Science.gov

Sample records for adopted software technology

  1. A Study of Performance and Effort Expectancy Factors among Generational and Gender Groups to Predict Enterprise Social Software Technology Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Sunil S.

    2013-01-01

    Social software technology has gained considerable popularity over the last decade and has had a great impact on hundreds of millions of people across the globe. Businesses have also expressed their interest in leveraging its use in business contexts. As a result, software vendors and business consumers have invested billions of dollars to use…

  2. Building Adoption of Visual Analytics Software

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchor, Nancy; Cook, Kristin A.; Scholtz, Jean

    2012-01-05

    Adoption of technology is always difficult. Issues such as having the infrastructure necessary to support the technology, training for users, integrating the technology into current processes and tools, and having the time, managerial support, and necessary funds need to be addressed. In addition to these issues, the adoption of visual analytics tools presents specific challenges that need to be addressed. This paper discusses technology adoption challenges and approaches for visual analytics technologies.

  3. The Decision-Adoption of Software Currency and Specificity Levels: A Quantitative Study of Information Technology (IT) Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somsen, W. Randy

    2009-01-01

    IT educators and learners are continually challenged to adapt to software changes and remain current in software applications. This study researched if it is necessary for IT educators to prepare IT students in the most current software releases--i.e., at the highest software currency preparation level and in the same software application that the…

  4. Scientific Software Component Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively

  5. Technology Adoption: an Interaction Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitorus, Hotna M.; Govindaraju, Rajesri; Wiratmadja, I. I.; Sudirman, Iman

    2016-02-01

    The success of a new technology depends on how well it is accepted by its intended users. Many technologies face the problem of low adoption rate, despite the benefits. An understanding of what makes people accept or reject a new technology can help speed up the adoption rate. This paper presents a framework for technology adoption based on an interactive perspective, resulting from a literature study on technology adoption. In studying technology adoption, it is necessary to consider the interactions among elements involved in the system, for these interactions may generate new characteristics or new relationships. The interactions among elements in a system adoption have not received sufficient consideration in previous studies of technology adoption. Based on the proposed interaction perspective, technology adoption is elaborated by examining interactions among the individual (i.e. the user or prospective user), the technology, the task and the environment. The framework is formulated by adopting several theories, including Perceived Characteristics of Innovating, Diffusion of Innovation Theory, Technology Acceptance Model, Task-Technology Fit and usability theory. The proposed framework is illustrated in the context of mobile banking adoption. It is aimed to offer a better understanding of determinants of technology adoption in various contexts, including technology in manufacturing systems.

  6. Process Acceptance and Adoption by IT Software Project Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardado, Deana R.

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the question of what factors determine acceptance and adoption of processes in the context of Information Technology (IT) software development projects. This specific context was selected because processes required for managing software development projects are less prescriptive than in other, more straightforward, IT…

  7. The Effect of Software Features on Software Adoption and Training in the Audit Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyo-Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Although software has been studied with technology adoption and training research, the study of specific software features for professional groups has been limited. To address this gap, I researched the impact of software features of varying complexity on internal audit (IA) professionals. Two studies along with the development of training…

  8. Payload software technology: Software technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Programmatic requirements for the advancement of software technology are identified for meeting the space flight requirements in the 1980 to 1990 time period. The development items are described, and software technology item derivation worksheets are presented along with the cost/time/priority assessments.

  9. Payload software technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A software analysis was performed of known STS sortie payload elements and their associated experiments. This provided basic data for STS payload software characteristics and sizes. A set of technology drivers was identified based on a survey of future technology needs and an assessment of current software technology. The results will be used to evolve a planned approach to software technology development. The purpose of this plan is to ensure that software technology is advanced at a pace and a depth sufficient to fulfill the identified future needs.

  10. Adopting software quality measures for healthcare processes.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ozkan; Demirörs, Onur

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the adoptability of software quality measures for healthcare process measurement. Quality measures of ISO/IEC 9126 are redefined from a process perspective to build a generic healthcare process quality measurement model. Case study research method is used, and the model is applied to a public hospital's Entry to Care process. After the application, weak and strong aspects of the process can be easily observed. Access audibility, fault removal, completeness of documentation, and machine utilization are weak aspects and these aspects are the candidates for process improvement. On the other hand, functional completeness, fault ratio, input validity checking, response time, and throughput time are the strong aspects of the process.

  11. Reusable Software Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Timothy E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the Reusable Software System (RSS) is to provide NASA Langley Research Center and its contractor personnel with a reusable software technology through the Internet. The RSS is easily accessible, provides information that is extractable, and the capability to submit information or data for the purpose of scientific research at NASA Langley Research Center within the Atmospheric Science Division.

  12. Software productivity improvement through software engineering technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been estimated that NASA expends anywhere from 6 to 10 percent of its annual budget on the acquisition, implementation and maintenance of computer software. Although researchers have produced numerous software engineering approaches over the past 5-10 years; each claiming to be more effective than the other, there is very limited quantitative information verifying the measurable impact htat any of these technologies may have in a production environment. At NASA/GSFC, an extended research effort aimed at identifying and measuring software techniques that favorably impact productivity of software development, has been active over the past 8 years. Specific, measurable, software development technologies have been applied and measured in a production environment. Resulting software development approaches have been shown to be effective in both improving quality as well as productivity in this one environment.

  13. Course Management Software Adoption: A Diffusion of Innovations Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmon, Carol; Fagan, Mary Helen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the adoption of course management software (CMS) among faculty in a nursing program in order to better understand the consequences that result from adoption decisions. Design/methodology/approach: A case study approach was taken using a component of diffusion of innovations theory as a framework for…

  14. Software Engineering Technology Infusion Within NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this paper, several software engineering technologies used within NASA are studied, and the mechanisms, schedules, and efforts at transferring these technologies are investigated. The goals of this study are: 1) to understand the difference between technology transfer (the adoption of a new method by large segments of an industry) as an industry-wide phenomenon and the adoption of a new technology by an individual organization (called technology infusion); and 2) to see if software engineering technology transfer differs from other engineering disciplines. While there is great interest today in developing technology transfer models for industry, it is the technology infusion process that actually causes changes in the current state of the practice.

  15. Open Source Software (OSS) Adoption Framework for Local Environment and its Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laila, U.; Bukhari, S. F. A.

    According to Business Software Alliance (BSA) Pakistan is ranked in the top 10 countries having highest piracy rate [1]. To overcome the problem of piracy local Information Technology (IT) companies are willing to migrate towards Open Source Software (OSS). Due to this reason need for framework/model for OSS adoption has become more pronounced.

  16. Factors Influencing Micro-Enterprises' Information Technology Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Changsoo

    2014-01-01

    Public and non-profit organizations are operating different types of programs to help micro-enterprises appropriately adopt and utilize information technology (IT) for their businesses. Some programs provide mentoring or consultation services; some simply deliver discounted hardware and software; and some offer training services. However, it is…

  17. CASE: Software design technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyanov, G.N.

    1994-05-01

    CASE (Computer-Aided Software Engineering) is a set of methodologies for software design, development, and maintenance supported by a complex of interconnected automation tools. CASE is a set of tools for the programmer, analyst, and developer for the automation of software design and development. Today, CASE has become an independent discipline in software engineering that has given rise to a powerful CASE industry made up of hundreds of firms and companies of various kinds. They include companies that develop tools for software analysis and design and have a wide network of distributors and dealers, firms that develop specialized tools for narrow subject areas or for individual stages of the software life cycle, firms that organize seminars and courses for specialists, consulting firms, which demonstrate the practical power of CASE toolkits for specific applications, and companies specializing in the publication of periodicals and bulletins on CASE. The principal purchasers of CASE toolkits abroad are military organizations, data-processing centers, and commercial software developers.

  18. Examining Teachers' Decisions to Adopt New Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, William; Crawley, Frank; Fine, Bethann

    2004-01-01

    This study examined teachers' beliefs about technology adoption as a reasoned, deliberate, intentional decision-making process, as reflected in Ajzen's (1985) Theory of Planned Behavior. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from teachers in four schools located in the southeastern region of the United States. Overall results indicated…

  19. Adopting Learning Technologies: From Belief to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bothma, Cornelius H.; Cant, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge faced by most heads of academic departments around the world is to manage the adoption and use of appropriate learning technologies in order to support the department's learning offerings to students. Earlier research undertaken by the authors revealed that lecturers within the Department of Marketing and Retail Management at the…

  20. Software technology insertion: A study of success factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lydon, Tom

    1990-01-01

    Managing software development in large organizations has become increasingly difficult due to increasing technical complexity, stricter government standards, a shortage of experienced software engineers, competitive pressure for improved productivity and quality, the need to co-develop hardware and software together, and the rapid changes in both hardware and software technology. The 'software factory' approach to software development minimizes risks while maximizing productivity and quality through standardization, automation, and training. However, in practice, this approach is relatively inflexible when adopting new software technologies. The methods that a large multi-project software engineering organization can use to increase the likelihood of successful software technology insertion (STI), especially in a standardized engineering environment, are described.

  1. Adoption of information technology by resident physicians.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Selene G; Nazarian, David G; Lim, Charles K

    2004-04-01

    The Internet represents a technological revolution that is transforming our society. In the healthcare industry, physicians have been typified as slow adopters of information technology. However, young physicians, having been raised in a computer-prevalent society, may be more likely to embrace technology. We attempt to characterize the use and acceptance of the Internet and information technology among resident physicians in a large academic medical center and to assess concerns regarding privacy, security, and credibility of information on the Internet. A 41-question survey was distributed to 150 pediatric, medical, and surgical residents at an urban, academic medical center. One hundred thirty-five residents completed the survey (response rate of 90%). Responses were evaluated and statistical analysis was done. The majority of resident physicians in our survey have adopted the tools of information technology. Ninety-eight percent used the Internet and 96% use e-mail. Two-thirds of the respondents used the Internet for healthcare-related purposes and a similar percentage thought that the Internet has affected their practice of medicine positively. The majority of residents thought that Internet healthcare services such as electronic medical records, peer-support websites, and remote patient monitoring would be beneficial for the healthcare industry. However, they are concerned about the credibility, privacy, and security of health and medical information online. The majority of resident physicians in our institution use Internet and information technology in their practice of medicine. Most think that the Internet will continue to have a beneficial role in the healthcare industry.

  2. Characterisation of adopters and non-adopters of dairy technologies in Ethiopia and Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kebebe, E G; Oosting, S J; Baltenweck, I; Duncan, A J

    2017-04-01

    While there is a general consensus that using dairy technologies, such as improved breeds of dairy cows, can substantially increase farm productivity and income, adoption of such technologies has been generally low in developing countries. The underlying reasons for non-adoption of beneficial technologies in the dairy sector are not fully understood. In this study, we characterised adopters and non-adopters of dairy technologies in Ethiopia and Kenya based on farmers' resources ownership in order to identify why many farmers in Ethiopia and Kenya have not adopted improved dairy technologies. As compared to non-adopters, farmers who adopt dairy technology own relatively more farm resources. The result signals that differences in resource endowments could lead to divergent technology adoption scenarios. Results show that a higher proportion of sample smallholders in Kenya have adopted dairy technologies than those in Ethiopia. Except for the use of veterinary services, fewer than 10% of sample farmers in Ethiopia have adopted dairy technologies-less than half the number of adopters in Kenya. The higher level of dairy technology adoption in Kenya can be ascribed partly to the long history of dairy development, including improvements in the value chain for the delivery of inputs, services and fluid milk marketing. Interventions that deal with the constraints related to access to farm resources and input and output markets could facilitate uptake of dairy technology in developing countries.

  3. 75 FR 10439 - Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios AGENCY: Federal... implement security features in software defined radios (SDRs). While, the Commission dismisses this petition... Order 1. On March 17, 2005, the Commission adopted the Cognitive Radio Report and Order, 70 FR...

  4. Understanding Technology Adoption: Theory and Future Directions for Informal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straub, Evan T.

    2009-01-01

    How and why individuals adopt innovations has motivated a great deal of research. This article examines individuals' computing adoption processes through the lenses of three adoption theories: Rogers's innovation diffusion theory, the Concerns-Based Adoption Model, the Technology Acceptance Model, and the United Theory of Acceptance and Use of…

  5. An Empirically Grounded Model of the Adoption of Intellectual Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    1992-01-01

    Data on adoption of 43 user-developed computing applications in 3 large corporations were analyzed to develop an empirically grounded model of the adoption process for intellectual technologies. A five-stage model consisting of Resource Acquisition, Application Development, Adoption/Renewal, Routinization/Enhancement, and External Adoption was…

  6. Software engineering technology transfer: Understanding the process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1993-01-01

    Technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this report, the mechanisms developed by NASA to transfer technology are explored and the actual mechanisms used to transfer software development technologies are investigated. Time, cost, and effectiveness of software engineering technology transfer is reported.

  7. Software Component Technologies and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batory, Don

    1995-01-01

    In the near future, software systems will be more reconfigurable than hardware. This will be possible through the advent of software component technologies which have been prototyped in universities and research labs. In this paper, we outline the foundations for those technologies and suggest how they might impact software for space applications.

  8. An Exploratory Study of Adoption of Course Management Software and Accompanying Instructional Changes by Faculty in the Liberal Arts and Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yohon, Teresa; Zimmerman, Don; Keeler, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    The study investigated liberal arts and science faculty's (1) overall adoption of WebCT, a course management software, (2) use of different WebCT functions, (3) perceptions of technology's impact on teaching, and (4) demographic factors that might explain the differences between WebCT adopters and non-adopters. Only 37% of respondents reported…

  9. Mobile technology and healthcare: the adoption issues and systemic problems.

    PubMed

    Standing, Susan; Standing, Craig

    2008-01-01

    Although the benefits that are associated with mobile technology have been recognised as offering great potential in the healthcare sector, its widespread adoption has been lagging. We propose that fundamental systemic issues are likely to be the main barriers to adoption. We explain that the fragmented nature of the conservative healthcare system, the contradictory incentives and improper outcome measures conspire to make the innovative adoption of mobile technology problematic. Researchers can only gain a limited understanding of a technology's potential success by using technology adoption frameworks and need to supplement this with a 'systems' perspective that takes a more strategic view.

  10. Software Technology Readiness for the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Tugurlan, Maria C.; Kirkham, Harold; Chassin, David P.

    2011-06-13

    Abstract Budget and schedule overruns in product development due to the use of immature technologies constitute an important matter for program managers. Moreover, unexpected lack of technology maturity is also a problem for buyers. Both sides of the situation would benefit from an unbiased measure of technology maturity. This paper presents the use of a software maturity metric called Technology Readiness Level (TRL), in the milieu of the smart grid. For most of the time they have been in existence, power utilities have been protected monopolies, guaranteed a return on investment on anything they could justify adding to the rate base. Such a situation did not encourage innovation, and instead led to widespread risk-avoidance behavior in many utilities. The situation changed at the end of the last century, with a series of regulatory measures, beginning with the Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act of 1978. However, some bad experiences have actually served to strengthen the resistance to innovation by some utilities. Some aspects of the smart grid, such as the addition of computer-based control to the power system, face an uphill battle. It is our position that the addition of TRLs to the decision-making process for smart grid power-system projects, will lead to an environment of more confident adoption.

  11. Preservice Teachers' Intention to Adopt Technology in Their Future Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Kun; Li, Yanju; Franklin, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    This study examined four factors that influence preservice teachers' intentions to adopt technology in classrooms based on the Theory of Planned Behavior and Technology Acceptance Model. These four factors--technology self-efficacy, attitudes toward technology, perceived ease of use of technology, and perceived barriers of technology…

  12. Environmental Justice and Green-Technology Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of an environmental justice (EJ) program adopted by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) as a part of its regulation to phase out a toxic chemical used by dry cleaners. SCAQMD provided financial incentives to switch early and gave establishments in EJ neighborhoods priority in applying for…

  13. Technology Adoption of Medical Faculty in Teaching: Differentiating Factors in Adopter Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayim, Nese; Yildirim, Soner; Saka, Osman

    2006-01-01

    Despite large investments by higher education institutions in technology for faculty and student use, instructional technology is not being integrated into instruction in higher education institutions including medical education institutions. While the diffusion of instructional technologies has reached a saturation point among early adopters of…

  14. The State and Pattern of Health Information Technology Adoption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Innovations in information technology (IT) have improved efficiency and quality in many industries. Healthcare has not been one of them. Although...has been called for to speed the adoption process for Health Information Technology (HIT), based on the widespread belief that its adoption, or

  15. Factors Influencing Cloud-Computing Technology Adoption in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailu, Alemayehu

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of new technology has complicating components both from the selection, as well as decision-making criteria and process. Although new technology such as cloud computing provides great benefits especially to the developing countries, it has challenges that may complicate the selection decision and subsequent adoption process. This study…

  16. Public Policy, Technology Adoption, and Aggregate Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, W.; Kopp, R.J.; Morgenstern, R.D.; Pizer, W.A.; Shih, J.S.

    1999-04-01

    This research examines the factors that influence the adoption of new energy-saving technologies among U.S. manufacturing plants and explores their potential impact on aggregate energy efficiency. We conduct this analysis using two models: a conventional diffusion model and a stand-alone model of new technology adoption we develop in this paper. The latter model allows us to compute effects on aggregate efficiency based solely on adoption data.

  17. Approaching hospital administration about adopting cooling technologies.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Lisa L; Parham, William M; Pastores, Stephen M

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide intensivists with information and examples regarding cooling technology selection, cost assessment, adaptation, barriers, and presentation to hospital administrators. A review of medical and business literature was conducted using the following search terms: technology assessment, organizational innovation, intensive care, critical care, hospital administration, and presentation to administrators. General recommendations for intensivists are made for assessing cooling technology with descriptions of common new technology implementation stages. A study of 16 hospitals implementing a new cardiac surgery technology is described. A description of successful implementation of an induced hypothermia protocol by one of the authors is presented. Although knowledgeable about the applications of new technologies, including cooling technology, intensivists have little guidance or training on tactics to obtain a hospital administration's funding and support. Intensive care unit budgets are usually controlled by nonintensivists whose interests are neutral, at best, to the needs of intensivists. To rise to the top of the large pile of requisition requests, an intensivist's proposal must be well conceived and aligned with hospital administration's strategic goals. Intensivists must understand the hospital acquisition process and administrative structure and participate on high-level hospital committees. Using design thinking and strong leadership skills, the intensivist can marshal support from staff and administrators to successfully implement cooling technology.

  18. Technology Adoption: Influence of Availability and Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, William Stewart

    2009-01-01

    Farmers are small business leaders using available technology to remain competitive. The availability of technology is dependent on the suppliers' use of the marketing mix 4Ps theory--product, price, placement, and promotion. The purpose of this study was to determine how the relation between availability and accessibility influences the adoption…

  19. Open Source Software in Medium Size Organizations: Key Factors for Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Jerry T.

    2010-01-01

    For-profit organizations are constantly evaluating new technologies to gain competitive advantage. One such technology, application software, has changed significantly over the past 25 years with the introduction of Open Source Software (OSS). In contrast to commercial software that is developed by private companies and sold to organizations, OSS…

  20. Information Technology Diffusion: A Comparative Case Study of Intranet Adoption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    Information Technology Diffusion: A Comparative Case Study of Intranet Adoption George A. Zolla Jr. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943...unfreezing”. Cooper and Zmud [4] defined IT implementation as “an organizational effort directed toward diffusing appropriate information technology within a...1999 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Information Technology Diffusion: A Comparative Case Study of Intranet Adoption 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  1. Factors influencing adoption of manure separation technology in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Gebrezgabher, Solomie A; Meuwissen, Miranda P M; Kruseman, Gideon; Lakner, Dora; Oude Lansink, Alfons G J M

    2015-03-01

    Manure separation technologies are essential for sustainable livestock operations in areas with high livestock density as these technologies result in better utilization of manure and reduced environmental impact. Technologies for manure separation have been well researched and are ready for use. Their use, however, has been limited to the Netherlands. This paper investigates the role of farm and farmer characteristics and farmers' attitudes toward technology-specific attributes in influencing the likelihood of the adoption of mechanical manure separation technology. The analysis used survey data collected from 111 Dutch dairy farmers in 2009. The results showed that the age and education level of the farmer and farm size are important variables explaining the likelihood of adoption. In addition to farm and farmer characteristics, farmers' attitudes toward the different attributes of manure separation technology significantly affect the likelihood of adoption. The study generates useful information for policy makers, technology developers and distributors in identifying the factors that impact decision-making behaviors of farmers.

  2. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Adoption KidsHealth > For Teens > Adoption Print A A A ... of Adoption en español La adopción What Is Adoption? Caz knew she'd been adopted as a ...

  3. Exploring the Adoption of Instructional Technologies: The Mainstream Faculty Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Leslie C.

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades the adoption of digital technologies has grown from a few elite users to influencing and impacting almost all of modem society. Higher education is one area of society where digital technologies have become embedded in its instructional practices because digital technologies can enhance student engagement with innovative…

  4. Generational Differences in Technology Adoption in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario, Victoria C.

    2012-01-01

    This research study investigated the technological perceptions and expectations of community college students, faculty, administrators, and Information Technology (IT) staff. The theoretical framework is based upon two assumptions on the process of technological innovation: it can be explained by diffusion of adoption theory, and by studying the…

  5. Categories for Barriers to Adoption of Instructional Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Although higher education has spent millions of dollars on instructional technologies, often higher education administration complains that instructors are not adopting them. Without a full understanding of possible barriers, higher education institutes are hard-pressed to develop either appropriate goals or sound strategies for the adoption of…

  6. Information Technology Adoption and Procedural Performance in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Yunfeng

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation studies two specific topics on information technologies in health care industry. (1) The status and change of integrated health care delivery system level IT spending and hospital level IT adoption between 1999 and 2006. (2) The potential link between hospital level IT adoptions and quality as quantified by procedural performance…

  7. Benefits and Financial Impacts of Adopting Technology in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenman, Katri; Isomursu, Minna; Federley, Maija; Seisto, Anu

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an analysis of the impacts of adopting information and communication technology (ICT) solutions in a learning context. The analysis is based on a literature survey of articles reporting research cases studying the impact of adopting ICT based solutions in various learning contexts. The subject has been reviewed…

  8. Bridging the gap between sustainable technology adoption and protecting natural resources: Predicting intentions to adopt energy management technologies in California

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Bingye; Sintov, Nicole

    2016-10-24

    To achieve energy savings, emerging energy management technologies and programs require customer adoption. Although a variety of models can be used to explain the adoption of energy management technologies and programs, they overlook the seemingly unconventional element of level of affiliation with nature. In fact, connectedness to nature has been identified as an important driver of many pro-environmental behaviors, but its role in pro-environmental technology adoption is also not well understood. Can affiliation with nature help to bridge the apparent gap—and complex chain of events—between sustainable technology adoption and protecting natural resources? Based on survey data from 856 southern Californiamore » residents, this study investigated the influence of connectedness to nature and other factors on intentions to adopt five energy management technologies and programs: using three platforms to monitor home energy use (website, mobile phone application, in-home display); signing up for a time-of-use pricing plan; and participating in demand response events. Regression results showed that nature connectedness was the strongest predictor of all outcomes such that higher nature connectedness predicted greater likelihood of technology and program adoption. In conclusion, these findings suggest that connectedness to nature may facilitate “bridging the logic gap” between sustainable innovation adoption and environmental protection.« less

  9. Bridging the gap between sustainable technology adoption and protecting natural resources: Predicting intentions to adopt energy management technologies in California

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bingye; Sintov, Nicole

    2016-10-24

    To achieve energy savings, emerging energy management technologies and programs require customer adoption. Although a variety of models can be used to explain the adoption of energy management technologies and programs, they overlook the seemingly unconventional element of level of affiliation with nature. In fact, connectedness to nature has been identified as an important driver of many pro-environmental behaviors, but its role in pro-environmental technology adoption is also not well understood. Can affiliation with nature help to bridge the apparent gap—and complex chain of events—between sustainable technology adoption and protecting natural resources? Based on survey data from 856 southern California residents, this study investigated the influence of connectedness to nature and other factors on intentions to adopt five energy management technologies and programs: using three platforms to monitor home energy use (website, mobile phone application, in-home display); signing up for a time-of-use pricing plan; and participating in demand response events. Regression results showed that nature connectedness was the strongest predictor of all outcomes such that higher nature connectedness predicted greater likelihood of technology and program adoption. In conclusion, these findings suggest that connectedness to nature may facilitate “bridging the logic gap” between sustainable innovation adoption and environmental protection.

  10. Privacy Attitudes among Early Adopters of Emerging Health Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Cynthia; Bietz, Matthew J.; Patrick, Kevin; Bloss, Cinnamon S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Advances in health technology such as genome sequencing and wearable sensors now allow for the collection of highly granular personal health data from individuals. It is unclear how people think about privacy in the context of these emerging health technologies. An open question is whether early adopters of these advances conceptualize privacy in different ways than non-early adopters. Purpose This study sought to understand privacy attitudes of early adopters of emerging health technologies. Methods Transcripts from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with early adopters of genome sequencing and health devices and apps were analyzed with a focus on participant attitudes and perceptions of privacy. Themes were extracted using inductive content analysis. Results Although interviewees were willing to share personal data to support scientific advancements, they still expressed concerns, as well as uncertainty about who has access to their data, and for what purpose. In short, they were not dismissive of privacy risks. Key privacy-related findings are organized into four themes as follows: first, personal data privacy; second, control over personal information; third, concerns about discrimination; and fourth, contributing personal data to science. Conclusion Early adopters of emerging health technologies appear to have more complex and nuanced conceptions of privacy than might be expected based on their adoption of personal health technologies and participation in open science. Early adopters also voiced uncertainty about the privacy implications of their decisions to use new technologies and share their data for research. Though not representative of the general public, studies of early adopters can provide important insights into evolving attitudes toward privacy in the context of emerging health technologies and personal health data research. PMID:27832194

  11. A software technology evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novaes-Card, David N.

    1985-01-01

    A set of quantitative approaches is presented for evaluating software development methods and tools. The basic idea is to generate a set of goals which are refined into quantifiable questions which specify metrics to be collected on the software development and maintenance process and product. These metrics can be used to characterize, evaluate, predict, and motivate. They can be used in an active as well as passive way by learning form analyzing the data and improving the methods and tools based upon what is learned from that analysis. Several examples were given representing each of the different approaches to evaluation. The cost of the approaches varied inversely with the level of confidence in the interpretation of the results.

  12. [Adoption].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue addresses adoption and the young child's life. Contributors suggest ways in which practitioners in many professions and settings can better understand and support adoptive families. The first article, "Adoption, 1990" by Barbara F. Nordhaus and Albert J. Solnit, reviews the history of adoption and notes obstacles to…

  13. Planning for the V&V of infused software technologies for the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Fesq, Lorraine M.; Ingham, Michel D.; Klein, Suzanne L.; Nelson, Stacy D.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission is planning to make use of advanced software technologies in order to support fulfillment of its ambitious science objectives. The mission plans to adopt the Mission Data System (MDS) as the mission software architecture, and plans to make significant use of on-board autonomous capabilities for the rover software.

  14. Software technology testbed softpanel prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: analysis of using Ada for the development of real-time control systems for the Space Station; analysis of the functionality of the Application Generator; analysis of the User Support Environment criteria; analysis of the SSE tools and procedures which are to be used for the development of ground/flight software for the Space Station; analysis if the CBATS tutorial (an Ada tutorial package); analysis of Interleaf; analysis of the Integration, Test and Verification process of the Space Station; analysis of the DMS on-orbit flight architecture; analysis of the simulation architecture.

  15. Is managed care restraining the adoption of technology by hospitals?

    PubMed

    Mas, Núria; Seinfeld, Janice

    2008-07-01

    As health care costs increase, cost-control mechanisms become more widespread and it is crucial to understand their implications for the health care market. This paper examines the effect that managed care activity (based on the aim to control health care expenditure) has on the adoption of technologies by hospitals. We use a hazard rate model to investigate whether higher levels of managed care market share are associated with a decrease on medical technology adoption during the period 1982-1995. We analyze annual data on 5390 US hospitals regarding the adoption of 13 different technologies. Our results are threefold: first, we find that managed care has a negative effect on hospitals' technology acquisition for each of the 13 medical technologies in our study, and its effect is stronger for those technologies diffusing in the 1990s, when the managed care sector is at its largest. If managed care enrollment had remained at its 1984 level, there would be 5.3%, 7.3% and 4.1% more hospitals with diagnostic radiology, radiation therapy and cardiac technologies, respectively. Second, we find that the rise in managed care leads to long-term reductions in medical cost growth. Finally, we take into account that profitability analysis is one of the main dimensions considered by hospitals when deciding about the adoption of new technologies. In order to determine whether managed care affects technologies differently if they have a different cost-reimbursement ratio (CRR), we have created a unique data set with information on the cost-reimbursement for each of the 13 technologies and we find that managed care enrollment has a considerably larger negative effect on the adoption of less profitable technologies.

  16. Challenges Facing Adoption of Information Communication Technology in African Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murgor, Titus Kiptoo

    2015-01-01

    A significant number of the universities and higher educational institutions have adopted the latest technology and implemented it productively, for the development of skilled human resource in respective area of specialization, as part of their responsibility. Information and communication Technology (ICT) has grown tremendously around the globe…

  17. Health care technology adoption and diffusion in a social context.

    PubMed

    Coyte, Peter C; Holmes, Dave

    2007-02-01

    This article highlights mechanisms that may further sustainable technological development for the 21st century. The distributional effects associated with the adoption and diffusion of health care technologies are addressed wherein the capacity to capitalize on the health gains from the adoption of technology varies in society. These effects are caused by the actions of individuals as they segment themselves into distinct social groups. The circumstances under which social institutions are further segmented are explored and may motivate public sector limits on the funding for and diffusion of health care technologies. Safety and efficacy benchmarks are necessary but insufficient conditions for sustainability as product advantage on grounds of cost-effectiveness must also be demonstrated. Furthermore, given the substantial role played by public sector decision makers in purchasing health care technologies, the distributional consequences associated with the uptake and diffusion of technology need to be gauged by product designers and those responsible for marketing.

  18. Evaluation and Management Documentation and Coding Technology Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Susan H.; Gamm, Larry D.

    2007-01-01

    This study determines the relative effect of financial incentives, practice characteristics, and regulatory guidelines on the utilization of documentation and coding technology among physician practices employing HIM professionals. A total of 442 HIM professionals, 9.78 percent of the surveyed population, completed a Web-based survey regarding their practices and E/M documentation and coding methods used. More physician practices use the traditional documentation and coding methods than use automated methods. Less than half of the practices using automated documentation technology also utilized automated coding technology. Financial incentives and regulatory guidelines were not related to documentation or coding method used. Organization size and type were highly related to documentation or coding method used. Practices using coding technology were more likely to perform coding validation. The reasons for low levels of coding technology adoption, which requires little additional physician effort, suggest the potential presence of unique factors inhibiting the adoption of this technology. PMID:18066357

  19. Overcoming Barriers to Technology Adoption in Small Manufacturing Enterprises (SMEs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    7 3.4 Adopting a Control-System-Modeling Tool.................................................8 3.5 Adapting Ecommerce and Manufacturing Execution...production of platform systems, components, and munitions is constrained not only by the surge capacity of the prime contractor, but also by the...Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools that simplified implementing the design in hardware and software. 3.5 Adapting Ecommerce and Manufacturing

  20. Barriers to open source software adoption in Quebec's health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Paré, Guy; Wybo, Michael D; Delannoy, Charles

    2009-02-01

    We conducted in-depth interviews with 15 CIOs to identify the principal impediments to adoption of open source software in the Quebec health sector. We found that key factors for not adopting an open source solution were closely linked to the orientations of ministry level policy makers and a seeming lack of information on the part of operational level IT managers concerning commercially oriented open source providers. We use the case of recent changes in the structure of Quebec's health care organizations and a change in the commercial policies of a key vendor to illustrate our conclusions regarding barriers to adoption of open source products.

  1. Reproductive health professionals' adoption of emerging technologies for health promotion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peggy B; Buzi, Ruth S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess reproductive health professionals' familiarity with and use of various electronic technologies to support health promotion. The study also examined the relationship between demographic characteristics and attitudes and beliefs of the effectiveness of new technologies and perceived barriers for usage. A total of 165 reproductive health professionals at two conferences related to reproductive health in the United States completed the study survey. Personal and organizational factors affected the adoption of electronic technologies for health promotion. This included lack of knowledge, skills, and confidence as well as privacy concerns. The results of the study also suggested that being from an older generation was associated with having lower levels of knowledge, skills, and confidence in using new media. These findings highlight the importance of creating learning opportunities on the use of new technology for health promotion as well as addressing specific perceived barriers among reproductive health professionals in order to promote the adoption of these technologies.

  2. Determinants of User Adoption of Policy and Procedure Software: An Examination of Relationships between Task-Specific Computer Self-Efficacy, Perceived Relevance, Perceived Complexity and Predictions of Intent to Use Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lori Jill

    2012-01-01

    For nurses or physicians practicing in any healthcare setting today, nothing seems to be as unsettling then change associated with the introduction of new information technology. The need for information technology has created a new host of challenges that do not easily align to clinical practice. In this study, perceptions of usefulness, ease of…

  3. Exploring the Factors Influencing the Adoption of Open Source Software in Western Cape Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Kevin; Begg, Shameemah; Tanner, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Open Source Software (OSS) presents many benefits to both the private and the public sectors, and has proven to be a viable solution in schools. Although a policy mandating the use of OSS exists in the Western Cape province of South Africa, very few schools in the province have adopted OSS. The education system in South Africa is currently facing…

  4. Physicians' adoption of information technology: a consumer behavior approach.

    PubMed

    Eger, M S; Godkin, R L; Valentine, S R

    2001-01-01

    Studies report physician resistance to information technology in a time when the practice of medicine could benefit from technological support. Anecdotally, it is suspected that lack of training, discomfort with technological innovations, a perceived shift in the doctor/patient relationship, or medical/legal issues may account for this circumstance. Empirical studies attribute this lag to age, personality factors, behavioral issues, and occupational influences. This paper integrates the information technology and consumer behavior literatures to discuss physicians' acceptance, adoption, and application of IT.

  5. Reasons for adopting technological innovations reducing physical workload in bricklaying.

    PubMed

    de Jong, A M; Vink, P; de Kroon, J C A

    2003-09-15

    In this paper the adoption of technological innovations to improve the work of bricklayers and bricklayers' assistants is evaluated. Two studies were performed among 323 subjects to determine the adoption of the working methods, the perceived workload, experiences with the working methods, and the reasons for adopting the working methods. Furthermore, a comparison of the results of the studies was made with those of two similar studies in the literature. The results show that more than half of the sector adopted the innovations. The perceived workload was reduced. The employees and employers are satisfied with the working methods and important reasons for adoption were cost/benefit advantages, improvement of work and health, and increase in productivity. Problems preventing the adoption were the use of the working methods at specific sites, for instance in renovation work. The adoption of the new working methods could perhaps have been higher or faster if more attention had been paid to the active participation of bricklayers and bricklayers' assistants during the development of the new working methods and to the use of modern media techniques, such as the Internet and CD/DVD.

  6. Health Information Technology Adoption in California Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Katherine K.; Rudin, Robert S.; Wilson, Machelle D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives National and state initiatives to spur adoption of electronic health record (EHR) use and health information exchange (HIE) among providers in rural and underserved communities have been in place for 15 years. Our goal was to systematically assess the impact of these initiatives by quantifying the level of adoption and key factors associated with adoption among community health centers (CHCs) in California. Study Design Cross-sectional statewide survey. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of all California primary care CHCs from August to September 2013. Multiple logistic regressions were fit to test for associations between various practice characteristics and adoption of EHRs, Meaningful Use (MU)–certified EHRs, and HIE. For the multivariable model, we included those variables which were significant at the P = .10 level in the univariate tests. Results We received responses from 194 CHCs (73.5% response rate). Adoption of any EHRs (80.3%) and MU–certified EHRs (94.6% of those with an EHR) was very high. Adoption of HIE is substantial (48.7%) and took place within a few years (mean = 2.61 years; SD = 2.01). More than half (54.7%) of CHCs are able to receive data into the EHR, indicating some level of interoperability. Patient engagement capacity is moderate, with 21.6% offering a personal health record, and 55.2% electronic visit summaries. Rural location and belonging to a multi-site clinic organization both increase the odds of adoption of EHRs, HIE, and electronic visit summary, with odds ratios ranging from 0.63 to 3.28 (all P values <.05). Conclusions Greater adoption of health information technology (IT) in rural areas may be the result of both federal and state investments. As CHCs lack access to capital for investments, continued support of technology infrastructure may be needed for them to further leverage health IT to improve healthcare. PMID:26760431

  7. The Adoption of Technological Innovations by Municipal Governments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Irwin; Menzel, Donald C.

    1978-01-01

    Data on the adoption of 43 technological innovations in four service delivery areas were obtained from nationally representative samples of municipal governments. The service delivery areas included fire fighting, solid waste collection and disposal, traffic control, and air pollution control. (Author/RLV)

  8. Barriers to Adoption of Instructional Communications Technology in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieman, E.; Fiordo, R.

    Adoption of instructional communications technology meets with resistance and even opposition in higher education; however, by anticipating and estimating the resistance to change, instructional innovators can gain compliance from the colleagues they are trying to help. Resistance to change in education is caused by many factors both real and…

  9. Variation In Rural Health Information Technology Adoption And Use.

    PubMed

    Heisey-Grove, Dawn M

    2016-02-01

    While rural hospitals and physicians have adopted health information technology at the same, or greater, rates as their urban counterparts, meaningful-use attestation varies dramatically among rural providers. Also, rural providers are more likely to skip a year of declaring that they have met meaningful-use requirements, putting them at a financial disadvantage compared to urban providers.

  10. Barriers to Adopting Technology for Teaching and Learning in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Senaidi, Said; Lin, Lin; Poirot, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the perceived barriers to adopting information and communication technologies (ICT) in Omani higher education. One hundred faculty members from four different departments at the College of Applied Sciences in Oman participated in the study. The participants took a survey, which was developed based on the Western literature.…

  11. The Media Adoption Stage Model of Technology for Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brent Christian

    2010-01-01

    This study examined survey data from professional credentialed members of the American Art Therapy Association and 8 follow up interviews to determine how art therapists adopt or reject technology and/or new digital media for therapeutic use with their clients. Using Rogers's (2003) "diffusion of innovation" model, the author identified a…

  12. Hurdling barriers through market uncertainty: Case studies ininnovative technology adoption

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Christopher T.; Radspieler Jr., Anthony; Payne, Jack

    2002-08-18

    The crisis atmosphere surrounding electricity availability in California during the summer of 2001 produced two distinct phenomena in commercial energy consumption decision-making: desires to guarantee energy availability while blackouts were still widely anticipated, and desires to avoid or mitigate significant price increases when higher commercial electricity tariffs took effect. The climate of increased consideration of these factors seems to have led, in some cases, to greater willingness on the part of business decision-makers to consider highly innovative technologies. This paper examines three case studies of innovative technology adoption: retrofit of time-and-temperature signs on an office building; installation of fuel cells to supply power, heating, and cooling to the same building; and installation of a gas-fired heat pump at a microbrewery. We examine the decision process that led to adoption of these technologies. In each case, specific constraints had made more conventional energy-efficient technologies inapplicable. We examine how these barriers to technology adoption developed over time, how the California energy decision-making climate combined with the characteristics of these innovative technologies to overcome the barriers, and what the implications of hurdling these barriers are for future energy decisions within the firms.

  13. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... biological families) and where they came from. This curiosity often becomes more intense as part of the ... adoptive family or feel close to them. This curiosity, which can feel quite intense, is a normal ...

  14. Nursing faculty concerns regarding the adoption of computer technology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D; Watson, J E

    1997-01-01

    This article describes a study conducted to determine nursing faculty concerns about the use of computer technology. Study participants answered a standardized questionnaire (Stages of Concern) designed to measure concern about innovation adoption, and an author-developed survey, which included questions on level of technology use. The questionnaire and survey were given to nursing faculty before and after their participation in a series of computer technology and literacy workshops. Initially, most workshop participants were low-level computer users whose concerns about technology decreased after the workshops. Some workshop participants also experienced a statistically significant increase in their comfort levels in the use of computer applications. Results support the Stages of Concern questionnaire as a tool to monitor the technology integration process and to guide ongoing faculty development efforts.

  15. Understanding the Perception of Very Small Software Companies towards the Adoption of Process Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basri, Shuib; O'Connor, Rory V.

    This paper is concerned with understanding the issues that affect the adoption of software process standards by Very Small Entities (VSEs), their needs from process standards and their willingness to engage with the new ISO/IEC 29110 standard in particular. In order to achieve this goal, a series of industry data collection studies were undertaken with a collection of VSEs. A twin track approach of a qualitative data collection (interviews and focus groups) and quantitative data collection (questionnaire) were undertaken. Data analysis was being completed separately and the final results were merged, using the coding mechanisms of grounded theory. This paper serves as a roadmap for both researchers wishing to understand the issues of process standards adoption by very small companies and also for the software process standards community.

  16. Five constants of information technology adoption in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Mariel L; McCreless, Tamuchin; Côté, Murray J

    2007-01-01

    The healthcare industry has developed a dependence on information technology (IT) for maintaining and improving both clinical and business operations. Whether IT is used for office automation or for reducing medical errors, there are five constants that routinely influence the successful integration of IT in healthcare. These constants are the proper use and maintenance of the IT budget, the role of supportive leadership, the use of project management, the process of implementation, and the significance of end user involvement. These constants challenge healthcare organizations to efficiently and effectively use their financial and human resources when adopting new IT. These constants also shape how the healthcare industry approaches the adoption and utilization of new IT. A collective understanding of these constants and their interrelationships will enable healthcare organizations to better integrate new IT and achieve organizational goals of developing a solid technological infrastructure to truly enhance the delivery of quality healthcare.

  17. Decision support software technology demonstration plan

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN,T.; ARMSTRONG,A.

    1998-09-01

    The performance evaluation of innovative and alternative environmental technologies is an integral part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) mission. Early efforts focused on evaluating technologies that supported the implementation of the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts. In 1986 the Agency began to demonstrate and evaluate the cost and performance of remediation and monitoring technologies under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program (in response to the mandate in the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA)). In 1990, the US Technology Policy was announced. This policy placed a renewed emphasis on making the best use of technology in achieving the national goals of improved quality of life for all Americans, continued economic growth, and national security. In the spirit of the technology policy, the Agency began to direct a portion of its resources toward the promotion, recognition, acceptance, and use of US-developed innovative environmental technologies both domestically and abroad. Decision Support Software (DSS) packages integrate environmental data and simulation models into a framework for making site characterization, monitoring, and cleanup decisions. To limit the scope which will be addressed in this demonstration, three endpoints have been selected for evaluation: Visualization; Sample Optimization; and Cost/Benefit Analysis. Five topics are covered in this report: the objectives of the demonstration; the elements of the demonstration plan; an overview of the Site Characterization and Monitoring Technology Pilot; an overview of the technology verification process; and the purpose of this demonstration plan.

  18. The Adoption of Grid Computing Technology by Organizations: A Quantitative Study Using Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udoh, Emmanuel E.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in grid technology have enabled some organizations to harness enormous computational power on demand. However, the prediction of widespread adoption of the grid technology has not materialized despite the obvious grid advantages. This situation has encouraged intense efforts to close the research gap in the grid adoption process. In this…

  19. Software agent technology in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Staab, T. A.

    2002-01-01

    The IT (Information Technology) environment in today's laboratories is characterized as being highly distributed, heterogeneous, and in some instances extremely dynamic. Larger organizations have to deal with hundreds of different systems, ranging from standalone workstations and devices in laboratories to fully integrated LIMS (Laboratory Information Management System) and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) systems. An information system operating in such an environment must handle several emerging problems, such as heterogeneous hardware and software platforms, as well as distributed information sources and capabilities. It is also expected that the IT infrastructure scales well, easily integrates with legacy systems, allows resource sharing, and supports day-to-day operations such as information retrieval, data storage, validation, tracking, replication, and archival in a fully automated fashion. By using real-world examples, this presentation will illustrate how software agent technology can be used to manage the ever increasing IT complexity and user demands in the laboratory of the future.

  20. Adopt or Adapt: Sanitation Technology Choices in Urbanizing Malawi.

    PubMed

    Chunga, Richard M; Ensink, Jeroen H J; Jenkins, Marion W; Brown, Joe

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a mixed-methods study examining adaptation strategies that property owners in low-income, rapidly urbanizing areas in Malawi adopt to address the limitations of pit latrines, the most common method of disposing human excreta. A particular challenge is lack of space for constructing new latrines as population density increases: traditional practice has been to cap full pits and simply move to a new site, but increasing demands on space require new approaches to extend the service life of latrines. In this context, we collected data on sanitation technology choices from January to September 2013 through 48 in-depth interviews and a stated preference survey targeting 1,300 property owners from 27 low-income urban areas. Results showed that property owners with concern about space for replacing pit latrines were 1.8 times more likely to select pit emptying service over the construction of new pit latrines with a slab floor (p = 0.02) but there was no significant association between concern about space for replacing pit latrines and intention to adopt locally promoted, novel sanitation technology known as ecological sanitation (ecosan). Property owners preferred to adapt existing, known technology by constructing replacement pit latrines on old pit latrine locations, reducing the frequency of replacing pit latrines, or via emptying pit latrines when full. This study highlights potential challenges to adoption of wholly new sanitation technologies, even when they present clear advantages to end users. To scale, alternative sanitation technologies for rapidly urbanising cities should offer clear advantages, be affordable, be easy to use when shared among multiple households, and their design should be informed by existing adaptation strategies and local knowledge.

  1. Adopt or Adapt: Sanitation Technology Choices in Urbanizing Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Chunga, Richard M.; Ensink, Jeroen H. J.; Jenkins, Marion W.; Brown, Joe

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a mixed-methods study examining adaptation strategies that property owners in low-income, rapidly urbanizing areas in Malawi adopt to address the limitations of pit latrines, the most common method of disposing human excreta. A particular challenge is lack of space for constructing new latrines as population density increases: traditional practice has been to cap full pits and simply move to a new site, but increasing demands on space require new approaches to extend the service life of latrines. In this context, we collected data on sanitation technology choices from January to September 2013 through 48 in-depth interviews and a stated preference survey targeting 1,300 property owners from 27 low-income urban areas. Results showed that property owners with concern about space for replacing pit latrines were 1.8 times more likely to select pit emptying service over the construction of new pit latrines with a slab floor (p = 0.02) but there was no significant association between concern about space for replacing pit latrines and intention to adopt locally promoted, novel sanitation technology known as ecological sanitation (ecosan). Property owners preferred to adapt existing, known technology by constructing replacement pit latrines on old pit latrine locations, reducing the frequency of replacing pit latrines, or via emptying pit latrines when full. This study highlights potential challenges to adoption of wholly new sanitation technologies, even when they present clear advantages to end users. To scale, alternative sanitation technologies for rapidly urbanising cities should offer clear advantages, be affordable, be easy to use when shared among multiple households, and their design should be informed by existing adaptation strategies and local knowledge. PMID:27532871

  2. A Model to Predict Educators' Attitudes towards Technology and Thus Technology Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Govender, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    "Technology," the buzz word for the last ten to fifteen years in South Africa. Technology availability is quite often mistaken for technology adoption and use. Technology has been made available to almost all tertiary institutions and at least some public schools. However, in most tertiary institutions many professors still refuse to use…

  3. Adoption of Speech Recognition Technology in Community Healthcare Nursing.

    PubMed

    Al-Masslawi, Dawood; Block, Lori; Ronquillo, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    Adoption of new health information technology is shown to be challenging. However, the degree to which new technology will be adopted can be predicted by measures of usefulness and ease of use. In this work these key determining factors are focused on for design of a wound documentation tool. In the context of wound care at home, consistent with evidence in the literature from similar settings, use of Speech Recognition Technology (SRT) for patient documentation has shown promise. To achieve a user-centred design, the results from a conducted ethnographic fieldwork are used to inform SRT features; furthermore, exploratory prototyping is used to collect feedback about the wound documentation tool from home care nurses. During this study, measures developed for healthcare applications of the Technology Acceptance Model will be used, to identify SRT features that improve usefulness (e.g. increased accuracy, saving time) or ease of use (e.g. lowering mental/physical effort, easy to remember tasks). The identified features will be used to create a low fidelity prototype that will be evaluated in future experiments.

  4. To Promote Adoption of Household Health Technologies, Think Beyond Health

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Christina; Platt, Lauren; Slaski, Alexander; Gupta, Rajesh; Miller, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Health risks from poor malaria control, unsafe water, and indoor air pollution are responsible for an important share of the global disease burden—and they can be addressed by efficacious household health technologies that have existed for decades. However, coverage rates of these products among populations at risk remain disappointingly low. We conducted a review of the medical and public health literatures and found that health considerations alone are rarely sufficient motivation for households to adopt and use these technologies. In light of these findings, we argue that health education and persuasion campaigns by themselves are unlikely to be adequate. Instead, health policymakers and professionals must understand what users value beyond health and possibly reengineer health technologies with these concerns in mind. PMID:23948003

  5. To promote adoption of household health technologies, think beyond health.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Mark C; Warner, Christina; Platt, Lauren; Slaski, Alexander; Gupta, Rajesh; Miller, Grant

    2013-10-01

    Health risks from poor malaria control, unsafe water, and indoor air pollution are responsible for an important share of the global disease burden-and they can be addressed by efficacious household health technologies that have existed for decades. However, coverage rates of these products among populations at risk remain disappointingly low. We conducted a review of the medical and public health literatures and found that health considerations alone are rarely sufficient motivation for households to adopt and use these technologies. In light of these findings, we argue that health education and persuasion campaigns by themselves are unlikely to be adequate. Instead, health policymakers and professionals must understand what users value beyond health and possibly reengineer health technologies with these concerns in mind.

  6. Applying observations from technological transformations in complex adaptive systems to inform health policy on technology adoption.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew B; Merrill, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Many complex markets such as banking and manufacturing have benefited significantly from technology adoption. Each of these complex markets experienced increased efficiency, quality, security, and customer involvement as a result of technology transformation in their industry. Healthcare has not benefited to the same extent. We provide initial findings from a policy analysis of complex markets and the features of these transformations that can influence health technology adoption and acceptance.

  7. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology

    PubMed Central

    Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn; Naenna, Thanakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand. Data collected from 400 employees including physicians, nurses, and hospital staff members were tested the model using structural equation modeling technique. The results found that the factors with a significant effect are performance expectancy, effort expectancy and facilitating conditions. They were also found to have a significant impact on behavioral intention to use the acceptance healthcare technology. In addition, in Thai provincial areas, positive significance was found with two factors: social influence on behavioral intention and facilitating conditions to direct using behavior. Based on research findings, in order for healthcare information technology to be widely adopted and used by healthcare staffs in healthcare supply chain management, the healthcare organizational management should improve healthcare staffs' behavioral intention and facilitating conditions. PMID:26417235

  8. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology.

    PubMed

    Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn; Naenna, Thanakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand. Data collected from 400 employees including physicians, nurses, and hospital staff members were tested the model using structural equation modeling technique. The results found that the factors with a significant effect are performance expectancy, effort expectancy and facilitating conditions. They were also found to have a significant impact on behavioral intention to use the acceptance healthcare technology. In addition, in Thai provincial areas, positive significance was found with two factors: social influence on behavioral intention and facilitating conditions to direct using behavior. Based on research findings, in order for healthcare information technology to be widely adopted and used by healthcare staffs in healthcare supply chain management, the healthcare organizational management should improve healthcare staffs' behavioral intention and facilitating conditions.

  9. Accelerating Industrial Adoption of Metal Additive Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanian, Kenneth; McDonald, Tom

    2016-03-01

    While metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology has clear benefits, there are still factors preventing its adoption by industry. These factors include the high cost of metal AM systems, the difficulty for machinists to learn and operate metal AM machines, the long approval process for part qualification/certification, and the need for better process controls; however, the high AM system cost is the main barrier deterring adoption. In this paper, we will discuss an America Makes-funded program to reduce AM system cost by combining metal AM technology with conventional computerized numerical controlled (CNC) machine tools. Information will be provided on how an Optomec-led team retrofitted a legacy CNC vertical mill with laser engineered net shaping (LENS®—LENS is a registered trademark of Sandia National Labs) AM technology, dramatically lowering deployment cost. The upgraded system, dubbed LENS Hybrid Vertical Mill, enables metal additive and subtractive operations to be performed on the same machine tool and even on the same part. Information on the LENS Hybrid system architecture, learnings from initial system deployment and continuing development work will also be provided to help guide further development activities within the materials community.

  10. Cultural and Technological Issues and Solutions for Geodynamics Software Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heien, E. M.; Hwang, L.; Fish, A. E.; Smith, M.; Dumit, J.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    Computational software and custom-written codes play a key role in scientific research and teaching, providing tools to perform data analysis and forward modeling through numerical computation. However, development of these codes is often hampered by the fact that there is no well-defined way for the authors to receive credit or professional recognition for their work through the standard methods of scientific publication and subsequent citation of the work. This in turn may discourage researchers from publishing their codes or making them easier for other scientists to use. We investigate the issues involved in citing software in a scientific context, and introduce features that should be components of a citation infrastructure, particularly oriented towards the codes and scientific culture in the area of geodynamics research. The codes used in geodynamics are primarily specialized numerical modeling codes for continuum mechanics problems; they may be developed by individual researchers, teams of researchers, geophysicists in collaboration with computational scientists and applied mathematicians, or by coordinated community efforts such as the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics. Some but not all geodynamics codes are open-source. These characteristics are common to many areas of geophysical software development and use. We provide background on the problem of software citation and discuss some of the barriers preventing adoption of such citations, including social/cultural barriers, insufficient technological support infrastructure, and an overall lack of agreement about what a software citation should consist of. We suggest solutions in an initial effort to create a system to support citation of software and promotion of scientific software development.

  11. Accepting Technology as a Solution: A Quantitative Study Investigating the Adoption of Technology at Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demuth, Leroy G., III.

    2010-01-01

    Adopting a new technology is an important decision for many academic institutions. Colleges have had to upgrade technology or face diminishing enrollment as students choose to attend other, more responsive institutions. New and imaginative approaches to technology have been developed and implemented by faculty, support staff, and students to…

  12. A Singular Vision for a Disparate Future: Technology Adoption Patterns in Higher Learning through 2035

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henshaw, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Technology adoption in any sector is rarely uniform. Understanding the drivers and constraints associated with technology adoption makes it easier to anticipate how technology will be used and what populations will benefit the most. Robert G. Henshaw examines factors likely to influence technology adoption within U.S. higher education over the…

  13. The Impact of Autonomous Systems Technology on JPL Mission Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: (1) Autonomy for Future Missions- Mars Outposts, Titan Aerobot, and Europa Cryobot / Hydrobot; (2) Emergence of Autonomy- Remote Agent Architecture, Closing Loops Onboard, and New Millennium Flight Experiment; and (3) Software Engineering Challenges- Influence of Remote Agent, Scalable Autonomy, Autonomy Software Validation, Analytic Verification Technology, and Autonomy and Software Software Engineering.

  14. Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software

    SciTech Connect

    Malony, Allen D.

    2007-05-08

    Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress

  15. The Role of Organizational Sub-Cultures in Higher Education Adoption of Open Source Software (OSS) for Teaching/Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams van Rooij, Shahron

    2010-01-01

    This paper contrasts the arguments offered in the literature advocating the adoption of open source software (OSS)--software delivered with its source code--for teaching and learning applications, with the reality of limited enterprise-wide deployment of those applications in U.S. higher education. Drawing on the fields of organizational…

  16. Adoption and supply of a distributed energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Neil Douglas

    2000-12-01

    Technical and economic developments in distributed generation (DG) represent an opportunity for a radically different energy market paradigm, and potentially significant cuts in global carbon emissions. This thesis investigates DG along two interrelated themes: (1) Early adoption and supply of the DG technology of internal combustion (IC) engine cogeneration. (2) Private and social cost implications of DG for private investors and within an energy system. IC engine cogeneration of both power and heat has been a remarkable success in the Netherlands with over 5,000 installations and 1,500MWe of installed capacity by 1997. However, the technology has struggled in the UK with an installed capacity of 110Mwe, fulfilling only 10% of its large estimated potential. An investment simulation model of DG investments in the UK and Netherlands was used, together with analysis of site level data on all DG adoptions from 1985 through 1997. In the UK over 60% of the early installations were sized too small (<140kWe) to be economically attractive (suppliers made their money with maintenance contracts). In the Netherlands, most facilities were sized well above the economic size threshold of 100kWe (lower due to reduced operating and grid connection costs). Institutional players were key in improved sizing of DG. Aided by energy market and CO2 reduction regulatory policy, Dutch distributions utilities played a proactive role in DG. This involved joint ventures with engine cogen suppliers and users, offering improved electricity buy-back tariffs and lower connection costs. This has allowed flexible operation of distributed generation, especially in electricity sales to the grid. Larger units can be sized for on-site heat requirements with electricity export providing revenue and aiding in management of energy networks. A comparison of internal and external costs of three distributed and three centralized generation technologies over a range of heat to power ratios (HPR) was made

  17. Adoption of new software and hardware solutions at the VLT: the ESPRESSO control architecture case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirami, R.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Coretti, I.; Santin, P.; Mannetta, M.; Baldini, V.; Cristiani, S.; Abreu, M.; Cabral, A.; Monteiro, M.; Mégevand, D.; Zerbi, F.

    2012-09-01

    ESPRESSO is a fiber-fed cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph which can be operated with one or up to 4 UT (Unit Telescope) of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It will be located in the Combined-Coudé Laboratory (CCL) of the VLT and it will be the first permanent instrument using a 16-m equivalent telescope. The ESPRESSO control software and electronics are in charge of the control of all instrument subsystems: the four Coudé Trains (one for each UT), the front-end and the fiber-fed spectrograph itself contained within a vacuum vessel. The spectrograph is installed inside a series of thermal enclosures following an onion-shell principle with increasing temperature stability from outside to inside. The proposed electronics architecture will use the OPC Unified Architecture (OPC UA) as a standard layer to communicate with PLCs (Programmable Logical Controller), replacing the old Instrument Local Control Units (LCUs) for ESO instruments based on VME technology. The instrument control software will be based on the VLT Control Software package and will use the IC0 Field Bus extension for the control of the instrument hardware. In this paper we present the ESPRESSO software architectural design proposed at the Preliminary Design Review as well as the control electronics architecture.

  18. Factors Influencing Adoption of Information Technology Infrastructure Library: Utilizing the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Din S. Z.

    2013-01-01

    There is a shortage of evidence based research that provides organizations with the necessary information in support of their technology adoption decisions in relation to ITSM technologies. As such, this research study attempted to bridge the gap by offering insight on possible factors that could influence such decisions. An examination of…

  19. Factors Affecting Faculty Use of Learning Technologies: Implications for Models of Technology Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Tom; Sainter, Phillip; Saunders, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    This study examines factors associated with the use of learning technologies by higher education faculty. In an online survey in a UK university, 114 faculty respondents completed a measure of Internet self-efficacy, and reported on their use of learning technologies along with barriers to their adoption. Principal components analysis suggested…

  20. Social Software and Educational Technology: Informal, Formal and Technical Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Roberto; Baranauskas, M. Cecilia C.; da Silva, Sergio Roberto P.

    2013-01-01

    Social software is a growing reality worldwide and several authors are discussing its use to promote social interaction in learning contexts. Although problems regarding privacy, reputation, and identity are commonly reported in social software, an explicit concern regarding peoples' values is not a common practice in its design and adoption,…

  1. Technology Tips: Making Connections Using Embedded Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groden, Claire; Pattison-Gordon, Laurie

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of software created for practical, real-world applications to connect mathematics to other subjects and to the world outside the classroom. Software presented includes Design Your Own Home, Bridgebuilder, Physics Explorer, Aldus Superpaint, and Sprout. (MKR)

  2. NASA Software Assurance's Roles in Research and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Martha

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the interactions between the scientist and engineers doing research and technology and the software developers and others who are doing software assurance. There is a discussion of the role of the Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) in developing software to be used for research and technology, and the importance of this role as the technology moves to the higher levels of the technology readiness levels (TRLs). There is also a call to change the way the development of software is developed.

  3. Adopting Digital Technologies in the Classroom: 10 Assessment Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staley, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Technology has long been a part of the classroom space. Sometime in the 1990s, the word technology was co-opted to refer only to digital tools. "Technology in the classroom" or "technology stocks" or "the dangers posed by technology" came to refer only to digital technology rather than to technology as a whole. As such, much of the discussion…

  4. Examining the Relationship between Technological, Organizational, and Environmental Factors and Cloud Computing Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweel, Abdeneaser

    2012-01-01

    High uncertainties related to cloud computing adoption may hinder IT managers from making solid decisions about adopting cloud computing. The problem addressed in this study was the lack of understanding of the relationship between factors related to the adoption of cloud computing and IT managers' interest in adopting this technology. In…

  5. A Review of Software Maintenance Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    Analyzer " Interface Checker " Assertion Checker " Path Flow Analyzer * Usage Counter " Timing Analyzer b. Source Fairley , R. E., "An Experimental...Francisco, CA, October 1976, pp. 470-476. Fairley , R. E., "Modern Software Design Techniques," Proceedings MRI Symposium on Computer Software Engineering...New York, NY, April 1976, pp. 11-30. Fairley , R. E., "An Experimental Program Testing Facility," IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, Volume SE

  6. Infusing Software Engineering Technology into Practice at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pressburger, Thomas; Feather, Martin S.; Hinchey, Michael; Markosia, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    We present an ongoing effort of the NASA Software Engineering Initiative to encourage the use of advanced software engineering technology on NASA projects. Technology infusion is in general a difficult process yet this effort seems to have found a modest approach that is successful for some types of technologies. We outline the process and describe the experience of the technology infusions that occurred over a two year period. We also present some lessons from the experiences.

  7. SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative) software technology program plan. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, C.J.; Redwine, S.T.; Bloom, M.I.; Brykczynski, B.; Chludzinski, J.

    1987-06-01

    This paper was prepared in response to a request from the Battle Management C3 office within the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) of the Department of Defense (DoD). The request was for a software-technology program plan to define software research and development (RandD) efforts required by the SDI, and to provide the basis for integrating the SDIO software technology program with ongoing non-SDIO programs. The paper emphasizes reviewing the ongoing software programs and plans within the DoD and academia. The reviews identify critical software technology areas required to meet the unique SDI requirements, and indicate priorities among the software technologies to meet attainability, productivity, and reliability goals, as well as functional performance objectives.

  8. Crossing the Technology Adoption Chasm: Implications for DoD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-30

    elli= cowpea varieties for extension education in Southwestern Nigeria. The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension, 12(3), 195-200. O’Rourke...Adekoya, A.E. (2006). Implication of farmers’ propensity to discontinue adoption of downey-mildew resistant maize and improved cowpea varieties for... Cowpea (Farmer) Feedback Provision (-) Marketability Varieties Input Availability (+) Dependent Variable = De-adoption of Cowpea

  9. ATM Technology Adoption in U.S. Campus Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Engui; Perry, John F.; Anderson, Larry S.; Brook, R. Dan; Hare, R. Dwight; Moore, Arnold J.; Xu, Xiaohe

    This study examined the relationships between ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) adoption in universities and four organizational variables: university size, type, finances, and information processing maturity. Another purpose of the study was to identify the current status of ATM adoption in campus networking. Subjects were university domain LAN…

  10. Educational Software and Adaptive Technology for Students with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Mario D.; Sachs, Rose

    Technological solutions have enabled postsecondary students with learning disabilities to compete equally with nondisabled peers in the educational environment. Such solutions have included a variety of educational software, word processing applications, and adaptive technology. Educational software has many benefits over more traditional…

  11. Software support for improving technology infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.; Hicks, K. A.; Johnson, K. R.; Cornford, S. L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on describing the custom software tool, DDP, that was developed to support the TIMA process, and on showing how the needs of the TIMA process have influenced the development of the structure and capabilities of the DDP software.

  12. Factors of adoption of mobile information technology by homecare nurses: a technology acceptance model 2 approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiying; Cocosila, Mihail; Archer, Norm

    2010-01-01

    Pervasive healthcare support through mobile information technology solutions is playing an increasing role in the attempt to improve healthcare and reduce costs. Despite the apparent attractiveness, many mobile applications have failed or have not been implemented as predicted. Among factors possibly leading to such outcomes, technology adoption is a key problem. This must be investigated early in the development process because healthcare is a particularly sensitive area with vital social implications. Moreover, it is important to investigate technology acceptance using the support of scientific tools validated for relevant information systems research. This article presents an empirical study based on the Technology Acceptance Model 2 in mobile homecare nursing. The study elicited the perceptions of 91 Canadian nurses who used personal digital assistants for 1 month in their daily activities. A partial least squares modeling data analysis revealed that nurse's perception of usefulness is the main factor in the adoption of mobile technology, having subjective norm and image within the organization as significant antecedents. Overall, this study was the first attempt at investigating scientifically, through a pertinent information systems research model, user adoption of mobile systems by homecare nursing personnel.

  13. Health information technology adoption in U.S. acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Seblega, Binyam; Wan, Thomas; Unruh, Lynn; Agiro, Abiy; Miao, Li

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies show that the healthcare industry lags behind many other economic sectors in the adoption of information technology. The purpose of this study is to understand differences in structural characteristics between providers that do and that do not adopt Health Information Technology (HIT) applications. Publicly available secondary data were used from three sources: American Hospital Association (AHA) annual survey, Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) analytics annual survey, and Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) databases. Fifty-two information technologies were grouped into three clusters: clinical, administrative, and strategic decision making ITs. Negative binomial regression was applied with adoption of technology as the dependent variables and eight organizational and contextual factors as the independent variables. Hospitals adopt a relatively larger proportion of administrative information technology as compared to clinical and strategic IT. Large size, urban location and HMO penetration were found to be the most influential hospital characteristics that positively affect information technology adoption. There are still considerable variations in the adoption of information technology across hospitals and in the type of technology adopted. Organizational factors appear to be more influential than market factors when it comes to information technology adoption. The future research may examine whether the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program in 2011 would increase the information technology uses in hospitals as it provides financial incentives for HER adoptions and uses among providers.

  14. Study of fault-tolerant software technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slivinski, T.; Broglio, C.; Wild, C.; Goldberg, J.; Levitt, K.; Hitt, E.; Webb, J.

    1984-01-01

    Presented is an overview of the current state of the art of fault-tolerant software and an analysis of quantitative techniques and models developed to assess its impact. It examines research efforts as well as experience gained from commercial application of these techniques. The paper also addresses the computer architecture and design implications on hardware, operating systems and programming languages (including Ada) of using fault-tolerant software in real-time aerospace applications. It concludes that fault-tolerant software has progressed beyond the pure research state. The paper also finds that, although not perfectly matched, newer architectural and language capabilities provide many of the notations and functions needed to effectively and efficiently implement software fault-tolerance.

  15. Adopting Quality Assurance Technology in Customer-Vendor Relationships: A Case Study of How Interorganizational Relationships Influence the Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeager, Lise Tordrup; Tjørnehøj, Gitte

    Quality assurance technology is a formal control mechanism aiming at increasing the quality of the product exchanged between vendors and customers. Studies of the adoption of this technology in the field of system development rarely focus on the role of the relationship between the customer and vendor in the process. We have studied how the process of adopting quality assurance technology by a small Danish IT vendor developing pharmacy software for a customer in the public sector was influenced by the relationship with the customer. The case study showed that the adoption process was shaped to a high degree by the relationship and vice versa. The prior high level of trust and mutual knowledge helped the parties negotiate mutually feasible solutions throughout the adoption process. We thus advise enhancing trust-building processes to strengthen the relationships and to balance formal control and social control to increase the likelihood of a successful outcome of the adoption of quality assurance technology in a customer-vendor relationship.

  16. Expanding Human Capabilities through the Adoption and Utilization of Free, Libre, and Open Source Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, James Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Free, libre, and open source software (FLOSS) is software that is collaboratively developed. FLOSS provides end-users with the source code and the freedom to adapt or modify a piece of software to fit their needs (Deek & McHugh, 2008; Stallman, 2010). FLOSS has a 30 year history that dates to the open hacker community at the Massachusetts…

  17. Technology Integration in Education: An Examination of Technology Adoption in Teaching and Learning by Secondary Teachers in Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore possible causal factors for level of teachers' adoption of technology in teaching and learning. Furthering the understanding of the factors related to teachers' technology adoption may facilitate increased levels of technology integration in the teaching and learning process. Based on previous research and…

  18. Policy support, economic incentives and the adoption of irrigation technology in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, R.; Wang, J.; Morris, J.

    2014-11-01

    The challenges China faces in terms of water availability in the agricultural sector are exacerbated by the sector's low irrigation efficiency. To increase irrigation efficiency, promoting irrigation technology has been emphasized by policy makers in China. The overall goal of this paper is to understand the effect of policy support and economic incentives on the adoption of irrigation technology in China. Based on a unique dataset collected at household and village levels from seven provinces in China, results indicated that household-based irrigation technology has become noticeable in almost every Chinese village. In contrast, only about half of Chinese villages have adopted community-based irrigation technology. Despite the relatively high adoption level of household-based irrigation technology at the village level, its actual adoption on crop-sown areas was not high, and it was even lower for community-based irrigation technology. The econometric analyses results revealed that policy supports via subsidies and extension services have played an important role in promoting the adoption of irrigation technology. Strikingly, the present irrigation pricing policy has played significant but contradictory roles in promoting the adoption of different types of irrigation technology. Irrigation pricing showed a positive impact on household-based irrigation technology, and a negative impact on community-based irrigation technology, possibly related to their substitution relationship, because having higher adoption of household-based irrigation technology reduce the incentives to invest in community-based irrigation technology. The paper finally concludes and discusses some policy implications.

  19. Using Multiple Technologies to Teach Nursing Students about Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sharonlyn; Henneman, Kris; Herrera, Maida Y.; Hockman, Elaine; Brooks, Evelyn; Darland, Nancy; Kulik, Noel; Sandy-Hanson, Anika E.

    2013-01-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly more important in the enhancement of educating university students. Very little research has been done regarding how the combination of educational technologies affects test scores, compared to the use of one technology alone. This research article examines whether the post-scores of nursing students increased…

  20. Adopting Technology: Using Student Qualitative Data and Gartner's Hype Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grundmeyer, Trent

    2014-01-01

    Technology is changing education. School leaders are charged with purchasing and leveraging technology to maximize an ever-changing landscape of teaching and learning. They have many factors to consider as they make decisions about what specific technologies to purchase for their schools. Gartner's Hype Cycle is an annually published report that…

  1. Instructional Technology Adoption in the Best Adult Training Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knirk, Frederick G.; Christinaz, Daniel

    Both interview and direct observation data were collected via on-site visits with the training directors at 22 U.S. training centers which had been identified as the best training facilities in order to examine why the instructional methods, techniques, and media changes in use had been tried and adopted, and to identify the trends these methods…

  2. Implementation and the Process of Adopting Managerial Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolek, Francis W.

    1975-01-01

    An innovation adoption process paradigm is presented in four stages. Users (1) are aware of a specific need, (2) relate to the logical continuity between previous approaches and the innovation, (3) assess evidence of positive value, and (4) integrate the innovation with their personal and social lives. (Author/MLF)

  3. Adopting best practices: "Agility" moves from software development to healthcare project management.

    PubMed

    Kitzmiller, Rebecca; Hunt, Eleanor; Sproat, Sara Breckenridge

    2006-01-01

    It is time for a change in mindset in how nurses operationalize system implementations and manage projects. Computers and systems have evolved over time from unwieldy mysterious machines of the past to ubiquitous computer use in every aspect of daily lives and work sites. Yet, disconcertingly, the process used to implement these systems has not evolved. Technology implementation does not need to be a struggle. It is time to adapt traditional plan-driven implementation methods to incorporate agile techniques. Agility is a concept borrowed from software development and is presented here because it encourages flexibility, adaptation, and continuous learning as part of the implementation process. Agility values communication and harnesses change to an advantage, which facilitates the natural evolution of an adaptable implementation process. Specific examples of agility in an implementation are described, and plan-driven implementation stages are adapted to incorporate relevant agile techniques. This comparison demonstrates how an agile approach enhances traditional implementation techniques to meet the demands of today's complex healthcare environments.

  4. Software Technology Transfer and Export Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    capabilities based on research primarily conducted by U.S. laboratories , even before U.S. companies have been willing to make the investment. c) Several...configuration control tools. The tools oermit ex-ression, proof, and enforcement of correctness of software to its specifications at several levels of detail

  5. Teaching with Technology: Literature and Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Denise

    1994-01-01

    Reviews five computer programs and compact disc-read only memory (CD-ROM) products designed to improve students' reading and problem-solving skills: (1) "Reading Realities" (Teacher Support Software); (2) "Kid Rhymes" (Creative Pursuits); (3) "First-Start Biographies" (Troll Associates); (4) "My Silly CD of ABCs" (Discis Classroom Editions); and…

  6. EHR and the real meaning of technology adoption.

    PubMed

    Sappington, Rodney W

    2010-01-01

    When we seek to transform healthcare delivery through deploying EHR we are doing something quite different from merely gaining efficiency or attempting to save costs. We are transforming how patients manage disease and a healthy life. It is helpful to look to the history of medicine and informatics and then turn to voices in the field to get a clearer idea of what kind of occasion EHR adoption may represent. Automating care through systems challenges an organization's ability to broker flows of complex information, people, and efficiencies that may serve many masters other than clinical. As EHR systems are adopted with the hope of improved patient outcomes, such systems will allow for new administrative power that will have unintended effects for how and who determines the future boundaries of health.

  7. Adoption of waste minimization technology to benefit electroplaters

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, E.M.K.; Li, C.P.H.; Yu, C.M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Because of increasingly stringent environmental legislation and enhanced environmental awareness, electroplaters in Hong Kong are paying more heed to protect the environment. To comply with the array of environmental controls, electroplaters can no longer rely solely on the end-of-pipe approach as a means for abating their pollution problems under the particular local industrial environment. The preferred approach is to adopt waste minimization measures that yield both economic and environmental benefits. This paper gives an overview of electroplating activities in Hong Kong, highlights their characteristics, and describes the pollution problems associated with conventional electroplating operations. The constraints of using pollution control measures to achieve regulatory compliance are also discussed. Examples and case studies are given on some low-cost waste minimization techniques readily available to electroplaters, including dragout minimization and water conservation techniques. Recommendations are given as to how electroplaters can adopt and exercise waste minimization techniques in their operations. 1 tab.

  8. An Exploratory Study of Adoption of Software and Hardware by Faculty in the Liberal Arts and Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yohon, Teresa; Zimmerman, Don

    2006-01-01

    Universities and colleges are investing millions of dollars in information technology infrastructure to support teaching, research, and service, and thousands of dollars annually in faculty training programs. And yet, many college graduates entering the workforce lack adequate technology skills. To ascertain the frequency of faculty adoption of…

  9. Adoption of Aquaculture Technology by Fish Farmers in Imo State of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ike, Nwachukwu; Roseline, Onuegbu

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluated the level of adoption of aquaculture technology extended to farmers in Imo State, Nigeria. To improve aquaculture practice in Nigeria, a technology package was developed and disseminated to farmers in the state. This package included ten practices that the farmers were supposed to adopt. Eighty-two respondents were randomly…

  10. Organizational Influences in Technology Adoption Decisions: A Case Study of Digital Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguz, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the organizational level decision factors in technology adoption in the context of digital libraries. A qualitative case study approach was used to investigate the adoption of a specific technology, XML-based Web services, in digital libraries. Rogers' diffusion of innovations and Wenger's communities of…

  11. Essays on Adoption and Diffusion of New Technology in Supply Chains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Daeheon

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decades, network technologies across supply chains have been introduced and promoted with the premised benefits for all participants. However industry experience with an adoption process of some technology suggests that some firms have a great amount of uncertainty in estimating the benefits of its adoption. This uncertainty will…

  12. Factors Influencing New Entrant Dairy Farmer's Decision-Making Process around Technology Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Roberta; Heanue, Kevin; Pierce, Karina; Horan, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this paper are to (1) evaluate the main factors influencing grazing system technology adoption among new entrant (NE) dairy farmers within Europe and the Irish pasture-based dairy industry, and (2) to determine the extent to which economic factors influence decision-making around technology adoption and use among NEs to the…

  13. Emerging Technologies for Software-Reliant Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing...Computing 3. Social Computing 4. Data Intelligence 5. Not Sure Polling Question 7 Emerging Technologies Webinar– February 2011 © 2011 Carnegie Mellon...Commoditization of technology • End-user empowerment • Large-scale data mining • Low energy consumption • Multi-core and parallelization 8 Emerging Technologies

  14. Faculty Technology Adoption and Integration: Motivations and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mrabet, Khalid

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, technology integration has become one of the top priorities at higher education institutions. Consequently, faculty members found themselves compelled to integrate computers and other technology into their teaching, research, and public service. The purpose of this qualitative study was to gain an understanding of some of the…

  15. Does the Adoption of Plagiarism-Detection Software in Higher Education Reduce Plagiarism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youmans, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    In two studies, students at California State University, Northridge wrote papers that were checked for plagiarism using plagiarism-detection software. In the first study, half of the students in two classes were randomly selected and told by the professor that their term papers would be scanned for plagiarism using the software. Students in the…

  16. The development and technology transfer of software engineering technology at NASA. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitman, C. L.; Erb, D. M.; Izygon, M. E.; Fridge, E. M., III; Roush, G. B.; Braley, D. M.; Savely, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    The United State's big space projects of the next decades, such as Space Station and the Human Exploration Initiative, will need the development of many millions of lines of mission critical software. NASA-Johnson (JSC) is identifying and developing some of the Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) technology that NASA will need to build these future software systems. The goal is to improve the quality and the productivity of large software development projects. New trends are outlined in CASE technology and how the Software Technology Branch (STB) at JSC is endeavoring to provide some of these CASE solutions for NASA is described. Key software technology components include knowledge-based systems, software reusability, user interface technology, reengineering environments, management systems for the software development process, software cost models, repository technology, and open, integrated CASE environment frameworks. The paper presents the status and long-term expectations for CASE products. The STB's Reengineering Application Project (REAP), Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) project, and software development cost model (COSTMODL) project are then discussed. Some of the general difficulties of technology transfer are introduced, and a process developed by STB for CASE technology insertion is described.

  17. Technology identity: the role of sociotechnical representations in the adoption of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Ulucanlar, S; Faulkner, A; Peirce, S; Elwyn, G

    2013-12-01

    This study explored the sociotechnical influences shaping the naturally-occurring adoption and non-adoption of device technologies in the UK's National Health Service (NHS), amid increasing policy interest in this area. The study was informed by Science and Technology Studies and structuration and Actor Network Theory perspectives, drawing attention to the performative capacities of the technology alongside human agentic forces such as agendas and expectations, in the context of structural and macro conditions. Eight technologies were studied using a comparative ethnographic case study design and purposive and snowball sampling to identify relevant NHS, academic and industry participants. Data were collected between May 2009 and February 2012, included in-depth interviews, conference observations and printed and web-based documents and were analysed using constructivist grounded theory methods. The study suggests that while adoption decisions are made within the jurisdiction of healthcare organisations, they are shaped within a dynamic and fluid 'adoption space' that transcends organisational and geographic boundaries. Diverse influences from the industry, health care organisation and practice, health technology assessment and policy interact to produce 'technology identities.' Technology identities are composite and contested attributes that encompass different aspects of the technology (novelty, effectiveness, utility, risks, requirements) and that give a distinctive character to each. We argue that it is these socially constructed and contingent heuristic identities that shape the desirability, acceptability, feasibility and adoptability of each technology, a perspective that policy must acknowledge in seeking to intervene in health care technology adoption.

  18. The systematic evolution of a NASA software technology, Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deregt, M. P.; Dulfer, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A long range program is described whose ultimate purpose is to make possible the production of software in NASA within predictable schedule and budget constraints and with major characteristics such as size, run-time, and correctness predictable within reasonable tolerances. As part of the program a pilot NASA computer center will be chosen to apply software development and management techniques systematically and determine a set which is effective. The techniques will be developed by a Technology Group, which will guide the pilot project and be responsible for its success. The application of the technology will involve a sequence of NASA programming tasks graduated from simpler ones at first to complex systems in late phases of the project. The evaluation of the technology will be made by monitoring the operation of the software at the users' installations. In this way a coherent discipline for software design, production maintenance, and management will be evolved.

  19. Policies, economic incentives and the adoption of modern irrigation technology in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, R.; Wang, J.; Morris, J.

    2015-07-01

    The challenges China faces in terms of water availability in the agricultural sector are exacerbated by the sector's low irrigation efficiency. To increase irrigation efficiency, promoting modern irrigation technology has been emphasized by policy makers in the country. The overall goal of this paper is to understand the effect of governmental support and economic incentives on the adoption of modern irrigation technology in China, with a focus on household-based irrigation technology and community-based irrigation technology. Based on a unique data set collected at household and village levels from seven provinces, the results indicated that household-based irrigation technology has become noticeable in almost every Chinese village. In contrast, only about half of Chinese villages have adopted community-based irrigation technology. Despite the relatively high adoption level of household-based irrigation technology at the village level, its actual adoption in crop sown areas was not high, even lower for community-based irrigation technology. The econometric analysis results revealed that governmental support instruments like subsidies and extension services policies have played an important role in promoting the adoption of modern irrigation technology. Strikingly, the present irrigation pricing policy has played a significant but contradictory role in promoting the adoption of different types of modern irrigation technology. Irrigation pricing showed a positive impact on household-based irrigation technology, and a negative impact on community-based irrigation technology, possibly related to the substitution effect that is, the higher rate of adoption of household-based irrigation technology leads to lower incentives for investment in community-based irrigation technology. The paper finally concludes and discusses some policy implications.

  20. Walking the Talk: Adopting and Adapting Sustainable Scientific Software Development processes in a Small Biology Lab

    PubMed Central

    Crusoe, Michael R.; Brown, C. Titus

    2016-01-01

    The khmer software project provides both research and production functionality for largescale nucleic-acid sequence analysis. The software implements several novel data structures and algorithms that perform data pre-fltering for common bioinformatics tasks, including sequence mapping and de novo assembly. Development is driven by a small lab with one full-time developer (MRC), as well as several graduate students and a professor (CTB) who contribute regularly to research features. Here we describe our efforts to bring better design, testing, and more open development to the khmer software project as of version 1.1. The khmer software is developed openly at http://github.com/dib-lab/khmer/. PMID:27942385

  1. Guidelines on Minimum Standards for College Technology, Adopted Spring 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, Sacramento.

    The document provides guidelines that cover a comprehensive collection of tools for instructional technology for California community colleges. The Academic Senate strongly supports the concept that state-of-the art equipment and instrumentation are indispensable across the curriculum, especially in vocational areas, for the development of…

  2. Technology Adoption in Higher Education: Overcoming Anxiety through Faculty Bootcamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Terri; Wisniewski, Mary Ann; Kuhlemeyer, Greg; Isaacs, Gerald; Krzykowski, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The reluctance to design and teach online courses in higher education is often attributed to technology anxiety in faculty. This article documents a faculty development model that has successfully helped faculty overcome this obstacle. "Bootcamps," faculty development programs held at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI, were specifically and…

  3. Renewable energy technologies adoption in Kazakhstan: potentials, barriers and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatayev, Marat; Marazza, Diego; Contin, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The growth in environmental pollution alongside an increasing demand for electricity in Kazakhstan calls for a higher level of renewable energy penetration into national power systems. Kazakhstan has great potential for renewable energies from wind, solar, hydro and biomass resources that can be exploited for electricity production. In 2013, the Kazakhstani Ministry of Energy initiated a new power development plan, which aims to bring the share of renewable energy to 3% by 2020 rising to 30% by 2030 and 50% by 2050. The current contribution of renewable energy resources in the national electricity mix, however, is less than 1%. As a developing country, Kazakhstan has faced a number of barriers to increase renewable energy use, which have to be analysed and translated into a comprehensive renewable energy policy framework. This study presents an overview of the current conditions of renewable energy development in Kazakhstan. Secondly, it identifies and describes the main barriers that prevent diffusion of renewable energy technologies in Kazakhstan. Finally, the paper provides solutions to overcome specific barriers in order to successfully develop a renewable energy technology sector in Kazakhstan.

  4. Component Technology for High-Performance Scientific Simulation Software

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, T; Kohn, S; Kumfert, G

    2000-11-09

    We are developing scientific software component technology to manage the complexity of modem, parallel simulation software and increase the interoperability and re-use of scientific software packages. In this paper, we describe a language interoperability tool named Babel that enables the creation and distribution of language-independent software libraries using interface definition language (IDL) techniques. We have created a scientific IDL that focuses on the unique interface description needs of scientific codes, such as complex numbers, dense multidimensional arrays, complicated data types, and parallelism. Preliminary results indicate that in addition to language interoperability, this approach provides useful tools for thinking about the design of modem object-oriented scientific software libraries. Finally, we also describe a web-based component repository called Alexandria that facilitates the distribution, documentation, and re-use of scientific components and libraries.

  5. Factors Influencing EFL Novice Teachers' Adoption of Technologies in Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinh, Huong Thi Bao

    2009-01-01

    A primary research conducted with 12 Vietnamese teachers of English using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews has revealed that big investment into technological infrastructure and the top-down approach of implementing technological change in English teaching are not a guarantee for the adoption of technology by English teachers in their…

  6. Factors influencing the adoption of health information technologies: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Garavand, Ali; Mohseni, Mohammah; Asadi, Heshmatollah; Etemadi, Manal; Moradi-Joo, Mohammad; Moosavi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The successful implementation of health information technologies requires investigating the factors affecting the acceptance and use of them. The aim of this study was to determine the most important factors affecting the adoption of health information technologies by doing a systematic review on the factors affecting the acceptance of health information technology. Methods This systematic review was conducted by searching the major databases, such as Google Scholar, Emerald, Science Direct, Web of Science, Pubmed, and Scopus. We used various keywords, such as adoption, use, acceptance of IT in medicine, hospitals, and IT theories in health services, and we also searched on the basis of several important technologies, such as Electronic Health Records (HER), Electronic Patient Records (EPR), Electronic Medical Records (EMR), Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE), Hospital Information System (HIS), Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), and others in the 2004–2014 period. Results The technology acceptance model (TAM) is the most important model used to identify the factors influencing the adoption of information technologies in the health system; also, the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model has had a lot of applications in recent years in the health system. Ease of use, usefulness, social impact, facilitating conditions, attitudes and behavior of users are effective in the adoption of health information technologies. Conclusion By considering various factors, including ease of use, usefulness, and social impact, the rate of the adoption of health information technology can be increased. PMID:27757179

  7. Adoption of e-health technology by physicians: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    de Grood, Chloe; Raissi, Aida; Kwon, Yoojin; Santana, Maria Jose

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of this scoping review was to summarize the current literature identifying barriers and opportunities that facilitate adoption of e-health technology by physicians. Design Scoping review. Setting MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases as provided by Ovid were searched from their inception to July 2015. Studies captured by the search strategy were screened by two reviewers and included if the focus was on barriers and facilitators of e-health technology adoption by physicians. Results Full-text screening yielded 74 studies to be included in the scoping review. Within those studies, eleven themes were identified, including cost and liability issues, unwillingness to use e-health technology, and training and support. Conclusion Cost and liability issues, unwillingness to use e-health technology, and training and support were the most frequently mentioned barriers and facilitators to the adoption of e-health technology. Government-level payment incentives and privacy laws to protect health information may be the key to overcome cost and liability issues. The adoption of e-health technology may be facilitated by tailoring to the individual physician’s knowledge of the e-health technology and the use of follow-up sessions for physicians and on-site experts to support their use of the e-health technology. To ensure the effective uptake of e-health technologies, physician perspectives need to be considered in creating an environment that enables the adoption of e-health strategies. PMID:27536128

  8. Introducing Electronic Textbooks as Daily-Use Technology in Schools: A Top-Down Adoption Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Thomas K. F.

    2017-01-01

    This study took frequency of use and the adoption process into account to define the participants and external variables of the research model. School electronic textbooks are a daily-use technology and they are adopted in a compulsory, top-down way. Their introduction can evoke feelings of anxiety among teachers because of a possible increase in…

  9. Social Media Adoption and Use among Information Technology Professionals and Implications for Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundahl Philpot, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This sequential, mixed methods research addressed emerging social media use practices among IT professionals and explored lived experiences of senior IT leaders relative to successful organizational social media adoption and use. The study was informed by structuration theory and elements from the universal technology adoption and use (UTAUT)…

  10. The Bring Your Own Technology Initiative: An Examination of Teachers' Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardoza, Yanet; Tunks, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    This case study explored teachers' concerns, use, and actual practices in their adoption of the Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) initiative. Participants were 12 secondary teachers in a private school setting. The Concerns-Based Adoption Model tools provided data: Stages of Concern Questionnaire (SoCQ), Levels of Use interview, and the Innovation…

  11. Cycles of Innovation in the Adoption of Information Technology: A View for Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Martha C.

    2004-01-01

    A framework for viewing developments in information technology [IT] is presented as an elaborated model of the adoption of innovations, with implications for language teaching. The model is loosely based on that of Rogers (1995), but involves three successive phases of "innovation-adoption". The model provides a context for a discussion of CALL…

  12. The 2005 Minnesota Internet Study: An Examination of Metro/Rural Differences in Digital Technology Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Rural Policy and Development, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Since 2001 the Center for Rural Policy & Development (CRPD) has annually conducted surveys of rural Minnesota households to discern the level of computer ownership, Internet connectivity and broadband adoption throughout rural Minnesota. Since the beginning of this longitudinal effort, significant increases in technology adoption have been…

  13. Designing Handheld Software to Support Classroom Assessment: An Analysis of Conditions for Teacher Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Yarnall, Louise

    2005-01-01

    Since 2002, Project WHIRL (Wireless Handhelds In Reflection on Learning) has investigated potential uses of handheld computers in K-12 science classrooms using a teacher-involved process of software development and field trials. Te project is a three-year research and development grant from the National Science Foundation, and it is a partnership…

  14. Improvement of CSCW Software Implementation in NPD: The CAM Mechanism for a Better Adoption by Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Restrepo, Tomas; Arbelaez, Natalia; Millet, Dominique; Gidel, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Cooperation between disseminated actors is a key factor in improving new product development (NPD) performance. In the last years, numerous CSCW software applications have been introduced in the industry to support NPD with a low success rate. This is partly due to the limited insight of the organisational and human factors influencing user…

  15. Software and codes for analysis of concentrating solar power technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2008-12-01

    This report presents a review and evaluation of software and codes that have been used to support Sandia National Laboratories concentrating solar power (CSP) program. Additional software packages developed by other institutions and companies that can potentially improve Sandia's analysis capabilities in the CSP program are also evaluated. The software and codes are grouped according to specific CSP technologies: power tower systems, linear concentrator systems, and dish/engine systems. A description of each code is presented with regard to each specific CSP technology, along with details regarding availability, maintenance, and references. A summary of all the codes is then presented with recommendations regarding the use and retention of the codes. A description of probabilistic methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of concentrating solar power technologies is also provided.

  16. Foundations of software technology and theoretical computer science

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, C.E.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The papers in this book report on foundations of software technology and theoretical computer science project research results. The authors report on algorithmics: design and analysis of graph, geometric, algebraic and VLSI algorithms; data structures; average analysis; complexity theory; parallel parsing; concurrency; algebraic semantics, event structures; logic programming; algebraic properties, semantics; and software technology: program transformations, algebraic methods. These results together with the formal techniques employed to present them reflect current trends pursued by research groups around the world. The papers treat their topics by reviewing existing results, developing and demonstrating new techniques and suggesting further directions for research.

  17. Application of software technology to a future spacecraft computer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaugh, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine how major improvements in spacecraft computer systems can be obtained from recent advances in hardware and software technology. Investigations into integrated circuit technology indicated that the CMOS/SOS chip set being developed for the Air Force Avionics Laboratory at Wright Patterson had the best potential for improving the performance of spaceborne computer systems. An integral part of the chip set is the bit slice arithmetic and logic unit. The flexibility allowed by microprogramming, combined with the software investigations, led to the specification of a baseline architecture and instruction set.

  18. Lessons learned in deploying software estimation technology and tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panlilio-Yap, Nikki; Ho, Danny

    1994-01-01

    Developing a software product involves estimating various project parameters. This is typically done in the planning stages of the project when there is much uncertainty and very little information. Coming up with accurate estimates of effort, cost, schedule, and reliability is a critical problem faced by all software project managers. The use of estimation models and commercially available tools in conjunction with the best bottom-up estimates of software-development experts enhances the ability of a product development group to derive reasonable estimates of important project parameters. This paper describes the experience of the IBM Software Solutions (SWS) Toronto Laboratory in selecting software estimation models and tools and deploying their use to the laboratory's product development groups. It introduces the SLIM and COSTAR products, the software estimation tools selected for deployment to the product areas, and discusses the rationale for their selection. The paper also describes the mechanisms used for technology injection and tool deployment, and concludes with a discussion of important lessons learned in the technology and tool insertion process.

  19. Organizational factors influencing health information technology adoption in long-term-care facilities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiankai; Wang, Yangmei; Moczygemba, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Long-term care (LTC) is an important sector of the health care industry. However, the adoption of health information technology (HIT) systems in LTC facilities lags behind that in other sectors of health care. Previous literature has focused on the financial and technical barriers. This study examined the organizational factors associated with HIT adoption in LTC facilities. A survey of 500 LTC facilities in Texas enabled researchers to compile HIT indexes for further statistical analyses. A general linear model was used to study the associations between the clinical/administrative HIT indexes and organizational factors. The empirical outcomes show that the size of an LTC facility has a significant association with HIT adoption. Rural LTC facilities, especially freestanding ones, adopt less HIT than their urban counterparts, whereas freestanding LTC facilities have the lowest HIT adoption overall. There is not enough evidence to support ownership status as a significant factor in HIT adoption. Some implications are proposed, but further research is necessary.

  20. Software radio technology and applications to law enforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitola, Joseph, III

    1997-02-01

    Law enforcement use of radio includes the rapid creation of networks for the dozens of law enforcement organizations who come together in situations as diverse as the TWA 800 disaster in New York or the SunFest celebration in Palm Beach. The software radio is a proven technology for rapidly building such interoperable networks, including seamless bridging cross sub-networks of different frequency bands, channel modulations and information formats. In addition, law enforcement must manage the costs of related radio base station infrastructure, mobile units and handsets. The software radio is a collection of engineering techniques for creating radio infrastructure that can be programmed for new standards and that can be dynamically updated with new software personalities even 'over the air,' reducing the need to purchase new hardware to remain current with emerging radio interface standards. Although relatively expensive today, continuing DoD, federal and commercial investment in software radio technology will bring products within the reach of law enforcement applications within the next few years. The Modular Multifunction Information Transfer Systems (MMITS) Forum provides further impetus for cost reductions through the market efficiencies of open architecture. This article summarizes software radio technology and key trends in the marketplace including the progress of the MMITS forum. Expanded law enforcement participation in this forum would accelerate the availability of low cost products for law enforcement.

  1. Problem severity, technology adoption, and intent to seek online counseling among overseas Filipino workers.

    PubMed

    Hechanova, Ma Regina M; Tuliao, Antover P; Teh, Lota A; Alianan, Arsenio S; Acosta, Avegale

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the factors that influence the intent to seek online counseling among overseas Filipino workers (OFWs). A survey among 365 OFWs revealed that problem severity and technology adoption predict intent to use online counseling. Among the three factors of technology adoption, perceived ease in the use of technology and perceived presence of organization and technological infrastructure to support use predicted intent to use online counseling. Our hypothesis about the presence of interaction between problem severity and facilitating conditions was supported. Among individuals with low problem severity, those who perceive the presence of organization and technological infrastructure to support use have a higher intent to use online counseling. However, at higher levels of problem severity, the effect of facilitating conditions seems to disappear. These findings highlight the crucial role of preventive online mental health services. The study contributes to theory by integrating the stage model of help-seeking behaviors and technology adoption theory in predicting intent to use online counseling. Specifically, that intent to seek online counseling is affected by the existence and perceived gravity of a problem, moderated by technology adoption factors, particularly facilitating conditions. These have implications on the need to educate potential users on the advantages of counseling and ensure that migrant workers have access to technology and that the technology is easy to use.

  2. Advances in Games Technology: Software, Models, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prakash, Edmond; Brindle, Geoff; Jones, Kevin; Zhou, Suiping; Chaudhari, Narendra S.; Wong, Kok-Wai

    2009-01-01

    Games technology has undergone tremendous development. In this article, the authors report the rapid advancement that has been observed in the way games software is being developed, as well as in the development of games content using game engines. One area that has gained special attention is modeling the game environment such as terrain and…

  3. Assessment Models and Software Support for Assistive Technology Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Len; Sanche, Bob

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews requirements for considering the need for assistive technology (AT) services within the Individualized Education Program process and highlights the importance of collaborative teamwork. Current AT models are described, along with the AT Co-Planner. The use of a software version of the model is discussed. (Contains references.)…

  4. SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative): technology, survivability, and software

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report reviews the status of the various SDI technologies and system components. It analyzes the feasibility of producing dependable software of the complexity that advanced BMD systems would require. Finally, it summarizes what is now known, and unknown, about the probable survivability of such systems against concerted enemy attacks of various kinds.

  5. A Software Technology Transition Entropy Based Engineering Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    using Shannon’s statistical approach to entropy. The TechTx Entropy Feedback model 1 Piaget , Jean ...32 2. Structure Changes – Internal - External Relationship ( Piaget )... 32 3. Technology Model...instruments used as necessary between the subject and the object to be reached. ( Piaget 1977, p. 72). For philosophical musings in software engineering, we

  6. The Behavioral Intentions of Hong Kong Primary Teachers in Adopting Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Gary K. W.

    2016-01-01

    The use of educational technology by Hong Kong primary school teachers has been realized by the government's long-term support to the technology infrastructure, professional training, technical support, and development of teaching resources in local primary schools. However, the high adoption rate may not reflect the willingness of teachers to…

  7. Information Technology Adoption for Service Innovation Practices and Competitive Advantage: The Case of Financial Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, J. S.; Tsou, H. T.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The importance of information technology to current business practices has long drawn the attention of practitioners and academicians. Aim: This paper aims to broaden understanding about service innovation as a critical organizational capability through which information technology adoption influences the competitive advantage of a…

  8. An Evidence-Based Adoption of Technology Model for Remote Monitoring of Elders’ Daily Activities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    What benefit will new technologies offer if they are inadequately or not used? This work presents a meta-synthesis of adoption of technology related findings from four innovative monitoring intervention research studies with older adults and their informal and/or formal caregivers. Each study employed mixed methods analyses that lead to an understanding of the key variables that influenced adoption of telephone and Internet based wireless remote monitoring technologies by elders and their caregivers. The studies were all conducted in “real world” homes ranging from solo residences to multi-story independent living residential buildings. Insights gained came from issues not found in controlled laboratory environments but in the complex interplay of family-elder-staff dynamics around balancing safety and independence. Findings resulted in an adoption of technology model for remote monitoring of elders’ daily activities derived from evidence based research to advance both practical and theoretical development in the field of gerontechnology. PMID:21423843

  9. Dynamic Modeling of New Technology Succession: Projecting the Impact of Macro Events and Micro Behaviors On Software Market Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Sharon A.; Groothuis, Adam; Fellman, Philip Vos

    The subject of technology succession and new technology adoption in a generalized sense has been addressed by numerous authors for over one hundred years. Models which accommodate macro-level events as well as micro-level actions are needed to gain insight to future market outcomes. In the ICT industry, macro-level factors affecting technology adoption include global events and shocks, economic factors, and global regulatory trends. Micro-level elements involve individual agent actions and interactions, such as the behaviors of buyers and suppliers in reaction to each other, and to macro events. Projecting technology adoption and software market composition and growth requires evaluating a special set of technology characteristics, buyer behaviors, and supplier issues and responses which make this effort particularly challenging.

  10. Workshop and conference on Grand Challenges applications and software technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    On May 4--7, 1993, nine federal agencies sponsored a four-day meeting on Grand Challenge applications and software technology. The objective was to bring High-Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Grand Challenge applications research groups supported under the federal HPCC program together with HPCC software technologists to: discuss multidisciplinary computational science research issues and approaches, identify major technology challenges facing users and providers, and refine software technology requirements for Grand Challenge applications research. The first day and a half focused on applications. Presentations were given by speakers from universities, national laboratories, and government agencies actively involved in Grand Challenge research. Five areas of research were covered: environmental and earth sciences; computational physics; computational biology, chemistry, and materials sciences; computational fluid and plasma dynamics; and applications of artificial intelligence. The next day and a half was spent in working groups in which the applications researchers were joined by software technologists. Nine breakout sessions took place: I/0, Data, and File Systems; Parallel Programming Paradigms; Performance Characterization and Evaluation of Massively Parallel Processing Applications; Program Development Tools; Building Multidisciplinary Applications; Algorithm and Libraries I; Algorithms and Libraries II; Graphics and Visualization; and National HPCC Infrastructure.

  11. The adoption and implementation of RFID technologies in healthcare: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wen; Chu, Chao-Hsien; Li, Zang

    2012-12-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology not only offers tracking capability to locate equipment, supplies and people in real time, but also provides efficient and accurate access to medical data for health professionals. However, the reality of RFID adoption in healthcare is far behind earlier expectation. This study reviews literature on the use of RFID in healthcare/hospitals following a formal innovation-decision framework. We aim to identify the common applications, potential benefits, barriers, and critical success factors. Our study facilitates quick assessment and provides guidance for researchers and practitioners in adopting RFID in medical arenas. Many earlier adopters in healthcare found RFID to be functional and useful in such areas as asset tracking and patient identification. Major barriers to adoption include technological limitations, interference concerns, prohibitive costs, lack of global standards and privacy concerns. Better designed RFID systems with low cost and privacy issues addressed are needed to increase acceptance of RFID in healthcare.

  12. Software control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope enclosure PLC hardware using COTS software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrowman, Alastair J.; de Bilbao, Lander; Ariño, Javier; Murga, Gaizka; Goodrich, Bret; Hubbard, John R.; Greer, Alan; Mayer, Chris; Taylor, Philip

    2012-09-01

    As PLCs evolve from simple logic controllers into more capable Programmable Automation Controllers (PACs), observatories are increasingly using such devices to control complex mechanisms1, 2. This paper describes use of COTS software to control such hardware using the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) Common Services Framework (CSF). We present the Enclosure Control System (ECS) under development in Spain and the UK. The paper details selection of the commercial PLC communication library PLCIO. Implemented in C and delivered with source code, the library separates the programmer from communication details through a simple API. Capable of communicating with many types of PLCs (including Allen-Bradley and Siemens) the API remains the same irrespective of PLC in use. The ECS is implemented in Java using the observatory's framework that provides common services for software components. We present a design following a connection-based approach where all components access the PLC through a single connection class. The link between Java and PLCIO C library is provided by a thin Java Native Interface (JNI) layer. Also presented is a software simulator of the PLC based upon the PLCIO Virtual PLC. This creates a simulator operating below the library's API and thus requires no change to ECS software. It also provides enhanced software testing capabilities prior to hardware becoming available. Results are presented in the form of communication timing test data, showing that the use of CSF, JNI and PLCIO provide a control system capable of controlling enclosure tracking mechanisms, that would be equally valid for telescope mount control.

  13. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff.

    PubMed

    Langhan, Melissa L; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G

    2015-01-01

    Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practice. This study elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within 10 emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practice, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff and user friendliness were facilitators. This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology.

  14. A Trend Study: Technology Adoption in the Teaching-Learning Process by Secondary Business Teachers--2002 and 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmann, Donna H.; Kotrlik, Joe W.

    2008-01-01

    This study determined Louisiana secondary business teachers' adoption of technology for use in instruction. Teachers have increased their technology adoption for use in instruction over the past five years, although they still do not have access to the technology they need to utilize technology fully. Moderate barriers exist that prevent them from…

  15. Interorganizational transfer of technology - A study of adoption of NASA innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. K.; Rubenstein, A. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes a study on the effects of top management support, various techno-economic factors, organizational climate, and decision-making modes on the adoption of NASA innovations. Field research consisted of interviews and questionnaires directed to sixty-five organizations. Forty-five test cases where different decisions for adoption of ideas for new products or processes were made on NASA Tech Briefs were studied in relation to the effects of various factors on the degree of success of adoption, including: (1) the degree of general connection of the technology to the firm's existing operation, (2) the specificity of the relationship between the technology and some existing and recognized problem, (3) the degree of urgency of the problem to which the technology was related, (4) maturity of technology available to implement the technology, (5) availability of personnel and financial resources to implement the technology, (6) degree of top management interest, (7) the use of confrontation in joint-decision, (8) the use of smoothing in decision-making, and (9) the use of forcing in decision-making. It was found that top managements interest was important in the product cases only, and that the success of process innovations was dependent on the quality of information and the specificity of the relationship between the technology and some recognized existing problem.

  16. Ising-like agent-based technology diffusion model: Adoption patterns vs. seeding strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laciana, Carlos E.; Rovere, Santiago L.

    2011-03-01

    The well-known Ising model used in statistical physics was adapted to a social dynamics context to simulate the adoption of a technological innovation. The model explicitly combines (a) an individual's perception of the advantages of an innovation and (b) social influence from members of the decision-maker's social network. The micro-level adoption dynamics are embedded into an agent-based model that allows exploration of macro-level patterns of technology diffusion throughout systems with different configurations (number and distributions of early adopters, social network topologies). In the present work we carry out many numerical simulations. We find that when the gap between the individual's perception of the options is high, the adoption speed increases if the dispersion of early adopters grows. Another test was based on changing the network topology by means of stochastic connections to a common opinion reference (hub), which resulted in an increment in the adoption speed. Finally, we performed a simulation of competition between options for both regular and small world networks.

  17. Estimating The Rate of Technology Adoption for Cockpit Weather Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Stough, H. P.

    2000-01-01

    In February 1997, President Clinton announced a national goal to reduce the weather related fatal accident rate for aviation by 80% in ten years. To support that goal, NASA established an Aviation Weather Information Distribution and Presentation Project to develop technologies that will provide timely and intuitive information to pilots, dispatchers, and air traffic controllers. This information should enable the detection and avoidance of atmospheric hazards and support an improvement in the fatal accident rate related to weather. A critical issue in the success of NASA's weather information program is the rate at which the market place will adopt this new weather information technology. This paper examines that question by developing estimated adoption curves for weather information systems in five critical aviation segments: commercial, commuter, business, general aviation, and rotorcraft. The paper begins with development of general product descriptions. Using this data, key adopters are surveyed and estimates of adoption rates are obtained. These estimates are regressed to develop adoption curves and equations for weather related information systems. The paper demonstrates the use of adoption rate curves in product development and research planning to improve managerial decision processes and resource allocation.

  18. Families made by science. Arnold Gesell and the technologies of modern child adoption.

    PubMed

    Herman, E

    2001-12-01

    This essay considers the effort to transform child adoption into a modern scientific enterprise during the first half of the twentieth century via a case study of Arnold Gesell (1880-1961), a Yale developmentalist well known for his studies of child growth and the applied technologies that emerged from them: normative scales promising to measure and predict development. Scientific adoption was a central aspiration for many human scientists, helping professionals, and state regulators. They aimed to reduce the numerous hazards presumed to be inherent in adopting children, especially infants, who were not one's "own." By importing insights and techniques drawn from the world of science into the practical world of family formation, scientific adoption stood for kinship by design. This case study explores one point of intersection between the history of science and the history of social welfare and social policy, simultaneously illustrating the cultural progress and power of scientific authority and the numerous obstacles to its practical realization.

  19. Learning, Misallocation, and Technology Adoption: Evidence from New Malaria Therapy in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Adhvaryu, Achyuta

    I study how the misallocation of new technology to individuals who have low ex post returns to its use affects learning and adoption behavior. I focus on antimalarial treatment, which is frequently over-prescribed in many low-income country contexts where diagnostic tests are inaccessible. I show that misdiagnosis reduces average therapeutic effectiveness, because only a fraction of adopters actually have malaria, and slows the rate of social learning due to increased noise. I use data on adoption choices, the timing and duration of fever episodes, and individual blood slide confirmations of malarial status from a pilot study for a new malaria therapy in Tanzania to show that individuals whose reference groups experienced fewer misdiagnoses exhibited stronger learning effects and were more likely to adopt.

  20. Learning, Misallocation, and Technology Adoption: Evidence from New Malaria Therapy in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Achyuta

    2014-01-01

    I study how the misallocation of new technology to individuals who have low ex post returns to its use affects learning and adoption behavior. I focus on antimalarial treatment, which is frequently over-prescribed in many low-income country contexts where diagnostic tests are inaccessible. I show that misdiagnosis reduces average therapeutic effectiveness, because only a fraction of adopters actually have malaria, and slows the rate of social learning due to increased noise. I use data on adoption choices, the timing and duration of fever episodes, and individual blood slide confirmations of malarial status from a pilot study for a new malaria therapy in Tanzania to show that individuals whose reference groups experienced fewer misdiagnoses exhibited stronger learning effects and were more likely to adopt. PMID:25729112

  1. Hospital adoption of medical technology: an empirical test of alternative models.

    PubMed Central

    Teplensky, J. D.; Pauly, M. V.; Kimberly, J. R.; Hillman, A. L.; Schwartz, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examines hospital motivations to acquire new medical technology, an issue of considerable policy relevance: in this case, whether, when, and why hospitals acquire a new capital-intensive medical technology, magnetic resonance imaging equipment (MRI). STUDY DESIGN. We review three common explanations for medical technology adoption: profit maximization, technological preeminence, and clinical excellence, and incorporate them into a composite model, controlling for regulatory differences, market structures, and organizational characteristics. All four models are then tested using Cox regressions. DATA SOURCES. The study is based on an initial sample of 637 hospitals in the continental United States that owned or leased an MRI unit as of 31 December 1988, plus nonadopters. Due to missing data the final sample consisted of 507 hospitals. The data, drawn from two telephone surveys, are supplemented by the AHA Survey, census data, and industry and academic sources. PRINCIPAL FINDING. Statistically, the three individual models account for roughly comparable amounts of variance in past adoption behavior. On the basis of explanatory power and parsimony, however, the technology model is "best." Although the composite model is statistically better than any of the individual models, it does not add much more explanatory power adjusting for the number of variables added. CONCLUSIONS. The composite model identified the importance a hospital attached to being a technological leader, its clinical requirements, and the change in revenues it associated with the adoption of MRI as the major determinants of adoption behavior. We conclude that a hospital's adoption behavior is strongly linked to its strategic orientation. PMID:7649751

  2. A taxonomy and discussion of software attack technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

    2005-03-01

    Software is a complex thing. It is not an engineering artifact that springs forth from a design by simply following software coding rules; creativity and the human element are at the heart of the process. Software development is part science, part art, and part craft. Design, architecture, and coding are equally important activities and in each of these activities, errors may be introduced that lead to security vulnerabilities. Therefore, inevitably, errors enter into the code. Some of these errors are discovered during testing; however, some are not. The best way to find security errors, whether they are introduced as part of the architecture development effort or coding effort, is to automate the security testing process to the maximum extent possible and add this class of tools to the tools available, which aids in the compilation process, testing, test analysis, and software distribution. Recent technological advances, improvements in computer-generated forces (CGFs), and results in research in information assurance and software protection indicate that we can build a semi-intelligent software security testing tool. However, before we can undertake the security testing automation effort, we must understand the scope of the required testing, the security failures that need to be uncovered during testing, and the characteristics of the failures. Therefore, we undertook the research reported in the paper, which is the development of a taxonomy and a discussion of software attacks generated from the point of view of the security tester with the goal of using the taxonomy to guide the development of the knowledge base for the automated security testing tool. The representation for attacks and threat cases yielded by this research captures the strategies, tactics, and other considerations that come into play during the planning and execution of attacks upon application software. The paper is organized as follows. Section one contains an introduction to our research

  3. The Adoption and Integration of Technology Within the Classroom: Teacher Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haight, Kevin W.

    Many teachers are failing to incorporate technology into their classroom instruction. Researchers have reported a general failure in this regard; however, minimal study is available on the role of teacher self-efficacy in incorporating technology into pedagogy. This sequential, mixed-method study sought to discover whether a significant correlation exists between teacher self-efficacy and technology adoption within an urban K--12 school district. The conceptual framework for the research is grounded in Bandura's theory of self-efficacy. A sample of K--12 faculty members completed a 38-item Likert-type survey designed to measure self-efficacy as it relates to the integration of technology within the classroom. Quantitative data were analyzed using a Pearson product-moment correlation to identify relationships between self-efficacy and technology adoption. In the qualitative phase of the study, 6 participants were interviewed. Constant comparison was performed to analyze the transcribed interview data. The findings indicated a positive correlation between teacher self-efficacy and the integration of technology. The results provide valuable information needed to address the concerns and fears of teachers as they integrate technology into their classroom instruction. Implications for social change include providing educators and administrators with the needed data to develop the skills required to teach technology to their students. Acquiring technical skills will prepare students to become more competitive in a technology based society and for further educational endeavors.

  4. Barriers to Adoption of Technology-Mediated Distance Education in Higher-Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Baiyun

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to empirically investigate the institutional approach to distance education, and examine whether the factors of concerns for program cost and faculty participation could statistically predict adoption of technology-mediated distance education (TMDE) among higher-education institutions. It is elusive to base the…

  5. Challenges of Adopting the Use of Technology in Less Developed Countries: The Case of Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Jayson W.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Everett Rogers's theory of the diffusion of innovations, this article identifies the barriers, challenges, and successes in the adoption of technology training by teacher trainers in Cambodia. The analysis was based on data collected from an open-ended survey, face-to-face interviews, and document analysis. Findings reveal that the…

  6. Resistance to the Adoption of Computer Communication Technology by Communication Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herling, Thomas J.

    A study examined adoption of computer communication technology by communication faculty in a sample of schools of communication in which online database services and electronic mail were made available to individual faculty members without cost or access barriers. A mail survey sent to 178 faculty at 10 institutions was returned by 115 faculty,…

  7. The US Public Sector and Its Adoption of Service Oriented Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) provides public sector organizations the capability to provide real increases in organizational effectiveness by aiding in the efficient exchange of information. Adoption of advanced IT such as service oriented environments, Web 2.0, and bespoke systems such as Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) promises to markedly…

  8. Perception Gaps and the Adoption of Information Technology in the Clinical Healthcare Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Implementation of information systems has lagged in many areas of clinical healthcare for a variety of reasons. Economics, data complexity and resistance are among the often quoted roadblocks. Research suggests that physicians play a major part in the adoption, use and diffusion of information technology (IT) in clinical settings. There are also…

  9. Factors That Affect Faculty Attitudes toward Adoption of Technology-Rich Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moukali, Khalid Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Universities worldwide are transitioning to blended learning where technology is used to enhance and augment traditional face-to-face instruction. Investigation of how well blended learning strategies are accepted and adopted in multicultural settings is needed to facilitate this transition. This study investigated factors and barriers that…

  10. A Productivity Analysis of Adopting Information Technology for the Treatment of Autism, with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dao, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of information technology might improve the productivity of autism treatment centers. Productivity improvement might resolve the problem of the insufficient supply of autism treatment service. The problem caused tremendous financial burdens to private individuals and public healthcare systems. The researcher explored the relationships…

  11. Forecasting Consumer Adoption of Information Technology and Services--Lessons from Home Video Forecasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfenstein, Bruce C.

    1989-01-01

    Describes research that examined the strengths and weaknesses of technological forecasting methods by analyzing forecasting studies made for home video players. The discussion covers assessments and explications of correct and incorrect forecasting assumptions, and their implications for forecasting the adoption of home information technologies…

  12. An Integrated Model for the Adoption of Information Technologies in U.S. Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia Molina, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    This thesis fulfills the requirements of a Doctor of Liberal Studies degree at Georgetown University. It advances our knowledge of the rationale and mechanisms surrounding the spread, adoption and abandonment of information and communication technologies in tertiary education institutions in the United States. This interdisciplinary thesis…

  13. Assessment of the Adoption of Agroforestry Technologies by Limited-Resource Farmers in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Paula E.; Owooh, Bismark; Idassi, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Agroforestry is a natural resource management system that integrates trees, forages, and livestock. The study reported here was conducted to determine farmers' knowledge about and willingness to adopt agroforestry technologies in North Carolina. The study reported participants were primarily older, male farmers, suggesting the need to attract more…

  14. Examining the Role of Transformational Leadership in Technology Adoption: Evidence from Bruneian Technical & Vocational Establishments (TVE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seyal, Afzaal H.

    2015-01-01

    This pioneering study discusses the thirty-five Bruneian technical & vocational institutions of top management (principals, deputy principals, senior masters, ICT coordinators and technical administrators) leadership style with the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). The study uses a survey approach further to…

  15. The Adoption and Use of Health Information Technology in Rural Areas: Results of a National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Ranjit; Lichter, Michael I.; Danzo, Andrew; Taylor, John; Rosenthal, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Context: Health information technology (HIT) is a national policy priority. Knowledge about the special needs, if any, of rural health care providers should be taken into account as policy is put into action. Little is known, however, about rural-urban differences in HIT adoption at the national level. Purpose: To conduct the first national…

  16. Adoption of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) by Agricultural Science and Extension Teachers in Abuja, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabi, Olugbenga Omotayo

    2016-01-01

    This study examined adoption of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) by agricultural science and extension teachers in Abuja, Nigeria. Specifically, the objectives are to: identify the background and demographic characteristics of agricultural science and extension teachers in the study area; examine the factors influencing adoption…

  17. Farmers' Adoption of Soil Conservation Technologies: A Case Study from Osun State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junge, B.; Deji, O.; Abaidoo, R.; Chikoye, D.; Stahr, K.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the attitude of farmers towards erosion and the adoption of appropriate soil conservation technologies (SCTs). For the survey, farmers were selected from the communities Esa Oke, Elwure and Owode-Ede and Akoda in Osun State in Nigeria. In the first three communities farmers did receive training on…

  18. Technology Adoption in Secondary Mathematics Teaching in Kenya: An Explanatory Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamau, Leonard Mwathi

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the factors related to technology adoption by secondary mathematics teachers in Nyandarua and Nairobi counties in the Republic of Kenya. Using a sequential explanatory mixed methods approach, I collected qualitative data from interviews and classroom observations of six teachers to better understand statistical results from the…

  19. Performance Management Practices, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Adoption and Managed Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagaari, James R. K.; Munene, John C.; Ntayi, Joseph Mpeera

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the need for managers of public universities to pay attention to performance management practices and information communication technology (ICT) adoption in order to achieve successful managed performance. Design/methodology/approach: Using a disproportionate stratified purposive approach, a…

  20. Quantifying the Effect of Discussion Group Membership on Technology Adoption and Farm Profit on Dairy Farms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Thia; Heanue, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Participatory extension, specifically farm discussion groups, has become a very popular form of agricultural extension in Ireland. The purpose of this article is to assess its effectiveness in promoting the adoption of new technologies and improving farm profit. Design/Methodology/Approach: Following a review of the background and theory…

  1. Diffusion and Adoption of Innovations in Fertilizer-Related Agricultural Production Technology in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrnes, Kerry J.

    This monograph reviews a wide range of research literature on the diffusion and adoption of innovations in agricultural production technology in the developing countries, with particular emphasis on the practice of using commercially purchased, inorganic fertilizer as a source of plant nutrients. It is intended that the report's documentation of…

  2. Technology Adoption and Welfare under a Monopoly: An Illustration of Microeconomic Policy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Uses a graphical analysis to determine the importance of quantity for consumer welfare and to examine the manner in which private and social welfare diverge in a monopoly. Criticizes the opinion that technology adoption by a monopoly always assumes a uniformly downward shift in the marginal cost curve. (MJP)

  3. Educational and Occupational Motivation and Adoption of Agricultural Technology among Rural Residents: A Preliminary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunte, Christopher N.

    A random sample, predominantly black, of about 100 rural Louisiana residents was interviewed in 1979-80 to determine the extent to which rural residents' educational and occupational motivations were related to their adoption of agricultural technology. Published literature relevant to the subject was reviewed. With the exception of an…

  4. The Impact of Treadle Pump Irrigation Technology Adoption on Poverty in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeoti, Adetola; Barry, Boubacar; Namara, Regassa; Kamara, Abdul

    2009-01-01

    Treadle pump (TP) technology has been promoted by Enterprise Works in West Africa as an alternative to the traditional rope and bucket irrigation. The aim is to improve output and incomes and reduce poverty among farm households. This paper reports a short term (two years) assessment of the dynamics of its adoption and impacts, with a special…

  5. Thai Hospitals' Adoption of Information Technology: A Theory Development and Nationwide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theera-Ampornpunt, Nawanan

    2011-01-01

    Background: With documented benefits and recent public policies, health information technology (IT) has received increasing attention in recent years. However, knowledge about Thailand's state of hospital IT adoption is lacking. The literature also identifies organizational management practices that are important to health IT implementation, but…

  6. Adopting new medical technologies in Russian hospitals: what causes inefficiency? (qualitative study).

    PubMed

    Shishkin, Sergey; Zasimova, Liudmila

    2017-03-02

    The adoption of new medical technologies often generates losses in efficiency associated with the excess or insufficient acquisition of new equipment, an inappropriate choice (in terms of economic and clinical parameters) of medical equipment, and its poor use. Russia is a good example for exploring the problem of the ineffective adoption of new medical technologies due to the massive public investment in new equipment for medical institutions in 2006-2013. This study examines the procurement of new technologies in Russian hospitals to find the main causes of inefficiency. The research strategy was based on in-depth semistructured interviews with representatives of prominent actors (regional health care authorities, hospital executives, senior physicians). The main result is that inefficiencies arise from the contradiction between hospitals' and authorities' motivation for acquiring new technologies: hospitals tend to adopt technologies which bring benefits to their department heads and physicians and minimize maintenance and servicing costs, while the authorities' main concern is the initial cost of the technology.

  7. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 774 - General Technology and Software Notes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General Technology and Software Notes... Software Notes 1. General Technology Note. The export of “technology” that is “required” for the... necessary” information. 2. General Software Note. License Exception TSU (“mass market” software)...

  8. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Damevski, Kostadin

    2009-03-30

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discover through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedened computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative hig-performance scientific computing.

  9. Achieving U.S. Health information technology adoption: the need for a third hand.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Blackford

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. health care information technology (HIT) market is broken; broad-scale adoption of HIT is not occurring despite considerable evidence of its impact on the quality of care and patient safety. Although adoption of HIT will not cure all that ails health care, it is an important step toward transformation of the U.S. health care delivery system. In this commentary I describe several critical issues pertaining to the HIT market failure and several ways in which the federal government may act as a deft and gentle "Third Hand" to assist the Invisible Hand of Adam Smith.

  10. Adoption of information technology enabled innovations by primary care physicians: model and questionnaire development.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, D. R.; Dixon, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    A survey instrument was developed based on a model of the substantive factors influencing the adoption of Information Technology (IT) enabled innovations by physicians. The survey was given to all faculty and residents in a Primary Care teaching institution. Computerized literature searching was the IT innovation studied. The results support the role of the perceived ease of use and the perceived usefulness of an innovation as well as the intent to use an innovation as factors important for implementation. The model and survey instruments developed show significant potential to enhance our understanding of the process of implementing IT innovations such that Physicians will adopt them. PMID:7950004

  11. 15 CFR 740.6 - Technology and software under restriction (TSR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Technology and software under... REGULATIONS LICENSE EXCEPTIONS § 740.6 Technology and software under restriction (TSR). (a) Scope. License Exception TSR permits exports and reexports of technology and software where the Commerce Country...

  12. 15 CFR 740.6 - Technology and software under restriction (TSR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Technology and software under... REGULATIONS LICENSE EXCEPTIONS § 740.6 Technology and software under restriction (TSR). (a) Scope. License Exception TSR permits exports and reexports of technology and software where the Commerce Country...

  13. 15 CFR 740.6 - Technology and software under restriction (TSR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Technology and software under... REGULATIONS LICENSE EXCEPTIONS § 740.6 Technology and software under restriction (TSR). (a) Scope. License Exception TSR permits exports and reexports of technology and software where the Commerce Country...

  14. 15 CFR 740.6 - Technology and software under restriction (TSR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Technology and software under... REGULATIONS LICENSE EXCEPTIONS § 740.6 Technology and software under restriction (TSR). (a) Scope. License Exception TSR permits exports and reexports of technology and software where the Commerce Country...

  15. 15 CFR 740.6 - Technology and software under restriction (TSR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Technology and software under... REGULATIONS LICENSE EXCEPTIONS § 740.6 Technology and software under restriction (TSR). (a) Scope. License Exception TSR permits exports and reexports of technology and software where the Commerce Country...

  16. Clinical technology assessment, cost-effective adoption, and quality management by hospitals in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Veluchamy, S; Saver, C L

    1990-06-01

    Technology assessment in the 1990s must become an integral part of a hospital's strategic priority goals, with active participation of physicians and top management. Technology assessment should involve a wide range of criteria and health care consumer expectations, so that the appropriateness, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and quality improvement aspects of new technologies are all considered. Mount Carmel Health's Advanced Treatment and Bionics Institute (ATBI), established in 1986, monitors significant developments in new technologies and performs technology and outcomes assessments. ATBI activities, which have facilitated adoption of 35 treatment-based projects, are integrated into the existing QA structure of Mount Carmel hospitals. Through resolution of identified problems, quality care can be promoted, while providing patients innovative medical treatments.

  17. Guide to CASE Adoption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    from Ovum Ltd. and the Software Technology Support Center at Hill Air Force Base (UT 84056). Overviews of relevant issues, including CASE adoption, can...Integration Battle." Ovum , 1989. Feuche, M. "How to Use CASE Technology." MIS Week, 10, 37 (Sep 1989), 29. Firth, R., Mosley, V., Pethia, R., Roberts, L...Computer Science Berkeey CA 94704 symllable on Internet. anonomcus FTP laGpll ubicatkin sue-isnodeunomc~Icasa-nniduct-11 hax OVUM Ltd 7 Rathbon Street A

  18. Use of Energy-Efficient Technologies: U.S. Marine Corps Perceptions to Adoption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    the opinion makers from an influence campaign. The elite adopts an innovation and communicates it throughout their personal network, which spurs ...of the game is direct, the technology or product is a representation. In both focus groups Marines gave examples of using gear they had previously...on Marines. In both focus groups, examples of Marines using a certain piece of gear were based on the gear used in Call of Duty. The comments seem to

  19. The use of governance tools in promotion of health care information technology adoption by physicians.

    PubMed

    Noblin, Alice M; Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Liu, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records are important technology for health care with promises of streamlining and improving care. However, physicians have been slow to adopt the technology usually because of financial constraints. Third-party payers, including Medicare and Medicaid, are coming forward with solutions and funding. While payers have the most to gain in terms of cost savings, they have been slow to provide a solution to the financial dilemmas posed by the new technology. This article details some governance tools that are frequently used to alleviate the financial concerns. Grants, loans, and tax expenditures are some of the options available to physicians to purchase electronic health records and other types of health care information technology.

  20. 15 CFR 740.13 - Technology and software-unrestricted (TSU).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Technology and software-unrestricted... REGULATIONS LICENSE EXCEPTIONS § 740.13 Technology and software—unrestricted (TSU). This license exception authorizes exports and reexports of operation technology and software; sales technology and...

  1. 15 CFR 740.13 - Technology and software-unrestricted (TSU).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Technology and software-unrestricted... REGULATIONS LICENSE EXCEPTIONS § 740.13 Technology and software—unrestricted (TSU). This license exception authorizes exports and reexports of operation technology and software; sales technology and...

  2. Subjective Norms as a Driver of Mass Communication Students' Intentions to Adopt New Media Production Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopp, Toby M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the impact of subjective norms on mass communication students' intentions to adopt new media production technologies was explored. The results indicated that subjective norms play an instrumental role in explaining behavioral intentions to adopt new media technologies. Moreover, the data indicated that public relations students…

  3. An Empirical Study of Factors Affecting Mobile Wireless Technology Adoption for Promoting Interactive Lectures in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Chin Lay; Balakrishnan, Vimala

    2016-01-01

    Use of mobile technology is widespread, particularly among the younger generation. There is a huge potential for utilizing such technology in lecture classes with large numbers of students, serving as an interaction tool between the students and lecturers. The challenge is to identify significant adoption factors to ensure effective adoption of…

  4. Social Influence on Information Technology Adoption and Sustained Use in Healthcare: A Hierarchical Bayesian Learning Method Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hao, Haijing

    2013-01-01

    Information technology adoption and diffusion is currently a significant challenge in the healthcare delivery setting. This thesis includes three papers that explore social influence on information technology adoption and sustained use in the healthcare delivery environment using conventional regression models and novel hierarchical Bayesian…

  5. Government Technology Acquisition Policy: The Case of Proprietary versus Open Source Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    This article begins by explaining the concepts of proprietary and open source software technology, which are now competing in the marketplace. A review of recent individual and cooperative technology development and public policy advocacy efforts, by both proponents of open source software and advocates of proprietary software, subsequently…

  6. How can environmental regulations promote clean coal technology adoption in APEC developing economies?

    SciTech Connect

    2007-11-15

    The study examines both existing and emerging regulatory frameworks in order to determine which type of regulations that would be most effective at promoting clean coal technology adoption in development Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC) economies and would be practical to implement. regulations targeting air emissions; regulations targeting water use; and regulations concerning coal combustion by-products. When considering the potential effect of existing and new environmental regulations on the adoption of clean coal the analysis of technologies was organised into three categories: environmental control technologies; high efficiency coal combustion technologies; and carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS). To target the recommendations towards APEC economies that would benefit the most from this analysis, the study focused on developing and transition APEC economies that are expected to rely on coal for a large part of their future generating capacity. These economies include China, Indonesia, the Philippines, the Russian Federation, Thailand, and Vietnam. ACARP provided funding to this study, under Project C15078. 10 figs., 14 tabs., 10 apps.

  7. Propulsion/flight control integration technology (PROFIT) software system definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, C. M.; Hastings, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Propulsion Flight Control Integration Technology (PROFIT) program is designed to develop a flying testbed dedicated to controls research. The control software for PROFIT is defined. Maximum flexibility, needed for long term use of the flight facility, is achieved through a modular design. The Host program, processes inputs from the telemetry uplink, aircraft central computer, cockpit computer control and plant sensors to form an input data base for use by the control algorithms. The control algorithms, programmed as application modules, process the input data to generate an output data base. The Host program formats the data for output to the telemetry downlink, the cockpit computer control, and the control effectors. Two applications modules are defined - the bill of materials F-100 engine control and the bill of materials F-15 inlet control.

  8. The intensive margin of technology adoption--Experimental evidence on improved cooking stoves in rural Senegal.

    PubMed

    Bensch, Gunther; Peters, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Today, almost 3 billion people in developing countries rely on biomass as primary cooking fuel, with profound negative implications for their well-being. Improved biomass cooking stoves are alleged to counteract these adverse effects. This paper evaluates take-up and impacts of low-cost improved stoves through a randomized controlled trial. The randomized stove is primarily designed to curb firewood consumption, but not smoke emissions. Nonetheless, we find considerable effects not only on firewood consumption, but also on smoke exposure and, consequently, smoke-related disease symptoms. The reduced smoke exposure results from behavioural changes in terms of increased outside cooking and a reduction in cooking time. We conclude that in order to assess the effectiveness of a technology-oriented intervention, it is critical to not only account for the incidence of technology adoption - the extensive margin - but also for the way the new technology is used - the intensive margin.

  9. A Comparison of Learning Technologies for Teaching Spacecraft Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straub, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The development of software for spacecraft represents a particular challenge and is, in many ways, a worst case scenario from a design perspective. Spacecraft software must be "bulletproof" and operate for extended periods of time without user intervention. If the software fails, it cannot be manually serviced. Software failure may…

  10. The use of software agents and distributed objects to integrate enterprises: Compatible or competing technologies?

    SciTech Connect

    Pancerella, C.M.

    1998-04-01

    Distributed object and software agent technologies are two integration methods for connecting enterprises. The two technologies have overlapping goals--interoperability and architectural support for integrating software components--though to date little or no integration of the two technologies has been made at the enterprise level. The primary difference between these two technologies is that distributed object technologies focus on the problems inherent in connecting distributed heterogeneous systems whereas software agent technologies focus on the problems involved with coordination and knowledge exchange across domain boundaries. This paper addresses the integration of these technologies in support of enterprise integration across organizational and geographic boundaries. The authors discuss enterprise integration issues, review their experiences with both technologies, and make recommendations for future work. Neither technology is a panacea. Good software engineering techniques must be applied to integrate an enterprise because scalability and a distributed software development team are realities.

  11. Systematic review of factors influencing the adoption of information and communication technologies by healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Desmartis, Marie; Labrecque, Michel; Car, Josip; Pagliari, Claudia; Pluye, Pierre; Frémont, Pierre; Gagnon, Johanne; Tremblay, Nadine; Légaré, France

    2012-02-01

    This systematic review of mixed methods studies focuses on factors that can facilitate or limit the implementation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in clinical settings. Systematic searches of relevant bibliographic databases identified studies about interventions promoting ICT adoption by healthcare professionals. Content analysis was performed by two reviewers using a specific grid. One hundred and one (101) studies were included in the review. Perception of the benefits of the innovation (system usefulness) was the most common facilitating factor, followed by ease of use. Issues regarding design, technical concerns, familiarity with ICT, and time were the most frequent limiting factors identified. Our results suggest strategies that could effectively promote the successful adoption of ICT in healthcare professional practices.

  12. Software reconfigurable processor technologies: the key to long-life infrastructure for future space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, J.; Farrington, A.; Gray, A.

    2001-01-01

    They present an overview of long-life reconfigurable processor technologies and of a specific architecture for implementing a software reconfigurable (software-defined) network processor for space applications.

  13. Technology Integration before Student Outcomes: Factors Affecting Teacher Adoption of Technology in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandyopadhyay, Alankar

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1920s, ICTs have been endorsed as solutions to challenges of access and quality in education. Proponents have also supported technology use in education on grounds that it could potentially impact cognitive, affective, and pedagogical outcomes. Based on these perceived benefits, many developed and developing countries have been…

  14. Assessing the Determinants of Information Technology Adoption in Jamaica's Public Sector Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Thomas, II.

    2010-01-01

    Superior performance improvement and productivity gains are normally achieved when labor or ordinary capital is substituted by information technology (IT) in organizations. Consequently, on average, organizations have spent more than 50% of their total capital budget on IT, but have not gained commensurate return on their investments, partly due…

  15. Quantifying the Impacts of Irrigation Technology Adoption on Water Resources in the High Plains Aquifer, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Anthony; Cotterman, Kayla; Hyndman, David

    2016-04-01

    Producers in key agricultural regions worldwide are contending with increasing demand while simultaneously managing declining water resources. The High Plains Aquifer (HPA) is the largest aquifer system in the United States, and supplied most of the water to irrigate 6 million hectares in 2012. Water levels in the central and southern sections of the aquifer have steadily declined, as groundwater recharge in this semi-arid region is insufficient to meet water demands. Individual irrigators have responded to these declines by moving from less efficient irrigation technologies to those that apply water more precisely. Yet, these newer technologies have also allowed for water to be pumped from lower-yielding wells, thus extending the life of any given well and allowing drawdown to continue. Here we use a dataset of the annual irrigation technology choices from every irrigator in the state of Kansas, located in the Central High Plains. This irrigation data, along with remotely-sensed Leaf Area Index, crop choice, and irrigated area, drives a coupled surface/groundwater simulation created using the Landscape Hydrology Model (LHM) to examine the impacts of changing irrigation technology on the regional water cycle, and water levels in the HPA. The model is applied to simulate cases in which no irrigation technology change had occurred, and complete adoption of newer technologies to better understand impacts of management choices on regional water resources.

  16. Nurses' adoption of technology: application of Rogers' innovation-diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-Ting

    2004-11-01

    This qualitative study applied Everett Rogers' innovation-diffusion model to analyze nurses' perceptions toward using a computerized care plan system. Twelve nurses from three respiratory intensive care units in Taiwan voluntarily participated in a one-on-one, in-depth interview. Data were analyzed by constant comparative analysis. The content that emerged was compared with the model's five innovation characteristics (relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, trialability, and observability), as perceived by new users. Results indicate that Rogers' model can accurately describe nurses' behavior during the process of adopting workplace innovations. Related issues that emerged deserve further attention to help nurses make the best use of technology.

  17. Attitudes of Patients Toward Adoption of 3D Technology in Pain Assessment: Qualitative Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Past research has revealed that insufficient pain assessment could, and often, has negative implications on the provision of quality health care. While current available clinical approaches have proven to be valid interventions, they are expensive and can often fail in providing efficient pain measurements. The increase in the prevalence of pain calls for more intuitive pain assessment solutions. Computerized alternatives have already been proposed both in the literature and in commerce, but may lack essential qualities such as accuracy of the collected clinical information and effective patient-clinician interaction. In response to this concern, 3-dimensional (3D) technology could become the innovative intervention needed to support and improve the pain assessment process. Objective The purpose of this analysis was to describe qualitative findings from a study which was designed to explore patients’ perceptions of adopting 3D technology in the assessment of their pain experience related to important themes that might positively or negatively influence the quality of the pain assessment process. Methods The perceptions of 60 individuals with some form of pain in the area of Greater London were collected through semi-structured interviews. Of the 60 respondents, 24 (43%) produced usable responses and were analyzed for content using principles of the grounded theory approach and thematic analysis, in order to gain insight into the participants’ beliefs and attitudes towards adopting 3D technology in pain assessment. Results The analysis identified 4 high-level core themes that were representative of the participants’ responses. These themes indicated that most respondents valued “the potential of 3D technology to facilitate better assessment of pain” as the most useful outcome of adopting a 3D approach. Respondents also expressed their opinions on the usability of the 3D approach, with no important concerns reported about its perceived ease of

  18. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 774 - General Technology and Software Notes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General Technology and Software Notes... REGULATIONS THE COMMERCE CONTROL LIST Pt. 774, Supp. 2 Supplement No. 2 to Part 774—General Technology and Software Notes 1. General Technology Note. The export of “technology” that is “required” for...

  19. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 774 - General Technology and Software Notes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General Technology and Software Notes... REGULATIONS THE COMMERCE CONTROL LIST Pt. 774, Supp. 2 Supplement No. 2 to Part 774—General Technology and Software Notes 1. General Technology Note. The export of “technology” that is “required” for...

  20. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 774 - General Technology and Software Notes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General Technology and Software Notes... REGULATIONS THE COMMERCE CONTROL LIST Pt. 774, Supp. 2 Supplement No. 2 to Part 774—General Technology and Software Notes 1. General Technology Note. The export of “technology” that is “required” for...

  1. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 774 - General Technology and Software Notes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General Technology and Software Notes... REGULATIONS THE COMMERCE CONTROL LIST Pt. 774, Supp. 2 Supplement No. 2 to Part 774—General Technology and Software Notes 1. General Technology Note. The export of “technology” that is “required” for...

  2. 31 CFR 545.205 - Prohibited importation of goods, software, technology, or services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., software, technology, or services. 545.205 Section 545.205 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating..., technology, or services. Except as otherwise authorized, and notwithstanding any contract entered into or any..., software, technology, or services owned or controlled by the Taliban or persons whose property or...

  3. SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative) Technology, Survivability and Software.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    influencing the cost of software de- velopment.) Fairley lists 17 different factors that affect the quality and productivity of soft- ware." There is...engineers; ’Barry W. Boehm. Software Engineering Economic» (Enjrlewood Cliffs.NJ: Prentice-Hall. 1981). p. 16. ■Richard Fairley , Software Engineering

  4. Adopting Clean Fuels and Technologies on School Buses. Pollution and Health Impacts in Children

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Jennifer; Sheppard, Lianne; Kaufman, Joel D.; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Davey, Mark E.; Sullivan, James R.; Jahnke, Jordan; Koenig, Jane; Larson, Timothy V.; Liu, L. J. Sally

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: More than 25 million American children breathe polluted air on diesel school buses. Emission reduction policies exist, but the health impacts to individual children have not been evaluated. Methods: Using a natural experiment, we characterized the exposures and health of 275 school bus riders before, during, and after the adoption of clean technologies and fuels between 2005 and 2009. Air pollution was measured during 597 trips on 188 school buses. Repeated measures of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), lung function (FEV1, FVC), and absenteeism were also collected monthly (1,768 visits). Mixed-effects models longitudinally related the adoption of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs), closed crankcase ventilation systems (CCVs), ultralow-sulfur diesel (ULSD), or biodiesel with exposures and health. Measurements and Main Results: Fine and ultrafine particle concentrations were 10–50% lower on buses using ULSD, DOCs, and/or CCVs. ULSD adoption was also associated with reduced FeNO (−16% [95% confidence interval (CI), −21 to −10%]), greater changes in FVC and FEV1 (0.02 [95% CI, 0.003 to 0.05] and 0.01 [95% CI, −0.006 to 0.03] L/yr, respectively), and lower absenteeism (−8% [95% CI, −16.0 to −0.7%]), with stronger associations among patients with asthma. DOCs, and to a lesser extent CCVs, also were associated with improved FeNO, FVC growth, and absenteeism, but these findings were primarily restricted to patients with persistent asthma and were often sensitive to control for ULSD. No health benefits were noted for biodiesel. Extrapolating to the U.S. population, changed fuel/technologies likely reduced absenteeism by more than 14 million/yr. Conclusions: National and local diesel policies appear to have reduced children’s exposures and improved health. PMID:25867003

  5. Stimuli Influencing Small Business Owner Adoption of a Software-as-a-Service Solution: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cianciotta, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing has moved beyond the early adoption phase and recent trends demonstrate encouraging adoption rates. This utility-based computing model offers significant IT flexibility and potential for cost savings for organizations of all sizes, but may be the most attractive to small businesses because of limited capital to fund required…

  6. Training software using virtual-reality technology and pre-calculated effective dose data.

    PubMed

    Ding, Aiping; Zhang, Di; Xu, X George

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the development of a software package, called VR Dose Simulator, which aims to provide interactive radiation safety and ALARA training to radiation workers using virtual-reality (VR) simulations. Combined with a pre-calculated effective dose equivalent (EDE) database, a virtual radiation environment was constructed in VR authoring software, EON Studio, using 3-D models of a real nuclear power plant building. Models of avatars representing two workers were adopted with arms and legs of the avatar being controlled in the software to simulate walking and other postures. Collision detection algorithms were developed for various parts of the 3-D power plant building and avatars to confine the avatars to certain regions of the virtual environment. Ten different camera viewpoints were assigned to conveniently cover the entire virtual scenery in different viewing angles. A user can control the avatar to carry out radiological engineering tasks using two modes of avatar navigation. A user can also specify two types of radiation source: Cs and Co. The location of the avatar inside the virtual environment during the course of the avatar's movement is linked to the EDE database. The accumulative dose is calculated and displayed on the screen in real-time. Based on the final accumulated dose and the completion status of all virtual tasks, a score is given to evaluate the performance of the user. The paper concludes that VR-based simulation technologies are interactive and engaging, thus potentially useful in improving the quality of radiation safety training. The paper also summarizes several challenges: more streamlined data conversion, realistic avatar movement and posture, more intuitive implementation of the data communication between EON Studio and VB.NET, and more versatile utilization of EDE data such as a source near the body, etc., all of which needs to be addressed in future efforts to develop this type of software.

  7. Study of fault tolerant software technology for dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Zacharias, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    The major aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using systems-based failure detection isolation and compensation (FDIC) techniques in building fault-tolerant software and extending them, whenever possible, to the domain of software fault tolerance. First, it is shown that systems-based FDIC methods can be extended to develop software error detection techniques by using system models for software modules. In particular, it is demonstrated that systems-based FDIC techniques can yield consistency checks that are easier to implement than acceptance tests based on software specifications. Next, it is shown that systems-based failure compensation techniques can be generalized to the domain of software fault tolerance in developing software error recovery procedures. Finally, the feasibility of using fault-tolerant software in flight software is investigated. In particular, possible system and version instabilities, and functional performance degradation that may occur in N-Version programming applications to flight software are illustrated. Finally, a comparative analysis of N-Version and recovery block techniques in the context of generic blocks in flight software is presented.

  8. The effect of hospital-physician integration on health information technology adoption.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Eric

    2013-10-01

    The US federal government has recently made a substantial investment to enhance the US health information technology (IT) infrastructure. Previous literature on the impact of IT on firm performance across multiple industries has emphasized the importance of a process of co-invention whereby organizations develop complementary practices to achieve greater benefit from their IT investments. In health care, employment of physicians by hospitals can confer greater administrative control to hospitals over physicians' actions and resources and thus enable the implementation of new technology and initiatives aimed at maximizing benefit from use of the technology. In this study, I tested for the relationship between hospital employment of physicians and hospitals' propensity to use health IT. I used state laws that prohibit hospital employment of physicians as an instrument to account for the endogenous relationship with hospital IT use. Hospital employment of physicians is associated with significant increases in the probability of hospital health IT use. Therefore, subsidization of health IT among hospitals not employing physicians may be less efficient. Furthermore, state laws prohibiting hospitals from employing physicians may inhibit adoption of health IT, thus working against policy initiatives aimed at promoting use of the technology.

  9. Exploratory research for the development of a computer aided software design environment with the software technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardwick, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Field studies were conducted by MCC to determine areas of research of mutual interest to MCC and JSC. NASA personnel from the Information Systems Directorate and research faculty from UHCL/RICIS visited MCC in Austin, Texas to examine tools and applications under development in the MCC Software Technology Program. MCC personnel presented workshops in hypermedia, design knowledge capture, and design recovery on site at JSC for ISD personnel. The following programs were installed on workstations in the Software Technology Lab, NASA/JSC: (1) GERM (Graphic Entity Relations Modeler); (2) gIBIS (Graphic Issues Based Information System); and (3) DESIRE (Design Recovery tool). These applications were made available to NASA for inspection and evaluation. Programs developed in the MCC Software Technology Program run on the SUN workstation. The programs do not require special configuration, but they will require larger than usual amounts of disk space and RAM to operate properly.

  10. Technology-driven dietary assessment: a software developer’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Buday, Richard; Tapia, Ramsey; Maze, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary researchers need new software to improve nutrition data collection and analysis, but creating information technology is difficult. Software development projects may be unsuccessful due to inadequate understanding of needs, management problems, technology barriers or legal hurdles. Cost overruns and schedule delays are common. Barriers facing scientific researchers developing software include workflow, cost, schedule, and team issues. Different methods of software development and the role that intellectual property rights play are discussed. A dietary researcher must carefully consider multiple issues to maximize the likelihood of success when creating new software. PMID:22591224

  11. A Practical Guide to the Technology and Adoption of Software Process Automation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    building capabilities (Phase 1) and the process example (Phase 2). They are, in fact, a modification of the set suggested in [ Weider - man 86], and are...J that some set of external logical conditions has occurred, such as a word processor updating a file, in conjunction with " Joe " being the editor on

  12. Faculty and organizational characteristics associated with informatics/health information technology adoption in DNP programs.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Cathy R; Meek, Julie A; Walker, Patricia Hinton

    2014-01-01

    Nursing informatics/health information technology are key components of graduate nursing education and an accreditation requirement, yet little is known about the extent to which doctor of nursing practice (DNP) curricula include these content domains. The purpose of this descriptive study was to elicit perceptions of DNP program directors relative to (a) whether and how the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's (AACN's) Essential IV standard has been met in their DNP programs; (b) whether the Technology Informatics Guiding Educational Reform Initiative Foundation's Phase II competencies have been integrated in their programs; and (c) the faculty and organizational characteristics associated with the adoption of the AACN's Essential IV. In 2011, an electronic survey was sent to all 138 DNP program directors identified on the AACN Web site with an 81.2% response rate. Findings include variation in whether and how programs have integrated informatics/health information technology content, a lack of informatics-certified and/or master's-prepared faculty, and a perceived lack of faculty awareness of informatics curricular guidelines. DNP program director and dean awareness and support of faculty informatics education, use of informatics competency guidelines, and national policy and stimulus funding support are recommended to promote curricular inclusion and the engagement of nurses in strong informatics practices.

  13. Adoption Space and the Idea-to-Market Process of Health Technologies.

    PubMed

    Saranummi, Niilo; Beuscart, Regis; Black, Norman; Maglaveras, Nicos; Strano, Chiara; Karavidopoulou, Youla

    2016-01-01

    Although Europe 'produces' excellent science, it has not been equally successful in translating scientific results into commercially successful companies in spite of European and national efforts invested in supporting the translation process. The Idea-to-Market process is highly complex due to the large number of actors and stakeholders. ITECH was launched to propose recommendations which would accelerate the Idea-to-Market process of health technologies leading to improvements in the competitiveness of the European health technology industry in the global markets. The project went through the following steps: defining the Idea-to-Market process model; collection and analysis of funding opportunities; identification of 12 gaps and barriers in the Idea-to-Market process; a detailed analysis of these supported by interviews; a prioritization process to select the most important issues; construction of roadmaps for the prioritized issues; and finally generating recommendations and associated action plans. Seven issues were classified as in need of actions. Three of these are part of the ongoing Medical Device Directive Reform (MDR), namely health technology assessment, post-market surveillance and regulatory process, and therefore not within the scope of ITECH. Recommendations were made for eHealth taxonomy; Education and training; Clinical trials and Adoption space and Human Factors Engineering (HFE).

  14. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, Alan

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  15. Estimating net changes in life-cycle emissions from adoption of emerging civil infrastructure technologies.

    PubMed

    Amponsah, Isaac; Harrison, Kenneth W; Rizos, Dimitris C; Ziehl, Paul H

    2008-01-01

    There is a net emissions change when adopting new materials for use in civil infrastructure design. To evaluate the total net emissions change, one must consider changes in manufacture and associated life-cycle emissions, as well as changes in the quantity of material required. In addition, in principle one should also consider any differences in costs of the two designs because cost savings can be applied to other economic activities with associated environmental impacts. In this paper, a method is presented that combines these considerations to permit an evaluation of the net change in emissions when considering the adoption of emerging technologies/materials for civil infrastructure. The method factors in data on differences between a standard and new material for civil infrastructure, material requirements as specified in designs using both materials, and price information. The life-cycle assessment approach known as economic input-output life-cycle assessment (EIO-LCA) is utilized. A brief background on EIO-LCA is provided because its use is central to the method. The methodology is demonstrated with analysis of a switch from carbon steel to high-performance steel in military bridge design. The results are compared with a simplistic analysis that accounts for the weight reduction afforded by use of the high-performance steel but assuming no differences in manufacture.

  16. 15 CFR 742.13 - Communications intercepting devices; software and technology for communications intercepting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Communications intercepting devices; software and technology for communications intercepting devices. 742.13 Section 742.13 Commerce and Foreign... Communications intercepting devices; software and technology for communications intercepting devices. (a)...

  17. 15 CFR 742.13 - Communications intercepting devices; software and technology for communications intercepting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Communications intercepting devices; software and technology for communications intercepting devices. 742.13 Section 742.13 Commerce and Foreign... Communications intercepting devices; software and technology for communications intercepting devices. (a)...

  18. A Survey of Hardware and Software Technologies for the Rapid Development of Multimedia Instructional Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganesan, Nanda

    2008-01-01

    A survey of hardware and software technologies was conducted to identify suitable technologies for the development of instructional modules representing various instructional approaches. The approaches modeled were short PowerPoint presentations, chalk-and-talk type of lectures and software tutorials. The survey focused on identifying application…

  19. "Willing but unwilling": attitudinal barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology among older adults.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Willis, Erin; Cameron, Glen; Geana, Mugur

    2014-06-01

    While much research focuses on adoption of electronic health-care records and other information technology among health-care providers, less research explores patient attitudes. This qualitative study examines barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology, particularly personal electronic health records, among older adults. We conducted in-depth interviews (30-90 min duration) with 35 American adults, aged 46-72 years, to determine their perceptions of and attitudes toward home-based health information technology. Analysis of interview data revealed that most barriers to adoption fell under four themes: technological discomfort, privacy or security concerns, lack of relative advantage, and perceived distance from the user representation. Based on our findings, systems to promote home-based health information technology should incorporate familiar computer applications, alleviate privacy and security concerns, and align with older adults' active and engaged self-image.

  20. The Impact of Function Extraction Technology on Next-Generation Software Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    sections summarize this research stream. 2.2 Fundamentals of Program Behavior Calculation The function-theoretic model of software [ Hausler 90...for FX technology to be applied in these areas. The central thesis of this research is that the ultra-large-scale systems of the fu - ture can be...Productivity Perceptions on the Use of Software Process Improve- ment Innovations." Information and Software Technology 47, 8 (June 2005): 543-553. [ Hausler 90

  1. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS) Program: SPMS Training Class: Student Handout. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-02

    Sequence 03705-001B 30 September 1991 (3 SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY FOR ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS ( STARS ) PROGRAM ELEGTE m AUG15 1991 Ö I 0 SPMS Training...September 1991 SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY FOR ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS ( STARS ) PROGRAM SPMS Training Class: Student Handout Addendum to: Software...document is the student handout prepared for the "SEI/ STARS P.3 Asset Acquisition Sub-task" training class. The student handout covers basic aspects

  2. Final Report for "Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software"

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlana Shasharina

    2010-12-01

    The goal of the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software is to fundamentally changing the way scientific software is developed and used by bringing component-based software development technologies to high-performance scientific and engineering computing. The role of Tech-X work in TASCS project is to provide an outreach to accelerator physics and fusion applications by introducing TASCS tools into applications, testing tools in the applications and modifying the tools to be more usable.

  3. Adopted technologies and basis for selection at municipal solid waste landfill facilities constructed in recent years in Japan.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Inoue, Yuzo

    2010-08-01

    In Japan, as the construction of new landfill facilities has become extremely difficult and the number of sites procured for landfill construction has decreased due to the 'not in my back yard' (NIMBY) syndrome, it has been assumed that the adoption of new technologies has increased. As the performance of new technologies exceeds that of conventional technologies, it is also assumed that residents would prefer the use of these new technologies and therefore any construction plans should be devised to ensure their use to ensure residents' satisfaction. In the present study, the technologies adopted for municipal solid waste landfill facilities constructed in recent years (2000 to 2004) in Japan and the bases for their adoption were investigated by means of a questionnaire survey. One of the main bases for the adoption of new technologies was the request by residents for new technology for roofing, rather than the other for new technologies for barrier systems, leachate treatment, and monitoring. In addition, it is possible that the municipalities did not recognize the difference between conventional and new technologies as defined in this study. The roof-type landfill that isolates waste from the surrounding environment was one of the requirements for the construction of new landfill facilities identified in the present investigation, and in this regard waste isolation should be required in all circumstances.

  4. Cooperative Learning and Technology: Using Interactive Group Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockterman, David

    1998-01-01

    Discusses cooperative learning and considers the use of interactive group software. Highlights include students' roles in groups; group accountability and peer pressure; the use of strong narrative; and characteristics to look for when reviewing software for interactive group use, including opportunity and context for group interaction and social…

  5. Technological Adoption and Organizational Adaptation: Developing a Model for Human Resource Management in an International Business Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gattiker, Urs E.

    A model of technological training has two dimensions: level of cultural stability and employee's level of cognitive ability. Each dimension has two variables. The variables of cultural stability are (1) technological adoption and organizational adaptation and (2) structure of work and work processes. For cognitive ability, the variables are…

  6. Examining Transformative Faculty Development Factors to Advance Technology Adoption and Diffusion at a Campus-Based Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKissic, Stephanie Camille

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-method research, in the context of a case study was to examine faculty concerns with integrating technologies and the influences and motivations that lead to technology adoption and diffusion in the classroom. Specifically, the study examined the conceptual frameworks of Rogers' Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT) and…

  7. New Aspect of Technology Adoption: A Case Study of Students' Self-Made English-Learning Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tai, Yaming; Ting, Yu-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how students perceive and adopt technology in their daily life is particularly relevant to today's Information and Communication Technology (ICT) environment, in which versatile ICT tools are becoming more and more pervasive, almost ubiquitous in our day-to-day activities. In the context of English as a foreign language, this study…

  8. Factors Related to the Adoption of IT Emerging Technologies by Research and Non-Research Based Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Then, Keri Ann; Amaria, Pesi

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the adoption of information technology (IT) emerging technology by higher education institutions with a focus on non-research and research based institutions categorized by Carnegie Mellon classifications that are members of EDUCAUSE, a higher education non-profit organization, whose mission is the use of IT in higher…

  9. Factors of Online Learning Adoption: A Comparative Juxtaposition of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndubisi, Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Organisational investments in information technologies have increased significantly in the past few decades. All around the globe and in Malaysia particularly, a number of educational institutions are experimenting with e-learning. Adopting the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and the technology acceptance model (TAM) this article tries to…

  10. Seven Processes that Enable NASA Software Engineering Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housch, Helen; Godfrey, Sally

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews seven processes that NASA uses to ensure that software is developed, acquired and maintained as specified in the NPR 7150.2A requirement. The requirement is to ensure that all software be appraised for the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI). The enumerated processes are: (7) Product Integration, (6) Configuration Management, (5) Verification, (4) Software Assurance, (3) Measurement and Analysis, (2) Requirements Management and (1) Planning & Monitoring. Each of these is described and the group(s) that are responsible is described.

  11. Data storage technology: Hardware and software, Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sable, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    This project involves the development of more economical ways of integrating and interfacing new storage devices and data processing programs into a computer system. It involves developing interface standards and a software/hardware architecture which will make it possible to develop machine independent devices and programs. These will interface with the machine dependent operating systems of particular computers. The development project will not be to develop the software which would ordinarily be the responsibility of the manufacturer to supply, but to develop the standards with which that software is expected to confirm in providing an interface with the user or storage system.

  12. The value of site-specific information and the environment: technology adoption and pesticide use under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Isik, Murat; Hudson, Darren; Coble, Keith H

    2005-08-01

    Remote sensing technology offers an opportunity to significantly increase the amount of site-specific information about field characteristics such as pest populations. Coupled with variable rate application technologies, this added information has the potential to provide environmental benefits through reduced pesticide applications. However, producers face a complicated adoption decision because output prices and crop yields are uncertain. A model is developed to examine the potential value of remote sensing information to pesticide applications in an option-value framework under uncertainty. Simulations suggest that remote sensing information could decrease pesticide use, but uncertainty and irreversibility are likely to limit technological adoption by farmers. Potential cost-share subsidies are discussed.

  13. Health Literacy and Health Information Technology Adoption: The Potential for a New Digital Divide

    PubMed Central

    Mabry-Flynn, Amanda; Champlin, Sara; Donovan, Erin E; Pounders, Kathrynn

    2016-01-01

    . Regarding privacy perceptions of HIT and institutional trust, patients with greater health literacy often demonstrated decreased privacy perceptions for HIT tools including fitness apps (P<.001) and nutrition apps (P<.001). Health literacy was negatively associated with trust in government (P<.001), media (P<.001), and technology companies (P<.001). Interestingly, health literacy score was positively associated with trust in health care (P=.03). Conclusions Patients with low health literacy were less likely to use HIT tools or perceive them as easy or useful, but they perceived information on HIT as private. Given the fast-paced evolution of technology, there is a pressing need to further the understanding of how health literacy is related to HIT app adoption and usage. This will ensure that all users receive the full health benefits from these technological advances, in a manner that protects health information privacy, and that users engage with organizations and providers they trust. PMID:27702738

  14. Understanding the Adoption Process of National Security Technology: An Integration of Diffusion of Innovations and Volitional Behavior Theories.

    PubMed

    Iles, Irina A; Egnoto, Michael J; Fisher Liu, Brooke; Ackerman, Gary; Roberts, Holly; Smith, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    After the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the U.S. government initiated several national security technology adoption programs. The American public, however, has been skeptical about these initiatives and adoption of national security technologies has been mandated, rather than voluntary. We propose and test a voluntary behavioral intention formation model for the adoption of one type of new security technology: portable radiation detectors. Portable radiation detectors are an efficient way of detecting radiological and nuclear threats and could potentially prevent loss of life and damage to individuals' health. However, their functioning requires that a critical mass of individuals use them on a daily basis. We combine the explanatory advantages of diffusion of innovation with the predictive power of two volitional behavior frameworks: the theory of reasoned action and the health belief model. A large sample survey (N = 1,482) investigated the influence of factors identified in previous diffusion of innovation research on portable radiation detector adoption intention. Results indicated that nonfinancial incentives, as opposed to financial incentives, should be emphasized in persuasive communications aimed at fostering adoption. The research provides a new integration of diffusion of innovation elements with determinants of volitional behavior from persuasion literature, and offers recommendations on effective communication about new security technologies to motivate public adoption and enhance national safety.

  15. Adopting Open-Source Software Applications in U. S. Higher Education: A Cross-Disciplinary Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rooij, Shahron Williams

    2009-01-01

    Higher Education institutions in the United States are considering Open Source software applications such as the Moodle and Sakai course management systems and the Kuali financial system to build integrated learning environments that serve both academic and administrative needs. Open Source is presumed to be more flexible and less costly than…

  16. Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Presented are reviews of two computer software packages for Apple II computers; "Organic Spectroscopy," and "Videodisc Display Program" for use with "The Periodic Table Videodisc." A sample spectrograph from "Organic Spectroscopy" is included. (CW)

  17. Technology Transfer Challenges for High-Assurance Software Engineering Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Penix, John; Markosian, Lawrence Z.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our experience with the challenges thar we are currently facing in our effort to develop advanced software verification and validation tools. We categorize these challenges into several areas: cost benefits modeling, tool usability, customer application domain, and organizational issues. We provide examples of challenges in each area and identrfj, open research issues in areas which limit our ability to transfer high-assurance software engineering tools into practice.

  18. Natural language processing-based COTS software and related technologies survey.

    SciTech Connect

    Stickland, Michael G.; Conrad, Gregory N.; Eaton, Shelley M.

    2003-09-01

    Natural language processing-based knowledge management software, traditionally developed for security organizations, is now becoming commercially available. An informal survey was conducted to discover and examine current NLP and related technologies and potential applications for information retrieval, information extraction, summarization, categorization, terminology management, link analysis, and visualization for possible implementation at Sandia National Laboratories. This report documents our current understanding of the technologies, lists software vendors and their products, and identifies potential applications of these technologies.

  19. The Adoption of New Endodontic Technology by Indian Dental Practitioners: A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ruchi; Rai, Rochna

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To ascertain the adoption of new endodontic technology in general dental practice in India in 2011. Methodology: A postal questionnaire survey comprising 26 questions was sent to 700 general dental practitioners. The questions covered professional activity, root canal preparation and instrumentation, choice of irrigants and intracanal medicaments, choice of obturation techniques and other aspects of endodontics. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Chi-square (χ2) test at 0.05 level of significance. Results: The overall response rate was 88%. The results showed that rubber dams were used by 27% of dental practitioners in India. The most widely used irrigant was sodium hypochlorite, which was used by 33% of the respondents. Thirty nine percent of the practitioners were still incorporating only hand files during the cleaning and shaping phase of treatment. The technique of choice was both step back and crown down (35%). Calcium hydroxide was found to be the most frequently used (62%) intracanal medicament. Lateral condensation with guttapercha (61%) was the most common method used for obturation. Majority used zinc oxide eugenol as a sealer (55%). The post obturation restoration was done mostly by composite material (46%). Most of the respondents placed crowns after root canal treatment. Digital radiography was reported as being used by 17% of the respondents. There was no difference between males and females with respect to the incorporation of new technologies in dentistry. They had been incorporated significantly more by respondents who held postgraduate qualifications and had professional activities of <5 years. Conclusion: The results indicated that new endodontic technology and materials are slowly being incorporated in clinical practice of endodontics in India. This survey shows the importance of continuing dental education for practitioners to update their knowledge. PMID:24392420

  20. The Relationships between Selected Organizational Variables and ATM Technology Adoption in Campus Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Engui

    1998-01-01

    Determines the relationships between ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) adoption and four organizational variables: university size, type, finances, and information-processing maturity. Identifies the current status of ATM adoption in campus networking in the United States. Contains 33 references. (DDR)

  1. Accuracy and Adoption of Wearable Technology Used by Active Citizens: A Marathon Event Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Suleder, Julian; Zowalla, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background Today, runners use wearable technology such as global positioning system (GPS)–enabled sport watches to track and optimize their training activities, for example, when participating in a road race event. For this purpose, an increasing amount of low-priced, consumer-oriented wearable devices are available. However, the variety of such devices is overwhelming. It is unclear which devices are used by active, healthy citizens and whether they can provide accurate tracking results in a diverse study population. No published literature has yet assessed the dissemination of wearable technology in such a cohort and related influencing factors. Objective The aim of this study was 2-fold: (1) to determine the adoption of wearable technology by runners, especially “smart” devices and (2) to investigate on the accuracy of tracked distances as recorded by such devices. Methods A pre-race survey was applied to assess which wearable technology was predominantly used by runners of different age, sex, and fitness level. A post-race survey was conducted to determine the accuracy of the devices that tracked the running course. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate whether age, sex, fitness level, or track distance were influencing factors. Recorded distances of different device categories were tested with a 2-sample t test against each other. Results A total of 898 pre-race and 262 post-race surveys were completed. Most of the participants (approximately 75%) used wearable technology for training optimization and distance recording. Females (P=.02) and runners in higher age groups (50-59 years: P=.03; 60-69 years: P<.001; 70-79 year: P=.004) were less likely to use wearables. The mean of the track distances recorded by mobile phones with combined app (mean absolute error, MAE=0.35 km) and GPS-enabled sport watches (MAE=0.12 km) was significantly different (P=.002) for the half-marathon event. Conclusions A great variety of vendors (n=36) and devices

  2. Facilitators and Barriers to Adopting Robotic-Assisted Surgery: Contextualizing the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology

    PubMed Central

    BenMessaoud, Christine; Kharrazi, Hadi; MacDorman, Karl F.

    2011-01-01

    Robotic-assisted surgical techniques are not yet well established among surgeon practice groups beyond a few surgical subspecialties. To help identify the facilitators and barriers to their adoption, this belief-elicitation study contextualized and supplemented constructs of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) in robotic-assisted surgery. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 21 surgeons comprising two groups: users and nonusers. The main facilitators to adoption were Perceived Usefulness and Facilitating Conditions among both users and nonusers, followed by Attitude Toward Using Technology among users and Extrinsic Motivation among nonusers. The three main barriers to adoption for both users and nonusers were Perceived Ease of Use and Complexity, Perceived Usefulness, and Perceived Behavioral Control. This study's findings can assist surgeons, hospital and medical school administrators, and other policy makers on the proper adoption of robotic-assisted surgery and can guide future research on the development of theories and framing of hypotheses. PMID:21283719

  3. Optimizing technology development and adoption in medical imaging using the principles of innovation diffusion, part II: practical applications.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2012-02-01

    Successful adoption of new technology development can be accentuated by learning and applying the scientific principles of innovation diffusion. This is of particular importance to areas within the medical imaging practice which have lagged in innovation; perhaps, the most notable of which is reporting which has remained relatively stagnant for over a century. While the theoretical advantages of structured reporting have been well documented throughout the medical imaging community, adoption to date has been tepid and largely relegated to the academic and breast imaging communities. Widespread adoption will likely require an alternative approach to innovation, which addresses the heterogeneity and diversity of the practicing radiologist community along with the ever-changing expectations in service delivery. The challenges and strategies for reporting innovation and adoption are discussed, with the goal of adapting and customizing new technology to the preferences and needs of individual end-users.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT; ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION SUPPORT SOFTWARE; ENVIRONMENTAL SOFTWARE SITEPRO VERSION 2.0"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the...

  5. Information and communications technology in U.S. health care: why is adoption so slow and is slower better?

    PubMed

    Christensen, Michael C; Remler, Dahlia

    2009-12-01

    Politicians across the political spectrum support greater investment in health care information and communications technology (ICT) and expect it to significantly decrease costs and improve health outcomes. We address three policy questions about adoption of ICT in health care: First, why is there so little adoption? Second, what policies will facilitate and accelerate adoption? Third, what is the best pace for adoption? We first describe the unusual economics of ICT, particularly network externalities, and then determine how those economics interact with and are exacerbated by the unusual economics of health care. High replacement costs and the need for technical compatibility are general barriers to ICT adoption and often result in lock-in to adopted technologies. These effects are compounded in health care because the markets for health care services, health insurance, and labor are interlinked. In addition, the government interacts with all markets in its role as an insurer. Patient heterogeneity further exacerbates these effects. Finally, ICT markets are often characterized by natural monopolies, resulting in little product diversity, an effect ill-suited to patient heterogeneity. The ongoing process for setting technical standards for health care ICT is critical but needs to include all relevant stakeholders, including patient groups. The process must be careful (i.e., slow), flexible, and allow for as much diversity as possible. We find that waiting to adopt ICT is a surprisingly wise policy.

  6. An empirical study of opinion leader effects on mobile information technology adoption in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haijing; Padman, Rema; Telang, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    Given the increasing number of applications but slow adoption of IT, including mobile IT, in healthcare, it is important to develop a better understanding of the contextual factors that motivate IT adoption by physicians. Although studies have shown that age or gender may affect physicians' IT adoption, those factors cannot be controlled when deploying a new IT. Therefore, the current research examines empirical evidence of a contextual factor, opinion leader effects, on IT adoption in healthcare that can be influenced by organizational policies. Using a unique panel dataset of physicians' usage of a mobile clinical IT from a community hospital, we observe a significant result that physicians under the influence of opinion leaders are three times more likely to adopt the IT than otherwise. This finding suggests that incentivizing a small proportion of opinion leaders to adopt a new IT has the potential to motivate wider adoption across the organization.

  7. Software Quality Evaluation Models Applicable in Health Information and Communications Technologies. A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Villamor Ordozgoiti, Alberto; Delgado Hito, Pilar; Guix Comellas, Eva María; Fernandez Sanchez, Carlos Manuel; Garcia Hernandez, Milagros; Lluch Canut, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Information and Communications Technologies in healthcare has increased the need to consider quality criteria through standardised processes. The aim of this study was to analyse the software quality evaluation models applicable to healthcare from the perspective of ICT-purchasers. Through a systematic literature review with the keywords software, product, quality, evaluation and health, we selected and analysed 20 original research papers published from 2005-2016 in health science and technology databases. The results showed four main topics: non-ISO models, software quality evaluation models based on ISO/IEC standards, studies analysing software quality evaluation models, and studies analysing ISO standards for software quality evaluation. The models provide cost-efficiency criteria for specific software, and improve use outcomes. The ISO/IEC25000 standard is shown as the most suitable for evaluating the quality of ICTs for healthcare use from the perspective of institutional acquisition.

  8. Virtual Reality Robotic Programming Software in the Technology Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geissler, Jason; Knott, Patrick J.; Vazquez, Matthew R.; Wright, John R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Robots make a wonderful context for teaching students about many concepts important to technological literacy. They can provide an authentic context and produce high levels of motivation. According to Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology (STL) (ITEA, 2000, 2002), there are six core concepts that should be…

  9. The adoption of medications in substance abuse treatment: associations with organizational characteristics and technology clusters.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Ducharme, Lori J; Roman, Paul M

    2007-03-16

    Despite growing interest in closing the "research to practice gap", there are few data on the availability of medications in American substance abuse treatment settings. Recent research suggests that organizational characteristics may be associated with medication availability. It is unclear if the availability of medications can be conceptualized in terms of "technology clusters", where the availability of a medication is positively associated with the likelihood that other medications are also offered. Using data from 403 privately funded and 363 publicly funded specialty substance abuse treatment centers in the US, this research models the availability of agonist medications, naltrexone, disulfiram, and SSRIs. Bivariate logistic regression models indicated considerable variation in adoption across publicly funded non-profit, government-owned, privately funded non-profit, and for-profit treatment centers. Some of these differences were attenuated by organizational characteristics, such as accreditation, the presence of staff physicians, and the availability of detoxification services. There was some evidence that naltrexone, disulfiram, and SSRIs represent a group of less intensely regulated medications that is distinct from more intensely regulated medications. These types of medications were associated with somewhat different correlates. Future research should continue to investigate the similarities and differences in the predictors of medication availability across national contexts.

  10. An Economic Analysis of Pigeonpea Seed Production Technology and Its Adoption Behavior: Indian Context

    PubMed Central

    Channanamchery, Radhika; Singh, R. K.; Kethineni, Udaya Bhaskar; Ram, H.; Prasad, S. Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    The present study was based on primary data collected from 100 farmers in Gulbarga district of Karnataka, India, during the agricultural year 2013-2014. Study shows that average land holding size of pigeonpea seed farmers was higher in comparison to grain farmers and district average. The study illustrates a ratio of 32 : 68 towards fixed and variable costs in pigeonpea certified seed production with a total cost of ₹ 39436 and the gross and net returns were ₹ 73300 and ₹ 33864 per hectare, respectively. The total cost of cultivation, gross return, and net return in pigeonpea seed production were higher by around 23, 32, and 44 percent than grain production, respectively. Hence, production of certified seed has resulted in a win-win situation for the farmers with higher yield and increased returns. The decision of the farmer on adoption of seed production technology was positively influenced by his education, age, land holding, irrigated land, number of crops grown, and extension contacts while family size was influencing negatively. Higher yield and profitability associated with seed production can be effectively popularized among farmers, resulting in increased certified seed production. PMID:27478865

  11. Finding a Balance: Computer Software, Intellectual Property and the Challenge of Technological Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report, prepared by the Office of Technological Assessment (OTA) in response to a request from the House Committee on the Judiciary, examines the rapid and complex technological changes and trends in computer software technologies and their possible effects on the nation's intellectual property system. The three policy issues identified are:…

  12. Transitions in Classroom Technology: Instructor Implementation of Classroom Management Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, David; Chung, Christina; Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The authors look at how business instructor needs are fulfilled by classroom management software (CMS), such as Moodle, and why instructors are sometimes slow to implement it. Instructors at different universities provided both qualitative and quantitative responses regarding their use of CMS. The results indicate that the top needs fulfilled by…

  13. Leveraging Information Technology. Track VI: Hardware/Software Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers from the 1987 CAUSE conference's Track VI, Hardware/Software Strategies, are presented. They include: "Integrated Systems--The Next Steps" (Morris A. Hicks); "Administrative Microcomputing--Roads Traveled, Lessons Learned" (David L. Smallen); "Murphy's First Law and Its Application to Administrative…

  14. Utilizing Technology for FCS Education: Selecting Appropriate Interactive Webinar Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoumenou, Virginie; Sigman-Grant, Madeleine; Coleman, Gayle; Malekian, Fatemeh; Zee, Julia M. K.; Fountain, Brent J.; Marsh, Akela

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify commonly used interactive webinar software platforms and to conduct a testing session on best practices related to an interactive webinar. The study employed the Adobe Connect and the Maestro Conference platforms. The 15 participants experienced five best practices: pre-work, polling, breakout room,…

  15. Orchestrating the Dynamic Adaptation of Distributed Software With Process Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Scanning and Software Distribution After Auto Discovery, IBM Red Book, May 9, 2003. [35] Marimba Inc., Marimba Embedded Management - Creating Self...Updating Appliances and Devices, Marimba White Paper, Mountain View, Ca., USA, 2001, http://www.marimba.com/products/datasheets/Embedded-wp-april

  16. Teaching with Technology. Software That's Right for You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Denise

    1995-01-01

    Recommends software to help teachers plan curriculum in the areas of comprehensive language arts ("Cornerstone"); writing and information ("Keroppi Day Hopper"); creative writing and imagination ("Imagination Express"); reading ("Jo-Jo's Reading Circus"); math ("Careers in Math: From Architects to Astronauts") and nature ("Eyewitness"). Provides…

  17. IMMEX Problem-Solving Software: Integrating Curriculum into Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underdahl, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    Explains the history of IMMEX (Interactive Multi-Media Exercises) and its evolution into a Web-delivered, interactive software program, which assesses student understanding of curriculum in K-16 classrooms by tracking its application in real-world, problem-solving scenarios. Discusses performance feedback for teachers and students, and offers…

  18. Problem-Solving Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    CBR Express software solves problems by adapting sorted solutions to new problems specified by a user. It is applicable to a wide range of situations. The technology was originally developed by Inference Corporation for Johnson Space Center's Advanced Software Development Workstation. The project focused on the reuse of software designs, and Inference used CBR as part of the ACCESS prototype software. The commercial CBR Express is used as a "help desk" for customer support, enabling reuse of existing information when necessary. It has been adopted by several companies, among them American Airlines, which uses it to solve reservation system software problems.

  19. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS) Program. The Cleanroom Engineering Software Development Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-28

    required for performing a Cleanroom Engineering effort from the standpoint of specifiers, developers, certifiers, and managers . The manual was developed...Process, Process Management , Defined Process, Cleanroom, 302 Software Engineering 16. PRICE CODE N/A 17. ’.CURIrY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY...Findings 1-4 1.3 IR-70 Project Profile 1-5 1.4 Acknowledgements 1-5 2. The Cleanroom Engineering Process: The Management Basis 2.1 Why Cleanroom

  20. Building Software Development Capacity to Advance the State of Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luterbach, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Educational technologists may advance the state of the field by increasing capacity to develop software tools and instructional applications. Presently, few academic programs in educational technology require even a single computer programming course. Further, the educational technologists who develop software generally work independently or in…

  1. Design and Implementation of Mapping Software: Developing Technology and Geography Skills in Two Different Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Robert S.; Drakes, Jerri; Deek, Fadi P.

    2002-01-01

    A software development collaboration project designed to maximize the skill sets and interests of school children and teachers, educational software technologists and researchers, and college undergraduates is presented. The work brings elementary school children with college seniors and technology consultants to implement a problem-solving…

  2. Determinants of Farmers' Adoption of Improved Soil Conservation Technology in a Middle Mountain Watershed of Central Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Krishna R.; Sitaula, Bishal K.; Nyborg, Ingrid L. P.; Paudel, Giridhari S.

    2008-08-01

    This study explores different socio-economic and institutional factors influencing the adoption of improved soil conservation technology (ISCT) on Bari land (Rainfed outward sloping terraces) in the Middle Mountain region of Central Nepal. Structured questionnaire survey and focus group discussion methods were applied to collect the necessary information from farm households. The logistic regression model predicted seven factors influencing the adoption of improved soil conservation technology in the study area including years of schooling of the household head, caste of the respondent, land holding size of the Bari land, cash crop vegetable farming, family member occupation in off farm sector, membership of the Conservation and Development Groups, and use of credit. The study showed that technology dissemination through multi-sectoral type community based local groups is a good option to enhance the adoption of improved soil conservation technology in the Middle Mountain farming systems in Nepal. Planners and policy makers should formulate appropriate policies and programs considering the farmers’ interest, capacity, and limitation in promoting improved soil conservation technology for greater acceptance and adoption by the farmers.

  3. 15 CFR 770.3 - Interpretations related to exports of technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1. 770.3 Section 770.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade... technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1. (a) Introduction. This section is intended to provide you additional guidance on how to determine whether your technology or software would be...

  4. 31 CFR 560.418 - Release of technology or software in the United States or a third country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Release of technology or software in... IRANIAN TRANSACTIONS REGULATIONS Interpretations § 560.418 Release of technology or software in the United States or a third country. The release of technology or software in the United States, or by a...

  5. 31 CFR 560.418 - Release of technology or software in the United States or a third country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release of technology or software in... IRANIAN TRANSACTIONS REGULATIONS Interpretations § 560.418 Release of technology or software in the United States or a third country. The release of technology or software in the United States, or by a...

  6. 15 CFR 770.3 - Interpretations related to exports of technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1. 770.3 Section 770.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade... technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1. (a) Introduction. This section is intended to provide you additional guidance on how to determine whether your technology or software would be...

  7. 15 CFR 770.3 - Interpretations related to exports of technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1. 770.3 Section 770.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade... technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1. (a) Introduction. This section is intended to provide you additional guidance on how to determine whether your technology or software would be...

  8. 31 CFR 545.204 - Prohibited exportation, reexportation, sale, or supply of goods, software, technology, or services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., sale, or supply of goods, software, technology, or services. 545.204 Section 545.204 Money and Finance... exportation, reexportation, sale, or supply of goods, software, technology, or services. Except as otherwise... States, or by a U.S. person, wherever located, of any goods, software, technology (including...

  9. 15 CFR 770.3 - Interpretations related to exports of technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1. 770.3 Section 770.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade... technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1. (a) Introduction. This section is intended to provide you additional guidance on how to determine whether your technology or software would be...

  10. 15 CFR 770.3 - Interpretations related to exports of technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1. 770.3 Section 770.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade... technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1. (a) Introduction. This section is intended to provide you additional guidance on how to determine whether your technology or software would be...

  11. 31 CFR 560.418 - Release of technology or software in the United States or a third country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Release of technology or software in... IRANIAN TRANSACTIONS AND SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Interpretations § 560.418 Release of technology or software in the United States or a third country. The release of technology or software in the United...

  12. 31 CFR 560.418 - Release of technology or software in the United States or a third country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Release of technology or software in... IRANIAN TRANSACTIONS REGULATIONS Interpretations § 560.418 Release of technology or software in the United States or a third country. The release of technology or software in the United States, or by a...

  13. 31 CFR 560.418 - Release of technology or software in the United States or a third country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Release of technology or software in... IRANIAN TRANSACTIONS AND SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Interpretations § 560.418 Release of technology or software in the United States or a third country. The release of technology or software in the United...

  14. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (CONCURRENT VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  15. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (DEC VAX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkin, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  16. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (MASSCOMP VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  17. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (SUN VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  18. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (SILICON GRAPHICS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  19. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-31

    SPONSORING4MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING I MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER Electronic Systems Center/ AVK Air Force Materiel Command...teamwork is now the normal mode of operation, and that people are excited about the software process being established and are motivated to produce high...Report CDRL 35503-004 Page 23 0 7. Recommendations Recommendations based on this work are made in three areas as follows: 1) Actions to support continued

  20. Factors Influencing the Adoption of Cloud Storage by Information Technology Decision Makers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheelock, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation uses a survey methodology to determine the factors behind the decision to adopt cloud storage. The dependent variable in the study is the intent to adopt cloud storage. Four independent variables are utilized including need, security, cost-effectiveness and reliability. The survey includes a pilot test, field test and statistical…

  1. Adoption of Technological Innovations: A Case Study of the ASSESS Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Sarah; Brown, Shane; Davis, Denny; LeBeau, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In engineering education, assessment instruments are often developed to evaluate programs and projects. Unfortunately, these innovations are not always adopted by intended audiences. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations (DI) Theory provides a framework to analyze characteristics of an innovation that will affect adoption. The Appraisal System for…

  2. Not All on the Same Page: E-Book Adoption and Technology Exploration by Seniors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quan-Haase, Anabel; Martin, Kim; Schreurs, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper aims to understand the adoption of e-books and e-readers by persons aged sixty and above. This includes an investigation into where seniors are in the stages of e-book adoption. Method: Data were collected through semi-structured interviews in a mid-size city in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. Analysis: Interviews were…

  3. Factors Leading to the Adoption of a Learning Technology: The Case of Graphics Calculators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handal, Boris; Cavanagh, Michael; Wood, Leigh; Petocz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study which examined factors leading to the adoption of graphics calculators (GCs) by secondary mathematics teachers in the state of New South Wales, Australia. In total, 587 teachers of the General Mathematics Course (Years 11 and 12) participated in the study. The median teachers' stage of adoption of GCs was found…

  4. Schools Going Mobile: A Study of the Adoption of Mobile Handheld Technologies in Western Australian Independent Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pegrum, Mark; Oakley, Grace; Faulkner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the adoption of mobile handheld technologies in ten Western Australian independent schools, based on interviews with staff conducted in 2011. iPads were the most popular device, followed by iPod Touches and iPhones. Class sets were common at lower levels, with 1:1 models becoming increasingly common at higher levels. Mobile…

  5. Connectivism in Learning Activity Design: Implications for Pedagogically-Based Technology Adoption in African Higher Education Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizito, Rita Ndagire

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the possible characteristics and the value of designing learning activities grounded in connectivism--an emerging learning theory. It is an exploratory attempt to connect the theory to the prevailing technology adoption archetypes used in African contexts with the aim of extracting influences that could shape pedagogical…

  6. Acceptance Factors Influencing Adoption of National Institute of Standards and Technology Information Security Standards: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiriakou, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of a comprehensive information security governance model and security controls is the best option organizations may have to protect their information assets and comply with regulatory requirements. Understanding acceptance factors of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Risk Management Framework (RMF) comprehensive…

  7. A University Engagement Model for Achieving Technology Adoption and Performance Improvement Impacts in Healthcare, Manufacturing, and Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinnis, David R.; Sloan, Mary Anne; Snow, L. David; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2014-01-01

    The Purdue Technical Assistance Program (TAP) offers a model of university engagement and service that is achieving technology adoption and performance improvement impacts in healthcare, manufacturing, government, and other sectors. The TAP model focuses on understanding and meeting the changing and challenging needs of those served, always…

  8. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Componet Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaraju, Madhusudhan

    2010-10-31

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2010Report Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software: Distributed CCA State University of New York, Binghamton, NY, 13902 Summary The overall objective of Binghamton's involvement is to work on enhancements of the CCA environment, motivated by the applications and research initiatives discussed in the proposal. This year we are working on re-focusing our design and development efforts to develop proof-of-concept implementations that have the potential to significantly impact scientific components. We worked on developing parallel implementations for non-hydrostatic code and worked on a model coupling interface for biogeochemical computations coded in MATLAB. We also worked on the design and implementation modules that will be required for the emerging MapReduce model to be effective for scientific applications. Finally, we focused on optimizing the processing of scientific datasets on multi-core processors. Research Details We worked on the following research projects that we are working on applying to CCA-based scientific applications. 1. Non-Hydrostatic Hydrodynamics: Non-static hydrodynamics are significantly more accurate at modeling internal waves that may be important in lake ecosystems. Non-hydrostatic codes, however, are significantly more computationally expensive, often prohibitively so. We have worked with Chin Wu at the University of Wisconsin to parallelize non-hydrostatic code. We have obtained a speed up of about 26 times maximum. Although this is significant progress, we hope to improve the performance further, such that it becomes a practical alternative to hydrostatic codes. 2. Model-coupling for water-based ecosystems: To answer pressing questions about water resources requires that physical models (hydrodynamics) be coupled with biological and chemical models. Most hydrodynamics codes are written in Fortran, however, while most ecologists work in MATLAB. This

  9. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (MASSCOMP VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  10. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (DEC VAX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkin, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  11. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (SILICON GRAPHICS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  12. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (CONCURRENT VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  13. ELAS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE (SUN VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Science and Technology Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) was originally designed to analyze and process digital imagery data, specifically remotely-sensed scanner data. This capability includes the processing of Landsat multispectral data; aircraft-acquired scanner data; digitized topographic data; and numerous other ancillary data, such as soil types and rainfall information, that can be stored in digitized form. ELAS has the subsequent capability to geographically reference this data to dozens of standard, as well as user created projections. As an integrated image processing system, ELAS offers the user of remotely-sensed data a wide range of capabilities in the areas of land cover analysis and general purpose image analysis. ELAS is designed for flexible use and operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating subsystem and an expandable set of FORTRAN application modules. Because all of ELAS resides in one "logical" FORTRAN program, data inputs and outputs, directives, and module switching are convenient for the user. There are over 230 modules presently available to aid the user in performing a wide range of land cover analyses and manipulation. The file management modules enable the user to allocate, define, access, and specify usage for all types of files (ELAS files, subfiles, external files etc.). Various other modules convert specific types of satellite, aircraft, and vector-polygon data into files that can be used by other ELAS modules. The user also has many module options which aid in displaying image data, such as magnification/reduction of the display; true color display; and several memory functions. Additional modules allow for the building and manipulation of polygonal areas of the image data. Finally, there are modules which allow the user to select and classify the image data. An important feature of the ELAS subsystem is that its structure allows new applications modules to be easily integrated in the future. ELAS has as a standard

  14. The Impact of Autonomy Technology on Spacecraft Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, E. B., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Autonomy technology for high-level, closed-loop control of spacecraft offers considerable benefits to space-flight projects. Those benefits can enable whole new classes of missions; however, they are not without cost.

  15. Factors that Impact Software Project Success in Offshore Information Technology (IT) Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edara, Venkatarao

    2011-01-01

    Information technology (IT) projects are unsuccessful at a rate of 65% to 75% per year, in spite of employing the latest technologies and training employees. Although many studies have been conducted on project successes in U.S. companies, there is a lack of research studying the impact of various factors on software project success in offshore IT…

  16. Software Piracy among Technology Education Students: Investigating Property Rights in a Culture of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teston, George

    2008-01-01

    When asked about individual perceptions of "technology," 68% of Americans primarily equate the term to the computer. Although this perception under represents the true breadth of the field, the statistic does speak to the ubiquitous role the computer plays across many technology disciplines. Software has become the building block of all major…

  17. Application of Artificial Intelligence technology to the analysis and synthesis of reliable software systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, Christian; Eckhardt, Dave

    1987-01-01

    The development of a methodology for the production of highly reliable software is one of the greatest challenges facing the computer industry. Meeting this challenge will undoubtably involve the integration of many technologies. This paper describes the use of Artificial Intelligence technologies in the automated analysis of the formal algebraic specifications of abstract data types. These technologies include symbolic execution of specifications using techniques of automated deduction and machine learning through the use of examples. On-going research into the role of knowledge representation and problem solving in the process of developing software is also discussed.

  18. Software Goes to School: Teaching for Understanding with New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, David N.; And Others

    This book brings together leading experts to offer an in-depth examination of how computer technology can play an invaluable part in educational efforts through its unique capacities to support the development of students' understanding of difficult concepts. Focusing on three broad themes-the nature of understanding, the potential of technology…

  19. Technology, Gender Attitude, and Software, among Middle School Math Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okeke, Godwin N.

    2014-01-01

    Technology has gained a firm stronghold in society as well as modern classroom. Students are assumed to have a natural aptitude for computers. Over the past decades, educational websites have appeared to be "interactive" and "to make learning fun". This study employed quantitative method of research using 8th grade instructors…

  20. The Effective Use of System and Software Architecture Standards for Software Technology Readiness Assessments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Acquisition Reform Act of 20099 Technology Readiness Evaluations in Space Programs* O I 000 02 (8 b 2008) SSA (18 O b 2010) JROC ICD Pre‐Systems...90009-2957 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11...REQUIREMENT.—Chapter 139 of title 10 , United States Code, is amended by inserting after section 2366 the following new section: ‘‘§ 2366a. Major defense

  1. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 734 - Questions and Answers-Technology and Software Subject to the EAR

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Software Subject to the EAR No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 734 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... Supplement No. 1 to Part 734—Questions and Answers—Technology and Software Subject to the EAR This supplement No. 1 contains explanatory questions and answers relating to technology and software that is...

  2. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 734 - Questions and Answers-Technology and Software Subject to the EAR

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Software Subject to the EAR No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 734 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... Supplement No. 1 to Part 734—Questions and Answers—Technology and Software Subject to the EAR This Supplement No. 1 contains explanatory questions and answers relating to technology and software that is...

  3. CORE (Common Operating Response Environment) Software Technology Suite

    ScienceCinema

    Gelston, Gariann; Rohlfing, Kerrie

    2016-07-12

    Agencies that oversee complex, multi-stakeholder programs need efficient, secure ways to link people and knowledge within and across organizations. The Common Operating Response Environment (CORE), a software suite developed by PNNL researchers does just that. The CORE tool—which is customizable for a multitude of uses—facilitates situational awareness by integrating diverse data streams without the need to reformat them, summarizing that information, and providing users with the information they need to rapidly understand and appropriately respond to situations. It is mobile device-ready, has a straightforward interface for ease of use across organizations and skill sets, and is incredibly configurable to the needs of each specific user, whether they require data summaries for high-level decision makers or tactical maps, operational data, or weather information for responders in the field. Information can be input into CORE and queried in a variety of ways—using customized forms, reports, visuals, or other organizational templates—according to the needs of each user’s organization, teams, and business processes. CORE data forms, for instance, could be accessed and used in real-time to capture information about vessels being inspected for nuclear material.

  4. CORE (Common Operating Response Environment) Software Technology Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Gelston, Gariann; Rohlfing, Kerrie

    2015-05-26

    Agencies that oversee complex, multi-stakeholder programs need efficient, secure ways to link people and knowledge within and across organizations. The Common Operating Response Environment (CORE), a software suite developed by PNNL researchers does just that. The CORE tool—which is customizable for a multitude of uses—facilitates situational awareness by integrating diverse data streams without the need to reformat them, summarizing that information, and providing users with the information they need to rapidly understand and appropriately respond to situations. It is mobile device-ready, has a straightforward interface for ease of use across organizations and skill sets, and is incredibly configurable to the needs of each specific user, whether they require data summaries for high-level decision makers or tactical maps, operational data, or weather information for responders in the field. Information can be input into CORE and queried in a variety of ways—using customized forms, reports, visuals, or other organizational templates—according to the needs of each user’s organization, teams, and business processes. CORE data forms, for instance, could be accessed and used in real-time to capture information about vessels being inspected for nuclear material.

  5. Adoption of new technology in sports medicine: case studies of the Gore-Tex prosthetic ligament and of thermal capsulorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Kocher, Mininder S

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of new technology in sports medicine is supposed to promote improvements in the care of patients. It is also supposed to prohibit technology that can harm patients. This evaluation process is not perfect and at times can promote technology that not only does not help patients but may harm them. Two examples of new sports medicine technology that were widely adopted but eventually abandoned are thermal capsulorrhaphy for treatment of shoulder instability and the Gore-Tex prosthetic ligament (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) for patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency. On analysis of the quick adoption of these 2 failed procedures, certain recommendations are apparent for improvement of the evaluation process. There must be a sound rationale behind any new technology, basic science research into the theory of the medical technology, and demonstrated improvements in animal models and clinical studies that are prospective cohort studies or randomized controlled trials, and finally, there must be careful follow-up and postmarket surveillance.

  6. Final Report: Towards an Emergent Model of Technology Adoption for Accelerating the Diffusion of Residential Solar PV

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Varun

    2016-08-15

    This project sought to enable electric utilities in Texas to accelerate diffusion of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) by systematically identifying and targeting existing barriers to PV adoption. A core goal of the project was to develop an integrated research framework that combines survey research, econometric modeling, financial modeling, and implementation and evaluation of pilot projects to study the PV diffusion system. This project considered PV diffusion as an emergent system, with attention to the interactions between the constituent parts of the PV socio-technical system including: economics of individual decision-making; peer and social influences; behavioral responses; and information and transaction costs. We also conducted two pilot projects, which have yielded new insights into behavioral and informational aspects of PV adoption. Finally, this project has produced robust and generalizable results that will provide deeper insights into the technology-diffusion process that will be applicable for the design of utility programs for other technologies such as home-energy management systems and plug-in electric vehicles. When we started this project in 2013 there was little systematic research on characterizing the decision-making process of households interested in adopting PV. This project was designed to fill that research gap by analyzing the PV adoption process from the consumers' decision-making perspective and with the objective to systematically identifying and addressing the barriers that consumers face in the adoption of PV. The two key components of that decision-making process are consumers' evaluation of: (i) uncertainties and non-monetary costs associated with the technology and (ii) the direct monetary cost-benefit. This project used an integrated approach to study both the non-monetary and the monetary components of the consumer decision-making process.

  7. How Do Teachers Prioritize the Adoption of Technology in the Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Serhat

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether teachers prioritize the use of technology. More specifically, this paper focused on how Turkish teachers think about the importance of technology and technological tools for their daily routines. The research design employed both qualitative and quantitative methods. The data were collected through document analyses,…

  8. Factors Influencing Accounting Faculty Members' Decision to Adopt Technology in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, F. Douglas; Kelley, Claudia L.; Medlin, B. Dawn

    2007-01-01

    With technology changing today's business environment, educators must strive to expose students to recent advances in technology, help them understand its impact on business, and foster in them an attitude of continual learning to keep current as change continues. The use of technology in the classroom is one way educators can begin to incorporate…

  9. Can economic incentives enhance adoption and use of a household energy technology? Evidence from a pilot study in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmani, Faraz; Steele, Jason; Jeuland, Marc

    2017-03-01

    While much work has examined approaches to increase uptake of a variety of household environmental, health and energy technologies, researchers and policymakers alike have struggled to ensure long-term use. Drawing on a pilot-scale experiment conducted in rural Cambodia, this study evaluates whether economic incentives enhance continued use of—and fuel savings from—improved cookstoves (ICS). Capital-cost subsidies that have been traditionally employed to enhance ICS adoption were augmented with rebates linked to stated and objectively measured use in order to investigate impacts on both initial and sustained adoption in the treatment group. Results show that households do respond to these rebates by adopting the intervention ICS at significantly higher rates, and by using it more frequently and for longer periods. Consistent with these stove-use patterns, solid-fuel use and time spent collecting or preparing fuels also decline. However, this effect appears to diminish over time. Thus, while economic inducements may significantly increase adoption and use of new environmental health technologies, corresponding reductions in environmental or livelihood burdens are not guaranteed. Additional research on the design and implementation of incentive-based interventions targeting households directly—such as carbon financing or other forms of results-based financing (RBF) for improved cookstoves—therefore seems warranted prior to wider implementation of such solutions.

  10. Technology Adoption in K-12 Education: A Qualitative Study Using TAM3 to Explore Why Technology Is Underutilized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosley, Victoria V. W.

    2012-01-01

    Educators, researchers, and the government speculate that technology can reform education and contribute to increased student learning. Despite extensive efforts to equip the K-12 schools with technology, the challenge is more than just getting technology into classrooms; it is getting teachers to use the technologies. The goal of this…

  11. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software

    SciTech Connect

    Sottile, Matthew

    2010-06-30

    The UO portion of the larger TASCS project was focused on the usability subproject identified in the original project proposal. The key usability issue that we tacked was that of supporting legacy code developers in migrating to a component-oriented design pattern and development model with minimal manual labor. It was observed during the lifetime of the TASCS (and previous CCA efforts) that more often than not, users would arrive with existing code that was developed previous to their exposure to component design methods. As such, they were faced with the task of both learning the CCA toolchain and at the same time, manually deconstructing and reassembling their existing code to fit the design constraints imposed by components. This was a common complaint (and occasional reason for a user to abandon components altogether), so our task was to remove this manual labor as much as possible to lessen the burden placed on the end-user when adopting components for existing codes. To accomplish this, we created a source-based static analysis tool that used code annotations to drive code generation and transformation operations. The use of code annotations is due to one of the key technical challenges facing this work programming languages are limited in the degree to which application-specific semantics can be represented in code. For example, data types are often ambiguous. The C pointer is the most common example cited in practice. Given a pointer to a location in memory, should it be interpreted as a singleton or an array. If it is to be interpreted as an array, how many dimensions does the array have? What are their extents? The annotation language that we designed and implemented addresses this ambiguity issue by allowing users to decorate their code in places where ambiguity exists in order to guide tools to interpret what the programmer really intends.

  12. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mathew Sottile

    2010-06-30

    The UO portion of the larger TASCS project was focused on the usability subproject identified in the original project proposal. The key usability issue that we tacked was that of supporting legacy code developers in migrating to a component-oriented design pattern and development model with minimal manual labor. It was observed during the lifetime of the TASCS (and previous CCA efforts) that more often than not, users would arrive with existing code that was developed previous to their exposure to component design methods. As such, they were faced with the task of both learning the CCA toolchain and at the same time, manually deconstructing and reassembling their existing code to fit the design constraints imposed by components. This was a common complaint (and occasional reason for a user to abandon components altogether), so our task was to remove this manual labor as much as possible to lessen the burden placed on the end-user when adopting components for existing codes. To accomplish this, we created a source-based static analysis tool that used code annotations to drive code generation and transformation operations. The use of code annotations is due to one of the key technical challenges facing this work | programming languages are limited in the degree to which application-specific semantics can be represented in code. For example, data types are often ambiguous. The C pointer is the most common example cited in practice. Given a pointer to a location in memory, should it be interpreted as a singleton or an array. If it is to be interpreted as an array, how many dimensions does the array have? What are their extents? The annotation language that we designed and implemented addresses this ambiguity issue by allowing users to decorate their code in places where ambiguity exists in order to guide tools to interpret what the programmer really intends.

  13. Adoption of Computer Communication Technology by Communication Faculty: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herling, Thomas J.

    A comparative case study investigated the extent of adoption of computer communication in two schools of communication. S. Ram's model of resistance to innovation was used as a theoretical framework. Subjects, 16 faculty at a medium-sized state school in the southern United States and 16 faculty at a large private institution in the Northeast,…

  14. Biometrics Technology: Understanding Dynamics Influencing Adoption for Control of Identification Deception within Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwatu, Gideon U.

    2011-01-01

    One of the objectives of any government is the establishment of an effective solution to significantly control crime. Identity fraud in Nigeria has generated global attention and negative publicity toward its citizens. The research problem addressed in this study was the lack of understanding of the dynamics that influenced the adoption and…

  15. "Making News Today": A Tool for Adoption of Ethics Principles Using Technology-Supported Television Journalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackall, David; Lockyer, Lori; Harper, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    There are movements internationally towards curricula that incorporate values and citizenship education. In Australia, this movement has been illustrated with the adoption of a national curriculum in values education. This has arisen from the perceived need for citizens to hold values around the rights and responsibilities of functioning within a…

  16. More Technology, Better Learning Resources, Better Learning? Lessons from Adopting Virtual Microscopy in Undergraduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helle, Laura; Nivala, Markus; Kronqvist, Pauliina

    2013-01-01

    The adoption of virtual microscopy at the University of Turku, Finland, created a unique real-world laboratory for exploring ways of reforming the learning environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the students' reactions and the impact of a set of measures designed to boost an experimental group's understanding of abnormal histology…

  17. The Adoption of Social Media as Educational Technology among Marketing Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuten, Tracy; Marks, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Social media usage has grown rapidly in recent years, as individuals have incorporated social networks such as Facebook into their daily activities and businesses have begun to use social tools to interact with consumers. Many social media tools, likewise, have applications relevant for marketing education. This study assesses the adoption of…

  18. An Analysis of ODL Student Perception and Adoption Behavior Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khor, Ean Teng

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical study aiming on investigating ODL students' perception and adoption of SCORM Compliant Learning Object (SCLO). With the increasing use of SCLO in recent years, a better understanding and implementation of effective instructional resources is necessary to meet the diverse needs of ODL students and enhance their…

  19. New technologies for supporting real-time on-board software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerridge, D.

    1995-03-01

    The next generation of on-board data management systems will be significantly more complex than current designs, and will be required to perform more complex and demanding tasks in software. Improved hardware technology, in the form of the MA31750 radiation hard processor, is one key component in addressing the needs of future embedded systems. However, to complement these hardware advances, improved support for the design and implementation of real-time data management software is now needed. This will help to control the cost and risk assoicated with developing data management software development as it becomes an increasingly significant element within embedded systems. One particular problem with developing embedded software is managing the non-functional requirements in a systematic way. This paper identifies how Logica has exploited recent developments in hard real-time theory to address this problem through the use of new hard real-time analysis and design methods which can be supported by specialized tools. The first stage in transferring this technology from the research domain to industrial application has already been completed. The MA37150 Hard Real-Time Embedded Software Support Environment (HESSE) is a loosely integrated set of hardware and software tools which directly support the process of hard real-time analysis for software targeting the MA31750 processor. With further development, this HESSE promises to provide embedded system developers with software tools which can reduce the risks associated with developing complex hard real-time software. Supported in this way by more sophisticated software methods and tools, it is foreseen that MA31750 based embedded systems can meet the processing needs for the next generation of on-board data management systems.

  20. Hosted Services for Advanced V and V Technologies: An Approach to Achieving Adoption without the Woes of Usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Penix, John; Markosian, Lawrence Z.; OMalley, Owen; Brew, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Attempts to achieve widespread use of software verification tools have been notably unsuccessful. Even 'straightforward', classic, and potentially effective verification tools such as lint-like tools face limits on their acceptance. These limits are imposed by the expertise required applying the tools and interpreting the results, the high false positive rate of many verification tools, and the need to integrate the tools into development environments. The barriers are even greater for more complex advanced technologies such as model checking. Web-hosted services for advanced verification technologies may mitigate these problems by centralizing tool expertise. The possible benefits of this approach include eliminating the need for software developer expertise in tool application and results filtering, and improving integration with other development tools.

  1. Could the Pharmaceutical Industry Benefit from Full-Scale Adoption of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) Technology with New Regulations?

    PubMed

    Coustasse, Alberto; Kimble, Craig A; Stanton, Robert B; Naylor, Mariah

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare regulators are directing attention to the pharmaceutical supply chain with the passage of the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) and the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA). Adoption of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has the ability to improve compliance, reduce costs, and improve safety in the supply chain but its implementation has been limited; primarily because of hardware and tag costs. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the benefits to the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare system of the adoption of RFID technology as a result of newly implemented supply chain regulations. The methodology was a review following the steps of a systematic review with a total of 96 sources used. With the DSCSA, pharmaceutical companies must track and trace prescription drugs across the supply chain, and RFID can resolve many track-and-trace issues with manufacturer control of data. The practical implication of this study is that pharmaceutical companies must continue to have the potential to increase revenues, decrease associated costs, and increase compliance with new FDA regulations with RFID. Still, challenges related to regulatory statute wording, implementation of two-dimensional barcode technology, and the variety of interfaces within the pharmaceutical supply chain have delayed adoption and its full implementation.

  2. Could the Pharmaceutical Industry Benefit from Full-Scale Adoption of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) Technology with New Regulations?

    PubMed Central

    Coustasse, Alberto; Kimble, Craig A.; Stanton, Robert B.; Naylor, Mariah

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare regulators are directing attention to the pharmaceutical supply chain with the passage of the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) and the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA). Adoption of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has the ability to improve compliance, reduce costs, and improve safety in the supply chain but its implementation has been limited; primarily because of hardware and tag costs. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the benefits to the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare system of the adoption of RFID technology as a result of newly implemented supply chain regulations. The methodology was a review following the steps of a systematic review with a total of 96 sources used. With the DSCSA, pharmaceutical companies must track and trace prescription drugs across the supply chain, and RFID can resolve many track-and-trace issues with manufacturer control of data. The practical implication of this study is that pharmaceutical companies must continue to have the potential to increase revenues, decrease associated costs, and increase compliance with new FDA regulations with RFID. Still, challenges related to regulatory statute wording, implementation of two-dimensional barcode technology, and the variety of interfaces within the pharmaceutical supply chain have delayed adoption and its full implementation. PMID:27843419

  3. Can Coolness Predict Technology Adoption? Effects of Perceived Coolness on User Acceptance of Smartphones with Curved Screens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Joon; Shin, Dong-Hee; Park, Eunil

    2015-09-01

    This study proposes an acceptance model for curved-screen smartphones, and explores how the sense of coolness induced by attractiveness, originality, subcultural appeal, and the utility of the curved screen promotes smartphone adoption. The results of structural equation modeling analyses (N = 246) show that these components of coolness (except utility) increase the acceptance of the technology by enhancing the smartphones' affectively driven qualities rather than their utilitarian ones. The proposed coolness model is then compared with the original technology acceptance model to validate that the coolness factors are indeed equally effective determinants of usage intention, as are the extensively studied usability factors such as perceived ease of use and usefulness.

  4. SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative) Software Technology Program Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    cFZ.1 02-W coo Z -- N C m. - 0Ce 0 co0)ccI-a e c LL 0 V - CA) 0- Vc 06. AdA c C4j 0. pr ’r U- technological capabilities (existing and under...2 Ci S L T 0 0 t ’c 61o" 0Ŕ ts 1 - o- - u.- ’:: E - &I a~S 0~- E ti~ LL ~SE 2* b~~~s 0 . l.oi - - A 1E a i " -- I" --- 6 jiti ljl:hI...OE ’I"’l j 5 t 0 IL C .3 | E U. 6. I0" *e - - 60 6 C I 3: 2 2 ; - I i’ I :, * e* - * I , "I ... - 0 2 % ll -" 𔄀 *2 OI211 3 1 6j l !I O l !o i .! -E I

  5. Evolving software reengineering technology for the emerging innovative-competitive era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Phillip Q.; Lock, Evan; Prywes, Noah

    1994-01-01

    applications which is facilitated by the integrated tools. The radical savings in the time and cost associated with software, due to use of CASE tools that support combined Reuse of Software and Reengineering of Legacy Code, will add an important impetus to improving the automation of enterprises. This will be reflected in continuing operations, as well as in innovating new business processes. The proposed multi-tool software development is based on state of the art technology, which will be further advanced through the use of open systems for adding new tools and experience in their use.

  6. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation. View all reports on the TEF Web page, http://www.eere.energy.gov/analysis/transportationenergyfutures/index.html.

  7. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, T.

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  8. Technology Transition and Adoption: A Study in Search of Metrics for Evaluating Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Intelligent RF Front Ends (IRFFE) 0 0 0 1 1 0 91 APPENDIX E. DARPA TECHNOLOGY DATABASE (CONTINUED) TECHNOLOGIES 31-60 (CONTINUED) Transition...Collaborative Australia/United States Experiment (HyCAUSE) UKN 0 1 1,605 0 0 3 60 Intelligent RF Front Ends (IRFFE) UKN 1 0 1,503 1 0 1 92 APPENDIX E...Intelligent RF Front Ends (IRFFE) 1 2 2 4 4 93 APPENDIX E. DARPA TECHNOLOGY DATABASE (CONTINUED) TECHNOLOGIES 31-60 (CONTINUED) Perceived

  9. An economic analysis of private incentives to adopt DNA barcoding technology for fish species authentication in Canada.

    PubMed

    Ugochukwu, Albert I; Hobbs, Jill E; Phillips, Peter W B; Gray, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The increasing spate of species substitution and mislabelling in fish markets has become a concern to the public and a challenge to both the food industry and regulators. Species substitution and mislabelling within fish supply chains occurs because of price incentives to misrepresent products for economic gain. Emerging authenticity technologies, such as the DNA barcoding technology that has been used to identify plants and animal (particularly fish) species through DNA sequencing, offer a potential technological solution to this information problem. However, the adoption of these authenticity technologies depends also on economic factors. The present study uses economic welfare analysis to examine the effects of species substitution and mislabelling in fish markets, and examines the feasibility of the technology for a typical retail store in Canada. It is assumed that increased accuracy of the technology in detecting fraud and enforcement of legal penalties and other associated costs would be likely to discourage cheating. Empirical results suggest that DNA barcoding technology would be feasible presently for a typical retail store only if authentication is done in a third party laboratory, as it may not be feasible on an individual retail store level once fixed and other associated costs of the technology are considered.

  10. Crossing the Great Divide: Adoption of New Technologies, Therapeutics and Diagnostics at Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMonaco, Harold J.; Koski, Greg

    2007-01-01

    The role of new technology in healthcare continues to expand from both the clinical and financial perspectives. Despite the importance of innovation, most academic medical centers do not have a clearly defined process for technology assessment. Recognizing the importance of new drugs, diagnostics and procedures in the care of patients and in the…

  11. A Correlational Study of the Technology Acceptance Model and Georgia Behavioral Healthcare Provider Telemedicine Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yallah, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of Telemedicine in behavioral health centers can be expensive if proactive steps were not taken to minimize user perceptions towards the new technology. Despite the significant capital investments on new Telemedicine, no consensus identified and explained what factors determined the acceptance, or rejection, of the technology.…

  12. Evaluating Your College's Readiness for Technology Adoption. Self-Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Melinda Mechur; Fletcher, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    For colleges seeking to improve student outcomes, new technologies often appear to hold the promise of transformative change. Across the country, colleges are using technological tools to enhance reform efforts related to how they teach, how they provide supports to students, and how they guide students through programs of study. In order for…

  13. Beyond Computers in the Classroom: Factors Related to Technology Adoption to Enhance Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckenmeyer, Janet A.

    2010-01-01

    How is technology being integrated to the extent possible toward the goals of improving teaching and learning? Research suggests that teachers will be more likely to try new methods of teaching if certain conditions exist. It is not known which conditions are more likely to influence a teacher's decision to integrate technology into the…

  14. Technology Adoption Applied to Educational Settings: Predicting Interventionists' Use of Video-Self Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckman, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Technology provides educators with a significant advantage in working with today's students. One particular application of technology for the purposes of academic and behavioral interventions is the use of video self-modeling (VSM). Although VSM is an evidence-based intervention, it is rarely used in educational settings. The present research…

  15. Implementation of a Technological Innovation: Factors Influencing the Adoption of a New Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Katrina M.

    2013-01-01

    School information systems (SIS) have the potential to cause a change in a school's technical, structural, psycho-social, and managerial systems. Implementation of a technological innovation such as an SIS is not a one-step occurrence; it is a process that occurs over time. Implementing any technological innovation involves active learning…

  16. Synthesizing Technology Adoption and Learners' Approaches towards Active Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kevin; Cheung, George; Wan, Kelvin; Brown, Ian; Luk, Green

    2015-01-01

    In understanding how active and blended learning approaches with learning technologies engagement in undergraduate education, current research models tend to undermine the effect of learners' variations, particularly regarding their styles and approaches to learning, on intention and use of learning technologies. This study contributes to further…

  17. Perception and Use of Instructional Technology: Teacher Candidates as Adopters of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chong, Han Nee

    2012-01-01

    Education has been slow to catch up on the use of instructional technology. Despite the fact that billions of dollars have been spent in purchasing, equipping and supporting technology, increased access has not translated into significant educational gain (McGrail, 2005; Selfe, 1999). One of the reasons for this is because teachers are not…

  18. Are Physicians Likely to Adopt Emerging Mobile Technologies? Attitudes and Innovation Factors Affecting Smartphone Use in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Putzer, Gavin J; Park, Yangil

    2012-01-01

    The smartphone has emerged as an important technological device to assist physicians with medical decision making, clinical tasks, and other computing functions. A smartphone is a device that combines mobile telecommunication with Internet accessibility as well as word processing. Moreover, smartphones have additional features such as applications pertinent to clinical medicine and practice management. The purpose of this study was to investigate the innovation factors that affect a physician's decision to adopt an emerging mobile technological device such as a smartphone. The study sample consisted of 103 physicians from community hospitals and academic medical centers in the southeastern United States. Innovation factors are elements that affect an individual's attitude toward using and adopting an emerging technology. In our model, the innovation characteristics of compatibility, job relevance, the internal environment, observability, personal experience, and the external environment were all significant predictors of attitude toward using a smartphone. These influential innovation factors presumably are salient predictors of a physician's attitude toward using a smartphone to assist with clinical tasks. Health information technology devices such as smartphones offer promise as a means to improve clinical efficiency, medical quality, and care coordination and possibly reduce healthcare costs. PMID:22737094

  19. Are physicians likely to adopt emerging mobile technologies? Attitudes and innovation factors affecting smartphone use in the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Putzer, Gavin J; Park, Yangil

    2012-01-01

    The smartphone has emerged as an important technological device to assist physicians with medical decision making, clinical tasks, and other computing functions. A smartphone is a device that combines mobile telecommunication with Internet accessibility as well as word processing. Moreover, smartphones have additional features such as applications pertinent to clinical medicine and practice management. The purpose of this study was to investigate the innovation factors that affect a physician's decision to adopt an emerging mobile technological device such as a smartphone. The study sample consisted of 103 physicians from community hospitals and academic medical centers in the southeastern United States. Innovation factors are elements that affect an individual's attitude toward using and adopting an emerging technology. In our model, the innovation characteristics of compatibility, job relevance, the internal environment, observability, personal experience, and the external environment were all significant predictors of attitude toward using a smartphone. These influential innovation factors presumably are salient predictors of a physician's attitude toward using a smartphone to assist with clinical tasks. Health information technology devices such as smartphones offer promise as a means to improve clinical efficiency, medical quality, and care coordination and possibly reduce healthcare costs.

  20. Barriers to physicians' adoption of healthcare information technology: an empirical study on multiple hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chihung; Lin, I-Chun; Roan, Jinsheng

    2012-06-01

    Prior research on technology usage had largely overlooked the issue of user resistance or barriers to technology acceptance. Prior research on the Electronic Medical Records had largely focused on technical issues but rarely on managerial issues. Such oversight prevented a better understanding of users' resistance to new technologies and the antecedents of technology rejection. Incorporating the enablers and the inhibitors of technology usage intention, this study explores physicians' reactions towards the electronic medical record. The main focus is on the barriers, perceived threat and perceived inequity. 115 physicians from 6 hospitals participated in the questionnaire survey. Structural Equation Modeling was employed to verify the measurement scale and research hypotheses. According to the results, perceived threat shows a direct and negative effect on perceived usefulness and behavioral intentions, as well as an indirect effect on behavioral intentions via perceived usefulness. Perceived inequity reveals a direct and positive effect on perceived threat, and it also shows a direct and negative effect on perceived usefulness. Besides, perceived inequity reveals an indirect effect on behavioral intentions via perceived usefulness with perceived threat as the inhibitor. The research finding presents a better insight into physicians' rejection and the antecedents of such outcome. For the healthcare industry understanding the factors contributing to physicians' technology acceptance is important as to ensure a smooth implementation of any new technology. The results of this study can also provide change managers reference to a smooth IT introduction into an organization. In addition, our proposed measurement scale can be applied as a diagnostic tool for them to better understand the status quo within their organizations and users' reactions to technology acceptance. By doing so, barriers to physicians' acceptance can be identified earlier and more effectively before

  1. How user diversity and country of origin impact the readiness to adopt E-health technologies: an intercultural comparison.

    PubMed

    Wilkowsk, Wiktoria; Ziefle, Martina; Alagöz, Firat

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, due to the demographical change and the resulting overload of healthcare systems, there has been an increasing interest focusing on the global proliferation of assistive medical technologies (=E-health) in home environments. The present study examines how users' diversity influences the readiness to adopt novel medical technologies, comparing users' attitudes in terms of perceived advantages and disadvantages in three technically and culturally different countries: Germany, Poland and Turkey. This investigation also intended to verify if acceptance of information and communication technologies is associated with the sensitive acceptance of E-health. Results revealed overall a considerably higher motivation to use medical technology compared to perceived barriers, with Polish users more willing to use E-health, higher than German or Turkish ones. Older participants showed a highly positive attitude, comparable to young and middle-aged respondents' receptiveness, differing from the latter in terms of greater appreciation of the advantage of higher independency when being supported by medical technology. With respect to gender, woman showed higher motivation to use E-health technology than men, although utilization barriers were not gendered. Following these results, an unconditional transfer of acceptance from information and communication to medical technology is not justified.

  2. Characterizing Participants in the ClinSeq Genome Sequencing Cohort as Early Adopters of a New Health Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Katie L.; Han, Paul K. J.; Hooker, Gillian W.; Klein, William M. P.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Biesecker, Barbara B.

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequencing is a novel clinical tool that has the potential to identify genetic origins of disease. However, the complexities of this new technology are significant and little is known about its integration into clinical care, and its potential adoption by patients. Expectations of its promise for personalized medicine are high and it is important to properly match expectations to the realities of the test. The NIH ClinSeq cohort study pilots the integration of genome sequencing into clinical research and care to assess the technical, medical and socio-behavioral aspects of implementing this technology. Over 950 adults ages 45-65 have been enrolled and clinically phenotyped. As an initial study, we describe the personality traits of ClinSeq participants, and explore how these traits compare to those that characterize early adopters of other new technologies. Our analysis was conducted on responses from 630 members of the cohort who completed a baseline survey on health cognitions, affect, health-related behaviors and personality traits, prior to receipt of any genome sequencing results. The majority of participants were white (90.5%), had at least a college degree (86.5%), and had at least one biological child (74.6%). Members of this ClinSeq sample were found to be high in dispositional optimism and resilience. Their high SES paralleled that of other early adopters of new technology. These attributes may contribute to participants’ expectations for favorable outcomes and willingness to take higher risks when compared to the general population. These characteristics may distinguish those who are most likely to pursue genome sequencing and be indicative of their psychological resources to manage returned results. PMID:26186621

  3. Factors Affecting Use of Instant Messaging Software by Information Technology Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Instant messaging systems--a type of social networking technology that connects people who are physically separated but working together--have seen a dramatic rise in use in globally dispersed organizations, yet there is an absence of academic research in predictive factors of instant messaging adoption. This study examined the factors influencing…

  4. The emergence of diagnostic imaging technologies in breast cancer: discovery, regulatory approval, reimbursement, and adoption in clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gold, Laura S; Klein, Gregory; Carr, Lauren; Kessler, Larry; Sullivan, Sean D

    2012-01-25

    In this article, we trace the chronology of developments in breast imaging technologies that are used for diagnosis and staging of breast cancer, including mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and positron emission tomography. We explore factors that affected clinical acceptance and utilization of these technologies from discovery to clinical use, including milestones in peer-reviewed publication, US Food and Drug Administration approval, reimbursement by payers, and adoption into clinical guidelines. The factors driving utilization of new imaging technologies are mainly driven by regulatory approval and reimbursement by payers rather than evidence that they provide benefits to patients. Comparative effectiveness research can serve as a useful tool to investigate whether these imaging modalities provide information that improves patient outcomes in real-world settings.

  5. The Effect of Dynamic Software on Prospective Mathematics Teachers' Perceptions Regarding Information and Communication Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Enver

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dynamic software on prospective mathematics teachers' perception levels regarding information and communication technology (ICT). The study was conducted with senior prospective teachers studying in a department of secondary mathematics education. The data of the study used both quantitative and…

  6. Success Rates by Software Development Methodology in Information Technology Project Management: A Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Gerald P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite over half a century of Project Management research, project success rates are still too low. Organizations spend a tremendous amount of valuable resources on Information Technology projects and seek to maximize the utility gained from their efforts. The author investigated the impact of software development methodology choice on ten…

  7. Roles for Software Technologies in Advancing Research and Theory in Educational Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadwin, Allyson F.; Winne, Philip H.; Nesbit, John C.

    2005-01-01

    While reviews abound on theoretical topics in educational psychology, it is rare that we examine our field's instrumentation development, and what effects this has on educational psychology's evolution. To repair this gap, this paper investigates and reveals the implications of software technologies for researching and theorizing about core issues…

  8. Software-Based Scoring and Sound Design: An Introductory Guide for Music Technology Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the creative function of virtual instruments, sequencers, loops, and software-based synthesizers to introduce basic scoring and sound design concepts for visual media in an introductory music technology course. Using digital audio workstations with user-focused and configurable options, novice composers can hone a broad range…

  9. 15 CFR 740.17 - Encryption commodities, software and technology (ENC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... are classified under ECCNs 5A002.a.1, .a.2, .a.5, .a.6, .a.9, or .b, systems, equipment and components therefor classified under ECCN 5B002, and equivalent or related software and technology classified under.... Reexports and transfers under License Exception ENC are subject to the criteria set forth in paragraph...

  10. 15 CFR 740.17 - Encryption commodities, software and technology (ENC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... are classified under ECCNs 5A002.a.1, .a.2, .a.5, .a.6, .a.9, or .b, systems, equipment and components therefor classified under ECCN 5B002, and equivalent or related software and technology classified under.... Reexports and transfers under License Exception ENC are subject to the criteria set forth in paragraph...

  11. 15 CFR 740.17 - Encryption commodities, software and technology (ENC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... are classified under ECCNs 5A002.a.1, .a.2, .a.5, .a.6, .a.9, or .b, systems, equipment and components therefor classified under ECCN 5B002, and equivalent or related software and technology classified under.... Reexports and transfers under License Exception ENC are subject to the criteria set forth in paragraph...

  12. 15 CFR 740.17 - Encryption commodities, software and technology (ENC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... are classified under ECCNs 5A002.a.1, a.2, a.5, a.6 or a.9, systems, equipment and components therefor classified under ECCN 5B002, and equivalent or related software and technology classified under ECCNs 5D002... transfers under License Exception ENC are subject to the criteria set forth in paragraph (c) of this...

  13. Higher Education Sub-Cultures and Open Source Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rooij, Shahron Williams

    2011-01-01

    Successful adoption of new teaching and learning technologies in higher education requires the consensus of two sub-cultures, namely the technologist sub-culture and the academic sub-culture. This paper examines trends in adoption of open source software (OSS) for teaching and learning by comparing the results of a 2009 survey of 285 Chief…

  14. Ten key considerations for the successful implementation and adoption of large-scale health information technology.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Bates, David W; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-06-01

    The implementation of health information technology interventions is at the forefront of most policy agendas internationally. However, such undertakings are often far from straightforward as they require complex strategic planning accompanying the systemic organizational changes associated with such programs. Building on our experiences of designing and evaluating the implementation of large-scale health information technology interventions in the USA and the UK, we highlight key lessons learned in the hope of informing the on-going international efforts of policymakers, health directorates, healthcare management, and senior clinicians.

  15. Adoption of Emissions Abating Technologies by U.S. Electricity Producing Firms Under the SO2 Emission Allowance Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamer, Gregorio Bernardo

    The objective of this research is to determine the adaptation strategies that coal-based, electricity producing firms in the United States utilize to comply with the emission control regulations imposed by the SO2 Emissions Allowance Market created by the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990, and the effect of market conditions on the decision making process. In particular, I take into consideration (1) the existence of carbon contracts for the provision of coal that may a affect coal prices at the plant level, and (2) local and geographical conditions, as well as political arrangements that may encourage firms to adopt strategies that appear socially less efficient. As the electricity producing sector is a regulated sector, firms do not necessarily behave in a way that maximizes the welfare of society when reacting to environmental regulations. In other words, profit maximization actions taken by the firm do not necessarily translate into utility maximization for society. Therefore, the environmental regulator has to direct firms into adopting strategies that are socially efficient, i.e., that maximize utility. The SO 2 permit market is an instrument that allows each firm to reduce marginal emissions abatement costs according to their own production conditions and abatement costs. Companies will be driven to opt for a cost-minimizing emissions abatement strategy or a combination of abatement strategies when adapting to new environmental regulations or markets. Firms may adopt one or more of the following strategies to reduce abatement costs while meeting the emission constraints imposed by the SO2 Emissions Allowance Market: (1) continue with business as usual on the production site while buying SO2 permits to comply with environmental regulations, (2) switch to higher quality, lower sulfur coal inputs that will generate less SO2 emissions, or (3) adopting new emissions abating technologies. A utility optimization condition is that the marginal value of each input

  16. Health care information technology in rural America: electronic medical record adoption status in meeting the national agenda.

    PubMed

    Bahensky, James A; Jaana, Mirou; Ward, Marcia M

    2008-01-01

    Continuing is a national political drive for investments in health care information technology (HIT) that will allow the transformation of health care for quality improvement and cost reduction. Despite several initiatives by the federal government to spur this development, HIT implementation has been limited, particularly in the rural market. The status of technology use in the transformation effort is reviewed by examining electronic medical records (EMRs), analyzing the existing rural environment, identifying barriers and factors affecting their development and implementation, and recommending needed steps to make this transformation occur, particularly in rural communities. A review of the literature for HIT in rural settings indicates that very little progress has been made in the adoption and use of HIT in rural America. Financial barriers and a large number of HIT vendors offering different solutions present significant risks to rural health care providers wanting to invest in HIT. Although evidence in the literature has demonstrated benefits of adopting HIT such as EMRs, important technical, policy, organizational, and financial barriers still exist that prevent the implementation of these systems in rural settings. To expedite the spread of HIT in rural America, federal and state governments along with private payers, who are important beneficiaries of HIT, must make difficult decisions as to who pays for the investment in this technology, along with driving standards, simplifying approaches for reductions in risk, and creating a workable operational plan.

  17. A Quantitative Assessment of Factors Affecting the Technological Development and Adoption of Companion Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dee; Smith, James A.; Meadows, Nick A.; Schuh, A.; Manescu, Katie E.; Bure, Kim; Davies, Benjamin; Horne, Rob; Kope, Mike; DiGiusto, David L.; Brindley, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid innovation in (epi)genetics and biomarker sciences is driving a new drug development and product development pathway, with the personalized medicine era dominated by biologic therapeutics and companion diagnostics. Companion diagnostics (CDx) are tests and assays that detect biomarkers and specific mutations to elucidate disease pathways, stratify patient populations, and target drug therapies. CDx can substantially influence the development and regulatory approval for certain high-risk biologics. However, despite the increasingly important role of companion diagnostics in the realization of personalized medicine, in the USA, there are only 23 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved companion diagnostics on the market for 11 unique indications. Personalized medicines have great potential, yet their use is currently constrained. A major factor for this may lie in the increased complexity of the companion diagnostic and corresponding therapeutic development and adoption pathways. Understanding the market dynamics of companion diagnostic/therapeutic (CDx/Rx) pairs is important to further development and adoption of personalized medicine. Therefore, data collected on a variety of factors may highlight incentives or disincentives driving the development of companion diagnostics. Statistical analysis for 36 hypotheses resulted in two significant relationships and 34 non-significant relationships. The sensitivity of the companion diagnostic was the only factor that significantly correlated with the price of the companion diagnostic. This result indicates that while there is regulatory pressure for the diagnostic and pharmaceutical industry to collaborate and co-develop companion diagnostics for the approval of personalized therapeutics, there seems to be a lack of parallel economic collaboration to incentivize development of companion diagnostics. PMID:26858745

  18. A Quantitative Assessment of Factors Affecting the Technological Development and Adoption of Companion Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dee; Smith, James A; Meadows, Nick A; Schuh, A; Manescu, Katie E; Bure, Kim; Davies, Benjamin; Horne, Rob; Kope, Mike; DiGiusto, David L; Brindley, David A

    2015-01-01

    Rapid innovation in (epi)genetics and biomarker sciences is driving a new drug development and product development pathway, with the personalized medicine era dominated by biologic therapeutics and companion diagnostics. Companion diagnostics (CDx) are tests and assays that detect biomarkers and specific mutations to elucidate disease pathways, stratify patient populations, and target drug therapies. CDx can substantially influence the development and regulatory approval for certain high-risk biologics. However, despite the increasingly important role of companion diagnostics in the realization of personalized medicine, in the USA, there are only 23 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved companion diagnostics on the market for 11 unique indications. Personalized medicines have great potential, yet their use is currently constrained. A major factor for this may lie in the increased complexity of the companion diagnostic and corresponding therapeutic development and adoption pathways. Understanding the market dynamics of companion diagnostic/therapeutic (CDx/Rx) pairs is important to further development and adoption of personalized medicine. Therefore, data collected on a variety of factors may highlight incentives or disincentives driving the development of companion diagnostics. Statistical analysis for 36 hypotheses resulted in two significant relationships and 34 non-significant relationships. The sensitivity of the companion diagnostic was the only factor that significantly correlated with the price of the companion diagnostic. This result indicates that while there is regulatory pressure for the diagnostic and pharmaceutical industry to collaborate and co-develop companion diagnostics for the approval of personalized therapeutics, there seems to be a lack of parallel economic collaboration to incentivize development of companion diagnostics.

  19. Adopting Disruptive Technologies in Traditional Universities: Continuing Education as an Incubator for Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Walter; Anderson, Terry; Garrison, Randy

    1999-01-01

    Traditional universities are feeling the impact of "disruptive technologies" such as distance education. Seeing how businesses have responded to such disruptions, universities should "incubate" innovations in a semiautonomous unit such as continuing education, which can address new markets with low margins. (SK)

  20. Assessing Factors Affecting Physician's Intention to Adopt Biometric Authentication Technology in Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corazao, Cesar E.

    2014-01-01

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) regulated the privacy and security of patient information. Since HIPPA became a law, hospital operators have struggled to comply fully with its security and privacy provisions. The proximity-based biometric authentication (PBBA) technology evolved in last decade to help…

  1. Early Adopters: Playing New Literacies and Pretending New Technologies in Print-Centric Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohlwend, Karen E.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, semiotic analysis of children's practices and designs with video game conventions considers how children use play and drawing as spatializing literacies that make room to import imagined technologies and user identities. Microanalysis of video data of classroom interactions collected during a three year ethnographic study of…

  2. Determinants of Adoption of Improved Fish Production Technologies among Fish Farmers in Delta State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofuoku, A. U.; Olele, N. F.; Emah, G. N.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate the determinants of improved fish production technologies in Delta State, Nigeria. Data were collected from a sample population of 250 fish farmers from ten randomly selected Local Government Areas of Delta State. The data were elicited from respondents with the use of structured interview schedule while…

  3. Information Technology Project Processes: Understanding the Barriers to Improvement and Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Bernard L.

    2009-01-01

    Every year, organizations lose millions of dollars due to IT (Information Technology) project failures. Over time, organizations have developed processes and procedures to help reduce the incidence of challenged IT projects. Research has shown that IT project processes can work to help reduce the number of challenged projects. The research in this…

  4. Learning Methods for Efficient Adoption of Contemporary Technologies in Architectural Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahdavinejad, Mohammadjavad; Dehghani, Sohaib; Shahsavari, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between technology and history is one of the most significant issues in achieving an efficient and progressive architecture in any era. This is a concept which stems from lesson of traditional architecture of Iran. Architecture as a part of art, has permanently been transforming just like a living organism. In fact, it has been…

  5. Users' Perception of Medical Simulation Training: A Framework for Adopting Simulator Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Leili Hayati

    2014-01-01

    Users play a key role in many training strategies, yet some organizations often fail to understand the users' perception after a simulation training implementation, their attitude about acceptance or rejection of and integration of emerging simulation technology in medical training (Gaba, 2007, and Topol, 2012). Several factors are considered to…

  6. The Impact of Health Information Technology Adoption by Outpatient Facilities on Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deily, Mary E; Hu, Tianyan; Terrizzi, Sabrina; Chou, Shin-Yi; Meyerhoefer, Chad D

    2013-01-01

    Objective Examine whether health information technology (HIT) at nonhospital facilities (NHFs) improves health outcomes and decreases resource use at hospitals within the same heath care network, and whether the impact of HIT varies as providers gain experience using the technologies. Data Sources Administrative claims data on 491,832 births in Pennsylvania during 1998–2004 from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council and HIT applications data from the Dorenfest Institute. Study Design Fixed-effects regression analysis of the impact of HIT at NHFs on adverse birth outcomes and resource use. Principal Findings Greater use of clinical HIT applications by NHFs is associated with reduced incidence of obstetric trauma and preventable complications, as well as longer lengths of stay. In addition, the beneficial effects of HIT increase the longer that technologies have been in use. However, we find no consistent evidence on whether or how nonclinical HIT in NHFs affects either resource use or health outcomes. Conclusions Clinical HIT applications at NHFs may reduce the likelihood of adverse birth outcomes, particularly after physicians and staff gain experience using the technologies. PMID:22742682

  7. Problem-Based Learning in Multimodal Learning Environments: Learners' Technology Adoption Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannou, Andri; Vasiliou, Christina; Zaphiris, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we enhanced a problem-based learning (PBL) environment with affordable, everyday technologies that can be found in most university classrooms (e.g., projectors, tablets, students' own smartphones, traditional paper-pencil, and Facebook). The study was conducted over a 3-year period, with 60 postgraduate learners in a human-computer…

  8. Topic Maps: Adopting User-Centred Indexing Technologies in Course Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, Vivek; Shaw, Steven; Dicks, Dennis; Lowerison, Gretchen; Zhang, Dai; Sanjakdar, Roukana

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an empirical evaluation of an indexing technology, topic maps (ISO 13250), in the context of an academic task in a higher education context. Topic maps are a form of indexing that define and display the interrelationships between various topics in a given domain, as well as anchor these topics to specific resources that help…

  9. Factors Predicting Pre-Service Teachers' Adoption of Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheon, Jongpil; Coward, Fanni; Song, Jaeki; Lim, Sunho

    2012-01-01

    Classrooms full of "digital natives" represent the norm in U. S. schools, but like their predecessors, they mostly inhabit spaces characterized by a traditional view of teaching and learning. Understanding contributors to this mismatch, and especially teachers' role, is especially critical as Web 2.0 technologies enable greater learner…

  10. Self Reflection and Preservice Teachers' Technological Pedagogical Knowledge: Promoting Earlier Adoption of Student-Centred Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Ping; Chee, Tan Seng; Wang, Longlong; Wong, Angela; Choy, Doris

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the qualitative findings relating to fourteen preservice teachers' development and translation of their technological pedagogical knowledge (TPK) into their classroom practices throughout the first year of their teacher preparation program. It was found that all fourteen participants demonstrated a gain in…

  11. Fingerprints in Place of Passwords: A Study of Technology Adoption in the Nursing Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francisco, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Health care is one of the most highly regulated industries in the United States. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) mandates the implementation of information systems security to protect the personal information of patients. Properly planned implementations ease the process of introducing new technologies like…

  12. Adoption of Mobile Technology for Teaching Preparation in Improving Teaching Quality of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawi, Aliff; Hamzah, Mohd Isa; Ren, Chua Chy; Tamuri, Ab Halim

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the readiness of teachers to use mobile phones for the purpose of teaching preparation. The study also reviewed the level of teachers' satisfaction when using the mobile technology applications developed for the purpose of teaching and learning in the classroom. This study used the mix method to collect data. A total of…

  13. Innovation in Business Organizations: Adoption of Japanese Management Principles and Communications Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Renee; And Others

    A survey was completed by 248 North Carolinian companies in a study conducted to determine the extent to which businesses have responded to recent theories on Japanese management principles and communication technologies. The five areas of the survey focused on (1) characteristics of the respondent and organization, (2) communication and decision…

  14. Roles for software technologies in advancing research and theory in educational psychology.

    PubMed

    Hadwin, Allyson F; Winne, Philip H; Nesbit, John C

    2005-03-01

    While reviews abound on theoretical topics in educational psychology, it is rare that we examine our field's instrumentation development, and what effects this has on educational psychology's evolution. To repair this gap, this paper investigates and reveals the implications of software technologies for researching and theorizing about core issues in educational psychology. From a set of approximately 1,500 articles published between 1999 and 2004, we sampled illustrative studies and organized them into four broad themes: (a) innovative ways to operationalize variables, (b) the changing nature of instructional interventions, (c) new fields of research in educational psychology, and (d) new constructs to be examined. In each area, we identify novel uses of these technologies and suggest how they may advance, and, in some instances, reshape theory and methodology. Overall, we demonstrate that software technologies hold significant potential to elaborate research in the field.

  15. Software Reuse Methods to Improve Technological Infrastructure for e-Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, James J.; Downs, Robert R.; Mattmann, Chris A.

    2011-01-01

    Social computing has the potential to contribute to scientific research. Ongoing developments in information and communications technology improve capabilities for enabling scientific research, including research fostered by social computing capabilities. The recent emergence of e-Science practices has demonstrated the benefits from improvements in the technological infrastructure, or cyber-infrastructure, that has been developed to support science. Cloud computing is one example of this e-Science trend. Our own work in the area of software reuse offers methods that can be used to improve new technological development, including cloud computing capabilities, to support scientific research practices. In this paper, we focus on software reuse and its potential to contribute to the development and evaluation of information systems and related services designed to support new capabilities for conducting scientific research.

  16. Key Drivers of Marines Willingness to Adopt Energy-Efficient Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    warrant officer 2 DoI diffusion of innovations DON Department of the Navy E2O Expeditionary Energy Office FMF fleet marine force GCSS ground...more energy -efficient. • “Expeditionary forces can reduce their logistical requirement if energy - efficient technologies are implemented ” • “It...Same thing with solar power. If solar power was so much better than electricity in terms of efficiency and cost why haven’t people jumped on it

  17. The Department of Defense’s Second Chasm in RFID-UID Technology Adoption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Electronic Funds Transfer EPC Electronics Product Code FOC Full Operational Capability FPDS-NG Federal Procurement Data System-Next Generation...technology, when they knew that the Electronics Product Code ( EPC ) global Generation 2 (Gen 2) standard had already been developed. Further, DoD...all material with pRFID tags attached. The rationale offered for instituting the change after the deadline was to help ensure that contractors would

  18. Transfer of computer software technology through workshops: The case of fish bioenergetics modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    A three-part program is proposed to promote the availability and use of computer software packages to fishery managers and researchers. The approach consists of journal articles that announce new technologies, technical reports that serve as user's guides, and hands-on workshops that provide direct instruction to new users. Workshops, which allow experienced users to directly instruct novices in software operation and application are important, but often neglected. The author's experience with organizing and conducting bioenergetics modeling workshops suggests the optimal workshop would take 2 days, have 10-15 participants, one computer for every two users, and one instructor for every 5-6 people.

  19. Height measurement of transparent objects by adopting differential interference contrast technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Sheng-Kang; Liu, Ting-Kun; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2010-05-10

    In this study, the differential interference contrast (DIC) approach originally used for image enhancement to increase the contrast between a transparent object and the background is adopted for the dimension measurement of transparent structures. With the phase difference image retrieved using the DIC technique, the phase map of the examined object can be approximated by integrating the phase difference. The need of integration accuracy is much higher for measurement than for image enhancement. In this study, a modified Fourier phase integration is proposed to reduce the effects of noise on surface profile reconstruction. The simulation results show that the proposed approach can effectively reduce the effects of noise. Experimental results are also conducted to study the feasibility of using the transmitted DIC with the proposed integration method for transparent object measurement. The results show that the height of a transparent structure measured using the DIC method is quite close to those measured using an atomic force microscope, while those measured using the white-light interference method result in a much larger measurement than all others.

  20. Crossing the Technology Adoption Chasm in the Presence of Network Externalities: Implications for DoD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    to as the Valley of Death ( VoD ), particularly within the DoD. The chasm reflects the significant problems as well as important implications for...1999). The challenge is to figure out how to break into the Early Majority and overcome the hazards of the VoD . When a technology is crossing...not the only criteria for crossing the DoD Valley of Death ( VoD ). In order to be considered successfully diffused – having crossed the Chasm into

  1. Reconfigurable Transceiver and Software-Defined Radio Architecture and Technology Evaluated for NASA Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the development and suitability of a software-based open-architecture for space-based reconfigurable transceivers (RTs) and software-defined radios (SDRs). The main objectives of this project are to enable advanced operations and reduce mission costs. SDRs are becoming more common because of the capabilities of reconfigurable digital signal processing technologies such as field programmable gate arrays and digital signal processors, which place radio functions in firmware and software that were traditionally performed with analog hardware components. Features of interest of this communications architecture include nonproprietary open standards and application programming interfaces to enable software reuse and portability, independent hardware and software development, and hardware and software functional separation. The goals for RT and SDR technologies for NASA space missions include prelaunch and on-orbit frequency and waveform reconfigurability and programmability, high data rate capability, and overall communications and processing flexibility. These operational advances over current state-of-art transceivers will be provided to reduce the power, mass, and cost of RTs and SDRs for space communications. The open architecture for NASA communications will support existing (legacy) communications needs and capabilities while providing a path to more capable, advanced waveform development and mission concepts (e.g., ad hoc constellations with self-healing networks and high-rate science data return). A study was completed to assess the state of the art in RT architectures, implementations, and technologies. In-house researchers conducted literature searches and analysis, interviewed Government and industry contacts, and solicited information and white papers from industry on space-qualifiable RTs and SDRs and their associated technologies for space-based NASA applications. The white papers were evaluated, compiled, and

  2. More technology, better learning resources, better learning? Lessons from adopting virtual microscopy in undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Helle, Laura; Nivala, Markus; Kronqvist, Pauliina

    2013-01-01

    The adoption of virtual microscopy at the University of Turku, Finland, created a unique real-world laboratory for exploring ways of reforming the learning environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the students' reactions and the impact of a set of measures designed to boost an experimental group's understanding of abnormal histology through an emphasis on knowledge of normal cells and tissues. The set of measures included (1) digital resources to review normal structures and an entrance examination for enforcement, (2) digital course slides highlighting normal and abnormal tissues, and (3) self-diagnostic quizzes. The performance of historical controls was used as a baseline, as previous students had never been exposed to the above-mentioned measures. The students' understanding of normal histology was assessed in the beginning of the module to determine the impact of the first set of measures, whereas that of abnormal histology was assessed at the end of the module to determine the impact of the whole set of measures. The students' reactions to the instructional measures were assessed by course evaluation data. Additionally, four students were interviewed. Results confirmed that the experimental group significantly outperformed the historical controls in understanding normal histology. The students held favorable opinions on the idea of emphasizing normal structures. However, with regards to abnormal histology, the historical controls outperformed the experimental group. In conclusion, allowing students access to high-quality digitized materials and boosting prerequisite skills are clearly not sufficient to boost final competence. Instead, the solution may lie in making students externally accountable for their learning throughout their training.

  3. Evaluation of teledermatology adoption by health-care professionals using a modified Technology Acceptance Model.

    PubMed

    Orruño, Estibalitz; Gagnon, Marie Pierre; Asua, José; Ben Abdeljelil, Anis

    2011-01-01

    We examined the main factors affecting the intention of physicians to use teledermatology using a modified Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The investigation was carried out during a teledermatology pilot study conducted in Spain. A total of 276 questionnaires were sent to physicians by email and 171 responded (62%). Cronbach's alpha was acceptably high for all constructs. Theoretical variables were well correlated with each other and with the dependent variable (Intention to Use). Logistic regression indicated that the original TAM model was good at predicting physicians' intention to use teledermatology and that the variables Perceived Usefulness and Perceived Ease of Use were both significant (odds ratios of 8.4 and 7.4, respectively). When other theoretical variables were added, the model was still significant and it also became more powerful. However, the only significant predictor in the modified model was Facilitators with an odds ratio of 9.9. Thus the TAM was good at predicting physicians' intention to use teledermatology. However, the most important variable was the perception of Facilitators to using the technology (e.g. infrastructure, training and support).

  4. Cost calculation: a necessary step towards widespread adoption of advanced radiotherapy technology.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Yolande; Borras, Jose Maria; Grau, Cai

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy costs are an often underestimated component of the economic assessment of new radiotherapy treatments and technologies. That the radiotherapy budget only consumes a finite part of the total cancer and healthcare budget does not relieve us from our responsibility to balance the extra costs to the additional benefits of new, more advanced, but typically also more expensive treatments we want to deliver. Yet, in contrast to what is the case for oncology drugs, literature evidence remains limited, as well for economic evaluations comparing new radiotherapy interventions as for cost calculation studies. Even more cumbersome, the available costing studies in the field of radiotherapy fail to accurately capture the real costs of our treatments due to the large variation in cost inputs, in scope of the analysis, in costing methodology. And this is not trivial. Accurate resource cost accounting lays the basis for the further steps in health technology assessment leading to radiotherapy investments and reimbursement, at the local, the national and the worldwide level. In the current paper we review some evidence from the existing costing literature and discuss how such data can be used to support reimbursement setting and investment cases for new radiotherapy equipment and infrastructure.

  5. Predicting Cloud Computing Technology Adoption by Organizations: An Empirical Integration of Technology Acceptance Model and Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekufu, ThankGod K.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are finding it difficult in today's economy to implement the vast information technology infrastructure required to effectively conduct their business operations. Despite the fact that some of these organizations are leveraging on the computational powers and the cost-saving benefits of computing on the Internet cloud, others…

  6. High Technology Systems with Low Technology Failures: Some Experiences with Rockets on Software Quality and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Larry G.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews three failures of software and how the failures contributed to or caused the failure of a launch or payload insertion into orbit. In order to avoid these systematic failures in the future, failure mitigation strategies are suggested for use.

  7. Influence of regional development policies and clean technology adoption on future air pollution exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hixson, Mark; Mahmud, Abdullah; Hu, Jianlin; Bai, Song; Niemeier, Debbie A.; Handy, Susan L.; Gao, Shengyi; Lund, Jay R.; Sullivan, Dana Coe; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2010-02-01

    Future air pollution emissions in the year 2030 were estimated for the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in central California using a combined system of land use, mobile, off-road, stationary, area, and biogenic emissions models. Four scenarios were developed that use different assumptions about the density of development and level of investment in transportation infrastructure to accommodate the expected doubling of the SJV population in the next 20 years. Scenario 1 reflects current land-use patterns and infrastructure while scenario 2 encouraged compact urban footprints including redevelopment of existing urban centers and investments in transit. Scenario 3 allowed sprawling development in the SJV with reduced population density in existing urban centers and construction of all planned freeways. Scenario 4 followed currently adopted land use and transportation plans for the SJV. The air quality resulting from these urban development scenarios was evaluated using meteorology from a winter stagnation event that occurred on December 15th, 2000 to January 7th 2001. Predicted base-case PM2.5 mass concentrations within the region exceeded 35 μg m -3 over the 22-day episode. Compact growth reduced the PM2.5 concentrations by ˜1 μg m -3 relative to the base-case over most of the SJV with the exception of increases (˜1 μg m -3) in urban centers driven by increased concentrations of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC). Low-density development increased the PM2.5 concentrations by 1-4 μg m -3 over most of the region, with decreases (0.5-2 μg m -3) around urban areas. Population-weighted average PM2.5 concentrations were very similar for all development scenarios ranging between 16 and 17.4 μg m -3. Exposure to primary PM components such as EC and OC increased 10-15% for high density development scenarios and decreased by 11-19% for low-density scenarios. Patterns for secondary PM components such as nitrate and ammonium ion were almost exactly reversed, with a 10

  8. Entrepreneurial model based technology creative industries sector software through the use of free open source software for Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, B.; Hasbullah; Purnama, W.; Hery, A.

    2016-04-01

    Creative industry development areas of software by using Free Open Source Software (FOSS) is expected to be one of the solutions to foster new entrepreneurs of the students who can open job opportunities and contribute to economic development in Indonesia. This study aims to create entrepreneurial coaching model based on the creative industries by utilizing FOSS software field as well as provide understanding and fostering entrepreneurial creative industries based field software for students of Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia. This activity phase begins with identifying entrepreneurs or business software technology that will be developed, training and mentoring, apprenticeship process at industrial partners, creation of business plans and monitoring and evaluation. This activity involves 30 UPI student which has the motivation to self-employment and have competence in the field of information technology. The results and outcomes expected from these activities is the birth of a number of new entrepreneurs from the students engaged in the software industry both software in the world of commerce (e-commerce) and education/learning (e-learning/LMS) and games.

  9. Technology for Evolutionary Software Development (Technologies pour le developpement de logiciels evolutifs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    how ‘open’ the system architecture is for ‘change’. These are things like adaptability, maintainability, portability8, and testability. • Develop...successfully to software development projects in the past, this approach is not suitable for commercial projects in the era of e-business where things ...simply because things do not perform as desired in practice. These changes are usually shifted into maintenance and upgrade phases of the project. • As

  10. Agent Based Modeling of Air Carrier Behavior for Evaluation of Technology Equipage and Adoption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horio, Brant M.; DeCicco, Anthony H.; Stouffer, Virginia L.; Hasan, Shahab; Rosenbaum, Rebecca L.; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2014-01-01

    As part of ongoing research, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and LMI developed a research framework to assist policymakers in identifying impacts on the U.S. air transportation system (ATS) of potential policies and technology related to the implementation of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). This framework, called the Air Transportation System Evolutionary Simulation (ATS-EVOS), integrates multiple models into a single process flow to best simulate responses by U.S. commercial airlines and other ATS stakeholders to NextGen-related policies, and in turn, how those responses impact the ATS. Development of this framework required NASA and LMI to create an agent-based model of airline and passenger behavior. This Airline Evolutionary Simulation (AIRLINE-EVOS) models airline decisions about tactical airfare and schedule adjustments, and strategic decisions related to fleet assignments, market prices, and equipage. AIRLINE-EVOS models its own heterogeneous population of passenger agents that interact with airlines; this interaction allows the model to simulate the cycle of action-reaction as airlines compete with each other and engage passengers. We validated a baseline configuration of AIRLINE-EVOS against Airline Origin and Destination Survey (DB1B) data and subject matter expert opinion, and we verified the ATS-EVOS framework and agent behavior logic through scenario-based experiments. These experiments demonstrated AIRLINE-EVOS's capabilities in responding to an input price shock in fuel prices, and to equipage challenges in a series of analyses based on potential incentive policies for best equipped best served, optimal-wind routing, and traffic management initiative exemption concepts..

  11. Farm, household, and farmer characteristics associated with changes in management practices and technology adoption among dairy smallholders.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Carlos Galdino; Ugoretz, Sarah Janes; Arriaga-Jordán, Carlos Manuel; Wattiaux, Michel André

    2015-02-01

    This study explored whether technology adoption and changes in management practices were associated with farm structure, household, and farmer characteristics and to identify processes that may foster productivity and sustainability of small-scale dairy farming in the central highlands of Mexico. Factor analysis of survey data from 44 smallholders identified three factors-related to farm size, farmer's engagement, and household structure-that explained 70 % of cumulative variance. The subsequent hierarchical cluster analysis yielded three clusters. Cluster 1 included the most senior farmers with fewest years of education but greatest years of experience. Cluster 2 included farmers who reported access to extension, cooperative services, and more management changes. Cluster 2 obtained 25 and 35 % more milk than farmers in clusters 1 and 3, respectively. Cluster 3 included the youngest farmers, with most years of education and greatest availability of family labor. Access to a network and membership in a community of peers appeared as important contributors to success. Smallholders gravitated towards easy to implement technologies that have immediate benefits. Nonusers of high investment technologies found them unaffordable because of cost, insufficient farm size, and lack of knowledge or reliable electricity. Multivariate analysis may be a useful tool in planning extension activities and organizing channels of communication to effectively target farmers with varying needs, constraints, and motivations for change and in identifying farmers who may exemplify models of change for others who manage farms that are structurally similar but performing at a lower level.

  12. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application.

  13. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 734 - Questions and Answers-Technology and Software Subject to the EAR

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... technology at conferences. Section C: Educational instruction. Section D: Research, correspondence, and... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Questions and Answers-Technology and... Supplement No. 1 to Part 734—Questions and Answers—Technology and Software Subject to the EAR This...

  14. The Mobile College Community: A Study of Adult Learners' Adoption and Use of Digital Communication Technologies on the Campuses of Florida's Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidert, John William

    2012-01-01

    Rapid advancements in technology and the proliferation of mobile communication devices available in the marketplace require that community college administrators and teachers better understand levels of digital communication technology adoption and how adult learners currently use them. Such an understanding is necessary to developing the…

  15. Factors Affecting ICT Adoption among Distance Education Students Based on the Technology Acceptance Model--A Case Study at a Distance Education University in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dastjerdi, Negin Barat

    2016-01-01

    The incorporation of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) into education systems is an active program and movement in education that illustrates modern education and enables an all-encompassing presence in the third millennium; however, prior to applying ICT, the factors affecting the adoption and use of these technologies should be…

  16. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Consolidated Progress Report July 2006 - March 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, D E; McInnes, L C; Govindaraju, M; Bramley, R; Epperly, T; Kohl, J A; Nieplocha, J; Armstrong, R; Shasharina, S; Sussman, A L; Sottile, M; Damevski, K

    2009-04-14

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  17. Center for Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kostadin, Damevski

    2015-01-25

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)1 tackles these these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  18. Moving forward in plant food safety and security through NanoBioSensors: Adopt or adapt biomedical technologies?

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tarun K; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh K; Bansal, Vipul

    2015-05-01

    Plant-based foods are integral part of our day-to-day diet. Increasing world population has put forth an ever increasing demand for plant-based foods, and food security remains a major concern. Similarly, biological, chemical, and physical threats to our food and increasing regulatory demands to control the presence of foreign species in food products have made food safety a growing issue. Nanotechnology has already established its roots in diverse disciplines. However, the food industry is yet to harness the full potential of the unique capabilities offered by this next-generation technology. While there might be safety concerns in regards to integration of nanoproducts with our food products, an aspect of nanotechnology that can make remarkable contribution to different elements of the food chain is the use of nanobiosensors and diagnostic platforms for monitoring food traceability, quality, safety, and nutritional value. This brings us to an important question that whether existing diagnostic platforms that have already been well developed for biomedical and clinical application are suitable for food industry or whether the demands of the food industry are altogether different that may not allow adoption/adaptation of the existing technology. This review is an effort to raise this important "uncomfortable" yet "timely" question.

  19. The Relationship between Job Satisfaction and Intent to Turnover among Software Engineers in the Information Technology Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agada, Chuks N.

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this study was to examine the relationship between job satisfaction and intent to turnover among software engineers in the information technology (IT) industry. The population that was analyzed in this study was software engineers in the IT industry to determine whether there is a relationship between job satisfaction and intent to…

  20. CUSTOMER RESPONSE TO BESTPRACTICES TRAINING AND SOFTWARE TOOLS PROVIDED BY DOE'S INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin; Martin, Michaela A; Schmoyer, Richard L

    2008-03-01

    The BestPractices program area, which has evolved into the Save Energy Now (SEN) Initiative, is a component of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) that provides technical assistance and disseminates information on energy-efficient technologies and practices to U.S. industrial firms. The BestPractices approach to information dissemination includes conducting training sessions which address energy-intensive systems (compressed air, steam, process heat, pumps, motors, and fans) and distributing DOE software tools on those same topics. The current report documents a recent Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) study undertaken to determine the implementation rate, attribution rate, and reduction factor for industrial end-users who received BestPractices training and registered software in FY 2006. The implementation rate is the proportion of service recipients taking energy-saving actions as a result of the service received. The attribution rate applies to those individuals taking energy-saving actions as a result of the services received and represents the portion of the savings achieved through those actions that is due to the service. The reduction factor is the saving that is realized from program-induced measures as a proportion of the potential savings that could be achieved if all service recipients took action. In addition to examining those factors, the ORNL study collected information on selected characteristics of service recipients, the perceived value of the services provided, and the potential energy savings that can be achieved through implementation of measures identified from the training or software. Because the provision of training is distinctly different from the provision of software tools, the two efforts were examined independently and the findings for each are reported separately.

  1. Earth resources technology system standalone software package: Description and user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. W.

    1975-01-01

    A user's guide and program description for the ERTS-B Stand-Alone Software Package is presented. This package was developed to compute the Keplerian elements at the descending node, the Brouwer mean elements at the node, the averaged Brouwer Mean Elements, and other orbital parameters for the orbits of the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS). The typical input for the program is an ephemeris file which resulted from a definitive orbit generated over a two day arc using the Cowell option in the Definitive Orbit Determination System (DODS) or the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS).

  2. Software Technology for Adaptable Reliable Systems (STARS) Joint Task Force Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-15

    34 NCASIFE 4 * ~~SIN 6162 -0618 -ŝ SCCUOUT? LASS8FlCAT@IO0 THIS PASShII . 0 am * SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY FOR ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS (STARS) JOINT TASK...Following the workshop, the Task Force concentrated on producing the final set of documents (see Section 4 ! 0 for a complete list). Revisions were...Lafayette, LA. 7(504’ Jack C. Wileden Univ. of Mass. 115 Pelham Road Amherst, MA. 01002 9 4 ° /, * -.. r*• 4 0 DOCUMENTS PRODUCED The following documents are

  3. NASA JPL Distributed Systems Technology (DST) Object-Oriented Component Approach for Software Inter-Operability and Reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Laverne; Hung, Chaw-Kwei; Lin, Imin

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a description of NASA JPL Distributed Systems Technology (DST) Section's object-oriented component approach to open inter-operable systems software development and software reuse. It will address what is meant by the terminology object component software, give an overview of the component-based development approach and how it relates to infrastructure support of software architectures and promotes reuse, enumerate on the benefits of this approach, and give examples of application prototypes demonstrating its usage and advantages. Utilization of the object-oriented component technology approach for system development and software reuse will apply to several areas within JPL, and possibly across other NASA Centers.

  4. Next Generation Astronomical Data Processing using Big Data Technologies from the Apache Software Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattmann, Chris

    2014-04-01

    In this era of exascale instruments for astronomy we must naturally develop next generation capabilities for the unprecedented data volume and velocity that will arrive due to the veracity of these ground-based sensor and observatories. Integrating scientific algorithms stewarded by scientific groups unobtrusively and rapidly; intelligently selecting data movement technologies; making use of cloud computing for storage and processing; and automatically extracting text and metadata and science from any type of file are all needed capabilities in this exciting time. Our group at NASA JPL has promoted the use of open source data management technologies available from the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in pursuit of constructing next generation data management and processing systems for astronomical instruments including the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) in Socorro, NM and the Atacama Large Milimetre/Sub Milimetre Array (ALMA); as well as for the KAT-7 project led by SKA South Africa as a precursor to the full MeerKAT telescope. In addition we are funded currently by the National Science Foundation in the US to work with MIT Haystack Observatory and the University of Cambridge in the UK to construct a Radio Array of Portable Interferometric Devices (RAPID) that will undoubtedly draw from the rich technology advances underway. NASA JPL is investing in a strategic initiative for Big Data that is pulling in these capabilities and technologies for astronomical instruments and also for Earth science remote sensing. In this talk I will describe the above collaborative efforts underway and point to solutions in open source from the Apache Software Foundation that can be deployed and used today and that are already bringing our teams and projects benefits. I will describe how others can take advantage of our experience and point towards future application and contribution of these tools.

  5. Advanced communications technology satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal communication protocol software user's guide, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    The Communication Protocol Software was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (ACTS HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenters terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various experiments by government, university, and industry agencies. The Communication Protocol Software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitor (C&PM) Software system of the HBR-LET. The Communication Protocol Software allows users to control and configure the Intermediate Frequency Switch Matrix (IFSM) on board the ACTS to yield a desired path through the spacecraft payload. Besides IFSM control, the C&PM Software System is also responsible for instrument control during HBR-LET experiments, uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during signal fade events, and data display. The Communication Protocol Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189162) outlines the commands and procedures to install and operate the Communication Protocol Software. Configuration files used to control the IFSM, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed. The Communication Protocol Software Maintenance Manual, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189163, to be published) is a programmer's guide to the Communication Protocol Software. This manual details the current implementation of the software from a technical perspective. Included is an overview of the Communication Protocol Software, computer algorithms, format representations, and computer hardware configuration. The Communication Protocol Software Test Plan (NASA CR-189164, to be published) provides a step-by-step procedure to verify the operation of the software. Included in the Test Plan is command transmission, telemetry reception, error detection, and error recovery procedures.

  6. Space Flight Software Development Software for Intelligent System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Crumbley, Tim

    2004-01-01

    The slide presentation examines the Marshall Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch, including software development projects, mission critical space flight software development, software technical insight, advanced software development technologies, and continuous improvement in the software development processes and methods.

  7. Convergence of Health Level Seven Version 2 Messages to Semantic Web Technologies for Software-Intensive Systems in Telemedicine Trauma Care

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Timothy Wayne; Cavalini, Luciana Tricai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To present the technical background and the development of a procedure that enriches the semantics of Health Level Seven version 2 (HL7v2) messages for software-intensive systems in telemedicine trauma care. Methods This study followed a multilevel model-driven approach for the development of semantically interoperable health information systems. The Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) ABCDE protocol was adopted as the use case. A prototype application embedded the semantics into an HL7v2 message as an eXtensible Markup Language (XML) file, which was validated against an XML schema that defines constraints on a common reference model. This message was exchanged with a second prototype application, developed on the Mirth middleware, which was also used to parse and validate both the original and the hybrid messages. Results Both versions of the data instance (one pure XML, one embedded in the HL7v2 message) were equally validated and the RDF-based semantics recovered by the receiving side of the prototype from the shared XML schema. Conclusions This study demonstrated the semantic enrichment of HL7v2 messages for intensive-software telemedicine systems for trauma care, by validating components of extracts generated in various computing environments. The adoption of the method proposed in this study ensures the compliance of the HL7v2 standard in Semantic Web technologies. PMID:26893947

  8. Consumer Security Perceptions and the Perceived Influence on Adopting Cloud Computing: A Quantitative Study Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquet, Katherine G.

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing may provide cost benefits for organizations by eliminating the overhead costs of software, hardware, and maintenance (e.g., license renewals, upgrading software, servers and their physical storage space, administration along with funding a large IT department). In addition to the promised savings, the organization may require…

  9. The Times They Are A-Changing: The Influence of Railroad Technology on the Adoption of Standard Time Zones in 1883.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Nathaniel

    2000-01-01

    Presents the story of the role railroad technology had in the adoption of Standard Time Zones in 1883 and also considers the influence of astronomers at the time. Includes the map of the standard railway time used by W. F. Allen and an annotated bibliography with primary and secondary sources. (CMK)

  10. An Analysis of Information Technology Managers' and Executives' Security Concerns on Willingness to Adopt Cloud Computing Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanque, Marcus M.

    2012-01-01

    The research conducted in this study inquires about Information Technology (IT) managers' and executives' attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge on Cloud Computing (CC) security. The study evaluated how these factors affect IT managers' and executives' willingness to adopt CC solutions in their organizations. Confidentiality,…

  11. A Behavioural Approach to Understanding Semi-Subsistence Farmers' Technology Adoption Decisions: The Case of Improved Paddy-Prawn System in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambodo, Leonardo A. A. T.; Nuthall, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study traced the origins of subsistence Farmers' technology adoption attitudes and extracted the critical elements in their decision making systems. Design/Methodology/Approach: The analysis was structured using a model based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). The role of a "bargaining process" was particularly…

  12. Examining EFL Teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge and the Adoption of Mobile-Assisted Language Learning: A Partial Least Square Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Liwei

    2016-01-01

    This study examines EFL (English as a foreign Language) teachers' technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) and how such knowledge affects the adoption of mobile-assisted language learning (MALL). A total of 158 in-service Taiwanese English teachers were surveyed. Two frameworks were employed to examine latent constructs: TPACK and the…

  13. Software-Defined Ultra-wideband Radio Communications: A New RF Technology for Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F

    2009-10-19

    Reliable wireless communication links for local-area (short-range) and regional (long-range) reach capabilities are crucial for emergency response to disasters. Lack of a dependable communication system can result in disruptions in the situational awareness between the local responders in the field and the emergency command and control centers. To date, all wireless communications systems such as cell phones and walkie-talkies use narrowband radio frequency (RF) signaling for data communication. However, the hostile radio propagation environment caused by collapsed structures and rubble in various disaster sites results in significant degradation and attenuation of narrowband RF signals, which ends up in frequent communication breakdowns. To address the challenges of reliable radio communication in disaster fields, we propose an approach to use ultra-wideband (UWB) or wideband RF waveforms for implementation on Software Defined Radio (SDR) platforms. Ultra-wideband communications has been proven by many research groups to be effective in addressing many of the limitations faced by conventional narrowband radio technologies. In addition, LLNL's radio and wireless team have shown significant success in field deployment of various UWB communications system for harsh environments based on LLNL's patented UWB modulation and equalization techniques. Furthermore, using software defined radio platform for UWB communications offers a great deal of flexibility in operational parameters and helps the radio system to dynamically adapt itself to its environment for optimal performance.

  14. Software development for the evaluation of the ergonomic compatibility on the selection of advanced manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Macías, A; Reyes, R; Guillen, L; García, J

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) is one of the most relevant resources that companies have to achieve competitiveness and best performance. The selection of AMT is a complex problem which involves significant amount of information and uncertainty when multiple aspects must be taken into consideration. Actual models for the selection of AMT are found scarce of the Human Factors and Ergonomics perspective which can lead to a more complete and reliable decision. This paper presents the development of software that enhances the application of an Ergonomic Compatibility Evaluation Model that supports decision making processes taking into consideration ergonomic attributes of designs. Ergonomic Compatibility is a construct used in this model and it is mainly based in the concept of human-artifact compatibility on human compatible systems. Also, an Axiomatic Design approach by the use of the Information Axiom was evolved under a fuzzy environment to obtain the Ergonomic Incompatibility Content. The extension of this axiom for the evaluation of ergonomic compatibility requirements was the theoretical framework of this research. An incremental methodology of four stages was used to design and develop the software that enables to compare AMT alternatives by the evaluation of Ergonomic Compatibility Attributes.

  15. Multivariate Statistical Analysis Software Technologies for Astrophysical Research Involving Large Data Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S. G.

    1994-01-01

    We developed a package to process and analyze the data from the digital version of the Second Palomar Sky Survey. This system, called SKICAT, incorporates the latest in machine learning and expert systems software technology, in order to classify the detected objects objectively and uniformly, and facilitate handling of the enormous data sets from digital sky surveys and other sources. The system provides a powerful, integrated environment for the manipulation and scientific investigation of catalogs from virtually any source. It serves three principal functions: image catalog construction, catalog management, and catalog analysis. Through use of the GID3* Decision Tree artificial induction software, SKICAT automates the process of classifying objects within CCD and digitized plate images. To exploit these catalogs, the system also provides tools to merge them into a large, complex database which may be easily queried and modified when new data or better methods of calibrating or classifying become available. The most innovative feature of SKICAT is the facility it provides to experiment with and apply the latest in machine learning technology to the tasks of catalog construction and analysis. SKICAT provides a unique environment for implementing these tools for any number of future scientific purposes. Initial scientific verification and performance tests have been made using galaxy counts and measurements of galaxy clustering from small subsets of the survey data, and a search for very high redshift quasars. All of the tests were successful and produced new and interesting scientific results. Attachments to this report give detailed accounts of the technical aspects of the SKICAT system, and of some of the scientific results achieved to date. We also developed a user-friendly package for multivariate statistical analysis of small and moderate-size data sets, called STATPROG. The package was tested extensively on a number of real scientific applications and has

  16. Multivariate statistical analysis software technologies for astrophysical research involving large data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S. George

    1994-01-01

    We developed a package to process and analyze the data from the digital version of the Second Palomar Sky Survey. This system, called SKICAT, incorporates the latest in machine learning and expert systems software technology, in order to classify the detected objects objectively and uniformly, and facilitate handling of the enormous data sets from digital sky surveys and other sources. The system provides a powerful, integrated environment for the manipulation and scientific investigation of catalogs from virtually any source. It serves three principal functions: image catalog construction, catalog management, and catalog analysis. Through use of the GID3* Decision Tree artificial induction software, SKICAT automates the process of classifying objects within CCD and digitized plate images. To exploit these catalogs, the system also provides tools to merge them into a large, complete database which may be easily queried and modified when new data or better methods of calibrating or classifying become available. The most innovative feature of SKICAT is the facility it provides to experiment with and apply the latest in machine learning technology to the tasks of catalog construction and analysis. SKICAT provides a unique environment for implementing these tools for any number of future scientific purposes. Initial scientific verification and performance tests have been made using galaxy counts and measurements of galaxy clustering from small subsets of the survey data, and a search for very high redshift quasars. All of the tests were successful, and produced new and interesting scientific results. Attachments to this report give detailed accounts of the technical aspects for multivariate statistical analysis of small and moderate-size data sets, called STATPROG. The package was tested extensively on a number of real scientific applications, and has produced real, published results.

  17. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 4: Software (E-4). A. Summary. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Only a few efforts are currently underway to develop an adequate technology base for the various themes. Particular attention must be given to software commonality and evolutionary capability, to increased system integrity and autonomy; and to improved communications among the program users, the program developers, and the programs themselves. There is a need for quantum improvement in software development methods and increasing the awareness of software by all concerned. Major thrusts identified include: (1) data and systems management; (2) software technology for autonomous systems; (3) technology and methods for improving the software development process; (4) advances related to systems of software elements including their architecture, their attributes as systems, and their interfaces with users and other systems; and (5) applications of software including both the basic algorithms used in a number of applications and the software specific to a particular theme or discipline area. The impact of each theme on software is assessed.

  18. The Experience of New WBI-Adopters in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uyeung, Lai Hung A; Ha, Tak Shing; Au, Grace

    2003-01-01

    The innovative use of information and communication technology is becoming increasingly popular among higher education institutions in Hong Kong. The motivation for adoption is expedited by great promotive efforts within the academic communities that accompany the current high level of financial, hardware, and software resources deployed in all…

  19. Open Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Annette; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Adult adoptees are increasingly challenging the practice of sealing their birth records. The authors examine the historical roots of adoptive practices in this country and suggest that the time has come for open adoption to gain acceptance as an alternative. (Author)

  20. DISSS/ET modernization feasibility of adapting existing software and hardware technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, R.S.

    1993-09-30

    The Fission Energy and Systems Safety Program (FESSP) at LLNL was funded by the DOE Office of Safeguards and Security to develop an integrated system, hereafter referred to as the Security Clearance Electronic Processing, Transfer, Evaluation, and Recordkeeping (SCEPTER) System, for the electronic collection and transfer of personnel security data between clearance offices at contractor sites and DOE field offices and the Office of Personnel Management(OPM). This system will use existing software and hardware technologies where feasible. The project will consist of three phases. The first phase will investigate user needs, determine the feasibility of using existing technologies, and define project requirements. The second phase will be a pilot project to develop the computer systems and procedures required to automate the security clearance work flow within DOE and between DOE and OPM. Once the pilot system is implemented and tested, the decision to extend the system throughout DOE can be made. This third phase, the extension to a full production system, will require the investment of considerable funds in equipment and in the development of both a computer system and management infrastructure to support its successful operation. This investment will be undertaken only after the pilot system is operational and evaluated.

  1. 7 Processes that Enable NASA Software Engineering Technologies: Value-Added Process Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housch, Helen; Godfrey, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The presentation reviews Agency process requirements and the purpose, benefits, and experiences or seven software engineering processes. The processes include: product integration, configuration management, verification, software assurance, measurement and analysis, requirements management, and planning and monitoring.

  2. Using stated preference methods to design cost-effective subsidy programs to induce technology adoption: an application to a stove program in southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Walter; Salgado, Hugo; Vásquez, Felipe; Chávez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    We study the design of an economic incentive based program - a subsidy - to induce adoption of more efficient technology in a pollution reduction program in southern Chile. Stated preferences methods, contingent valuation (CV), and choice experiment (CE) are used to estimate the probability of adoption and the willingness to share the cost of a new technology by a household. The cost-effectiveness property of different subsidy schemes is explored numerically for different regulatory objectives. Our results suggest that households are willing to participate in voluntary programs and to contribute by paying a share of the cost of adopting more efficient technologies. We find that attributes of the existing and the new technology, beyond the price, are relevant determinant factors of the participation decision and payment. Limited access to credit markets for low income families can be a major barrier for an effective implementation of these types of programs. Variations in the design of the subsidy and on the regulator's objective and constraints can have significant impact on the level and the cost of reduction of aggregate emissions achieved.

  3. Impacts of Technological Changes in the Cyber Environment on Software/Systems Engineering Workforce Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Knowledge Application domain Procedural design Cobol & Assembler Numerical analysis Skills Requirements analysis System design Project management...Software Engineer III Knowledge Application domain Procedural design Cobol & Assembler Num rical analysis Skills Requirements analysis Software Engineer II...Knowledge Application domain Procedural design Cobol & Assembler Num rical analysis Software Engineer I Knowledge Application domain Procedural

  4. Bridging Pedagogy and Technology: User Evaluation of Pronunciation Oriented CALL Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pi-Hua, Tsai

    2006-01-01

    While it has become common to employ pronunciation oriented software to improve one's pronunciation in L2, both language teachers and L2 learners feel uncertain about choosing software to meet their purposes. Taking "MyET", pronunciation oriented software written and highly praised in Taiwan, as a representative program, this study…

  5. Executive Guide to Software Maintenance. Reports on Computer Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Wilma M.

    This guide is designed for federal executives and managers who have a responsibility for the planning and management of software projects and for federal staff members who are affected by, or involved in, making software changes, and who need to be aware of steps that can reduce both the difficulty and cost of software maintenance. Organized in a…

  6. Learning Theories Applied to Teaching Technology: Constructivism versus Behavioral Theory for Instructing Multimedia Software Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Cajah S.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to find evidence for a beneficial learning theory to teach computer software programs. Additionally, software was analyzed for each learning theory's applicability to resolve whether certain software requires a specific method of education. The results are meant to give educators more effective teaching tools, so students…

  7. The Interpretative Flexibility, Instrumental Evolution, and Institutional Adoption of Mathematical Software in Educational Practice: The Examples of Computer Algebra and Dynamic Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthven, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    This article examines three important facets of the incorporation of new technologies into educational practice, focusing on emergent usages of the mathematical tools of computer algebra and dynamic geometry. First, it illustrates the interpretative flexibility of these tools, highlighting important differences in ways of conceptualizing and…

  8. Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1989-1992. Volume VI: Software Development Partnership Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This report, the sixth in a series of six, describes the evaluative activities carried out during Phase II of the California Educational Technology Assessment Program, and evaluates the partnership program between the California Department of Education (CDE) and seven software publishers. It is noted that this program was formed in 1986 in order…

  9. Using Graphing Software to Teach about Algebraic Forms: A Study of Technology-Supported Practice in Secondary-School Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthven, Kenneth; Deaney, Rosemary; Hennessy, Sara

    2009-01-01

    From preliminary analysis of teacher-nominated examples of successful technology-supported practice in secondary-school mathematics, the use of graphing software to teach about algebraic forms was identified as being an important archetype. Employing evidence from lesson observation and teacher interview, such practice was investigated in greater…

  10. Factors Influencing Teachers' Adoption and Integration of Information and Communication Technology into Teaching: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buabeng-Andoh, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Global investment in ICT to improve teaching and learning in schools have been initiated by many governments. Despite all these investments on ICT infrastructure, equipments and professional development to improve education in many countries, ICT adoption and integration in teaching and learning have been limited. This article reviews personal,…

  11. Emerging technologies for V&V of ISHM software for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Markosian, Lawrence Z.

    2006-01-01

    Systems1,2 required to exhibit high operational reliability often rely on some form of fault protection to recognize and respond to faults, preventing faults' escalation to catastrophic failures. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) extends the functionality of fault protection to both scale to more complex systems (and systems of systems), and to maintain capability rather than just avert catastrophe. Forms of ISHM have been utilized to good effect in the maintenance phase of systems' total lifecycles (often referred to as 'condition-based mainte-nance'), but less so in a 'fault protection' role during actual operations. One of the impediments to such use lies in the challenges of verification, validation and certification of ISHM systems themselves. This paper makes the case that state-of-the-practice V&V and certification techniques will not suffice for emerging forms of ISHM systems; however, a number of maturing software engineering assurance technologies show particular promise for addressing these ISHM V&V challenges.

  12. WorkstationJ: workstation emulation software for medical image perception and technology evaluation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartz, Kevin M.; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Caldwell, Robert T.; Madsen, Mark T.

    2007-03-01

    We developed image presentation software that mimics the functionality available in the clinic, but also records time-stamped, observer-display interactions and is readily deployable on diverse workstations making it possible to collect comparable observer data at multiple sites. Commercial image presentation software for clinical use has limited application for research on image perception, ergonomics, computer-aids and informatics because it does not collect observer responses, or other information on observer-display interactions, in real time. It is also very difficult to collect observer data from multiple institutions unless the same commercial software is available at different sites. Our software not only records observer reports of abnormalities and their locations, but also inspection time until report, inspection time for each computed radiograph and for each slice of tomographic studies, window/level, and magnification settings used by the observer. The software is a modified version of the open source ImageJ software available from the National Institutes of Health. Our software involves changes to the base code and extensive new plugin code. Our free software is currently capable of displaying computed tomography and computed radiography images. The software is packaged as Java class files and can be used on Windows, Linux, or Mac systems. By deploying our software together with experiment-specific script files that administer experimental procedures and image file handling, multi-institutional studies can be conducted that increase reader and/or case sample sizes or add experimental conditions.

  13. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Site Status Update

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, T W

    2008-12-03

    This report summarizes LLNL's progress for the period April through September of 2008 for the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) SciDAC. The TASCS project is organized into four major thrust areas: CCA Environment (72%), Component Technology Initiatives (16%), CCA Toolkit (8%), and User and Application Outreach & Support (4%). The percentage of LLNL's effort allocation is shown in parenthesis for each thrust area. Major thrust areas are further broken down into activity areas, LLNL's effort directed to each activity is shown in Figure 1. Enhancements, Core Tools, and Usability are all part of CCA Environment, and Software Quality is part of Component Technology Initiatives. The balance of this report will cover our accomplishments in each of these activity areas.

  14. Agile Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  15. "Carbopolis": A Java Technology-Based Free Software for Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichler, Marcelo Leandro; Xavier, Paulo Rafael; Araujo, Roberto Costa; Forte, Rafael Castro; Del Pino, Jose Claudio

    2005-01-01

    The goals of this paper are to describe some characteristics of the pedagogical project of the "Carbopolis" software and some programming solutions that were found during the computational implementation of this software. Relative to the first goal, some pedagogical features that are considered necessary to developing computerized learning…

  16. 15 CFR 740.13 - Technology and software-unrestricted (TSU).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ECCN 5D002 or for encryption software with symmetric key length exceeding 64-bits that qualifies as...) of the EAR, it is controlled under ECCN 5D992.c and is thus outside the scope of License Exception... controlled under ECCN 5D992.c. (3) Provisions and destinations—(i) Destinations. Mass market software...

  17. 15 CFR 740.13 - Technology and software-unrestricted (TSU).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ECCN 5D002 or for encryption software with symmetric key length exceeding 64-bits that qualifies as...) of the EAR, it is controlled under ECCN 5D992.c and is thus outside the scope of License Exception... controlled under ECCN 5D992.c. (3) Provisions and destinations—(i) Destinations. Mass market software...

  18. 15 CFR 740.13 - Technology and software-unrestricted (TSU).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... this paragraph (d) are not available for encryption software controlled for “EI” reasons under ECCN... EAR, it is controlled under ECCN 5D992.c and is thus outside the scope of License Exception TSU.) See... ECCN 5D992.c. (3) Provisions and destinations—(i) Destinations. Mass market software is available...

  19. Geometry + Technology = Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Funsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Several interactive geometry software packages are available today to secondary school teachers. An example is The Geometer's Sketchpad[R] (GSP), also known as Dynamic Geometry[R] software, developed by Key Curriculum Press. This numeric based technology has been widely adopted in the last twenty years, and a vast amount of creativity has been…

  20. Enhancement/upgrade of Engine Structures Technology Best Estimator (EST/BEST) Software System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the work performed during the contract period and the capabilities included in the EST/BEST software system. The developed EST/BEST software system includes the integrated NESSUS, IPACS, COBSTRAN, and ALCCA computer codes required to perform the engine cycle mission and component structural analysis. Also, the interactive input generator for NESSUS, IPACS, and COBSTRAN computer codes have been developed and integrated with the EST/BEST software system. The input generator allows the user to create input from scratch as well as edit existing input files interactively. Since it has been integrated with the EST/BEST software system, it enables the user to modify EST/BEST generated files and perform the analysis to evaluate the benefits. Appendix A gives details of how to use the newly added features in the EST/BEST software system.

  1. A Qualitative Analysis and Comparison of the Educational Technology Diffusion and Attitudes toward Adopting Computing Technologies, of the Ministry of Education, Principals/Vice-Principals, and Teachers, in Jamaican Public Primary and Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kerry-Ann

    2012-01-01

    Given the lack of computer diffusion studies in the Caribbean, and coupled with the necessity to understand Jamaica in efforts to get a clearer global representation of the digital divide, this study takes an exploratory approach and examines the differences of the computer technology adoption and diffusion attitudes and viewpoints between the…

  2. Meeting the Challenge of Providing Flexible Learning Opportunities: Considerations for Technology Adoption amongst Academic Staff (Relever le défi de fournir des occasions d'apprentissage flexibles: considérations pour l'adoption de la technologie par le personnel universitaire)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirriahi, Negin; Vaid, Bhuvinder S.; Burns, David P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a subset of findings from a larger study investigating resistance from academic staff to the integration of technology with on-campus foreign language teaching at one North American higher education institution. The study revealed that the factors influencing technology adoption paralleled Davis' Technology Acceptance Model's…

  3. Hardening Software Defined Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Utilizing this inflection point requires security technologies that have two characteristics. First, security technologies must be incentive-aligned...for initial adoption. Securing SDN requires designing technologies that provide immediate returns for the early adopters. Compare with BGPSEC, which... technologies must function without complete adoption. And of course, third, these must be resilient against attack. Compare with egress filtering, which

  4. Investigating IT Faculty Resistance to Learning Management System Adoption Using Latent Variables in an Acceptance Technology Model

    PubMed Central

    Bousbahi, Fatiha; Alrazgan, Muna Saleh

    2015-01-01

    To enhance instruction in higher education, many universities in the Middle East have chosen to introduce learning management systems (LMS) to their institutions. However, this new educational technology is not being used at its full potential and faces resistance from faculty members. To investigate this phenomenon, we conducted an empirical research study to uncover factors influencing faculty members' acceptance of LMS. Thus, in the Fall semester of 2014, Information Technology faculty members were surveyed to better understand their perceptions of the incorporation of LMS into their courses. The results showed that personal factors such as motivation, load anxiety, and organizational support play important roles in the perception of the usefulness of LMS among IT faculty members. These findings suggest adding these constructs in order to extend the Technology acceptance model (TAM) for LMS acceptance, which can help stakeholders of the university to implement the use of this system. This may assist in planning and evaluating the use of e-learning. PMID:26491712

  5. Investigating IT Faculty Resistance to Learning Management System Adoption Using Latent Variables in an Acceptance Technology Model.

    PubMed

    Bousbahi, Fatiha; Alrazgan, Muna Saleh

    2015-01-01

    To enhance instruction in higher education, many universities in the Middle East have chosen to introduce learning management systems (LMS) to their institutions. However, this new educational technology is not being used at its full potential and faces resistance from faculty members. To investigate this phenomenon, we conducted an empirical research study to uncover factors influencing faculty members' acceptance of LMS. Thus, in the Fall semester of 2014, Information Technology faculty members were surveyed to better understand their perceptions of the incorporation of LMS into their courses. The results showed that personal factors such as motivation, load anxiety, and organizational support play important roles in the perception of the usefulness of LMS among IT faculty members. These findings suggest adding these constructs in order to extend the Technology acceptance model (TAM) for LMS acceptance, which can help stakeholders of the university to implement the use of this system. This may assist in planning and evaluating the use of e-learning.

  6. Investigation of the current requirements engineering practices among software developers at the Universiti Utara Malaysia Information Technology (UUMIT) centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.; Abdullah, Inam

    2016-08-01

    Requirements Engineering (RE) is a systemic and integrated process of eliciting, elaborating, negotiating, validating and managing of the requirements of a system in a software development project. UUM has been supported by various systems developed and maintained by the UUM Information Technology (UUMIT) Centre. The aim of this study was to assess the current requirements engineering practices at UUMIT. The main problem that prompted this research is the lack of studies that support software development activities at the UUMIT. The study is geared at helping UUMIT produce quality but time and cost saving software products by implementing cutting edge and state of the art requirements engineering practices. Also, the study contributes to UUM by identifying the activities needed for software development so that the management will be able to allocate budget to provide adequate and precise training for the software developers. Three variables were investigated: Requirement Description, Requirements Development (comprising: Requirements Elicitation, Requirements Analysis and Negotiation, Requirements Validation), and Requirement Management. The results from the study showed that the current practice of requirement engineering in UUMIT is encouraging, but still need further development and improvement because a few RE practices were seldom practiced.

  7. The Study on Neuro-IE Management Software in Manufacturing Enterprises. -The Application of Video Analysis Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Jun; Fu, Huijian; Shang, Qian; Zhou, Xiangyang; Ma, Qingguo

    This paper analyzes the outstanding problems in current industrial production by reviewing the three stages of the Industrial Engineering Development. Based on investigations and interviews in enterprises, we propose the new idea of applying "computer video analysis technology" to new industrial engineering management software, and add "loose-coefficient" of the working station to this software in order to arrange scientific and humanistic production. Meanwhile, we suggest utilizing Biofeedback Technology to promote further research on "the rules of workers' physiological, psychological and emotional changes in production". This new kind of combination will push forward industrial engineering theories and benefit enterprises in progressing towards flexible social production, thus it will be of great theory innovation value, social significance and application value.

  8. Multirate Flutter Suppression System Design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing. Part 2; Methodology Application Software Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Gregory S.; Berg, Martin C.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies were applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing. This report describes the user's manual and software toolbox developed at the University of Washington to design a multirate flutter suppression control law for the BACT wing.

  9. Caltech/JPL Conference on Image Processing Technology, Data Sources and Software for Commercial and Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmann, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    Recent advances in image processing and new applications are presented to the user community to stimulate the development and transfer of this technology to industrial and commercial applications. The Proceedings contains 37 papers and abstracts, including many illustrations (some in color) and provides a single reference source for the user community regarding the ordering and obtaining of NASA-developed image-processing software and science data.

  10. An Assessment Process to Estimate the Secondary Injury Potential of Assistive Technology Adopted by Farmers with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathew, Samuel Narinchil

    2009-01-01

    Farmers with disabilities frequently fabricate or modify devices and worksites--referred to collectively as assistive technology (AT) in order to continue performing required tasks on their farms. In some cases these AT have been documented to cause secondary injury. Further, some farmers having disabilities are not able to fully benefit from…

  11. ICT for Education: A Conceptual Framework for the Sustainable Adoption of Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Patricio; Nussbaum, Miguel; Dombrovskaia, Lioubov

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education does not conclusively demonstrate significant effects on learning. However, not all ICT usage models are designed to affect student outcomes. Therefore, to accurately study the impact of ICT, the concept of an educational programme supported by ICT must first be…

  12. Experience, Adoption, and Technology: Exploring the Phenomenological Experiences of Faculty Involved in Online Teaching at One School of Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Terry; Davis, Trina; Larke, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Using the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) and Dewey's Theory of Experience, this phenomenological study explored the experiences of faculty who engaged in online teaching at one school of public health. Findings revealed that the experiences of public health faculty, who engaged in online teaching, are similar and…

  13. Analysis of Teachers' Adoption of Technology for Use in Instruction in Seven Career and Technical Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotrlik, Joe W.; Redmann, Donna H.

    2009-01-01

    This study addressed utilization of technology in instruction by secondary career and technical education (CTE) teachers in seven program areas in Louisiana. A stratified random sample was utilized, with 539 teachers responding to the survey after three data collection efforts. The data were determined to be representative of all CTE teachers in…

  14. Health Care Information Technology in Rural America: Electronic Medical Record Adoption Status in Meeting the National Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahensky, James A.; Jaana, Mirou; Ward, Marcia M.

    2008-01-01

    Continuing is a national political drive for investments in health care information technology (HIT) that will allow the transformation of health care for quality improvement and cost reduction. Despite several initiatives by the federal government to spur this development, HIT implementation has been limited, particularly in the rural market. The…

  15. Adoption of Web 2.0 Technology in Higher Education: A Case Study of Universities in National Capital Region, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyagi, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted in six (6) Indian Universities at NCR (National Capital Region) of India to explore the usage analysis of Web 2.0 technologies in learning environment by faculty members. The investigator conducted a survey with the help of structured questionnaire on 300 respondents. A total of 300 self-administered questionnaires…

  16. The emerging Web 2.0 social software: an enabling suite of sociable technologies in health and health care education.

    PubMed

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Wheeler, Steve

    2007-03-01

    Web 2.0 sociable technologies and social software are presented as enablers in health and health care, for organizations, clinicians, patients and laypersons. They include social networking services, collaborative filtering, social bookmarking, folksonomies, social search engines, file sharing and tagging, mashups, instant messaging, and online multi-player games. The more popular Web 2.0 applications in education, namely wikis, blogs and podcasts, are but the tip of the social software iceberg. Web 2.0 technologies represent a quite revolutionary way of managing and repurposing/remixing online information and knowledge repositories, including clinical and research information, in comparison with the traditional Web 1.0 model. The paper also offers a glimpse of future software, touching on Web 3.0 (the Semantic Web) and how it could be combined with Web 2.0 to produce the ultimate architecture of participation. Although the tools presented in this review look very promising and potentially fit for purpose in many health care applications and scenarios, careful thinking, testing and evaluation research are still needed in order to establish 'best practice models' for leveraging these emerging technologies to boost our teaching and learning productivity, foster stronger 'communities of practice', and support continuing medical education/professional development (CME/CPD) and patient education.

  17. The Social Construction of Educational Technology through the Use of Authentic Software Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Allan; Bissell, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A major strand of science and technology studies in recent decades has related to the social construction of technology (SCOT) movement, whose adherents maintain that technological systems are determined just as much by social forces as by technological ones. Taking this SCOT notion as a starting point, and putting a focus on the user, this paper…

  18. Modeling the Adoption Process of the Flight Training Synthetic Environment Technology (FTSET) in the Turkish Army Aviation (TUAA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    new technologies is usually explained by the Diffusion of Innovations Model37 and its S-shaped growth patterns. French Sociologist Gabriel Tarde ...Dohme, and Robert T . Nullmeyer, “Optimizing Simulator-Aircraft Mix for US Army Initial Entry Rotary Wing Training,” Technical Report 1092 (March 1999): 6... T . Nullmeyer, Optimizing Simulator- Aircraft Mix for US Army Initial Entry Rotary Wing Training (US Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and

  19. Software development environments: Status and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffel, Larry E.

    1988-01-01

    Currently software engineers are the essential integrating factors tying several components together. The components consist of process, methods, computers, tools, support environments, and software engineers. The engineers today empower the tools versus the tools empowering the engineers. Some of the issues in software engineering are quality, managing the software engineering process, and productivity. A strategy to accomplish this is to promote the evolution of software engineering from an ad hoc, labor intensive activity to a managed, technology supported discipline. This strategy may be implemented by putting the process under management control, adopting appropriate methods, inserting the technology that provides automated support for the process and methods, collecting automated tools into an integrated environment and educating the personnel.

  20. Applications of software-defined radio (SDR) technology in hospital environments.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Santiago, Raúl; Mateska, Aleksandra; Chomu, Konstantin; Gavrilovska, Liljana; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2013-01-01

    A software-defined radio (SDR) is a radio communication system where the major part of its functionality is implemented by means of software in a personal computer or embedded system. Such a design paradigm has the major advantage of producing devices that can receive and transmit widely different radio protocols based solely on the software used. This flexibility opens several application opportunities in hospital environments, where a large number of wired and wireless electronic devices must coexist in confined areas like operating rooms and intensive care units. This paper outlines some possible applications in the 2360-2500 MHz frequency band. These applications include the integration of wireless medical devices in a common communication platform for seamless interoperability, and cognitive radio (CR) for body area networks (BANs) and wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for medical environmental surveillance. The description of a proof-of-concept CR prototype is also presented.