henderson, William S; Becker, Amanda; Avitzur, Orly; Hier, Daniel B

    2010-05-01

    The tipping point for electronic health records (EHR) has been reached and universal adoption in the United States is now inevitable. Neurologists will want to choose their electronic health record prudently. Careful selection, contracting, planning, and training are essential to successful implementation. Neurologists need to examine their workflow carefully and make adjustments to ensure that efficiency is increased. Neurologists will want to achieve a significant return on investment and qualify for all applicable financial incentives from payers, including CMS. EHRs are not just record-keeping tools but play an important role in quality improvement, evidence-based medicine, pay for performance, patient education, bio-surveillance, data warehousing, and data exchange.

  6. [Social support contribution to health and the adoption and maintenance of health behaviors].

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Robichaud-Ekstrand, Sylvie

    2003-12-01

    Social support refers to the presence of individuals providing emotional or material resources. Its four components are: integration, structure, function, and quality. This article presents empirical and theoretical data, as well as criticism of studies which examine the relationship between social support, global health and cardiovascular health, also evaluating direct or moderating contributions to the adoption and maintenance of health behaviours in persons with cardiovascular disease. Concrete implications for nursing practice are reviewed.

  7. Health benefits and risk associated with adopting a vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Pilis, Wiesław; Stec, Krzysztof; Zych, Michał; Pilis, Anna

    2014-01-01

    A vegetarian diet may be adopted for various reasons that can include ecological, economic, religious, ethical and health considerations. In the latter case they arise from the desire to lose weight, in tackling obesity, improving physical fitness and/or in reducing the risk of acquiring certain diseases. It has been shown that properly applied vegetarian diet is the most effective way of reducing body mass (expressed as BMI), improving the plasma lipid profile and in decreasing the incidence of high arterial blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, stroke, metabolic syndrome and arteriosclerosis. In addition, improved insulin sensitivity together with lower rates of diabetes and cancer has been observed. Some studies have however found that a vegetarian diet may result in changes adversely affecting the body. These could include; hyperhomocysteinaemia, protein deficiency, anaemia, decreased creatinine content in muscles and menstrual disruption in women who undertake increased physical activity. Some of these changes may decrease the ability for performing activities that require physical effort. Nevertheless, on balance it can be reasonably concluded that the beneficial effects of a vegetarian diet significantly, by far, outweigh the adverse ones. It should also be noted that the term 'vegetarian diet' is not always clearly defined in the literature and it may include many dietary variations.

  8. Electronic Health Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... or misfiled or somehow damaged. For example, paper medical records for thousands of patients were destroyed by ... A federal law called the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act ( ...

  9. Introducing Electronic Textbooks as Daily-Use Technology in Schools: A Top-Down Adoption Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Thomas K. F.

    2017-01-01

    This study took frequency of use and the adoption process into account to define the participants and external variables of the research model. School electronic textbooks are a daily-use technology and they are adopted in a compulsory, top-down way. Their introduction can evoke feelings of anxiety among teachers because of a possible increase in…

  10. The Relationship between the Stages of Exercise Adoption and Other Health Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costakis, Catherine E.; Dunnagan, Tim; Haynes, George

    1999-01-01

    Examined whether stages of exercise adoption were associated with the practice of other health behaviors. Surveys of university employees examined demographics, health behavior, and stages of change. Results indicated that stage of exercise adoption was predictive of three out of five health behaviors. Encouraging individuals to think about…

  11. Predicting the use of electronic prescribing among early adopters in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Sicotte, Claude; Taylor, Laurel; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify the factors that can predict physicians’ use of electronic prescribing. Design All primary care physicians who practised in a single geographic region in Quebec were invited to use a free, advanced, research-based electronic prescribing and drug management system. This natural experiment was studied with an expansion of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), which was used to explain early adopters’ use of this electronic prescribing technology. Setting Quebec city region. Participants A total of 61 primary care physicians who practised in a single geographic region where there was no electronic prescribing. Main outcome measures Actual use of electronic prescribing; physicians’ perceptions of and intentions to use electronic prescribing; physician and practice characteristics. Results During the 9-month study period, 61 primary care physicians located in 26 practice sites used electronic prescribing to write 15 160 electronic prescriptions for 18 604 patients. Physician electronic prescribing rates varied considerably, from a low of 0 to a high of 75 per 100 patient visits, with a mean utilization rate of 30 per 100 patient visits. Overall, 34% of the variance in the use of electronic prescribing was explained by the expanded TAM. Computer experience (P = .001), physicians’ information-acquisition style (P = .01), and mean medication use in the practice (P = .02) were significant predictors. Other TAM factors that generally predict new technology adoption (eg, intention to use, perceived ease of use, and perceived usefulness) were not predictive in this study. Conclusion The adoption of electronic prescribing was a highly challenging task, even among early adopters. The insight that this pilot study provides into the determinants of the adoption of electronic prescribing suggests that novel physician-related factors (eg, information-acquisition style) and practice-related variables (eg, prevalence of medication use) influence

  12. Electronic Portfolios Enhance Health Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of School Health, 1999

    1999-01-01

    School health educators encourage the use of portfolios to demonstrate student learning. Electronic portfolios can solve problems inherent in traditional portfolios, reducing storage space and allowing video, audio, and interactive components to be included in documenting student growth. This paper describes benefits of electronic portfolios,…

  13. Health Care Provider Adoption of eHealth: Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Talaei-Khoei, Amir; Seale, Holly; Ray, Pradeep; MacIntyre, C Raina

    2013-01-01

    Background eHealth is an application of information and communication technologies across the whole range of functions that affect health. The benefits of eHealth (eg, improvement of health care operational efficiency and quality of patient care) have previously been documented in the literature. Health care providers (eg, medical doctors) are the key driving force in pushing eHealth initiatives. Without their acceptance and actual use, those eHealth benefits would be unlikely to be reaped. Objective To identify and synthesize influential factors to health care providers’ acceptance of various eHealth systems. Methods This systematic literature review was conducted in four steps. The first two steps facilitated the location and identification of relevant articles. The third step extracted key information from those articles including the studies’ characteristics and results. In the last step, identified factors were analyzed and grouped in accordance with the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT). Results This study included 93 papers that have studied health care providers’ acceptance of eHealth. From these papers, 40 factors were identified and grouped into 7 clusters: (1) health care provider characteristics, (2) medical practice characteristics, (3) voluntariness of use, (4) performance expectancy, (5) effort expectancy, (6) social influence, and (7) facilitating or inhibiting conditions. Conclusions The grouping results demonstrated that the UTAUT model is useful for organizing the literature but has its limitations. Due to the complex contextual dynamics of health care settings, our work suggested that there would be potential to extend theories on information technology adoption, which is of great benefit to readers interested in learning more on the topic. Practically, these findings may help health care decision makers proactively introduce interventions to encourage acceptance of eHealth and may also assist health policy makers

  14. Association of EMR Adoption with Minority Health Care Outcome Disparities in US Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Young; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Disparities in healthcare among minority groups can result in disparate treatments for similar severities of symptoms, unequal access to medical care, and a wide deviation in health outcomes. Such racial disparities may be reduced via use of an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system. However, there has been little research investigating the impact of EMR systems on the disparities in health outcomes among minority groups. Methods This study examined the impact of EMR systems on the following four outcomes of black patients: length of stay, inpatient mortality rate, 30-day mortality rate, and 30-day readmission rate, using patient and hospital data from the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society between 2000 and 2007. The difference-in-difference research method was employed with a generalized linear model to examine the association of EMR adoption on health outcomes for minority patients while controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Results We examined the association between EMR adoption and the outcomes of minority patients, specifically black patients. However, after controlling for patient and hospital characteristics we could not find any significant changes in the four health outcomes of minority patients before and after EMR implementation. Conclusions EMR systems have been reported to support better coordinated care, thus encouraging appropriate treatment for minority patients by removing potential sources of bias from providers. Also, EMR systems may improve the quality of care provided to patients via increased responsiveness to care processes that are required to be more time-sensitive and through improved communication. However, we did not find any significant benefit for minority groups after EMR adoption. PMID:27200220

  15. Factors influencing consumer adoption of USB-based Personal Health Records in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Usually patients receive healthcare services from multiple hospitals, and consequently their healthcare data are dispersed over many facilities’ paper and electronic-based record systems. Therefore, many countries have encouraged the research on data interoperability, access, and patient authorization. This study is an important part of a national project to build an information exchange environment for cross-hospital digital medical records carried out by the Department of Health (DOH) of Taiwan in May 2008. The key objective of the core project is to set up a portable data exchange environment in order to enable people to maintain and own their essential health information. This study is aimed at exploring the factors influencing behavior and adoption of USB-based Personal Health Records (PHR) in Taiwan. Methods Quota sampling was used, and structured questionnaires were distributed to the outpatient department at ten medical centers which participated in the DOH project to establish the information exchange environment across hospitals. A total of 3000 questionnaires were distributed and 1549 responses were collected, out of those 1465 were valid, accumulating the response rate to 48.83%. Results 1025 out of 1465 respondents had expressed their willingness to apply for the USB-PHR. Detailed analysis of the data reflected that there was a remarkable difference in the “usage intention” between the PHR adopters and non-adopters (χ2 =182.4, p < 0.001). From the result of multivariate logistic regression analyses, we found the key factors affecting patients’ adoption pattern were Usage Intention (OR, 9.43, 95%C.I., 5.87-15.16), Perceived Usefulness (OR, 1.60; 95%C.I., 1.11-2.29) and Subjective Norm (OR, 1.47; 95%C.I., 1.21-1.78). Conclusions Higher Usage Intentions, Perceived Usefulness and Subjective Norm of patients were found to be the key factors influencing PHR adoption. Thus, we suggest that government and hospitals should promote the

  16. How to make the fourth revolution: Human factors in the adoption of electronic instructional aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demerath, N. J.; Daniels, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    The prospects and problems of getting higher education in the United States (high school and above) to more fully utilize electronic technologies are examined. Sociological, psychological, and political factors are analyzed to determine the feasibility of adopting electronic instructional techniques. Differences in organizations, attitudes, and customs of different kinds of students, teachers, administrators, and publics are crucial factors in innovation.

  17. Behavioral Health Providers and Electronic Health Records: An Exploratory Beliefs Elicitation and Segmentation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shank, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    The widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is a public policy strategy to improve healthcare quality and reduce accelerating health care costs. Much research has focused on medical providers' perceptions of EHRs, but little is known about those of behavioral health providers. This research was informed by the theory of reasoned…

  18. A National Study of Fluoride Mouthrinse Adoption: Implications for School Health Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Jeanne A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The ongoing adoption of school-based fluoride mouthrinse programs has provided the opportunity to study issues surrounding the adoption and implementation of health technology by public schools. This article reports data on and implications of the National Study on the Diffusion of Preventive Health Measures to Schools. (Authors/CJ)

  19. Health Data Standards and Adoption Process: Preliminary Findings of a Qualitative Study in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkraiji, Abdullah; Jackson, Thomas; Murray, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to carry out a critical study of health data standards and adoption process with a focus on Saudi Arabia. Design/methodology/approach: Many developed nations have initiated programs to develop, promote, adopt and customise international health data standards to the local needs. The current status of, and future plans for,…

  20. Measuring Cognitive Characteristics Associated with Adoption and Implementation of Health Innovations in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingiss, Phyllis Levenson; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The study described here attempted to operationalize adopter characteristics identified by research and assess their relationship to the adoption and implementation of health innovations in schools. Surveys of second-grade teachers after the introduction of a new health promotion program identified three components of teacher views that measured…

  1. Worksite wellness: increasing adoption of workplace health promotion programs.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Carol Noel; Greene, Amanda Marie

    2013-07-01

    Worksite wellness programs are important interventions to protect and promote employee health. They help reduce direct and indirect health care costs, absenteeism, and presenteeism; avoid illness or injury; and improve the quality of work life and morale. This Tool introduces key concepts and strategic tips for planning workplace-based wellness programs rather than individual health promotion events, while highlighting organizational change and development theories central to introducing and implementing effective proactive worksite wellness programs.

  2. Gambling and the Health of the Public: Adopting a Public Health Perspective.

    PubMed

    Korn, David A.; Shaffer, Howard J.

    1999-01-01

    During the last decade there has been an unprecedented expansion of legalized gambling throughout North America. Three primary forces appear to be motivating this growth: (1) the desire of governments to identify new sources of revenue without invoking new or higher taxes; (2) tourism entrepreneurs developing new destinations for entertainment and leisure; and (3) the rise of new technologies and forms of gambling (e.g., video lottery terminals, powerball mega-lotteries, and computer offshore gambling). Associated with this phenomenon, there has been an increase in the prevalence of problem and pathological gambling among the general adult population, as well as a sustained high level of gambling-related problems among youth. To date there has been little dialogue within the public health sector in particular, or among health care practitioners in general, about the potential health impact of gambling or gambling-related problems. This article encourages the adoption of a public health perspective towards gambling. More specifically, this discussion has four primary objectives:1. Create awareness among health professionals about gambling, its rapid expansion and its relationship with the health care system;2. Place gambling within a public health framework by examining it from several perspectives, including population health, human ecology and addictive behaviors;3. Outline the major public health issues about how gambling can affect individuals, families and communities;4. Propose an agenda for strengthening policy, prevention and treatment practices through greater public health involvement, using the framework of The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion as a guide.By understanding gambling and its potential impacts on the public's health, policy makers and health practitioners can minimize gambling's negative impacts and appreciate its potential benefits.

  3. Predicting Adoption of Telemedicine by VA Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pak, Wesley Chong Y.

    2013-01-01

    Providing primary health and specialty services to 3.4 million rural and highly rural veterans is a challenging task because of geographic barriers and the uneven distribution of rural healthcare providers. Although the Veterans Health Administration is hoping that technology such as telemedicine expands availability of specialties' access to…

  4. Organizational factors influencing health information technology adoption in long-term-care facilities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiankai; Wang, Yangmei; Moczygemba, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Long-term care (LTC) is an important sector of the health care industry. However, the adoption of health information technology (HIT) systems in LTC facilities lags behind that in other sectors of health care. Previous literature has focused on the financial and technical barriers. This study examined the organizational factors associated with HIT adoption in LTC facilities. A survey of 500 LTC facilities in Texas enabled researchers to compile HIT indexes for further statistical analyses. A general linear model was used to study the associations between the clinical/administrative HIT indexes and organizational factors. The empirical outcomes show that the size of an LTC facility has a significant association with HIT adoption. Rural LTC facilities, especially freestanding ones, adopt less HIT than their urban counterparts, whereas freestanding LTC facilities have the lowest HIT adoption overall. There is not enough evidence to support ownership status as a significant factor in HIT adoption. Some implications are proposed, but further research is necessary.

  5. The Mental Health of U.S. Adolescents Adopted in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Margaret A.; Sharma, Anu; Elkins, Irene J.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether adopted youth are at excess risk for clinically relevant behavioral and emotional problems. Design We examined whether adopted and non-adopted adolescents differed on quantitative indicators of mental health and the prevalence of childhood disorders, and whether differences exist between internationally and domestically placed adoptees. Setting Assessments occurred at the University of Minnesota from 1998-2004. Participants Adolescents adopted in infancy were systematically ascertained from records of three large Minnesota adoption agencies; non-adopted adolescents were ascertained from Minnesota birth records. The final sample included these adolescents with their rearing parents. Main Exposure The main exposure was adoptive status: non-adopted (N=540), international adoptive placement (N=514), or domestic adoptive placement (N=178). Main Outcome Measures DSM-IV clinical assessments based on child and parent reports of attention-deficit/hyperactivity, oppositional defiant, conduct, major depressive, and separation anxiety disorders; teacher reports of psychological health; and contact with mental health professionals. Results Adoptees scored only moderately higher than non-adoptees on quantitative measures of mental health. Nonetheless, being adopted approximately doubled the odds of having contact with a mental health professional (OR=2.05, CI=1.48, 2.84) and of having a disruptive behavior disorder (OR=2.34, CI=1.72, 3.19). Relative to international adoptees, domestic adoptees had higher odds of having an externalizing disorder (OR=2.60, CI=1.67, 4.04). Conclusions Moderate mean differences in quantitative indicators of mental health can lead to substantial differences in disorder prevalence. While the majority of adopted youth are psychologically healthy, they may be at elevated risk for some externalizing disorders, especially among those domestically placed. PMID:18458187

  6. Intensifying Innovation Adoption in Educational eHealth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rissanen, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    In demanding innovation areas such as eHealth, the primary emphasis is easily placed on the product and process quality aspects in the design phase. Customer quality may receive adequate attention when the target audience is well-defined. But if the multidimensional evaluative focus does not get enough space until the implementation phase, this…

  7. Adoption of e-health technology by physicians: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    de Grood, Chloe; Raissi, Aida; Kwon, Yoojin; Santana, Maria Jose

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of this scoping review was to summarize the current literature identifying barriers and opportunities that facilitate adoption of e-health technology by physicians. Design Scoping review. Setting MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases as provided by Ovid were searched from their inception to July 2015. Studies captured by the search strategy were screened by two reviewers and included if the focus was on barriers and facilitators of e-health technology adoption by physicians. Results Full-text screening yielded 74 studies to be included in the scoping review. Within those studies, eleven themes were identified, including cost and liability issues, unwillingness to use e-health technology, and training and support. Conclusion Cost and liability issues, unwillingness to use e-health technology, and training and support were the most frequently mentioned barriers and facilitators to the adoption of e-health technology. Government-level payment incentives and privacy laws to protect health information may be the key to overcome cost and liability issues. The adoption of e-health technology may be facilitated by tailoring to the individual physician’s knowledge of the e-health technology and the use of follow-up sessions for physicians and on-site experts to support their use of the e-health technology. To ensure the effective uptake of e-health technologies, physician perspectives need to be considered in creating an environment that enables the adoption of e-health strategies. PMID:27536128

  8. Clinical genomics in the world of the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Marsolo, Keith; Spooner, S Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The widespread adoption of electronic health records presents a number of benefits to the field of clinical genomics. They include the ability to return results to the practitioner, to use genetic findings in clinical decision support, and to have data collected in the electronic health record that serve as a source of phenotypic information for analysis purposes. Not all electronic health records are created equal, however. They differ in their features, capabilities, and ease of use. Therefore, to understand the potential of the electronic health record, it is first necessary to understand its capabilities and the impact that implementation strategy has on usability. Specifically, we focus on the following areas: (i) how the electronic health record is used to capture data in clinical practice settings; (ii) how the implementation and configuration of the electronic health record affect the quality and availability of data; (iii) the management of clinical genetic test results and the feasibility of electronic health record integration; and (iv) the challenges of implementing an electronic health record in a research-intensive environment. This is followed by a discussion of the minimum functional requirements that an electronic health record must meet to enable the satisfactory integration of genomic results as well as the open issues that remain.

  9. Mining Electronic Health Records using Linked Data.

    PubMed

    Odgers, David J; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Meaningful Use guidelines have pushed the United States Healthcare System to adopt electronic health record systems (EHRs) at an unprecedented rate. Hospitals and medical centers are providing access to clinical data via clinical data warehouses such as i2b2, or Stanford's STRIDE database. In order to realize the potential of using these data for translational research, clinical data warehouses must be interoperable with standardized health terminologies, biomedical ontologies, and growing networks of Linked Open Data such as Bio2RDF. Applying the principles of Linked Data, we transformed a de-identified version of the STRIDE into a semantic clinical data warehouse containing visits, labs, diagnoses, prescriptions, and annotated clinical notes. We demonstrate the utility of this system though basic cohort selection, phenotypic profiling, and identification of disease genes. This work is significant in that it demonstrates the feasibility of using semantic web technologies to directly exploit existing biomedical ontologies and Linked Open Data.

  10. Determinants of Taxpayers' Adoption of Electronic Filing Methods in Taiwan: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Jen-Ruei; Chao, Wen-Pin; Farn, Cheng-Kiang

    2004-01-01

    Using the personal income tax filing as an example of e-governmental services, this paper seeks to develop an understanding of the factors that influence citizens' adoption of electronic tax-filing services based on empirical data gathered from a large-scale nationwide survey. The taxpayers' satisfaction and usage intention regarding the use of…

  11. Factors that Affect the Adoption and Use of Electronic Mail by K-12 Foreign Language Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, Janine Onffroy

    1998-01-01

    Reports the results of electronic mail instruction given to K-12 foreign-language teachers during workshops. Factors found to influence workshop participants' adoption of email included training, the need to keep up with educational technology trends, availability of an easy-to-use system, hands-on experience, school support, and individual…

  12. Organizational Learning and Large-Scale Change: Adoption of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavis, Virginia D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems in the United States and other countries, there is no organizational development model that addresses medical professionals' attitudes toward technology adoption in a learning organization. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a model would change those attitudes toward…

  13. 77 FR 54663 - Administrative Simplification: Adoption of a Standard for a Unique Health Plan Identifier...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD- 10-CM) for diagnosis coding... of Diseases, 10th Revision, Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS) for inpatient hospital procedure... health identifier for health care providers for use in the health care system and adopting the...

  14. 77 FR 22949 - Administrative Simplification: Adoption of a Standard for a Unique Health Plan Identifier...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... April 17, 2012 Part III Department of Health and Human Services 45 CFR Part 162 Administrative Simplification: Adoption of a Standard for a Unique Health Plan Identifier; Addition to the National Provider... Rules#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Part 162 RIN...

  15. Innovative Power of Health Care Organisations Affects IT Adoption: A bi-National Health IT Benchmark Comparing Austria and Germany.

    PubMed

    Hüsers, Jens; Hübner, Ursula; Esdar, Moritz; Ammenwerth, Elske; Hackl, Werner O; Naumann, Laura; Liebe, Jan David

    2017-02-01

    Multinational health IT benchmarks foster cross-country learning and have been employed at various levels, e.g. OECD and Nordic countries. A bi-national benchmark study conducted in 2007 revealed a significantly higher adoption of health IT in Austria compared to Germany, two countries with comparable healthcare systems. We now investigated whether these differences still persisted. We further studied whether these differences were associated with hospital intrinsic factors, i.e. the innovative power of the organisation and hospital demographics. We thus performed a survey to measure the "perceived IT availability" and the "innovative power of the hospital" of 464 German and 70 Austrian hospitals. The survey was based on a questionnaire with 52 items and was given to the directors of nursing in 2013/2014. Our findings confirmed a significantly greater IT availability in Austria than in Germany. This was visible in the aggregated IT adoption composite score "IT function" as well as in the IT adoption for the individual functions "nursing documentation" (OR = 5.98), "intensive care unit (ICU) documentation" (OR = 2.49), "medication administration documentation" (OR = 2.48), "electronic archive" (OR = 2.27) and "medication" (OR = 2.16). "Innovative power" was the strongest factor to explain the variance of the composite score "IT function". It was effective in hospitals of both countries but significantly more effective in Austria than in Germany. "Hospital size" and "hospital system affiliation" were also significantly associated with the composite score "IT function", but they did not differ between the countries. These findings can be partly associated with the national characteristics. Indicators point to a more favourable financial situation in Austrian hospitals; we thus argue that Austrian hospitals may possess a larger degree of financial freedom to be innovative and to act accordingly. This study is the first to empirically demonstrate the

  16. The Reality of Rhetoric in Information Systems Adoption: A Case Study Investigation of the Uk National Health Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Imran; Ferneley, Elaine

    The UK National Health Service is undergoing a tremendous IS -led change, the purpose of which is to create a service capable of meeting the demands of the 21st century. The aim of this paper is to examine the extent to which persuasive discourse, or rhetoric, influences and affects the adoption of information systems within the health sector. It seeks to explore the ways in which various actors use rhetoric to advance their own agendas and the impact this has on the system itself. As such, the paper seeks to contribute to diffusion research through the use of a case study analysis of the implementation of an Electronic Single Patient Care Record system within one UK Health Service Trust. The findings of the paper suggest that rhetoric is an important and effective persuasive tool, employed by system trainers to coax users into not only adopting the system but also using the system in a predefined manner.

  17. Barriers to open source software adoption in Quebec's health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Paré, Guy; Wybo, Michael D; Delannoy, Charles

    2009-02-01

    We conducted in-depth interviews with 15 CIOs to identify the principal impediments to adoption of open source software in the Quebec health sector. We found that key factors for not adopting an open source solution were closely linked to the orientations of ministry level policy makers and a seeming lack of information on the part of operational level IT managers concerning commercially oriented open source providers. We use the case of recent changes in the structure of Quebec's health care organizations and a change in the commercial policies of a key vendor to illustrate our conclusions regarding barriers to adoption of open source products.

  18. Pricing health behavior interventions to promote adoption: lessons from the marketing and business literature.

    PubMed

    Ribisl, Kurt M; Leeman, Jennifer; Glasser, Allison M

    2014-06-01

    The relatively high cost of delivering many public health interventions limits their potential for broad public impact by reducing their likelihood of adoption and maintenance over time. Practitioners identify cost as the primary factor for which interventions they select to implement, but researchers rarely disseminate cost information or consider its importance when developing new interventions. A new approach is proposed whereby intervention developers assess what individuals and agencies adopting their interventions are willing to pay and then design interventions that are responsive to this price range. The ultimate goal is to develop effective and affordable interventions, called lean interventions, which are widely adopted and have greater public health impact.

  19. Electronic health records: postadoption physician satisfaction and continued use.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward; Marvel, Jon

    2012-01-01

    One goal of public-policy makers in general and health care managers in particular is the adoption and efficient utilization of electronic health record (EHR) systems throughout the health care industry. Consequently, this investigation focused on the effects of known antecedents of technology adoption on physician satisfaction with EHR technology and the continued use of such systems. The American Academy of Family Physicians provided support in the survey of 453 physicians regarding their satisfaction with their EHR use experience. A conceptual model merging technology adoption and computer user satisfaction models was tested using structural equation modeling. Results indicate that effort expectancy (ease of use) has the most substantive effect on physician satisfaction and the continued use of EHR systems. As such, health care managers should be especially sensitive to the user and computer interface of prospective EHR systems to avoid costly and disruptive system selection mistakes.

  20. The Impacts of Electronic Health Record Implementation on the Health Care Workforce.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Health care organizations at various levels are transitioning into the new electronic era by implementing and adopting electronic health record systems. New job roles will be needed for this transition, and some current job roles will inevitably become obsolete due to the change. In addition to training new personnel to fill these new roles, the focus should also be on equipping the current health care workforce with knowledge and skills in health information technology and health informatics that will support their work and improve quality of care.

  1. Ready for eHealth? Health Professionals' Acceptance and Adoption of eHealth Interventions in Inpatient Routine Care.

    PubMed

    Hennemann, Severin; Beutel, Manfred E; Zwerenz, Rüdiger

    2017-03-01

    eHealth interventions can be effective in treating health problems. However, adoption in inpatient routine care seems limited. The present study therefore aimed to investigate barriers and facilitators to acceptance of eHealth interventions and of online aftercare in particular in health professionals of inpatient treatment. A total of 152 out of 287 health professionals of various professional groups in four inpatient rehabilitation facilities filled out a self-administered web-based questionnaire (response rate: 53%); 128 individuals were eligible for further data analysis. Acceptance and possible predictors were investigated with a complex research model based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. Acceptance of eHealth interventions was rather low (M = 2.47, SD = 0.98); however, acceptance of online aftercare was moderate (M = 3.08, SD = 0.96, t(127) = 8.22, p < .001), and eHealth literacy was elevated. Social influence, performance expectancy, and treatment-related internet and mobile use significantly predicted overall acceptance. No differences were found between professional and age groups. Although acceptance of eHealth interventions was limited in health professionals of inpatient treatment, moderate acceptance of online aftercare for work-related stress implies a basis for future implementation. Tailored eHealth education addressing misconceptions about inferiority and incongruity with conventional treatment considering the systemic aspect of acceptance formation are needed.

  2. Biometrics for electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Flores Zuniga, Alejandro Enrique; Win, Khin Than; Susilo, Willy

    2010-10-01

    Securing electronic health records, in scenarios in which the provision of care services is share among multiple actors, could become a complex and costly activity. Correct identification of patients and physician, protection of privacy and confidentiality, assignment of access permissions for healthcare providers and resolutions of conflicts rise as main points of concern in the development of interconnected health information networks. Biometric technologies have been proposed as a possible technological solution for these issues due to its ability to provide a mechanism for unique verification of an individual identity. This paper presents an analysis of the benefit as well as disadvantages offered by biometric technology. A comparison between this technology and more traditional identification methods is used to determine the key benefits and flaws of the use biometric in health information systems. The comparison as been made considering the viability of the technologies for medical environments, global security needs, the contemplation of a share care environment and the costs involved in the implementation and maintenance of such technologies. This paper also discusses alternative uses for biometrics technologies in health care environments. The outcome of this analysis lays in the fact that even when biometric technologies offer several advantages over traditional method of identification, they are still in the early stages of providing a suitable solution for a health care environment.

  3. Faculty and organizational characteristics associated with informatics/health information technology adoption in DNP programs.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Cathy R; Meek, Julie A; Walker, Patricia Hinton

    2014-01-01

    Nursing informatics/health information technology are key components of graduate nursing education and an accreditation requirement, yet little is known about the extent to which doctor of nursing practice (DNP) curricula include these content domains. The purpose of this descriptive study was to elicit perceptions of DNP program directors relative to (a) whether and how the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's (AACN's) Essential IV standard has been met in their DNP programs; (b) whether the Technology Informatics Guiding Educational Reform Initiative Foundation's Phase II competencies have been integrated in their programs; and (c) the faculty and organizational characteristics associated with the adoption of the AACN's Essential IV. In 2011, an electronic survey was sent to all 138 DNP program directors identified on the AACN Web site with an 81.2% response rate. Findings include variation in whether and how programs have integrated informatics/health information technology content, a lack of informatics-certified and/or master's-prepared faculty, and a perceived lack of faculty awareness of informatics curricular guidelines. DNP program director and dean awareness and support of faculty informatics education, use of informatics competency guidelines, and national policy and stimulus funding support are recommended to promote curricular inclusion and the engagement of nurses in strong informatics practices.

  4. Developing Effective Case Scenarios for Interprofessional Electronic Health Record Research.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kristie; Courtney, Karen L; Frisch, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, there have been numerous calls for research in interprofessional communication and documentation. Some of the limitations of research in this area have been proprietary user interfaces that may not be generalizable and impact varying adoption rates of electronic documentation among different health disciplines. In order to address these concerns, researchers need to create standardized case scenarios as research instruments. This paper outlines the process for developing a case scenario instrument for use in interprofessional electronic documentation research.

  5. Characteristics of Local Health Departments Associated with Implementation of Electronic Health Records and Other Informatics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Castrucci, Brian C.; Williams, Karmen S.; Luo, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Assessing local health departments' (LHDs') informatics capacities is important, especially within the context of broader, systems-level health reform. We assessed a nationally representative sample of LHDs' adoption of information systems and the factors associated with adoption and implementation by examining electronic health records, health information exchange, immunization registry, electronic disease reporting system, and electronic laboratory reporting. Methods We used data from the National Association of County and City Health Officials' 2013 National Profile of LHDs. We performed descriptive statistics and multinomial logistic regression for the five implementation-oriented outcome variables of interest, with three levels of implementation (implemented, plan to implement, and no activity). Independent variables included infrastructural and financial capacity and other characteristics associated with informatics capacity. Results Of 505 LHDs that responded to the survey, 69 (13.5%) had implemented health information exchanges, 122 (22.2%) had implemented electronic health records, 245 (47.5%) had implemented electronic laboratory reporting, 368 (73.0%) had implemented an electronic disease reporting system, and 416 (83.8%) had implemented an immunization registry. LHD characteristics associated with health informatics adoption included provision of greater number of clinical services, greater per capita public health expenditures, health information systems specialists on staff, larger population size, decentralized governance system, one or more local boards of health, metropolitan jurisdiction, and top executive with more years in the job. Conclusion Many LHDs lack health informatics capacity, particularly in smaller, rural jurisdictions. Cross-jurisdictional sharing, investment in public health informatics infrastructure, and additional training may help address these shortfalls. PMID:26957662

  6. The Adoption and Use of Health Information Technology in Rural Areas: Results of a National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Ranjit; Lichter, Michael I.; Danzo, Andrew; Taylor, John; Rosenthal, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Context: Health information technology (HIT) is a national policy priority. Knowledge about the special needs, if any, of rural health care providers should be taken into account as policy is put into action. Little is known, however, about rural-urban differences in HIT adoption at the national level. Purpose: To conduct the first national…

  7. Achieving U.S. Health information technology adoption: the need for a third hand.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Blackford

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. health care information technology (HIT) market is broken; broad-scale adoption of HIT is not occurring despite considerable evidence of its impact on the quality of care and patient safety. Although adoption of HIT will not cure all that ails health care, it is an important step toward transformation of the U.S. health care delivery system. In this commentary I describe several critical issues pertaining to the HIT market failure and several ways in which the federal government may act as a deft and gentle "Third Hand" to assist the Invisible Hand of Adam Smith.

  8. The Relationship between Genetic Attributions, Appraisals of Birth Mothers' Health, and the Parenting of Adoptive Mothers and Fathers.

    PubMed

    Stover, Carla Smith; Zhou, Yuchun; Leve, Leslie D; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Shaw, Daniel S; Reiss, David

    2015-01-01

    Parenting beliefs and attributions can influence parenting behavior. We used an adoption design to examine the associations among perinatal risk and poor birth mother health, adoptive parent appraisals of birth mothers' mental health, and genetic attributions to adoptive parents' feelings and behaviors toward their adopted infants. A sample of 361 pairs of adoptive parents and birth mothers were interviewed using standardized measures when infants were between 4 and 9 months old. Adoptive mothers and fathers were observed during play tasks when their infants were 9 months old. We found that adoptive mothers' and fathers' appraisals of birth mothers' health were associated with perinatal risk and poor birth mother health. Adoptive mothers' appraisals were linked to hostile parenting, after accounting for characteristics of the child that may influence her appraisals and attributions. These associations were not present for adoptive fathers. Genetic attributions were associated with both adoptive mother and fathers' feelings of daily hassles in parenting. These findings have implications for prevention and intervention.

  9. Next-generation phenotyping of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J

    2013-01-01

    The national adoption of electronic health records (EHR) promises to make an unprecedented amount of data available for clinical research, but the data are complex, inaccurate, and frequently missing, and the record reflects complex processes aside from the patient's physiological state. We believe that the path forward requires studying the EHR as an object of interest in itself, and that new models, learning from data, and collaboration will lead to efficient use of the valuable information currently locked in health records. PMID:22955496

  10. Next-generation phenotyping of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J

    2013-01-01

    The national adoption of electronic health records (EHR) promises to make an unprecedented amount of data available for clinical research, but the data are complex, inaccurate, and frequently missing, and the record reflects complex processes aside from the patient's physiological state. We believe that the path forward requires studying the EHR as an object of interest in itself, and that new models, learning from data, and collaboration will lead to efficient use of the valuable information currently locked in health records.

  11. Understanding adoption of a personal health record in rural health care clinics: revealing barriers and facilitators of adoption including attributions about potential patient portal users and self-reported characteristics of early adopting users.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jorie M; Carter, Marjorie; Hayden, Candace; Gibson, Bryan; Weir, Charlene; Snow, Laverne; Morales, Jose; Smith, Anne; Bateman, Kim; Gundlapalli, Adi V; Samore, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) are important for improving patient care. An important prerequisite to realize benefits of PHR use is patient recruitment. To understand clinic barriers to adoption, we used Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations theory to frame an examination of clinic staff perceptions of a new PHR and perceptions of likely patient portal users. Clinic staff reported many relative advantages and observable benefits of the PHR but also some distinct problems. Attributions about potential patient users included demographic, computer use, and personality characteristics staff expected in likely users. Analysis of patient survey data of early adopters compared to non-users revealed discrepancies between clinic staff expectations and early adopters' self-reports. Implications for improving adoption of PHRs include ensuring compatibility with existing systems and avoiding recruitment biases.

  12. The use of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Marca, Guillem; Perez, Angel; Blanco-Garcia, Martin German; Miravalles, Elena; Soley, Pere; Ortiga, Berta

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the level of adoption of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals and to identify potential barriers and facilitators to this process. We used an observational cross-sectional design. The survey was conducted between September and December 2011, using an electronic questionnaire distributed through email. We obtained a 30% response rate from the 214 hospitals contacted, all belonging to the Spanish National Health Service. The level of adoption of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals was found to be high: 39.1% of hospitals surveyed had a comprehensive EHR system while a basic system was functioning in 32.8% of the cases. However, in 2011 one third of the hospitals did not have a basic electronic health record system, although some have since implemented electronic functionalities, particularly those related to clinical documentation and patient administration. Respondents cited the acquisition and implementation costs as the main barriers to implementation. Facilitators for EHR implementation were: the possibility to hire technical support, both during and post implementation; security certification warranty; and objective third-party evaluations of EHR products. In conclusion, the number of hospitals that have electronic health records is in general high, being relatively higher in medium-sized hospitals.

  13. The Future Is Coming: Electronic Health Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bethesda, Maryland. Titled Personal Electronic Health Records: From Biomedical Research to People's Health , the conference will bring together some of the world's most creative minds in research, government, and health care. The goal? ...

  14. Applying observations from technological transformations in complex adaptive systems to inform health policy on technology adoption.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew B; Merrill, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Many complex markets such as banking and manufacturing have benefited significantly from technology adoption. Each of these complex markets experienced increased efficiency, quality, security, and customer involvement as a result of technology transformation in their industry. Healthcare has not benefited to the same extent. We provide initial findings from a policy analysis of complex markets and the features of these transformations that can influence health technology adoption and acceptance.

  15. Are low income patients receiving the benefits of electronic health records? A statewide survey.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matthew J; Harootunian, Gevork; Johnson, William G

    2013-06-01

    There are concerns that physicians serving low-income, Medicaid patients, in the United States are less likely to adopt electronic health records and, if so, that Medicaid patients will be denied the benefits from electronic health record use. This study seeks to determine whether physicians treating Medicaid patients were less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Physician surveys completed during physicians' license renewal process in Arizona were merged with the physician licensing data and Medicaid administrative claims data. Survey responses were received from 50.7 percent (6,780 out of 13,380) of all physicians practicing in Arizona. Physician survey responses were used to identify whether the physician used electronic health records and the degree to which the physician exchanged electronic health records with other health-care providers. Medicaid claims data were used to identify which physicians provided health care to Medicaid beneficiaries. The primary outcome of interest was whether Medicaid providers were more or less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate average marginal effects. In multivariate analysis, physicians with 20 or more Medicaid patients during the survey cycle were 4.1 percent more likely to use an electronic health record and 5.2 percent more likely to be able to transmit electronic health records to at least one health-care provider outside of their practice. These effects increase in magnitude when the analysis is restricted to solo practice physicians This is the first study to find a pro-Medicaid gap in electronic health record adoption suggesting that the low income patients served by Arizona's Health Care Cost Containment System are not at a disadvantage with regard to electronic health record access and that Arizona's model of promoting electronic health record adoption merits further study.

  16. Adoption of Evidence-Based Interventions in Local Health Departments: "1-2-3 Pap NC".

    PubMed

    Winterbauer, Nancy L; Bridger, Colleen M; Tucker, Ashley; Rafferty, Ann P; Luo, Huabin

    2015-08-01

    Descriptions of barriers and facilitators to adoption of evidence-based interventions in local health departments (LHDs) are limited. This study was conducted by the North Carolina Public Health Practice-Based Research Network to identify factors associated with adoption of an evidence-based human papillomavirus video intervention, "1-2-3 Pap NC," in North Carolina LHDs. A sequential mixed-method study design was used. Data from the 2013 National Profile of Local Health Departments were used to test associations between LHD characteristics and adoption of the intervention. Qualitative, key stakeholder interviews with LHD directors provided the context for quantitative data. Data collection and analysis continued from March 3, 2014, to September 15, 2014. Overall, 28% of North Carolina health jurisdictions (33 of 100 counties) implemented the intervention. Of the three channels used to deliver the intervention to clients, most LHDs opted to show the video in the exam room (42%), followed by website/other social media (36%) and video loop in the lobby/waiting room (22%). In logistic regression, gender of the director (female) was significantly and positively associated with adoption of the intervention (AOR=4.44, p<0.05). Being a first-time director was marginally significant (AOR=0.28, p=0.074), suggesting first-time directors were less likely to adopt. Qualitative results suggested that aspects of communication (awareness and positive attitudes) and agency directors' evaluation of resources, balanced against intervention complexity and flexibility, competing priorities, and mandates, influenced adoption. Adoption of evidence-based interventions by LHDs is critical to improve population health. Practice-based research can contribute to understanding facilitators and modifying barriers to this process.

  17. Survey of electronic veterinary medical record adoption and use by independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Krone, Lauren M.; Brown, Catherine M.; Lindenmayer, Joann M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the proportion of independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts that use electronic veterinary medical records (EVMRs), determine the purposes for which EVMRs are used, and identify perceived barriers to their use. Design Survey. Sample 100 veterinarians. Procedures 213 of 517 independent small animal veterinary practices operating in Massachusetts were randomly chosen for study recruitment. One veterinarian at each practice was invited by telephone to answer a hardcopy survey regarding practice demographics, medical records type (electronic, paper, or both), purposes of EVMR use, and perceived barriers to adoption. Surveys were mailed to the first 100 veterinarians who agreed to participate. Practices were categorized by record type and size (large [≥ 5 veterinarians], medium [3 to 4 veterinarians], or small [1 to 2 veterinarians]). Results 84 surveys were returned; overall response was 84 of 213 (39.4%). The EVMRs were used alone or together with paper records in 66 of 82 (80.5%) practices. Large and medium-sized practices were significantly more likely to use EVMRs combined with paper records than were small practices. The EVMRs were most commonly used for ensuring billing, automating reminders, providing cost estimates, scheduling, recording medical and surgical information, and tracking patient health. Least common uses were identifying emerging infectious diseases, research, and insurance. Eleven veterinarians in paper record–only practices indicated reluctance to change, anticipated technological problems, time constraints, and cost were barriers to EVMR use. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated EVMRs were underutilized as a tool for tracking and improving population health and identifying emerging infectious diseases. Efforts to facilitate adoption of EVMRs for these purposes should be strengthened by the veterinary medical, human health, and public health professions. PMID:25029312

  18. Relationship between age at gonadectomy and health problems in kittens adopted from shelters.

    PubMed

    Porters, N; Polis, I; Moons, C P H; Van de Maele, I; Ducatelle, R; Goethals, K; Duchateau, L; de Rooster, H

    2015-05-30

    Prepubertal gonadectomy (PPG) is promoted as a way of managing overpopulation in cats, but concerns about PPG and potential health issues still exist. The objective of the present study was to evaluate short-term and long-term health problems in cats subjected to PPG in comparison to gonadectomy at traditional age (TAG). In a prospective clinical trial, 800 shelter kittens aged between approximately 8 weeks and 12 weeks were recruited before adoption and randomly assigned to either the PPG group (gonadectomy performed immediately) or the TAG group (gonadectomy delayed until six months to eight months of age). Short-term health issues included mortality between when kittens arrived at the clinic and up to seven days after they returned to the shelter, as well as the occurrence of various other health issues arising in the first month following adoption. Kittens were followed-up until 24 months of age specifically for feline lower urinary tract disease, urethral obstruction (male cats), lameness, fractures and hypersensitivity disorders with dermatological presentation. In the short term, there were no significant differences between health problems in PPG and TAG kittens. Similarly, no significant differences were observed between treatment groups in terms of the type or number of health issues in the long term. In conclusion, there are no health-related contraindications to advocating PPG strategies in shelter cats. Ideally, PPG should be performed at the shelter facility itself as long as excellent infectious disease control and postoperative clinical observation before adoption are guaranteed.

  19. PACS and electronic health records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Simona; Gilboa, Flora; Shani, Uri

    2002-05-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) is a major component of the health informatics domain. An important part of the EHR is the medical images obtained over a patient's lifetime and stored in diverse PACS. The vision presented in this paper is that future medical information systems will convert data from various medical sources -- including diverse modalities, PACS, HIS, CIS, RIS, and proprietary systems -- to HL7 standard XML documents. Then, the various documents are indexed and compiled to EHRs, upon which complex queries can be posed. We describe the conversion of data retrieved from PACS systems through DICOM to HL7 standard XML documents. This enables the EHR system to answer queries such as 'Get all chest images of patients at the age of 20-30, that have blood type 'A' and are allergic to pine trees', which a single PACS cannot answer. The integration of data from multiple sources makes our approach capable of delivering such answers. It enables the correlation of medical, demographic, clinical, and even genetic information. In addition, by fully indexing all the tagged data in DICOM objects, it becomes possible to offer access to huge amounts of valuable data, which can be better exploited in the specific radiology domain.

  20. Understanding Adoption of a Personal Health Record in Rural Health Care Clinics: Revealing Barriers and Facilitators of Adoption including Attributions about Potential Patient Portal Users and Self-reported Characteristics of Early Adopting Users

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jorie M.; Carter, Marjorie; Hayden, Candace; Gibson, Bryan; Weir, Charlene; Snow, Laverne; Morales, Jose; Smith, Anne; Bateman, Kim; Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Samore, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) are important for improving patient care. An important prerequisite to realize benefits of PHR use is patient recruitment. To understand clinic barriers to adoption, we used Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovations theory to frame an examination of clinic staff perceptions of a new PHR and perceptions of likely patient portal users. Clinic staff reported many relative advantages and observable benefits of the PHR but also some distinct problems. Attributions about potential patient users included demographic, computer use, and personality characteristics staff expected in likely users. Analysis of patient survey data of early adopters compared to non-users revealed discrepancies between clinic staff expectations and early adopters’ self-reports. Implications for improving adoption of PHRs include ensuring compatibility with existing systems and avoiding recruitment biases. PMID:24551328

  1. Health information technology: integration of clinical workflow into meaningful use of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Bowens, Felicia M; Frye, Patricia A; Jones, Warren A

    2010-10-01

    This article examines the role that clinical workflow plays in successful implementation and meaningful use of electronic health record (EHR) technology in ambulatory care. The benefits and barriers of implementing EHRs in ambulatory care settings are discussed. The researchers conclude that widespread adoption and meaningful use of EHR technology rely on the successful integration of health information technology (HIT) into clinical workflow. Without successful integration of HIT into clinical workflow, clinicians in today's ambulatory care settings will continue to resist adoption and implementation of EHR technology.

  2. The bit in the middle: a synthesis of global health literature on policy formulation and adoption.

    PubMed

    Berlan, David; Buse, Kent; Shiffman, Jeremy; Tanaka, Sonja

    2014-12-01

    Policy formulation and adoption are poorly understood phases of the health policy process. We conducted a narrative synthesis of 28 articles on health policy in low- and middle-income countries to provide insight on what kinds of activities take place in these phases, the actors crafting policies and the institutions in which policy making occurs. The narrative synthesis involved an inductive process to identify relevant articles, extract relevant data from text and reach new understandings. We find that actors exercising decision-making power include not just various governmental entities, but also civil society, commissioners, nongovernmental organizations and even clergy. We also find that most articles identified two or more distinct institutions in which policy formulation and adoption occurred. Finally, we identify seven distinct activities inherent in policy formulation and adoption: generation of policy alternatives, deliberation and/or consultation, advocacy of specific policy alternatives, lobbying for specific alternatives, negotiation of policy decisions, drafting or enacting policy and guidance/influence on implementation development. Health policy researchers can draw on these categories to deepen their understanding of how policy formulation and adoption unfolds.

  3. Universal electronic health record MUDR.

    PubMed

    Hanzlicek, Petr; Spidlen, Josef; Nagy, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    One of the important research tasks of the European Centre for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology - Cardio (EuroMISE Centre - Cardio) is the applied research in the field of electronic health record design including electronic medical guidelines and intelligent systems for data mining and decision support. The research in the field of data storage and data acquisition was inspired by several European projects and standards, mostly by the I4C and TripleC projects. Based on experience gathered during cooperation in the TripleC project we have proposed a description of a flexible information storage model. The motivation for this effort was the large variability of the set of collected features in different departments - including temporal variability. Therefore, a dynamically extensible and modifiable structure of items is needed. In our model we use two basic structures called the knowledge base and data files. The main function of the knowledge base is to express the hierarchy of collectable features - medical concepts, their characteristics and relations among them. The data files structure is used to store the patient's data itself. These two structures can be described using graph theory expressions. Based on this model, a three-layer system architecture named "Multimedia Distributed Record" (MUDR) has been proposed and implemented. During the implementation, modern technologies such as Web Services, SOAP and XML were used. For the practical usage of EHR MUDR, an intelligent application called MUDRc (MUDR Client) was created. It enables physicians to use EHR MUDR in a flexible way. During the development process, maximum emphasis was placed on user-friendliness and comfortable usage of this application. Several methods of data entry can be used: pre-defined forms, direct entry into the tree data structure of the EHR MUDR, or automatic unstructured free-text report parsing and data retrieval. The system enables fast and simple importing and

  4. Electronic health records to facilitate clinical research.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Martin R; Blomster, Juuso I; Curtis, Lesley H; Duclaux, Sylvie; Ford, Ian; Fritz, Fleur; Goldman, Samantha; Janmohamed, Salim; Kreuzer, Jörg; Leenay, Mark; Michel, Alexander; Ong, Seleen; Pell, Jill P; Southworth, Mary Ross; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Thoenes, Martin; Zannad, Faiez; Zalewski, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide opportunities to enhance patient care, embed performance measures in clinical practice, and facilitate clinical research. Concerns have been raised about the increasing recruitment challenges in trials, burdensome and obtrusive data collection, and uncertain generalizability of the results. Leveraging electronic health records to counterbalance these trends is an area of intense interest. The initial applications of electronic health records, as the primary data source is envisioned for observational studies, embedded pragmatic or post-marketing registry-based randomized studies, or comparative effectiveness studies. Advancing this approach to randomized clinical trials, electronic health records may potentially be used to assess study feasibility, to facilitate patient recruitment, and streamline data collection at baseline and follow-up. Ensuring data security and privacy, overcoming the challenges associated with linking diverse systems and maintaining infrastructure for repeat use of high quality data, are some of the challenges associated with using electronic health records in clinical research. Collaboration between academia, industry, regulatory bodies, policy makers, patients, and electronic health record vendors is critical for the greater use of electronic health records in clinical research. This manuscript identifies the key steps required to advance the role of electronic health records in cardiovascular clinical research.

  5. Radio frequency identification (RFID) in health care: privacy and security concerns limiting adoption.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P

    2014-03-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has been implemented in a wide variety of industries. Health care is no exception. This article explores implementations and limitations of RFID in several health care domains: authentication, medication safety, patient tracking, and blood transfusion medicine. Each domain has seen increasing utilization of unique applications of RFID technology. Given the importance of protecting patient and data privacy, potential privacy and security concerns in each domain are discussed. Such concerns, some of which are inherent to existing RFID hardware and software technology, may limit ubiquitous adoption. In addition, an apparent lack of security standards within the RFID domain and specifically health care may also hinder the growth and utility of RFID within health care for the foreseeable future. Safeguarding the privacy of patient data may be the most important obstacle to overcome to allow the health care industry to take advantage of the numerous benefits RFID technology affords.

  6. Personal Health Record Use in the United States: Forecasting Future Adoption Levels

    PubMed Central

    Huerta, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) offer a tremendous opportunity to generate consumer support in pursing the triple aim of reducing costs, increasing access, and improving care quality. Moreover, surveys in the United States indicate that consumers want Web-based access to their medical records. However, concerns that consumers’ low health information literacy levels and physicians’ resistance to sharing notes will limit PHRs’ utility to a relatively small portion of the population have reduced both the product innovation and policy imperatives. Objective The purpose of our study was 3-fold: first, to report on US consumers’ current level of PHR activity; second, to describe the roles of imitation and innovation influence factors in determining PHR adoption rates; and third, to forecast future PHR diffusion uptake among US consumers under 3 scenarios. Methods We used secondary data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) of US citizens for the survey years 2008, 2011, and 2013. Applying technology diffusion theory and Bass modeling, we evaluated 3 future PHR adoption scenarios by varying the introduction dates. Results All models displayed the characteristic diffusion S-curve indicating that the PHR technology is likely to achieve significant market penetration ahead of meaningful use goals. The best-performing model indicates that PHR adoption will exceed 75% by 2020. Therefore, the meaningful use program targets for PHR adoption are below the rates likely to occur without an intervention. Conclusions The promise of improved care quality and cost savings through better consumer engagement prompted the US Institute of Medicine to call for universal PHR adoption in 1999. The PHR products available as of 2014 are likely to meet and exceed meaningful use stage 3 targets before 2020 without any incentive. Therefore, more ambitious uptake and functionality availability should be incorporated into future goals. PMID:27030105

  7. 75 FR 62684 - Health Insurance Reform; Announcement of Maintenance Changes to Electronic Data Transaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Part 162 RIN 0938-AM50 Health Insurance Reform; Announcement of Maintenance Changes to Electronic Data Transaction Standards Adopted Under the Health Insurance...: This document announces maintenance changes to some of the Health Insurance Portability...

  8. Acceptance and Usage of Electronic Health Record Systems in Small Medical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannan, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the U.S. government has been the development of a nationwide health information infrastructure, including adoption and use of an electronic health records (EHR) system. However, a 2008 survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics indicated a 41.5% usage of the EHR system by physicians in office-based…

  9. Impact of Electronic Health Records on Nurses' Information Seeking and Discriminating Skills for Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Adria S.

    2013-01-01

    In February 2009, the United States government passed into law the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) providing incentive money for hospitals and care providers to implement a certified electronic health record (EHR) in order to promote the adoption and…

  10. Health Status, Cognitive and Motor Development of Young Children Adopted from China, East Asia, and Russia across the First 6 Months after Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomerleau, Andree; Malcuit, Gerard; Chicoine, Jean-Francois; Seguin, Renee; Belhumeur, Celine; Germain, Patricia; Amyot, Isabelle; Jeliu, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    We compared health status, anthropometric and psychological development of 123 children adopted before 18 months of age from China, East Asia (Vietnam, Taiwan, Thailand, South Korea, Cambodia), and Eastern Europe (mostly Russia). Data were collected close to the time of arrival, and 3 and 6 months later. Anthropometric measures included weight,…

  11. Taming the EHR (Electronic Health Record) - There is Hope.

    PubMed

    DiAngi, Y T; Longhurst, C A; Payne, T H

    2016-01-01

    With increasing diffusion of EHR technology over the last half decade, clinician burnout is rising. As healthcare is a complex and highly regulated field, the rapid and mass adoption of EHR technology has created disruption for highly skilled workers such as clinicians. Although, much has been written about dissatisfaction with the EHR (electronic health record), a paucity of immediate solutions exists in the literature. This article suggests three actionable steps health systems and clinicians can make to expedite gains from and mitigate the effect of the EHR on clinical practice.

  12. Engaging Nurses in the Design and Adoption of mHealth Tools for Care Coordination.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Judy

    2016-01-01

    This panel will share ideas for the Nursing Informatics Specialists in the audience on how mHealth tools are being designed and used for clinical practice, education and research. They will describe specific mHealth projects they are involved in, give practical examples, and provide tangible tactics for nurses to make a difference. They will provide insight into new technology and standards developments that make it easy to connect the mobile app ecosystem - from open application program interfaces (APIs), to traditional health information technology tools like Electronic Health Records (EHRs).

  13. Adopting Clean Fuels and Technologies on School Buses. Pollution and Health Impacts in Children

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Jennifer; Sheppard, Lianne; Kaufman, Joel D.; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Davey, Mark E.; Sullivan, James R.; Jahnke, Jordan; Koenig, Jane; Larson, Timothy V.; Liu, L. J. Sally

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: More than 25 million American children breathe polluted air on diesel school buses. Emission reduction policies exist, but the health impacts to individual children have not been evaluated. Methods: Using a natural experiment, we characterized the exposures and health of 275 school bus riders before, during, and after the adoption of clean technologies and fuels between 2005 and 2009. Air pollution was measured during 597 trips on 188 school buses. Repeated measures of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), lung function (FEV1, FVC), and absenteeism were also collected monthly (1,768 visits). Mixed-effects models longitudinally related the adoption of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs), closed crankcase ventilation systems (CCVs), ultralow-sulfur diesel (ULSD), or biodiesel with exposures and health. Measurements and Main Results: Fine and ultrafine particle concentrations were 10–50% lower on buses using ULSD, DOCs, and/or CCVs. ULSD adoption was also associated with reduced FeNO (−16% [95% confidence interval (CI), −21 to −10%]), greater changes in FVC and FEV1 (0.02 [95% CI, 0.003 to 0.05] and 0.01 [95% CI, −0.006 to 0.03] L/yr, respectively), and lower absenteeism (−8% [95% CI, −16.0 to −0.7%]), with stronger associations among patients with asthma. DOCs, and to a lesser extent CCVs, also were associated with improved FeNO, FVC growth, and absenteeism, but these findings were primarily restricted to patients with persistent asthma and were often sensitive to control for ULSD. No health benefits were noted for biodiesel. Extrapolating to the U.S. population, changed fuel/technologies likely reduced absenteeism by more than 14 million/yr. Conclusions: National and local diesel policies appear to have reduced children’s exposures and improved health. PMID:25867003

  14. The Unintended Consequences of the Adoption of Electronic Medical Record Systems on Healthcare Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganju, Kartik K.

    2016-01-01

    In my dissertation, I study unintended consequences of the adoption of EMR systems. In my three essays, I examine how the adoption of EMR systems affects neighboring hospitals (spillover effects), can be used by hospitals to further its objectives in an unconventional manner ("upcoding" of patient case mix data), and how EMR adoption may…

  15. The Relationship between Genetic Attributions, Appraisals of Birth Mothers’ Health, and the Parenting of Adoptive Mothers and Fathers

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Carla Smith; Zhou, Yuchun; Leve, Leslie D.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Reiss, David

    2015-01-01

    Parenting beliefs and attributions can influence parenting behavior. We used an adoption design to examine the associations among perinatal risk and poor birth mother health, adoptive parent appraisals of birth mothers’ mental health, and genetic attributions to adoptive parents’ feelings and behaviors toward their adopted infants. A sample of 361 pairs of adoptive parents and birth mothers were interviewed using standardized measures when infants were between 4 and 9 months old. Adoptive mothers and fathers were observed during play tasks when their infants were 9 months old. We found that adoptive mothers’ and fathers’ appraisals of birth mothers’ health were associated with perinatal risk and poor birth mother health. Adoptive mothers’ appraisals were linked to hostile parenting, after accounting for characteristics of the child that may influence her appraisals and attributions. These associations were not present for adoptive fathers. Genetic attributions were associated with both adoptive mother and fathers’ feelings of daily hassles in parenting. These findings have implications for prevention and intervention. PMID:26316660

  16. HealthPartners adopts community business model to deepen focus on nonclinical factors of health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Isham, George J; Zimmerman, Donna J; Kindig, David A; Hornseth, Gary W

    2013-08-01

    Clinical care contributes only 20 percent to overall health outcomes, according to a population health model developed at the University of Wisconsin. Factors contributing to the remainder include lifestyle behaviors, the physical environment, and social and economic forces--all generally considered outside the realm of care. In 2010 Minnesota-based HealthPartners decided to target nonclinical community health factors as a formal part of its strategic business plan to improve public health in the Twin Cities area. The strategy included creating partnerships with businesses and institutions that are generally unaccustomed to working together or considering how their actions could help improve community health. This article describes efforts to promote healthy eating in schools, reduce the stigma of mental illness, improve end-of-life decision making, and strengthen an inner-city neighborhood. Although still in their early stages, the partnerships can serve as encouragement for organizations inside and outside health care that are considering undertaking similar efforts in their markets.

  17. Information and communications technology in U.S. health care: why is adoption so slow and is slower better?

    PubMed

    Christensen, Michael C; Remler, Dahlia

    2009-12-01

    Politicians across the political spectrum support greater investment in health care information and communications technology (ICT) and expect it to significantly decrease costs and improve health outcomes. We address three policy questions about adoption of ICT in health care: First, why is there so little adoption? Second, what policies will facilitate and accelerate adoption? Third, what is the best pace for adoption? We first describe the unusual economics of ICT, particularly network externalities, and then determine how those economics interact with and are exacerbated by the unusual economics of health care. High replacement costs and the need for technical compatibility are general barriers to ICT adoption and often result in lock-in to adopted technologies. These effects are compounded in health care because the markets for health care services, health insurance, and labor are interlinked. In addition, the government interacts with all markets in its role as an insurer. Patient heterogeneity further exacerbates these effects. Finally, ICT markets are often characterized by natural monopolies, resulting in little product diversity, an effect ill-suited to patient heterogeneity. The ongoing process for setting technical standards for health care ICT is critical but needs to include all relevant stakeholders, including patient groups. The process must be careful (i.e., slow), flexible, and allow for as much diversity as possible. We find that waiting to adopt ICT is a surprisingly wise policy.

  18. Embedding an electronic health record within a health visiting service.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Mandy; Dobbs, Janice; Monkhouse, Aileen

    2012-09-01

    County Durham and Darlington's implementation of an electronic health record across community health services provided an ideal opportunity for health visitors to take the lead in enhancing the system to reflect their paper clinical record. Practitioners' concerns, fears and anxieties in relation to confidentiality and professional accountability resulted in the project being further developed to include the employment of three full-time clinical IT facilitators. These were experienced health visitors and 'IT champions' with a sound knowledge of information governance with a specific remit to provide clinical support and supervision to health visitors in electronic clinical record keeping. These practitioners were instrumental in developing the system and proved the key to the project's success and ensuring that the electronic record was embedded into health visiting practice to improve the quality of patient care.

  19. Partners in Health: A Conceptual Framework for the Role of Community Health Workers in Facilitating Patients' Adoption of Healthy Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Van Devanter, Nancy; Islam, Nadia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-01-01

    We formulated a conceptual framework that begins to answer the national call to improve health care access, delivery, and quality by explaining the processes through which community health workers (CHWs) facilitate patients’ adoption of healthy behaviors. In September 2011 to January 2012, we conducted a qualitative study that triangulated multiple data sources: 26 in-depth interviews, training documents, and patient charts. CHWs served as partners in health to immigrant Filipinos with hypertension, leveraging their cultural congruence with intervention participants, employing interpersonal communication techniques to build trust and rapport, providing social support, and assisting with health behavior change. To drive the field forward, this work can be expanded with framework testing that may influence future CHW training and interventions. PMID:25790405

  20. The effect of hospital-physician integration on health information technology adoption.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Eric

    2013-10-01

    The US federal government has recently made a substantial investment to enhance the US health information technology (IT) infrastructure. Previous literature on the impact of IT on firm performance across multiple industries has emphasized the importance of a process of co-invention whereby organizations develop complementary practices to achieve greater benefit from their IT investments. In health care, employment of physicians by hospitals can confer greater administrative control to hospitals over physicians' actions and resources and thus enable the implementation of new technology and initiatives aimed at maximizing benefit from use of the technology. In this study, I tested for the relationship between hospital employment of physicians and hospitals' propensity to use health IT. I used state laws that prohibit hospital employment of physicians as an instrument to account for the endogenous relationship with hospital IT use. Hospital employment of physicians is associated with significant increases in the probability of hospital health IT use. Therefore, subsidization of health IT among hospitals not employing physicians may be less efficient. Furthermore, state laws prohibiting hospitals from employing physicians may inhibit adoption of health IT, thus working against policy initiatives aimed at promoting use of the technology.

  1. Electronic Personal Health Record Use Among Nurses in the Nursing Informatics Community.

    PubMed

    Gartrell, Kyungsook; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Wilson, Marisa L

    2015-07-01

    An electronic personal health record is a patient-centric tool that enables patients to securely access, manage, and share their health information with healthcare providers. It is presumed the nursing informatics community would be early adopters of electronic personal health record, yet no studies have been identified that examine the personal adoption of electronic personal health record's for their own healthcare. For this study, we sampled nurse members of the American Medical Informatics Association and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society with 183 responding. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify those factors associated with electronic personal health record use. Overall, 72% were electronic personal health record users. Users tended to be older (aged >50 years), be more highly educated (72% master's or doctoral degrees), and hold positions as clinical informatics specialists or chief nursing informatics officers. Those whose healthcare providers used electronic health records were significantly more likely to use electronic personal health records (odds ratio, 5.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-25.61). Electronic personal health record users were significantly less concerned about privacy of health information online than nonusers (odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.70) adjusted for ethnicity, race, and practice region. Informatics nurses, with their patient-centered view of technology, are in prime position to influence development of electronic personal health records. Our findings can inform policy efforts to encourage informatics and other professional nursing groups to become leaders and users of electronic personal health record; such use could help them endorse and engage patients to use electronic personal health records. Having champions with expertise in and enthusiasm for the new technology can promote the adoptionof electronic personal health records among healthcare providers as well as

  2. Revisiting Vertical Models To Simulate the Line Shape of Electronic Spectra Adopting Cartesian and Internal Coordinates.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Javier; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2016-10-11

    Vertical models for the simulation of spectroscopic line shapes expand the potential energy surface (PES) of the final state around the equilibrium geometry of the initial state. These models provide, in principle, a better approximation of the region of the band maximum. At variance, adiabatic models expand each PES around its own minimum. In the harmonic approximation, when the minimum energy structures of the two electronic states are connected by large structural displacements, adiabatic models can breakdown and are outperformed by vertical models. However, the practical application of vertical models faces the issues related to the necessity to perform a frequency analysis at a nonstationary point. In this contribution we revisit vertical models in harmonic approximation adopting both Cartesian (x) and valence internal curvilinear coordinates (s). We show that when x coordinates are used, the vibrational analysis at nonstationary points leads to a deficient description of low-frequency modes, for which spurious imaginary frequencies may even appear. This issue is solved when s coordinates are adopted. It is however necessary to account for the second derivative of s with respect to x, which here we compute analytically. We compare the performance of the vertical model in the s-frame with respect to adiabatic models and previously proposed vertical models in x- or Q1-frame, where Q1 are the normal coordinates of the initial state computed as combination of Cartesian coordinates. We show that for rigid molecules the vertical approach in the s-frame provides a description of the final state very close to the adiabatic picture. For sizable displacements it is a solid alternative to adiabatic models, and it is not affected by the issues of vertical models in x- and Q1-frames, which mainly arise when temperature effects are included. In principle the G matrix depends on s, and this creates nonorthogonality problems of the Duschinsky matrix connecting the normal

  3. Stigma, Social Context, and Mental Health: Lesbian and Gay Couples Across the Transition to Adoptive Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study to examine change in depression and anxiety across the first year of adoptive parenthood in same-sex couples (90 couples: 52 lesbian, 38 gay male). Given that sexual minorities uniquely contend with sexual orientation-related stigma, this study examined how both internalized and enacted forms of stigma affect the mental health of lesbians and gay men during the transition to parenthood. In addition, the role of contextual support was examined. Higher perceived workplace support, family support, and relationship quality were related to lower depressive and anxious symptoms at the time of the adoption, and higher perceived friend support was related to lower anxiety symptoms. Lower internalized homophobia and higher perceived neighborhood gay-friendliness were related to lower depressive symptoms. Finally, individuals with high internalized homophobia who lived in states with unfavorable legal climates regarding gay adoption experienced the steepest increases in depressive and anxious symptoms. Findings have important implications for counselors working with sexual minorities, especially those experiencing the transition to parenthood. PMID:21171740

  4. Stigma, social context, and mental health: lesbian and gay couples across the transition to adoptive parenthood.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Abbie E; Smith, JuliAnna Z

    2011-01-01

    This is the first study to examine change in depression and anxiety across the first year of adoptive parenthood in same-sex couples (90 couples: 52 lesbian, 38 gay male). Given that sexual minorities uniquely contend with sexual orientation-related stigma, this study examined how both internalized and enacted forms of stigma affect the mental health of lesbians and gay men during the transition to parenthood. In addition, the role of contextual support was examined. Higher perceived workplace support, family support, and relationship quality were related to lower depressive and anxious symptoms at the time of the adoption, and higher perceived friend support was related to lower anxiety symptoms. Lower internalized homophobia and higher perceived neighborhood gay-friendliness were related to lower depressive symptoms. Finally, individuals with high internalized homophobia who lived in states with unfavorable legal climates regarding gay adoption experienced the steepest increases in depressive and anxious symptoms. Findings have important implications for counselors working with sexual minorities, especially those experiencing the transition to parenthood.

  5. Implementing Health Outcomes for Better Information and Care (HOBIC): Lessons from an Early Adopter Site.

    PubMed

    Tregunno, Deborah; Gordon, Sandra; Gardiner-Harding, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Measuring patient outcomes to assess quality and to support evidence-based decision-making has gained momentum over the last two decades. In Ontario, the Health Outcomes for Better Information and Care (HOBIC) initiative has become a part of the province's Information Management Strategy as a way to demonstrate the impact of nursing care on health outcomes. In fall 2006, HOBIC implementation began in early adopter sites with the goal of sharing lessons learned with other healthcare providers and organizations. This action learning study was undertaken in one of the early adopter sites to gain a greater understanding of the factors that support, or fail to support, the integration of HOBIC into professional practice. Participants reported a lack of confidence using HOBIC that they attributed to scarce resources for ongoing education and support. Together, we developed a simulation workshop aimed at enhancing communication skills to achieve more meaningful nurse-patient interaction during the HOBIC assessment. This paper focuses Canadian nurse leaders' attention on the reality that implementing HOBIC is far from straightforward. The real challenge in HOBIC implementation is not mastery of the technology per se, but support for nurses and their ability to adapt daily practice in order to maximize its functionality.

  6. Evolution of Medication Administration Workflow in Implementing Electronic Health Record System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yuan-Han

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the clinical workflow evolutions when implementing the health information technology (HIT). The study especially emphasized on administrating medication when the electronic health record (EHR) systems were adopted at rural healthcare facilities. Mixed-mode research methods, such as survey, observation, and focus group, were…

  7. Health Care Professionals' Perceptions of the Use of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeyeye, Adebisi

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) use has improved significantly in health care organizations. However, many barriers and factors influence the success of EMR implementation and adoption. The purpose of the descriptive qualitative single-case study was to explore health care professionals' perceptions of the use of EMRs at a hospital division of a…

  8. Experiences of Adopting Blended Pedagogies in Health Assessment Course in Post RN Baccalaureate Program of Nursing in Karachi, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassum, Shanaz Hussein; Allana, Saleema; Dias, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There is little known about whether faculty and students in a resource constricted context experience a change in learning due to the adoption of blended learning (BL) pedagogies in a lab based course. The study aimed to understand the experiences of faculty and students' related to the adoption of BL pedagogies in health assessment…

  9. Electronic health records: eliciting behavioral health providers' beliefs.

    PubMed

    Shank, Nancy; Willborn, Elizabeth; Pytlikzillig, Lisa; Noel, Harmonijoie

    2012-04-01

    Interviews with 32 community behavioral health providers elicited perceived benefits and barriers of using electronic health records. Themes identified were (a) quality of care, (b) privacy and security, and (c) delivery of services. Benefits to quality of care were mentioned by 100% of the providers, and barriers by 59% of providers. Barriers involving privacy and security concerns were mentioned by 100% of providers, and benefits by 22%. Barriers to delivery of services were mentioned by 97% of providers, and benefits by 66%. Most providers (81%) expressed overall positive support for electronic behavioral health records.

  10. Adoption of a microbial health-based target for Australian drinking water regulation.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Joanne; Sinclair, Martha; Gibney, Katherine; Leder, Karin

    2015-09-01

    The health-based targets of 1 in 10,000 for infection and 10(-6) disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per person per year are increasingly being considered, or have already been adopted, to define microbial safety targets for water. The aim of this paper is to convey information about how these two targets compare by converting each of the target values to a common metric. The metric chosen for viral (rotavirus and norovirus) and protozoan (Cryptosporidium) reference pathogens is the estimated maximum number of annual drinking water-associated cases of acute diarrhoeal disease tolerated. For the reference bacterial pathogen Campylobacter, sequelae to acute diarrhoeal illness have also been considered in estimating the tolerable number of cases for the DALY target. Also investigated is whether non-compliance with targets would be detected as a waterborne disease outbreak by the health surveillance system in an extreme hypothetical situation whereby all tolerable cases per annum occurred as a single event. The paper highlights that verification of compliance with targets cannot be demonstrated by the absence of reported drinking water-associated outbreaks alone and concludes that introduction of a quantitative health-based outcome for drinking water in Australia would help improve water quality management by providing a common goal directly linked to health outcomes.

  11. Adoption Space and the Idea-to-Market Process of Health Technologies.

    PubMed

    Saranummi, Niilo; Beuscart, Regis; Black, Norman; Maglaveras, Nicos; Strano, Chiara; Karavidopoulou, Youla

    2016-01-01

    Although Europe 'produces' excellent science, it has not been equally successful in translating scientific results into commercially successful companies in spite of European and national efforts invested in supporting the translation process. The Idea-to-Market process is highly complex due to the large number of actors and stakeholders. ITECH was launched to propose recommendations which would accelerate the Idea-to-Market process of health technologies leading to improvements in the competitiveness of the European health technology industry in the global markets. The project went through the following steps: defining the Idea-to-Market process model; collection and analysis of funding opportunities; identification of 12 gaps and barriers in the Idea-to-Market process; a detailed analysis of these supported by interviews; a prioritization process to select the most important issues; construction of roadmaps for the prioritized issues; and finally generating recommendations and associated action plans. Seven issues were classified as in need of actions. Three of these are part of the ongoing Medical Device Directive Reform (MDR), namely health technology assessment, post-market surveillance and regulatory process, and therefore not within the scope of ITECH. Recommendations were made for eHealth taxonomy; Education and training; Clinical trials and Adoption space and Human Factors Engineering (HFE).

  12. Mechanisms of Change in the ARC Organizational Strategy: Increasing Mental Health Clinicians' EBP Adoption Through Improved Organizational Culture and Capacity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nathaniel J; Glisson, Charles; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Green, Philip

    2017-03-01

    The development of efficient and scalable implementation strategies in mental health is restricted by poor understanding of the change mechanisms that increase clinicians' evidence-based practice (EBP) adoption. This study tests the cross-level change mechanisms that link an empirically-supported organizational strategy for supporting implementation (labeled ARC for Availability, Responsiveness, and Continuity) to mental health clinicians' EBP adoption and use. Four hundred seventy-five mental health clinicians in 14 children's mental health agencies were randomly assigned to the ARC intervention or a control condition. Measures of organizational culture, clinicians' intentions to adopt EBPs, and job-related EBP barriers were collected before, during, and upon completion of the three-year ARC intervention. EBP adoption and use were assessed at 12-month follow-up. Multilevel mediation analyses tested changes in organizational culture, clinicians' intentions to adopt EBPs, and job-related EBP barriers as linking mechanisms explaining the effects of ARC on clinicians' EBP adoption and use. ARC increased clinicians' EBP adoption (OR = 3.19, p = .003) and use (81 vs. 56 %, d = .79, p = .003) at 12-month follow-up. These effects were mediated by improvement in organizational proficiency culture leading to increased clinician intentions to adopt EBPs and by reduced job-related EBP barriers. A combined mediation analysis indicated the organizational culture-EBP intentions mechanism was the primary carrier of ARC's effects on clinicians' EBP adoption and use. ARC increases clinicians' EBP adoption and use by creating proficient organizational cultures that increase clinicians' intentions to adopt EBPs.

  13. Incorporating Pharmacogenomics into Health Information Technology, Electronic Health Record and Decision Support System: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Abdullah

    2017-02-01

    As the adoption of information technology in healthcare is rising, the potentiality of moving Pharmacogenomics from benchside to bedside is aggravated. This paper reviews the current status of Pharmacogenomics (PGx) information and the attempts for incorporating them into the Electronic Health Record (EHR) system through Decision Support Systems (DSSs). Rigorous review strategies of PGx information and providing context-relevant recommendations in form of action plan- dose adjustment, lab tests rather than just information- would be ideal for making clinical recommendations out of PGx information. Lastly, realistic projections of what pharmacogenomics can provide is another important aspect in incorporating Pharmacogenomics into health information technology.

  14. Barriers to comparing the usability of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Ratwani, Raj M; Hettinger, A Zachary; Fairbanks, Rollin J

    2016-08-29

    Despite the widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), usability of many EHRs continues to be suboptimal, with some vendors failing to meet usability standards, resulting in clinician frustration and patient safety hazards. In an effort to increase EHR vendor competition on usability, recommendations have been made and legislation drafted to develop comparison tools that would allow purchasers to better understand the usability of EHR products prior to purchase. Usability comparison can be based on EHR vendor design and development processes, vendor usability testing as part of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology certification program, and usability of implemented products. Barriers exist within the current certified health technology program that prevent effective comparison of usability during each of these stages. We describe the importance of providing purchasers with improved information about EHR usability, barriers to making usability comparisons, and solutions to overcome these barriers.

  15. Electronic Health Record Use a Bitter Pill for Many Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Meigs, Stephen L.; Solomon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) adoption among office-based physician practices in the United States has increased significantly in the past decade. However, the challenges of using EHRs have resulted in growing dissatisfaction with the systems among many of these physicians. The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to increase understanding of physician perceptions regarding the value of using EHR technology. Important findings included the belief among physicians that EHR systems need to be more user-friendly and adaptable to individual clinic workflow preferences, physician beliefs that lack of interoperability among EHRs is a major barrier to meaningful use of the systems, and physician beliefs that EHR use does not improve the quality of care provided to patients. These findings suggest that although government initiatives to encourage EHR adoption among office-based physician practices have produced positive results, additional support may be required in the future to maintain this momentum. PMID:26903782

  16. Security Attacks and Solutions in Electronic Health (E-health) Systems.

    PubMed

    Zeadally, Sherali; Isaac, Jesús Téllez; Baig, Zubair

    2016-12-01

    For centuries, healthcare has been a basic service provided by many governments to their citizens. Over the past few decades, we have witnessed a significant transformation in the quality of healthcare services provided by healthcare organizations and professionals. Recent advances have led to the emergence of Electronic Health (E-health), largely made possible by the massive deployment and adoption of information and communication technologies (ICTs). However, cybercriminals and attackers are exploiting vulnerabilities associated primarily with ICTs, causing data breaches of patients' confidential digital health information records. Here, we review recent security attacks reported for E-healthcare and discuss the solutions proposed to mitigate them. We also identify security challenges that must be addressed by E-health system designers and implementers in the future, to respond to threats that could arise as E-health systems become integrated with technologies such as cloud computing, the Internet of Things, and smart cities.

  17. National electronic health record interoperability chronology.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, Stephen P

    2009-05-01

    The federal initiative for electronic health record (EHR) interoperability began in 2000 and set the stage for the establishment of the 2004 Executive Order for EHR interoperability by 2014. This article discusses the chronology from the 2001 e-Government Consolidated Health Informatics (CHI) initiative through the current congressional mandates for an aligned, interoperable, and agile DoD AHLTA and VA VistA.

  18. The relevance of netnography to the harness of Romanian health care electronic word-of-mouth.

    PubMed

    Bratucu, R; Gheorghe, I R; Radu, A; Purcarea, V L

    2014-09-15

    Nowadays, consumers use the computer mediated communication to make purchase decisions on a large variety of products and services. Since health care services are archetypal by nature, consumers in this field are one of the most encountered users of electronic word-of-mouth. The objective of this paper is to explain and support the necessity of adopting a different qualitative method when electronic word of mouth is harnessed on health care dedicated forums, that is, netnography.

  19. The relevance of netnography to the harness of Romanian health care electronic word-of-mouth

    PubMed Central

    Bratucu, R; Gheorghe, IR; Radu, A; Purcarea, VL

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nowadays, consumers use the computer mediated communication to make purchase decisions on a large variety of products and services. Since health care services are archetypal by nature, consumers in this field are one of the most encountered users of electronic word-of-mouth. The objective of this paper is to explain and support the necessity of adopting a different qualitative method when electronic word of mouth is harnessed on health care dedicated forums, that is, netnography. PMID:25408755

  20. Patient Perceptions of Electronic Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulejian, Armine

    2011-01-01

    Research objective. Electronic Health Records (EHR) are expected to transform the way medicine is delivered with patients/consumers being the intended beneficiaries. However, little is known regarding patient knowledge and attitudes about EHRs. This study examined patient perceptions about EHR. Study design. Surveys were administered following…

  1. Health information technology: initial set of standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria for electronic health record technology. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-01-13

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is issuing this interim final rule with a request for comments to adopt an initial set of standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria, as required by section 3004(b)(1) of the Public Health Service Act. This interim final rule represents the first step in an incremental approach to adopting standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria to enhance the interoperability, functionality, utility, and security of health information technology and to support its meaningful use. The certification criteria adopted in this initial set establish the capabilities and related standards that certified electronic health record (EHR) technology will need to include in order to, at a minimum, support the achievement of the proposed meaningful use Stage 1 (beginning in 2011) by eligible professionals and eligible hospitals under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs.

  2. Addressing Barriers to the Development and Adoption of Rapid Diagnostic Tests in Global Health.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric; Sikes, Hadley D

    Immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have demonstrated significant potential for use as point-of-care diagnostic tests in resource-limited settings. Most notably, RDTs for malaria have reached an unparalleled level of technological maturity and market penetration, and are now considered an important complement to standard microscopic methods of malaria diagnosis. However, the technical development of RDTs for other infectious diseases, and their uptake within the global health community as a core diagnostic modality, has been hindered by a number of extant challenges. These range from technical and biological issues, such as the need for better affinity agents and biomarkers of disease, to social, infrastructural, regulatory and economic barriers, which have all served to slow their adoption and diminish their impact. In order for the immunochromatographic RDT format to be successfully adapted to other disease targets, to see widespread distribution, and to improve clinical outcomes for patients on a global scale, these challenges must be identified and addressed, and the global health community must be engaged in championing the broader use of RDTs.

  3. Barriers and Facilitators to Adoption of Genomic Services for Colorectal Care within the Veterans Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Sperber, Nina R.; Andrews, Sara M.; Voils, Corrine I.; Green, Gregory L.; Provenzale, Dawn; Knight, Sara

    2016-01-01

    We examined facilitators and barriers to adoption of genomic services for colorectal care, one of the first genomic medicine applications, within the Veterans Health Administration to shed light on areas for practice change. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 58 clinicians to understand use of the following genomic services for colorectal care: family health history documentation, molecular and genetic testing, and genetic counseling. Data collection and analysis were informed by two conceptual frameworks, the Greenhalgh Diffusion of Innovation and Andersen Behavioral Model, to allow for concurrent examination of both access and innovation factors. Specialists were more likely than primary care clinicians to obtain family history to investigate hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC), but with limited detail; clinicians suggested templates to facilitate retrieval and documentation of family history according to guidelines. Clinicians identified advantage of molecular tumor analysis prior to genetic testing, but tumor testing was infrequently used due to perceived low disease burden. Support from genetic counselors was regarded as facilitative for considering hereditary basis of CRC diagnosis, but there was variability in awareness of and access to this expertise. Our data suggest the need for tools and policies to establish and disseminate well-defined processes for accessing services and adhering to guidelines. PMID:27136589

  4. Addressing Barriers to the Development and Adoption of Rapid Diagnostic Tests in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eric; Sikes, Hadley D.

    2015-01-01

    Immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have demonstrated significant potential for use as point-of-care diagnostic tests in resource-limited settings. Most notably, RDTs for malaria have reached an unparalleled level of technological maturity and market penetration, and are now considered an important complement to standard microscopic methods of malaria diagnosis. However, the technical development of RDTs for other infectious diseases, and their uptake within the global health community as a core diagnostic modality, has been hindered by a number of extant challenges. These range from technical and biological issues, such as the need for better affinity agents and biomarkers of disease, to social, infrastructural, regulatory and economic barriers, which have all served to slow their adoption and diminish their impact. In order for the immunochromatographic RDT format to be successfully adapted to other disease targets, to see widespread distribution, and to improve clinical outcomes for patients on a global scale, these challenges must be identified and addressed, and the global health community must be engaged in championing the broader use of RDTs. PMID:26594252

  5. Access Control Model for Sharing Composite Electronic Health Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Ahn, Gail-Joon; Covington, Michael J.; Zhang, Xinwen

    The adoption of electronically formatted medical records, so called Electronic Health Records (EHRs), has become extremely important in healthcare systems to enable the exchange of medical information among stakeholders. An EHR generally consists of data with different types and sensitivity degrees which must be selectively shared based on the need-to-know principle. Security mechanisms are required to guarantee that only authorized users have access to specific portions of such critical record for legitimate purposes. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for modelling access control scheme for composite EHRs. Our model formulates the semantics and structural composition of an EHR document, from which we introduce a notion of authorized zones of the composite EHR at different granularity levels, taking into consideration of several important criteria such as data types, intended purposes and information sensitivities.

  6. Ethical issues in electronic health records: A general overview

    PubMed Central

    Ozair, Fouzia F.; Jamshed, Nayer; Sharma, Amit; Aggarwal, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) is increasingly being implemented in many developing countries. It is the need of the hour because it improves the quality of health care and is also cost-effective. Technologies can introduce some hazards hence safety of information in the system is a real challenge. Recent news of security breaches has put a question mark on this system. Despite its increased usefulness, and increasing enthusiasm in its adoption, not much attention is being paid to the ethical issues that might arise. Securing EHR with an encrypted password is a probable option. The purpose of this article is to discuss the various ethical issues arising in the use of the EHRs and their possible solutions. PMID:25878950

  7. Health Care Support Issues for Internationally Adopted Children: A Qualitative Approach to the Needs and Expectations of Families

    PubMed Central

    Lesens, Olivier; Schmidt, Anna; De Rancourt, Florence; Poirier, Véronique; Labbe, André; Laurichesse, Henri; Marty, Laurent; Beytout, Jean; Vorilhon, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background Families of internationally adopted children may face specific problems with which general practitioners (GPs) may not be familiar. The aim of the study was to explore problems faced by families before, during and after the arrival of their internationally adopted child and to assess the usefulness of a specific medical structure for internationally adopted children, which could be a resource for the GP. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a qualitative study using individual semistructured guided conversations and interviewed 21 families that had adopted a total of 26 children internationally in the Puy de Dome department, France, in 2003. Quantitative data were used to describe the pathologies diagnosed and the investigations performed.Our study showed that the history of these families, from the start of the adoption project to its achievement, is complex and warrants careful analysis. Health-care providers should not only consider the medical aspects of adoption, but should also be interested in the histories of these families, which may play a role in the forming of attachments between the adoptee and their adoptive parents and prevent further trouble during the development of the child. We also showed that adoptive parents have similar fears or transient difficulties that may be resolved quickly by listening and reassurance. Most such families would support the existence of a specific medical structure for internationally adopted children, which could be a resource for the general practitioner. However, the health-care providers interviewed were divided on the subject and expressed their fear that a special consultation could be stigmatizing to children and families. Conclusions/Significance A specific consultation with well-trained and experienced practitioners acting in close collaboration with GPs and paediatricians may be of help in better understanding and supporting adopted children and their families. PMID:22363614

  8. Electronic health records access during a disaster.

    PubMed

    Morchel, Herman; Raheem, Murad; Stevens, Lee

    2014-01-01

    As has been demonstrated previously, medical care providers that employ an electronic health records (EHR) system provide more appropriate, cost effective care. Those providers are also better positioned than those who rely on paper records to recover if their facility is damaged as a result of severe storms, fires, or other events. The events surrounding Superstorm Sandy in 2012 made it apparent that, with relatively little additional effort and investment, health care providers with EHR systems may be able to use those systems for patient care purposes even during disasters that result in damage to buildings and facilities, widespread power outages, or both.

  9. Electronic Health Records Access During a Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Morchel, Herman; Raheem, Murad; Stevens, Lee

    2014-01-01

    As has been demonstrated previously, medical care providers that employ an electronic health records (EHR) system provide more appropriate, cost effective care. Those providers are also better positioned than those who rely on paper records to recover if their facility is damaged as a result of severe storms, fires, or other events. The events surrounding Superstorm Sandy in 2012 made it apparent that, with relatively little additional effort and investment, health care providers with EHR systems may be able to use those systems for patient care purposes even during disasters that result in damage to buildings and facilities, widespread power outages, or both. PMID:24683443

  10. Genetic counselors' current use of personal health records-based family histories in genetic clinics and considerations for their future adoption.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Chaney; Deshazo, Jonathan P; Bodurtha, Joann; Quillin, John; Creswick, Heather

    2013-06-01

    Given the widespread adoption of electronic medical records and recent emergence of electronic family history tools, we examined genetic counselors' perspectives on the emerging technology of the personal health record (PHR)-based family history tool that links to an electronic medical record (EMR). Two-hundred thirty-three genetic counselors responded to an on-line survey eliciting current use of electronic family history (EFH) tools and familiarity with PHR-based family history tools. Additionally, after being shown a series of screen shots of a newly developed PHR-based family history tool based on the U.S. Surgeon General's My Family Health Portrait (United States Department of Health and Human Services 2009), participants were surveyed about the perceived usefulness, ease of use, and impact on current workflow that this kind of tool would have in their practices. Eighty-three percent reported that their institution has an EMR, yet only 35 % have a dedicated space for family history. Eighty-two percent reported that less than 5 % of their patients have a PHR, and only 16 % have worked with patients who have a PHR. Seventy-two percent or more agreed that a PHR-based family history tool would facilitate communication, increase accuracy of information, ensure consistency in recording information, increase focus on actual counseling, reduce repetitive questions, improve efficiency, and increase the legibility and clarity. Our findings suggest that participants were familiar with existing EFH tools, but that the majority did not use them in practice. Genetic counselors' adoption of such tools is limited due to non-existence of this kind of technology or inability to integrate it into their clinics. They are also strongly in favor of adopting a PHR-based family history tool in genetics clinics, but have practical concerns that must be addressed before the tool can be implemented.

  11. [The model of state health policy and the system of medical assistance adopted in present-day Brazil].

    PubMed

    Queiroz, M de S; Vianna, A L

    1992-04-01

    A contribution to the analysis of the health reform presently occurring in Brazil is presented. The need to consolidate the theoretical background which supports the advances already achieved in order to understand recent events in the area is stressed. In this regard, the health reform is understood as a question transcending the mere administrative and managerial aspect of the health system, since it necessarily involves a redefinition of the concepts of health, disease and the medical practice adopted by the dominant mechanistic paradigm of medicine. The recent events which delineate the health system in Brazil are analysed and criticised in the light of this concern.

  12. Facilitating transitions to EMR adoption through client-side electronic documentation.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, Michael; Lester, William

    2007-10-11

    We provide a description of a web-based, client-side application to facilitate physician documentation of hospital admissions and progress notes. This system is currently being used in an Oregon academic medical center independent from and in conjunction with computerized hospital information systems. Unique features of the application include clickable and modifiable review of systems and physical exam templates, automatic incorporation of electronic information from the existing electronic systems, and creation of a centralized note repository.

  13. Electronic health records: current and future use.

    PubMed

    Peters, Steve G; Khan, Munawwar A

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current state of the electronic medical record, including benefits and shortcomings, and presents key factors likely to drive development in the next decade and beyond. The current electronic medical record to a large extent represents a digital version of the traditional paper legal record, owned and maintained by the practitioner. The future electronic health record is expected to be a shared tool, engaging patients in decision making, wellness and disease management and providing data for individual decision support, population management and analytics. Many drivers will determine this path, including payment model reform, proliferation of mobile platforms, telemedicine, genomics and individualized medicine and advances in 'big data' technologies.

  14. Implementation factors and their effect on e-Health service adoption in rural communities: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An ageing population is seen as a threat to the quality of life and health in rural communities, and it is often assumed that e-Health services can address this issue. As successful e-Health implementation in organizations has proven difficult, this systematic literature review considers whether this is so for rural communities. This review identifies the critical implementation factors and, following the change model of Pettigrew and Whipp, classifies them in terms of “context”, “process”, and “content”. Through this lens, we analyze the empirical findings found in the literature to address the question: How do context, process, and content factors of e-Health implementation influence its adoption in rural communities? Methods We conducted a systematic literature review. This review included papers that met six inclusion and exclusion criteria and had sufficient methodological quality. Findings were categorized in a classification matrix to identify promoting and restraining implementation factors and to explore whether any interactions between context, process, and content affect adoption. Results Of the 5,896 abstracts initially identified, only 51 papers met all our criteria and were included in the review. We distinguished five different perspectives on rural e-Health implementation in these papers. Further, we list the context, process, and content implementation factors found to either promote or restrain rural e-Health adoption. Many implementation factors appear repeatedly, but there are also some contradictory results. Based on a further analysis of the papers’ findings, we argue that interaction effects between context, process, and content elements of change may explain these contradictory results. More specifically, three themes that appear crucial in e-Health implementation in rural communities surfaced: the dual effects of geographical isolation, the targeting of underprivileged groups, and the changes in ownership required

  15. The informatics nurse specialist role in electronic health record usability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Crystal L; Seckman, Charlotte A

    2014-05-01

    Health information technology is revolutionizing the way we interact with health-related data. One example of this can be seen in the rising adoption rates of electronic health records by healthcare providers. Nursing plays a vital role in electronic health record adoption, not only because of their numbers but also their intimate understanding of workflow. The success of an electronic health record also relies on how usable the software is for clinicians, and a thorough usability evaluation is needed before implementing a system within an organization. Not all nurses have the knowledge and skills to perform extensive usability testing; therefore, the informatics nurse specialist plays a critical role in the process. This article will discuss core usability principles, provide a framework for applying these concepts, and explore the role of the informatics nurse specialist in electronic health record evaluation. Health information technology is fundamentally changing the clinical practice environment, and many nurses are seeking leadership positions in the field of informatics. As technology and software become more sophisticated, usability principles must be used under theguidance of the informatics nurse specialist to provide a relevant, robust, and well-designed electronic health record to address the needs of the busy clinician.

  16. 42 CFR 425.506 - Electronic health records technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic health records technology. 425.506 Section 425.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Standards and Reporting § 425.506 Electronic health records technology. (a) ACOs, ACO participants, and...

  17. 42 CFR 425.506 - Electronic health records technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic health records technology. 425.506 Section 425.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Standards and Reporting § 425.506 Electronic health records technology. (a) ACOs, ACO participants, and...

  18. 42 CFR 425.506 - Electronic health records technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic health records technology. 425.506 Section 425.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Standards and Reporting § 425.506 Electronic health records technology. (a) ACOs, ACO participants, and...

  19. Executive function and mental health in adopted children with a history of recreational drug exposures.

    PubMed

    Piper, Brian J; Gray, Hilary M; Corbett, Selena M; Birkett, Melissa A; Raber, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive children are at increased risk for problematic behaviors but the origin of these individual differences in neurobehavioral function is unclear. This investigation examined whether adopted children with prenatal exposure to a wide variety of recreational drugs exhibited higher scores (i.e. more problems) with executive function and psychiatric symptomology. Caregivers of children ages 5 to 18 completed an online survey with items about use of alcohol, nicotine, or methamphetamine during pregnancy followed by the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF, N = 437 including 59 adoptive parents) or the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL, N = 549 including 54 adoptive parents). Relative to a comparison group of children raised by their biological parents, adoptive children that were polysubstance exposed during prenatal development exhibited higher rates of academic difficulties and were behind their classmates in math and reading. Adoptive children had statistically and clinically significant higher BRIEF ratings and this pattern was similar for boys and girls. CBCL ratings were significantly increased in adoptive children, particularly for Externalizing and Attention problems. Adoptive children with a history of polysubstance exposures including alcohol, nicotine, and methamphetamine are at heightened risk for difficulties with executive function as well as various psychopathologies. These findings suggest that increased monitoring to identify and implement remediation strategies may be warranted for adopted children with a history of in utero drug exposures.

  20. Executive Function and Mental Health in Adopted Children with a History of Recreational Drug Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Brian J.; Gray, Hilary M.; Corbett, Selena M.; Birkett, Melissa A.; Raber, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive children are at increased risk for problematic behaviors but the origin of these individual differences in neurobehavioral function is unclear. This investigation examined whether adopted children with prenatal exposure to a wide variety of recreational drugs exhibited higher scores (i.e. more problems) with executive function and psychiatric symptomology. Caregivers of children ages 5 to 18 completed an online survey with items about use of alcohol, nicotine, or methamphetamine during pregnancy followed by the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF, N = 437 including 59 adoptive parents) or the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL, N = 549 including 54 adoptive parents). Relative to a comparison group of children raised by their biological parents, adoptive children that were polysubstance exposed during prenatal development exhibited higher rates of academic difficulties and were behind their classmates in math and reading. Adoptive children had statistically and clinically significant higher BRIEF ratings and this pattern was similar for boys and girls. CBCL ratings were significantly increased in adoptive children, particularly for Externalizing and Attention problems. Adoptive children with a history of polysubstance exposures including alcohol, nicotine, and methamphetamine are at heightened risk for difficulties with executive function as well as various psychopathologies. These findings suggest that increased monitoring to identify and implement remediation strategies may be warranted for adopted children with a history of in utero drug exposures. PMID:25337917

  1. 75 FR 44313 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ...This final rule implements the provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Pub. L. 111-5) that provide incentive payments to eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in Medicare and Medicaid programs that adopt and successfully demonstrate meaningful use of certified electronic health record (EHR)......

  2. Automated Methods to Extract Patient New Information from Clinical Notes in Electronic Health Record Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The widespread adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) has resulted in rapid text proliferation within clinical care. Clinicians' use of copying and pasting functions in EHR systems further compounds this by creating a large amount of redundant clinical information in clinical documents. A mixture of redundant information (especially outdated…

  3. 75 FR 1843 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ...This proposed rule would implement the provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Pub. L. 111-5) that provide incentive payments to eligible professionals (EPs) and eligible hospitals participating in Medicare and Medicaid programs that adopt and meaningfully use certified electronic health record (EHR) technology. The proposed rule would specify the--initial......

  4. The current state of electronic health record (EHR) use in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Amir A; Mwachofi, Ari K; Hughes, Danny R; Broyles, Robert W; Wheeler, Denna; Roswell, Robert H

    2013-02-01

    There is ample evidence of the positive impact of electronic health records (EHR) on operational efficiencies and quality of care. Yet, growth in the adoption of EHR and sharing of information among providers has been slow. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 provides financial incentives for eligible providers to adopt and implement EHR. Until now, little information was available regarding the use of EHR in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the Oklahoma Health Information Exchange Trust (OHIET), this study reveals that the frequency of use of EHR among Oklahoma providers is near the national average. Although a large number of Oklahoma physicians have received Medicaid incentive payments for planned adoption, implementation, or upgrade of EHR systems, relatively few eligible providers in Oklahoma have been certified to receive Medicare incentive payments through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and even fewer have actually received these incentive payments.

  5. Mental Health Trainees' Explicit and Implicit Attitudes Toward Transracial Adoptive Families Headed by Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tony Xing; Jordan-Arthur, Brittany; Garafano, Jeffrey S; Curran, Laura

    2016-09-15

    We investigated 109 (79.8% female; 76% White, and 83.5% Heterosexual) mental health trainees' explicit and implicit attitudes toward heterosexual, lesbian, and gay White couples adopting and raising Black children. To determine explicit attitudes, we used a vignette depicting a Black child ready for adoption and three types of equally qualified White families who were headed by a heterosexual couple, gay couple, or lesbian couple. The trainees were asked to indicate which type of family they preferred to adopt the child. To determine implicit attitudes, we used the computer programed latency-based multifactor implicit association test (IAT) protocol. The IAT data were collected from each participant individually. Explicit data showed that over 80% of the participants indicated no strong preference in terms of which type of family should adopted the child. However, IAT data showed that the trainees implicitly preferred lesbian couples. Overall, the degree of congruence between explicit and implicit was very low. Implications for training were discussed.

  6. Adopting an Electronic Text Book for a Postgraduate Accounting Course: An Experiential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoch, Herbert P.; Teoh, Hai Yap; Kropman, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Students are becoming accustomed to using the Internet as an information source that supplements or replaces the normal institutional and classroom handout. However, the use of full electronic books through the Internet or CD instead of a printed full text book is a uniquely different experience, not only for these students but also for academics…

  7. Electronic Health Records Place 1st at Indy 500

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR Electronic Health Records Place 1st at Indy 500 Past ... last May's Indy 500 had thousands of personal Electronic Health Records on hand for those attending—and ...

  8. Organizational Barriers to Adopting an Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention in Community-Based Mental Health Organizations.

    PubMed

    Patterson, David A; Wolf Adelv Unegv Waya, Silver; Dulmus, Catherine N

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines two factors related to successfully implementing a brief alcohol screening throughout all community-based mental health organizations. The first issue is related to an organization's internal structures, such as culture and climate that can impede evidenced-based practice implementation. There is literature suggesting that organizational culture and climate affect decisions about whether evidence-based practices are adopted and implemented within health care agencies. Following this literature review on organizational barriers, the history and successes of adopting an alcohol screening and brief intervention are reviewed. Studying, identifying, and understanding the organizational factors associated with the successful dissemination and implementation of best practices throughout community-based mental health organizations would contribute to increasing the likelihood that an alcohol screening and brief intervention are implemented throughout mental health organizations.

  9. Hospital electronic health information exchange grew substantially in 2008-12.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Michael F; Patel, Vaishali; Charles, Dustin; Swain, Matthew; Mostashari, Farzad

    2013-08-01

    Electronic health information exchange can improve care coordination for patients by enabling more timely and complete sharing of clinical information among providers and hospitals. Approaches to health information exchange have expanded in recent years with the growth in entities such as regional health information organizations (HIOs) and the increased adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems. However, little is known about the extent of exchange activity in US hospitals. Using national surveys of hospitals, we found that between 2008 and 2012, hospitals' electronic exchange of health information with other providers increased significantly, regardless of provider type, organizational affiliation, or type of clinical information. In 2012 nearly six in ten hospitals actively exchanged electronic health information with providers and hospitals outside their organization, an increase of 41 percent since 2008. EHR adoption and HIO participation were associated with significantly greater hospital exchange activity, but exchanges with providers outside the organization and exchanges of clinical care summaries and medication lists remained limited. New and ongoing policy initiatives and payment reforms may accelerate the electronic exchange of health information by creating new data exchange options, defining standards for interoperability, and creating payment incentives for information sharing across organizational boundaries.

  10. Adoption and Use of a Mobile Health Application in Older Adults for Cognitive Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yasini, Mobin; Marchand, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Serious games could be used to improve cognitive functions in the elderly. We evaluated the adoption of a new tablet application dedicated to cognitive stimulation in the elderly. The Stim'Art application offers various serious games to work different cognitive functions (memory, attention, concentration, etc.). The usage of fifteen older adults was followed for six months. The type of the game, the number of launches for each game, the time spent on each game, the difficulty level, the success rate and perceived well-being of users have been studied and compared at the end of the first and the sixth months. The participants have played half an hour per day on average. The average time of playing per day in the sixth month was significantly higher than the average time of playing during the first month (p value < 7 * 10(-4)). The same result was found for the average number of game launches per day (p value < 7 * 10(-4)). However, older people seem not to launch more difficult levels in the last month. The success rate at sixth months was significantly higher than the success rate at the end of the first month (p value < 6.4 * 1010(-4)). Generally, seniors have had an improvement in their wellbeing score judged by themselves. Our study showed that the mobile application receives a good admission from users. The results are promising and can pave the way for improving cognitive function in the elderly patients. The use of tablets and the constitution of serious games in close cooperation with health professionals and elderly patients (the end user), are likely to provide satisfactory results to improve healthcare provided for elderly patients suffering from cognitive disorders.

  11. Quality and Certification of Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Hoerbst, A.; Ammenwerth, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous projects, initiatives, and programs are dedicated to the development of Electronic Health Records (EHR) worldwide. Increasingly more of these plans have recently been brought from a scientific environment to real life applications. In this context, quality is a crucial factor with regard to the acceptance and utility of Electronic Health Records. However, the dissemination of the existing quality approaches is often rather limited. Objectives The present paper aims at the description and comparison of the current major quality certification approaches to EHRs. Methods A literature analysis was carried out in order to identify the relevant publications with regard to EHR quality certification. PubMed, ACM Digital Library, IEEExplore, CiteSeer, and Google (Scholar) were used to collect relevant sources. The documents that were obtained were analyzed using techniques of qualitative content analysis. Results The analysis discusses and compares the quality approaches of CCHIT, EuroRec, IHE, openEHR, and EN13606. These approaches differ with regard to their focus, support of service-oriented EHRs, process of (re-)certification and testing, number of systems certified and tested, supporting organizations, and regional relevance. Discussion The analyzed approaches show differences with regard to their structure and processes. System vendors can exploit these approaches in order to improve and certify their information systems. Health care organizations can use these approaches to support selection processes or to assess the quality of their own information systems. PMID:23616834

  12. Assessing Factors Affecting Physician's Intention to Adopt Biometric Authentication Technology in Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corazao, Cesar E.

    2014-01-01

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) regulated the privacy and security of patient information. Since HIPPA became a law, hospital operators have struggled to comply fully with its security and privacy provisions. The proximity-based biometric authentication (PBBA) technology evolved in last decade to help…

  13. Closing the Research-Practice Gap: Factors Affecting Adoption and Implementation of a Children's Mental Health Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Joanna L.; MacKay, Sherri; Peterson-Badali, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Despite the availability of effective interventions, they are not widely used in community mental health centers. This study examined the adoption and implementation of The Arson Prevention Program for Children (TAPP-C), a program for juvenile firesetters developed at a teaching hospital and disseminated to community settings. Questionnaire data…

  14. [The introduction of the electronic health card in Germany].

    PubMed

    Bales, S

    2005-07-01

    From 2006 onwards all members of the health insurance system in Germany will be issued an electronic health card which will replace the current health insurance card. The new health card will be technically upgraded to also include patient-related health data or provide access to such data in addition to its administrative functions. Therefore, it is evident that the health card be fitted with a microprocessor that permits authentication (electronic identity check), encryption and the electronic digital signature, thus ensuring maximum data safety and security. For easy identification of the insured person, the electronic health card will bear a photograph of the card holder.

  15. Electronic Health Records in Long-Term Care: Staff Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Rebecca

    2015-10-12

    As long-term post-acute care (LTPAC) settings continue to increase their adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), it is important to learn from end users currently working with the technology to identify clinical implications and opportunities to improve systems and surrounding processes. This study utilized one-on-one interviews of direct care nurses (n = 20) in a Midwest United States LTPAC setting to describe patterns of use, and areas to improve. The majority of respondents evaluated the EHR as easy to use, with a positive impact on quality of care, through efficiencies gained in communication with the care team. Staff responses outline desired modifications to the software, including fixes to data fields for more accurate medication administration and accurate reports on bowel protocol follow-up. Recommendations for LTPAC organizations are made regarding improved staff training on the EHR, and modifications to the EHR and related processes to improve quality of care and staff retention.

  16. mHealth adoption in low-resource environments: a review of the use of mobile healthcare in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Chib, Arul; van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Car, Josip

    2015-01-01

    The acknowledged potential of using mobile phones for improving healthcare in low-resource environments of developing countries has yet to translate into significant mHealth policy investment. The low uptake of mHealth in policy agendas may stem from a lack of evidence of the scalable, sustainable impact on health indicators. The mHealth literature in low- and middle-income countries reveals a burgeoning body of knowledge; yet, existing reviews suggest that the projects yield mixed results. This article adopts a stage-based approach to understand the varied contributions to mHealth research. The heuristic of inputs-mechanism-outputs is proposed as a tool to categorize mHealth studies. This review (63 articles comprising 53 studies) reveals that mHealth studies in developing countries tend to concentrate on specific stages, principally on pilot projects that adopt a deterministic approach to technological inputs (n = 32), namely introduction and implementation. Somewhat less studied were research designs that demonstrate evidence of outputs (n = 15), such as improvements in healthcare processes and public health indicators. The review finds a lack of emphasis on studies that provide theoretical understanding (n = 6) of adoption and appropriation of technological introduction that produces measurable health outcomes. As a result, there is a lack of dominant theory, or measures of outputs relevant to making policy decisions. Future work needs to aim for establishing theoretical and measurement standards, particularly from social scientific perspectives, in collaboration with researchers from the domains of information technology and public health. Priorities should be set for investments and guidance in evaluation disseminated by the scientific community to practitioners and policymakers.

  17. Health Reform in Minnesota: An Analysis of Complementary Initiatives Implementing Electronic Health Record Technology and Care Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Soderberg, Karen; Rajamani, Sripriya; Wholey, Douglas; LaVenture, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Minnesota enacted legislation in 2007 that requires all health care providers in the state to implement an interoperable electronic health record (EHR) system by 2015. 100% of hospitals and 98% of clinics had adopted EHR systems by end of 2015. Minnesota’s 2008 health reform included a health care home (HCH) program, Minnesota’s patient centered medical home. By end of 2014, 43% of HCH eligible clinics were certified with 335 certified HCHs and 430 eligible but not certified clinics. Objectives: To study the association between adoption and use of EHRs in primary care clinics and HCH certification, including use of clinical decision support tools, patient registries, electronic exchange of patient information, and availability of patient portals. Methods: Study utilized data from the 2015 Minnesota Health Information Technology Clinic Survey conducted annually by the Minnesota Department of Health. The response rate was 80% with 1,181 of 1,473 Minnesota clinics, including 662 HCH eligible primary care clinics. The comparative analysis focused on certified HCHs (311) and eligible but not certified clinics (351). Results: HCH clinics utilized the various tools of EHR technology at a higher rate than non-HCH clinics. This greater utilization was noted across a range of functionalities: clinical decision support, patient disease registries, EHR to support quality improvement, electronic exchange of summary care records and availability of patient portals. HCH certification was significant for clinical decision support tools, registries and quality improvement. Conclusions: HCH requirements of care management, care coordination and quality improvement can be better supported with EHR technology, which underscores the higher rate of utilization of EHR tools by HCH clinics. Optimizing electronic exchange of health information remains a challenge for all clinics, including HCH certified clinics. This research presents the synergy between complementary

  18. The Challenges of Electronic Health Records and Diabetes Electronic Prescribing: Implications for Safety Net Care for Diverse Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lenny L. S.; Fouts, Michelle M.; Murphy, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    Widespread electronic health record (EHR) implementation creates new challenges in the diabetes care of complex and diverse populations, including safe medication prescribing for patients with limited health literacy and limited English proficiency. This review highlights how the EHR electronic prescribing transformation has affected diabetes care for vulnerable patients and offers recommendations for improving patient safety through EHR electronic prescribing design, implementation, policy, and research. Specifically, we present evidence for (1) the adoption of RxNorm; (2) standardized naming and picklist options for high alert medications such as insulin; (3) the widespread implementation of universal medication schedule and language-concordant labels, with the expansion of electronic prescription 140-character limit; (4) enhanced bidirectional communication with pharmacy partners; and (5) informatics and implementation research in safety net healthcare systems to examine how EHR tools and practices affect diverse vulnerable populations. PMID:28197420

  19. Implementing a network for electronic surveillance reporting from public health reference laboratories: an international perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, N. H.; Martin, S. M.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic data reporting from public health laboratories to a central site provides a mechanism for public health officials to rapidly identify problems and take action to prevent further spread of disease. However, implementation of reference laboratory systems is much more complex than simply adopting new technology, especially in international settings. We describe three major areas to be considered by international organizations for successful implementation of electronic reporting systems from public health reference laboratories: benefits of electronic reporting, planning for system implementation (e.g., support, resources, data analysis, country sovereignty), and components of system initiation (e.g., authority, disease definition, feedback, site selection, assessing readiness, problem resolution). Our experience with implementation of electronic public health laboratory data management and reporting systems in the United States and working with international organizations to initiate similar efforts demonstrates that successful reference laboratory reporting can be implemented if surveillance issues and components are planned. PMID:11747687

  20. Matrix Analysis of the Digital Divide in eHealth Services Using Awareness, Want, and Adoption Gap

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The digital divide usually refers to access or usage, but some studies have identified two other divides: awareness and demand (want). Given that the hierarchical stages of the innovation adoption process of a customer are interrelated, it is necessary and meaningful to analyze the digital divide in eHealth services through three main stages, namely, awareness, want, and adoption. Objective By following the three main integrated stages of the innovation diffusion theory, from the customer segment viewpoint, this study aimed to propose a new matrix analysis of the digital divide using the awareness, want, and adoption gap ratio (AWAG). I compared the digital divide among different groups. Furthermore, I conducted an empirical study on eHealth services to present the practicability of the proposed methodology. Methods Through a review and discussion of the literature, I proposed hypotheses and a new matrix analysis. To test the proposed method, 3074 Taiwanese respondents, aged 15 years and older, were surveyed by telephone. I used the stratified simple random sampling method, with sample size allocation proportioned by the population distribution of 23 cities and counties (strata). Results This study proposed the AWAG segment matrix to analyze the digital divide in eHealth services. First, awareness and want rates were divided into two levels at the middle point of 50%, and then the 2-dimensional cross of the awareness and want segment matrix was divided into four categories: opened group, desire-deficiency group, perception-deficiency group, and closed group. Second, according to the degrees of awareness and want, each category was further divided into four subcategories. I also defined four possible strategies, namely, hold, improve, evaluate, and leave, for different regions in the proposed matrix. An empirical test on two recently promoted eHealth services, the digital medical service (DMS) and the digital home care service (DHCS), was conducted

  1. Northern Territory HealthConnect: shared electronic health record service implementation experiences and benefits realised in indigenous health.

    PubMed

    Moo, Stephen; Fletcher, John

    2007-01-01

    This presentation summarises the learnings from the HealthConnect Northern Territory (HCNT) Shared Electronic Health Record Service (SEHR) from Trial to Implementation and the emerging benefits realized as the project is implemented across the Northern Territory of Australia. The presentation: * explores the challenges and experiences of implementing a SEHR service in urban and in some of the remotest regions on the Australian continent. * demonstrates the emerging health benefits e-Health can provide in enabling the sharing of medical information between public and private health service providers in particular the service delivery and benefits provided to a highly mobile Indigenous population who currently experience the greatest health problems and experience difficulties accessing continuum of care created by factors which include remoteness, mobility and communication. * explores the evolvement of the "opt in" consumer consent model adopted by the Territory for the implementation of the HCNT SEHR.* advises of plans for future development, which inform other implementations, and NeHTA standards development for the implementation of the National SEHR Service. * Informs project plans to incorporate NeHTA standards as they are developed and transition the HCNT SEHR to the National SEHR Service when implemented recognising the importance of developing strong partnerships with key stakeholders, in particular consumers, health care providers and system vendors who inform project development and implementation.

  2. New Unintended Adverse Consequences of Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Sittig, D F; Wright, A; Ash, J; Singh, H

    2016-11-10

    Although the health information technology industry has made considerable progress in the design, development, implementation, and use of electronic health records (EHRs), the lofty expectations of the early pioneers have not been met. In 2006, the Provider Order Entry Team at Oregon Health & Science University described a set of unintended adverse consequences (UACs), or unpredictable, emergent problems associated with computer-based provider order entry implementation, use, and maintenance. Many of these originally identified UACs have not been completely addressed or alleviated, some have evolved over time, and some new ones have emerged as EHRs became more widely available. The rapid increase in the adoption of EHRs, coupled with the changes in the types and attitudes of clinical users, has led to several new UACs, specifically: complete clinical information unavailable at the point of care; lack of innovations to improve system usability leading to frustrating user experiences; inadvertent disclosure of large amounts of patient-specific information; increased focus on computer-based quality measurement negatively affecting clinical workflows and patient-provider interactions; information overload from marginally useful computer-generated data; and a decline in the development and use of internally-developed EHRs. While each of these new UACs poses significant challenges to EHR developers and users alike, they also offer many opportunities. The challenge for clinical informatics researchers is to continue to refine our current systems while exploring new methods of overcoming these challenges and developing innovations to improve EHR interoperability, usability, security, functionality, clinical quality measurement, and information summarization and display.

  3. Electronic health records and the evolution of diabetes care: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vishal; Reed, Mary E; Grant, Richard W

    2015-05-01

    Adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has increased dramatically since the 2009 implementation of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that the majority of U.S. hospitals and nearly half of U.S. health care professionals have implemented an EHR with advanced functionality.(1) The goals of the HITECH act were not only to incentivize the adoption of EHRs, but also to increase the quality, safety, and efficiency of health care by promoting the concept of "meaningful use."(2,3) The stepwise implementation of "meaningful use" is now entering the latter stages with a focus on improving patient outcomes.(4).

  4. Organ Procurement Organizations and the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Howard, R J; Cochran, L D; Cornell, D L

    2015-10-01

    The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has adversely affected the ability of organ procurement organizations (OPOs) to perform their federally mandated function of honoring the donation decisions of families and donors who have signed the registry. The difficulties gaining access to potential donor medical record has meant that assessment, evaluation, and management of brain dead organ donors has become much more difficult. Delays can occur that can lead to potential recipients not receiving life-saving organs. For over 40 years, OPO personnel have had ready access to paper medical records. But the widespread adoption of EHRs has greatly limited the ability of OPO coordinators to readily gain access to patient medical records and to manage brain dead donors. Proposed solutions include the following: (1) hospitals could provide limited access to OPO personnel so that they could see only the potential donor's medical record; (2) OPOs could join with other transplant organizations to inform regulators of the problem; and (3) hospital organizations could be approached to work with Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to revise the Hospital Conditions of Participation to require OPOs be given access to donor medical records.

  5. Disassociation for electronic health record privacy.

    PubMed

    Loukides, Grigorios; Liagouris, John; Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris; Terrovitis, Manolis

    2014-08-01

    The dissemination of Electronic Health Record (EHR) data, beyond the originating healthcare institutions, can enable large-scale, low-cost medical studies that have the potential to improve public health. Thus, funding bodies, such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the U.S., encourage or require the dissemination of EHR data, and a growing number of innovative medical investigations are being performed using such data. However, simply disseminating EHR data, after removing identifying information, may risk privacy, as patients can still be linked with their record, based on diagnosis codes. This paper proposes the first approach that prevents this type of data linkage using disassociation, an operation that transforms records by splitting them into carefully selected subsets. Our approach preserves privacy with significantly lower data utility loss than existing methods and does not require data owners to specify diagnosis codes that may lead to identity disclosure, as these methods do. Consequently, it can be employed when data need to be shared broadly and be used in studies, beyond the intended ones. Through extensive experiments using EHR data, we demonstrate that our method can construct data that are highly useful for supporting various types of clinical case count studies and general medical analysis tasks.

  6. Mental health, attachment and breastfeeding: implications for adopted children and their mothers

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Karleen D

    2006-01-01

    Breastfeeding an adopted child has previously been discussed as something that is nice to do but without potential for significant benefit. This paper reviews the evidence in physiological and behavioural research, that breastfeeding can play a significant role in developing the attachment relationship between child and mother. As illustrated in the case studies presented, in instances of adoption and particularly where the child has experienced abuse or neglect, the impact of breastfeeding can be considerable. Breastfeeding may assist attachment development via the provision of regular intimate interaction between mother and child; the calming, relaxing and analgesic impact of breastfeeding on children; and the stress relieving and maternal sensitivity promoting influence of breastfeeding on mothers. The impact of breastfeeding as observed in cases of adoption has applicability to all breastfeeding situations, but may be especially relevant to other at risk dyads, such as those families with a history of intergenerational relationship trauma; this deserves further investigation. PMID:16722597

  7. Factors related to adopting healthy behaviors by patients with tuberculosis in Isfahan: Application of health belief model

    PubMed Central

    Johari, Maryam; Eslami, Ahmad Ali; Alahverdipoor, Hamid; Hasanzade, Akbar; Farid, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium Tuberculosis complex. It is one of the most common infectious diseases largely resulting from the patient's lifestyle. The purpose of the present study is to investigate factors related with adopting health behaviors by patients with tuberculosis based on the health belief model. Materials and Methods: The present cross-sectional study was performed on 196 patients with tuberculosis. Data was collected using a 47-item, self-designed, questionnaire. Cronbach's alpha was calculated as 73.9. The Pearson test was used to study the correlation between independent variables and adopting a healthy behavior. Results: The mean score for adopting healthy behaviors by patients was 87.52 ± 13.8. The Pearson correlation test indicated a statistically significant relation between adopting healthy behaviors and scores of knowledge (P < 0.001, r = 0.536), perceived susceptibility (P < 0.001, r = 0.36), perceived benefits (P < 0.001, r = 0.347), and perceived barriers (P = 0.046, r = 0.143). Conclusion: Direct relationship was found between adoptinga healthy behavior and scores of knowledge, perceived susceptibility, and perceived benefit. Although the results of this study can be the basis of educational interventions, any generalizations should be performed cautiously. PMID:25250352

  8. Factors Influencing the Adoption of a Health Promoting School Approach in the Province of Quebec, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschesnes, M.; Trudeau, F.; Kebe, M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined a prediction model that integrated three categories of predictors likely to influence adoption of the Quebec Healthy Schools (HS) approach, i.e. attributes of the approach, individual and contextual characteristics. HS receptivity was considered as a potential mediator. For this study, 141 respondents representing 96 schools…

  9. Stigma, Social Context, and Mental Health: Lesbian and Gay Couples across the Transition to Adoptive Parenthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first study to examine change in depression and anxiety across the first year of adoptive parenthood in same-sex couples (90 couples: 52 lesbian, 38 gay male). Given that sexual minorities uniquely contend with sexual orientation-related stigma, this study examined how both internalized and enacted forms of stigma affect the mental…

  10. Health Education Textbook Adoption in Texas: A Lesson in Politics and Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, David; Barr, Elissa

    2007-01-01

    Textbooks are often a core element of curricula and delivery of classroom instruction and have long been a source of controversy. The textbook adoption process has become less about content and more about political/cultural pressure. Special-interest groups from the right and left exert enormous influence on textbook content through bias and…

  11. Adopting Health Behavior Change Theory throughout the Clinical Practice Guideline Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceccato, Natalie E.; Ferris, Lorraine E.; Manuel, Douglas; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.

    2007-01-01

    Adopting a theoretical framework throughout the clinical practice guideline (CPG) process (development, dissemination, implementation, and evaluation) can be useful in systematically identifying, addressing, and explaining behavioral influences impacting CPG uptake and effectiveness. This article argues that using a theoretical framework should…

  12. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.

  13. Data Quality in Electronic Health Records Research.

    PubMed

    Feder, Shelli L

    2017-01-01

    The proliferation of the electronic health record (EHR) has led to increasing interest and opportunities for nurse scientists to use EHR data in a variety of research designs. However, methodological problems pertaining to data quality may arise when EHR data are used for nonclinical purposes. Therefore, this article describes common domains of data quality and approaches for quality appraisal in EHR research. Common data quality domains include data accuracy, completeness, consistency, credibility, and timeliness. Approaches for quality appraisal include data validation with data rules, evaluation and verification of data abstraction methods with statistical measures, data comparisons with manual chart review, management of missing data using statistical methods, and data triangulation between multiple EHR databases. Quality data enhance the validity and reliability of research findings, form the basis for conclusions derived from the data, and are, thus, an integral component in EHR-based study design and implementation.

  14. Adopting a Proactive Approach to Good Health: A Way Forward for Rural Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penman, Joy; Ellis, Bronwyn

    2010-01-01

    Minimising discrepancies between Australia's rural and the more favourable urban health status relates to more than workforce recruitment, retention and access to health services: A proactive strategy, using resources at hand, can empower people to improve their health. Academics from a nurse education unit have, therefore, regularly engaged with…

  15. An Exploration of the Adoption of Public Health Degrees and Certificates in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Brenda A.

    2012-01-01

    Efforts aimed at strengthening the governmental public health workforce have led to increased attention on undergraduate public health education. The focus, to date, has been on four-year institutions with minimal attention provided to community, or two-year, colleges and their potential role in addressing public health workforce needs. Progress…

  16. Uses of electronic health records for public health surveillance to advance public health.

    PubMed

    Birkhead, Guthrie S; Klompas, Michael; Shah, Nirav R

    2015-03-18

    Public health surveillance conducted by health departments in the United States has improved in completeness and timeliness owing to electronic laboratory reporting. However, the collection of detailed clinical information about reported cases, which is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, to understand transmission, or to determine disease-related risk factors, is still heavily dependent on manual processes. The increasing prevalence and functionality of electronic health record (EHR) systems in the United States present important opportunities to advance public health surveillance. EHR data have the potential to further increase the breadth, detail, timeliness, and completeness of public health surveillance and thereby provide better data to guide public health interventions. EHRs also provide a unique opportunity to expand the role and vision of current surveillance efforts and to help bridge the gap between public health practice and clinical medicine.

  17. Factors Driving the Adoption of Quality Improvement Initiatives in Local Health Departments: Results From the 2010 Profile Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huabin; Sotnikov, Sergey; McLees, Anita; Stokes, Shereitte

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, quality improvement (QI) has become a major focus in advancing the goal of improving performance of local health departments (LHDs). However, limited empirical data exists on the current implementation of QI initiatives in LHDs and factors associated with adoption of QI initiatives. Objectives (1) To examine the current implementation of QI implementation initiatives by LHDs and (2) to identify factors contributing to LHDs’ decision to implement QI initiatives. Methods In this study, a novel theoretical framework based on analysis of QI in medicine was applied to analyze QI by LHDs. LHDs’ QI adoption was assessed by the number of formal QI projects reported by LHDs that responded to module 1 of the 2010 National Profile of Local Health Department Study (Profile Study) conducted by the National Association of County & City Health Officials. The Profile Study data were merged with data from the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Area Resource Files and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials’ 2010 Survey. Logistic regression analyses were conducted using Stata 11 SVY procedure to account for the complex sampling design. Results The Profile Study data indicated that about 73% of the LHDs reported implementing 1 or more QI projects. LHDs with large jurisdiction population (>50 000), higher per capita public health expenditure, a designated QI staff member, or prior participation in performance improvement programs were more likely to have undertaken QI initiatives. Conclusion According to the Profile Study, more than a quarter of LHDs surveyed did not report implementing any formal QI projects. Greater investments in QI programs and designation of QI staff can be effective strategies to promote QI adoption. The validity of the definition of a formal QI project needs to be established. More research to identify the barriers to successful QI implementation at LHDs is also needed. PMID:24978615

  18. Mandatory Use of Electronic Health Records: Overcoming Physician Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Viseeta K.

    2012-01-01

    Literature supports the idea that electronic health records hold tremendous value for the healthcare system in that it increases patient safety, improves the quality of care and provides greater efficiency. The move toward mandatory implementation of electronic health records is a growing concern in the United States health care industry. The…

  19. Confidentiality, electronic health records, and the clinician.

    PubMed

    Graves, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The advent of electronic health records (EHRs) to improve access and enable research in the everyday clinical world has simultaneously made medical information much more vulnerable to illicit, non-beneficent uses. This wealth of identified, aggregated data has and will attract attacks by domestic governments for surveillance and protection, foreign governments for espionage and sabotage, organized crime for illegal profits, and large corporations for "legal" profits. Against these powers with almost unlimited resources no security scheme is likely to prevail, so the design of such systems should include appropriate security measures. Unlike paper records, where the person maintaining and controlling the existence of the records also controls access to them, these two functions can be separated for EHRs. By giving physical control over access to individual records to their individual owners, the aggregate is dismantled, thereby protecting the nation's identified health information from large-scale data mining or tampering. Control over the existence and integrity of all the records--yet without the ability to examine their contents--would be left with larger institutions. This article discusses the implications of all of the above for the role of the clinician in assuring confidentiality (a cornerstone of clinical practice), for research and everyday practice, and for current security designs.

  20. The electronic health record: a digital divide?

    PubMed

    Glaser, John

    2007-10-01

    The gap between EHR adoption among larger providers versus adoption by smaller or rural providers has caused a "digital divide" that could threaten smaller providers' survival in the years ahead. Closing this gap will require the collective action of providers, payers, and government.

  1. Adopting public health approaches to communication disability: challenges for the education of speech-language pathologists.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Karen; McAllister, Lindy; Davidson, Bronwyn; Marshall, Julie; Law, James

    2014-01-01

    Public health approaches to communication disability challenge the profession of speech-language pathology (SLP) to reconsider both frames of reference for practice and models of education. This paper reviews the impetus for public health approaches to communication disability and considers how public health is, and could be, incorporated into SLP education, both now and in the future. The paper describes tensions between clinical services, which have become increasingly specialized, and public health approaches that offer a broader view of communication disability and communication disability prevention. It presents a discussion of these tensions and asserts that public health approaches to communication are themselves a specialist field, requiring specific knowledge and skills. The authors suggest the use of the term 'communication disability public health' to refer to this type of work and offer a preliminary definition in order to advance discussion. Examples from three countries are provided of how some SLP degree programmes are integrating public health into the SLP curriculum. Alternative models of training for communication disability public health that may be relevant in the future in different contexts and countries are presented, prompting the SLP profession to consider whether communication disability public health is a field of practice for speech-language pathologists or whether it has broader workforce implications. The paper concludes with some suggestions for the future which may advance thinking, research and practice in communication disability public health.

  2. Australian health professionals' social media (Web 2.0) adoption trends: early 21st century health care delivery and practice promotion.

    PubMed

    Usher, Wayne T

    2012-01-01

    This study was concerned with identifying reasons behind patterns of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major health professions. Attention was given to uncovering some of the more significant motivations for the resistance or adoption of Web 2.0 technologies for health care delivery and practice promotion by Australian health professionals. Surveys were developed from a common set of questions with specific variations between professions negotiated with professional health societies. Survey questions were constructed in an attempt to identify Web 2.0 adoption trends. An online survey (www.limesurvey.org) was used to collect data. Initial data preparation involved the development of one integrated SPSS file to incorporate all responses from the eight surveys undertaken. Initial data analysis applied Frequencies and Crosstabs to the identified groups and provided a profile of respondents by key business and demographic characteristics. Of the 935 respondents, 9.5% of participants indicated that they used Web 2.0 for their professional work, 19.1% of them did not use it for work but used it for their personal needs and 71.3% of them did not use Web 2.0 at all. Participants have indicated that the main reason for 'choosing not to adopt' Web 2.0 applications as a way of delivering health care to their patients is due to the health professionals' lack of understanding of Web 2.0 (83.3%), while the main reason for 'choosing to adopt' Web 2.0 applications is the perception of Web 2.0 as a quick and effective method of communication (73.0%). This study has indicated that Australian health professionals 'choose not to adopt' Web 2.0 usage as a way of delivering health care primarily due to 'a lack of understanding as to how social media would be used in health care' (83.3%). This study identifies that Australian health professionals are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies in their private lives but are failing to see how such technologies

  3. Adoption of online health management tools among healthy older adults: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Zettel-Watson, Laura; Tsukerman, Dmitry

    2016-06-01

    As the population ages and chronic diseases abound, overburdened healthcare systems will increasingly require individuals to manage their own health. Online health management tools, quickly increasing in popularity, have the potential to diminish or even replace in-person contact with health professionals, but overall efficacy and usage trends are unknown. The current study explored perceptions and usage patterns among users of online health management tools, and identified barriers and barrier-breakers among non-users. An online survey was completed by 169 computer users (aged 50+). Analyses revealed that a sizable minority (37%) of participants use online health management tools and most users (89%) are satisfied with these tools, but a limited range of tools are being used and usage occurs in relatively limited domains. Improved awareness and education for online health management tools could enhance people's abilities to remain at home as they age, reducing the financial burden on formal assistance programs.

  4. Electronic health records within integrated care in Germany.

    PubMed

    Jähn, Karl; Gärtig-Daugs, Anja; Nagel, Eckhard

    2005-04-01

    The planned introduction of an electronic health card is seen as a milestone in the dissemination of extended electronic health records in Germany. This paper deals with the main issues likely to result from the use of the electronic health insurance card. The role of the patient in the health care process and the patients enhanced access to his or her personal medical record are reflected. A high level of acceptance of the electronic health insurance card and extended electronic documentation procedures can be expected if ethical, legal, and technological concerns of the public are addressed and appropriate incentives are established. Finally, the electronic health insurance card can serve as a useful aid to support the ongoing implementation of disease management programs for the most important chronic conditions in Germany.

  5. Adoption of new health products in low and middle income settings: how product development partnerships can support country decision making.

    PubMed

    Wells, William A; Brooks, Alan

    2011-03-31

    When a new health product becomes available, countries have a choice to adopt the product into their national health systems or to pursue an alternate strategy to address the public health problem. Here, we describe the role for product development partnerships (PDPs) in supporting this decision-making process. PDPs are focused on developing new products to respond to health problems prevalent in low and middle income settings. The impact of these products within public sector health systems can only be realized after a country policy process. PDPs may be the organizations most familiar with the evidence which assists decision making, and this generally translates into involvement in international policy development, but PDPs have limited reach into endemic countries. In a few individual countries, there may be more extensive involvement in tracking adoption activities and generating local evidence. This local PDP involvement begins with geographical prioritization based on disease burden, relationships established during clinical trials, PDP in-country resources, and other factors. Strategies adopted by PDPs to establish a presence in endemic countries vary from the opening of country offices to engagement of part-time consultants or with long-term or ad hoc committees. Once a PDP commits to support country decision making, the approaches vary, but include country consultations, regional meetings, formation of regional, product-specific committees, support of in-country advocates, development of decision-making frameworks, provision of technical assistance to aid therapeutic or diagnostic guideline revision, and conduct of stakeholder and Phase 4 studies. To reach large numbers of countries, the formation of partnerships, particularly with WHO, are essential. At this early stage, impact data are limited. But available evidence suggests PDPs can and do play an important catalytic role in their support of country decision making in a number of target countries.

  6. Diffusion of innovation in mental health policy adoption: what should we ask about the quality of policy and the role of stakeholders in this process? Comment on "Cross-national diffusion of mental health policy".

    PubMed

    Lee, Lucy

    2015-03-10

    In his recent study, Gordon Shen analyses a pertinent question facing the global mental health research and practice community today; that of how and why mental health policy is or is not adopted by national governments. This study identifies becoming a World Health Organization (WHO) member nation, and being in regional proximity to countries which have adopted a mental health policy as supportive of mental health policy adoption, but no support for its hypothesis that country recipients of higher levels of aid would have adopted a mental health policy due to conditionalities imposed on aid recipients by donors. Asking further questions of each may help to understand more not only about how and why mental health policies may be adopted, but also about the relevance and quality of implementation of these policies and the role of specific actors in achieving adoption and implementation of high quality mental health policies.

  7. Use of Local Health Department Websites: A Study of E-Government Adoption and Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaltonen, Pamela Massie

    2013-01-01

    Two distinct but converging activities have the potential to alter the way local public health departments conduct business. These activities are the emergence of e-government and the addition of preparedness as a basic function of the public health system. Preparedness implies timely collaboration with government entities, community partners and…

  8. 76 FR 40457 - Administrative Simplification: Adoption of Operating Rules for Eligibility for a Health Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... Prescription Drug Programs (NCPDP) Telecommunication standard Version 5.1, which are specified at 45 CFR part... 837 I Health care claims--Institutional. NCPDP D.0 Health care claims--Retail pharmacy drug. ASC X12.... NCPDP D.0 Coordination of Benefits--Retail pharmacy drug. ASC X12 837 D Coordination of...

  9. Adoption of Soil Health Improvement Strategies by Australian Farmers: II. Impediments and Incentives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, J. McL.; Cattle, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Many farmers remain hesitant to implement structured management plans and strategies tailored to address soil health, irrespective of mounting scientific evidence for the credibility of certain soil health indicators, an increase in the reporting of program benefits and progress in communicating these benefits. Hence, the purpose of this…

  10. Adoption of Soil Health Improvement Strategies by Australian Farmers: I. Attitudes, Management and Extension Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, J. McL.; Cattle, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: There is inconsistency in the design, understanding, implementation and monitoring of soil health programmes. Despite mounting scientific evidence for the credibility of certain soil health indicators, an increase in the reporting of programme benefits, and progress in communicating these benefits, many farmers remain hesitant to…

  11. Health information technology: standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria for electronic health record technology, 2014 edition; revisions to the permanent certification program for health information technology. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-04

    With this final rule, the Secretary of Health and Human Services adopts certification criteria that establish the technical capabilities and specify the related standards and implementation specifications that Certified Electronic Health Record (EHR) Technology will need to include to, at a minimum, support the achievement of meaningful use by eligible professionals, eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs beginning with the EHR reporting periods in fiscal year and calendar year 2014. This final rule also makes changes to the permanent certification program for health information technology, including changing the program's name to the ONC HIT Certification Program.

  12. Does competition by health maintenance organizations affect the adoption of cost-containment measures by fee-for-service plans?

    PubMed

    Joesch, J M; Wickizer, T M; Feldstein, P J

    1998-06-01

    How groups insured by fee-for-service health plans react to increased competition from health maintenance organizations (HMOs) is an unresolved question. We investigated whether groups insured by indemnity plans respond to HMO market competition by changing selected health insurance features, such as deductible amounts, stop loss levels, and coinsurance rates, or by adopting utilization management or preferred provider organization (PPO) benefit options. We collected benefit design data for the years 1985 through 1992 from 95 insured groups in 62 US metropolitan statistical areas. Multivariate hazard analysis showed that groups located in markets with higher rates of change in HMO enrollment were less likely to increase deductibles or stop loss levels. Groups located in markets with higher HMO enrollment were more likely to adopt utilization management or PPO benefit options. A group located in a market with an HMO penetration rate of 20% was 65% more likely to have included a PPO option as part of its insurance benefit plan than a group located in a market with an HMO penetration rate of 15% (p < 0.05). Concern about possible adverse selection effects may deter some fee-for-service groups from changing their health insurance coverage. Under some conditions, however, groups insured under fee-for-service plans do respond to managed care competition by changing their insurance benefits to achieve greater cost containment.

  13. The power of local action in occupational health: the adoption of local exhaust ventilation in the Chicago tuckpointing trade

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Silica is a pervasive and potentially deadly occupational hazard in construction. The occupational risk posed by silica has long been known, but efforts to use engineering controls to minimize dust generation in tuckpointing operations, a masonry restoration specialty, have been slow. Objectives The objective of this study is to explore how local innovation in occupational safety and health may emerge, absent the establishment of national standards. Method This study uses a case study to explore the adoption of local exhaust ventilation in tuckpointing operations in the Chicago area. Sources of data for this research include interviews with a diverse range of key informants and the review of archival material. Results This case study found local unions, municipal regulators, contractors, and major public users of construction services played a central role in the events and milestones that led to the early adoption of local exhaust ventilation in Chicago. The adoption of local exhaust ventilation technology in Chicago demonstrates the potential for local actors to fill an important void when rulemaking in vital areas of occupational of health impedes effective national regulation. PMID:27362634

  14. Adopting customers' empowerment and social networks to encourage participations in e-health services.

    PubMed

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil; Low, Patrick Kim Cheng; Wint, Zaw; Younis, Mustafa Z

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present an e-health model that embeds empowerment and social network intervention that may extend the role of customers in health care settings. A 25-item Likert-type survey instrument was specifically developed for this study and administered to a sample of 108 participants in Indonesia from October to November 2012. The data were analyzed to provide ideas on how to move forward with the e-health initiative as a means to improve e-health services. The survey revealed that there is a high demand for customers' empowerment and involvement in social networks to improve their health literacy and customer satisfaction. Regardless of the limitations of the study, the participants have responded with great support for the abilities of the prototype systems drawn from the survey. The survey results were used as requirements to develop a system prototype that incorporates the expectations of the people. The prototype (namely Clinic 2.0) was derived from the model and confirmed from the survey. Participants were selected to use the system for three months, after which we measured its impact towards their health literacy and customer satisfaction. The results show that the system intervention through Clinic 2.0 leads to a high level of customer satisfaction and health literacy.

  15. Ten key considerations for the successful implementation and adoption of large-scale health information technology.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Bates, David W; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-06-01

    The implementation of health information technology interventions is at the forefront of most policy agendas internationally. However, such undertakings are often far from straightforward as they require complex strategic planning accompanying the systemic organizational changes associated with such programs. Building on our experiences of designing and evaluating the implementation of large-scale health information technology interventions in the USA and the UK, we highlight key lessons learned in the hope of informing the on-going international efforts of policymakers, health directorates, healthcare management, and senior clinicians.

  16. Characteristics of German hospitals adopting health IT systems - results from an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Jan-David; Egbert, Nicole; Frey, Andreas; Hübner, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Hospital characteristics that facilitate IT adoption have been described by the literature extensively, however with controversial results. The aim of this study therefore is to draw a set of the most important variables from previous studies and include them in a combined analysis for testing their contribution as single factors and their interactions. Total number of IT systems installed and number of clinical IT systems in the hospital were used as criterion variables. Data from a national survey of German hospitals served as basis. Based on a stepwise multiple regression analysis four variables were identified to significantly explain the degree of IT adoption (60% explained variance): 1) hospital size, 2) IT department, 3) reference customer and 4) ownership (private vs. public). Our results replicate previous findings with regard to hospital size and ownership. In addition our study emphasizes the importance of a reliable internal structure for IT projects (existence of an IT department) and the culture of testing and installing most recent IT products (being a reference customer). None of the interactions between factors was significant.

  17. Testing the Electronic Personal Health Record Acceptance Model by Nurses for Managing Their Own Health

    PubMed Central

    Trinkoff, A.M.; Storr, C.L.; Wilson, M.L.; Gurses, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To our knowledge, no evidence is available on health care professionals’ use of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) for their health management. We therefore focused on nurses’ personal use of ePHRs using a modified technology acceptance model. Objectives To examine (1) the psychometric properties of the ePHR acceptance model, (2) the associations of perceived usefulness, ease of use, data privacy and security protection, and perception of self as health-promoting role models to nurses’ own ePHR use, and (3) the moderating influences of age, chronic illness and medication use, and providers’ use of electronic health record (EHRs) on the associations between the ePHR acceptance constructs and ePHR use. Methods A convenience sample of registered nurses, those working in one of 12 hospitals in the Maryland and Washington, DC areas and members of the nursing informatics community (AMIA and HIMSS), were invited to respond to an anonymous online survey; 847 responded. Multiple logistic regression identified associations between the model constructs and ePHR use, and the moderating effect. Results Overall, ePHRs were used by 47%. Sufficient reliability for all scales was found. Three constructs were significantly related to nurses’ own ePHR use after adjusting for covariates: usefulness, data privacy and security protection, and health-promoting role model. Nurses with providers that used EHRs who perceived a higher level of data privacy and security protection had greater odds of ePHR use than those whose providers did not use EHRs. Older nurses with a higher self-perception as health-promoting role models had greater odds of ePHR use than younger nurses. Conclusions Nurses who use ePHRs for their personal health might promote adoption by the general public by serving as health-promoting role models. They can contribute to improvements in patient education and ePHR design, and serve as crucial resources when working with their

  18. The development of a highly constrained health level 7 implementation guide to facilitate electronic laboratory reporting to ambulatory electronic health record systems.

    PubMed

    Sujansky, Walter V; Overhage, J Marc; Chang, Sophia; Frohlich, Jonah; Faus, Samuel A

    2009-01-01

    Electronic laboratory interfaces can significantly increase the value of ambulatory electronic health record (EHR) systems by providing laboratory result data automatically and in a computable form. However, many ambulatory EHRs cannot implement electronic laboratory interfaces despite the existence of messaging standards, such as Health Level 7, version 2 (HL7). Among several barriers to implementing laboratory interfaces is the extensive optionality within the HL7 message standard. This paper describes the rationale for and development of an HL7 implementation guide that seeks to eliminate most of the optionality inherent in HL7, but retain the information content required for reporting outpatient laboratory results. A work group of heterogeneous stakeholders developed the implementation guide based on a set of design principles that emphasized parsimony, practical requirements, and near-term adoption. The resulting implementation guide contains 93% fewer optional data elements than HL7. This guide was successfully implemented by 15 organizations during an initial testing phase and has been approved by the HL7 standards body as an implementation guide for outpatient laboratory reporting. Further testing is required to determine whether widespread adoption of the implementation guide by laboratories and EHR systems can facilitate the implementation of electronic laboratory interfaces.

  19. Examining factors that influence the adoption of health-promoting behaviours among people with venous disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Charne; Kapp, Suzanne; Donohue, Lisa

    2014-04-01

    People living with venous disease are encouraged to make a number of behaviour modifications to facilitate healing and to prevent a recurrence of a venous leg ulcer. This investigation sought to examine factors described in the literature that shape the effectiveness of multi-component education programs and conduct a secondary analysis of data to examine relationships between various health behaviours for people with a venous leg ulcer who participated in a standardised e-learning education program. This study found few statistically significant and typically minor relationships between health behaviours after participants had completed the education program. No significant differences were identified by participant gender, age or need for a carer, for either the number of health behaviours performed after the education or the number of behaviour changes made during the education. Participants performing few of the recommended health-promoting behaviours prior to the education achieved more behaviour change than those already engaged in the sought after activities [F(2,154) = 16·038, P = 0·000]. The notable lack of associations between the performance of the health-promoting behaviours places emphasis on the need for comprehensive investigation of the moderators and mediators of multi-faceted behaviour change to promote wound healing and chronic disease management.

  20. [Advances in eHealth in Colombia: adoption of the National Cancer Information System].

    PubMed

    Rivillas, Juan Carlos; Huertas Quintero, Jancy Andrea; Montaño Caicedo, José Ivo; Ospina Martínez, Martha Lucía

    2014-01-01

    The use of the eHealth has become feasible and acceptable in a variety of fields and contexts in Colombia. This article reports on the Colombian experience using eHealth tools applied to cancer, as well as the challenges, emerging trends, and positive outcomes related to the use of information technology and communication in the national health system. One of these outcomes has been Colombia's National Cancer Information System, in place since 2012, which is the result of political action and strategies focused on applying these innovative technologies in the field of health. The final judgment will depend of the extent to which it is possible to guide timely, effective, and coordinated interventions to optimize care for people with cancer, improve their quality of life, and significantly reduce inequalities. Once this is achieved, the next step should be to replicate the experience and apply eHealth-based tools more broadly in the contexts and fields that the country and the Region require.

  1. Impact on the Performance of Health Workers Adopted Performance-Related Contracts in the Provision of Basic Public Health Service At Village and Township Levels

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, Yaojun; HUO, Zhen’ang; WU, Jian; XIE, Shuangbao; ZHANG, Liang; FENG, Zhanchun

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper focus on the impact on the performance of health workers at village and township levels in the provision of a government stipulated package of basic public health service, which adopted the performance-related contracts mode. Methods: The concept of balanced scorecard was adopted and developed to gather the 11 evaluation indicators distributed in four quadrants. These were implemented using on-site questionnaire and interview design. Four thousand and twenty-one respondents at 30 administrative villages including 2674 respondents at 20 pilot villages and 1347 at 10 control villages were investigated. Meanwhile, 62 administration officials from three counties and nine townships were interviewed. Results: Eight of 11 evaluation indicators were obviously better in pilot counties than in Control County, The remaining three indicators respectively represented that equal, inferior to control county, and could not clear judge. Conclusion: The performance of health workers at village and township levels in the provision of basic public health service in pilot counties, which adopted the performance-related contracts mode, is better than before and control county. PMID:23785674

  2. Balancing Good Intentions: Protecting the Privacy of Electronic Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClanahan, Kitty

    2008-01-01

    Electronic information is a vital but complex component in the modern health care system, fueling ongoing efforts to develop a universal electronic health record infrastructure. This innovation creates a substantial tension between two desirable values: the increased quality and utility of patient medical records and the protection of the privacy…

  3. The Impact of Health Information Technology Adoption by Outpatient Facilities on Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deily, Mary E; Hu, Tianyan; Terrizzi, Sabrina; Chou, Shin-Yi; Meyerhoefer, Chad D

    2013-01-01

    Objective Examine whether health information technology (HIT) at nonhospital facilities (NHFs) improves health outcomes and decreases resource use at hospitals within the same heath care network, and whether the impact of HIT varies as providers gain experience using the technologies. Data Sources Administrative claims data on 491,832 births in Pennsylvania during 1998–2004 from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council and HIT applications data from the Dorenfest Institute. Study Design Fixed-effects regression analysis of the impact of HIT at NHFs on adverse birth outcomes and resource use. Principal Findings Greater use of clinical HIT applications by NHFs is associated with reduced incidence of obstetric trauma and preventable complications, as well as longer lengths of stay. In addition, the beneficial effects of HIT increase the longer that technologies have been in use. However, we find no consistent evidence on whether or how nonclinical HIT in NHFs affects either resource use or health outcomes. Conclusions Clinical HIT applications at NHFs may reduce the likelihood of adverse birth outcomes, particularly after physicians and staff gain experience using the technologies. PMID:22742682

  4. Collaborative search in electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Qiaozhu; Hanauer, David A

    2011-01-01

    Objective A full-text search engine can be a useful tool for augmenting the reuse value of unstructured narrative data stored in electronic health records (EHR). A prominent barrier to the effective utilization of such tools originates from users' lack of search expertise and/or medical-domain knowledge. To mitigate the issue, the authors experimented with a ‘collaborative search’ feature through a homegrown EHR search engine that allows users to preserve their search knowledge and share it with others. This feature was inspired by the success of many social information-foraging techniques used on the web that leverage users' collective wisdom to improve the quality and efficiency of information retrieval. Design The authors conducted an empirical evaluation study over a 4-year period. The user sample consisted of 451 academic researchers, medical practitioners, and hospital administrators. The data were analyzed using a social-network analysis to delineate the structure of the user collaboration networks that mediated the diffusion of knowledge of search. Results The users embraced the concept with considerable enthusiasm. About half of the EHR searches processed by the system (0.44 million) were based on stored search knowledge; 0.16 million utilized shared knowledge made available by other users. The social-network analysis results also suggest that the user-collaboration networks engendered by the collaborative search feature played an instrumental role in enabling the transfer of search knowledge across people and domains. Conclusion Applying collaborative search, a social information-foraging technique popularly used on the web, may provide the potential to improve the quality and efficiency of information retrieval in healthcare. PMID:21486887

  5. SHORT-RUN SUBSIDIES AND LONG-RUN ADOPTION OF NEW HEALTH PRODUCTS: EVIDENCE FROM A FIELD EXPERIMENT

    PubMed Central

    Dupas, Pascaline

    2014-01-01

    Short-run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long-run adoption? A common fear among development practitioners is that one-off subsidies may negatively affect long-run adoption through reference-dependence: People might anchor around the subsidized price and be unwilling to pay more for the product later. But for experience goods, one-off subsidies could also boost long-run adoption through learning. This paper uses data from a two-stage randomized pricing experiment in Kenya to estimate the relative importance of these effects for a new, improved antimalarial bed net. Reduced form estimates show that a one-time subsidy has a positive impact on willingness to pay a year later inherit. To separately identify the learning and anchoring effects, we estimate a parsimonious experience-good model. Estimation results show a large, positive learning effect but no anchoring. We black then discuss the types of products and the contexts inherit for which these results may apply. PMID:25308977

  6. “Big Data” and the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Ross, M. K.; Wei, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Implementation of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems continues to expand. The massive number of patient encounters results in high amounts of stored data. Transforming clinical data into knowledge to improve patient care has been the goal of biomedical informatics professionals for many decades, and this work is now increasingly recognized outside our field. In reviewing the literature for the past three years, we focus on “big data” in the context of EHR systems and we report on some examples of how secondary use of data has been put into practice. Methods We searched PubMed database for articles from January 1, 2011 to November 1, 2013. We initiated the search with keywords related to “big data” and EHR. We identified relevant articles and additional keywords from the retrieved articles were added. Based on the new keywords, more articles were retrieved and we manually narrowed down the set utilizing predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results Our final review includes articles categorized into the themes of data mining (pharmacovigilance, phenotyping, natural language processing), data application and integration (clinical decision support, personal monitoring, social media), and privacy and security. Conclusion The increasing adoption of EHR systems worldwide makes it possible to capture large amounts of clinical data. There is an increasing number of articles addressing the theme of “big data”, and the concepts associated with these articles vary. The next step is to transform healthcare big data into actionable knowledge. PMID:25123728

  7. Construct comparisons of IT adoption theories across cultures and innovativeness of health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Sung; Kim, Hye-Sook; Park, Young-Taek; Speedie, Stuart M

    2008-11-06

    This investigation verified the study model derived from TAM and tested path significance across moderating variables such as cultures, personal innovativeness in IT (PIIT), and two different health care professionals. The findings demonstrated that the theory can apply to other settings and to different work professionals as well as across PIIT. There were different aspects on path significance, which have managerial implications on how an organization can successfully use their IT resources without resistance.

  8. How many schools adopt interviews during the student admission process across the health professions in the United States of America?

    PubMed

    Glazer, Greer; Startsman, Laura F; Bankston, Karen; Michaels, Julia; Danek, Jennifer C; Fair, Malika

    2016-01-01

    Health profession schools use interviews during the admissions process to identify certain non-cognitive skills that are needed for success in diverse, inter-professional settings. This study aimed to assess the use of interviews during the student admissions process across health disciplines at schools in the United States of America in 2014. The type and frequency of non-cognitive skills assessed were also evaluated. Descriptive methods were used to analyze a sample of interview rubrics collected as part of a national survey on admissions in the health professions, which surveyed 228 schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and public health. Of the 228 schools, 130 used interviews. The most desirable non-cognitive skills from 34 schools were identified as follows: communication skills (30), motivation (22), readiness for the profession (17), service (12), and problem-solving (12). Ten schools reported using the multiple mini-interview format, which may indicate potential for expanding this practice. Disparities in the use of interviewing across health professions should be verified to help schools adopt interviews during student admissions processes.

  9. Analysis of Service-learning activities adopted in health courses of Federal University of Bahia.

    PubMed

    Baldoino, Aline Silva; Veras, Renata Meira

    2016-06-01

    is study aimed to raise and discuss the data about the integration of health courses teaching and service activities o ered at the Federal University of Bahia (UFBA), pre- senting scenarios practices and major di culties existing in the relationship between the university and the services of health. is was a qualitative study of descriptive explo- ratory character, using a questionnaire as a research tool applied to the coordinators of selected health courses. e selection was by reading the political pedagogical project, the following courses were selected: nursing, physical therapy, speech therapy, medicine, nu- trition, dentistry and public health. e results indicated eight types of teaching-service integration activities, 57 scenarios of practice and the main di culties. It was concluded that these courses are sticking to changes in academic training in health, in view of the large number of basic health units in the teaching service process. us, it emphasizes that the UFBA includes activities in health care that enable the integration-education in the higher education process, although there are some di culties in this relationship indicated by the coordinators. Esse estudo teve como objetivo levantar e discutir os dados acerca das atividades de integração ensino-serviço de cursos de saúde oferecidos na Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), apresentando os cenários de práticas e as principais di culdades existentes na relação entre a uni- versidadeeosserviçosdesaúde.Tratou-sedeumapesquisaqualitativa,decaráterdescritivoexploratório,utilizando-seumquestionáriocomo instrumento de investigação aplicado aos coordenadores dos cursos de saúde selecionados. A seleção foi mediante a leitura do projeto político pedagógico, sendo selecionados os seguintes cursos: enfermagem, sioterapia, fonoaudiologia, medicina, nutrição, odontologia e saúde coletiva. Os resultados indicaram 8 tipos de atividades de integração ensino-serviço, 57 cenários de pr

  10. Behavioral and Social Sciences at the National Institutes of Health: adoption of research findings in health research and practice as a scientific priority.

    PubMed

    Riley, William T

    2017-02-22

    The National Institutes of Health's Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) recently released its Strategic Plan for 2017 to 2021. This plan highlights three scientific priorities: (1) improve the synergy of basic and applied behavioral and social sciences research, (2) enhance and promote the research infrastructure, methods, and measures needed to support a more cumulative and integrated approach to behavioral and social sciences research, and (3) facilitate the adoption of behavioral and social sciences research findings in health research and in practice. This commentary focuses on the challenges and opportunities to facilitate the adoption of research findings in health research and in practice. In addition to the ongoing NIH support for dissemination and implementation (D&I) research, we must address transformative challenges and opportunities such as better disseminating and implementing D&I research, merging research and practice, adopting more rigorous and diverse methods and measures for both D&I and clinical trials research, evaluating technological-based delivery of interventions, and transitioning from minimally adaptable intervention packages to planned adaptations rooted in behavior change principles. Beyond translation into practice and policy, the OBSSR Strategic Plan also highlights the need for translation of behavioral and social science findings into the broader biomedical research enterprise.

  11. Characterizing Participants in the ClinSeq Genome Sequencing Cohort as Early Adopters of a New Health Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Katie L.; Han, Paul K. J.; Hooker, Gillian W.; Klein, William M. P.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Biesecker, Barbara B.

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequencing is a novel clinical tool that has the potential to identify genetic origins of disease. However, the complexities of this new technology are significant and little is known about its integration into clinical care, and its potential adoption by patients. Expectations of its promise for personalized medicine are high and it is important to properly match expectations to the realities of the test. The NIH ClinSeq cohort study pilots the integration of genome sequencing into clinical research and care to assess the technical, medical and socio-behavioral aspects of implementing this technology. Over 950 adults ages 45-65 have been enrolled and clinically phenotyped. As an initial study, we describe the personality traits of ClinSeq participants, and explore how these traits compare to those that characterize early adopters of other new technologies. Our analysis was conducted on responses from 630 members of the cohort who completed a baseline survey on health cognitions, affect, health-related behaviors and personality traits, prior to receipt of any genome sequencing results. The majority of participants were white (90.5%), had at least a college degree (86.5%), and had at least one biological child (74.6%). Members of this ClinSeq sample were found to be high in dispositional optimism and resilience. Their high SES paralleled that of other early adopters of new technology. These attributes may contribute to participants’ expectations for favorable outcomes and willingness to take higher risks when compared to the general population. These characteristics may distinguish those who are most likely to pursue genome sequencing and be indicative of their psychological resources to manage returned results. PMID:26186621

  12. Accelerated Adoption of Smoke-Free Laws After Ratification of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Uang, Randy; Hiilamo, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to evaluate the effect of ratifying the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) on countries enacting smoke-free laws covering indoor workplaces, restaurants, and bars. Methods. We compared adoption of smoke-free indoor workplace, restaurant, and bar laws in countries that did versus did not ratify the FCTC, accounting for years since the ratification of the FCTC and for countries’ World Bank income group. Results. Ratification of the FCTC significantly (P < .001) increased the probability of smoke-free laws. This effect faded with time, with a half-life of 3.1 years for indoor workplaces and 3.8 years for restaurants and bars. Compared with high-income countries, upper-middle–income countries had a significantly higher probability of smoke-free indoor workplace laws. Conclusions. The FCTC accelerated the adoption of smoke-free indoor workplace, restaurant, and bar laws, with the greatest effect in the years immediately following ratification. The policy implication is that health advocates must increase efforts to secure implementation of FCTC smoke-free provisions in countries that have not done so. PMID:26562125

  13. Determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a redefined role in health promotion at school

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The quest for greater efficiency in the provision of primary healthcare services and the implementation of a "health-promoting school" approach encourage the optimal redefinition of the role of school nurses. School nurses are viewed as professionals who might be significant actors in the promotion of youth health. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a new health-promotion role as a strategic option for the health-promoting school. Methods This study was based on an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). A total of 251 respondents (response rate of 70%) from 42 school health programs across the Province of Québec completed a mail survey regarding their intention to adopt the proposed health-promotion role. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and intention. A discriminant analysis of the beliefs was performed to identify the main targets of action. Results A total of 73% of respondents expressed a positive intention to accept to play the proposed role. The main predictors were perceived behavioural control (β = 0.36), moral norm (β = 0.27), attitude (β = 0.24), and subjective norm (β = 0.21) (ps < .0001), explaining 83% of the variance. The underlying beliefs distinguishing nurses who had a high intention from those who had a low intention referred to their feelings of being valued, their capacity to overcome the nursing shortage, the approval of the school nurses' community and parents of the students, their leadership skills, and their gaining of a better understanding of school needs. Conclusions Results suggest that leadership is a skill that should be addressed to increase the ability of school nurses to assume the proposed role. Findings also indicate that public health administrators need to ensure adequate nurse staffing in the schools in order to increase the

  14. Chapter 13: Mining Electronic Health Records in the Genomics Era

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Joshua C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The combination of improved genomic analysis methods, decreasing genotyping costs, and increasing computing resources has led to an explosion of clinical genomic knowledge in the last decade. Similarly, healthcare systems are increasingly adopting robust electronic health record (EHR) systems that not only can improve health care, but also contain a vast repository of disease and treatment data that could be mined for genomic research. Indeed, institutions are creating EHR-linked DNA biobanks to enable genomic and pharmacogenomic research, using EHR data for phenotypic information. However, EHRs are designed primarily for clinical care, not research, so reuse of clinical EHR data for research purposes can be challenging. Difficulties in use of EHR data include: data availability, missing data, incorrect data, and vast quantities of unstructured narrative text data. Structured information includes billing codes, most laboratory reports, and other variables such as physiologic measurements and demographic information. Significant information, however, remains locked within EHR narrative text documents, including clinical notes and certain categories of test results, such as pathology and radiology reports. For relatively rare observations, combinations of simple free-text searches and billing codes may prove adequate when followed by manual chart review. However, to extract the large cohorts necessary for genome-wide association studies, natural language processing methods to process narrative text data may be needed. Combinations of structured and unstructured textual data can be mined to generate high-validity collections of cases and controls for a given condition. Once high-quality cases and controls are identified, EHR-derived cases can be used for genomic discovery and validation. Since EHR data includes a broad sampling of clinically-relevant phenotypic information, it may enable multiple genomic investigations upon a single set of genotyped

  15. How user diversity and country of origin impact the readiness to adopt E-health technologies: an intercultural comparison.

    PubMed

    Wilkowsk, Wiktoria; Ziefle, Martina; Alagöz, Firat

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, due to the demographical change and the resulting overload of healthcare systems, there has been an increasing interest focusing on the global proliferation of assistive medical technologies (=E-health) in home environments. The present study examines how users' diversity influences the readiness to adopt novel medical technologies, comparing users' attitudes in terms of perceived advantages and disadvantages in three technically and culturally different countries: Germany, Poland and Turkey. This investigation also intended to verify if acceptance of information and communication technologies is associated with the sensitive acceptance of E-health. Results revealed overall a considerably higher motivation to use medical technology compared to perceived barriers, with Polish users more willing to use E-health, higher than German or Turkish ones. Older participants showed a highly positive attitude, comparable to young and middle-aged respondents' receptiveness, differing from the latter in terms of greater appreciation of the advantage of higher independency when being supported by medical technology. With respect to gender, woman showed higher motivation to use E-health technology than men, although utilization barriers were not gendered. Following these results, an unconditional transfer of acceptance from information and communication to medical technology is not justified.

  16. Integration of clinical research documentation in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Broach, Debra

    2015-04-01

    Clinical trials of investigational drugs and devices are often conducted within healthcare facilities concurrently with clinical care. With implementation of electronic health records, new communication methods are required to notify nonresearch clinicians of research participation. This article reviews clinical research source documentation, the electronic health record and the medical record, areas in which the research record and electronic health record overlap, and implications for the research nurse coordinator in documentation of the care of the patient/subject. Incorporation of clinical research documentation in the electronic health record will lead to a more complete patient/subject medical record in compliance with both research and medical records regulations. A literature search provided little information about the inclusion of clinical research documentation within the electronic health record. Although regulations and guidelines define both source documentation and the medical record, integration of research documentation in the electronic health record is not clearly defined. At minimum, the signed informed consent(s), investigational drug or device usage, and research team contact information should be documented within the electronic health record. Institutional policies should define a standardized process for this integration in the absence federal guidance. Nurses coordinating clinical trials are in an ideal position to define this integration.

  17. Disparities in Primary Care EHR Adoption Rates

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Dominic; Zhang, Shun; Douglas, Megan; Sow, Charles; Strothers, Harry; Rust, George

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates electronic health record (EHR) adoption by primary care providers in Georgia to assess adoption disparities according to practice size and type, payer mix, and community characteristics. Frequency variances of EHR “Go Live” status were estimated. Odds ratios were calculated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Large practices and community health centers (CHCs) were more likely to Go Live (>80% EHR adoption) than rural health clinics and other underserved settings (53%). A significantly lower proportion (68.9%) of Medicaid predominant providers had achieved Go Live status and had a 47% higher risk of not achieving Go Live status than private insurance predominant practices. Disparities in EHR adoption rates may exacerbate existing disparities in health outcomes of patients served by these practices. Targeted support such as that provided to CHCs would level the playing field for practices now at a disadvantage. PMID:27587942

  18. Electronic health information system implementation models - a review.

    PubMed

    Logan, Julia

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of clinical information systems and electronic medical records does not have a good track record. It is estimated that more than 50% of implementations fail. A review of electronic health information system (EHIS) models incorporating clinical information systems and electronic medical records was undertaken to determine the models developed and applied in health. Twenty one health and five non-health models were identified. The non-health models were included as a number of health models were derived form these. The findings and evaluation of the models has identified varying contents and results. The models identified were assessed to determine how these related to each other, whether models were tested and how, if benefits were identified and if costsavings were projected or realised. This review of EHIS implementation models has identified a need for clear definition of terms used, careful categorisation and for models to be comprehensive, extensive and rigorous if successful outcomes are to occur.

  19. Evaluating community health centers’ adoption of a new global capitation payment (eCHANGE) study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Angier, H; O’Malley, JP; Marino, M; McConnell, KJ; Cottrell, E; Jacob, RL; Likumahuwa-Ackman, S; Heintzman, J; Huguet, N; Bailey, SR; DeVoe, JE

    2017-01-01

    Primary care patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) are an effective healthcare delivery model. Evidence regarding the most effective payment models for increased coordination efforts is sparse. This protocol paper describes the evaluation of an Alternative Payment Methodology (APM) implemented in a subset of Oregon community health centers (CHCs), using a prospective matched observational design. The APM is a primary care payment reform intervention that changed Oregon’s Medicaid payment for several CHCs from fee-for-service reimbursement to a per-member-per-month capitated payment. We will implement a difference-in-difference analytic approach to evaluate pre-post APM changes between intervention and control groups, including: 1) clinic-level outcomes, 2) patient-level clinical outcomes, and 3) patient-level econometric outcomes. Findings from the project will be of national significance, as there is a need for evidence regarding how novel payment methods might enhance PCMH capabilities and support their capacity to produce better quality and outcomes. If this capitated payment method is proven effective, study findings will inform dissemination of similar APMs nationwide. PMID:27836506

  20. Phased implementation of electronic health records through an office of clinical transformation

    PubMed Central

    Banas, Colin A; Erskine, Alistair R; Sun, Shumei

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that when carefully implemented, health information technologies (HIT) have a positive impact on behavior, as well as operational, process, and clinical outcomes. Recent economic stimulus initiatives have prompted unprecedented federal investment in HIT. Despite strong interest from the healthcare delivery community to achieve ‘meaningful use’ of HIT within a relatively short time frame, few best-practice implementation methodologies have been described. Herein we outline HIT implementation strategies at an academic health center with an office of clinical transformation. Seven percent of the medical center's information technology budget was dedicated to the Office of Clinical Transformation, and successful conversion of 1491 physicians to electronic-based documentation was accomplished. This paper outlines the process re-design, end-user adoption, and practice transformation strategies that resulted in a 99.7% adoption rate within 6 months of the introduction of digital documentation. PMID:21659444

  1. Phased implementation of electronic health records through an office of clinical transformation.

    PubMed

    Banas, Colin A; Erskine, Alistair R; Sun, Shumei; Retchin, Sheldon M

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that when carefully implemented, health information technologies (HIT) have a positive impact on behavior, as well as operational, process, and clinical outcomes. Recent economic stimulus initiatives have prompted unprecedented federal investment in HIT. Despite strong interest from the healthcare delivery community to achieve 'meaningful use' of HIT within a relatively short time frame, few best-practice implementation methodologies have been described. Herein we outline HIT implementation strategies at an academic health center with an office of clinical transformation. Seven percent of the medical center's information technology budget was dedicated to the Office of Clinical Transformation, and successful conversion of 1491 physicians to electronic-based documentation was accomplished. This paper outlines the process re-design, end-user adoption, and practice transformation strategies that resulted in a 99.7% adoption rate within 6 months of the introduction of digital documentation.

  2. Assessing the Potential Adoption and Usefulness of Concurrent, Action-Oriented, Electronic Adverse Drug Event Triggers Designed for the Outpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Mull, Hillary J.; Rosen, Amy K.; Shimada, Stephanie L.; Rivard, Peter E.; Nordberg, Brian; Long, Brenna; Hoffman, Jennifer M.; Leecaster, Molly; Savitz, Lucy A.; Shanahan, Christopher W.; Helwig, Amy; Nebeker, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adverse drug event (ADE) detection is an important priority for patient safety research. Trigger tools have been developed to help identify ADEs. In previous work we developed seven concurrent, action-oriented, electronic trigger algorithms designed to prompt clinicians to address ADEs in outpatient care. Objectives: We assessed the potential adoption and usefulness of the seven triggers by testing the positive predictive validity and obtaining stakeholder input. Methods: We adapted ADE triggers, “bone marrow toxin—white blood cell count (BMT-WBC),” “bone marrow toxin - platelet (BMT-platelet),” “potassium raisers,” “potassium reducers,” “creatinine,” “warfarin,” and “sedative hypnotics,” with logic to suppress flagging events with evidence of clinical intervention and applied the triggers to 50,145 patients from three large health care systems. Four pharmacists assessed trigger positive predictive value (PPV) with respect to ADE detection (conservatively excluding ADEs occurring during clinically appropriate care) and clinical usefulness (i.e., whether the trigger alert could change care to prevent harm). We measured agreement between raters using the free kappa and assessed positive PPV for the trigger’s detection of harm, clinical usefulness, and both. Stakeholders from the participating health care systems rated the likelihood of trigger adoption and the perceived ease of implementation. Findings: Agreement between pharmacist raters was moderately high for each ADE trigger (kappa free > 0.60). Trigger PPVs for harm ranged from 0 (Creatinine, BMT-WBC) to 17 percent (potassium raisers), while PPV for care change ranged from 0 (WBC) to 60 percent (Creatinine). Fifteen stakeholders rated the triggers. Our assessment identified five of the seven triggers as good candidates for implementation: Creatinine, BMT-Platelet, Potassium Raisers, Potassium Reducers, and Warfarin. Conclusions: At least five outpatient ADE triggers

  3. Empirically supported treatments in rural community mental health centers: a preliminary report on current utilization and attitudes toward adoption.

    PubMed

    Jameson, John Paul; Chambless, Dianne L; Blank, Michael B

    2009-12-01

    Rural community mental health centers (CMHCs) face numerous problems that might be alleviated by the dissemination of empirically supported treatments (ESTs). The current study lays the groundwork for EST dissemination by examining current treatment practices in rural clinics as well as the attitudes of decision makers toward ESTs and perceived barriers to their adoption. Twenty-five rural and 38 non-rural clinical directors responded to a mailed survey. Rural respondents were as likely as non-rural respondents to report EST use in their clinic for most anxiety disorders, and more likely to report use of an EST for major depressive disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, ESTs represent a relatively small proportion of the treatments reported for depression and anxiety disorders. Attitudes toward manualized ESTs did not differ between groups. Further, rural and nonrural clinics did not see the barriers to the adoption of ESTs as insurmountable. These preliminary results suggest that rural CMHCs are open to the use of ESTs and should be included in widespread dissemination initiatives.

  4. Platform links clinical data with electronic health records

    Cancer.gov

    To make data gathered from patients in clinical trials available for use in standard care, NCI has created a new computer tool to support interoperability between clinical research and electronic health record systems. This new software represents an inno

  5. Health Care Professionals Devise Ways to Get Around Using Electronic Health Record Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... atención médica Search Health Topics Search ahrq.gov Health Care Delivery Access to Care Costs Health Care Utilization ... Newsroom Newsletter Blog Events Research Activities, September 2013 Health care professionals devise ways to get around using electronic ...

  6. Assisting adoptive families: children adopted at older ages.

    PubMed

    Singer, Ellen; Krebs, Madeleine

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the adoption experience can help health care providers develop sensitivity to the special tasks of adopted children and their families. Children who are adopted at older ages may face particular challenges. Age at adoptive placement, the burden of loss, pre-adoptive experiences, and the challenge of attachment are all significant issues in older-child adoption. Pediatric nurses demonstrate sensitivity and support to adopted children and their families by using appropriate language about adoption; understanding the significance of missing health information; providing appropriate referrals as needed; and displaying an open, caring attitude.

  7. How Environmental Uncertainty Moderates the Effect of Relative Advantage and Perceived Credibility on the Adoption of Mobile Health Services by Chinese Organizations in the Big Data Era.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Zhang, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of adoption of mobile health services by an organization on the diffusion of mobile technology in the big data era, it has received minimal attention in literature. This study investigates how relative advantage and perceived credibility affect an organization's adoption of mobile health services, as well as how environmental uncertainty changes the relationship of relative advantage and perceived credibility with adoption. A research model that integrates relative advantage, perceived credibility, environmental uncertainty, and an organization's intention to use mobile health service is developed. Quantitative data are collected from senior managers and information systems managers in 320 Chinese healthcare organizations. The empirical findings show that while relative advantage and perceived credibility both have positive effects on an organization's intention to use mobile health services, relative advantage plays a more important role than perceived credibility. Moreover, environmental uncertainty positively moderates the effect of relative advantage on an organization's adoption of mobile health services. Thus, mobile health services in environments characterized with high levels of uncertainty are more likely to be adopted because of relative advantage than in environments with low levels of uncertainty.

  8. How Environmental Uncertainty Moderates the Effect of Relative Advantage and Perceived Credibility on the Adoption of Mobile Health Services by Chinese Organizations in the Big Data Era

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of adoption of mobile health services by an organization on the diffusion of mobile technology in the big data era, it has received minimal attention in literature. This study investigates how relative advantage and perceived credibility affect an organization's adoption of mobile health services, as well as how environmental uncertainty changes the relationship of relative advantage and perceived credibility with adoption. A research model that integrates relative advantage, perceived credibility, environmental uncertainty, and an organization's intention to use mobile health service is developed. Quantitative data are collected from senior managers and information systems managers in 320 Chinese healthcare organizations. The empirical findings show that while relative advantage and perceived credibility both have positive effects on an organization's intention to use mobile health services, relative advantage plays a more important role than perceived credibility. Moreover, environmental uncertainty positively moderates the effect of relative advantage on an organization's adoption of mobile health services. Thus, mobile health services in environments characterized with high levels of uncertainty are more likely to be adopted because of relative advantage than in environments with low levels of uncertainty. PMID:28115932

  9. 75 FR 81885 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Correcting Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Correcting Amendment AGENCY: Centers for Medicare...; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program'' that appeared in the July 28, 2010 Federal Register. DATES... 44314) the final rule entitled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record...

  10. School Nurse Role in Electronic School Health Records. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiltz, Cynthia; Johnson, Katie; Lechtenberg, Julia Rae; Maughan, Erin; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are essential for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) to provide efficient and effective care in the school and monitor the health of the entire student population. It is also the position of…

  11. Text mining electronic health records to identify hospital adverse events.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Hardahl, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Manual reviews of health records to identify possible adverse events are time consuming. We are developing a method based on natural language processing to quickly search electronic health records for common triggers and adverse events. Our results agree fairly well with those obtained using manual reviews, and we therefore believe that it is possible to develop automatic tools for monitoring aspects of patient safety.

  12. A decision technology system for health care electronic commerce.

    PubMed

    Forgionne, G A; Gangopadhyay, A; Klein, J A; Eckhardt, R

    1999-08-01

    Mounting costs have escalated the pressure on health care providers and payers to improve decision making and control expenses. Transactions to form the needed decision data will routinely flow, often electronically, between the affected parties. Conventional health care information systems facilitate flow, process transactions, and generate useful decision information. Typically, such support is offered through a series of stand-alone systems that lose much useful decision knowledge and wisdom during health care electronic commerce (e-commerce). Integrating the stand-alone functions can enhance the quality and efficiency of the segmented support, create synergistic effects, and augment decision-making performance and value for both providers and payers. This article presents an information system that can provide complete and integrated support for e-commerce-based health care decision making. The article describes health care e-commerce, presents the system, examines the system's potential use and benefits, and draws implications for health care management and practice.

  13. Understanding How Participants Become Champions and Succeed in Adopting Healthy Lifestyles: A Storytelling of a Community Health and Nutrition Program at a Land-Grant University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keo, Phalla Duong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and understand the experiences of participants who become champions and succeed in adopting healthy lifestyles. The setting was a health and nutrition educational program at University of Minnesota Extension. The main research questions were: How do participants in the Community Health Education Program…

  14. Possibilities and Implications of Using the ICF and Other Vocabulary Standards in Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Vreeman, Daniel J; Richoz, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    There is now widespread recognition of the powerful potential of electronic health record (EHR) systems to improve the health-care delivery system. The benefits of EHRs grow even larger when the health data within their purview are seamlessly shared, aggregated and processed across different providers, settings and institutions. Yet, the plethora of idiosyncratic conventions for identifying the same clinical content in different information systems is a fundamental barrier to fully leveraging the potential of EHRs. Only by adopting vocabulary standards that provide the lingua franca across these local dialects can computers efficiently move, aggregate and use health data for decision support, outcomes management, quality reporting, research and many other purposes. In this regard, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) is an important standard for physiotherapists because it provides a framework and standard language for describing health and health-related states. However, physiotherapists and other health-care professionals capture a wide range of data such as patient histories, clinical findings, tests and measurements, procedures, and so on, for which other vocabulary standards such as Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes and Systematized Nomenclature Of Medicine Clinical Terms are crucial for interoperable communication between different electronic systems. In this paper, we describe how the ICF and other internationally accepted vocabulary standards could advance physiotherapy practise and research by enabling data sharing and reuse by EHRs. We highlight how these different vocabulary standards fit together within a comprehensive record system, and how EHRs can make use of them, with a particular focus on enhancing decision-making. By incorporating the ICF and other internationally accepted vocabulary standards into our clinical information systems, physiotherapists will be able to leverage the potent

  15. The adoption of provider-based rural health clinics by rural hospitals: a study of market and institutional forces.

    PubMed Central

    Krein, S L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the response of rural hospitals to various market and organizational signals by determining the factors that influence whether or not they establish a provider-based rural health clinic (RHC) (a joint Medicare/Medicaid program). DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Several secondary sources for 1989-1995: the AHA Annual Survey, the PPS Minimum Data Set and a list of RHCs from HCFA, the Area Resource File, and professional associations. The analysis includes all general medical/surgical rural hospitals operating in the United States during the study period. STUDY DESIGN: A longitudinal design and pooled cross-sectional data were used, with the rural hospital as the unit of analysis. Key variables were examined as sets and include measures of competitive pressures (e.g., hospital market share), physician resources, nurse practitioner/physician assistant (NP/PA) practice regulation, hospital performance pressures (e.g., operating margin), innovativeness, and institutional pressure (i.e., the cumulative force of adoption). PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adoption of provider-based RHCs by rural hospitals appears to be motivated less as an adaptive response to observable economic or internal organizational signals than as a reaction to bandwagon pressures. CONCLUSIONS: Rural hospitals with limited resources may resort to imitating others because of uncertainty or a limited ability to fully evaluate strategic activities. This can result in actions or behaviors that are not consistent with policy objectives and the perceived need for policy changes. Such activity in turn could have a negative effect on some providers and some rural residents. Images Figure 1 PMID:10201851

  16. Electronic Health Records: Permanent, Private, and Informative | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology What is an electronic health record? An electronic health record is a systematic collection of information about a patient's health. It contains such things ...

  17. Factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of electronic health records for nursing education (EHRNE) software program.

    PubMed

    Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Chan, Sally Wai Chi; Pulcini, Joyce; Wang, Wenru

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Health Information Technology Act (2009) in America had recommended that electronic health records (EHRs) should be fully adopted by 2014. This has urged educational institutions to prepare healthcare professionals to be competent in using electronic health records (EHRs) while they are in schools. To equip nursing students with competency in using EHRs, an electronic health record for nursing education (EHRNE) has been developed and integrated it into nursing curricula. The purposes of the study were to investigate the factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of the EHRs in nursing education using the extended Technology Acceptance Model with self-efficacy as a conceptual framework. The study is a descriptive study design using self-reported questionnaires with 212 student participants. The IBM SPSS and AMOS 22.0 were used to analyze the data. The results showed that attitude toward using the EHRNE was the most influential factor on students' acceptance. The preliminary findings suggested that to enhance the students' acceptance of the EHRNE, cultivation of a positive attitude toward using this EHR as well as increasing the perceived usefulness is very important. Also, the study's framework could be used in guiding learning health informatics and be applied to nursing students.

  18. Harnessing the power of student health data: Selecting, using, and implementing electronic school health documentation systems.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathleen H; Guthrie, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    School nurses manage an immense amount of student health information, making electronic documentation systems essential to provide effective care for students. This article describes the elements of and rationale for using an electronic documentation system, the use of standardized nursing languages, and strategies for successfully implementing an electronic documentation system.

  19. Factors Affecting the Adoption of Electronic Books by Undergraduate Students in a Small, Midwestern, Liberal Arts University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Edward W.

    2012-01-01

    Many academic libraries were early adopters of e-books and continue to acquire e-books to support student learning. The e-book is an innovation that purports to replace the printed book; however, students continue to prefer to use the printed book. While students prefer the printed book, academic libraries that provide access to e-books report…

  20. Electronic health records: a new tool to combat chronic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Navaneethan, Sankar D; Jolly, Stacey E; Sharp, John; Jain, Anil; Schold, Jesse D; Schreiber, Martin J; Nally, Joseph V

    2013-03-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) were first developed in the 1960s as clinical information systems for document storage and retrieval. Adoption of EHRs has increased in the developed world and is increasing in developing countries. Studies have shown that quality of patient care is improved among health centers with EHRs. In this article, we review the structure and function of EHRs along with an examination of its potential application in CKD care and research. Well-designed patient registries using EHRs data allow for improved aggregation of patient data for quality improvement and to facilitate clinical research. Preliminary data from the United States and other countries have demonstrated that CKD care might improve with use of EHRs-based programs. We recently developed a CKD registry derived from EHRs data at our institution and complimented the registry with other patient details from the United States Renal Data System and the Social Security Death Index. This registry allows us to conduct a EHRs-based clinical trial that examines whether empowering patients with a personal health record or patient navigators improves CKD care, along with identifying participants for other clinical trials and conducting health services research. EHRs use have shown promising results in some settings, but not in others, perhaps attributed to the differences in EHRs adoption rates and varying functionality. Thus, future studies should explore the optimal methods of using EHRs to improve CKD care and research at the individual patient level, health system and population levels.

  1. Electronic health records: a new tool to combat chronic kidney disease?

    PubMed Central

    Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Jolly, Stacey E.; Sharp, John; Jain, Anil; Schold, Jesse D.; Schreiber, Martin J.; Nally, Joseph V.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) were first developed in the 1960s as clinical information systems for document storage and retrieval. Adoption of EHRs has increased in the developed world and is increasing in developing countries. Studies have shown that quality of patient care is improved among health centers with EHRs. In this article, we review the structure and function of EHRs along with an examination of its potential application in CKD care and research. Well-designed patient registries using EHRs data allow for improved aggregation of patient data for quality improvement and to facilitate clinical research. Preliminary data from the United States and other countries have demonstrated that CKD care might improve with use of EHRs-based programs. We recently developed a CKD registry derived from EHRs data at our institution and complimented the registry with other patient details from the United States Renal Data System and the Social Security Death Index. This registry allows us to conduct a EHRs-based clinical trial that examines whether empowering patients with a personal health record or patient navigators improves CKD care, along with identifying participants for other clinical trials and conducting health services research. EHRs use have shown promising results in some settings, but not in others, perhaps attributed to the differences in EHRs adoption rates and varying functionality. Thus, future studies should explore the optimal methods of using EHRs to improve CKD care and research at the individual patient level, health system and population levels. PMID:23320972

  2. Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records: Exploring Recommendations for Successful Implementation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Urowitz, Sara; Apatu, Emma; DeLenardo, Claudette; Eysenbach, Gunther; Harth, Tamara; Pai, Howard; Leonard, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Background Providing patients with access to their electronic health records offers great promise to improve patient health and satisfaction with their care, as well to improve professional and organizational approaches to health care. Although many benefits have been identified, there are many questions about best practices for the implementation of patient accessible Electronic Health Records (EHRs). Objectives To develop recommendations to assist health care organizations in providing patients with access to EHRs in a meaningful, responsible, and responsive manner. Methods A Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record (PAEHR) Workshop was held with nationally and internationally renowned experts to explore issues related to providing patient access to the EHR and managing institutional change. Results The PAEHR Workshop was attended by 45 participants who discussed recommendations for the implementation of patient accessible EHRs. Recommendations were discussed under four subject domains: (1) providing patient access to the EHR, (2) maintaining privacy and confidentiality related to the PAEHR, (3) patient education and navigation of the PAEHR, and (4) strategies for managing institutional change. The discussion focused on the need for national infrastructure, clear definitions for privacy, security and confidentiality, flexible, interoperable solutions, and patient and professional education. In addition, there was a strong call for research into all domains of patient accessible EHRs to ensure the adoption of evidence-based practices. Conclusions Patient access to personal health information is a fundamental issue for patient engagement and empowerment. Health care professionals and organizations should consider the potential benefits and risks of patient access when developing EHR strategies. Flexible, standardized, and interoperable solutions must be integrated with outcomes-based research to activate effectively patients as partners in their health care

  3. Adoption of security and confidentiality features in an operational community health information network: the Comox Valley experience--case example.

    PubMed

    Moehr, J R; McDaniel, J G

    1998-03-01

    Since 1993, a budding community health information network (CHIN) has been in operation in the Comox Valley in Canada. A general hospital and three multi-doctor clinics are linked electronically. The clinics operate without paper charts using a comprehensive clinic information system. The link is provided by RSALink, a commercial message exchange service, based on Health Link, a system developed at the University of Victoria (McDaniel et al., Can. Med. Inform. 1 (1994) 40-41; McDaniel, Dissertation, University of Victoria, Canada, 1994). Health Link is a highly adaptable message exchange service with rich functionality. Despite this, the system is used exclusively to receive laboratory results transmitted by the hospital's laboratory system (RSAStat). The results are deposited in the patient data base of a commercial clinic information system (CliniCare). This case is instructive because the users' selection of services available through Health Link allows us to observe the preferences in this informational sophisticated environment. Laboratory data transmission is appreciated as highly beneficial. The reliability, security and ample privacy protection and authentication features of Health Link, in contrast, are used in a black box mode and are not consciously exploited. This is consistent with our experience of the use of other systems which have operated for a substantial time, essentially without serious protection features. Our experience suggests that security and confidentiality features are exploited only to the extent that they do not require additional effort or conscientious intervention. This puts the system provider in the difficult position of either offering interactive systems that nobody will use, or providing automated features that nobody is aware of and that are therefore not used to full advantage--if at all.

  4. [Electronic health strategies in The Americas: current situation and perspectives].

    PubMed

    D Agostino, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the Strategy and Plan of Action on eHealth (2012-2017) is to contribute to sustainable development of health systems of member states. Its adoption aims to improve quality and access to health services through the use of information and communication technologies (ICT), the implementation of digital literacy programs and access to quality information to advance towards more informed, equitable, competitive and democratic societies. PAHO/WHO considers that in society, free and equal access to health information should be a fundamental right of individuals. Access to information, knowledge sharing and use of information and communication technology in the health sector continues to grow and is driving significant changes in the way people interact with health services and among themselves in social networks and through the use of mobile devices (mHealth). This hyper-connected society, or information society, brings new challenges and opportunities related to the use of massive data (Big Data) that forces us to rethink our relationship with reality and the traditional ways of managing health information.

  5. Improve Synergy Between Health Information Exchange and Electronic Health Records to Increase Rates of Continuously Insured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Rachel; Burdick, Tim; Angier, Heather; Wallace, Lorraine; Nelson, Christine; Likumahuwa-Ackman, Sonja; Sumic, Aleksandra; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Affordable Care Act increases health insurance options, yet many Americans may struggle to consistently maintain coverage. While health care providers have traditionally not been involved in providing insurance enrollment support to their patients, the ability for them to do so now exists. We propose that providers could capitalize on the expansion of electronic health records (EHRs) and the advances in health information exchanges (HIEs) to improve their patients’ insurance coverage rates and continuity. Evidence for Argument: We describe a project in which we are building strategies for linking, and thus improving synergy between, payer and EHR data. Through this effort, care teams will have access to new automated tools and increased EHR functionality designed to help them assist their patients in obtaining and maintaining health insurance coverage. Suggestion for the Future: The convergence of increasing EHR adoption, improving HIE functionality, and expanding insurance coverage options, creates new opportunities for clinics to help their patients obtain public health insurance. Harnessing this nascent ability to exchange information between payers and providers may improve synergies between HIE and EHRs, and thus support clinic-based efforts to keep patients continuously insured. PMID:26355818

  6. Organizational complements to electronic health records in ambulatory physician performance: the role of support staff.

    PubMed

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Jha, Ashish K

    2012-01-01

    In industries outside healthcare, highly skilled employees enable substantial gains in productivity after adoption of information technologies. The authors explore whether the presence of highly skilled, autonomous clinical support staff is associated with higher performance among physicians with electronic health records (EHRs). Using data from a survey of general internists, the authors assessed whether physicians with EHRs were more likely to be top performers on cost and quality if they worked with nurse practitioners or physician assistants. It was found that, among physicians with EHRs, those with highly skilled, autonomous staff were far more likely to be top performing than those without such staff (OR 7.0, 95% CI 1.7 to 34.8, p=0.02). This relationship did not hold among physicians without EHRs (OR 1.0). As we begin a national push towards greater EHR adoption, it is critical to understand why some physicians gain from EHR use and others do not.

  7. Organizational complements to electronic health records in ambulatory physician performance: the role of support staff

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ashish K

    2012-01-01

    In industries outside healthcare, highly skilled employees enable substantial gains in productivity after adoption of information technologies. The authors explore whether the presence of highly skilled, autonomous clinical support staff is associated with higher performance among physicians with electronic health records (EHRs). Using data from a survey of general internists, the authors assessed whether physicians with EHRs were more likely to be top performers on cost and quality if they worked with nurse practitioners or physician assistants. It was found that, among physicians with EHRs, those with highly skilled, autonomous staff were far more likely to be top performing than those without such staff (OR 7.0, 95% CI 1.7 to 34.8, p=0.02). This relationship did not hold among physicians without EHRs (OR 1.0). As we begin a national push towards greater EHR adoption, it is critical to understand why some physicians gain from EHR use and others do not. PMID:22517802

  8. Medical assistants' roles in electronic health record processes in primary care practices: the untold story.

    PubMed

    Adewale, Victoria; Anthony, David; Borkan, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    The role of the medical assistant has been undervalued in the past. Many publications have detailed the integral role of the nursing staff and physicians, but the medical assistant role has come last in formal recognition. As healthcare settings move toward a more Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model, the attitudes of this model will need to be adopted, two of which are team-based care and adoption of the electronic health record (EHR). As the EHR continues to gain more traction in healthcare, a thorough understanding of it, by everyone, will be vital for its success. In this article, the medical assistant's relationship with the EHR is outlined through qualitative interviews and observations with medical assistants in PCMH programs. The data describe diverse EHR experiences and how these experiences are influenced by and reflected in workflow issues, training, patient care, and an expanding role of the medical assistant.

  9. Impacts on rural livelihoods in Cambodia following adoption of best practice health and husbandry interventions by smallholder cattle farmers.

    PubMed

    Young, J R; O'Reilly, R A; Ashley, K; Suon, S; Leoung, I V; Windsor, P A; Bush, R D

    2014-08-01

    To better understand how smallholder farmers whom own the majority of Cambodian cattle can contribute to efforts to address food security needs in the Mekong region, a five-year research project investigating methods to improve cattle health and husbandry practices was conducted. Cattle production in Cambodia is constrained by transboundary animal diseases (TADs) including foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) plus poor nutrition, reproduction and marketing knowledge. The project worked in six villages in Kandal, Takeo and Kampong Cham province during 2007-12. Farmers from three 'high intervention' (HI) villages incrementally received a participatory extension programme that included FMD and HS vaccination, forage development and husbandry training. Evaluation of project impacts on livelihoods was facilitated by comparison with three 'low intervention' (LI) villages where farmers received vaccinations only. Results of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) and socio-economic surveys conducted in 2012 of 120 participating farmers identified that farmer knowledge in the HI project sites exceeded LI sites on the topics of biosecurity, internal parasites, nutrition and reproduction. HI farmers adopted biosecurity practices including a willingness to vaccinate for FMD and HS at their own cost, separate sick from healthy cattle, grow and feed forages and displayed awareness of the benefits of building fattening pens. HI farmers that grew forages observed time savings exceeding two hours per day each for men, women and children, enabling expansion of farm enterprises, secondary employment and children's schooling. Logistic regression analysis revealed that farmers in the HI group significantly increased annual household income (P < 0.001), with 53% reporting an increase of 100% or more. We conclude that improving smallholder KAP of cattle health and production can lead to improved livelihoods. This strategy should be of interest to policymakers

  10. MDPHnet: secure, distributed sharing of electronic health record data for public health surveillance, evaluation, and planning.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Joshua; Brown, Jeffrey S; Land, Thomas; Platt, Richard; Klompas, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Electronic health record systems contain clinically detailed data from large populations of patients that could significantly enrich public health surveillance. Clinical practices' security, privacy, and proprietary concerns, however, have limited their willingness to share these data with public health agencies. We describe a novel distributed network for public health surveillance called MDPHnet. The system allows the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) to initiate custom queries against participating practices' electronic health records while the data remain behind each practice's firewall. Practices can review proposed queries before execution and approve query results before releasing them to the health department. MDPH is using the system for routine surveillance for priority conditions and to evaluate the impact of public health interventions.

  11. Open Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Annette; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Adult adoptees are increasingly challenging the practice of sealing their birth records. The authors examine the historical roots of adoptive practices in this country and suggest that the time has come for open adoption to gain acceptance as an alternative. (Author)

  12. Future of electronic health records: implications for decision support.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Brian; Leonard, Joan C; Vigoda, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    The potential benefits of the electronic health record over traditional paper are many, including cost containment, reductions in errors, and improved compliance by utilizing real-time data. The highest functional level of the electronic health record (EHR) is clinical decision support (CDS) and process automation, which are expected to enhance patient health and healthcare. The authors provide an overview of the progress in using patient data more efficiently and effectively through clinical decision support to improve health care delivery, how decision support impacts anesthesia practice, and how some are leading the way using these systems to solve need-specific issues. Clinical decision support uses passive or active decision support to modify clinician behavior through recommendations of specific actions. Recommendations may reduce medication errors, which would result in considerable savings by avoiding adverse drug events. In selected studies, clinical decision support has been shown to decrease the time to follow-up actions, and prediction has proved useful in forecasting patient outcomes, avoiding costs, and correctly prompting treatment plan modifications by clinicians before engaging in decision-making. Clinical documentation accuracy and completeness is improved by an electronic health record and greater relevance of care data is delivered. Clinical decision support may increase clinician adherence to clinical guidelines, but educational workshops may be equally effective. Unintentional consequences of clinical decision support, such as alert desensitization, can decrease the effectiveness of a system. Current anesthesia clinical decision support use includes antibiotic administration timing, improved documentation, more timely billing, and postoperative nausea and vomiting prophylaxis. Electronic health record implementation offers data-mining opportunities to improve operational, financial, and clinical processes. Using electronic health record data

  13. Template and Model Driven Development of Standardized Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Kropf, Stefan; Chalopin, Claire; Denecke, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Digital patient modeling targets the integration of distributed patient data into one overarching model. For this integration process, both a theoretical standard-based model and information structures combined with concrete instructions in form of a lightweight development process of single standardized Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are needed. In this paper, we introduce such a process along side a standard-based architecture. It allows the modeling and implementation of EHRs in a lightweight Electronic Health Record System (EHRS) core. The approach is demonstrated and tested by a prototype implementation. The results show that the suggested approach is useful and facilitates the development of standardized EHRSs.

  14. The challenges in making electronic health records accessible to patients

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Leslie; Schein, Rebecca; Morra, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a tension between growing consumer demands for access to information and a healthcare system that may not be prepared to meet these demands. Designing an effective solution for this problem will require a thorough understanding of the barriers that now stand in the way of giving patients electronic access to their health data. This paper reviews the following challenges related to the sharing of electronic health records: cost and security concerns, problems in assigning responsibilities and rights among the various players, liability issues and tensions between flexible access to data and flexible access to physicians. PMID:22120207

  15. Using Electronic Health Records to Help Coordinate Care

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Lynda C; Anderson, Gerard F; Kues, Irvin W

    2004-01-01

    The use of electronic health records that can securely transmit patient data among physicians will help coordinate the care of 60 million Americans with multiple chronic conditions. This article summarizes the different organizations in the United States that are developing this technology. It discusses some of the problems encountered and the current initiatives to resolve them. The article concludes with three recommendations for enhancing care coordination: (1) a common health record, such as the Continuity of Care Record, to facilitate the exchange of clinical information among health providers; (2) regional governance structures to encourage the exchange of clinical data; and (3) payment by purchasers of care, both public and private, to physicians for using electronic health records. PMID:15330973

  16. Electronic networks, community intermediaries, and the public's health.

    PubMed Central

    Milio, N

    1996-01-01

    Information technology (IT) has the potential to assist disadvantaged communities in gaining access to mainstream resources, and to a new kind of community health-supporting infrastructure. Federal and state information technology policy will affect how and how well community institutions can reach their goals, collaborate with service agencies, and effectively advocate investing essential, health-supporting resources in their communities. The current information technology focus of the health professions is institution and provider-oriented. It should have a wider scope to include community-based organizations. Laborious efforts undertaken by community-based organizations (CBOs) with only a patchwork of resources and without policy support suggest their value to the public's health. Increasingly burdened public health organizations should examine the public health interest in closing the gap between IT-poor and IT-rich organizations and develop a strategy for building inclusive electronic webs with CBOs. PMID:8826628

  17. Fine-Grained Access Control for Electronic Health Record Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, Pham Thi Bach; Wohlgemuth, Sven; Echizen, Isao; Thuy, Dong Thi Bich; Thuc, Nguyen Dinh

    There needs to be a strategy for securing the privacy of patients when exchanging health records between various entities over the Internet. Despite the fact that health care providers such as Google Health and Microsoft Corp.'s Health Vault comply with the U.S Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the privacy of patients is still at risk. Several encryption schemes and access control mechanisms have been suggested to protect the disclosure of a patient's health record especially from unauthorized entities. However, by implementing these approaches, data owners are not capable of controlling and protecting the disclosure of the individual sensitive attributes of their health records. This raises the need to adopt a secure mechanism to protect personal information against unauthorized disclosure. Therefore, we propose a new Fine-grained Access Control (FGAC) mechanism that is based on subkeys, which would allow a data owner to further control the access to his data at the column-level. We also propose a new mechanism to efficiently reduce the number of keys maintained by a data owner in cases when the users have different access privileges to different columns of the data being shared.

  18. Electronic health records: what does your signature signify?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Electronic health records serve multiple purposes, including clinical communication, legal documentation, financial transaction capture, research and analytics. Electronic signatures attached to entries in EHRs have different logical and legal meanings for different users. Some of these are vestiges from historic paper formats that require reconsideration. Traditionally accepted functions of signatures, such as identity verification, attestation, consent, authorization and non-repudiation can become ambiguous in the context of computer-assisted workflow processes that incorporate functions like logins, auto-fill and audit trails. This article exposes the incompatibility of expectations among typical users of electronically signed information. PMID:22888846

  19. A survey of informatics approaches to whole-exome and whole-genome clinical reporting in the electronic health record

    PubMed Central

    Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Amendola, Laura; Aronson, Samuel J.; Garraway, Levi; Gray, Stacy; Grundmeier, Robert W.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Jarvik, Gail; Karavite, Dean; Lebo, Matthew; Plon, Sharon E.; Van Allen, Eliezer; Weck, Karen E.; White, Peter S.; Yang, Yaping

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Genome-scale clinical sequencing is being adopted more broadly in medical practice. The National Institutes of Health developed the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) program to guide implementation and dissemination of best practices for the integration of sequencing into clinical care. This study describes and compares the state of the art of incorporating whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing results into the electronic health record, including approaches to decision support across the six current CSER sites. Methods The CSER Medical Record Working Group collaboratively developed and completed an in-depth survey to assess the communication of genome-scale data into the electronic health record. We summarized commonalities and divergent approaches. Results Despite common sequencing platform (Illumina) adoptions, there is a great diversity of approaches to annotation tools and workflow, as well as to report generation. At all sites, reports are human-readable structured documents available as passive decision support in the electronic health record. Active decision support is in early implementation at two sites. Conclusion The parallel efforts across CSER sites in the creation of systems for report generation and integration of reports into the electronic health record, as well as the lack of standardized approaches to interfacing with variant databases to create active clinical decision support, create opportunities for cross-site and vendor collaborations. PMID:24071794

  20. Developing Electronic Cooperation Tools: A Case From Norwegian Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Mydske, Per Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Background Many countries aim to create electronic cooperational tools in health care, but the progress is rather slow. Objective The study aimed to uncover how the authoritys’ financing policies influence the development of electronic cooperational tools within public health care. Methods An interpretative approach was used in this study. We performed 30 semistructured interviews with vendors, policy makers, and public authorities. Additionally, we conducted an extensive documentation study and participated in 18 workshops concerning information and communication technology (ICT) in Norwegian health care. Results We found that the interorganizational communication in sectors like health care, that have undergone an independent development of their internal information infrastructure would find it difficult to create electronic services that interconnect the organizations because such connections would affect all interconnected organizations within the heterogenic structure. The organizations would, to a large extent, depend on new functionality in existing information systems. Electronic patient records play a central role in all parts of the health care sector and therefore dependence is established to the information systems and theirs vendors. The Norwegian government authorities, which run more than 80% of the Norwegian health care, have not taken extraordinary steps to compensate for this dependency–the government's political philosophy is that each health care institution should pay for further electronic patient record development. However, cooperational tools are complex due to the number of players involved and the way they are intertwined with the overall workflow. The customers are not able to buy new functionalities on the drawing table, while the electronic patient record vendors are not willing to take the economic risk in developing cooperational tools. Thus, the market mechanisms in the domain are challenged. We also found that public projects

  1. Can big data transform electronic health records into learning health systems?

    PubMed

    Harper, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    In the United States and globally, healthcare delivery is in the midst of an acute transformation with the adoption and use of health information technology (health IT) thus generating increasing amounts of patient care data available in computable form. Secure and trusted use of these data, beyond their original purpose can change the way we think about business, health, education, and innovation in the years to come. "Big Data" is data whose scale, diversity, and complexity require new architecture, techniques, algorithms, and analytics to manage it and extract value and hidden knowledge from it.

  2. Extending Adoption of Innovation Theory with Consumer Influence the Case of Personal Health Records (PHRs) and Patient Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    A long tradition of adoption of innovations research in the information systems context suggests that innovative information systems are typically adopted by the largest companies, with the most slack resources and the most management support within competitive markets. Additionally, five behavioral characteristics (relative advantage,…

  3. Using electronic health record alerts to provide public health situational awareness to clinicians.

    PubMed

    Lurio, Joseph; Morrison, Frances P; Pichardo, Michelle; Berg, Rachel; Buck, Michael D; Wu, Winfred; Kitson, Kwame; Mostashari, Farzad; Calman, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Alerting providers to public health situations requires timeliness and context-relevance, both lacking in current systems. Incorporating decision support tools into electronic health records may provide a way to deploy public health alerts to clinicians at the point of care. A timely process for responding to Health Alert Network messages sent by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene was developed by a network of community health centers. Alerts with order sets and recommended actions were created to notify primary care providers of local disease outbreaks. The process, effect, and lessons learned from alerts for Legionella, toxogenic E coli, and measles outbreaks are described. Electronic alerts have the potential to improve management of diseases during an outbreak, including appropriate laboratory testing, management guidance, and diagnostic assistance as well as to enhance bi-directional data exchange between clinical and public health organizations.

  4. The electronic cigarette: potential health benefit or mere business?

    PubMed

    De Marco, Cinzia; Invernizzi, Giovanni; Bosi, Sandra; Pozzi, Paolo; Di Paco, Adriano; Mazza, Roberto; Ruprecht, Ario Alberto; Munarini, Elena; Boffi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have attracted considerable attention as a possible alternative to tobacco cigarettes, but uncertainties about their impact on health and indoor air quality as well as their commercial success without a clear regulatory framework are arousing concern. We have therefore tried to summarize the health-related implications of the use of e-cigarettes in order to help physicians and health professionals provide accurate information on this device. Given the lack of unequivocal scientific data on their toxicity and safety, we conclude that at the moment there is no reason to approve e-cigarettes as a safe alternative to tobacco smoke.

  5. Electronic Health Record in Italy and Personal Data Protection.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Silvio; Bellavista, Alessandro; Corso, Pietro Paolo; Zangara, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with the Italian Electronic Health Record (hereinafter EHR), recently introduced by Act 221/2012, with a specific focus on personal data protection. Privacy issues--e.g., informed consent, data processing, patients' rights and minors' will--are discussed within the framework of recent e-Health legislation, national Data Protection Code, the related Data Protection Authority pronouncements and EU law. The paper is aimed at discussing the problems arising from a complex, fragmentary and sometimes uncertain legal framework on e-Health.

  6. Electronic Health Object: Transforming Health Care Systems From Static to Interactive and Extensible.

    PubMed

    Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil; Anshari, Muhammad; Younis, Mustafa Z; Kisa, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) store health-related patient information in an electronic format, improving the quality of health care management and increasing efficiency of health care processes. However, in existing information systems, health-related records are generated, managed, and controlled by health care organizations. Patients are perceived as recipients of care and normally cannot directly interact with the system that stores their health-related records; their participation in enriching this information is not possible. Many businesses now allow customers to participate in generating information for their systems, strengthening customer relationships. This trend is supported by Web 2.0, which enables interactivity through various means, including social networks. Health care systems should be able to take advantage of this development. This article proposes a novel framework in addressing the emerging need for interactivity while preserving and extending existing electronic medical data. The framework has 3 dimensions of patient health record: personal, social, and medical dimensions. The framework is designed to empower patients, changing their roles from static recipient of health care services to dynamic and active partners in health care processes.

  7. Questioning Behavior on a Consumer Health Electronic List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn Domas

    2000-01-01

    Using a thorough analytical framework, this study characterizes the questioning behavior on a consumer health-related electronic list. Analysis examines the dedication of the list to questioning; pattern of question asking within a message; type of question; length of answer anticipated; subject of question; combination of type of question and…

  8. Electronic health records and national patient-safety goals.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Singh, Hardeep

    2012-11-08

    Hospitals and clinics are adapting to new technologies and implementing electronic health records, but the efforts need to be aligned explicitly with goals for patient safety. EHRs bring the risks of both technical failures and inappropriate use, but they can also help to monitor and improve patient safety.

  9. Use of electronic health records can improve the health care industry's environmental footprint.

    PubMed

    Turley, Marianne; Porter, Catherine; Garrido, Terhilda; Gerwig, Kathy; Young, Scott; Radler, Linda; Shaber, Ruth

    2011-05-01

    Electronic health records have the potential to improve the environmental footprint of the health care industry. We estimate that Kaiser Permanente's electronic health record system, which covers 8.7 million beneficiaries, eliminated 1,000 tons of paper records and 68 tons of x-ray film, and that it has lowered gasoline consumption among patients who otherwise would have made trips to the doctor by at least three million gallons per year. However, the use of personal computers resulted in higher energy consumption and generated an additional 250 tons of waste. We conclude that electronic health records have a positive net effect on the environment, and that our model for evaluating their impact can be used to determine whether their use can improve communities' health.

  10. Ethical considerations in internet use of electronic protected health information.

    PubMed

    Polito, Jacquelyn M

    2012-03-01

    Caregivers, patients, and their family members are increasingly reliant on social network websites for storing, communicating, and referencing medical information. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule seeks balance by protecting the privacy of patients' health information and assuring that this information is available to those who need it to provide health care. Though federal and state governments have created laws and policies to safeguard patient privacy and confidentiality, the laws are inadequate against the rapid and innovative use of electronic health websites. As Internet use broadens access to information, health professionals must be aware that this information is not always secure. We must identify and reflect on medical ethics issues and be accountable for maintaining privacy for the patient.

  11. Nurses' expectations and perceptions of a redesigned Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Zulma; Recondo, Francisco; Sommer, Janine; Schachner, Bibiana; Garcia, Gabriela; Luna, Daniel; Benítez, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    When a new Electronic Health Record is implemented or modifications are made, the full acceptance by end users depends on their expectations and perceptions about the possible benefits and the potential impacts on care quality. The redesign of an electronic nurse chart should consider the inherent characteristics of nurses' practice and the variables that may influence the implementation and use of the new chart. In this study, a qualitative method evaluated nurses' expectations and perceptions about the implementation impacts of a redesigned nurse chart in an electronic health record at Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires. Seventy-four nurses participated in three operative groups. Following ground theory, three analytic dimensions were found: impact at work, communication and chart quality. In addition, time was a recurrent topic. Nurses found it difficult to think positively if reduction in time of documentation was not assured.

  12. Integrated Electronic Health Record Database Management System: A Proposal.

    PubMed

    Schiza, Eirini C; Panos, George; David, Christiana; Petkov, Nicolai; Schizas, Christos N

    2015-01-01

    eHealth has attained significant importance as a new mechanism for health management and medical practice. However, the technological growth of eHealth is still limited by technical expertise needed to develop appropriate products. Researchers are constantly in a process of developing and testing new software for building and handling Clinical Medical Records, being renamed to Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems; EHRs take full advantage of the technological developments and at the same time provide increased diagnostic and treatment capabilities to doctors. A step to be considered for facilitating this aim is to involve more actively the doctor in building the fundamental steps for creating the EHR system and database. A global clinical patient record database management system can be electronically created by simulating real life medical practice health record taking and utilizing, analyzing the recorded parameters. This proposed approach demonstrates the effective implementation of a universal classic medical record in electronic form, a procedure by which, clinicians are led to utilize algorithms and intelligent systems for their differential diagnosis, final diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  13. Electronic health records in an occupational health setting-Part II. Global deployment.

    PubMed

    Bey, Jean M; de Magalhães, Josiane S; Bojórquez, Lorena; Lin, Karen

    2013-03-01

    Electronic medical record systems are being used by more multi-national corporations. This article describes one corporation's considerations and process in successfully deploying a global electronic medical record system to international facilities in Brazil, Mexico, Singapore, and Taiwan. This article summarizes feedback from the experiences of occupational health nurse superusers in these countries.

  14. Overcoming barriers to implementing patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Listhaus, Alyson; Covarrubias, Constanza M; Schmidt, Siegfried OF; Mackey, Sean; Carek, Peter J; Fillingim, Roger B; Hurley, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, the authors describe the implementation of a system for collecting patient-reported outcomes and integrating results in an electronic health record. The objective was to identify lessons learned in overcoming barriers to collecting and integrating patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record. The authors analyzed qualitative data in 42 documents collected from system development meetings, written feedback from users, and clinical observations with practice staff, providers, and patients. Guided by the Unified Theory on the Adoption and Use of Information Technology, 5 emergent themes were identified. Two barriers emerged: (i) uncertain clinical benefit and (ii) time, work flow, and effort constraints. Three facilitators emerged: (iii) process automation, (iv) usable system interfaces, and (v) collecting patient-reported outcomes for the right patient at the right time. For electronic health record-integrated patient-reported outcomes to succeed as useful clinical tools, system designers must ensure the clinical relevance of the information being collected while minimizing provider, staff, and patient burden. PMID:26159464

  15. Overcoming barriers to implementing patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record: a case report.

    PubMed

    Harle, Christopher A; Listhaus, Alyson; Covarrubias, Constanza M; Schmidt, Siegfried Of; Mackey, Sean; Carek, Peter J; Fillingim, Roger B; Hurley, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, the authors describe the implementation of a system for collecting patient-reported outcomes and integrating results in an electronic health record. The objective was to identify lessons learned in overcoming barriers to collecting and integrating patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record. The authors analyzed qualitative data in 42 documents collected from system development meetings, written feedback from users, and clinical observations with practice staff, providers, and patients. Guided by the Unified Theory on the Adoption and Use of Information Technology, 5 emergent themes were identified. Two barriers emerged: (i) uncertain clinical benefit and (ii) time, work flow, and effort constraints. Three facilitators emerged: (iii) process automation, (iv) usable system interfaces, and (v) collecting patient-reported outcomes for the right patient at the right time. For electronic health record-integrated patient-reported outcomes to succeed as useful clinical tools, system designers must ensure the clinical relevance of the information being collected while minimizing provider, staff, and patient burden.

  16. Privacy, security, and the public health researcher in the era of electronic health record research

    PubMed Central

    Sarwate, Anand D.

    2016-01-01

    Health data derived from electronic health records are increasingly utilized in large-scale population health analyses. Going hand in hand with this increase in data is an increasing number of data breaches. Ensuring privacy and security of these data is a shared responsibility between the public health researcher, collaborators, and their institutions. In this article, we review the requirements of data privacy and security and discuss epidemiologic implications of emerging technologies from the computer science community that can be used for health data. In order to ensure that our needs as researchers are captured in these technologies, we must engage in the dialogue surrounding the development of these tools. PMID:28210428

  17. Innovative uses of electronic health records and social media for public health surveillance.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Emma M; Weitzman, Elissa R

    2014-03-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) and social media have the potential to enrich public health surveillance of diabetes. Clinical and patient-facing data sources for diabetes surveillance are needed given its profound public health impact, opportunity for primary and secondary prevention, persistent disparities, and requirement for self-management. Initiatives to employ data from EHRs and social media for diabetes surveillance are in their infancy. With their transformative potential come practical limitations and ethical considerations. We explore applications of EHR and social media for diabetes surveillance, limitations to approaches, and steps for moving forward in this partnership between patients, health systems, and public health.

  18. Privacy, security, and the public health researcher in the era of electronic health record research.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Neal D; Sarwate, Anand D

    2016-01-01

    Health data derived from electronic health records are increasingly utilized in large-scale population health analyses. Going hand in hand with this increase in data is an increasing number of data breaches. Ensuring privacy and security of these data is a shared responsibility between the public health researcher, collaborators, and their institutions. In this article, we review the requirements of data privacy and security and discuss epidemiologic implications of emerging technologies from the computer science community that can be used for health data. In order to ensure that our needs as researchers are captured in these technologies, we must engage in the dialogue surrounding the development of these tools.

  19. Envisioning a Learning Health Care System: The Electronic Primary Care Research Network, A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Brendan C.; Peterson, Kevin A.; Speedie, Stuart; Taweel, Adel; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Hobbs, F. D. Richard

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The learning health care system refers to the cycle of turning health care data into knowledge, translating that knowledge into practice, and creating new data by means of advanced information technology. The electronic Primary Care Research Network (ePCRN) was a project, funded by the US National Institutes of Health, with the aim to facilitate clinical research using primary care electronic health records (EHRs). METHODS We identified the requirements necessary to deliver clinical studies via a distributed electronic network linked to EHRs. After we explored a variety of informatics solutions, we constructed a functional prototype of the software. We then explored the barriers to adoption of the prototype software within US practice-based research networks. RESULTS We developed a system to assist in the identification of eligible cohorts from EHR data. To preserve privacy, counts and flagging were performed remotely, and no data were transferred out of the EHR. A lack of batch export facilities from EHR systems and ambiguities in the coding of clinical data, such as blood pressure, have so far prevented a full-scale deployment. We created an international consortium and a model for sharing further ePCRN development across a variety of ongoing projects in the United States and Europe. CONCLUSIONS A means of accessing health care data for research is not sufficient in itself to deliver a learning health care system. EHR systems need to use sophisticated tools to capture and preserve rich clinical context in coded data, and business models need to be developed that incentivize all stakeholders from clinicians to vendors to participate in the system. PMID:22230831

  20. Some correlates of electronic health information management system success in nigerian teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Adebowale I; Popoola, Sunday O

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, an electronic health information management system (EHIMS) is crucial for patient care in hospitals. This paper explores the aspects and elements that contribute to the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals. The study adopted a survey research design. The population of study comprised 442 health information management personnel in five teaching hospitals that had implemented EHIMS in Nigeria. A self-developed questionnaire was used as an instrument for data collection. The findings revealed that there is a positive, close relationship between all the identified factors and EHIMS's success: technical factors (r = 0.564, P < 0.05); social factors (r = 0.616, P < 0.05); organizational factors (r = 0.621, P < 0.05); financial factors (r = 0.705, P < 0.05); and political factors (r = 0.589, P < 0.05). We conclude that consideration of all the identified factors was highly significant for the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals.

  1. Ethics of Implementing Electronic Health Records in Developing Countries: Points to Consider

    PubMed Central

    Were, Martin C.; Meslin, Eric M.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic Health Record systems (EHRs) are increasingly being used in many developing countries, several of which have moved beyond isolated pilot projects to active large-scale implementation as part of their national health strategies. Despite growing enthusiasm for adopting EHRs in resource poor settings, almost no attention has been paid to the ethical issues that might arise. In this article we argue that these ethical issues should be addressed now if EHRs are to be appropriately implemented in these settings. We take a systematic approach guided by a widely accepted ethical framework currently in use for developing countries to first describe the ethical issues, and then propose a set of ‘Points to Consider’ to guide further thinking and decision-making. PMID:22195214

  2. Dissemination of an Electronic Manual to Build Capacity for Implementing Farmers' Markets with Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Guest, M Aaron; Freedman, Darcy; Alia, Kassandra A; Brandt, Heather M; Friedman, Daniela B

    2015-10-01

    Community-university partnerships can lend themselves to the development of tools that encourage and promote future community health development. The electronic manual, "Building Farmacies," describes an approach for developing capacity and sustaining a community health center-based farmers' market that emerged through a community-university partnership. Manual development was guided by the Knowledge to Action Framework and experiences developing a multivendor, produce-only farmers' market at a community health center in rural South Carolina. The manual was created to illustrate an innovative solution for community health development. The manual was disseminated electronically through 25 listservs and interested individuals voluntarily completed a Web-based survey to access the free manual. During the 6-month dissemination period, 271 individuals downloaded the manual. Findings highlighted the value of translating community-based participatory research into user-friendly manuals to guide future intervention development and dissemination approaches, and demonstrate the need to include capacity building opportunities to support translation and adoption of interventions.

  3. Where is nursing in the electronic health care record?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Beverly; Petrovskaya, Olga; McIntyre, Marjorie; Frisch, Noreen

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore the possibilities for documenting professional nursing practice in an electronic health record. Recognizing that there are a variety of approaches to electronic documentation, the intent of this discussion is to generate a general rather than a particular approach to this issue. Nurses themselves must determine the ways in which professional nursing care will be captured in the electronic systems used in their facilities. Questions that arise from nursing include: How can nurses balance generalized care and protocol management with the need for documentation of each individual's nursing needs and particular experiences? How can the goals of nursing care be incorporated into the record? How can nursing actions/interventions be clearly communicated to all members of the health care team? In what ways can an electronic record document collaboration with the client to determine individualized outcomes of care and treatment? In considering these questions a number of issues arise: the selection of standardized languages to be used in the records, the title of the record, the tension between coding and text, the accessibility and transferability of the record, the ability to retrieve data on nursing outcomes through data mining techniques, ownership of the record, and privacy/security of the information stored. Although the paper will make no attempt to answer these questions it will draw on relevant journal articles to provide a context for this pivotal change in that way we account for health care practice.

  4. Enhancing patient safety and quality of care by improving the usability of electronic health record systems: recommendations from AMIA

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Blackford; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Dente, Mark A; Hashmat, Bill; Koppel, Ross; Overhage, J Marc; Payne, Thomas H; Rosenbloom, S Trent; Weaver, Charlotte; Zhang, Jiajie

    2013-01-01

    In response to mounting evidence that use of electronic medical record systems may cause unintended consequences, and even patient harm, the AMIA Board of Directors convened a Task Force on Usability to examine evidence from the literature and make recommendations. This task force was composed of representatives from both academic settings and vendors of electronic health record (EHR) systems. After a careful review of the literature and of vendor experiences with EHR design and implementation, the task force developed 10 recommendations in four areas: (1) human factors health information technology (IT) research, (2) health IT policy, (3) industry recommendations, and (4) recommendations for the clinician end-user of EHR software. These AMIA recommendations are intended to stimulate informed debate, provide a plan to increase understanding of the impact of usability on the effective use of health IT, and lead to safer and higher quality care with the adoption of useful and usable EHR systems. PMID:23355463

  5. Enhancing patient safety and quality of care by improving the usability of electronic health record systems: recommendations from AMIA.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Blackford; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Dente, Mark A; Hashmat, Bill; Koppel, Ross; Overhage, J Marc; Payne, Thomas H; Rosenbloom, S Trent; Weaver, Charlotte; Zhang, Jiajie

    2013-06-01

    In response to mounting evidence that use of electronic medical record systems may cause unintended consequences, and even patient harm, the AMIA Board of Directors convened a Task Force on Usability to examine evidence from the literature and make recommendations. This task force was composed of representatives from both academic settings and vendors of electronic health record (EHR) systems. After a careful review of the literature and of vendor experiences with EHR design and implementation, the task force developed 10 recommendations in four areas: (1) human factors health information technology (IT) research, (2) health IT policy, (3) industry recommendations, and (4) recommendations for the clinician end-user of EHR software. These AMIA recommendations are intended to stimulate informed debate, provide a plan to increase understanding of the impact of usability on the effective use of health IT, and lead to safer and higher quality care with the adoption of useful and usable EHR systems.

  6. Ethical questions must be considered for electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Merle; Arnold, Michael V; Pearce, Christopher M; Fry, Craig

    2012-09-01

    National electronic health record initiatives are in progress in many countries around the world but the debate about the ethical issues and how they are to be addressed remains overshadowed by other issues. The discourse to which all others are answerable is a technical discourse, even where matters of privacy and consent are concerned. Yet a focus on technical issues and a failure to think about ethics are cited as factors in the failure of the UK health record system. In this paper, while the prime concern is the Australian Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR), the discussion is relevant to and informed by the international context. The authors draw attention to ethical and conceptual issues that have implications for the success or failure of electronic health records systems. Important ethical issues to consider as Australia moves towards a PCEHR system include: issues of equity that arise in the context of personal control, who benefits and who should pay, what are the legitimate uses of PCEHRs, and how we should implement privacy. The authors identify specific questions that need addressing.

  7. Public Trust in Health Information Sharing: Implications for Biobanking and Electronic Health Record Systems

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jodyn; Kardia, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon’s MTurk system (n = 447). We found that seeing one’s primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public’s trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making. PMID:25654300

  8. Training providers: beyond the basics of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Training is a critical part of health information technology implementations, but little emphasis is placed on post-implementation training to support day-to-day activities. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of post-implementation training on key electronic health record activities. Methods Based on feedback from providers and requests for technical support, we developed two classes designed to improve providers’ effectiveness with the electronic health record. Training took place at Kaiser Permanente, Mid-Atlantic States. The classes focused on managing patient-level information using problem lists and medication lists, as well as efficient documentation and chart review. Both classes used the blended learning method, integrating concrete scenarios, hands-on exercises and take-home materials to reinforce class concepts. To evaluate training effectiveness, we used a case–control study with a 1:4 match on pre-training performance. We measured the usage rate of two key electronic health record functions (problem list and medication list management) for six months before and after training. Change scores were compared using the Wilcoxon sign rank test. Results 36 participants and 144 non-participants were included in the training evaluation. Training participants were more likely to manage both medication lists and problem lists after training. Class material is now being incorporated into an enterprise-wide multi-modal training program available to all providers at Kaiser Permanente in the Mid-Atlantic States. Conclusions Ongoing information technology training is well-received by healthcare providers, who expressed a clear preference for additional training. Training improved use of two important electronic health record features that are included as part of the Meaningful Use criteria. PMID:24295150

  9. 45 CFR 162.1601 - Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and... Electronic Funds Transfers (EFT) and Remittance Advice § 162.1601 Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction. The health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and...

  10. 45 CFR 162.1601 - Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and... Electronic Funds Transfers (EFT) and Remittance Advice § 162.1601 Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction. The health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and...

  11. 45 CFR 162.1601 - Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and... Electronic Funds Transfers (EFT) and Remittance Advice § 162.1601 Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction. The health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and...

  12. Implementing electronic health care predictive analytics: considerations and challenges.

    PubMed

    Amarasingham, Ruben; Patzer, Rachel E; Huesch, Marco; Nguyen, Nam Q; Xie, Bin

    2014-07-01

    The use of predictive modeling for real-time clinical decision making is increasingly recognized as a way to achieve the Triple Aim of improving outcomes, enhancing patients' experiences, and reducing health care costs. The development and validation of predictive models for clinical practice is only the initial step in the journey toward mainstream implementation of real-time point-of-care predictions. Integrating electronic health care predictive analytics (e-HPA) into the clinical work flow, testing e-HPA in a patient population, and subsequently disseminating e-HPA across US health care systems on a broad scale require thoughtful planning. Input is needed from policy makers, health care executives, researchers, and practitioners as the field evolves. This article describes some of the considerations and challenges of implementing e-HPA, including the need to ensure patients' privacy, establish a health system monitoring team to oversee implementation, incorporate predictive analytics into medical education, and make sure that electronic systems do not replace or crowd out decision making by physicians and patients.

  13. Integrating health information technology and electronic health records into the management of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Wells, Alvin F; Arnold, Lesley M; Curtis, Cassandra E; Dunegan, L Jean; Lapp, Charles W; McCarberg, Bill H; Clair, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a widespread chronic pain condition that represents a significant economic burden for patients and health care systems. Effective treatment of FM requires a multidisciplinary management strategy that incorporates pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapy. Steps such as reducing the time to diagnosis and improving treatment decisions can result in significant cost savings and improved patient outcomes. An FM management framework, based on patient education and goal setting, has emphasized the need for ongoing care of patients with FM. In this article, we discuss how this framework could be further improved through the use of health information technology, including electronic health records. Health information technology/electronic health records can be incorporated at every stage of patient care, from initial presentation to diagnosis, through to making treatment decisions and maintaining ongoing patient management. This can lead to a number of potential benefits for patients with FM (by improving their level of care), primary care providers (by creating greater efficiencies), and the health care system (by reducing costs). Ultimately, the treatment and care of patients with FM need be no more burdensome to primary care providers than any other chronic illness. Through the greater efficiencies and optimized treatment approaches facilitated by health information technology/electronic health records, it should be possible to drive best-practice care for patients with FM and improve patient outcomes.

  14. A Standards-Based Architecture Proposal for Integrating Patient mHealth Apps to Electronic Health Record Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fontelo, P.; Rossi, E.; Ackerman, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Mobile health Applications (mHealth Apps) are opening the way to patients’ responsible and active involvement with their own healthcare management. However, apart from Apps allowing patient’s access to their electronic health records (EHRs), mHealth Apps are currently developed as dedicated “island systems”. Objective Although much work has been done on patient’s access to EHRs, transfer of information from mHealth Apps to EHR systems is still low. This study proposes a standards-based architecture that can be adopted by mHealth Apps to exchange information with EHRs to support better quality of care. Methods Following the definition of requirements for the EHR/mHealth App information exchange recently proposed, and after reviewing current standards, we designed the architecture for EHR/mHealth App integration. Then, as a case study, we modeled a system based on the proposed architecture aimed to support home monitoring for congestive heart failure patients. We simulated such process using, on the EHR side, OpenMRS, an open source longitudinal EHR and, on the mHealth App side, the iOS platform. Results The integration architecture was based on the bi-directional exchange of standard documents (clinical document architecture rel2 – CDA2). In the process, the clinician “prescribes” the home monitoring procedures by creating a CDA2 prescription in the EHR that is sent, encrypted and de-identified, to the mHealth App to create the monitoring calendar. At the scheduled time, the App alerts the patient to start the monitoring. After the measurements are done, the App generates a structured CDA2-compliant monitoring report and sends it to the EHR, thus avoiding local storage. Conclusions The proposed architecture, even if validated only in a simulation environment, represents a step forward in the integration of personal mHealth Apps into the larger health-IT ecosystem, allowing the bi-directional data exchange between patients and

  15. Ethics and the electronic health record in dental school clinics.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, Robert A; Valenza, John A

    2012-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are a major development in the practice of dentistry, and dental schools and dental curricula have benefitted from this technology. Patient data entry, storage, retrieval, transmission, and archiving have been streamlined, and the potential for teledentistry and improvement in epidemiological research is beginning to be realized. However, maintaining patient health information in an electronic form has also changed the environment in dental education, setting up potential ethical dilemmas for students and faculty members. The purpose of this article is to explore some of the ethical issues related to EHRs, the advantages and concerns related to the use of computers in the dental operatory, the impact of the EHR on the doctor-patient relationship, the introduction of web-based EHRs, the link between technology and ethics, and potential solutions for the management of ethical concerns related to EHRs in dental schools.

  16. Integration services to enable regional shared electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ilídio C; Cunha, João P S

    2011-01-01

    eHealth is expected to integrate a comprehensive set of patient data sources into a coherent continuum, but implementations vary and Portugal is still lacking on electronic patient data sharing. In this work, we present a clinical information hub to aggregate multi-institution patient data and bridge the information silos. This integration platform enables a coherent object model, services-oriented applications development and a trust framework. It has been instantiated in the Rede Telemática de Saúde (www.RTSaude.org) to support a regional Electronic Health Record approach, fed dynamically from production systems at eight partner institutions, providing access to more than 11,000,000 care episodes, relating to over 350,000 citizens. The network has obtained the necessary clearance from the Portuguese data protection agency.

  17. Moving from good to great in ambulatory electronic health record implementation.

    PubMed

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Song, Paula H; Robbins, Julie; Hirsch, Annemarie; Jorina, Maria; Kowalczyk, Nina; Chisolm, Deena

    2010-01-01

    Despite a good general understanding of the need to ensure provider adoption and use of electronic health record (EHR) systems, many implementations fall short of expectations, and little is known about effective approaches in the ambulatory care area. We aimed to comprehensively study and synthesize best practices for ambulatory EHR system implementation in healthcare organizations, emphasizing strategies that maximize physician adoption and use. Following an extensive literature review, we held 47 key informant interviews with representatives of six U.S. healthcare organizations purposively selected based on reported success with ambulatory EHR system implementation. We interviewed both administrative and clinical informants in order to improve our understanding of ambulatory EHR implementation from both perspectives. We found that while all 6 sites studied were reported to have strong EHR implementation practices, we were able to characterize "good" versus "great" approaches across the sites. Specifically, "great" implementations included a key element focused on optimization and improvement over time that helped healthcare organizations support physician adoption and use of the EHR system. The "great" implementation approaches we saw also included explicit considerations of improved data capture and quality of care in their focus on optimization in order to maximize the value of the EHR.

  18. Learning from heterogeneous temporal data in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Papapetrou, Panagiotis; Asker, Lars; Boström, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health records contain large amounts of longitudinal data that are valuable for biomedical informatics research. The application of machine learning is a promising alternative to manual analysis of such data. However, the complex structure of the data, which includes clinical events that are unevenly distributed over time, poses a challenge for standard learning algorithms. Some approaches to modeling temporal data rely on extracting single values from time series; however, this leads to the loss of potentially valuable sequential information. How to better account for the temporality of clinical data, hence, remains an important research question. In this study, novel representations of temporal data in electronic health records are explored. These representations retain the sequential information, and are directly compatible with standard machine learning algorithms. The explored methods are based on symbolic sequence representations of time series data, which are utilized in a number of different ways. An empirical investigation, using 19 datasets comprising clinical measurements observed over time from a real database of electronic health records, shows that using a distance measure to random subsequences leads to substantial improvements in predictive performance compared to using the original sequences or clustering the sequences. Evidence is moreover provided on the quality of the symbolic sequence representation by comparing it to sequences that are generated using domain knowledge by clinical experts. The proposed method creates representations that better account for the temporality of clinical events, which is often key to prediction tasks in the biomedical domain.

  19. Electronic Health Records: An Enhanced Security Paradigm to Preserve Patient's Privacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamanig, Daniel; Stingl, Christian

    In recent years, demographic change and increasing treatment costs demand the adoption of more cost efficient, highly qualitative and integrated health care processes. The rapid growth and availability of the Internet facilitate the development of eHealth services and especially of electronic health records (EHRs) which are promising solutions to meet the aforementioned requirements. Considering actual web-based EHR systems, patient-centric and patient moderated approaches are widely deployed. Besides, there is an emerging market of so called personal health record platforms, e.g. Google Health. Both concepts provide a central and web-based access to highly sensitive medical data. Additionally, the fact that these systems may be hosted by not fully trustworthy providers necessitates to thoroughly consider privacy issues. In this paper we define security and privacy objectives that play an important role in context of web-based EHRs. Furthermore, we discuss deployed solutions as well as concepts proposed in the literature with respect to this objectives and point out several weaknesses. Finally, we introduce a system which overcomes the drawbacks of existing solutions by considering an holistic approach to preserve patient's privacy and discuss the applied methods.

  20. Electronic screening for mental health in rural primary care: implementation.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Sarah P; Mahone, Irma H; Zerull, Lisa M; Guerlain, Stephanie; Akan, Doruk; Hauenstein, Emily; Schorling, John

    2009-03-01

    The goals of this study were to develop a computer-based electronic screening tool (eScreening) and determine the feasibility of implementing eScreening for rural users of primary care. This descriptive pilot adapted existing screening measures for depression and alcohol abuse to a portable computer-based format and examined the feasibility of its adoption and use. This was a three-step design using convenience samples for (1) a focus group with providers, (2) usability testing with selected rural patients using the computerized touch screen, and (3) implementing the touch screen platform with a small sample in primary care to determine feasibility. This paper reports on Phase III, which assessed consumer response to eScreening.

  1. A personally controlled electronic health record for Australia

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Christopher; Bainbridge, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective On July 1, 2012 Australia launched a personally controlled electronic health record (PCEHR) designed around the needs of consumers. Using a distributed model and leveraging key component national eHealth infrastructure, the PCEHR is designed to enable sharing of any health information about a patient with them and any other health practitioner involved in their care to whom the patient allows access. This paper discusses the consumer-facing part of the program. Method Design of the system was through stakeholder consultation and the development of detailed requirements, followed by clinical design assurance. Results Patients are able to access any posted information through a web-accessible ‘consumer portal.’ Within the portal they are able to assert access controls on all or part of their record. The portal includes areas for consumers to record their own personal information. Discussion The PCEHR has the potential to transform the ability of patients to actively engage in their own healthcare, and to enable the emerging partnership model of health and healthcare in medicine. The ability to access health information traditionally kept within the closed walls of institutions also raises challenges for the profession, both in the language clinicians choose and the ethical issues raised by the changed roles and responsibilities. Conclusions The PCEHR is aimed at connecting all participants and their interventions, and is intended to become a system-wide activity. PMID:24650635

  2. Open source cardiology electronic health record development for DIGICARDIAC implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugarte, Nelson; Medina, Rubén.; Huiracocha, Lourdes; Rojas, Rubén.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development of a Cardiology Electronic Health Record (CEHR) system. Software consists of a structured algorithm designed under Health Level-7 (HL7) international standards. Novelty of the system is the integration of high resolution ECG (HRECG) signal acquisition and processing tools, patient information management tools and telecardiology tools. Acquisition tools are for management and control of the DIGICARDIAC electrocardiograph functions. Processing tools allow management of HRECG signal analysis searching for indicative patterns of cardiovascular pathologies. Telecardiology tools incorporation allows system communication with other health care centers decreasing access time to the patient information. CEHR system was completely developed using open source software. Preliminary results of process validation showed the system efficiency.

  3. Archetype Development Process of Electronic Health Record of Minas Gerais.

    PubMed

    Abreu Maia, Thais; Fernandes De Muylder, Cristiana; Mendonça Queiroga, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    The Electronic Health Record (EHR) supports health systems and aims to reduce fragmentation, which will enable continuity of patient care. The paper's main objective is to define the steps, roles and artifacts for an archetype development process (ADP) for the EHR at the Brazilian National Health System (SUS) in the State of Minas Gerais (MG). This study was conducted using qualitative analysis based upon an applied case. It had an exploratory purpose metodologically defined in four stages: literature review; descriptive comparison; proposition of an archetype development process and proof of concept. The proof of concept showed that the proposed ADP ensures the archetype quality and supports the semantic interoperability in SUS to improve clinical safety and the continuity of patient care.

  4. Enhancing electronic health records to support clinical research.

    PubMed

    Vawdrey, David K; Weng, Chunhua; Herion, David; Cimino, James J

    2014-01-01

    The "Learning Health System" has been described as an environment that drives research and innovation as a natural outgrowth of patient care. Electronic health records (EHRs) are necessary to enable the Learning Health System; however, a source of frustration is that current systems fail to adequately support research needs. We propose a model for enhancing EHRs to collect structured and standards-based clinical research data during clinical encounters that promotes efficiency and computational reuse of quality data for both care and research. The model integrates Common Data Elements (CDEs) for clinical research into existing clinical documentation workflows, leveraging executable documentation guidance within the EHR to support coordinated, standardized data collection for both patient care and clinical research.

  5. Characterizing Physicians Practice Phenotype from Unstructured Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sanjoy; Wang, Yajuan; Byrd, Roy J.; Ng, Kenney; Steinhubl, Steven R.; deFilippi, Christopher; Stewart, Walter F.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical practice varies among physicians in ways that could lead to variation in what is documented in a patient’s electronic health records (EHR) and act as a source of bias to predictive model performance that is independent of patient health status. We used EHR encounter note data on 5,187primary care patients 50 to 85 years of age selected for a separate case-control study covering 144 unique primary care physicians (PCPs). A validated text extractor tool was used to identify mentions of Framingham heartfailure signs and symptoms (FHFSS) from the notes. Hierarchical clustering analyses were performed on the encounter note data for finding subgroups of PCPs with distinct FHFSS documentation behaviors. Three distinct PCP groups were identified that differed in the rate of documenting assertions and denials of mentions. Physician subgroup differences were not explained by patient disease burden, medication use, or other factors related to health. PMID:28269847

  6. Mental Health Issues and the Foster Care System: An Examination of the Impact of the Adoption and Safe Families Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWey, Lenore M.; Henderson, Tammy L.; Tice, Susan N.

    2006-01-01

    Although marriage and family therapists are being called on to help at-risk families, some say that clinicians have insufficient knowledge about the impact of policies on families involved in the foster care system. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to identify how the Adoption and Safe Families Act informs decision making, to…

  7. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often…

  8. Honoring Dental Patients' Privacy Rule Right of Access in the Context of Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Ramoni, Rachel B; Asher, Sheetal R; White, Joel M; Vaderhobli, Ram; Ogunbodede, Eyitope O; Walji, Muhammad F; Riedy, Christine; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2016-06-01

    A person's right to access his or her protected health information is a core feature of the U.S. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule. If the information is stored electronically, covered entities must be able to provide patients with some type of machine-readable, electronic copy of their data. The aim of this study was to understand how academic dental institutions execute the Privacy Rule's right of access in the context of electronic health records (EHRs). A validated electronic survey was distributed to the clinical deans of 62 U.S. dental schools during a two-month period in 2014. The response rate to the survey was 53.2% (N=33). However, three surveys were partially completed, and of the 30 completed surveys, the 24 respondents who reported using axiUm as the EHR at their dental school clinic were the ones on which the results were based (38.7% of total schools at the time). Of the responses analyzed, 86% agreed that clinical modules should be considered part of a patient's dental record, and all agreed that student teaching-related modules should not. Great variability existed among these clinical deans as to whether administrative and financial modules should be considered part of a patient record. When patients request their records, close to 50% of responding schools provide the information exclusively on paper. This study found variation among dental schools in their implementation of the Privacy Rule right of access, and although all the respondents had adopted EHRs, a large number return records in paper format.

  9. Perceptions of chronically ill and healthy consumers about electronic personal health records: a comparative empirical investigation

    PubMed Central

    Cocosila, Mihail; Archer, Norm

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a model of consumer perceptions of electronic personal health records (PHRs) and validate it in a comparative study between consumers who report having a chronic illness and those who report being well. Materials and methods A model of PHR use motivators and barriers was built and tested through a national survey across Canada. Data were collected from 800 individuals, 18 years or older. Half reported having a chronic illness or disability and half reported being well. Analyses were performed with structural equation modelling techniques. Results A total of 389 answers from chronically ill and 383 from well participants were collected. Perceived usefulness was the key explanation of the intention to use PHRs for both ill and well people (total effect of 0.601 and 0.565, respectively) followed by security, privacy and trust in PHRs (total effect of 0.377 and 0.479, respectively). Conversely, computer anxiety was perceived as a significant barrier (total effect of −0.327 for ill individuals and −0.212 for well individuals). Discussion The model proposed was appropriate in explaining key consumer positive and negative perceptions on electronic PHR use. We found little difference in perceptions of electronic PHRs between chronically ill and well individuals, although self-reporting their health status might have influenced the results. Conclusions To increase the adoption rate of electronic PHRs among both chronically ill and well consumers it is necessary to reinforce consumer perceptions of the usefulness of and trust in these eHealth technologies while mitigating their anxieties about computer use in general. PMID:25056975

  10. Developing an Interface to Order and Document Health Education Videos in the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Transitioning to electronic health records (EHRs) provides an opportunity for health care systems to integrate educational content available on interactive patient systems (IPS) with the medical documentation system. This column discusses how one hospital simplified providers' workflow by making it easier to order educational videos and ensure that completed education is documented within the medical record. Integrating the EHR and IPS streamlined the provision of patient education, improved documentation, and supported the organization in meeting core requirements for Meaningful Use.

  11. Variations in Patient Portal Adoption in Four Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Jonathan S.

    2010-01-01

    This case report reviews the patient portal adoption experiences of four primary care practices at Partners HealthCare during 2002 – 2009. Although each practice used the enterprise patient portal (Patient Gateway) and electronic health record, their patient enrollments varied substantially, as did their marketing approaches, new feature adoption, leadership approach, and staff involvement. Marketing limitations, leadership concerns, and limited staff engagement characterized the low-enrollment practices, but not the others. These factors, along with other practice characteristics such as location and patient demographics, should be explored in future research to identify best practices for successful adoption of a patient portal. PMID:21347096

  12. Using a Patient Portal to Transmit Patient Reported Health Information into the Electronic Record: Workflow Implications and User Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sorondo, Barbara; Allen, Amy; Bayleran, Janet; Doore, Stacy; Fathima, Samreen; Sabbagh, Iyad; Newcomb, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This project implemented an integrated patient self-reported screening tool in a patient portal and assessed clinical workflow and user experience in primary care practices. Methods: An electronic health risk assessment based on the CMS Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) was developed to integrate self-reported health information into the patient’s electronic health record (EHR). Patients enrolled in care coordination tested the implementation. The evaluation plan included quantitative and qualitative measures of patient adoption, provider adoption, workflow impact, financial impact, and technology impact. Findings: Seventy-two patients completed the sample AWV, and 80% of the questionnaires had clinical findings that required provider follow-up. Patients expressed satisfaction with the portal, as it enabled them to view their health record and enter information. Implementation did not reduce office staff time. Providers and office staff agreed that an electronic system for adding information to their record would increase patient satisfaction, but they expressed concern with the need to promptly review the information and the time involved to accomplish this prior to an office visit. Discussion: Despite satisfaction among patients, portal adoption is still low, due to technological limitations and to the lack of adaptability to primary care practice workflow. Notwithstanding those barriers, the use of the portal for completion of repetitive tasks, such as screening tools, should be encouraged. Conclusions: Patients can effectively use portals to complete the patient reported section of the CMS AWV. However, if the information is not completed during the same day of the office visit, the time required to address health findings outside of a regular office visit is uncompensated, and diminished the enthusiasm for this process among primary care practice staff. PMID:27683669

  13. Personal, Electronic, Secure National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records Conference

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR Personal, Electronic, Secure: National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records ... One suggestion for saving money is to implement electronic personal health records. With this in mind, the ...

  14. Health behavior modification after electron beam computed tomography and physician consultation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jennifer; Allison, Mathew; Wright, C Michael

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to determine whether participants reported altering health behaviors (physical activity, diet, and alcohol consumption) after seeing results from an electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) scan for coronary artery calcium and reviewing these results with a physician. Clinicians attempt to motivate patients to control cardiovascular risk factors by adopting healthy behaviors and reducing harmful actions. Asymptomatic patients (N = 510) were evaluated by EBCT for the extent of coronary artery calcium. Information pertaining to demographics, health history, and lifestyle/health behaviors was obtained from each participant at the time of the EBCT scan. Patients were given their numerical calcium score, shown images of their coronary arteries, and counseled by a physician for lifestyle and medical risk modification based on their coronary artery calcium score. Approximately 6 years after the scan, participants completed a follow-up questionnaire related to lifestyle modifications. In multivariable analysis, the presence and extent of coronary artery calcium was significantly associated with beneficial health behavior modifications. Specifically, the greater a patient's coronary artery calcium score, the more likely they were to report increasing exercise (odds ratio = 1.34, P = 0.02), changing diet (odds ratio = 1.40, P < 0.01), and changing alcohol intake (odds ratio = 1.46, P = 0.05). This study suggests that seeing and being counseled on the presence and extent of coronary artery calcium is significantly associated with behavior change.

  15. [The electronic health record: computerised provider order entry and the electronic instruction document as new functionalities].

    PubMed

    Derikx, Joep P M; Erdkamp, Frans L G; Hoofwijk, A G M

    2013-01-01

    An electronic health record (EHR) should provide 4 key functionalities: (a) documenting patient data; (b) facilitating computerised provider order entry; (c) displaying the results of diagnostic research; and (d) providing support for healthcare providers in the clinical decision-making process.- Computerised provider order entry into the EHR enables the electronic receipt and transfer of orders to ancillary departments, which can take the place of handwritten orders.- By classifying the computer provider order entries according to disorders, digital care pathways can be created. Such care pathways could result in faster and improved diagnostics.- Communicating by means of an electronic instruction document that is linked to a computerised provider order entry facilitates the provision of healthcare in a safer, more efficient and auditable manner.- The implementation of a full-scale EHR has been delayed as a result of economic, technical and legal barriers, as well as some resistance by physicians.

  16. 76 FR 56503 - Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB... INFORMATION: Title: VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records, VA Form 10- 0400. OMB Control Number: 2900... recorded in VHA electronic health records system. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is......

  17. Technical Limitations of Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers: Implications on Ambulatory Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Christopher E.

    2010-01-01

    Research objectives: This dissertation examines the state of development of each of the eight core electronic health record (EHR) functionalities as described by the IOM and describes how the current state of these functionalities limit quality improvement efforts in ambulatory care settings. There is a great deal of literature describing both the…

  18. Standards for the electronic health record, emerging from health care's Tower of Babel.

    PubMed

    Liu, G C; Cooper, J G; Schoeffler, K M; Hammond, W E

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers the standardization of an Electronic Health Record (EHR). Relations between several distinct medical datasets and information systems are mapped in order to derive a more precise definition of the EHR. Two international efforts to establish standards for the EHR are presented and critiqued. Strategies for standardizing the EHR are analyzed and recommendations are provided for approaching the standardization process.

  19. A Quantitative Exploration of the Relationship between Patient Health and Electronic Personal Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Denise Williams

    2009-01-01

    The use of electronic personal health records is becoming increasingly more popular as healthcare providers, healthcare and government leaders, and patients are seeking ways to improve healthcare quality and to decrease costs (Abrahamsen, 2007). This quantitative, descriptive correlational study examined the relationship between the degree of…

  20. Integrating the Electronic Health Record into high-fidelity interprofessional intensive care unit simulations.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jeffrey A; Tutsch, Alycia S R; Gorsuch, Adriel; Mohan, Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR), there is a growing appreciation for the central role they play in clinical decision making and team communication, with many studies documenting new safety issues with integration of the EHR into the clinical enterprise. To study these issues, we created a high-fidelity simulation instance of our clinical EHR. In this paper, we describe the impact of integrating the EHR into high-fidelity, interprofessional intensive care unit (ICU) simulations, and the errors induced. We found a number of safety issues directly related to the EHR including alert fatigue, negative impacts on interprofessional communication, and problems with selective data gathering, and these issues were present for all members of the interprofessional team. Through successful integration of the EHR into high-fidelity team-based simulations, we now have an infrastructure to focus educational initiative and deploy informatics solutions to mitigate these safety issues.

  1. Specialty Task Force: A Strategic Component to Electronic Health Record (EHR) Optimization.

    PubMed

    Romero, Mary Rachel; Staub, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Post-implementation stage comes after an electronic health record (EHR) deployment. Analyst and end users deal with the reality that some of the concepts and designs initially planned and created may not be complementary to the workflow; creating anxiety, dissatisfaction, and failure with early adoption of system. Problems encountered during deployment are numerous and can vary from simple to complex. Redundant ticket submission creates backlog for Information Technology personnel resulting in delays in resolving concerns with EHR system. The process of optimization allows for evaluation of system and reassessment of users' needs. A solid and well executed optimization infrastructure can help minimize unexpected end-user disruptions and help tailor the system to meet regulatory agency goals and practice standards. A well device plan to resolve problems during post implementation is necessary for cost containment and to streamline communication efforts. Creating a specialty specific collaborative task force is efficacious and expedites resolution of users' concerns through a more structured process.

  2. Variability in Electronic Health Record Usage and Perceptions among Specialty vs. Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Redd, Travis K; Doberne, Julie W; Lattin, Daniel; Yackel, Thomas R; Eriksson, Carl O; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Ash, Joan S; Chiang, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Despite federal incentives for adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), surveys have shown that EHR use is less common among specialty physicians than generalists. Concerns have been raised that current-generation EHR systems are inadequate to meet the unique information gathering needs of specialists. This study sought to identify whether information gathering needs and EHR usage patterns are different between specialists and generalists, and if so, to characterize their precise nature. We found that specialists and generalists have significantly different perceptions of which elements of the EHR are most important and how well these systems are suited to displaying clinical information. Resolution of these disparities could have implications for clinical productivity and efficiency, patient and physician satisfaction, and the ability of clinical practices to achieve Meaningful Use incentives.

  3. Electronic health records-Applications for the allergist/immunologist: All that glitters is not gold.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Lawrence D

    2016-07-01

    A review of existing literature on electronic health records (EHR) demonstrates the lack of a comprehensive analysis of the current status of, and impediments for, physicians, including allergists/immunologists, to adopting a fully functioning system. For physicians to logically embrace the use of EHRs, a comprehensive but straightforward presentation of this complex subject would be helpful. In fact, although there is some evaluative information regarding data derived from EHRs about asthma epidemiology and practice guidelines as well as recording adverse allergic reactions, it is impossible to find one scholarly article that evaluated the use of fully functional EHRs from the perspective of an allergist or immunologist. This analysis presents a review of the background and goals of EHRs and describes the major problems that delayed their widespread acceptance. Necessary solutions to the problems are presented in this article. The potential benefits of better EHRs could foster widespread acceptance and use of these systems.

  4. Defining a comprehensive verotype using electronic health records for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Boland, Mary Regina; Hripcsak, George; Shen, Yufeng; Chung, Wendy K; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-12-01

    The burgeoning adoption of electronic health records (EHR) introduces a golden opportunity for studying individual manifestations of myriad diseases, which is called 'EHR phenotyping'. In this paper, we break down this concept by: relating it to phenotype definitions from Johannsen; comparing it to cohort identification and disease subtyping; introducing a new concept called 'verotype' (Latin: vere = true, actually) to represent the 'true' population of similar patients for treatment purposes through the integration of genotype, phenotype, and disease subtype (eg, specific glucose value pattern in patients with diabetes) information; analyzing the value of the 'verotype' concept for personalized medicine; and outlining the potential for using network-based approaches to reverse engineer clinical disease subtypes.

  5. Impact of Electronic Health Record Systems on Information Integrity: Quality and Safety Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Sue

    2013-01-01

    While the adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems promises a number of substantial benefits, including better care and decreased healthcare costs, serious unintended consequences from the implementation of these systems have emerged. Poor EHR system design and improper use can cause EHR-related errors that jeopardize the integrity of the information in the EHR, leading to errors that endanger patient safety or decrease the quality of care. These unintended consequences also may increase fraud and abuse and can have serious legal implications. This literature review examines the impact of unintended consequences of the use of EHR systems on the quality of care and proposed solutions to address EHR-related errors. This analysis of the literature on EHR risks is intended to serve as an impetus for further research on the prevalence of these risks, their impact on quality and safety of patient care, and strategies for reducing them. PMID:24159271

  6. Impact of electronic health record systems on information integrity: quality and safety implications.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Sue

    2013-01-01

    While the adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems promises a number of substantial benefits, including better care and decreased healthcare costs, serious unintended consequences from the implementation of these systems have emerged. Poor EHR system design and improper use can cause EHR-related errors that jeopardize the integrity of the information in the EHR, leading to errors that endanger patient safety or decrease the quality of care. These unintended consequences also may increase fraud and abuse and can have serious legal implications. This literature review examines the impact of unintended consequences of the use of EHR systems on the quality of care and proposed solutions to address EHR-related errors. This analysis of the literature on EHR risks is intended to serve as an impetus for further research on the prevalence of these risks, their impact on quality and safety of patient care, and strategies for reducing them.

  7. Educational Mixology: A Pedagogical Approach to Promoting Adoption of Technology to Support New Learning Models in Health Science Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Paige L.; Lyons, Laurie B.; Straker, Howard O.; Barnett, Jacqueline S.; Schlumpf, Karen S.; Cotton, Linda; Corcoran, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    For disciplines heavily reliant upon traditional classroom teaching, such as medicine and health sciences, incorporating new learning models may pose challenges for students and faculty. In an effort to innovate curricula, better align courses to required student learning outcomes, and address the call to redesign health professions education,…

  8. Experience, Adoption, and Technology: Exploring the Phenomenological Experiences of Faculty Involved in Online Teaching at One School of Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Terry; Davis, Trina; Larke, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Using the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) and Dewey's Theory of Experience, this phenomenological study explored the experiences of faculty who engaged in online teaching at one school of public health. Findings revealed that the experiences of public health faculty, who engaged in online teaching, are similar and…

  9. Adopting an ethical approach to global health training: the evolution of the Botswana - University of Pennsylvania partnership.

    PubMed

    Dacso, Matthew; Chandra, Amit; Friedman, Harvey

    2013-11-01

    Global health training opportunities for medical students and residents have proliferated in recent years. These short-term elective rotations allow trainees to learn about global health issues by participating in various aspects of education and health care in resource-limited settings. Recently published consensus-based ethical guidelines have suggested considerations for the design of international electives that address the activities of host and sending sites, visiting students and residents, and sponsors.The authors analyze the value of global health training opportunities for medical students, residents, faculty, host and sending institutions, and other stakeholders from the perspective of the Botswana-University of Pennsylvania Partnership, a program that has provided global health experiences for health care trainees for more than 10 years. Drawing from the Working Group on Ethics Guidelines for Global Health Training framework, they illustrate the ethical and logistical challenges faced by the program's organizers and the solutions that they implemented alongside their host site partners. They conclude with a summary of recommendations to guide implementation of ethically sound international health electives in resource-limited settings.

  10. Oral Health Promotion and Homelessness: A Theory-Based Approach to Understanding Processes of Implementation and Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, Laura; Freeman, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use the Theory of Diffusion of Innovations as a framework to explore the qualitative data gleaned from a process evaluation of the Smile4life intervention across Scottish National Health Service (NHS) Boards and to inform future oral health promotion and homelessness. Design: A qualitative exploration. Setting: In 2012, the…

  11. A policy framework for public health uses of electronic health data.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Deven; Rosati, Kristen; Evans, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Successful implementation of a program of active safety surveillance of drugs and medical products depends on public trust. This article summarizes how the initial pilot phase of the FDA's Sentinel Initiative, Mini-Sentinel, is being conducted in compliance with applicable federal and state laws. The article also sets forth the attributes of Mini-Sentinel that enhance privacy and public trust, including the use of a distributed data system (where identifiable information remains at the data partners) and the adoption by participants of additional mandatory policies and procedures implementing fair information practices. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of this model for other types of secondary health data uses.

  12. A review of security of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Than

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to answer the research question, "Are current information security technologies adequate for electronic health records (EHRs)?" In order to achieve this, the following matters have been addressed in this article: (i) What is information security in the context of EHRs? (ii) Why is information security important for EHRs? and (iii) What are the current technologies for information security available to EHRs? It is concluded that current EHR security technologies are inadequate and urgently require improvement. Further study regarding information security of EHRs is indicated.

  13. Electronic media, violence, and adolescents: an emerging public health problem.

    PubMed

    David-Ferdon, Corinne; Hertz, Marci Feldman

    2007-12-01

    Adolescents' access to and use of new media technology (e.g., cell phone, personal data assistant, computer for Internet access) are on the rise, and this explosion of technology brings with it potential benefits and risks. Attention is growing about the risk of adolescents to become victims of aggression perpetrated by peers with new technology. In September 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened a panel of experts in technology and youth aggression to examine this specific risk. This special issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health presents the data and recommendations for future directions discussed at the meeting. The articles in the Journal support the argument that electronic aggression is an emerging public health problem in need of additional prevalence and etiological research to support the development and evaluation of effective prevention programs.

  14. Interoperability of electronic health records and personal health records: key interoperability issues associated with information exchange.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Simone; Lippitt, Alex

    2009-01-01

    As patients receive medical care, their clinical history may be tracked and recorded by multiple electronic systems developed by independent vendors. Medical providers might use electronic health record (EHR) software tailored to the needs of trained medical personnel, whereas patients may interact with personal health records (PHR). The purpose of this essay is to identify the key interoperability issues associated with the information exchange between these two types of systems and offer an approach for enhancing interoperability. This article is part of a series of unpublished essays titled A Community View on How Personal Health Records Can Improve Patient Care and Outcomes in Many Healthcare Settings, a collaborative project of Northern Illinois Physicians For Connectivity and the Coalition for Quality and Patient Safety of Chicagoland. For further information on how you can obtain copies of the complete work, contact the principle Dr. Stasia Kahn at Stash5@sbcglobal.net.

  15. System-wide adoption of health promotion practices by schools: evaluation of a telephone and mail-based dissemination strategy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Elizabeth; Knight, Jenny; Gillham, Karen; Campbell, Elizabeth; Nicholas, Craig; Wiggers, John

    2006-09-01

    Schools can potentially benefit from system-wide approaches to the dissemination of health promotion practices. This intervention study undertaken in the Hunter Region of NSW, Australia, used a pre-post design to assess whether a phone and mail intervention dissemination strategy was associated with an increase in the proportion of 218 primary schools undertaking eight health promotion practices. Health promotion practices addressed the prevention of harm associated with five agreed health issues-smoking, nutrition, playground safety, asthma and infectious diseases. The study also assessed acceptability of the dissemination strategy to schools, cost and whether intervention schools' characteristics were associated with uptake of health promotion practices. Compared to baseline a significant improvement in prevalence was observed at both 1 and 2 year follow-up for seven of the eight health promotion practices addressed. The greatest improvement occurred in the first year of the project. There was a greater uptake of the practice of providing information regarding passive smoking in urban schools. The dissemination strategy was found to have a cost per adopted practice of 121 Australian dollars and to be acceptable to the large majority (>90%) of schools. The results suggest that the dissemination strategy may represent a relatively low cost method of enhancing health promotion practices in schools and of monitoring such practices. Further research addressing the methodological issues of this study is needed to confirm these findings.

  16. [EHealth, health networks and electronic health record: towards a culture of sharing and trust].

    PubMed

    Nicolas, L

    2012-09-01

    In Belgium, the computerization of the ambulatory care sector and general practice in particular has been continuously progressing over the last ten years. Although regional differences exist, 75% of the Belgian general practitioners own today a software to assist them in the management of their patients. To date however, general practitioners have been hardly using their electronic system to share or communicate with other actors of the system. The silo culture remains the norm. Aside from certain group practices, computerization has thus not yet contributed to improve in a significant way the quality of care of the patient. The implementation in 2012 of the "shared electronic health record" thanks to the deployment in production of the 5 health networks connected via the federal directory of references is due to deeply change this situation. Communication flows between health care professionals will thus rapidly intensify and the amount of information available at the point of care will increase significantly. This is however only the first step. The future electronic patient record (EPR) will need to make room for a deep integration of the actors around the patient thanks--among other things--to the implementation of a global semantic interoperability strategy. This integration of actors together with the empowerment of the patient are indeed essential preliminary conditions in order to adapt our health system to the enormous challenges that we will all have to face in the next 10 years.

  17. Professional Hubris and its Consequences: Why Organizations of Health-Care Professions Should Not Adopt Ethically Controversial Positions.

    PubMed

    Vogelstein, Eric

    2016-05-01

    In this article, I argue that professional healthcare organizations such as the AMA and ANA ought not to take controversial stances on professional ethics. I address the best putative arguments in favor of taking such stances, and argue that none are convincing. I then argue that the sort of stance-taking at issue has pernicious consequences: it stands to curb critical thought in social, political, and legal debates, increase moral distress among clinicians, and alienate clinicians from their professional societies. Thus, because there are no good arguments in favor of stance-taking and at least some risks in doing so, professional organizations should refrain from adopting the sort of ethically controversial positions at issue.

  18. Health Considerations in Regulation and Taxation of Electronic Cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Mainous, Arch G; Tanner, Rebecca J; Mainous, Ryan W; Talbert, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is experiencing unprecedented growth. This can be contrasted to the use of conventional cigarettes which showed a decrease among adults with the current smoker prevalence dropping from 20.9% in 2005 to 17.8% in 2013. There is some data that e-cigarettes are attracting both former smokers and never smokers, and in particular, young people as users. Currently most states do not tax e-cigarettes. Taxation and regulation may have a similar overall goal of decreasing smoking but regulation tends to focus reduced availability of products. In terms of tobacco control, taxation focuses on the demand side of the equation. Taxation is a distinct strategy from regulation and has been shown to decrease new adopters of conventional cigarettes. A variety of potential taxation strategies can be considered by policymakers based on different assumptions about e-cigarettes and their utility, ranging from untaxed to taxation at moderate levels compared to conventional cigarettes to taxation equal to conventional cigarettes. Until more evidence for the benefits of e-cigarettes is presented, it seems prudent to view them as a potentially harmful and addictive product that ought to be regulated and taxed in an equivalent manner to conventional cigarettes.

  19. Electronic Health Record Innovations for Healthier Patients and Happier Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H.

    2015-01-01

    This special issue explores a range of health information technology (HIT) issues that can help primary care practices and patients. Findings address the design of HIT systems, primarily electronic health records (EHRs), the utility of various functionalities, and implementation strategies that ensure the greatest value. The articles also remind us that, while HIT can support the delivery of care, it is not a panacea. To be effective, functionality needs to be relevant and timely for both the clinician and patient. Prompts and better documentation can improve care, and “prompt fatigue” is not inevitable. Information presented within EHRs needs to be actionable. There is an ongoing tension between information overload and the right—and helpful—information. Even the order of presentation of information can make a difference in the outcome. Whether supported by HIT or not, basic tenants of care, such as including the whole care team in trainings, communicating with other providers, and engaging patients, remain essential. The studies in this issue will prove useful for informatics developers, practices and health systems making HIT decisions, and care teams refining HIT to support the needs of their patients. PMID:25957359

  20. Effect of an electronic health record on the culture of an outpatient medical oncology practice in a four-hospital integrated health care system: 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Brockstein, Bruce; Hensing, Thomas; Carro, George W; Obel, Jennifer; Khandekar, Janardan; Kaminer, Lynne; Van De Wege, Christine; de Wilton Marsh, Robert

    2011-07-01

    The electronic health record (EHR) was adopted into the NorthShore University HealthSystem, a four-hospital integrated health system located in suburban Chicago, in 2003. By 2005, all chemotherapy and medicine order entry was conducted through the EHR, completing the incorporation of a fully paperless EHR in our hospital-based oncology practice in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. The use of the EHR has dramatically changed our practice environment by improving efficiency, patient safety, research productivity, and operations, while allowing evaluation of adherence to established quality measures and incorporation of new quality improvement initiatives. The reach of the EHR has been substantial and has influenced every aspect of care at our institution over the short period since its implementation. In this article, we describe subjective and objective measures, outcomes, and achievements of our 5-year EHR experience.

  1. Evaluating increased resource use in fibromyalgia using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Jay M; Masters, Elizabeth T; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Smith, David M; Faulkner, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Objective The management of fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic musculoskeletal disease, remains challenging, and patients with FM are often characterized by high health care resource utilization. This study sought to explore potential drivers of all-cause health care resource utilization and other factors associated with high resource use, using a large electronic health records (EHR) database to explore data from patients diagnosed with FM. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of de-identified EHR data from the Humedica database. Adults (≥18 years) with FM were identified based on ≥2 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for FM (729.1) ≥30 days apart between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012 and were required to have evidence of ≥12 months continuous care pre- and post-index; first FM diagnosis was the index event; 12-month pre- and post-index reporting periods. Multivariable analysis evaluated relationships between variables and resource utilization. Results Patients were predominantly female (81.4%), Caucasian (87.7%), with a mean (standard deviation) age of 54.4 (14.8) years. The highest health care resource utilization was observed for the categories of “medication orders” and “physician office visits,” with 12-month post-index means of 21.2 (21.5) drug orders/patient and 15.1 (18.1) office visits/patient; the latter accounted for 73.3% of all health care visits. Opioids were the most common prescription medication, 44.3% of all patients. The chance of high resource use was significantly increased (P<0.001) 26% among African-Americans vs Caucasians and for patients with specific comorbid conditions ranging from 6% (musculoskeletal pain or depression/bipolar disorder) to 21% (congestive heart failure). Factors significantly associated with increased medications ordered included being female (P<0.001) and specific comorbid conditions (P<0.05). Conclusion Physician office visits and pharmacotherapy orders were key

  2. 78 FR 79201 - Medicare and State Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse; Electronic Health Records Safe Harbor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... 1001 Medicare and State Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse; Electronic Health Records Safe Harbor... Inspector General 42 CFR Part 1001 RIN 0991-AB33 Medicare and State Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse... and technologies in the health care industry. In accordance with this authority, OIG published a...

  3. Electronic Health in Perspective of Healthcare Managers: A Qualitative Study in South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    BASTANI, Peivand; ABOLHASANI, Nazanin; SHAARBAFCHIZADEH, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The important role of electronic health as well as importance of health care systems awareness and readiness may lead to develop the essential infrastructures for electronic health especially in developing countries. This study aims to investigate goals, gains, applications, challenges and other important issues related to success performance of electronic health. Method This research proposed a grounded theory in a qualitative design and a purposive sampling was used to select participants which consisted of 28 hospital managers and staff field managers working in deputy of health and curative affairs of Medical Science Universities in south of Iran. Semi structured interviews were conducted using a topic guide and intended themes derived from the results using Max QDA software during five steps. Results Nine themes through interviewees” viewpoints were made up as followed: Electronic health definition, necessity and importance of electronic health, electronic health advantages, relationship between electronic health and internet, physicians” opposition to electronic health, prerequisites for electronic health, solutions for applying electronic health plan, factors affecting electronic health acceptance in society and electronic health system challenges. Conclusion It seems that there are good circumstances in the south medical universities about settlement and implementations of electronic health and their managers are aware of its advantages, importance and necessities. The present findings implicate that these organizations should consider the user friendly and probable resistances of the present clients, in this regard it is suggested that the used technology must be accepted by users, having standard base, inexpensive and simple enough while less vulnerable in response to changes. PMID:26110152

  4. The professional psychiatric/mental health nurse: skills, competencies and supports required to adopt recovery-orientated policy in practice.

    PubMed

    Cusack, E; Killoury, F; Nugent, L E

    2017-03-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Nationally and internationally there has been a movement away from the traditional medical model towards a more holistic recovery-oriented approach to mental health care delivery. At every level of service provision the emphasis is firmly on recovery and on facilitating active partnership working and involvement of service users, their carers and family members. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This is the first study to identify on a national level specific areas of care that are addressed most or least by psychiatric and mental health nurses in care planning for mental health service users in Ireland. In addition, this is the first study to identify nationally how the recovery approach is being implemented by psychiatric and mental health nurses in relation to current recovery-orientated policy. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Mental healthcare staff require more education on the recovery concept and this needs to be multidisciplinary team wide. Further research is required to establish how best to develop a shared approach to working with service users and their families within the mental healthcare environment. Further investigation is required to help determine how funding could be allocated appropriately for education and training and service development nationally.

  5. Conflict and Compromise in Public Health Policy: Analysis of Changes Made to Five Competitive Food Legislative Proposals Prior to Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinour, Lauren M.

    2015-01-01

    Competitive foods in schools have historically been scrutinized for their ubiquity and poor nutritional quality, leading many states to enact legislation limiting the availability and accessibility of these items. Evaluations of these policy approaches show their promise in improving the healthfulness of school food environments, considered an…

  6. Data Quality and Interoperability Challenges for eHealth Exchange Participants: Observations from the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record Health Pilot Phase

    PubMed Central

    Botts, Nathan; Bouhaddou, Omar; Bennett, Jamie; Pan, Eric; Byrne, Colene; Mercincavage, Lauren; Olinger, Lois; Hunolt, Elaine; Cullen, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Authors studied the United States (U.S.) Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record (VLER) Health pilot phase relative to two attributes of data quality – the adoption of eHealth Exchange data standards, and clinical content exchanged. The VLER Health pilot was an early effort in testing implementation of eHealth Exchange standards and technology. Testing included evaluation of exchange data from the VLER Health pilot sites partners: VA, U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and private sector health care organizations. Domains assessed data quality and interoperability as it relates to: 1) conformance with data standards related to the underlying structure of C32 Summary Documents (C32) produced by eHealth Exchange partners; and 2) the types of C32 clinical content exchanged. This analysis identified several standards non-conformance issues in sample C32 files and informed further discourse on the methods needed to effectively monitor Health Information Exchange (HIE) data content and standards conformance. PMID:25954333

  7. Mobile health platform for pressure ulcer monitoring with electronic health record integration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joel J P C; Pedro, Luís M C C; Vardasca, Tomé; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Martins, Henrique M G

    2013-12-01

    Pressure ulcers frequently occur in patients with limited mobility, for example, people with advanced age and patients wearing casts or prostheses. Mobile information communication technologies can help implement ulcer care protocols and the monitoring of patients with high risk, thus preventing or improving these conditions. This article presents a mobile pressure ulcer monitoring platform (mULCER), which helps control a patient's ulcer status during all stages of treatment. Beside its stand-alone version, it can be integrated with electronic health record systems as mULCER synchronizes ulcer data with any electronic health record system using HL7 standards. It serves as a tool to integrate nursing care among hospital departments and institutions. mULCER was experimented with in different mobile devices such as LG Optimus One P500, Samsung Galaxy Tab, HTC Magic, Samsung Galaxy S, and Samsung Galaxy i5700, taking into account the user's experience of different screen sizes and processing characteristics.

  8. Adoption and Use of Internet Technologies in Health Communication: Examining Disparities in Diffusion Patterns, Health Information Sources, and Patient-Provider Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Philip Minter

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the impact of internet technologies on the field of health communication. Access and use of health communication technologies has and will continue to become increasingly important to manage and treat chronic conditions and other ailments, particularly in the context of health care reform that promotes improved quality…

  9. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health…

  10. Let the left hand know what the right is doing: a vision for care coordination and electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Robert S; Bates, David W

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential for electronic health records to help providers coordinate care, the current marketplace has failed to provide adequate solutions. Using a simple framework, we describe a vision of information technology capabilities that could substantially improve four care coordination activities: identifying collaborators, contacting collaborators, collaborating, and monitoring. Collaborators can include any individual clinician, caregiver, or provider organization involved in care for a given patient. This vision can be used to guide the development of care coordination tools and help policymakers track and promote their adoption.

  11. Rational use of electronic health records for diabetes population management.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Emma M; Klompas, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Population management is increasingly invoked as an approach to improve the quality and value of diabetes care. Recent emphasis is driven by increased focus on both costs and measures of care as the US moves from fee for service to payment models in which providers are responsible for costs incurred, and outcomes achieved, for their entire patient population. The capacity of electronic health records (EHRs) to create patient registries, apply analytic tools, and facilitate provider- and patient-level interventions has allowed rapid evolution in the scope of population management initiatives. However, findings on the efficacy of these efforts for diabetes are mixed, and work remains to achieve the full potential of an-EHR based population approach. Here we seek to clarify definitions and key domains, provide an overview of evidence for EHR-based diabetes population management, and recommend future directions for applying the considerable power of EHRs to diabetes care and prevention.

  12. Query log analysis of an electronic health record search engine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Mei, Qiaozhu; Zheng, Kai; Hanauer, David A

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed a longitudinal collection of query logs of a full-text search engine designed to facilitate information retrieval in electronic health records (EHR). The collection, 202,905 queries and 35,928 user sessions recorded over a course of 4 years, represents the information-seeking behavior of 533 medical professionals, including frontline practitioners, coding personnel, patient safety officers, and biomedical researchers for patient data stored in EHR systems. In this paper, we present descriptive statistics of the queries, a categorization of information needs manifested through the queries, as well as temporal patterns of the users' information-seeking behavior. The results suggest that information needs in medical domain are substantially more sophisticated than those that general-purpose web search engines need to accommodate. Therefore, we envision there exists a significant challenge, along with significant opportunities, to provide intelligent query recommendations to facilitate information retrieval in EHR.

  13. Leveraging the cloud for electronic health record access.

    PubMed

    Coats, Brian; Acharya, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers are under increasing pressure to enable widespread access to their electronic health record (EHR) systems for the patients they serve; the meaningful use incentive programs are perhaps the most significant driver encouraging this access. Elsewhere, the cloud has become extremely efficient and successful at establishing digital identities for individuals and making them interoperable across heterogeneous systems. As the healthcare industry contemplates providing patients access to their EHRs, the solution should leverage existing cloud investment, not duplicate it. Through an analysis of industry standards and similar work being performed in other industries, a trust framework has been derived for exchanging identity information. This research lays out a comprehensive structure that healthcare providers can easily use to integrate their EHRs with the cloud for identity validation, while meeting compliance guidelines for security and privacy. Further, this research has been implemented at a large regional hospital, yielding immediate and tangible improvements.

  14. Leveraging the Cloud for Electronic Health Record Access

    PubMed Central

    Coats, Brian; Acharya, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers are under increasing pressure to enable widespread access to their electronic health record (EHR) systems for the patients they serve; the meaningful use incentive programs are perhaps the most significant driver encouraging this access. Elsewhere, the cloud has become extremely efficient and successful at establishing digital identities for individuals and making them interoperable across heterogeneous systems. As the healthcare industry contemplates providing patients access to their EHRs, the solution should leverage existing cloud investment, not duplicate it. Through an analysis of industry standards and similar work being performed in other industries, a trust framework has been derived for exchanging identity information. This research lays out a comprehensive structure that healthcare providers can easily use to integrate their EHRs with the cloud for identity validation, while meeting compliance guidelines for security and privacy. Further, this research has been implemented at a large regional hospital, yielding immediate and tangible improvements. PMID:24808814

  15. Investigation of the effect of education based on the health belief model on the adoption of hypertension-controlling behaviors in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Khorsandi, Mahboobeh; Fekrizadeh, Zohreh; Roozbahani, Nasrin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Hypertension is one of the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and stroke, and has a direct relationship with aging. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of education based on the health belief model (HBM) on the adoption of hypertension-controlling behaviors in the elderly. Methods The present quasiexperimental study was conducted on 100 hypertensive elderly persons from Qom, Iran. The questionnaire was completed by the participants before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention. Results The results of repeated measure analysis of variance showed a significant difference in the scores of the constructs in the intervention and nonintervention groups before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention (P<0.001). Conclusion Education based on the HBM increases the performance and enhances the health beliefs regarding hypertension in the elderly population with hypertension. Therefore, it is recommended to consider the HBM to enhance self-care behaviors in the elderly. PMID:28184154

  16. Introducing vouchers for malaria prevention in Ghana and Tanzania: context and adoption of innovation in health systems.

    PubMed

    de Savigny, Don; Webster, Jayne; Agyepong, Irene Akua; Mwita, Alex; Bart-Plange, Constance; Baffoe-Wilmot, Aba; Koenker, Hannah; Kramer, Karen; Brown, Nick; Lengeler, Christian

    2012-10-01

    There are striking similarities in health system and other contexts between Tanzania and Ghana that are relevant to the scaling up of continuous delivery of insecticide treated nets (ITNs) for malaria prevention. However, specific contextual factors of relevance to ITN delivery have led implementation down very different pathways in the two countries. Both countries have made major efforts and investments to address this intervention through integrating consumer discount vouchers into the health system. Discount vouchers require arrangements among the public, private and non-governmental sectors and constitute a complex intervention in both health systems and business systems. In Tanzania, vouchers have moved beyond the planning agenda, had policies and programmes formulated, been sustained in implementation at national scale for many years and have become as of 2012 the main and only publicly supported continuous delivery system for ITNs. In Ghana national-scale implementation of vouchers never progressed beyond consideration on the agenda and piloting towards formulation of policy; and the approach was replaced by mass distribution campaigns with less dependency on or integration with the health system. By 2011, Ghana entered a phase with no publicly supported continuous delivery system for ITNs. To understand the different outcomes, we compared the voucher programme timelines, phases, processes and contexts in both countries in reference to the main health system building blocks (governance, human resources, financing, informatics, technologies and service delivery). Contextual factors which provided an enabling environment for the voucher scheme in Tanzania did not do so in Ghana. The voucher scheme was never seen as an appropriate national strategy, other delivery systems were not complementary and the private sector was under-developed. The extensive time devoted to engagement and consensus building among all stakeholders in Tanzania was an important and

  17. Electronic Health Records Data and Metadata: Challenges for Big Data in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Lauren E; Moulaison, Heather Lea

    2013-12-01

    This article, written by researchers studying metadata and standards, represents a fresh perspective on the challenges of electronic health records (EHRs) and serves as a primer for big data researchers new to health-related issues. Primarily, we argue for the importance of the systematic adoption of standards in EHR data and metadata as a way of promoting big data research and benefiting patients. EHRs have the potential to include a vast amount of longitudinal health data, and metadata provides the formal structures to govern that data. In the United States, electronic medical records (EMRs) are part of the larger EHR. EHR data is submitted by a variety of clinical data providers and potentially by the patients themselves. Because data input practices are not necessarily standardized, and because of the multiplicity of current standards, basic interoperability in EHRs is hindered. Some of the issues with EHR interoperability stem from the complexities of the data they include, which can be both structured and unstructured. A number of controlled vocabularies are available to data providers. The continuity of care document standard will provide interoperability in the United States between the EMR and the larger EHR, potentially making data input by providers directly available to other providers. The data involved is nonetheless messy. In particular, the use of competing vocabularies such as the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms, MEDCIN, and locally created vocabularies inhibits large-scale interoperability for structured portions of the records, and unstructured portions, although potentially not machine readable, remain essential. Once EMRs for patients are brought together as EHRs, the EHRs must be managed and stored. Adequate documentation should be created and maintained to assure the secure and accurate use of EHR data. There are currently a few notable international standards initiatives for EHRs. Organizations such as Health Level Seven

  18. A primer for health care managers: data sanitization, equipment disposal, and electronic waste.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Cathy M

    2011-01-01

    In this article, security regulations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act concerning data sanitization and the disposal of media containing stored electronic protected health information are discussed, and methods for effective sanitization and media disposal are presented. When disposing of electronic media, electronic waste-or e-waste-is produced. Electronic waste can harm human health and the environment. Responsible equipment disposal methods can minimize the impact of e-waste. Examples of how health care organizations can meet the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations while also behaving responsibly toward the environment are provided. Examples include the environmental stewardship activities of reduce, reuse, reeducate, recover, and recycle.

  19. The Relationship between Using Electronic Health Records and Meeting Accreditation Standards for Client Safety in Residential Aged Care Homes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Yu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the benefits of using electronic health records (EHR) for client safety in residential aged care (RAC) homes. The aged care accreditation reports published between 27 April 2011 and 3 December 2013 were downloaded and analysed. It could be seen from these reports that only 1,031(37.45%) RAC homes in Australia had adopted an EHR system by 2013. 13 RAC homes failed one or more accreditation standards. Only one of these was using an EHR system and this one met the accreditation standards on information systems. Our study provides empirical evidence to suggest that adopting and using EHR can be one of the effective organisational mechanisms to meeting accreditation standards in RAC homes.

  20. Personal health records as portal to the electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Jennifer E; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2014-03-01

    This topic review discusses the evolving clinical challenges associated with the implementation of electronic personal health records (PHR) that are fully integrated with electronic medical records (EMR). The benefits of facilitating patient access to the EMR through web-based, PHR-portals may be substantial; foremost is the potential to enhance the flow of information between patient and healthcare practitioner. The benefits of improved communication and transparency of care are presumed to be a reduction in clinical errors, increased quality of care, better patient-management of disease, and better disease and symptom comprehension. Yet PHR databases allow patients open access to newly-acquired clinical data without the benefit of concurrent expert clinical interpretation, and therefore may create the potential for greater patient distress and uncertainty. With specific attention to neuro-oncology patients, this review focuses on the developing conflicts and consequences associated with the use of a PHR that parallels data acquisition of the EMR in real-time. We conclude with a discussion of recommendations for implementing fully-integrated PHR for neuro-oncology patients.

  1. An electronic health record-enabled obesity database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of weight loss therapies is commonly measured using body mass index and other obesity-related variables. Although these data are often stored in electronic health records (EHRs) and potentially very accessible, few studies on obesity and weight loss have used data derived from EHRs. We developed processes for obtaining data from the EHR in order to construct a database on patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Methods Clinical data obtained as part of standard of care in a bariatric surgery program at an integrated health delivery system were extracted from the EHR and deposited into a data warehouse. Data files were extracted, cleaned, and stored in research datasets. To illustrate the utility of the data, Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate length of post-operative follow-up. Results Demographic, laboratory, medication, co-morbidity, and survey data were obtained from 2028 patients who had undergone RYGB at the same institution since 2004. Pre-and post-operative diagnostic and prescribing information were available on all patients, while survey laboratory data were available on a majority of patients. The number of patients with post-operative laboratory test results varied by test. Based on Kaplan-Meier estimates, over 74% of patients had post-operative weight data available at 4 years. Conclusion A variety of EHR-derived data related to obesity can be efficiently obtained and used to study important outcomes following RYGB. PMID:22640398

  2. Electronic health records: new opportunities for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Coorevits, P; Sundgren, M; Klein, G O; Bahr, A; Claerhout, B; Daniel, C; Dugas, M; Dupont, D; Schmidt, A; Singleton, P; De Moor, G; Kalra, D

    2013-12-01

    Clinical research is on the threshold of a new era in which electronic health records (EHRs) are gaining an important novel supporting role. Whilst EHRs used for routine clinical care have some limitations at present, as discussed in this review, new improved systems and emerging research infrastructures are being developed to ensure that EHRs can be used for secondary purposes such as clinical research, including the design and execution of clinical trials for new medicines. EHR systems should be able to exchange information through the use of recently published international standards for their interoperability and clinically validated information structures (such as archetypes and international health terminologies), to ensure consistent and more complete recording and sharing of data for various patient groups. Such systems will counteract the obstacles of differing clinical languages and styles of documentation as well as the recognized incompleteness of routine records. Here, we discuss some of the legal and ethical concerns of clinical research data reuse and technical security measures that can enable such research while protecting privacy. In the emerging research landscape, cooperation infrastructures are being built where research projects can utilize the availability of patient data from federated EHR systems from many different sites, as well as in international multilingual settings. Amongst several initiatives described, the EHR4CR project offers a promising method for clinical research. One of the first achievements of this project was the development of a protocol feasibility prototype which is used for finding patients eligible for clinical trials from multiple sources.

  3. The implications of electronic health record for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Shabo, Amnon

    2005-12-01

    The emerging concept of an electronic health record (EHR) targeted at a patient centric, cross-institutional and longitudinal information entity (possibly spanning the individuals lifetime) has great promise for personalized medicine. In fact, it is probably the only vehicle through which we may truly realize the personalization of medicine beyond population-based genetic profiles that are expected to become part of medication and treatment indications in the near future. The new EHR standards include mechanisms that integrate clinical data with genomic testing results obtained through applying research-type procedures, such as full DNA sequencing, to an individual patient. Although the most optimal process for the utilization of integrated clinical-genomic data in the EHR framework is still unclear, the new Health Level Seven (HL7) Clinical Genomics Draft Standard for Trial Use suggests using the 'encapsulate & bubble-up' approach, which includes two main phases: the encapsulation of raw genomic data and bubbling-up the most clinically significant portions of that data, while associating it with clinical phenotypes residing in the individual's EHR.

  4. 2015 Edition Health Information Technology (Health IT) Certification Criteria, 2015 Edition Base Electronic Health Record (EHR) Definition, and ONC Health IT Certification Program Modifications. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-10-16

    This final rule finalizes a new edition of certification criteria (the 2015 Edition health IT certification criteria or "2015 Edition'') and a new 2015 Edition Base Electronic Health Record (EHR) definition, while also modifying the ONC Health IT Certification Program to make it open and accessible to more types of health IT and health IT that supports various care and practice settings. The 2015 Edition establishes the capabilities and specifies the related standards and implementation specifications that Certified Electronic Health Record Technology (CEHRT) would need to include to, at a minimum, support the achievement of meaningful use by eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs (EHR Incentive Programs) when such edition is required for use under these programs.

  5. The State of Open Source Electronic Health Record Projects: A Software Anthropology Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Electronic health records (EHR) are a key tool in managing and storing patients’ information. Currently, there are over 50 open source EHR systems available. Functionality and usability are important factors for determining the success of any system. These factors are often a direct reflection of the domain knowledge and developers’ motivations. However, few published studies have focused on the characteristics of free and open source software (F/OSS) EHR systems and none to date have discussed the motivation, knowledge background, and demographic characteristics of the developers involved in open source EHR projects. Objective This study analyzed the characteristics of prevailing F/OSS EHR systems and aimed to provide an understanding of the motivation, knowledge background, and characteristics of the developers. Methods This study identified F/OSS EHR projects on SourceForge and other websites from May to July 2014. Projects were classified and characterized by license type, downloads, programming languages, spoken languages, project age, development status, supporting materials, top downloads by country, and whether they were “certified” EHRs. Health care F/OSS developers were also surveyed using an online survey. Results At the time of the assessment, we uncovered 54 open source EHR projects, but only four of them had been successfully certified under the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC Health IT) Certification Program. In the majority of cases, the open source EHR software was downloaded by users in the United States (64.07%, 148,666/232,034), underscoring that there is a significant interest in EHR open source applications in the United States. A survey of EHR open source developers was conducted and a total of 103 developers responded to the online questionnaire. The majority of EHR F/OSS developers (65.3%, 66/101) are participating in F/OSS projects as part of a paid activity and only 25.7% (26

  6. 45 CFR 1355.40 - Foster care and adoption data collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES GENERAL... electronically report certain data regarding children in foster care and adoption. The foster care data...

  7. 45 CFR 1355.40 - Foster care and adoption data collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES GENERAL... electronically report certain data regarding children in foster care and adoption. The foster care data...

  8. Electronic health record usability: analysis of the user-centered design processes of eleven electronic health record vendors.

    PubMed

    Ratwani, Raj M; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Hettinger, A Zachary; Benda, Natalie C

    2015-11-01

    The usability of electronic health records (EHRs) continues to be a point of dissatisfaction for providers, despite certification requirements from the Office of the National Coordinator that require EHR vendors to employ a user-centered design (UCD) process. To better understand factors that contribute to poor usability, a research team visited 11 different EHR vendors in order to analyze their UCD processes and discover the specific challenges that vendors faced as they sought to integrate UCD with their EHR development. Our analysis demonstrates a diverse range of vendors' UCD practices that fall into 3 categories: well-developed UCD, basic UCD, and misconceptions of UCD. Specific challenges to practicing UCD include conducting contextually rich studies of clinical workflow, recruiting participants for usability studies, and having support from leadership within the vendor organization. The results of the study provide novel insights for how to improve usability practices of EHR vendors.

  9. Some Correlates of Electronic Health Information Management System Success in Nigerian Teaching Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Adebowale I; Popoola, Sunday O

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, an electronic health information management system (EHIMS) is crucial for patient care in hospitals. This paper explores the aspects and elements that contribute to the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals. The study adopted a survey research design. The population of study comprised 442 health information management personnel in five teaching hospitals that had implemented EHIMS in Nigeria. A self-developed questionnaire was used as an instrument for data collection. The findings revealed that there is a positive, close relationship between all the identified factors and EHIMS’s success: technical factors (r = 0.564, P < 0.05); social factors (r = 0.616, P < 0.05); organizational factors (r = 0.621, P < 0.05); financial factors (r = 0.705, P < 0.05); and political factors (r = 0.589, P < 0.05). We conclude that consideration of all the identified factors was highly significant for the success of EHIMS in Nigerian teaching hospitals. PMID:25983557

  10. Electronic Health Record (EHR) As a Vehicle for Successful Health Care Best Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: application of EHR in journey toward the development and adaptation of best practice approach in health care has particular importance. The aim of this review article is survey of successful best practice through EHR. Methods: In this literature review articles were searched with keywords like Electronic Health Record, Best Practice in Science Direct, Google Scholar and Pub Med databases since 1999. Results: best practice in health care through some services like utilization management, case management, and information technology tools can perform. Utilization management in combination with evidence based medicine facilitate determine best decision. Health records are based on evidence medicine and be the richest source of health information. Definitely use of EHR has play pivotal role in journey toward the development and adaptation of best practice approach. Conclusion: Because of potential capabilities, EHR can be regarded as a main core and fundamental element in best practice approach. Success implementation of EHR relies on many factors that should be considered. Some critical success factors for EHR implementation that should be noted are change management, Physicians, nurses and key stakeholders involvement, leadership, provide reliable information technology infrastructure, system design, privacy and security, right budget, support high level management, clear communicate, determine goals and user needs, and define roles and responsibilities, interoperability standards. PMID:25648601

  11. Electronic Health Record-Related Safety Concerns: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Electronic Health Record Users

    PubMed Central

    Pajunen, Tuuli; Saranto, Kaija; Lehtonen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Background The rapid expansion in the use of electronic health records (EHR) has increased the number of medical errors originating in health information systems (HIS). The sociotechnical approach helps in understanding risks in the development, implementation, and use of EHR and health information technology (HIT) while accounting for complex interactions of technology within the health care system. Objective This study addresses two important questions: (1) “which of the common EHR error types are associated with perceived high- and extreme-risk severity ratings among EHR users?”, and (2) “which variables are associated with high- and extreme-risk severity ratings?” Methods This study was a quantitative, non-experimental, descriptive study of EHR users. We conducted a cross-sectional web-based questionnaire study at the largest hospital district in Finland. Statistical tests included the reliability of the summative scales tested with Cronbach’s alpha. Logistic regression served to assess the association of the independent variables to each of the eight risk factors examined. Results A total of 2864 eligible respondents provided the final data. Almost half of the respondents reported a high level of risk related to the error type “extended EHR unavailability”. The lowest overall risk level was associated with “selecting incorrectly from a list of items”. In multivariate analyses, profession and clinical unit proved to be the strongest predictors for high perceived risk. Physicians perceived risk levels to be the highest (P<.001 in six of eight error types), while emergency departments, operating rooms, and procedure units were associated with higher perceived risk levels (P<.001 in four of eight error types). Previous participation in eLearning courses on EHR-use was associated with lower risk for some of the risk factors. Conclusions Based on a large number of Finnish EHR users in hospitals, this study indicates that HIT safety hazards should

  12. An electronic health record to support patients and institutions of the health care system.

    PubMed

    Uckert, Frank; Müller, Marcel Lucas; Bürkle, Thomas; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-08-24

    The department of Medical Informatics of the University Hospital Münster and the Gesakon GmbH (an university offspring) initiated the cooperative development of an electronic health record (EHR) called "akteonline.de" in 2000. From 2001 onwards several clinics of the university hospital have already offered this EHR (within pilot projects) as an additional service to selected subsets of their patients. Based on the experiences of those pilot projects the system architecture and the basic data model underwent several evolutionary enhancements, e.g. implementations of electronic interfaces to other clinical systems (considering for example data interchange methods like the Clinical Document Architecture - standardized within the HL7 group - and also interfacing architectures of German GP systems, such as VCS and D2D). "akteonline.de" in its current structure supports patients as well as health care professionals and aims at providing a collaborative health information system which perfectly supports the clinical workflow even across institutional boundaries and including the patient himself. Since such an EHR needs to strictly fulfill high data security and data protection requirements, a complex authorization and access control component has been included. Furthermore the EHR data are encrypted within the database itself and during their transfer across the internet.

  13. Electronic health records and support for primary care teamwork

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Kevin; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Cross, Dori A.; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Objective Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Methods Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. Results EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Discussion Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. Conclusions EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. PMID:25627278

  14. The business end of health information technology. Can a fully integrated electronic health record increase provider productivity in a large community practice?

    PubMed

    De Leon, Samantha; Connelly-Flores, Alison; Mostashari, Farzad; Shih, Sarah C

    2010-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are expected to transform and improve the way medicine is practiced. However, providers perceive many barriers toward implementing new health information technology. Specifically, they are most concerned about the potentially negative impact on their practice finances and productivity. This study compares the productivity of 75 providers at a large urban primary care practice from January 2005 to February 2009, before and after implementing an EHR system, using longitudinal mixed model analyses. While decreases in productivity were observed at the time the EHR system was implemented, most providers quickly recovered, showing increases in productivity per month shortly after EHR implementation. Overall, providers had significant productivity increases of 1.7% per month per provider from pre- to post-EHR adoption. The majority of the productivity gains occurred after the practice instituted a pay-for-performance program, enabled by the data capture of the EHRs. Coupled with pay-for-performance, EHRs can spur rapid gains in provider productivity.

  15. Detecting Unplanned Care From Clinician Notes in Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Tamang, Suzanne; Patel, Manali I.; Blayney, Douglas W.; Kuznetsov, Julie; Finlayson, Samuel G.; Vetteth, Yohan; Shah, Nigam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Reduction in unplanned episodes of care, such as emergency department visits and unplanned hospitalizations, are important quality outcome measures. However, many events are only documented in free-text clinician notes and are labor intensive to detect by manual medical record review. Methods: We studied 308,096 free-text machine-readable documents linked to individual entries in our electronic health records, representing care for patients with breast, GI, or thoracic cancer, whose treatment was initiated at one academic medical center, Stanford Health Care (SHC). Using a clinical text-mining tool, we detected unplanned episodes documented in clinician notes (for non-SHC visits) or in coded encounter data for SHC-delivered care and the most frequent symptoms documented in emergency department (ED) notes. Results: Combined reporting increased the identification of patients with one or more unplanned care visits by 32% (15% using coded data; 20% using all the data) among patients with 3 months of follow-up and by 21% (23% using coded data; 28% using all the data) among those with 1 year of follow-up. Based on the textual analysis of SHC ED notes, pain (75%), followed by nausea (54%), vomiting (47%), infection (36%), fever (28%), and anemia (27%), were the most frequent symptoms mentioned. Pain, nausea, and vomiting co-occur in 35% of all ED encounter notes. Conclusion: The text-mining methods we describe can be applied to automatically review free-text clinician notes to detect unplanned episodes of care mentioned in these notes. These methods have broad application for quality improvement efforts in which events of interest occur outside of a network that allows for patient data sharing. PMID:25980019

  16. Adoption: medical and legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, C K

    1978-06-01

    The problem of abandoned children is of great magnitude in India. Placement of these children in a family environment is essential for their physical, mental, and emotional development. Adoption must be approached from the child welfare perspective. The pediatrician can play an important role in the adoption process. The pediatrician should perform a thorough medical examination of infants to be adopted, both to ensure the child's welfare and to give adoptive parents an assessment of the child's health. Information should be collected on the medical history of the child's biologic parents to aid in the evaluation process. Adoptive parents should also undergo medical and pyschological examinations. Pediatricians can additionally work with social welfare departments in establishing criteria for matching children with adoptive parents. Adoptions in India are currently governed by provisions or the 1956 Hindu Adoptions and Maintenance Act. Since this legislation excludes groups such as Muslims, Christians, and Parsis from its purview, there has been a demand for national legislation providing a uniform adoption law for all the communities in India. The Union Government introduced such a comprehensive bill in 1972, the Adoption of Children Bill; however, no action was ever taken. It is urged that this legislation be reactivated, and that the restriction on the removal of children for adoption outside India be lifted.

  17. Strengthening Adoption Practice, Listening to Adoptive Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Anne; Gonet, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    In-depth interviews with 500 adoptive families who received postadoption services through Virginia's Adoptive Family Preservation (AFP) program paint a richly detailed picture of the challenges adoptive families face and what they need to sustain adoption for many years after finalization. Findings document the need for support in a variety of…

  18. Small physician practices in new york needed sustained help to realize gains in quality from use of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Andrew M; Bishop, Tara F; Shih, Sarah; Casalino, Lawrence P

    2013-01-01

    The 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act spurred adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) in the United States, through such measures as financial incentives to providers through Medicare and Medicaid and regional extension centers, which provide ongoing technical assistance to practices. Yet the relationship between EHR adoption and quality of care remains poorly understood. We evaluated the early effects on quality of the Primary Care Information Project, which provides subsidized EHRs and technical assistance to primary care practices in underserved neighborhoods in New York City, using the regional extension center model. We found that just general participation in, or exposure to, the project was not enough to improve quality of care. It took sustained exposure on the part of these practices and technical assistance to them before they demonstrated improvement on measures of care most likely to be affected by the use of electronic health records, such as cancer screenings and care for patients with diabetes. Participating in the Primary Care Information Project for nine or more months was associated with significantly improved quality, but only for this limited group of quality measures and only for physicians receiving extensive technical assistance.

  19. Security evaluation and assurance of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Weber-Jahnke, Jens H

    2009-01-01

    Electronic Health Records (EHRs) maintain information of sensitive nature. Security requirements in this context are typically multilateral, encompassing the viewpoints of multiple stakeholders. Two main research questions arise from a security assurance point of view, namely how to demonstrate the internal correctness of EHRs and how to demonstrate their conformance in relation to multilateral security regulations. The above notions of correctness and conformance directly relate to the general concept of system verification, which asks the question "are we building the system right?" This should not be confused with the concept of system validation, which asks the question "are we building the right system?" Much of the research in the medical informatics community has been concerned with the latter aspect (validation). However, trustworthy security requires assurances that standards are followed and specifications are met. The objective of this paper is to contribute to filling this gap. We give an introduction to fundamentals of security assurance, summarize current assurance standards, and report on experiences with using security assurance methodology applied to the EHR domain, specifically focusing on case studies in the Canadian context.

  20. Clinical Research Informatics and Electronic Health Record Data

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, M. M.; Rusincovitch, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The goal of this survey is to discuss the impact of the growing availability of electronic health record (EHR) data on the evolving field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI), which is the union of biomedical research and informatics. Results Major challenges for the use of EHR-derived data for research include the lack of standard methods for ensuring that data quality, completeness, and provenance are sufficient to assess the appropriateness of its use for research. Areas that need continued emphasis include methods for integrating data from heterogeneous sources, guidelines (including explicit phenotype definitions) for using these data in both pragmatic clinical trials and observational investigations, strong data governance to better understand and control quality of enterprise data, and promotion of national standards for representing and using clinical data. Conclusions The use of EHR data has become a priority in CRI. Awareness of underlying clinical data collection processes will be essential in order to leverage these data for clinical research and patient care, and will require multi-disciplinary teams representing clinical research, informatics, and healthcare operations. Considerations for the use of EHR data provide a starting point for practical applications and a CRI research agenda, which will be facilitated by CRI’s key role in the infrastructure of a learning healthcare system. PMID:25123746

  1. Medical guidelines presentation and comparing with Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Veselý, Arnost; Zvárová, Jana; Peleska, Jan; Buchtela, David; Anger, Zdenek

    2006-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are now being developed in many places. More advanced systems provide also reminder facilities, usually based on if-then rules. In this paper we propose a method how to build the reminder facility directly upon the guideline interchange format (GLIF) model of medical guidelines. The method compares data items on the input of EHR system with medical guidelines GLIF model and is able to reveal if the input data item, that represents patient diagnosis or proposed patient treatment, contradicts with medical guidelines or not. The reminder facility can be part of EHR system itself or it can be realized by a stand-alone reminder system (SRS). The possible architecture of stand-alone reminder system is described in this paper and the advantages of stand-alone solution are discussed. The part of the EHR system could be also a browser that would present graphical GLIF model in easy to understand manner on the user screen. This browser can be data driven and focus attention of user to the relevant part of medical guidelines GLIF model.

  2. An Electronic Health Record Investigation of Lenticulostriate Vasculopathy Features.

    PubMed

    Frankovich, Jennifer; Egan, Maximillian; Mahony, Talia; Benitz, William; Shaw, Gary

    2017-02-01

    Objective Lenticulostriate vasculopathy (LSV) is characterized by linear hyperechogenicities in the basal ganglia found on the head ultrasounds of infants. We reviewed electronic health records of infants with and without LSV to investigate whether physician dictations indicated symptoms which could reflect subtle basal ganglia injury. Study Design In a case-control study, we analyzed data from 46 infants with LSV and 127 controls. Infants were stratified between term and preterm birth. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for tone abnormalities, apnea, feeding difficulties, seizures, and movement abnormalities in the presence of LSV. Results Both term and preterm infants with LSV showed elevated risks for tone abnormalities (OR: 3.6 and 2.9, respectively). Term infants with LSV showed elevated risks for hypotonia (OR: 4.3), apnea (OR: 2.9), and feeding difficulties (OR: 4.1). Preterm infants with LSV showed elevated risks for truncal hypotonia (OR: 3.9) and hyperreflexia (OR: 3.9). Conclusion Our findings provide some evidence that LSV is associated with an increased risk of early signs of abnormal development, possibly relating to signs of subtle basal ganglia injury. Historically LSV has been considered incidental. The associations identified here suggest that LSV findings are worthy of further study.

  3. Public health challenges of electronic cigarettes in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungkyu; Kimm, Heejin; Yun, Ji Eun; Jee, Sun Ha

    2011-11-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarrettes) were recently introduced and advertised as a smoking cession device in South Korea. As the social norm to quit smoking has gained hold in the country, the number of e-cigarette users is growing rapidly. This phenomenon should be urgently considered, because of the lack of research that has been conducted to examine the safety of e-cigarettes and its efficacy as a smoking cessation aid. This paper raises several public health concerns on e-cigarettes in South Korea. Uncertain regulations of the government on e-cigarettes are contributing to an increase of e-cigarette users and allowing the e-cigarette industry to circumvent existing regulations. The aggressive marketing activity of this industry is also a core factor that is responsible for the rapid increase of e-cigarette use, in particular among the youth. Following the enforcement of tobacco control, some cigarette smokers may be encouraged to purchase e-cigarettes in order to circumvent the regulations, even though the dual use of e-cigarette and cigarette may be more harmful. Until there is clear evidence of the e-cigarette's safety, it is recommended that the industry's marketing and promotional activities be banned and closely monitored, and public campaigns be initiated to educate the public regarding e-cigarettes.

  4. CADe System Integrated within the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Vállez, Noelia; Déniz, Óscar; Fernández, María del Milagro; Pastor, Carlos; Rienda, Miguel Ángel; Esteve, Pablo; Arias, María

    2013-01-01

    The latest technological advances and information support systems for clinics and hospitals produce a wide range of possibilities in the storage and retrieval of an ever-growing amount of clinical information as well as in detection and diagnosis. In this work, an Electronic Health Record (EHR) combined with a Computer Aided Detection (CADe) system for breast cancer diagnosis has been implemented. Our objective is to provide to radiologists a comprehensive working environment that facilitates the integration, the image visualization, and the use of aided tools within the EHR. For this reason, a development methodology based on hardware and software system features in addition to system requirements must be present during the whole development process. This will lead to a complete environment for displaying, editing, and reporting results not only for the patient information but also for their medical images in standardised formats such as DICOM and DICOM-SR. As a result, we obtain a CADe system which helps in detecting breast cancer using mammograms and is completely integrated into an EHR. PMID:24151586

  5. Assessing use of a standardized dental diagnostic terminology in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Tokede, Oluwabunmi; White, Joel; Stark, Paul C; Vaderhobli, Ram; Walji, Muhammad F; Ramoni, Rachel; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta; Kimmes, Nicole; Tavares, Anamaria; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2013-01-01

    Although standardized terminologies such as the International Classification of Diseases have been in use in medicine for over a century, efforts in the dental profession to standardize dental diagnostic terms have not achieved widespread acceptance. To address this gap, a standardized dental diagnostic terminology, the EZCodes, was developed in 2009. Fifteen dental education institutions in the United States and Europe have implemented the EZCodes dental diagnostic terminology. This article reports on the utilization and valid entry of the EZCodes at three of the dental schools that have adopted this standardized dental diagnostic terminology. Electronic data on the use of procedure codes with diagnostic terms from the three schools over a period from July 2010 to June 2011 were aggregated. The diagnostic term and procedure code pairs were adjudicated by three calibrated dentists. Analyses were conducted to gain insight into the utilization and valid entry of the EZCodes diagnostic terminology in the one-year period. Error proportions in the entry of diagnostic term (and by diagnostic category) were also computed. In the twelve-month period, 29,965 diagnostic terms and 249,411 procedure codes were entered at the three institutions resulting in a utilization proportion of 12 percent. Caries and periodontics were the most frequently used categories. More than 1,000 of the available 1,321 diagnostic terms were never used. Overall, 60.5 percent of the EZCodes entries were found to be valid. The results demonstrate low utilization of EZCodes in an electronic health record and raise the need for specific training of dental providers on the importance of using dental diagnostic terminology and specifically how to use the terms in the electronic record. These findings will serve to increase the use/correct use of the EZCodes dental diagnostic terminology and ultimately create a reliable platform for undertaking clinical, outcomes, and quality improvement-related research.

  6. Factors affecting adoption, implementation fidelity, and sustainability of the Redesigned Community Health Fund in Tanzania: a mixed methods protocol for process evaluation in the Dodoma region.

    PubMed

    Kalolo, Albino; Radermacher, Ralf; Stoermer, Manfred; Meshack, Menoris; De Allegri, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the implementation of various initiatives to address low enrollment in voluntary micro health insurance (MHI) schemes in sub-Saharan Africa, the problem of low enrollment remains unresolved. The lack of process evaluations of such interventions makes it difficult to ascertain whether their poor results are because of design failures or implementation weaknesses. Objective In this paper, we describe a process evaluation protocol aimed at opening the 'black box' to evaluate the implementation processes of the Redesigned Community Health Fund (CHF) program in the Dodoma region of Tanzania. Design The study employs a cross-sectional mixed methods design and is being carried out 3 years after the launch of the Redesigned CHF program. The study is grounded in a conceptual framework which rests on the Diffusion of Innovation Theory and the Implementation Fidelity Framework. The study utilizes a mixture of quantitative and qualitative data collection tools (questionnaires, focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, and document review), and aligns the evaluation to the Theory of Intervention developed by our team. Quantitative data will be used to measure program adoption, implementation fidelity, and their moderating factors. Qualitative data will be used to explore the responses of stakeholders to the intervention, contextual factors, and moderators of adoption, implementation fidelity, and sustainability. Discussion This protocol describes a systematic process evaluation in relation to the implementation of a reformed MHI. We trust that the theoretical approaches and methodologies described in our protocol may be useful to inform the design of future process evaluations focused on the assessment of complex interventions, such as MHI schemes.

  7. Effect of education based on the theory of planned behavior on adoption of oral health behaviors of pregnant women referred to health centers of Birjand in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimipour, Sediqe; Ebrahimipoiur, Hossein; Alibakhshian, Fateme; Mohamadzadeh, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Oral health of pregnant women is very important because of the adverse effects of pregnancy on the oral hard and soft tissues and vice versa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of education on oral health behaviors of pregnant women based on the theory of planned behavior in Birjand. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was carried out among 150 pregnant women admitted to health centers, who were selected using simple sampling (75 females in each case and control group). Educational program through face-to-face training was performed in the case group, and the control group received only usual training through leaflet distribution. Data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed by the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 18 software at 0.05 significance level. Results: The most frequent age group was 26–30 years. Before the intervention, the mean scores of knowledge, attitude, perceived behavioral control, subjective norms, behavioral intention, and performance of the intervention and control groups showed no significant difference (P ≥ 0.05). After the intervention, the average of all scores in the intervention group showed significant increase compared to the control group (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: Face-to-face training using the theory of planned behavior has positive impact on oral health behaviors of pregnant women. Accordingly, training sessions in order to raising awareness and positive attitude and controlling healthcare behaviors can improve oral health behaviors of pregnant women. PMID:28032052

  8. Consensus Statement on Electronic Health Predictive Analytics: A Guiding Framework to Address Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Amarasingham, Ruben; Audet, Anne-Marie J.; Bates, David W.; Glenn Cohen, I.; Entwistle, Martin; Escobar, G. J.; Liu, Vincent; Etheredge, Lynn; Lo, Bernard; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Ram, Sudha; Saria, Suchi; Schilling, Lisa M.; Shahi, Anand; Stewart, Walter F.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Xie, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Context: The recent explosion in available electronic health record (EHR) data is motivating a rapid expansion of electronic health care predictive analytic (e-HPA) applications, defined as the use of electronic algorithms that forecast clinical events in real time with the intent to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs. There is an urgent need for a systematic framework to guide the development and application of e-HPA to ensure that the field develops in a scientifically sound, ethical, and efficient manner. Objectives: Building upon earlier frameworks of model development and utilization, we identify the emerging opportunities and challenges of e-HPA, propose a framework that enables us to realize these opportunities, address these challenges, and motivate e-HPA stakeholders to both adopt and continuously refine the framework as the applications of e-HPA emerge. Methods: To achieve these objectives, 17 experts with diverse expertise including methodology, ethics, legal, regulation, and health care delivery systems were assembled to identify emerging opportunities and challenges of e-HPA and to propose a framework to guide the development and application of e-HPA. Findings: The framework proposed by the panel includes three key domains where e-HPA differs qualitatively from earlier generations of models and algorithms (Data Barriers, Transparency, and Ethics) and areas where current frameworks are insufficient to address the emerging opportunities and challenges of e-HPA (Regulation and Certification; and Education and Training). The following list of recommendations summarizes the key points of the framework: Data Barriers: Establish mechanisms within the scientific community to support data sharing for predictive model development and testing.Transparency: Set standards around e-HPA validation based on principles of scientific transparency and reproducibility.Ethics: Develop both individual-centered and society-centered risk-benefit approaches to evaluate

  9. Leveraging Big Data and Electronic Health Records to Enhance Novel Approaches to Acute Kidney Injury Research and Care.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Scott M; Goldstein, Stuart L; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2017-03-08

    While acute kidney injury (AKI) has been poorly defined historically, a decade of effort has culminated in a standardized, consensus definition. In parallel, electronic health records (EHRs) have been adopted with greater regularity, clinical informatics approaches have been refined, and the field of EHR-enabled care improvement and research has burgeoned. Although both fields have matured in isolation, uniting the 2 has the capacity to redefine AKI-related care and research. This article describes how the application of a consistent AKI definition to the EHR dataset can accurately and rapidly diagnose and identify AKI events. Furthermore, this electronic, automated diagnostic strategy creates the opportunity to develop predictive approaches, optimize AKI alerts, and trace AKI events across institutions, care platforms, and administrative datasets.

  10. Eliminating LGBTIQQ Health Disparities: The Associated Roles of Electronic Health Records and Institutional Culture.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Edward J; Hazarian, Shea; Yarborough, Mark; Sánchez, John Paul

    2014-09-01

    For all humans, sexual orientation and gender identity are essential elements of identity, informing how we plan and live our lives. The historic invisibility of sexual minorities in medicine has meant that these important aspects of their identities as patients have been ignored, with the result that these patients have been denied respect, culturally competent services, and proper treatment. Likely due to historic rejection and mistreatment, there is evidence of reluctance on the part of LGBT patients to disclose their sexual orientation (SO) or gender identity (GI) to their health care providers. There is some perception of risk in sharing SO and GI for many patients who have had bad prior experiences. Despite these risks, we argue that we can improve the quality of care provided this population only by encouraging them to self-identify and then using that information to improve quality of care. One strategy both to prompt patient self-identification and to store and use SO and GI data to improve care centers on the use of electronic health records. However, gathering SO and GI data in the EHR requires a workforce that knows both how to obtain and how to use that information. To develop these competencies, educational programs for health professionals must prepare students and educators to elicit and to use sexual orientation and gender identity information to improve care while simultaneously ensuring the safety of patients, trainees, and staff and faculty members as SO and GI become openly discussed and integral parts of ongoing medical discussion and care. As determination of SO and GI demographics becomes more common in health research, we will more fully understand the health risks for all the LGBTIQQ populations.

  11. A survey analysis suggests that electronic health records will yield revenue gains for some practices and losses for many.

    PubMed

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Green, Carol E; Bates, David W

    2013-03-01

    Health care providers remain uncertain about how they will fare financially if they adopt electronic health record (EHR) systems. We used survey data from forty-nine community practices in a large EHR pilot, the Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative, to project five-year returns on investment. We found that the average physician would lose $43,743 over five years; just 27 percent of practices would have achieved a positive return on investment; and only an additional 14 percent of practices would have come out ahead had they received the $44,000 federal meaningful-use incentive. The largest difference between practices with a positive return on investment and those with a negative return was the extent to which they used their EHRs to increase revenue, primarily by seeing more patients per day or by improved billing that resulted in fewer rejected claims and more accurate coding. Almost half of the practices did not realize savings in paper medical records because they continued to keep records on paper. We conclude that current meaningful use incentives alone may not ensure that most practices, particularly smaller ones, achieve a positive return on investment from EHR adoption. Policies that provide additional support, such as expanding the regional extension center program, could help ensure that practices make the changes required to realize a positive return on investment from EHRs.

  12. Barriers to adopting and implementing an oral health programme for managing early childhood caries through primary health care providers in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To identify barriers to participation in a primary oral health care programme aimed at preventing early childhood caries, as perceived by nurses. Methods Of a total of 140 randomly selected nurses employed in 40 government health centres in Lima, 123 completed a pre-tested questionnaire. Background variables were districts’ ‘socio-economic status’ (SES) and ‘years of experience’. Factor analysis was performed. ANOVA was applied for testing the influence of the background variables on the barrier factors. Chi-square test was applied to test for differences between single item barriers and the background variables. The Likert-scale (1–4) was used. Results There was no statistical significant effect of ‘SES’ or of ‘years of experience’ of nurses on any of the 7 barrier factors, nor on the 11 single item barrier factors. The highest mean score (3.81) was obtained for the barrier factor ‘importance of oral health’, followed by ‘perceived responsibility’ (3.44). The lowest mean score was (1.70) for ‘knowledge on caries prevention’. Conclusions Nurses consider oral health very important and are willing to participate actively in programmes aimed at reducing Early Childhood Caries, provided that they will be trained well and that the director and dentists of the health centre give their consent. PMID:24597792

  13. [Risk communication during health crises: results of a cross-sectional study to evaluate the effectiveness of adopted corporate communication strategies during the H1N1 influenza pandemic in Italy and on the training needs of health professionals].

    PubMed

    De Giusti, Maria; Mannocci, Alice; Miccoli, Silvia; Palazzo, Caterina; Di Thiene, Domitilla; Scalmato, Valeria; Ursillo, Paolo; Monteduro, Maria Antonietta; Turri, Alberto; Mazzoli, Pier Giovanni; Boccia, Antonio; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of corporate communication activities carried out during the A(H1N1) pandemic influenza in Italy and to identify educational needs of health professionals with regards to crisis communication. The study compared two samples representing respectively the general population and health professionals, living in different regions of northern, central and southern Italy. A self-administered questionnaire was used, with questions on knowledge about preventive measures during a pandemic and on satisfaction with the adopted communication campaigns. Study results highlight that both samples had very little knowledge of appropriate preventive behaviors to be adopted during a pandemic. The sample of health professionals received a greater amount of information about the pandemic with respect to the general population and showed a strong interest toward the problem of receiving adequate training in risk communication. The degree of knowledge about preventive measures is directly proportional to the existence of institutional communication activities and to having consulted a health professional.

  14. Using Electronic Health Records for Population Health Research: A Review of Methods and Applications.

    PubMed

    Casey, Joan A; Schwartz, Brian S; Stewart, Walter F; Adler, Nancy E

    2016-01-01

    The use and functionality of electronic health records (EHRs) have increased rapidly in the past decade. Although the primary purpose of EHRs is clinical, researchers have used them to conduct epidemiologic investigations, ranging from cross-sectional studies within a given hospital to longitudinal studies on geographically distributed patients. Herein, we describe EHRs, examine their use in population health research, and compare them with traditional epidemiologic methods. We describe diverse research applications that benefit from the large sample sizes and generalizable patient populations afforded by EHRs. These have included reevaluation of prior findings, a range of diseases and subgroups, environmental and social epidemiology, stigmatized conditions, predictive modeling, and evaluation of natural experiments. Although studies using primary data collection methods may have more reliable data and better population retention, EHR-based studies are less expensive and require less time to complete. Future EHR epidemiology with enhanced collection of social/behavior measures, linkage with vital records, and integration of emerging technologies such as personal sensing could improve clinical care and population health.

  15. An Electronic Health Record Based on Structured Narrative

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephen B.; Bakken, Suzanne; Dine, Daniel; Hyun, Sookyung; Mendonça, Eneida; Morrison, Frances; Bright, Tiffani; Van Vleck, Tielman; Wrenn, Jesse; Stetson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Objective To develop an electronic health record that facilitates rapid capture of detailed narrative observations from clinicians, with partial structuring of narrative information for integration and reuse. Design We propose a design in which unstructured text and coded data are fused into a single model called structured narrative. Each major clinical event (e.g., encounter or procedure) is represented as a document that is marked up to identify gross structure (sections, fields, paragraphs, lists) as well as fine structure within sentences (concepts, modifiers, relationships). Marked up items are associated with standardized codes that enable linkage to other events, as well as efficient reuse of information, which can speed up data entry by clinicians. Natural language processing is used to identify fine structure, which can reduce the need for form-based entry. Validation The model is validated through an example of use by a clinician, with discussion of relevant aspects of the user interface, data structures and processing rules. Discussion The proposed model represents all patient information as documents with standardized gross structure (templates). Clinicians enter their data as free text, which is coded by natural language processing in real time making it immediately usable for other computation, such as alerts or critiques. In addition, the narrative data annotates and augments structured data with temporal relations, severity and degree modifiers, causal connections, clinical explanations and rationale. Conclusion Structured narrative has potential to facilitate capture of data directly from clinicians by allowing freedom of expression, giving immediate feedback, supporting reuse of clinical information and structuring data for subsequent processing, such as quality assurance and clinical research. PMID:17947628

  16. Relational Machine Learning for Electronic Health Record-Driven Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Peissig, Peggy L.; Costa, Vitor Santos; Caldwell, Michael D.; Rottscheit, Carla; Berg, Richard L.; Mendonca, Eneida A.; Page, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electronic health records (EHR) offer medical and pharmacogenomics research unprecedented opportunities to identify and classify patients at risk. EHRs are collections of highly inter-dependent records that include biological, anatomical, physiological, and behavioral observations. They comprise a patient’s clinical phenome, where each patient has thousands of date-stamped records distributed across many relational tables. Development of EHR computer-based phenotyping algorithms require time and medical insight from clinical experts, who most often can only review a small patient subset representative of the total EHR records, to identify phenotype features. In this research we evaluate whether relational machine learning (ML) using Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) can contribute to addressing these issues as a viable approach for EHR-based phenotyping. Methods Two relational learning ILP approaches and three well-known WEKA (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis) implementations of non-relational approaches (PART, J48, and JRIP) were used to develop models for nine phenotypes. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) coded EHR data were used to select training cohorts for the development of each phenotypic model. Accuracy, precision, recall, F-Measure, and Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (AUROC) curve statistics were measured for each phenotypic model based on independent manually verified test cohorts. A two-sided binomial distribution test (sign test) compared the five ML approaches across phenotypes for statistical significance. Results We developed an approach to automatically label training examples using ICD-9 diagnosis codes for the ML approaches being evaluated. Nine phenotypic models for each MLapproach were evaluated, resulting in better overall model performance in AUROC using ILP when compared to PART (p=0.039), J48 (p=0.003) and JRIP (p=0.003). Discussion ILP has the potential to improve

  17. The Effect of an Educational Intervention Program on the Adoption of Low Back Pain Preventive Behaviors in Nurses: An Application of the Health Belief Model.

    PubMed

    Sharafkhani, Naser; Khorsandi, Mahboobeh; Shamsi, Mohsen; Ranjbaran, Mehdi

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of a theory-based educational intervention program on the level of knowledge and Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs among nurses in terms of the adoption of preventive behaviors. Methods This pretest/posttest quasi-experimental study was conducted on 100 nurses who were recruited through the multistage sampling method. The nurses were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The participants were evaluated before and 3 months after the educational intervention. A multidimensional questionnaire was prepared based on the theoretical structures of the HBM to collect the data. Data analysis was performed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results There was no significant difference in the mean values of HBM constructs prior to the intervention between the intervention and control groups. However, after the administration of the educational program, the mean scores of knowledge and HBM constructs significantly increased in the intervention group when compared with the control group (p < 0.0001). Conclusion The results of the current study revealed that the educational intervention based on the HBM was effective in improving the nurses' scores of knowledge and HBM constructs; therefore, theory-based health educational strategies are suggested as an effective alternative to traditional educational interventions.

  18. Ethical, legal, and social implications of incorporating genomic information into electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Hazin, Ribhi; Brothers, Kyle B.; Malin, Bradley A.; Koenig, Barbara A.; Sanderson, Saskia C.; Rothstein, Mark A.; Williams, Marc S.; Clayton, Ellen W.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of genomic data in the electronic health record raises important ethical, legal, and social issues. In this article, we highlight these challenges and discuss potential solutions. We provide a brief background on the current state of electronic health records in the context of genomic medicine, discuss the importance of equitable access to genome-enabled electronic health records, and consider the potential use of electronic health records for improving genomic literacy in patients and providers. We highlight the importance of privacy, access, and security, and of determining which genomic information is included in the electronic health record. Finally, we discuss the challenges of reporting incidental findings, storing and reinterpreting genomic data, and nondocumentation and duty to warn family members at potential genetic risk. PMID:24030434

  19. Why Do Health Economists Promote Technology Adoption Rather Than the Search for Efficiency? A Proposal for a Change in Our Approach to Economic Evaluation in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Scotland, Graham; Bryan, Stirling

    2017-02-01

    At a time of intense pressure on health care budgets, the technology management challenge is for disinvestment in low-value technologies and reinvestment in higher value alternatives. The aim of this article is to explore ways in which health economists might begin to redress the observed imbalance between the evaluation of new and existing in-use technologies. The argument is not against evaluating new technologies but in favor of the "search for efficiency," where the ultimate objective is to identify reallocations that improve population health in the face of resource scarcity. We explore why in-use technologies may be of low value and consider how economic evaluation analysts might embrace a broader efficiency lens, first through "technology management" (a process of analysis and evidence-informed decision making throughout a technology's life cycle) and progressing through "pathway management" (the search for efficiency gains across entire clinical care pathways). A number of model-based examples are used to illustrate the approaches.

  20. Electronic health records: Is it a risk worth taking in healthcare delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Vera Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    The electronic health record represents a major change in healthcare delivery, either for health professionals and health institutions, either for patients. In this essay we will mainly focus on its consequences regarding patient safety and medical liability. In this particular domain the electronic health record has dual effects: on one side prevents medical errors and, in this sense, promotes patient safety and protects the doctor from lawsuits; but, on the other side, when not used properly, it may also generate other kind of errors, potentially threatening patient safety and, therefore, increasing the risk of juridical liability for the physician. This paper intends to underline the main human errors, technologic mistakes and medical faults that may occur while using the electronic health record and the ways to overcome them, also explaining how the electronic health record may be used in court during a judicial proceeding. PMID:26693253

  1. Electronic Health Record (EHR) Organizational Change: Explaining Resistance Through Profession, Organizational Experience, and EHR Communication Quality.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Ashley K

    2017-02-03

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act passed by the U.S. government in 2009 mandates that all healthcare organizations adopt a certified electronic health record (EHR) system by 2015. Failure to comply will result in Medicare reimbursement penalties, which steadily increase with each year of delinquency. There are several repercussions of this seemingly top-down, rule-bound organizational change-one of which is employee resistance. Given the penalties for violating EHR meaningful use standards are ongoing, resistance to this mandate presents a serious issue for healthcare organizations. This study surveyed 345 employees in one healthcare organization that recently implemented an EHR. Analysis of variance results offer theoretical and pragmatic contributions by demonstrating physicians, nurses, and employees with more experience in their organization are the most resistant to EHR change. The job characteristics model is used to explain these findings. Hierarchical regression analyses also demonstrate the quality of communication surrounding EHR implementation-from both formal and informal sources-is negatively associated with EHR resistance and positively associated with perceived EHR implementation success and EHR's perceived relative advantage.

  2. The impact of converting to an electronic health record on organizational culture and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Cindy J; Becker, Susan M; Reynolds, Katherine S; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Caprini, Carol Ann; Hahn, Elizabeth A; Peres, Alan; Arnold, Benjamin J

    2007-06-01

    Implementing an information technology system can impact more than just quality of care and patient outcomes. The purpose of this 4-year, observational research project is to examine changes in organizational culture, quality improvement (QI) maturity, and quality of care following adoption of a single, electronic health record (EHR) system within an integrated healthcare network. The primary outcome measure, the Culture and Quality Questionnaire (CQQ), assesses the perceived culture of an organization and the degree of CQI maturity in seven quality management areas. Baseline surveys were distributed prior to conversion to the EHR. Subsequent data collection occurred at 12 months post "go live" and will occur at 24 and 36 months after the first hospital "go live". Secondary data were abstracted from routinely collected patient satisfaction measures and standard quality indicators. Contrary to expectation, our findings from the Baseline and 12-month follow-up data suggest that employees perceived the organizational culture as becoming more, rather than less, hierarchical. We also hypothesized that quality indicators would show improvement due to enhanced information flow and ease of information retrieval. This hypothesis was not supported by 1-year results. However, follow-up data from years two and three may provide different results.

  3. A qualitative study identifying the cost categories associated with electronic health record implementation in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Slight, Sarah P; Quinn, Casey; Avery, Anthony J; Bates, David W; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Objective We conducted a prospective evaluation of different forms of electronic health record (EHR) systems to better understand the costs incurred during implementation and the factors that can influence these costs. Methods We selected a range of diverse organizations across three different geographical areas in England that were at different stages of implementing three centrally procured applications, that is, iSOFT's Lorenzo Regional Care, Cerner's Millennium, and CSE's RiO. 41 semi-structured interviews were conducted with hospital staff, members of the implementation team, and those involved in the implementation at a national level. Results Four main overarching cost categories were identified: infrastructure (eg, hardware and software), personnel (eg, training team), estates/facilities (eg, space), and other (eg, training materials). Many factors were felt to impact on these costs, with different hospitals choosing varying amounts and types of infrastructure, diverse training approaches for staff, and different software applications to integrate with the new system. Conclusions Improving the quality and safety of patient care through EHR adoption is a priority area for UK and US governments and policy makers worldwide. With cost considered one of the most significant barriers, it is important for hospitals and governments to be clear from the outset of the major cost categories involved and the factors that may impact on these costs. Failure to adequately train staff or to follow key steps in implementation has preceded many of the failures in this domain, which can create new safety hazards. PMID:24523391

  4. 42 CFR 495.370 - Appeals process for a Medicaid provider receiving electronic health record incentive payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... electronic health record incentive payments. 495.370 Section 495.370 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.370 Appeals process for a Medicaid provider receiving electronic health...

  5. Design of the New York City Macroscope: Innovations in Population Health Surveillance Using Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Newton-Dame, Remle; McVeigh, Katharine H.; Schreibstein, Lauren; Perlman, Sharon; Lurie-Moroni, Elizabeth; Jacobson, Laura; Greene, Carolyn; Snell, Elisabeth; Thorpe, Lorna E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic health records (EHRs) have the potential to offer real-time, inexpensive standardized health data about chronic health conditions. Despite rapid expansion, EHR data evaluations for chronic disease surveillance have been limited. We present design and methods for the New York City (NYC) Macroscope, an EHR-based chronic disease surveillance system. This methods report is the first in a three part series describing the development and validation of the NYC Macroscope. This report describes in detail the infrastructure underlying the NYC Macroscope; indicator definitions; design decisions that were made to maximize data quality; characteristics of the population sampled; completeness of data collected; and lessons learned from doing this work. The second report describes the methods used to evaluate the validity and robustness of NYC Macroscope prevalence estimates; presents validation results for estimates of obesity, smoking, depression and influenza vaccination; and discusses the implications of our findings for NYC and for other jurisdictions embarking on similar work. The third report applies the same validation methods to metabolic outcomes, including the prevalence, treatment and control of diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia. Methods: We designed the NYC Macroscope for comparison to a local “gold standard,” the 2013–14 NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and the telephonic 2013 Community Health Survey. NYC Macroscope indicators covered prevalence, treatment, and control of diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia; and prevalence of influenza vaccination, obesity, depression and smoking. Indicators were stratified by age, sex, and neighborhood poverty, and weighted to the in-care NYC population and limited to primary care patients. Indicator queries were distributed to a virtual network of primary care practices; 392 practices and 716,076 adult patients were retained in the final sample. Findings: The NYC

  6. The Electronic Health Record Objective Structured Clinical Examination: Assessing Student Competency in Patient Interactions While Using the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Biagioli, Frances E.; Elliot, Diane L.; Palmer, Ryan T.; Graichen, Carla C.; Rdesinski, Rebecca E.; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Galper, Ari B.; Tysinger, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Because many medical students do not have access to electronic health records (EHRs) in the clinical environment, simulated EHR training is necessary. Explicitly training medical students to use EHRs appropriately during patient encounters equips them to engage patients while also attending to the accuracy of the record and contributing to a culture of information safety. Approach Faculty developed and successfully implemented an EHR objective structured clinical examination (EHR-OSCE) for clerkship students at two institutions. The EHR-OSCE objectives include assessing EHR-related communication and data management skills. Outcomes The authors collected performance data for students (n = 71) at the first institution during academic years 2011–2013 and for students (n = 211) at the second institution during academic year 2013–2014. EHR-OSCE assessment checklist scores showed that students performed well in EHR-related communication tasks, such as maintaining eye contact and stopping all computer work when the patient expresses worry. Findings indicated student EHR skill deficiencies in the areas of EHR data management including medical history review, medication reconciliation, and allergy reconciliation. Most students’ EHR skills failed to improve as the year progressed, suggesting that they did not gain the EHR training and experience they need in clinics and hospitals. Next Steps Cross-institutional data comparisons will help determine whether differences in curricula affect students’ EHR skills. National and institutional policies and faculty development are needed to ensure that students receive adequate EHR education, including hands-on experience in the clinic as well as simulated EHR practice. PMID:27332870

  7. Integrating Genomic Resources with Electronic Health Records using the HL7 Infobutton Standard

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Maglott, Donna R.; Nelson, Tristan H.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Martin, Christa L.; Goehringer, Scott R.; Freimuth, Robert R.; Williams, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The Clinical Genome Resource (ClinGen) Electronic Health Record (EHR) Workgroup aims to integrate ClinGen resources with EHRs. A promising option to enable this integration is through the Health Level Seven (HL7) Infobutton Standard. EHR systems that are certified according to the US Meaningful Use program provide HL7-compliant infobutton capabilities, which can be leveraged to support clinical decision-making in genomics. Objectives To integrate genomic knowledge resources using the HL7 infobutton standard. Two tactics to achieve this objective were: (1) creating an HL7-compliant search interface for ClinGen, and (2) proposing guidance for genomic resources on achieving HL7 Infobutton standard accessibility and compliance. Methods We built a search interface utilizing OpenInfobutton, an open source reference implementation of the HL7 Infobutton standard. ClinGen resources were assessed for readiness towards HL7 compliance. Finally, based upon our experiences we provide recommendations for publishers seeking to achieve HL7 compliance. Results Eight genomic resources and two sub-resources were integrated with the ClinGen search engine via OpenInfobutton and the HL7 infobutton standard. Resources we assessed have varying levels of readiness towards HL7-compliance. Furthermore, we found that adoption of standard terminologies used by EHR systems is the main gap to achieve compliance. Conclusion Genomic resources can be integrated with EHR systems via the HL7 Infobutton standard using OpenInfobutton. Full compliance of genomic resources with the Infobutton standard would further enhance interoperability with EHR systems. PMID:27579472

  8. Clinical decision support: the power behind the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Glaser, John

    2008-07-01

    There are six strategic objectives for promoting adoption of clinical decision support: Use a standardized format for representing clinical data and CDS interventions. Ensure appropriate access to clinical data and CDS interventions. Provide support and incentives for providers to use CDS. Disseminate information about best practices for system design, CDS delivery, and CDS implementation. Continue national demonstrations and evaluation of CDS use. Leverage data interchange between EHRs.

  9. What is Clinical Safety in Electronic Health Care Record Systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, George

    There is mounting public awareness of an increasing number of adverse clinical incidents within the National Health Service (NHS), but at the same time, large health care projects like the National Programme for IT (NPFIT) are claiming that safer care is one of the benefits of the project and that health software systems in particular have the potential to reduce the likelihood of accidental or unintentional harm to patients. This paper outlines the approach to clinical safety management taken by CSC, a major supplier to NPFIT; discusses acceptable levels of risk and clinical safety as an end-to-end concept; and touches on the future for clinical safety in health systems software.

  10. Correlation of Electronic Health Records Use and Reduced Prevalence of Diabetes Co-Morbidities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eller, James D.

    2013-01-01

    The general problem is Native American tribes have high prevalence rates of diabetes. The specific problem is the failure of IHS sites to adopt EHR may cause health care providers to miss critical opportunities to improve screening and triage processes that result in quality improvement. The purpose of the quantitative correlational study was to…

  11. Improving the effectiveness of electronic health record-based referral processes.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Adol; Sittig, Dean F; Murphy, Daniel R; Singh, Hardeep

    2012-09-13

    Electronic health records are increasingly being used to facilitate referral communication in the outpatient setting. However, despite support by technology, referral communication between primary care providers and specialists is often unsatisfactory and is unable to eliminate care delays. This may be in part due to lack of attention to how information and communication technology fits within the social environment of health care. Making electronic referral communication effective requires a multifaceted "socio-technical" approach. Using an 8-dimensional socio-technical model for health information technology as a framework, we describe ten recommendations that represent good clinical practices to design, develop, implement, improve, and monitor electronic referral communication in the outpatient setting. These recommendations were developed on the basis of our previous work, current literature, sound clinical practice, and a systems-based approach to understanding and implementing health information technology solutions. Recommendations are relevant to system designers, practicing clinicians, and other stakeholders considering use of electronic health records to support referral communication.

  12. 45 CFR 170.210 - Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for health information technology to... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION... FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Standards and Implementation Specifications for Health...

  13. 45 CFR 170.210 - Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for health information technology to... Welfare Department of Health and Human Services HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION... FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Standards and Implementation Specifications for Health...

  14. 45 CFR 170.210 - Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for health information technology to... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION... FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Standards and Implementation Specifications for Health...

  15. Process and Effects Evaluation of a Digital Mental Health Intervention Targeted at Improving Occupational Well-Being: Lessons From an Intervention Study With Failed Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Ermes, Miikka

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital interventions have the potential to serve as cost-effective ways to manage occupational stress and well-being. However, little is known about the adoption of individual-level digital interventions at organizations. Objectives The aim of this paper is to study the effects of an unguided digital mental health intervention in occupational well-being and the factors that influence the adoption of the intervention. Methods The intervention was based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and its aim was to teach skills for stress management and mental well-being. It was delivered via a mobile and a Web-based app that were offered to employees of two information and communication technology (ICT) companies. The primary outcome measures were perceived stress and work engagement, measured by a 1-item stress questionnaire (Stress) and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9). The intervention process was evaluated regarding the change mechanisms and intervention stages using mixed methods. The initial interviews were conducted face-to-face with human resource managers (n=2) of both companies in August 2013. The participants were recruited via information sessions and email invitations. The intervention period took place between November 2013 and March 2014. The participants were asked to complete online questionnaires at baseline, two months, and four months after the baseline measurement. The final phone interviews for the volunteer participants (n=17) and the human resource managers (n=2) were conducted in April to May 2014, five months after the baseline. Results Of all the employees, only 27 (8.1%, 27/332) took the app into use, with a mean use of 4.8 (SD 4.7) different days. In the beginning, well-being was on good level in both companies and no significant changes in well-being were observed. The activities of the intervention process failed to integrate the intervention into everyday activities at the workplace. Those who took the app into

  16. Electronic health in ghana: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Afarikumah, Ebenezer

    2014-01-01

    The health-care system in Ghana is similar to those in other developing countries and access to health services for remote communities is extremely limited. In July, 2010, the Government of Ghana launched the national e health strategy. A number of international organizations have initiated various pilot projects, including disseminating and collecting data, education initiatives and telemedicine. In addition, several institutions and organizations are dedicated to the promotion of e-health and a range of Web-based health consultancy services have begun. The main objective of this study is to provide an overview of eHealth activities in Ghana. It was a daunting task, not least because of the need to gather information on eHealth projects and initiatives in Ghana, as there is no existing repository of such information. Through literature search in Africa journals online, Hinari, Medline, Google.com, Journal of Telemedicine and e-Health, Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Journal of Medical Internet Research and Interaction with eHealth experts, followed up with some of the authors' for directions to other projects, and following the references in some articles. A total of twenty-two (22) pilot projects have been identified in Ghana. Mobile devices in use range from PDAs to simple phones and smart phones. The key findings of this research are that there are about 22 eHealth project at various stages of implementation in Ghana. Some of these projects have wind up and others are still being implemented. Mobile devices in use range from PDAs to simple mobile phones and smart phones. Most of the projects have been donor initiated. Data collection started in March 2010 to June 2013. Although eHealth seems to have a limited role in Ghana at present, there is growing interest in the opportunities it may offer in terms of improving the delivery and access to services, especially in remote locations. Recommendations for further research are provided.

  17. Health and physical function predicting strength and balance training adoption: a community-based study among individuals aged 75 and older.

    PubMed

    Aartolahti, Eeva; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Lönnroos, Eija; Häkkinen, Arja

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the characteristics of health and physical function that are associated with not starting strength and balance training (SBT). The study population consisted of 339 community-dwelling individuals (75-98 years, 72% female). As part of a population-based intervention study they received comprehensive geriatric assessment, physical activity counseling, and had the opportunity to take part in SBT at the gym once a week. Compared with the SBT-adopters, the nonadopters (n = 157, 46%) were older and less physically active, had more comorbidities and lower cognitive abilities, more often had sedative load of drugs or were at the risk of malnutrition, had lower grip strength and more instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) difficulties, and displayed weaker performance in Berg Balance Scale and Timed Up and Go assessments. In multivariate models, higher age, impaired cognition, and lower grip strength were independently associated with nonadoption. In the future, more individually-tailored interventions are needed to overcome the factors that prevent exercise initiation.

  18. A physician's role following a breach of electronic health information.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel; Schleiter, Kristin; Crigger, Bette-Jane; McMahon, John W; Benjamin, Regina M; Douglas, Sharon P

    2010-01-01

    The Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs of the American Medical Association examines physicians' professional ethical responsibility in the event that the security of patients' electronic records is breached.

  19. Adopted Children and Discipline

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families Media Work & Play ... Community Healthy Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Adoption & Foster Care > Adopted Children & Discipline Family Life Listen Español Text ...

  20. Analysis of diagnoses extracted from electronic health records in a large mental health case register

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Yevgeniya; Stewart, Robert; Broadbent, Matthew; Hubbard, Tim J. P.; Dobson, Richard J. B.

    2017-01-01

    The UK government has recently recognised the need to improve mental health services in the country. Electronic health records provide a rich source of patient data which could help policymakers to better understand needs of the service users. The main objective of this study is to unveil statistics of diagnoses recorded in the Case Register of the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, one of the largest mental health providers in the UK and Europe serving a source population of over 1.2 million people residing in south London. Based on over 500,000 diagnoses recorded in ICD10 codes for a cohort of approximately 200,000 mental health patients, we established frequency rate of each diagnosis (the ratio of the number of patients for whom a diagnosis has ever been recorded to the number of patients in the entire population who have made contact with mental disorders). We also investigated differences in diagnoses prevalence between subgroups of patients stratified by gender and ethnicity. The most common diagnoses in the considered population were (recurrent) depression (ICD10 codes F32-33; 16.4% of patients), reaction to severe stress and adjustment disorders (F43; 7.1%), mental/behavioural disorders due to use of alcohol (F10; 6.9%), and schizophrenia (F20; 5.6%). We also found many diagnoses which were more likely to be recorded in patients of a certain gender or ethnicity. For example, mood (affective) disorders (F31-F39); neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders (F40-F48, except F42); and eating disorders (F50) were more likely to be found in records of female patients, while males were more likely to be diagnosed with mental/behavioural disorders due to psychoactive substance use (F10-F19). Furthermore, mental/behavioural disorders due to use of alcohol and opioids were more likely to be recorded in patients of white ethnicity, and disorders due to use of cannabinoids in those of black ethnicity. PMID:28207753

  1. Disruptive Innovation: Implementation of Electronic Consultations in a Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Justice

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic consultations (e-consults) offer rapid access to specialist input without the need for a patient visit. E-consult implementation began in 2011 at VA Boston Healthcare System (VABHS). By early 2013, e-consults were available for all clinical services. In this implementation, the requesting clinician selects the desired consultation within the electronic health record (EHR) ordering menu, which creates an electronic form that is pre-populated with patient demographic information and allows free-text entry of the reason for consult. This triggers a message to the requesting clinician and requested specialty, thereby enabling bidirectional clinician-clinician communication. Objective The aim of this study is to examine the utilization of e-consults in a large Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system. Methods Data from the electronic health record was used to measure frequency of e-consult use by provider type (physician or nurse practitioner (NP) and/or physician assistant), and by the requesting and responding specialty from January 2012 to December 2013. We conducted chart reviews for a purposive sample of e-consults and semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of clinicians and hospital leaders to better characterize the process, challenges, and usability of e-consults. Results A total of 7097 e-consults were identified, 1998 from 2012 and 5099 from 2013. More than one quarter (27.56%, 1956/7097) of the e-consult requests originated from VA facilities in New England other than VABHS and were excluded from subsequent analysis. Within the VABHS e-consults (72.44%, 5141/7097), variability in frequency and use of e-consults across provider types and specialties was found. A total of 64 NPs requested 2407 e-consults (median 12.5, range 1-415). In contrast, 448 physicians (including residents and fellows) requested 2349 e-consults (median 2, range 1-116). More than one third (37.35%, 1920/5141) of e-consults were sent from primary care to

  2. Electronic retrieval of health information by healthcare providers to improve practice and patient care

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Jessie; Grad, Roland; Pluye, Pierre; Hannes, Karin; Deane, Katherine; Labrecque, Michel; Welch, Vivian; Tugwell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background The movement towards evidence-based practice makes explicit the need for access to current best evidence to improve health. Advances in electronic technologies have made health information more available, but does availability affect the rate of use of evidence in practice? Objectives To assess the effectiveness of interventions intended to provide electronic retrieval (access to information) to health information by healthcare providers to improve practice and patient care. Search methods We obtained studies from computerized searches of multiple electronic bibliographic databases, supplemented by checking reference lists, and consultation with experts. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including cluster randomized trials (CRCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCT), and interrupted time series analyses (ITS) of any language publication status examining interventions of effectiveness of electronic retrieval of health information by healthcare providers. Data collection and analysis Duplicate relevancy screening of searches, data abstraction and risk of bias assessment was undertaken. Main results We found two studies that examined this question. Neither study found any changes in professional behavior following an intervention that facilitated electronic retrieval of health information. There was some evidence of improvements in knowledge about the electronic sources of information reported in one study. Neither study assessed changes in patient outcomes or the costs of provision of the electronic resource and the implementation of the recommended evidence-based practices. Authors’ conclusions Overall there was insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of electronic retrieval of healthcare information by healthcare providers to improve practice and patient care. PMID:19588361

  3. Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities

    MedlinePlus

    ... multiple chronic conditions better manage their health care. Definitions Residential care communities : Includes assisted-living facilities and ... a unit or wing that met the above definition and residents could be enumerated separately. The 2010 ...

  4. Electronic health records in rheumatology: emphasis on automated scoring and additional use.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jutta G; Chehab, Gamal; Schneider, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records are increasingly used and frequently required from various regulatory authorities. Apart from their day-to-day use by health care professionals for routine clinical practice and/or the improvement of quality of care processes, patients with chronic inflammatory disease may become increasingly involved in the data retrieval process by self-monitoring and providing patient-reported (outcome) data. Among key features of electronic health records are automated scoring, visualisation of validated measures, and long-term systematic patient-centered data collection in a structured and standardised manner. Data derived from electronic health records are increasingly incorporated into patient-centered research, registries, and other secondary uses. Thus, electronic health records offer opportunities to improve knowledge and to create new process flows in rheumatology health care. The article summarises some of these opportunities in patient care, as well as an overview of secondary use scenarios. In addition, the article focuses on patients' active involvement in the disease management process via health information applications, reports on patients' perspectives, as well as some legal and regulatory matters concerning electronic health records.

  5. Building the electronic health sciences library for the twenty-first century: the Galter Library experience.

    PubMed

    Shedlock, J; Barkey, D C; Ross, F

    1996-01-01

    Constructing home pages for World-Wide Web access has become a major activity in academic health sciences libraries. At the Northwestern University, Galter Health Sciences Library staff are creating the library's new health information system using Web resources and integrating them with existing library systems-NUmed (OVID MEDLINE) and LUIS/NUcat (NOTIS). Development of Web pages, including selection and organization of electronic information, has become the building process for the electronic library. Selection, organization, design, and construction are important factors in the creation of an efficient and useful information system. Using resources like the World-Wide Web and tools like Netscape, library staff are designing an interface, defining policies and guidelines, and creating the tools that will give users easy access to local and international electronic, scholarly information resources. In this paper, the process used at Northwestern is shown as a model of an electronic health sciences library for the twenty-first century.

  6. A vision for the systematic monitoring and improvement of the quality of electronic health data.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brian E; Rosenman, Marc; Xia, Yuni; Grannis, Shaun J

    2013-01-01

    In parallel with the implementation of information and communications systems, health care organizations are beginning to amass large-scale repositories of clinical and administrative data. Many nations seek to leverage so-called Big Data repositories to support improvements in health outcomes, drug safety, health surveillance, and care delivery processes. An unsupported assumption is that electronic health care data are of sufficient quality to enable the varied use cases envisioned by health ministries. The reality is that many electronic health data sources are of suboptimal quality and unfit for particular uses. To more systematically define, characterize and improve electronic health data quality, we propose a novel framework for health data stewardship. The framework is adapted from prior data quality research outside of health, but it has been reshaped to apply a systems approach to data quality with an emphasis on health outcomes. The proposed framework is a beginning, not an end. We invite the biomedical informatics community to use and adapt the framework to improve health data quality and outcomes for populations in nations around the world.

  7. Archetype-based electronic health records: a literature review and evaluation of their applicability to health data interoperability and access.

    PubMed

    Wollersheim, Dennis; Sari, Anny; Rahayu, Wenny

    2009-01-01

    Health Information Managers (HIMs) are responsible for overseeing health information. The change management necessary during the transition to electronic health records (EHR) is substantial, and ongoing. Archetype-based EHRs are a core health information system component which solve many of the problems that arise during this period of change. Archetypes are models of clinical content, and they have many beneficial properties. They are interoperable, both between settings and through time. They are more amenable to change than conventional paradigms, and their design is congruent with clinical practice. This paper is an overview of the current archetype literature relevant to Health Information Managers. The literature was sourced in the English language sections of ScienceDirect, IEEE Explore, Pubmed, Google Scholar, ACM Digital library and other databases on the usage of archetypes for electronic health record storage, looking at the current areas of archetype research, appropriate usage, and future research. We also used reference lists from the cited papers, papers referenced by the openEHR website, and the recommendations from experts in the area. Criteria for inclusion were (a) if studies covered archetype research and (b) were either studies of archetype use, archetype system design, or archetype effectiveness. The 47 papers included show a wide and increasing worldwide archetype usage, in a variety of medical domains. Most of the papers noted that archetypes are an appropriate solution for future-proof and interoperable medical data storage. We conclude that archetypes are a suitable solution for the complex problem of electronic health record storage and interoperability.

  8. A semantic approach for digital long-term preservation of electronic health documents.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Stephan; Schäfer, Michael; Rauch, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Long-term preservation of electronic patient health information is a key issue for life-long electronic health records, however, it is poorly implemented in healthcare institutions and little attention is given to problems like obsolescence of formats and EHR applications or changing regulations, which jeopardize reusability of information after decades of preservation. We present in this paper an ontology driven approach to digital preservation and related metadata management which seems to be superior to conventional concepts of the digital library world.

  9. Health care and privacy law in electronic commerce.

    PubMed

    Wright, B

    1994-01-01

    As electronic data interchange (EDI) continues to gain acceptance and use, questions regarding protection of the confidentiality of private healthcare information have arisen. This article explains how a computer-based information system equipped with appropriate safeguards can be far better at ensuring privacy than a paper-based system.

  10. ICNP Catalogues for supporting nursing content in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Coenen, Amy; Kim, Tae Youn; Bartz, Claudia C; Jansen, Kay; Hardiker, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe sets of nursing concepts including, for example, nursing diagnoses and interventions, which are knowledge-based and clinically relevant to support nursing practice. Health information systems using the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) provide a platform for standardized nursing documentation for patients' health care, clinical decision support, and repositories for re-use of clinical data for quality evaluation, research, management decisions and policy development. Clinically relevant sets of ICNP concepts can facilitate implementation of health information systems for nursing. Descriptive analysis was used to examine the types of, and relationships among, existing nursing content sets. Findings included the need for various types of content sets, as represented in ICNP catalogues, for nursing documentation. Five types of ICNP Catalogues included Care Plans, Order Sets, Clinical Templates, Nursing Minimum Data Sets, and Terminology Subsets.

  11. Adoption law: a district nurse's guide.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2011-04-01

    The Government wants to see a large rise in the use of adoption as a means of giving children a secure, loving and permanent home. Guidance coming into effect from April calls for a more pragmatic approach to adoption placements, and calls for the active promotion of the adoption process by health and social care professionals. District nurses will encounter people interested in becoming prospective adopters, but who are unsure if their background or lifestyle makes them eligible. It is essential that district nurses have a working understanding of the guidance and provisions of the Adoption and Children Act 2002 to confidently advise others about adoption and clarify any issues raised.

  12. Stakeholder engagement: a key component of integrating genomic information into electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Hartzler, Andrea; McCarty, Catherine A.; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Williams, Marc S.; Brilliant, Murray; Bowton, Erica A.; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Faucett, William A.; Ferryman, Kadija; Field, Julie R.; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Horowitz, Carol R.; Koenig, Barbara A.; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Ralston, James D.; Sanderson, Saskia C.; Smith, Maureen E.; Trinidad, Susan Brown

    2014-01-01

    Integrating genomic information into clinical care and the electronic health record can facilitate personalized medicine through genetically guided clinical decision support. Stakeholder involvement is critical to the success of these implementation efforts. Prior work on implementation of clinical information systems provides broad guidance to inform effective engagement strategies. We add to this evidence-based recommendations that are specific to issues at the intersection of genomics and the electronic health record. We describe stakeholder engagement strategies employed by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network, a national consortium of US research institutions funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute to develop, disseminate, and apply approaches that combine genomic and electronic health record data. Through select examples drawn from sites of the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network, we illustrate a continuum of engagement strategies to inform genomic integration into commercial and homegrown electronic health records across a range of health-care settings. We frame engagement as activities to consult, involve, and partner with key stakeholder groups throughout specific phases of health information technology implementation. Our aim is to provide insights into engagement strategies to guide genomic integration based on our unique network experiences and lessons learned within the broader context of implementation research in biomedical informatics. On the basis of our collective experience, we describe key stakeholder practices, challenges, and considerations for successful genomic integration to support personalized medicine. PMID:24030437

  13. Use of Electronic Health Records by Nurses for Symptom Management in Inpatient Settings: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ozkaynak, Mustafa; Reeder, Blaine; Hoffecker, Lilian; Makic, Mary Beth; Sousa, Karen

    2017-02-25

    Symptom management is one of the essential functions of nurses in inpatient settings; yet, little is understood about the manner in which nurses use electronic health records for symptom documentation. Therefore, the purpose of this systematic review is to characterize nurses' use of electronic health records for documentation of symptom assessment and management in inpatient settings, to inform design studies that better support electronic health records for patient symptom management by nurses. We searched the Ovid Medline (1946-current), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (EBSCO, 1981-current), and Excerpta Medica Database (Embase.com, 1974-current) databases from inception through May 2015 using multiple subject headings and "free text" key words, representing the concepts of electronic medical records, symptom documentation, and inpatient setting. One thousand nine hundred eighty-two articles were returned from the search. Eighteen publications from the years 2003 to 2014 were included after abstract and full text review. Studies heavily focused on a pain as symptom. Nurses face challenges when using electronic health records that can threaten quality and safety of care. Clinical, design, and administrative recommendations were identified to overcome the challenges of nurses' electronic health record use. A call for interdisciplinary, comprehensive, systematic interventions and user-centered design of information systems is needed.

  14. The Family of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavao, Joyce Maguire

    This book aims to provide a broad framework within which to think about adoption as a whole system, so that everyone involved will learn to feel some empathy for the other members of the adoption process. The book, written by a family and adoption therapist who was adopted as an infant, describes predictable developmental stages and challenges for…

  15. 78 FR 4151 - Medicare Program; Request for Information on Hospital and Vendor Readiness for Electronic Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... Hospital and Vendor Readiness for Electronic Health Records Hospital Inpatient Quality Data Reporting... questions regarding their readiness to conduct electronic reporting of certain patient-level data under the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program using the Quality Reporting Document Architecture...

  16. Early Experiences with Mobile Electronic Health Records Application in a Tertiary Hospital in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minah; Hong, Eunseok; Kim, Sunhyu; Ahn, Ryeok; Hong, Jungseok; Song, Seungyeol; Kim, Tak; Kim, Jeongkeun; Yeo, Seongwoon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recent advances in mobile technology have opened up possibilities to provide strongly integrated mobile-based services in healthcare and telemedicine. Although the number of mobile Electronic Health Record (EHR) applications is large and growing, there is a paucity of evidence demonstrating the usage patterns of these mobile applications by healthcare providers. This study aimed to illustrate the deployment process for an integrated mobile EHR application and to analyze usage patterns after provision of the mobile EHR service. Methods We developed an integrated mobile application that aimed to enhance the mobility of healthcare providers by improving access to patient- and hospital-related information during their daily medical activities. The study included mobile EHR users who accessed patient healthcare records between May 2013 and May 2014. We performed a data analysis using a web server log file analyzer from the integrated EHR system. Cluster analysis was applied to longitudinal user data based on their application usage pattern. Results The mobile EHR service named M-UMIS has been in service since May 2013. Every healthcare provider in the hospital could access the mobile EHR service and view the medical charts of their patients. The frequency of using services and network packet transmission on the M-UMIS increased gradually during the study period. The most frequently accessed service in the menu was the patient list. Conclusions A better understanding regarding the adoption of mobile EHR applications by healthcare providers in patient-centered care provides useful information to guide the design and implementation of future applications. PMID:26618036

  17. Unintended adverse consequences of electronic health record introduction to a mature universal HIV screening program.

    PubMed

    Medford-Davis, Laura N; Yang, Katharine; Pasalar, Siavash; Pillow, M Tyson; Miertschin, Nancy P; Peacock, William F; Giordano, Thomas P; Hoxhaj, Shkelzen

    2016-01-01

    Early HIV detection and treatment decreases morbidity and mortality and reduces high-risk behaviors. Many Emergency Departments (EDs) have HIV screening programs as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recent federal legislation includes incentives for electronic health record (EHR) adoption. Our objective was to analyze the impact of conversion to EHR on a mature ED-based HIV screening program. A retrospective pre- and post-EHR implementation cohort study was conducted in a large urban, academic ED. Medical records were reviewed for HIV screening rates from August 2008 through October 2013. On 1 November 2010, a comprehensive EHR system was implemented throughout the hospital. Before EHR implementation, labs were requested by providers by paper orders with HIV-1/2 automatically pre-selected on every form. This universal ordering protocol was not duplicated in the new EHR; rather it required a provider to manually enter the order. Using a chi-squared test, we compared HIV testing in the 6 months before and after EHR implementation; 55,054 patients presented before, and 50,576 after EHR implementation. Age, sex, race, acuity of presenting condition, and HIV seropositivity rates were similar pre- and post-EHR, and there were no major patient or provider changes during this period. Average HIV testing rate was 37.7% of all ED patients pre-, and 22.3% post-EHR, a 41% decline (p < 0.0001), leading to 167 missed new diagnoses after EHR. The rate of HIV screening in the ED decreased after EHR implementation, and could have been improved with more thoughtful inclusion of existing human processes in its design.

  18. We are bitter, but we are better off: case study of the implementation of an electronic health record system into a mental health hospital in England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In contrast to the acute hospital sector, there have been relatively few implementations of integrated electronic health record (EHR) systems into specialist mental health settings. The National Programme for Information Technology (NPfIT) in England was the most expensive IT-based transformation of public services ever undertaken, which aimed amongst other things, to implement integrated EHR systems into mental health hospitals. This paper describes the arrival, the process of implementation, stakeholders’ experiences and the local consequences of the implementation of an EHR system into a mental health hospital. Methods Longitudinal, real-time, case study-based evaluation of the implementation and adoption of an EHR software (RiO) into an English mental health hospital known here as Beta. We conducted 48 in-depth interviews with a wide range of internal and external stakeholders, undertook 26 hours of on-site observations, and obtained 65 sets of relevant documents from various types relating to Beta. Analysis was both inductive and deductive, the latter being informed by the ‘sociotechnical changing’ theoretical framework. Results Many interviewees perceived the implementation of the EHR system as challenging and cumbersome. During the early stages of the implementation, some clinicians felt that using the software was time-consuming leading to the conclusion that the EHR was not fit for purpose. Most interviewees considered the chain of deployment of the EHR–which was imposed by NPfIT–as bureaucratic and obstructive, which restricted customization and as a result limited adoption and use. The low IT literacy among users at Beta was a further barrier to the implementation of the EHR. This along with inadequate training in using the EHR software led to resistance to the significant cultural and work environment changes initiated by EHR. Despite the many challenges, Beta achieved some early positive results. These included: the ability to

  19. The Centers For Medicare And Medicaid Services Electronic Health Records for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Brett

    2012-06-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Electronic Health Records (EHR) incentive program for hospitals is described with respect to the requirements to receive the incentive payments, how to calculate the amount, and the pertinent time frames. Comparisons between the CMS EHR and Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) are presented. The hallmarks of successful computerized health records are reviewed.

  20. Examining the Relationship between Electronic Health Record Interoperability and Quality Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Bernice M.

    2013-01-01

    A lack of interoperability impairs data quality among health care providers' electronic health record (EHR) systems. The problem is whether the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9000 principles relate to the problem of interoperability in implementation of EHR systems. The purpose of the nonexperimental quantitative research…