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Sample records for adopting evidence-based practice

  1. Mental Health Provider Attitudes Toward Adoption of Evidence-Based Practice: The Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS)

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward organizational change have not been well studied. Dissemination and implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) into real-world settings represent organizational change that may be limited or facilitated by provider attitudes toward adoption of new treatments, interventions, and practices. A brief measure of mental health provider attitudes toward adoption of EBPs was developed and attitudes were examined in relation to a set of provider individual difference and organizational characteristics. Methods Participants were 322 public sector clinical service workers from 51 programs providing mental health services to children and adolescents and their families. Results Four dimensions of attitudes toward adoption of EBPs were identified: (1) intuitive Appeal of EBP, (2) likelihood of adopting EBP given Requirements to do so, (3) Openness to new practices, and (4) perceived Divergence of usual practice with research-based/academically developed interventions. Provider attitudes varied by education level, level of experience, and organizational context. Conclusions Attitudes toward adoption of EBPs can be reliably measured and vary in relation to individual differences and service context. EBP implementation plans should include consideration of mental health service provider attitudes as a potential aid to improve the process and effectiveness of dissemination efforts. PMID:15224451

  2. Promoting Evidence-Based Practices: The Adoption of a Prevention Support System in Community Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Sarah B.; Paddock, Susan M.; Ebener, Patricia; Burkhart, A. K.; Chinman, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Prevention support systems (PSSs) are designed to help communities implement evidence-based practices (EBPs). Little is known about the factors that influence their adoption. In this article, we examined adoption of a PSS for substance abuse prevention called Getting To Outcomes (GTO)[R] among staff in two community coalitions with varying levels…

  3. Adopting and Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Master's-Level Social Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Brett; Hovmand, Peter; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Zayas, Luis H.

    2007-01-01

    This article makes specific suggestions for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) in the master's-in-social-work (MSW) curriculum. The authors use the model of EBP as it was originally conceived: a process for posing empirically answerable questions, finding and evaluating the best available evidence, and applying that evidence in conjunction…

  4. Evidence-based practice implementation: The impact of public versus private sector organization type on organizational support, provider attitudes, and adoption of evidence-based practice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The goal of this study is to extend research on evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation by examining the impact of organizational type (public versus private) and organizational support for EBP on provider attitudes toward EBP and EBP use. Both organization theory and theory of innovation uptake and individual adoption of EBP guide the approach and analyses in this study. We anticipated that private sector organizations would provide greater levels of organizational support for EBPs leading to more positive provider attitudes towards EBPs and EBP use. We also expected attitudes toward EBPs to mediate the association of organizational support and EBP use. Methods Participants were mental health service providers from 17 communities in 16 states in the United States (n = 170). Path analyses were conducted to compare three theoretical models of the impact of organization type on organizational support for EBP and of organizational support on provider attitudes toward EBP and EBP use. Results Consistent with our predictions, private agencies provided greater support for EBP implementation, and staff working for private agencies reported more positive attitudes toward adopting EBPs. Organizational support for EBP partially mediated the association of organization type on provider attitudes toward EBP. Organizational support was significantly positively associated with attitudes toward EBP and EBP use in practice. Conclusion This study offers further support for the importance of organizational context as an influence on organizational support for EBP and provider attitudes toward adopting EBP. The study demonstrates the role organizational support in provider use of EBP in practice. This study also suggests that organizational support for innovation is a malleable factor in supporting use of EBP. Greater attention should be paid to organizational influences that can facilitate the dissemination and implementation of EBPs in community settings. PMID

  5. Adoption policy and evidence-based domestic adoption practice: a comparison of Romania, Ukraine, India, Guatemala, and Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Groza, Victor; Bunkers, Kelley M

    2014-01-01

    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989), The Hague Convention on the Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (The Hague Permanent Bureau, 1993), and the Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children (2009) have provided a comprehensive, rights-based framework and guidance for developing domestic adoption and alternative, family based care programs. Domestic adoption is a critical component of any child-protection system and a core part of the range of alternative care options that the United Nations and other international organizations recommend be developed, resourced, and made accessible to children without parental care. This article uses data collected from adoptive parents' postadoption and governmental data in Romania, Ukraine, India, Guatemala, and Ethiopia to focus on domestic adoption in each of these countries. The article highlights both promising practices in domestic adoption as well as policies and practices that require additional research.

  6. Improving the adoption of evidence-based practice among nurses in Army outpatient medical treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Yackel, Edward E; Short, Nancy M; Lewis, Paul C; Breckenridge-Sproat, Sara T; Turner, Barbara S

    2013-09-01

    This quality improvement project implemented and evaluated an evidence-based practice (EBP) program at two Army outpatient health care facilities. The EBP program consisted of five implementation strategies that aimed to inculcate EBP into organizational culture as well as nursing practice and culture. A conceptual model of the "Diffusion of Innovations" theory was adapted to explain the application of the program. The Institutional Review Boards at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Duke University School of Medicine reviewed and exempted this quality improvement project. A pretest-posttest design was used with four instruments at each facility. The EBP program was successful in enhancing organizational culture and readiness for EBP (p < 0.01) and nursing staff's belief about the value of EBP and their ability to implement it (p < 0.05). Another indicator that the EBP program achieved its goals was the significant difference (p = 0.002) in the movement of the outpatient health care facilities toward an EBP culture. These results suggest that this EBP program may be an effective method for empowering outpatient nursing staff with the knowledge and tools necessary to use evidence-based nursing practice. PMID:24005550

  7. A mixed-methods approach to investigating the adoption of evidence-based pain practices in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Ersek, Mary; Jablonski, Anita

    2014-07-01

    This mixed methods study examined perceived facilitators and obstacles to adopting evidence-based pain management protocols vis-a-vis documented practice changes that were measured using a chart audit tool. This analysis used data from a subgroup of four nursing homes that participated in a clinical trial. Focus group interviews with staff yielded qualitative data about perceived factors that affected their willingness and ability to use the protocols. Chart audits determined whether pain assessment and management practices changed over time in light of these reported facilitators and barriers. Reported facilitators included administrative support, staff consistency, and policy and procedure changes. Barriers were staff attitudes, regulatory issues, and provider mistrust of nurses' judgment. Overall, staff reported improvements in pain practices. These reports were corroborated by modest but significant increases in adherence to recommended practices. Change in clinical practice is complex and requires attention to both structural and process aspects of care. PMID:24640959

  8. A mixed-methods approach to investigating the adoption of evidence-based pain practices in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Ersek, Mary; Jablonski, Anita

    2014-07-01

    This mixed methods study examined perceived facilitators and obstacles to adopting evidence-based pain management protocols vis-a-vis documented practice changes that were measured using a chart audit tool. This analysis used data from a subgroup of four nursing homes that participated in a clinical trial. Focus group interviews with staff yielded qualitative data about perceived factors that affected their willingness and ability to use the protocols. Chart audits determined whether pain assessment and management practices changed over time in light of these reported facilitators and barriers. Reported facilitators included administrative support, staff consistency, and policy and procedure changes. Barriers were staff attitudes, regulatory issues, and provider mistrust of nurses' judgment. Overall, staff reported improvements in pain practices. These reports were corroborated by modest but significant increases in adherence to recommended practices. Change in clinical practice is complex and requires attention to both structural and process aspects of care.

  9. Theories of Change and Adoption of Innovations: The Evolving Evidence-Based Intervention and Practice Movement in School Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psychology in the Schools, 2005

    2005-01-01

    As the evidence-based intervention (EBI) movement proliferated in medicine, psychology, and education, interest turned to establishing criteria for determining whether an intervention and/or program can be described as evidence-based. Less attention has been focused on establishing an empirical basis to understand and facilitate adoption of EBIs…

  10. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Aerts, Sally; Dowler, David; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Casey, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ years with a history of repeated falls or fall-related health-care use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79 ± 8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged six primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall-risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety) to 78% (for vitamin D). An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21%) and home safety (24%). Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall-risk factors (p = 0.003). Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p = 0.04) and perform more fall-risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p = 0.007) than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall-risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice. PMID:27660753

  11. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Aerts, Sally; Dowler, David; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Casey, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ years with a history of repeated falls or fall-related health-care use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79 ± 8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged six primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall-risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety) to 78% (for vitamin D). An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21%) and home safety (24%). Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall-risk factors (p = 0.003). Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p = 0.04) and perform more fall-risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p = 0.007) than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall-risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice.

  12. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Elizabeth A; Aerts, Sally; Dowler, David; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Casey, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ years with a history of repeated falls or fall-related health-care use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79 ± 8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged six primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall-risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety) to 78% (for vitamin D). An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21%) and home safety (24%). Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall-risk factors (p = 0.003). Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p = 0.04) and perform more fall-risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p = 0.007) than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall-risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice. PMID:27660753

  13. Training substance abuse treatment organizations to adopt evidence-based practices: the Addiction Technology Transfer Center of New England Science to Service Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Squires, Daniel D; Gumbley, Stephen J; Storti, Susan A

    2008-04-01

    Underutilization of evidence-based treatments for substance abuse represents a longstanding problem for the field and the public health of our nation. Those who would most benefit from research advances (community treatment agencies and the clients they serve) have historically been the least likely to be exposed to innovative evidence-based methods for substance abuse treatment. To help address this gap, the Addiction Technology Transfer Center of New England (ATTC-NE), located at Brown University, has adapted and implemented an organizational change strategy intended to equip substance abuse treatment organizations and their employees with the skills needed to adopt evidence-based treatment practices. Since 2003, the ATTC-NE has worked with 54 community-based substance abuse treatment agencies from across New England using this model, which is called Science to Service Laboratory (SSL). Twenty-eight of 54 agencies completed all of the SSL components, and 26 of these 28 completer agencies (96%) successfully adopted and implemented contingency management as a result. Survey data comparing completer and dropout agencies' satisfaction with the quality, organization, and utility of the SSL indicate that both groups rated the SSL favorably. However, differences emerged with respect to organizational characteristics between completer and dropout agencies. Specifically, dropout agencies were more likely to report turnover in staff positions vital to training effort. Future directions for the model are discussed.

  14. Evidence-Based Language Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Eric J.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine evidence-based procedures in medicine and to demonstrate that the same protocols can be used in English language instruction. In the evidence-based methodology, studies are divided into those that address specific language problems. Integrated studies are presented as a systematic overview, meta-analysis,…

  15. Implementing Evidence-Based Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Edward J.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, social work has been influenced by new forms of practice that hold promise for bringing practice and research together to strengthen the scientific knowledge base supporting social work intervention. The most recent new practice framework is evidence-based practice. However, although evidence-based practice has many qualities that might…

  16. Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2005-01-01

    School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

  17. Implementing Evidence Based Practices: Six "Drivers" of Success. Part 3 in a Series on Fostering the Adoption of Evidence-Based Practices in Out-Of-School Time Programs. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2007-29

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Allison J. R.; Blase, Karen; Bowie, Lillian

    2007-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges for practitioners is implementing a new program or a new practice. This challenge is due, in large part, to a lack of information on strategies that promote effective and efficient program implementation. In most cases, implementation strategies have been limited to paper-based manuals that focus on describing…

  18. Disseminating evidence-based care into practice.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Eric A; Rosenbek, Susan A; Roman, Sarah P

    2013-08-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has launched the Partnership for Patients initiative, promising a 20% reduction in readmissions nationally across all payers by December 31, 2013. To address this ambitious goal, CMS has awarded grants to Hospital Engagement Networks, Pioneer Accountable Care Organizations, and the Community-based Care Transitions Program, as well as instituted new penalties for excessive readmission that began in October 2012. National efforts aimed at realizing this goal are predicated, in part, on our effectiveness in disseminating evidence-based care models into practice to improve outcomes and reduce costs. The Care Transitions Intervention (CTI) has been developed, tested, and disseminated to over 750 health care organizations in 40 states nationwide. Four factors promote wide-scale CTI dissemination. The first factor focuses on model fidelity whereby adopters are given insight into which elements of the intervention can be adapted and customized. The second factor concerns the selection of Transitions Coaches and reinforcement of their role through training and participation in a national peer learning network. The third factor relates to model execution with attention to integrating the intervention into existing workflows and fostering relationships with community stakeholders. The fourth factor involves cultivating the support to sustain or expand the intervention through continually making the business case in a changing health care landscape. The lessons learned through the dissemination and implementation of the CTI may be generalizable to the spread of a variety of evidence-based care models.

  19. Evidence-Based Practices and Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesibov, Gary B.; Shea, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Interventions for autism are increasing being held to standards such as "evidence-based practice" in psychology and "scientifically-based research" in education. When these concepts emerged in the context of adult psychotherapy and regular education, they caused considerable controversy. Application of the concepts to autism treatments and special…

  20. Evidence-Based Practice Goes beyond Google

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitzing, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is applying research to assist in the selection of interventions that result in increased client quality care. Recently the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (2010), a new accreditation body for recreational therapy education, included standards that state students should obtain knowledge…

  1. Evidence-Based Practice in Rehabilitation Counseling: Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezyak, Jill L.; Kubota, Coleen; Rosenthal, David

    2010-01-01

    This study describes certified rehabilitation counselors' attitudes (n=163) about evidence based practice, knowledge and skills related to obtaining and evaluating evidence, use of literature in practice, availability of information, and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice. Responses related to knowledge and skills were mixed with strong…

  2. Cultural considerations in evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Hulme, Polly A

    2010-07-01

    The role of culture in evidence-based practice (EBP) is examined using the components of the EBP process as a framework for discussion. Issues that are identified include the recruitment and retention of ethnic groups in research; paternalism and institutional racism in regard to those who cannot afford best practice; and cultural differences between health professionals and patients in their understanding of best practice, health, and illness. Strategies that are suggested to reduce cultural incongruence include shared clinical decision making and development of a cultural knowledge system to improve EBP and outcomes on an organizational level.

  3. Network Structural Influences on the Adoption of Evidence-Based Prevention in Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujimoto, Kayo; Valente, Thomas W.; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the impact of key variables in coalition communication networks, centralization and density, on the adoption of evidence-based substance abuse prevention. Data were drawn from a network survey and a corresponding community leader survey that measured leader attitudes and practices toward substance abuse prevention programs. Two…

  4. Evidence-based Practice of Radiology.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Lisa P; Dunne, Ruth M; Carroll, Anne G; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-10-01

    Current health care reform in the United States is producing a shift in radiology practice from the traditional volume-based role of performing and interpreting a large number of examinations to providing a more affordable and higher-quality service centered on patient outcomes, which is described as a value-based approach to the provision of health care services. In the 1990 s, evidence-based medicine was defined as the integration of current best evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. When these methods are applied outside internal medicine, the process is called evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP facilitates understanding, interpretation, and application of the best current evidence into radiology practice, which optimizes patient care. It has been incorporated into "Practice-based Learning and Improvement" and "Systems-based Practice," which are two of the six core resident competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and two of the 12 American Board of Radiology milestones for diagnostic radiology. Noninterpretive skills, such as systems-based practice, are also formally assessed in the "Quality and Safety" section of the American Board of Radiology Core and Certifying examinations. This article describes (a) the EBP framework, with particular focus on its relevance to the American Board of Radiology certification and maintenance of certification curricula; (b) how EBP can be integrated into a residency program; and (c) the current value and likely place of EBP in the radiology information technology infrastructure. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26466187

  5. Evidence-based Practice of Radiology.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Lisa P; Dunne, Ruth M; Carroll, Anne G; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-10-01

    Current health care reform in the United States is producing a shift in radiology practice from the traditional volume-based role of performing and interpreting a large number of examinations to providing a more affordable and higher-quality service centered on patient outcomes, which is described as a value-based approach to the provision of health care services. In the 1990 s, evidence-based medicine was defined as the integration of current best evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. When these methods are applied outside internal medicine, the process is called evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP facilitates understanding, interpretation, and application of the best current evidence into radiology practice, which optimizes patient care. It has been incorporated into "Practice-based Learning and Improvement" and "Systems-based Practice," which are two of the six core resident competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and two of the 12 American Board of Radiology milestones for diagnostic radiology. Noninterpretive skills, such as systems-based practice, are also formally assessed in the "Quality and Safety" section of the American Board of Radiology Core and Certifying examinations. This article describes (a) the EBP framework, with particular focus on its relevance to the American Board of Radiology certification and maintenance of certification curricula; (b) how EBP can be integrated into a residency program; and (c) the current value and likely place of EBP in the radiology information technology infrastructure. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  6. Evaluating the Properties of the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS) in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melas, Christos D.; Zampetakis, Leonidas A.; Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Moustakis, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    The Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS; Aarons, 2004) is a relatively new construct for the study of attitudes toward the adoption of innovation and evidence-based practices (EBPs) in mental health service settings. Despite widespread interest in measuring the attitudes of health care providers in conjunction with the adoption of EBPs,…

  7. Joanna Briggs Institute: an evidence-based practice database.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily; Malloy, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The Joanna Briggs Institute Evidence-Based Practice Database offers systematic reviews, practice recommendations, and consumer information designed to support evidence-based practice. A sample search was conducted within the Ovid platform to demonstrate functionality and available tools.

  8. Evidence-based practice in pediatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Maureen E; Roxborough, Lori

    2002-11-01

    EBP is not a new concept. To practice using the newest and best research evidence, clinicians must have the knowledge and skills to find and appraise the quality of the evidence. This process starts with the formulation of a focused question, followed by an effective search for the best evidence, critical appraisal of the evidence retrieved, and integration of that best evidence into practice. There are an increasing number of resources that can provide clinicians with the best evidence and that can assist clinicians with enhancement of their EBP skills. Unique challenges exist in practicing in an evidence-based manner in the field of pediatric rehabilitation, but through the collaboration of clinicians and researchers, these challenges can be overcome.

  9. A framework for disseminating evidence-based health promotion practices.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jeffrey R; Cheadle, Allen; Hannon, Peggy A; Forehand, Mark; Lichiello, Patricia; Mahoney, Eustacia; Snyder, Susan; Yarrow, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Wider adoption of evidence-based, health promotion practices depends on developing and testing effective dissemination approaches. To assist in developing these approaches, we created a practical framework drawn from the literature on dissemination and our experiences disseminating evidence-based practices. The main elements of our framework are 1) a close partnership between researchers and a disseminating organization that takes ownership of the dissemination process and 2) use of social marketing principles to work closely with potential user organizations. We present 2 examples illustrating the framework: EnhanceFitness, for physical activity among older adults, and American Cancer Society Workplace Solutions, for chronic disease prevention among workers. We also discuss 7 practical roles that researchers play in dissemination and related research: sorting through the evidence, conducting formative research, assessing readiness of user organizations, balancing fidelity and reinvention, monitoring and evaluating, influencing the outer context, and testing dissemination approaches. PMID:22172189

  10. Evidence-Based Special Education in the Context of Scarce Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practices (EBPs) are supported as generally effective for populations of learners by bodies of high-quality and experimental research and, when aligned with stakeholder values and practical needs, should be prioritized for implementation. However, evidence-based practices are not currently available for all learner types in all…

  11. Evidence-Based Practice for Outpatient Clinical Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John D.

    2006-01-01

    This column focuses on evidence-based practice (EBP) within multidisciplinary outpatient settings, but first provides some definitions. Besides EBP (Burns and Hoagwood, 2005; Guyatt and Rennie, 2002), there are also evidence-based medicine (EBM; March et al., 2005), evidence-based service (EBS; Chorpita et al., 2002), and evidence-based treatment…

  12. E-Learning and Evidence Based Practice in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quong, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    JCTIC has used open source software to develop a unique school online environment that has made evidence based practice viable in their school. In this paper the proposition is made that eLearning enables evidence based practice which in turn leads to improved student outcomes. Much has been written about evidence based practice in schools, but…

  13. The ABCs of Evidence-Based Practice for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretlow, Allison G.; Blatz, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    It is critical teachers adhere to federal policies regarding evidence-based practices. Quickly identifying and effectively using evidence-based programs and practices is particularly important for special educators, because students in special education often already have academic or behavioral deficits. Using evidence-based practices with…

  14. Colonoscopy Comfort: An Evidence-Based Practice Project.

    PubMed

    McCommons, Robin; Wheeler, Megan; Houston, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Decreased discomfort after colonoscopy is a high priority for patients. Typically, air is used to insufflate the bowel during colonoscopy, but emerging literature shows that carbon dioxide insufflation decreases postoperative discomfort and flatus. An evidence-based practice project was developed and implemented by a surgical department at a community hospital. The Director of Surgical Services brought the evidence to the staff, secured agreement from a physician champion, and the new process was quickly adopted. Patients experienced less discomfort and flatus postprocedure with carbon dioxide insufflation, and were able to be discharged expediently. These patient outcomes validated the literature and confirmed the success of the practice change.

  15. Teaching strategies to support evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Winters, Charlene A; Echeverri, Rebecca

    2012-06-01

    Evidence-based practice is an expected core competency of all health care clinicians regardless of discipline. Use of evidence-based practice means integrating the best research with clinical expertise and patient values to achieve optimal health outcomes. Evidence-based practice requires nurses to access and appraise evidence rapidly before integrating it into clinical practice. Role modeling and integrating the skills necessary to develop evidence-based practice into clinical and nonclinical courses is an important part in developing positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice, an essential first step to using evidence to guide practice decisions. The step-by-step approach to evidence-based practice proposed by Melnyk and colleagues provides an excellent organizing framework for teaching strategies specifically designed to facilitate nurses' knowledge and skill development in evidence-based practice.

  16. Evidence-Based Practice: Promoting Evidence-Based Interventions in School Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Shernoff, Elisa Steele

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of issues related to evidence-based practice and the role that the school psychology profession can play in developing and disseminating evidence-based interventions (EBIs). Historical problems relating to and the recurring debate about the integration of research into practice are presented as a context for the current…

  17. Evidence-Based Practice: Promoting Evidence-Based Interventions in School Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Steele Shernoff, Elisa

    2004-01-01

    We present an overview of issues related to evidence-based practice and the role that the school psychology profession can play in developing and disseminating evidence based interventions (EBIs). Historical problems relating to and the recurring debate about the integration of research into practice are presented as a context for the current…

  18. Adoption of Evidence-Based Interventions in Local Health Departments: "1-2-3 Pap NC".

    PubMed

    Winterbauer, Nancy L; Bridger, Colleen M; Tucker, Ashley; Rafferty, Ann P; Luo, Huabin

    2015-08-01

    Descriptions of barriers and facilitators to adoption of evidence-based interventions in local health departments (LHDs) are limited. This study was conducted by the North Carolina Public Health Practice-Based Research Network to identify factors associated with adoption of an evidence-based human papillomavirus video intervention, "1-2-3 Pap NC," in North Carolina LHDs. A sequential mixed-method study design was used. Data from the 2013 National Profile of Local Health Departments were used to test associations between LHD characteristics and adoption of the intervention. Qualitative, key stakeholder interviews with LHD directors provided the context for quantitative data. Data collection and analysis continued from March 3, 2014, to September 15, 2014. Overall, 28% of North Carolina health jurisdictions (33 of 100 counties) implemented the intervention. Of the three channels used to deliver the intervention to clients, most LHDs opted to show the video in the exam room (42%), followed by website/other social media (36%) and video loop in the lobby/waiting room (22%). In logistic regression, gender of the director (female) was significantly and positively associated with adoption of the intervention (AOR=4.44, p<0.05). Being a first-time director was marginally significant (AOR=0.28, p=0.074), suggesting first-time directors were less likely to adopt. Qualitative results suggested that aspects of communication (awareness and positive attitudes) and agency directors' evaluation of resources, balanced against intervention complexity and flexibility, competing priorities, and mandates, influenced adoption. Adoption of evidence-based interventions by LHDs is critical to improve population health. Practice-based research can contribute to understanding facilitators and modifying barriers to this process. PMID:26190805

  19. Adoption of Evidence-Based Interventions in Local Health Departments: "1-2-3 Pap NC".

    PubMed

    Winterbauer, Nancy L; Bridger, Colleen M; Tucker, Ashley; Rafferty, Ann P; Luo, Huabin

    2015-08-01

    Descriptions of barriers and facilitators to adoption of evidence-based interventions in local health departments (LHDs) are limited. This study was conducted by the North Carolina Public Health Practice-Based Research Network to identify factors associated with adoption of an evidence-based human papillomavirus video intervention, "1-2-3 Pap NC," in North Carolina LHDs. A sequential mixed-method study design was used. Data from the 2013 National Profile of Local Health Departments were used to test associations between LHD characteristics and adoption of the intervention. Qualitative, key stakeholder interviews with LHD directors provided the context for quantitative data. Data collection and analysis continued from March 3, 2014, to September 15, 2014. Overall, 28% of North Carolina health jurisdictions (33 of 100 counties) implemented the intervention. Of the three channels used to deliver the intervention to clients, most LHDs opted to show the video in the exam room (42%), followed by website/other social media (36%) and video loop in the lobby/waiting room (22%). In logistic regression, gender of the director (female) was significantly and positively associated with adoption of the intervention (AOR=4.44, p<0.05). Being a first-time director was marginally significant (AOR=0.28, p=0.074), suggesting first-time directors were less likely to adopt. Qualitative results suggested that aspects of communication (awareness and positive attitudes) and agency directors' evaluation of resources, balanced against intervention complexity and flexibility, competing priorities, and mandates, influenced adoption. Adoption of evidence-based interventions by LHDs is critical to improve population health. Practice-based research can contribute to understanding facilitators and modifying barriers to this process.

  20. Increasing capacity for evidence-based practice through the evidence-based practice academy.

    PubMed

    Green, Angela; Jeffs, Debra; Huett, Amy; Jones, Luann R; Schmid, Barbara; Scott, Angela R; Walker, Liz

    2014-02-01

    Although mentoring is an important aspect of implementing evidence-based practice (EBP), few models exist for EBP education. The EBP Academy is an innovative, 6-month educational program designed to develop clinical staff as EBP nurse mentors. Sessions provide protected time for participants to work on their EBP projects with assigned mentors who have EBP expertise and similar clinical or research interests. Participants develop EBP projects focused on improving care in their clinical areas. Evaluation of the EBP Academy is based on a four-level model, including participant feedback about the program, perception of meeting program objectives, ability to apply knowledge to practice through EBP projects, and outcome data measured as a result of implementing the EBP changes. By developing EBP mentors, capacity to move nursing practice to a stronger evidence-based foundation can be enhanced. Positive, professional nursing and patient outcomes have been demonstrated when structured EBP education is provided.

  1. Personalizing Research: Special Educators' Awareness of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guckert, Mary; Mastropieri, Margo A.; Scruggs, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Although evidence-based practices are considered critical to student success, a research-to-practice gap exists. This qualitative study examined practicing special education teachers' perceptions of their use of evidence-based practices. Special education teachers were interviewed and their classroom practices examined. Major themes emerged and…

  2. EditorialEvidence based library and information practice.

    PubMed

    Grant, Maria J

    2011-06-01

    Whilst many of us engage in supporting clinicians in identifying, appraising and using evidence, how many of us adopt the same approach to our own work? A recent survey by the UK LIS Research Coalition indicated that 60% of respondents use research reports as a source of information whilst a similar proportion of health library respondents use professional events such as conferences as a source of information. This summer sees the 6(th) International Evidence Based Library and Information Practice (EBLIP6) being held at the University of Salford, UK between 27(th) -30(th) June which will go some way to satisfying this latter information need whilst the Health Information and Libraries Journal can help satisfy the need for research reports. Whatever you're doing this summer, let's make it evidence based.

  3. Evidence-based practice: developing mentors to support students.

    PubMed

    Barry, Debbie; Houghton, Trish; Warburton, Tyler

    2016-08-17

    This article, the ninth in a series of 11, provides guidance for new and established mentors and practice teachers on evidence-based practice, the seventh domain of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice (SSLAP). Evidence-based practice is an important aspect of contemporary healthcare and is central to student preparation programmes for nursing, midwifery and specialist community public health nursing (SCPHN). The article describes evidence-based practice, discussing the importance and implementation of an evidence-based approach in the context of role development for mentors and practice teachers in the preparation of nursing, midwifery and SCPHN students. PMID:27533414

  4. Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education: Some Practical Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Tankersley, Melody; Cook, Lysandra; Landrum, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    A major tenet of both the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the No Child Left Behind Act is the identification and use of evidence-based practices, or those instructional techniques shown by research as most likely to improve student outcomes meaningfully. However, much confusion exists regarding the meaning and potential…

  5. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses…

  6. An innovative clinical practicum to teach evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Brancato, Vera C

    2006-01-01

    A clinical practicum was successfully implemented for RN to BSN students to apply evidence-based practice to actual clinical problems affecting nursing practice. The author describes how this practicum was implemented and the requisite resources and support systems. This senior-level capstone course enabled students to understand and value a lifelong learning approach to evidence-based practice.

  7. An Evidence-Based Adoption of Technology Model for Remote Monitoring of Elders’ Daily Activities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    What benefit will new technologies offer if they are inadequately or not used? This work presents a meta-synthesis of adoption of technology related findings from four innovative monitoring intervention research studies with older adults and their informal and/or formal caregivers. Each study employed mixed methods analyses that lead to an understanding of the key variables that influenced adoption of telephone and Internet based wireless remote monitoring technologies by elders and their caregivers. The studies were all conducted in “real world” homes ranging from solo residences to multi-story independent living residential buildings. Insights gained came from issues not found in controlled laboratory environments but in the complex interplay of family-elder-staff dynamics around balancing safety and independence. Findings resulted in an adoption of technology model for remote monitoring of elders’ daily activities derived from evidence based research to advance both practical and theoretical development in the field of gerontechnology. PMID:21423843

  8. Transformational and Transactional Leadership: Association With Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Leadership in organizations is important in shaping workers’ perceptions, responses to organizational change, and acceptance of innovations, such as evidence-based practices. Transformational leadership inspires and motivates followers, whereas transactional leadership is based more on reinforcement and exchanges. Studies have shown that in youth and family service organizations, mental health providers’ attitudes toward adopting an evidence-based practice are associated with organizational context and individual provider differences. The purpose of this study was to expand these findings by examining the association between leadership and mental health providers’ attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice. Methods Participants were 303 public-sector mental health service clinicians and case managers from 49 programs who were providing mental health services to children, adolescents, and their families. Data were gathered on providers’ characteristics, attitudes toward evidence-based practices, and perceptions of their supervisors’ leadership behaviors. Zero-order correlations and multilevel regression analyses were conducted that controlled for effects of service providers’ characteristics. Results Both transformational and transactional leadership were positively associated with providers’ having more positive attitudes toward adoption of evidence-based practice, and transformational leadership was negatively associated with providers’ perception of difference between the providers’ current practice and evidence-based practice. Conclusions Mental health service organizations may benefit from improving transformational and transactional supervisory leadership skills in preparation for implementing evidence-based practices. PMID:16870968

  9. Evidence-based practice: how nurse leaders can facilitate innovation.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice (EBNP) is the wave of the future. Increasingly, EBNP is being identified as a key to quality and excellence in nursing services. Incorporating evidence into practice is necessary to deliver scientifically sound patient care. In addition, understanding the importance of evidence is crucial for meeting the excellence requirements of Magnet designation. Despite the growing popularity of EBNP and its documented significant benefits, the literature demonstrates that only 15% of the nursing workforce consistently practices within an EBNP framework. If EBNP adoption is to increase in the profession, it will require the active efforts of nurse leaders to pursue an aggressive innovation diffusion strategy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the nurse leader's role in facilitating EBNP in nursing using a theoretical framework grounded in innovation diffusion theory. The article develops 4 areas of focus. First, the components of innovation diffusion theory are discussed. Second, a pertinent empirical review of the EBNP adoption literature is presented. Third, strategies for applying innovation diffusion theory to facilitate EBNP adoption are proposed. Lastly, the article ends with a leadership call to action.

  10. Challenges for the adoption of evidence-based maternity care in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turan, Janet Molzan; Bulut, Ayşen; Nalbant, Hacer; Ortayli, Nuriye; Erbaydar, Tuğrul

    2006-05-01

    Evidence-based medicine is an important tool for improving the quality of maternity care. However, getting providers to change their practices may not be an easy or rapid process, and other factors, in addition to knowledge of the literature, may be important. This study documents the current state of obstetric practices at three maternity hospitals in Istanbul, Turkey, and identifies attitudes, social pressures, and perceptions that, according to the theory of planned behavior, may pose challenges for adoption of evidence-based practices. Data were collected through interviews with administrators, examination of hospital statistics, provider and client interviews, and structured observations of maternity care. Practices that did not follow current guidelines included routine episiotomy, not allowing companionship during labor, use of procedures to speed up labor without indications, routine enema, restriction of mobility, restriction of oral fluids, supine position for delivery, and non-use of active management of the third stage of labor. The findings indicate that providers had negative attitudes about some recommended practices, while they had positive attitudes towards some ineffective and/or harmful practices. We identified social pressure to comply with practices recommended by supervisors and peers, as well as the belief that limited resources affect maternity care providers, opportunities to perform evidence-based procedures. An underlying problem was the failure to involve women in decision-making regarding their own maternity care. In addition to informing providers about the evidence, it seems necessary to develop standard protocols, improve physical conditions, and implement behavior interventions that take into account provider attitudes, social pressures, and beliefs. PMID:16289786

  11. Continuing to challenge practice to be evidence based.

    PubMed

    Makic, Mary Beth Flynn; Rauen, Carol; Jones, Kimmith; Fisk, Anna C

    2015-04-01

    Practice habits continue in clinical practice despite the availability of research and other forms of evidence that should be used to guide critical care practice interventions. This article is based on a presentation at the 2014 National Teaching Institute of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. The article is part of a series of articles that challenge critical care nurses to examine the evidence guiding nursing practice interventions. Four common practice interventions are reviewed: (1) weight-based medication administration, (2) chest tube patency maintenance, (3) daily interruption of sedation, and (4) use of chest physiotherapy in children. For weight-based administration of medication, the patient's actual weight should be measured, rather than using an estimate. The therapeutic effectiveness and dosages of medications used in obese patients must be critically evaluated. Maintaining patency of chest tubes does not require stripping and milking, which probably do more harm than good. Daily interruption of sedation and judicious use of sedatives are appropriate in most patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Traditional chest physiotherapy does not help children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, or asthma and does not prevent atelectasis after extubation. Critical care nurses are challenged to evaluate their individual practice and to adopt current evidence-based practice interventions into their daily practice. PMID:25834007

  12. Evidence-Based Practice: Integrating Classroom Curriculum and Field Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchman, Ellen; Lalane, Monique

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the use of problem-based learning to teach the scope and consequences of evidence-based practices in mental health through an innovative assignment that integrates classroom and field learning. The authors illustrate the planning and implementation of the Evidence-Based Practice: Integrating Classroom Curriculum and Field…

  13. The Evidence Missing from Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Richard B.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.

    2007-01-01

    Comments on the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in psychology. Regrettably, the task force report was largely silent on three critical issues. As a consequence, it omitted much of the evidence necessary for a complete picture of evidence-based…

  14. Operationalizing Evidence-Based Practice: The Development of an Institute for Evidence-Based Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regehr, Cheryl; Stern, Susan; Shlonsky, Aron

    2007-01-01

    Although evidence-based practice (EBP) has received increasing attention in social work in the past few years, there has been limited success in moving from academic discussion to engaging social workers in the process of implementing EBP in practice. This article describes the challenges, successes, and future aims in the process of developing a…

  15. Lessons to be Learned from Evidence-based Medicine: Practice and Promise of Evidence-based Medicine and Evidence-based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Fredric M.

    2000-01-01

    Presents statistics of deaths caused by medical errors and argues the effects of misconceptions in diagnosis and treatment. Suggests evidence-based medicine to enhance the quality of practice and minimize error rates. Presents 10 evidence-based lessons and discusses the possible benefits of evidence-based medicine to evidence-based education and…

  16. Teaching evidence-based practice: implications for psychology.

    PubMed

    Collins, Frank L; Leffingwell, Thad R; Belar, Cynthia D

    2007-07-01

    A movement advocating the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) is increasingly influencing health care and the practice of psychology. Thus, teaching evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP) is critical to the preparation of future health service psychologists. In this article, the authors address common myths associated with EBP, propose core components involved in teaching EBPP, and describe an example of how such training can be incorporated into a professional psychology education and training curriculum.

  17. Utilization of evidence-based practice by registered occupational therapists.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Karen Ann V; Ballantyne, Scott; Kulbitsky, Autumnrose; Margolis-Gal, Michelle; Daugherty, Timothy; Ludwig, Ferol

    2005-01-01

    Although the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) is presently on the rise, there have been limited studies examining its use by occupational therapists within the US. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of EBP among registered occupational therapists in the occupational therapy intervention planning process. This descriptive study surveyed 500 members of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), of which 131 participants responded (26%). The results of the study supported the hypothesis that, within the sample studied, a minority of registered occupational therapists in the US utilize EBP in the intervention planning process. Other results included: (1) As level of academic education increased, the view of the importance of research to occupational therapy decreased. (2) As the years of practice increased, the use of research evidence in making clinical decisions decreased. As the occupational therapy profession moves towards utilization of EBP as a professional standard, it is imperative that the profession examines specific strategies to promote the adoption of such practice by its members, including the promotion of competency in evidence utilization, and the valuing of the established clinical reasoning skills of the practitioner while integrating research evidence into intervention planning to support professional practice. PMID:16398202

  18. An evidence-based assessment of prescribed grazing practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthesis findings regarding the evidence-based assessment of prescribed grazing practices include: 1) stocking rate, in conjunction with appropriate temporal and spatial animal distribution, is a key management variable that influences numerous conservation outcomes, 2) assumptions regarding livest...

  19. Educational Research and Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammersley, Martyn, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Combining classic articles that have been key markers in recent debates with new and influential material, this book addresses the problems involved in educational research and the issues surrounding its contribution to policymaking and practice. The authors examine the diverse approaches within qualitative research and address some of the key…

  20. Organizational change strategies for evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Robin P; Dearholt, Sandi; Poe, Stephanie; Pugh, Linda C; White, Kathleen M

    2007-12-01

    Evidence-based practice, a crucial competency for healthcare providers and a basic force in Magnet hospitals, results in better patient outcomes. The authors describe the strategic approach to support the maturation of The Johns Hopkins Nursing evidence-based practice model through providing leadership, setting expectations, establishing structure, building skills, and allocating human and material resources as well as incorporating the model and tools into undergraduate and graduate education at the affiliated university. PMID:18090518

  1. Evidence Based Medicine in Pediatric Practice: Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Kianifar, Hamid-Reza; Akhondian, Javad; Najafi-Sani, Mehri; Sadeghi, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Practicing medicine according to the best evidence is gaining popularity in the medical societies. Although this concept, which is usually called Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) has been explained in many resources, it has not been addressed enough in pediatrics. In this review, we briefly explained Evidence Based Medicine approach and its applications in pediatrics in order to help the pediatricians to efficiently integrate EBM into their daily practice. PMID:23056715

  2. Barriers and Enablers to Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Robyn

    2014-01-01

    The importance of educational practices based on evidence is well-supported in the literature, however barriers to their implementation in classrooms still exist. This paper examines the phenomenon of evidence-based practice in education highlighting enablers and barriers to their implementation with particular reference to RTLB practice.

  3. Evidence-Based Practice: A Framework for Making Effective Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Trina D.; Detrich, Ronnie; Slocum, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The research to practice gap in education has been a long-standing concern. The enactment of No Child Left Behind brought increased emphasis on the value of using scientifically based instructional practices to improve educational outcomes. It also brought education into the broader evidence-based practice movement that started in medicine and has…

  4. Evidence-Based Interprofessional Practice: Learning and Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littek, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this journal article is to investigate evidence-based practice (EBP) or He Ritenga Whaimohio, as one of the seven principles outlined in the "Resource Teacher: Learning and Behaviour (RTLB) Toolkit" (2011) that guides RTLB practice; and to critique the principle of EBP through practical reflection. (Contains 2 tables and 2…

  5. What Is "Evidence-Based Practice" in Geography Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Educationalists developed the concept of "evidence-based practice" during the 1990s because of concern about the relevance of educational research to practitioners and about its impact on their practice. This article outlines the different kinds of research evidence related to geographical education, which might inform practice. It then discusses…

  6. Evidence-based ethics? On evidence-based practice and the "empirical turn" from normative bioethics

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Maya J

    2005-01-01

    Background The increase in empirical methods of research in bioethics over the last two decades is typically perceived as a welcomed broadening of the discipline, with increased integration of social and life scientists into the field and ethics consultants into the clinical setting, however it also represents a loss of confidence in the typical normative and analytic methods of bioethics. Discussion The recent incipiency of "Evidence-Based Ethics" attests to this phenomenon and should be rejected as a solution to the current ambivalence toward the normative resolution of moral problems in a pluralistic society. While "evidence-based" is typically read in medicine and other life and social sciences as the empirically-adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means for increasing certainty, I propose that the evidence-based movement in fact gains consensus by displacing normative discourse with aggregate or statistically-derived empirical evidence as the "bottom line". Therefore, along with wavering on the fact/value distinction, evidence-based ethics threatens bioethics' normative mandate. The appeal of the evidence-based approach is that it offers a means of negotiating the demands of moral pluralism. Rather than appealing to explicit values that are likely not shared by all, "the evidence" is proposed to adjudicate between competing claims. Quantified measures are notably more "neutral" and democratic than liberal markers like "species normal functioning". Yet the positivist notion that claims stand or fall in light of the evidence is untenable; furthermore, the legacy of positivism entails the quieting of empirically non-verifiable (or at least non-falsifiable) considerations like moral claims and judgments. As a result, evidence-based ethics proposes to operate with the implicit normativity that accompanies the production and presentation of all biomedical and scientific facts unchecked. Summary The "empirical turn" in bioethics signals a need for

  7. Integrating evidence-based perfusion into practices: the International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Likosky, Donald S

    2006-12-01

    There is surmounting pressure for clinicians domestically and abroad not only to practice evidence-based perfusion, but also to supplement practice with documentation thereof. In this editorial, I shall describe an international initiative aimed at embracing this dictum from patients, regulatory bodies, and payers. "Research is the only hope that the future will be different than the past"- Daniel Mintz, MD "Practical men who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences are usually the slaves of some defunct economist.... It is ideas not vested interests which are dangerous for good or evil."-John Maynard Keynes.

  8. Using a Critical Appraisal Assignment to Infuse Evidence-Based Practice into a Therapeutic Modality Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwart, Mary Beth; Olson, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    Context: It is the responsibility of athletic training educators, through curriculum and clinical experiences, to engage students towards adopting evidence-based practice (EBP) into their practice. The initial task of implementing EBP into a curriculum or course can seem like a large task for educators and students. As a way to start scaffolding…

  9. Evidence-Based Practice: Separating Science From Pseudoscience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Catherine M; Hunsley, John

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) requires that clinicians be guided by the best available evidence. In this article, we address the impact of science and pseudoscience on psychotherapy in psychiatric practice. We describe the key principles of evidence-based intervention. We describe pseudoscience and provide illustrative examples of popular intervention practices that have not been abandoned, despite evidence that they are not efficacious and may be harmful. We distinguish efficacy from effectiveness, and describe modular approaches to treatment. Reasons for the persistence of practices that are not evidence based are examined at both the individual and the professional system level. Finally, we offer suggestions for the promotion of EBP through clinical practice guidelines, modelling of scientific decision making, and training in core skills. PMID:26720821

  10. A regional evidence-based practice fellowship: collaborating competitors.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Susan Mace; Moore, Penny; Allender, Marinda

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe the development of an effort by 21 hospitals and 2 academic institutions in a metropolitan area to strengthen the diffusion of evidence-based practice in their organizations. This has been accomplished by providing collaborative training, mentoring, and support for direct-care RNs through an evidence-based fellowship. The participating direct-care nurses are prepared to take the new knowledge, skills, and abilities they have gained back to the bedside care environment.

  11. Strategies for searching and managing evidence-based practice resources.

    PubMed

    Robb, Meigan; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2014-10-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice requires the use of effective search strategies to locate relevant resources to guide practice change. Continuing education and staff development professionals can assist nurses to conduct effective literature searches. This article provides suggestions for strategies to aid in identifying search terms. Strategies also are recommended for refining searches by using controlled vocabulary, truncation, Boolean operators, PICOT (Population/Patient Problem, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, Time) searching, and search limits. Suggestions for methods of managing resources also are identified. Using these approaches will assist in more effective literature searches and may help evidence-based practice decisions.

  12. Clinician adoption patterns and patient outcome results in use of evidence-based nursing plans of care.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Youn; Lang, Norma M; Berg, Karen; Weaver, Charlotte; Murphy, Judy; Ela, Sue

    2007-10-11

    Delivery of safe, effective and appropriate health care is an imperative facing health care organizations globally. While many initiatives have been launched in a number of countries to address this need from a medical perspective, a similar focus for generating evidence-based nursing knowledge has been missing. This paper reports on a collaborative evidence-based practice (EBP) research initiative that adds nursing knowledge into computerized care protocols. Here, a brief overview of the study's aims, purpose and methodology is presented as well as results of data analysis and lessons learned. The research team examined nurses' adoption patterns of EBP recommendations with respect to activity tolerance using four-month patient data collected from a pilot hospital. Study findings indicate a need for more focus on the system design and implementation process with the next rollout phase to promote evidence-based nursing practice.

  13. Using Family Paradigms to Improve Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Jones, Rebecca S.; Imig, David R.; Villarruel, Francisco A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence-based practice (EBP) describes clinical decision making using research, clinical experience, and client values. For family-centered practices, the client's family is integral to this process. This article proposes that using family paradigms, a family science framework, may help elicit and understand client/family values within…

  14. Determining Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Tankersley, Melody; Landrum, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Determining evidence-based practices is a complicated enterprise that requires analyzing the methodological quality and magnitude of the available research supporting specific practices. This article reviews criteria and procedures for identifying what works in the fields of clinical psychology, school psychology, and general education; and it…

  15. Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders: Progress Not Perfection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Ray D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This commentary is written in response to a companion paper by Nan Bernstein Ratner ("Evidence-Based Practice: An Examination of its Ramifications for the Practice of Speech-Language Pathology"). Method: The comments reflect my experience as Vice President for Research and Technology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association…

  16. Practitioner Expertise in Evidence-Based Practice Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Stanley G.; Marsh, Jeanne C.

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an orientation to practice that values evidence as a resource for clinical decision making while recognizing that evidence alone is never sufficient to make a clinical decision. Critics of EBP typically ignore, negate, or misrepresent the role of practitioner thinking processes and expertise in clinical settings.…

  17. Unraveling Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Cook, Sara Cothren

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based practices (EBPs) are instructional techniques that meet prescribed criteria related to the research design, quality, quantity, and effect size of supporting research, which have the potential to help bridge the research-to-practice gap and improve student outcomes. In this article, the authors (a) discuss the importance of clear…

  18. Critical Thinking: Knowledge and Skills for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: I respond to Kamhi's (2011) conclusion in his article "Balancing Certainty and Uncertainty in Clinical Practice" that rational or critical thinking is an essential complement to evidence-based practice (EBP). Method: I expand on Kamhi's conclusion and briefly describe what clinicians might need to know to think critically within an EBP…

  19. Evidence-Based Practice and Evaluation: From Insight to Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunsmuir, Sandra; Brown, Emma; Iyadurai, Suzi; Monsen, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    With the growing emphasis on accountability and evidence-based practice, evaluation has become increasingly important in the contexts in which educational psychologists (EPs) practice. This paper describes a Target Monitoring and Evaluation (TME) system, derived from Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) which was developed to evaluate outcomes of a wide…

  20. The Concept of Evidence in Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvernbekk, Tone

    2011-01-01

    There exists a vast literature on evidence-based practice (EBP) in education. The debate branches out in several directions, for example, what EBP entails for the nature of educational practice, what it entails for the teaching profession, what counts as use and abuse of evidence, and what educational research could or should contribute to a what…

  1. Situational Analysis: A Framework for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annan, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Situational analysis is a framework for professional practice and research in educational psychology. The process is guided by a set of practice principles requiring that psychologists' work is evidence-based, ecological, collaborative and constructive. The framework is designed to provide direction for psychologists who wish to tailor their…

  2. Evidence-Based Practice and Quality Improvement in Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Balakas, Karen; Smith, Joan R

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, nursing education has experienced several significant changes in response to challenges faced by healthcare organizations. Accrediting organizations have called for improved quality and safety in care, and the Institute of Medicine has identified evidence-based practice and quality improvement as 2 core competencies to include in the curricula for all healthcare professionals. However, the application of these competencies reaches far beyond the classroom setting. For nurses to possess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to apply evidence-based practice and quality improvement to the real-world setting, academic-clinical institution partnerships are vital. PMID:27465447

  3. Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine: Is It Working in Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Price, Christopher P

    2012-01-01

    The principles of Evidence-Based Medicine have been established for about two decades, with the need for evidence-based clinical practice now being accepted in most health systems around the world. These principles can be employed in laboratory medicine. The key steps in evidence-based practice, namely (i) formulating the question; (ii) searching for evidence; (iii) appraising evidence; (iv) applying evidence; and (v) assessing the experience are all accepted but, as yet, translation into daily clinical and laboratory practice has been slow. Furthermore, the demand for evidence-based laboratory medicine (EBLM) has been slow to develop. There are many contrasting observations about laboratory medicine, for example (i) there is too much testing vs insufficient testing; (ii) testing is expensive vs laboratories are expected to generate income; and (iii) test results have little impact on outcomes vs test results are crucial to clinical decision making. However, there is little evidence to support any of these observations. Integrating the principles of EBLM into routine practice will help to resolve some of these issues by identifying (a) where laboratory medicine fits into the care pathway; (b) where testing is appropriate; (c) the nature and quality of evidence required to demonstrate the clinical utility of a test; (d) how the test result impacts on clinical actions; (e) where changes in the care pathway will occur; and (f) where benefit/value can be achieved. These answers will help to establish the culture of EBLM in clinical and laboratory practice. PMID:22363094

  4. Evidence-based practices in community mental health: outcome evaluation.

    PubMed

    Painter, Kirstin

    2012-10-01

    In 2003, questions were being raised relating to the lack of evidence-based treatments available in public mental health and whether the use of treatments found effective in research settings would be equally effective in real world situations. In response, one state passed a bill mandating a disease management model of service delivery and the use of evidence-based practices designed to obtain better clinical and functional outcomes, and to maximize the possibility for recovery for adults experiencing a serious mental illness. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the re-engineered public mental health system and report on findings of a longitudinal time-series study of the redesigned community mental health system. Findings of the study suggest using evidence-based practices and following a disease management model of mental health service delivery can be effective in real world settings for adults experiencing serious mental health symptoms and functional impairment.

  5. Factors Associated with Adoption of Evidence-Based Substance Use Prevention Curricula in US School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrbach, Louise Ann; Ringwalt, Christopher L.; Ennett, Susan T.; Vincus, Amy A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines factors associated with the adoption of evidence-based substance use prevention curricula (EBC) in a national sample of school districts. Substance abuse prevention coordinators in public school districts (n = 1593), which were affiliated with a random sample of schools that served students in Grades 5-8, completed a written…

  6. A conceptual model for growing evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Vratny, Amy; Shriver, Deb

    2007-01-01

    Nursing administration at a small medical center is developing and implementing an evidence-based practice (EBP) model of care to support a culture of quality care, clinical excellence, cost-effectiveness, critical thinking, empowerment of staff, and professional growth. The purpose of this article is to describe a conceptual model for EBP that addresses how to overcome barriers to implementation. Clinician expertise and values, experience, patient preference and expectation, and caring become grounded in a practice environment that must strive to become rooted in clinical research to evolve into a practice that is evidence-based. Education helps to nourish EBP, but leadership, enthusiasm, mentorship, clinical inquiry, and reflective practice make EBP thrive. The EBP ambassadors branch out to each department to grow journal clubs, EBP Web pages, EBP projects, research utilization projects, and staff-led practice reviews. The fruits are quality patient care and outcomes, clinical excellence, cost-effectiveness, critical thinking, empowerment of staff, and professional growth.

  7. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouffard, Marcel; Reid, Greg

    2012-01-01

    The evidence-based practice (EBP) movement has been extremely influential over the last 20 years. Fields like medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nursing, psychology, and education have adopted the idea that policy makers and practitioners should use interventions that have demonstrated efficiency and effectiveness. This apparently…

  8. Lean methodology: an evidence-based practice approach for healthcare improvement.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pauline M; Patterson, Claire J; OʼConnell, Mary P

    2013-12-10

    Lean methodology, an evidence-based practice approach adopted from Toyota, is grounded on the pillars of respect for people and continuous improvement. This article describes the use of Lean methodology to improve healthcare outcomes for patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Nurse practitioners and other clinicians should be knowledgeable about this methodology and become leaders in Lean transformation.

  9. Strategies for Improving Fidelity in the National Evidence-Based Practices Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Gary R.; Drake, Robert E.; McHugo, Gregory J.; Rapp, Charles A.; Whitley, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Background: The National Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs) Project developed and tested a model for facilitating the implementation of five psychosocial EBPs for adults with severe mental illness in the United States. Methods: The implementation model was tested in 53 sites in 8 states. In each site, one of the five EBPs was adopted for…

  10. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  11. Single-Subject Experimental Design for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byiers, Breanne J.; Reichle, Joe; Symons, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) represent an important tool in the development and implementation of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the strategies and tactics of SSEDs and their application in speech-language pathology research. Method: The authors…

  12. Evidence-Based Practice Empowers Practitioners: A Response to Epstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Epstein makes a strong argument for the value of clinical data mining (CDM), although he minimizes some of the potential limitations in that methodology, such as attrition. Epstein's portrayal of evidence-based practice (EBP) as practitioner-bashing and treasuring intervention manuals overlooks the emphasis in the EBP process on the need for…

  13. Evidence-Based Practices with Students Who Are Deaf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckner, John L.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, professionals in all fields that work with students with disabilities, including education, face a "demand" that their decisions about which interventions to use be guided by evidence-based practices. The "gold standard" for evaluating the effectiveness of interventions is the use of randomized, controlled trials that are well designed…

  14. Need to Address Evidence-Based Practice in Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article presents a case for addressing evidence-based practice (EBP) in educational administration. Content is arranged around four objectives: (a) summarizing the status of educational administration as a profession, (b) defining evidence and the model, (c) explaining EBP's social and professional merit, and (d) identifying barriers…

  15. Reflections on the Teaching of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shlonsky, Aron; Stern, Susan B.

    2007-01-01

    As the process of evidence-based practice (EBP) gains a foothold in the curricula of schools of social work and the various helping professions, instructors have been encountering a unique set of challenges. On one hand, educators must develop new curricula to convey material that is often complex and is, even in its most advanced state, still in…

  16. Commentary: evidence-based practice and forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Richard D

    2009-01-01

    A diverse sampling of articles was considered as a landscape against which evidence-based practice has been and should be a part of forensic psychiatry. Caveats were identified, limitations suggested, and recommendations made as to how such a marriage might work.

  17. Disseminating Evidence-Based Practices in Secondary Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustian, April; Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Test, David W.

    2013-01-01

    As educators move into a new era of educational reform, it becomes imperative that teachers use evidence-based instructional practices shown to be effective for students with disabilities. One area that plays a role in this process is secondary transition. The National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center has identified 63…

  18. Evidence-Based Rehabilitation Counseling Practice: A Pedagogical Imperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosciulek, John F.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how rehabilitation educators can aid students and practitioners in learning about and engaging in evidence-based rehabilitation counseling practice (EBRCP). Information describing (a) the definition and rationale for EBRCP, (b) controversies surrounding EBRCP, (c) facilitating rehabilitation counselor enthusiasm for EBRCP,…

  19. Marketing evidence-based practice: what a CROC™!

    PubMed

    Boyington, Alice R; Ferrall, Sheila M; Sylvanus, Terry

    2010-10-01

    Nurses should be engaged in evidence-based practice (EBP) to ensure that nursing care is efficient and effective. This article describes one cancer center's use of the Marketing Mix framework to educate staff nurses with the CROC™: Clinging Rigidly to Outdated Care campaign. As a result of the campaign, five EBP projects have been initiated in the cancer center.

  20. Integrating Evidence-Based Practice and Social Work Field Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmond, Tonya; Megivern, Deborah; Williams, Cynthia; Rochman, Estelle; Howard, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    The social work academic community is currently considering and critiquing the idea of evidence-based practice (EBP). Given the vital part that practicum education plays in the social work profession, understanding the views of field instructors on this subject is essential. The George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University…

  1. Marketing evidence-based practice: what a CROC™!

    PubMed

    Boyington, Alice R; Ferrall, Sheila M; Sylvanus, Terry

    2010-10-01

    Nurses should be engaged in evidence-based practice (EBP) to ensure that nursing care is efficient and effective. This article describes one cancer center's use of the Marketing Mix framework to educate staff nurses with the CROC™: Clinging Rigidly to Outdated Care campaign. As a result of the campaign, five EBP projects have been initiated in the cancer center. PMID:20880823

  2. Evidence-Based Practices and Implementation Science in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Odom, Samuel L.

    2013-01-01

    Establishing a process for identifying evidence-based practices (EBPs) in special education has been a significant advance for the field because it has the potential for generating more effective educational programs and producing more positive outcomes for students with disabilities. However, the potential benefit of EBPs is bounded by the…

  3. Evidence-Based Practice in Adapted Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Jooyeon; Yun, Joonkoo

    2010-01-01

    Although implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) has been strongly advocated by federal legislation as well as school districts in recent years, the concept has not been well accepted in adapted physical education (APE), perhaps due to a lack of understanding of the central notion of EBP. The purpose of this article is to discuss how APE…

  4. Multicultural competence and evidence-based practice in group therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eric C; Kakkad, Dhruvi; Balzano, Julie

    2008-11-01

    The multicultural competence (MC) and evidence-based practice (EBP) initiatives have each generated healthy debates in the mental health field, with ample implications for clinical training and practice. Using two case illustrations, we highlight practical challenges and prospects in the intersection of MC and EBP. To facilitate complementary practice of MC and EBP, we offer strategies for the group therapist as a "local clinical scientist" to deliver culturally responsive treatments. We stress the importance of cultural adaptation of EBP models, namely, modifying evidence-based interventions that involve changes in service delivery, in the nature of the therapeutic relationship, or in components of the treatment itself to accommodate the cultural beliefs and behaviors of racial-cultural minority clients. Cultural adaptation of EBP in group therapy needs to be grounded in developmental contextualism and social justice. We discuss the two cases with an eye toward advancing multicultural competence in group therapy. PMID:18802951

  5. Multicultural competence and evidence-based practice in group therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eric C; Kakkad, Dhruvi; Balzano, Julie

    2008-11-01

    The multicultural competence (MC) and evidence-based practice (EBP) initiatives have each generated healthy debates in the mental health field, with ample implications for clinical training and practice. Using two case illustrations, we highlight practical challenges and prospects in the intersection of MC and EBP. To facilitate complementary practice of MC and EBP, we offer strategies for the group therapist as a "local clinical scientist" to deliver culturally responsive treatments. We stress the importance of cultural adaptation of EBP models, namely, modifying evidence-based interventions that involve changes in service delivery, in the nature of the therapeutic relationship, or in components of the treatment itself to accommodate the cultural beliefs and behaviors of racial-cultural minority clients. Cultural adaptation of EBP in group therapy needs to be grounded in developmental contextualism and social justice. We discuss the two cases with an eye toward advancing multicultural competence in group therapy.

  6. [Problems and strategies in developing Chinese medicine evidence-based clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhan, Si-yan; Liu, Bao-yan

    2011-11-01

    Some problems are confronted in the development of Chinese medicine (CM) evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in the aspects of individualized treatment, quality of research, reporting bias, safety assessment, and so on. After comprehensive retrieving of current methods for developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in the field of complementary and alternative medicine, and an optimal combining with widely accepted standardized methods in evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for allopathic medicine, we put forward strategies for these aforesaid problems. In terms of individualized treatment, practical randomized control trials could be considered for inclusion. In terms of quality of research, the method to formulate guideline recommendations was proposed in case of insufficient evidence. In terms of reporting bias, commonly used databases in complementary and alternative medicine were listed. In terms of safety evaluation, GRADE system was suggested to adopt.

  7. Finding the common core: evidence-based practices, clinically relevant evidence, and core mechanisms of change.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Thomas L; Kelley, Susan Douglas

    2010-03-01

    Improving the quality of children's mental health care can benefit from the adoption of evidence based and evidence informed treatments. However, the promise of moving science into practice is hampered by three core elements that need to be addressed in the current conversation among key stakeholders: (1) expanding our understanding of the clinical relevance of different types of evidence, (2) emphasizing the identification of core mechanisms of change, and (3) re-conceptualizing what evidence-based practice means. This paper focuses on these elements in an attempt to find a common core among stakeholders that may create opportunities for more inclusive conversation to move the field of children's mental health care forward.

  8. Feedback informed treatment: evidence-based practice meets social construction.

    PubMed

    Tilsen, Julie; McNamee, Sheila

    2015-03-01

    This article explores the challenges presented by the mandate for evidence-based practice for family therapists who identify with the philosophical stance of social construction. The history of psychotherapy outcome research is reviewed, as are current findings that provide empirical evidence for an engaged, dialogic practice. The authors suggest that the binary between empiricism and social construction may be unhinged by understanding empiricism as a particular discursive frame (i.e., a particular way of talking, acting, and being in the world), one of many available as a way of understanding and talking about our work. Through a case vignette, the authors introduce the evidence-based practice of Feedback Informed Treatment as an elaboration of social construction, and as an example of bridging the gap between the discursive frames of empiricism and social construction.

  9. Implementing evidence-based practices: considerations for the hospice setting.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Sara; Mackin, Melissa Lehan; Reyes, Jimmy; Herr, Keela; Titler, Marita; Fine, Perry; Forcucci, Chris

    2010-09-01

    With increased regulation and scrutiny of outcomes, hospice programs are being challenged to consider the implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs). This study reports findings from hospice director interviews and staff focus groups, which occurred following the completion of a multifaceted translating research into practice (TRIP) intervention designed to promote evidence-based pain management practices. The purpose of this article is to provide background on the use of EBPs, to report facilitators and barriers to overall implementation of pain management EBPs in hospice, and to provide recommendations for hospices interested in increasing the use of EBPs. Three areas for evaluation prior to implementing an EBP initiative in hospices were identified: community, agency, and staff cultures. Recommendations for implementation of EBPs in hospices are provided. PMID:20167834

  10. Feedback informed treatment: evidence-based practice meets social construction.

    PubMed

    Tilsen, Julie; McNamee, Sheila

    2015-03-01

    This article explores the challenges presented by the mandate for evidence-based practice for family therapists who identify with the philosophical stance of social construction. The history of psychotherapy outcome research is reviewed, as are current findings that provide empirical evidence for an engaged, dialogic practice. The authors suggest that the binary between empiricism and social construction may be unhinged by understanding empiricism as a particular discursive frame (i.e., a particular way of talking, acting, and being in the world), one of many available as a way of understanding and talking about our work. Through a case vignette, the authors introduce the evidence-based practice of Feedback Informed Treatment as an elaboration of social construction, and as an example of bridging the gap between the discursive frames of empiricism and social construction. PMID:25394600

  11. Factors influencing law enforcement decisions to adopt an evidence-based robbery prevention program.

    PubMed

    Cabell, A; Casteel, C; Chronister, T; Nocera, M; Vladutiu, C J; Peek-Asa, C

    2013-12-01

    Homicide is the leading cause of workplace death among small retail and service businesses in the United States. Evidence-based programs have been shown to reduce robbery and robbery-related crimes in small retail businesses; however, reaching small businesses with programs has been difficult. As small businesses typically have no corporate backing or trade affiliation, police departments have been identified as potential vehicles for program dissemination. A national sample of 300 law enforcement agencies was surveyed to identify facilitators and barriers to adoption and sustainability of an evidence-based program. The questionnaire was developed using behavioral theory concepts and administered via telephone. Preliminary findings suggest the primary facilitators to program adoption included organizational capacity factors such as staff buy-in, dedicated personnel and financial support. Competing responsibilities was the primary barrier identified by agencies. Agency size and program complexity were identified as potential predictors of program adoption. Identifying agency and program-specific characteristics that influence program adoption by law enforcement agencies will be valuable for marketing programs to agencies that have the infrastructure to support and sustain program dissemination. Understanding these factors will optimize the reach of evidence-based strategies to small businesses. PMID:24057272

  12. Improving the culture of evidence-based practice at a Magnet® hospital.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Louise; Zeller, Edna; Damitio, Diane; Culbert, Sarah; Bayley, K Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the foundation of quality care, but EBP is not widely adopted. This study evaluated the impact of a hospital-wide EBP nursing project on the organizational culture of a Magnet hospital. Results of pre- and postintervention surveys suggest the intervention increased the nurses' confidence in the hospital's EBP environment. Belief in EBP was related to confidence in implementing EBP in practice.

  13. Criteria for evidence-based practice in Iranian traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Soltani Arabshahi, SeyyedKamran; Mohammadi Kenari, Hoorieh; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Shams-Ardakani, MohammadReza; Bigdeli, Shoaleh

    2015-07-01

    The major difference between Iranian traditional medicine and allopathic medicine is in the application  of  evidence  and  documents.  In  this  study,  criteria  for  evidence-based  practice  in  Iranian traditional medicine and its rules of practice were studied. The experts' views were investigated through in- depth, semi-structured interviews and the results were categorized into four main categories including Designing clinical questions/clinical question-based search, critical appraisal, resource search criteria and clinical prescription appraisal. Although the application of evidence in Iranian traditional medicine follows Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) principles but it benefits from its own rules, regulations, and criteria that are compatible with EBM.

  14. Evidence-Based Practice in Group Care: The Effects of Policy, Research, and Organizational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Carol; Sanders, Larry; Gurevich, Maria; Fulton, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the effect of a province-wide vision of evidence-based and outcome-based services for children and youth and the challenges of implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) and evidence-based treatment (EBT) approaches within group care settings. The paper is based on the results of a survey of group care settings in the…

  15. Evidence-based practice, research, peer review, and publication.

    PubMed

    Gunn, I P

    1998-11-01

    For about a quarter of a century, concerns have been expressed about published biomedical research. It became more acute after some published research and broad dissemination was found fraudulent. With the emphasis now being placed on scientifically validated or evidence-based practice, it has become more imperative that clinical guidelines be based on credible information in our textbooks and research literature. Since the early 1990s, it has been found that much of the research in our electronic databases does not meet quality standards and often is irrelevant, calling into questions problems with peer review, including the selection and publication process of our journals. This column is devoted to calling attention to these problems not only to CRNAs and other researchers, but also to the consumers of research who often use it to make changes in their practice. It also calls attention to the CRNA community about the movement toward calls for greater accountability in practice, both as to quality and cost, from which the movement toward evidence-based practice, the identification and benchmarking of best practices, and the development and implementation of clinical practice guideline has evolved. To feel ownership in anesthesia-related clinical practice guidelines, CRNAs must become involved in their development and implementation. PMID:9866493

  16. Strengthening Adoption Practice, Listening to Adoptive Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Anne; Gonet, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    In-depth interviews with 500 adoptive families who received postadoption services through Virginia's Adoptive Family Preservation (AFP) program paint a richly detailed picture of the challenges adoptive families face and what they need to sustain adoption for many years after finalization. Findings document the need for support in a variety of…

  17. Evidence based practice profiles: Differences among allied health professions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most previous studies of allied health professionals' evidence based practice (EBP) attitudes, knowledge and behaviours have been conducted with profession specific questionnaires of variable psychometric strength. This study compared the self-report EBP profiles of allied health professionals/trainees in an Australian university. Methods The Evidence-Based Practice Profile (EBP2) questionnaire assessed five domains (Relevance, Terminology, Practice, Confidence, Sympathy) in 918 subjects from five professional disciplines. One and 2-way factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) and t-tests analysed differences based on prior exposure to EBP, stage of training, professional discipline, age and gender. Results There were significant differences between stages of training (p < 0.001) for all domains and between EBP exposure groups for all but one domain (Sympathy). Professional discipline groups differed for Relevance, Terminology, Practice (p < 0.001) and Confidence (p = 0.006). Males scored higher for Confidence (p = 0.002) and females for Sympathy (p = 0.04), older subjects (> 24 years) scored higher for all domains (p < 0.05). Age and exposure affected all domains (p < 0.02). Differences in stages of training largely explained age-related differences in Confidence and Practice (p ≤ 0.001) and exposure-related differences in Confidence, Practice and Sympathy (p ≤ 0.023). Conclusions Across five allied health professions, self-report EBP characteristics varied with EBP exposure, across stages of training, with profession and with age. PMID:20937140

  18. Adopting an Evidence-Based Lifestyle Physical Activity Program: Dissemination Study Design and Methods.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Andrea L; Buller, David B; Dearing, James W; Cutter, Gary; Guerra, Michele; Wilcox, Sara; Bettinghaus, Erwin P

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a scarcity of research studies that have examined academic-commercial partnerships to disseminate evidence-based physical activity programs. Understanding this approach to dissemination is essential because academic-commercial partnerships are increasingly common. Private companies have used dissemination channels and strategies to a degree that academicians have not, and declining resources require academicians to explore these partnerships. PURPOSE: This paper describes a retrospective case-control study design including the methods, demographics, organizational decision-making, implementation rates, and marketing strategy for Active Living Every Day (ALED), an evidence-based lifestyle physical activity program that has been commercially available since 2001. Evidence-based public health promotion programs rely on organizations and targeted sectors to disseminate these programs although relatively little is known about organizational-level and sector-level influences that lead to their adoption and implementation. METHODS: Cases (n=154) were eligible if they had signed an ALED license agreement with Human Kinetics (HK), publisher of the program's textbooks and facilitator manuals, between 2001 and 2008. Two types of controls were matched (2:2:1) and stratified by sector and region. Active controls (Control 1; n=319) were organizations that contacted HK to consider adopting ALED. Passive controls (Control 2; n=328) were organizations that received unsolicited marketing materials and did not initiate contact with HK. We used Diffusion of Innovations Theory (DIT) constructs as the basis for developing the survey of cases and controls. RESULTS: Using the multi-method strategy recommended by Dillman, a total of n=801 cases and controls were surveyed. Most organizations were from the fitness sector followed by medical, nongovernmental, governmental, educational, worksite and other sectors with significantly higher response rates from government

  19. Adopting an Evidence-Based Lifestyle Physical Activity Program: Dissemination Study Design and Methods.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Andrea L; Buller, David B; Dearing, James W; Cutter, Gary; Guerra, Michele; Wilcox, Sara; Bettinghaus, Erwin P

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a scarcity of research studies that have examined academic-commercial partnerships to disseminate evidence-based physical activity programs. Understanding this approach to dissemination is essential because academic-commercial partnerships are increasingly common. Private companies have used dissemination channels and strategies to a degree that academicians have not, and declining resources require academicians to explore these partnerships. PURPOSE: This paper describes a retrospective case-control study design including the methods, demographics, organizational decision-making, implementation rates, and marketing strategy for Active Living Every Day (ALED), an evidence-based lifestyle physical activity program that has been commercially available since 2001. Evidence-based public health promotion programs rely on organizations and targeted sectors to disseminate these programs although relatively little is known about organizational-level and sector-level influences that lead to their adoption and implementation. METHODS: Cases (n=154) were eligible if they had signed an ALED license agreement with Human Kinetics (HK), publisher of the program's textbooks and facilitator manuals, between 2001 and 2008. Two types of controls were matched (2:2:1) and stratified by sector and region. Active controls (Control 1; n=319) were organizations that contacted HK to consider adopting ALED. Passive controls (Control 2; n=328) were organizations that received unsolicited marketing materials and did not initiate contact with HK. We used Diffusion of Innovations Theory (DIT) constructs as the basis for developing the survey of cases and controls. RESULTS: Using the multi-method strategy recommended by Dillman, a total of n=801 cases and controls were surveyed. Most organizations were from the fitness sector followed by medical, nongovernmental, governmental, educational, worksite and other sectors with significantly higher response rates from government

  20. Interdisciplinary Evidence-based Practice: Moving from Silos to Synergy

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Robin P.; Spring, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    Despite the assumption that health care providers work synergistically in practice, professions have tended to be more exclusive than inclusive when it comes to educating students in a collaborative approach to interdisciplinary evidence-based practice (EBP). This article explores the state of academic and clinical training regarding interdisciplinary EBP, describes efforts to foster interdisciplinary EBP, and suggests strategies to accelerate the translation of EBP across disciplines. Moving from silos to synergy in interdisciplinary EBP will require a paradigm shift. Changes can be leveraged professionally and politically using national initiatives currently in place on improving quality and health care reform. PMID:21074648

  1. Three collaborative models for scaling up evidence-based practices.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Patricia; Roberts, Rosemarie; Jones, Helen; Marsenich, Lynne; Sosna, Todd; Price, Joseph M

    2012-07-01

    The current paper describes three models of research-practice collaboration to scale-up evidence-based practices (EBP): (1) the Rolling Cohort model in England, (2) the Cascading Dissemination model in San Diego County, and (3) the Community Development Team model in 53 California and Ohio counties. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) and KEEP are the focal evidence-based practices that are designed to improve outcomes for children and families in the child welfare, juvenile justice, and mental health systems. The three scale-up models each originated from collaboration between community partners and researchers with the shared goal of wide-spread implementation and sustainability of MTFC/KEEP. The three models were implemented in a variety of contexts; Rolling Cohort was implemented nationally, Cascading Dissemination was implemented within one county, and Community Development Team was targeted at the state level. The current paper presents an overview of the development of each model, the policy frameworks in which they are embedded, system challenges encountered during scale-up, and lessons learned. Common elements of successful scale-up efforts, barriers to success, factors relating to enduring practice relationships, and future research directions are discussed.

  2. Sustained adoption of an evidence-based treatment: a survey of clinicians certified in problem-solving therapy.

    PubMed

    Crabb, Rebecca M; Areán, Patricia A; Hegel, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Training models that incorporate case supervision in addition to didactic instruction appear to be effective in maximizing clinicians' proficiency in evidence-based treatments (EBTs). However, it is unknown the extent to which these models promote sustained adoption of EBTs. We describe the results of an online survey on post-training utilization of an EBT, problem-solving therapy (PST), among 40 clinicians highly trained in PST. Seventy-five percent of the survey's 40 respondents reported that they continued to use PST in their clinical practices. Many PST-trained clinicians reported that they had modified the PST protocol in their clinical practices according to patient characteristics or preferences. Considering these results, we recommend emphasizing patient variability and treatment tailoring throughout the training process as a means for promoting clinicians' sustained adoption of EBTs.

  3. Sustained Adoption of an Evidence-Based Treatment: A Survey of Clinicians Certified in Problem-Solving Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, Rebecca M.; Areán, Patricia A.; Hegel, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Training models that incorporate case supervision in addition to didactic instruction appear to be effective in maximizing clinicians' proficiency in evidence-based treatments (EBTs). However, it is unknown the extent to which these models promote sustained adoption of EBTs. We describe the results of an online survey on post-training utilization of an EBT, problem-solving therapy (PST), among 40 clinicians highly trained in PST. Seventy-five percent of the survey's 40 respondents reported that they continued to use PST in their clinical practices. Many PST-trained clinicians reported that they had modified the PST protocol in their clinical practices according to patient characteristics or preferences. Considering these results, we recommend emphasizing patient variability and treatment tailoring throughout the training process as a means for promoting clinicians' sustained adoption of EBTs. PMID:23008764

  4. Neuropsychology 3.0: Evidence-Based Science and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bilder, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychology is poised for transformations of its concepts and methods, leveraging advances in neuroimaging, the human genome project, psychometric theory, and information technologies. It is argued that a paradigm shift towards evidence-based science and practice can be enabled by innovations, including: (1) formal definition of neuropsychological concepts and tasks in cognitive ontologies; (2) creation of collaborative neuropsychological knowledgebases; and (3) design of web-based assessment methods that permit free development, large-sample implementation, and dynamic refinement of neuropsychological tests and the constructs these aim to assess. This article considers these opportunities, highlights selected obstacles, and offers suggestions for stepwise progress towards these goals. PMID:21092355

  5. Neuropsychology 3.0: evidence-based science and practice.

    PubMed

    Bilder, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychology is poised for transformations of its concepts and methods, leveraging advances in neuroimaging, the human genome project, psychometric theory, and information technologies. It is argued that a paradigm shift toward evidence-based science and practice can be enabled by innovations, including (1) formal definition of neuropsychological concepts and tasks in cognitive ontologies; (2) creation of collaborative neuropsychological knowledgebases; and (3) design of Web-based assessment methods that permit free development, large-sample implementation, and dynamic refinement of neuropsychological tests and the constructs these aim to assess. This article considers these opportunities, highlights selected obstacles, and offers suggestions for stepwise progress toward these goals.

  6. Evidence-Based Practice: SLTs under Siege or Opportunity for Growth? The Use and Nature of Research Evidence in the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCurtin, Arlene; Roddam, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Speech and language therapists are encouraged to be evidence-based practitioners in contemporary clinical practice. This apparently signifies their commitment to "good" practice. An examination of evidence-based practice (EBP) and its adoption in clinical practice is therefore warranted. Aims: This paper aims to explore EBP,…

  7. Evidence-Based Practice: The Psychology of EBP Implementation.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Denise M; Gunia, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an approach used in numerous professions that focuses attention on evidence quality in decision making and action. We review research on EBP implementation, identifying critical underlying psychological factors facilitating and impeding its use. In describing EBP and the forms of evidence it employs, we highlight the challenges individuals face in appraising evidence quality, particularly that of their personal experience. We next describe critical EBP competencies and the challenges underlying their acquisition: foundational competencies of critical thinking and domain knowledge, and functional competencies such as question formulation, evidence search and appraisal, and outcome evaluation. We then review research on EBP implementation across diverse fields from medicine to management and organize findings around three key contributors to EBP: practitioner ability, motivation, and opportunity to practice (AMO). Throughout, important links between psychology and EBP are highlighted, along with the contributions psychological research can make to further EBP development and implementation.

  8. Evidence-Based Practice: What Does It Really Mean for the Early Childhood Field?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buysse, Virginia; Wesley, Patricia W.; Snyder, Patricia; Winton, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The growing use of the term "evidence-based" in conference presentations, web sites, journal articles and grants announcements suggest definitive answers to a host of practice-related issues. The purpose of this paper is to address the questions of: (1) defining evidence-based practice; (2) how evidence-based practice differs from other practices;…

  9. Organizational Culture and Climate and Mental Health Provider Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sawitzky, Angelina C

    2006-02-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice (EBP) are associated with organizational context and provider individual differences. Organizational culture and climate are contextual factors that can affect staff acceptance of innovation. This study examined the association of organizational culture and climate with attitudes toward adopting EBP. Participants were 301 public sector mental health service providers from 49 programs providing mental health services for youths and families. Correlation analyses and multilevel hierarchical regressions, controlling for effects of provider characteristics, showed that constructive culture was associated with more positive attitudes toward adoption of EBP and poor organizational climates with perceived divergence of usual practice and EBP. Behavioral health organizations may benefit from consideration of how culture and climate affect staff attitudes toward change in practice.

  10. Evidence-based practice: reflections from five European case studies.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Juan I; Fraser, Alec; Boaz, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence-based practice (EBP) is now the accepted orthodoxy in clinical practice and developed from evidence-based medicine. EBP is based on a specific type of evidence that is derived from studies based on randomised controlled trials (RCT). This type of evidence is suited to acute medical care and is more problematic for other clinicians such as nurses and therapists, particularly when they are situated within community or primary care settings. Setting Five stroke care services in England (2), Sweden (2) and Poland (1). Aims To reflect on the evidence gained from these case studies to shed light on various aspects of EBP. This paper focuses on three key issues: (1) the importance of context for evidence, (2) the nature of knowledge, and (3) professional hierarchies. Methods Five qualitative case studies into stroke care were carried out in England, Sweden and Poland. One hundred and twenty semi-structured interviews were carried out with a range of healthcare staff who provided specialised and non-specialised stroke care in acute, community and primary care between October 2010 and September 2011. Medical doctors, nurses and different therapists were included in the samples in all five case studies. For this paper, we reflect on some aspects of this work to illuminate the different interprofessional perspectives relating to EBP in stroke care. Results The lack of RCT-based evidence in the community and primary care sectors can lead to the clinicians working in these sectors being perceived as having a lower status. Clinicians use both tacit and encoded knowledge to guide their practice and there existed both intraand interprofessional tensions in these two types of knowledge. The professional hierarchy of stroke teams varies with national context and the role of the non-specialists is less valued in stroke care. PMID:25949726

  11. 76 FR 57742 - National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices AGENCY: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice Regarding Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP):...

  12. How Do Dentists Understand Evidence and Adopt It in Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sbaraini, Alexandra; Carter, Stacy M.; Evans, R. Wendell

    2012-01-01

    Although there is now a large evidence-based dentistry literature, previous investigators have shown that dentists often consider research evidence irrelevant to their practice. To understand why this is the case, we conducted a qualitative study. Objective: Our aim was to identify how dentists define evidence and how they adopt it in practice.…

  13. Motivational Interviewing: An Evidence-Based Practice for Improving Student Practice Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohman, Melinda; Pierce, Paloma; Barnett, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based communication method to assist clients in resolving their ambivalence regarding change. With a school emphasis on evidence-based practice and learning outcomes, a social work department implemented a semester-long course on MI. The purpose of this study was to determine baseline skills and…

  14. Social Workers’ Orientation Toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process

    PubMed Central

    Kolmer, Deirdre M. Beneken genaamd; Schalk, René

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study assesses social workers’ orientation toward the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and explores which specific variables (e.g. age) are associated. Methods: Data were collected from 341 Dutch social workers through an online survey which included a Dutch translation of the EBP Process Assessment Scale (EBPPAS), along with 13 background/demographic questions. Results: The overall level of orientation toward the EBP process is relatively low. Although respondents are slightly familiar with it and have slightly positive attitudes about it, their intentions to engage in it and their actual engagement are relatively low. Respondents who followed a course on the EBP process as a student are more oriented toward it than those who did not. Social workers under 29 are more familiar with the EBP process than those over 29. Conclusions: We recommend educators to take a more active role in teaching the EBP process to students and social workers.

  15. Social Workers’ Orientation Toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process

    PubMed Central

    Kolmer, Deirdre M. Beneken genaamd; Schalk, René

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study assesses social workers’ orientation toward the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and explores which specific variables (e.g. age) are associated. Methods: Data were collected from 341 Dutch social workers through an online survey which included a Dutch translation of the EBP Process Assessment Scale (EBPPAS), along with 13 background/demographic questions. Results: The overall level of orientation toward the EBP process is relatively low. Although respondents are slightly familiar with it and have slightly positive attitudes about it, their intentions to engage in it and their actual engagement are relatively low. Respondents who followed a course on the EBP process as a student are more oriented toward it than those who did not. Social workers under 29 are more familiar with the EBP process than those over 29. Conclusions: We recommend educators to take a more active role in teaching the EBP process to students and social workers. PMID:27630517

  16. Immersive Interprofessional Education Using an Evidence-Based Practice Course.

    PubMed

    Hale, LaDonna S; DiLollo, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    Beyond medical knowledge and clinical skills, physician assistant curricula must include instruction in collaborative, interprofessional, patient-centered, evidence-based practice (EBP). Development and implementation of interprofessional education (IPE) are challenging. This article describes a replicable model for an interprofessional graduate-level course that incorporates both exposure and immersion, allowing students to develop and demonstrate the Interprofessional Education Collaborative's 38 core competencies for interprofessional, collaborative decision making and problem solving while also acquiring functional skills in EBP. Pre- and postcourse surveys demonstrated both improved student self-confidence with EBP skills and appreciation for an interprofessional approach to patient care. Barriers to, and facilitators of, development and implementation of IPE courses, as well as effective IPE strategies and tools, are discussed. PMID:27548762

  17. Establishing CASA as an evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Jennifer; Berrick, Jill Duerr

    2013-01-01

    In this article the authors examine the evidentiary status of the Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) program through a review of current research findings and a critical analysis of the study methodologies used to produce those findings. Due to the equivocal research findings and widespread methodological weaknesses (most notably selection bias) in the literature base, it is determined that there is not currently enough evidence to establish CASA as an evidence-based practice. In spite of the challenges to the feasibility of such research, a future research agenda is suggested that calls for the execution of large randomized controlled trials in order to produce findings that will inform a deeper understanding of CASA effectiveness in improving child outcomes.

  18. [Explanation of Evidence-based Guidelines of Clinical Practice with Acupuncture and Moxibustion: Adult Bronchial Asthma].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yue; Wu, Zhongchao; Zhou, Wenna; Si, Xiaohua; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Jincao; Chen, Zhongjie; Li, Rongjun; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Xiao, Liwei

    2016-05-01

    The development and compilation of Evidence-based Guidelines of Clinical Practice with Acupuncture and Moxibustion: Adult Bronchial Asthma are introduced from three aspects, named the guideline methodology, the guideline structure and the guideline content. Based on the acupuncture-moxibustion practice and clinical research, the evidence-based medicine method is adopted. During the development and compilation of the guideline, the characteristics and advantages of acupuncture and moxibustion are specially considered in the treatment of this disease; the latest optimum evidences at home and abroad, experts' experience and patients' value are closely integrated with each other. Additionally, the worldwide accepted assessments of evidence quality and the recommendation (GRADE system) are combined with the clinical evidences of the ancient and modern famous acupuncture-moxibustion experts, and the clinical research evidences are with the experts' consensus to the large extent. The purpose of the guideline is to provide the maximal guidance to the clinical physicians.

  19. [Explanation of Evidence-based Guidelines of Clinical Practice with Acupuncture and Moxibustion: Adult Bronchial Asthma].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yue; Wu, Zhongchao; Zhou, Wenna; Si, Xiaohua; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Jincao; Chen, Zhongjie; Li, Rongjun; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Xiao, Liwei

    2016-05-01

    The development and compilation of Evidence-based Guidelines of Clinical Practice with Acupuncture and Moxibustion: Adult Bronchial Asthma are introduced from three aspects, named the guideline methodology, the guideline structure and the guideline content. Based on the acupuncture-moxibustion practice and clinical research, the evidence-based medicine method is adopted. During the development and compilation of the guideline, the characteristics and advantages of acupuncture and moxibustion are specially considered in the treatment of this disease; the latest optimum evidences at home and abroad, experts' experience and patients' value are closely integrated with each other. Additionally, the worldwide accepted assessments of evidence quality and the recommendation (GRADE system) are combined with the clinical evidences of the ancient and modern famous acupuncture-moxibustion experts, and the clinical research evidences are with the experts' consensus to the large extent. The purpose of the guideline is to provide the maximal guidance to the clinical physicians. PMID:27509620

  20. Drugs and blood transfusions: dogma- or evidence-based practice?

    PubMed

    Murdock, J; Watson, D; Dorée, C J; Blest, A; Roberts, M M; Brunskill, S J

    2009-02-01

    There is a lack of consensus on the safety of the coadministration of drugs and red blood cells (RBCs). A systematic review was undertaken to establish the evidence base for this question and assess how the evidence may be translated into present clinical day practice. Comprehensive searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and hand searching of transfusion journals, guidelines and websites identified 12 relevant papers: 11 in-vitro experiments and 1 case report. Data on incidences of haemolysis and agglutination following coadministration were extracted and analysed. Overall findings suggest that iron chelators (two papers), antimicrobials (three papers) and lower doses of opioids (three papers) are safe to coadminister with RBCs. Haemolysis was observed with higher doses of opioids (three papers). Transposition of these findings to clinical practice is limited because of the lack of clinical applicability of in-vitro experiments and diversity in how, and what, clinical outcome measures were used. Further evidence from true clinical settings would be required to inform clinical practice on the efficacy and safety of the coadministration of drugs and RBCs. PMID:19302450

  1. Cultural competence in the era of evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Engebretson, Joan; Mahoney, Jane; Carlson, Elizabeth D

    2008-01-01

    Cultural competence has become an important concern for contemporary health care delivery, with ethical and legal implications. Numerous educational approaches have been developed to orient clinicians, and standards and position statements promoting cultural competence have been published by both the American Medical Association and the American Nurses Association. Although a number of health care regulatory agencies have developed standards or recommendations, clinical application to patient care has been challenging. These challenges include the abstract nature of the concept, essentializing culture to race or ethnicity, and the attempts to associate culture with health disparities. To make cultural competence relevant to clinical practice, we linked a cultural competency continuum that identifies the levels of cultural competency (cultural destructiveness, cultural incapacity, cultural blindness, cultural precompetence, and cultural proficiency) to well-established values in health care. This situates cultural competence and proficiency in alignment with patient-centered care. A model integrating the cultural competency continuum with the components of evidence-based care (i.e., best research practice, clinical expertise, and patient's values and circumstances) is presented.

  2. Information systems: the key to evidence-based health practice.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Increasing prominence is being given to the use of best current evidence in clinical practice and health services and programme management decision-making. The role of information in evidence-based practice (EBP) is discussed, together with questions of how advanced information systems and technology (IS&T) can contribute to the establishment of a broader perspective for EBP. The author examines the development, validation and use of a variety of sources of evidence and knowledge that go beyond the well-established paradigm of research, clinical trials, and systematic literature review. Opportunities and challenges in the implementation and use of IS&T and knowledge management tools are examined for six application areas: reference databases, contextual data, clinical data repositories, administrative data repositories, decision support software, and Internet-based interactive health information and communication. Computerized and telecommunications applications that support EBP follow a hierarchy in which systems, tasks and complexity range from reference retrieval and the processing of relatively routine transactions, to complex "data mining" and rule-driven decision support systems. PMID:11143195

  3. School Psychology: A Public Health Framework: I. From Evidence-Based Practices to Evidence-Based Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoagwood, Kimberly; Johnson, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    Describes current perspectives on evidence-based practices in psychology, medicine, and education; discusses challenges in the implementation and dissemination of research-based findings into schools; describes differences between current models of organizational behavior as studied in children's mental health services and in education; and…

  4. Leadership, Innovation Climate, and Attitudes toward Evidence-Based Practice during a Statewide Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Leadership is important in practice change, yet there are few studies addressing this issue in mental health and social services. This study examined the differential roles of transformational (i.e., charismatic) leadership and leader member exchange (i.e., the relationship between a supervisor and their direct service providers) on team innovation climate (i.e., openness to new innovations) and provider attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice (EBP) during a statewide evidence-based practice implementation (EBPI) of an intervention to reduce child neglect. Methods Participants were 140 case-managers in 30 teams providing home-based services to families in a statewide child-welfare system. Teams were assigned by region to EBPI or services as usual (SAU) conditions. Multiple group path analysis was used to examine associations of transformational leadership and leader member exchange with innovation climate and attitudes toward adoption and use of EBP. Results Transformational leadership predicted higher innovation climate during implementation while leader member exchange predicted higher innovation climate during SAU. Innovation climate was, in turn, associated with more positive attitudes toward EBP for the EBPI group. Conclusions Strategies designed to enhance supervisor transformational leadership have the potential to facilitate implementation efforts by promoting a strong climate for EBPI and positive provider attitudes toward adoption and use of EBP. PMID:22449648

  5. Council for Exceptional Children: Standards for Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the "Council for Exceptional Children (CEC)" presents Standards for Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education. The statement presents an approach for categorizing the evidence base of practices in special education. The quality indicators and the criteria for categorizing the evidence base of special education…

  6. The Four Cornerstones of Evidence-Based Practice in Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilgun, Jane F.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to place evidence-based practice within its wider scholarly contexts and draw lessons from the experiences of other professions that are engaged in implementing it. The analysis is based primarily on evidence-based medicine, the parent discipline of evidence-based practice, but the author also draws on evidence-based…

  7. [Ethical problems in clinical practice of evidence-based medicine].

    PubMed

    Rogler, G; Fröhlich, G

    2009-07-01

    Ethical problems as consequences of evidence-based medicine (EBM) have insufficiently been investigated and discussed. EBM--as initially intended--is usually interpreted as an attempt to treat patients individually with respect to their personal preferences and the present situation according to the best available clinical evidence. This practice is in line with accepted medical ethics. Therefore, it does not appear to be a relevant issue for discussion at first sight. However, between the theoretical concept and the practical use (or misuse) of this approach discrepancies exist which require some considerations. In particular the practical use of EBM generates a number of ethical problems: EBM is increasingly misused as an instrument of resource-allocation. Based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for very specific patient groups, the general access to medical supply is regulated and limited. The recurrence to general ("supra-individual") external evidence may additionally be in strong contrast to the individual patients' intentions and will and leads to conflicts for therapy decisions. If no longer the individual preferences and the patients' will are in the center of therapy decisions but a so called "general welfare", the mutual trust between patient and doctor is eroded. The utilitaristic approach of a primacy of this general welfare in opposition to the individual welfare is favored by the present interpretation and use of EBM. This conflicts with the perception of the doctor as a patient's advocate. However, the doctor being the patient's advocate is the basis of the traditional medical ethos. We should take care that we do not completely lose the basis of our medical ethos.

  8. Implementing evidence-based nursing practice: a tale of two intrapartum nursing units.

    PubMed

    Angus, Jan; Hodnett, Ellen; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda

    2003-12-01

    Despite concerns that the rise of evidence-based practice threatens to transform nursing practice into a performative exercise disciplined by scientific knowledge, others have found that scientific knowledge is by no means the preeminent source of knowledge within the dynamic settings of health-care. We argue that the contexts within which evidence-based innovations are implemented are as influential in the outcomes as the individual practitioners who attempt these changes. A focused ethnography was done in follow-up to an earlier trial that evaluated the effectiveness of a marketing strategy to encourage the adoption of evidence-based intrapartum nursing practice. Bourdieu's (1990, 1991) concepts of habitus, capital and social field were used in our refinement of the analysis of the ethnographic findings. Nursing leadership, interprofessional struggle with physicians, the characteristics of the community and the physical environment were prominent issues at all of the sites. Detailed descriptions of the sociohistorical context and of the experiences at two sites are presented to illustrate the complexities encountered when implementing innovations.

  9. Evidence-Based Practice Knowledge, Use, and Factors that Influence Decisions: Results from an Evidence-Based Practice Survey of Providers in American Indian/Alaska Native Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Angela; Walrath-Greene, Christine; Fisher, Sylvia; Crossbear, Shannon; Walker, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Evidence-based Treatment Survey were used to compare providers serving families in American Indian and Alaska Native communities to their counterparts in non-American Indian/Alaska Native communities on provider characteristics and factors that influence their decision to use evidence-based practices (N = 467). The findings suggest…

  10. Adopted: A practical salinity scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Unesco/ICES/SCOR/IAPSO Joint Panel on Oceanographic Tables and Standards has recommended the adoption of a Practical Salinity Scale, 1978, and a corresponding new International Equation of State of Seawater, 1980. A full account of the research leading to their recommendation is available in the series Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science.The parent organizations have accepted the panel's recommendations and have set January 1, 1982, as the date when the new procedures, formulae, and tables should replace those now in use.

  11. Supporting Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices through Practice-Based Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Patricia A.; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Fox, Lise

    2015-01-01

    In active implementation science frameworks, coaching has been described as an important competency "driver" to ensure evidence-based practices are implemented as intended. Empirical evidence also has identified coaching as a promising job-embedded professional development strategy to support implementation of quality teaching practices.…

  12. Evidence-Based Practice in Kinesiology: The Theory to Practice Gap Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Duane

    2005-01-01

    As evidence-based practice sweeps the applied health professions, it is a good time to evaluate the generation of knowledge in Kinesiology and its transmission to professionals and the public. Knowledge transmission has been debated in the past from the perspectives of the theory-to-practice gap and the discipline versus profession emphasis.…

  13. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis 2015.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hiroshi; Saito, Hidetsugu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Uto, Hirofumi; Obara, Katsutoshi; Sakaida, Isao; Shibuya, Akitaka; Seike, Masataka; Nagoshi, Sumiko; Segawa, Makoto; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Kato, Akinobu; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Michitaka, Kojiro; Murawaki, Toshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis in 2015. Eighty-three clinical questions were selected, and a literature search was performed for the clinical questions with use of the MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases for the period between 1983 and June 2012. Manual searching of the latest important literature was added until August 2015. The guidelines were developed with use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. This digest version in English introduces selected clinical questions and statements related to the management of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Branched-chain amino acids relieve hypoalbuminemia and hepatic encephalopathy and improve quality of life. Nucleoside analogues and peginterferon plus ribavirin combination therapy improve the prognosis of patients with hepatitis B virus related liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C related compensated liver cirrhosis, respectively, although the latter therapy may be replaced by direct-acting antivirals. For liver cirrhosis caused by primary biliary cirrhosis and active autoimmune hepatitis, urosodeoxycholic acid and steroid are recommended, respectively. The most adequate modalities for the management of variceal bleeding are the endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices and the balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration following endoscopic obturation with cyanoacrylate for gastric varices. Beta-blockers are useful for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. The V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan is a useful add-on therapy in careful diuretic therapy for ascites. Albumin infusion is useful for the prevention of paracentesis-induced circulatory disturbance and renal failure. In addition to disaccharides, the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin is useful for the management of encephalopathy. Anticoagulation therapy is proposed for

  14. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis 2015.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hiroshi; Saito, Hidetsugu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Uto, Hirofumi; Obara, Katsutoshi; Sakaida, Isao; Shibuya, Akitaka; Seike, Masataka; Nagoshi, Sumiko; Segawa, Makoto; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Kato, Akinobu; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Michitaka, Kojiro; Murawaki, Toshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis in 2015. Eighty-three clinical questions were selected, and a literature search was performed for the clinical questions with use of the MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases for the period between 1983 and June 2012. Manual searching of the latest important literature was added until August 2015. The guidelines were developed with use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. This digest version in English introduces selected clinical questions and statements related to the management of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Branched-chain amino acids relieve hypoalbuminemia and hepatic encephalopathy and improve quality of life. Nucleoside analogues and peginterferon plus ribavirin combination therapy improve the prognosis of patients with hepatitis B virus related liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C related compensated liver cirrhosis, respectively, although the latter therapy may be replaced by direct-acting antivirals. For liver cirrhosis caused by primary biliary cirrhosis and active autoimmune hepatitis, urosodeoxycholic acid and steroid are recommended, respectively. The most adequate modalities for the management of variceal bleeding are the endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices and the balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration following endoscopic obturation with cyanoacrylate for gastric varices. Beta-blockers are useful for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. The V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan is a useful add-on therapy in careful diuretic therapy for ascites. Albumin infusion is useful for the prevention of paracentesis-induced circulatory disturbance and renal failure. In addition to disaccharides, the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin is useful for the management of encephalopathy. Anticoagulation therapy is proposed for

  15. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukudo, Shin; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Akiho, Hirotada; Inamori, Masahiko; Endo, Yuka; Okumura, Toshikatsu; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Kamiya, Takeshi; Sato, Ken; Chiba, Toshimi; Furuta, Kenji; Yamato, Shigeru; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Azuma, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Mine, Tetsuya; Miura, Soichiro; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    New strategies for the care of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are developing and several novel treatments have been globally produced. New methods of care should be customized geographically because each country has a specific medical system, life style, eating habit, gut microbiota, genes and so on. Several clinical guidelines for IBS have been proposed and the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) subsequently developed evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for IBS. Sixty-two clinical questions (CQs) comprising 1 definition, 6 epidemiology, 6 pathophysiology, 10 diagnosis, 30 treatment, 4 prognosis, and 5 complications were proposed and statements were made to answer to CQs. A diagnosis algorithm and a three-step treatment was provided for patients with chronic abdominal pain or abdominal discomfort and/or abnormal bowel movement. If more than one alarm symptom/sign, risk factor and/or routine examination is positive, colonoscopy is indicated. If all of them, or the subsequent colonoscopy, are/is negative, Rome III or compatible criteria is applied. After IBS diagnosis, step 1 therapy consisting of diet therapy, behavioral modification and gut-targeted pharmacotherapy is indicated for four weeks. Non-responders to step 1 therapy proceed to the second step that includes psychopharmacological agents and simple psychotherapy for four weeks. In the third step, for patients non-responsive to step 2 therapy, a combination of gut-targeted pharmacotherapy, psychopharmacological treatments and/or specific psychotherapy is/are indicated. Clinical guidelines and consensus for IBS treatment in Japan are well suited for Japanese IBS patients; as such, they may provide useful insight for IBS treatment in other countries around the world. PMID:25500976

  16. Implementing evidence-based practice: effectiveness of a structured multifaceted mentorship programme

    PubMed Central

    Wallen, Gwenyth R.; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Melnyk, Bernadette; Fineout-Overholt, Ellen; Miller-Davis, Claiborne; Yates, Janice; Hastings, Clare

    2010-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of the effectiveness of a structured multifaceted mentorship programme designed to implement evidence-based practice in a clinical research intensive environment. Background Barriers to implementing evidence-based practice are well-documented in the literature. Evidence-based practice is associated with higher quality care and better patient outcomes than care that is steeped in tradition. However, the integration of evidence-based practice implementation into daily clinical practice remains inconsistent, and the chasm between research and bedside practice remains substantial. Methods This quasi-experimental mixed methods study included three focused discussions with nursing leadership and shared governance staff as well as pre- (N=159) and post-intervention (N=99) questionnaires administered between June 2006 and February 2007. Online questionnaires included measures of organizational readiness, evidence-based practice beliefs, evidence-based practice implementation, job satisfaction, group cohesion and intent to leave nursing and the current job. Results Participants in the evidence-based practice mentorship programme had a larger increase in perceived organizational culture and readiness for evidence-based practice and in evidence-based practice belief scores than those who did not participate. Qualitative findings suggested that leadership support of a culture for evidence-based practice and the dedication of resources for sustainability of the initiative needed to be a priority for engaging staff at all levels. Conclusion These findings corroborate other studies showing that nurses’ beliefs about evidence-based practice are significantly correlated with evidence-based practice implementation and that having a mentor leads to stronger beliefs and greater implementation by nurses as well as greater group cohesion, which is a potent predictor of nursing turnover rates. PMID:20825512

  17. Evidence-Based Practices Are Not Reformulated Best Practices: A Response to Martindale's "Children with Significant Hearing Loss: Learning to Listen, Talk, and Read--Evidence-Based Best Practices"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirmer, Barbara R.; Williams, Cheri

    2008-01-01

    "Communication Disorders Quarterly's" special series on evidence-based practices and, specifically, Martindale's article on evidence-based practices in learning to listen, talk, and read among children with significant hearing loss appear to confuse best practices with evidence-based practices and, perhaps more serious, offer little evidence for…

  18. Incorporating Foundational Evidence-Based Practice Concepts and Skills across an Athletic Training Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jutte, Lisa S.; Walker, Stacy E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to provide an example of how to develop and implement an evidence-based practice (EBP) concepts and skills plan in an athletic training education program (ATEP). Background: Evidence-based practice is an integral part of medical practice today. As stated in the "Athletic Training Educational Competencies…

  19. A Study of an Online Tool to Support Evidence-Based Practices with Infants and Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzhardt, Jay; Walker, Dale; Greenwood, Charles R.; Carta, Judith J.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated Early Head Start home visitors' use of evidence-based practices and the effectiveness of a web-based system to support these practices. Home visitors learned to use 3 evidence-based practices: (a) frequent assessment of children's early communication for screening and progress monitoring, (b) 2 home-based language promoting…

  20. Where's the evidence? An innovative approach to teaching staff about evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Janice M; Heitschmidt, Mary; Joyce, Mary Beth; Staneva, Ilianna; Zemansky, Peggy; Francisco, Mary Ann; Powell, Barbara; Kennedy, Terri; Kranzer, Susan French

    2006-01-01

    Preparing nurses to incorporate research and evidence-based findings into nursing practice is important to meet the needs of patients and their families in today's healthcare arena. This article highlights the use of a mock trial as an innovative approach to educating staff nurses on evidence-based practice and identifies future implications for educating staff nurses on incorporating evidence into nursing practice.

  1. Evidence-based practice in health education and promotion: a review and introduction to resources.

    PubMed

    Hill, Elizabeth K; Alpi, Kristine M; Auerbach, Marilyn

    2010-05-01

    This review examines evidence-based practice (EBP) in health education and promotion with a focus on how academically trained health educators develop EBP skills and how health education and promotion practitioners access the literature to inform their activities. Competencies and credentialing in health education related to evidence-based practice are outlined and sources for evidence-based practice literature in health education and promotion are described. An exploratory questionnaire to consider teaching and resources in evidence-based practice was distributed to faculty and librarians from the top 10 ranked health education doctoral programs. Findings highlighted the integral value of EBP instruction to the curriculum. Growth opportunities in evidence-based health education and health promotion for instructors, practitioners, and librarians include promotion and expansion of online evidence-based public health resources to close the evidence-practice gap.

  2. Evidence-Based Secondary Transition Practices for Enhancing School Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Test, David W.; Fowler, Catherine H.; White, James; Richter, Sharon; Walker, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 28% of students with disabilities do not complete high school (National Longitudinal Transition Study-2, 2005). This increases the likelihood that these students will experience low wages, high rates of incarceration, and limited access to postsecondary education. This article reviews evidence-based secondary transition practices…

  3. Adaptive Practice: Next Generation Evidence-Based Practice in Digital Environments.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice in nursing is considered foundational to safe, competent care. To date, rigid traditional perceptions of what constitutes 'evidence' have constrained the recognition and use of practice-based evidence and the exploitation of novel forms of evidence from data rich environments. Advancements such as the conceptualization of clinical intelligence, the prevalence of increasingly sophisticated digital health information systems, and the advancement of the Big Data phenomenon have converged to generate a new contemporary context. In today's dynamic data-rich environments, clinicians have new sources of valid evidence, and need a new paradigm supporting clinical practice that is adaptive to information generated by diverse electronic sources. This opinion paper presents adaptive practice as the next generation of evidence-based practice in contemporary evidence-rich environments and provides recommendations for the next phase of evolution.

  4. Legislating Clinical Practice: Counselor Responses to an Evidence-Based Practice Mandate

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, Traci; Bergmann, Luke; Rasplica, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    The demand to connect research findings with clinical practice for patients with substance use disorders has accelerated state and federal efforts focused on implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs). One unique state driven strategy is Oregon’s Evidence-Based Practice mandate, which ties state funds to specific treatment practices. Clinicians play an essential role in implementation of shifts in practice patterns and use of EBPs, but little is understood about how legislative efforts impact clinicians’ sentiments and decision-making. This study presents longitudinal data from focus groups and interviews completed during the planning phase (n = 66) and early implementation of the mandate (n = 73) to investigate provider attitudes toward this policy change. Results reflect three emergent themes: (1) concern about retaining individualized treatment and clinical latitude, (2) distrust of government involvement in clinical care, and (3) the need for accountability and credibility for the field. We conclude with recommendations for state agencies considering EBP mandates. PMID:22185037

  5. Supporting Evidence-Based Practice in Schools with an Online Database of Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Joelle D.; Bowen, Natasha K.; Bowen, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of multidisciplinary recommendations to use evidence-based interventions in schools and a growing knowledge base of such practices, most schools are not using empirically supported interventions. On the basis of a careful analysis of barriers to the implementation of the best researched programs, an online, free, and publicly available…

  6. Evidence-Based Practice for Children with Speech Sound Disorders: Part 2 Application to Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Elise; McLeod, Sharynne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides both a tutorial and a clinical example of how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can conduct evidence-based practice (EBP) when working with children with speech sound disorders (SSDs). It is a companion paper to the narrative review of 134 intervention studies for children who have an SSD (Baker & McLeod, 2011).…

  7. Physiology versus evidence-based guidance for critical care practice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Evidence based medicine is an attempt to optimize the medical decision process through methods primarily based on evidence coming from meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and randomized controlled trials ("evidence-based medicine"), rather than on "clinical judgment" alone. The randomized trials are the cornerstones of this process. However, the randomized trials are just a method to prove or disprove a given hypothesis, which, in turn, derives from a general observation of the reality (premises or theories). In this paper we will examine some of the most recent randomized trials performed in Intensive Care, analyzing their premises, hypothesis and outcome. It is quite evident that when the premises are wrong or too vague the unavoidable consequences will be a negative outcome. We should pay when designing the trial an equal attention in defining premises and hypothesis that we pay for the trial conduction. PMID:26729063

  8. Evidence-based practice: management of adult sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Chau, Justin K; Cho, John J W; Fritz, Dieter K

    2012-10-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a complex disease state influenced by genetics, age, noise, and many other factors. This article reviews our current knowledge regarding the causes of sensorineural hearing loss and reviews the more challenging clinical presentations of sensorineural hearing loss. We have reviewed the latest medical literature in an attempt to provide an evidence-based strategy for the assessment and management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss, rapidly progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and asymmetric/unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

  9. Leadership, Organizational Climate, and Perceived Burden of Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    Brimhall, Kim C; Fenwick, Karissa; Farahnak, Lauren R; Hurlburt, Michael S; Roesch, Scott C; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    The use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) is associated with favorable client outcomes, yet perceived burden of using EBPs may affect the adoption and implementation of such practices. Multilevel path analysis was used to examine the associations of transformational leadership with organizational climate, and their associations with perceived burden of using EBPs. Results indicated significant relationships between transformational leadership and empowering and demoralizing climates, and between demoralizing climate and perceived burden of EBPs. We found significant indirect associations of leadership and perceived burden through organizational climate. Findings suggest that further research is needed to examine the extent to which improving leadership and organizational climate may reduce perceived burden and use of EBPs with the ultimate goal of enhancing quality of care. PMID:26152770

  10. Leadership, Organizational Climate, and Perceived Burden of Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    Brimhall, Kim C; Fenwick, Karissa; Farahnak, Lauren R; Hurlburt, Michael S; Roesch, Scott C; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    The use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) is associated with favorable client outcomes, yet perceived burden of using EBPs may affect the adoption and implementation of such practices. Multilevel path analysis was used to examine the associations of transformational leadership with organizational climate, and their associations with perceived burden of using EBPs. Results indicated significant relationships between transformational leadership and empowering and demoralizing climates, and between demoralizing climate and perceived burden of EBPs. We found significant indirect associations of leadership and perceived burden through organizational climate. Findings suggest that further research is needed to examine the extent to which improving leadership and organizational climate may reduce perceived burden and use of EBPs with the ultimate goal of enhancing quality of care.

  11. Adopting a blended learning approach to teaching evidence based medicine: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is a core unit delivered across many medical schools. Few studies have investigated the most effective method of teaching a course in EBM to medical students. The objective of this study was to identify whether a blended-learning approach to teaching EBM is more effective a didactic-based approach at increasing medical student competency in EBM. Methods A mixed-methods study was conducted consisting of a controlled trial and focus groups with second year graduate medical students. Students received the EBM course delivered using either a didactic approach (DID) to learning EBM or a blended-learning approach (BL). Student competency in EBM was assessed using the Berlin tool and a criterion-based assessment task, with student perceptions on the interventions assessed qualitatively. Results A total of 61 students (85.9%) participated in the study. Competency in EBM did not differ between the groups when assessed using the Berlin tool (p = 0.29). Students using the BL approach performed significantly better in one of the criterion-based assessment tasks (p = 0.01) and reported significantly higher self-perceived competence in critical appraisal skills. Qualitative analysis identified that students had a preference for the EBM course to be delivered using the BL approach. Conclusions Implementing a blended-learning approach to EBM teaching promotes greater student appreciation of EBM principles within the clinical setting. Integrating a variety of teaching modalities and approaches can increase student self-confidence and assist in bridging the gap between the theory and practice of EBM. PMID:24341502

  12. Implementation of evidence-based practice by nurses working in community settings and their strategies to mentor student nurses to develop evidence-based practice: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Joanne Mary; Mallion, Jaimee

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how community nurses apply the best available evidence to their practice, and how they mentor student nurses to conceptualize and implement evidence-based practice in community settings. In the UK, the expansion of health-care provision in the community has supported the development of highly skilled community nurses. However, there is limited literature regarding the strategies used by community nurses to implement evidence-based practice and mentor student nurses to conceptualize evidence-based practice in community placements. An exploratory qualitative approach applying inductive reasoning to focus group data was used. As a result, nurses working for a community NHS Foundation Trust in South England with a mentor qualification were invited to participate in one of the seven focus groups, 33 nurses participated. Data were analyzed with thematic analysis. The themes discussed in this paper are: 'our practice is evidence-based' as guidelines and policies provided structure, but occasionally stifled autonomous clinical decision-making, and 'time' as a barrier and facilitator to mentoring student nurses in community settings. In conclusion, nurses need to develop the ability to incorporate patients' needs and wishes within evidence-based care. Time was a facilitator for some community mentors, but protected time is required to complete the necessary practice documentation of student nurses.

  13. Implementation of evidence-based practice by nurses working in community settings and their strategies to mentor student nurses to develop evidence-based practice: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Joanne Mary; Mallion, Jaimee

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how community nurses apply the best available evidence to their practice, and how they mentor student nurses to conceptualize and implement evidence-based practice in community settings. In the UK, the expansion of health-care provision in the community has supported the development of highly skilled community nurses. However, there is limited literature regarding the strategies used by community nurses to implement evidence-based practice and mentor student nurses to conceptualize evidence-based practice in community placements. An exploratory qualitative approach applying inductive reasoning to focus group data was used. As a result, nurses working for a community NHS Foundation Trust in South England with a mentor qualification were invited to participate in one of the seven focus groups, 33 nurses participated. Data were analyzed with thematic analysis. The themes discussed in this paper are: 'our practice is evidence-based' as guidelines and policies provided structure, but occasionally stifled autonomous clinical decision-making, and 'time' as a barrier and facilitator to mentoring student nurses in community settings. In conclusion, nurses need to develop the ability to incorporate patients' needs and wishes within evidence-based care. Time was a facilitator for some community mentors, but protected time is required to complete the necessary practice documentation of student nurses. PMID:27562665

  14. Training Teachers to Use Evidence-Based Practices for Autism: Examining Procedural Implementation Fidelity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Rieth, Sarah; Lee, Ember; Reisinger, Erica M.; Mandell, David S.; Connell, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which public school teachers implemented evidence-based interventions for students with autism in the way these practices were designed. Evidence-based practices for students with autism are rarely incorporated into community settings, and little is known about the quality of implementation.…

  15. CEC's Standards for Classifying the Evidence Base of Practices in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Buysse, Virginia; Klingner, Janette; Landrum, Timothy J.; McWilliam, R. A.; Tankersley, Melody; Test, David W.

    2015-01-01

    As an initial step toward improving the outcomes of learners with disabilities, special educators have formulated guidelines for identifying evidence-based practices. We describe the Council of Exceptional Children's new set of standards for identifying evidence-based practices in special education and how they (a) were systematically vetted by…

  16. Evidence-Based Practice for Teachers of Children with Autism: A Dynamic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubas, Margaret; Mitchell, Jennifer; De Leo, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice related to autism research is a controversial topic. Governmental entities and national agencies are defining evidence-based practice as a specific set of interventions that educators should implement; however, large-scale efforts to generalize autism research, which are often single-subject case designs, may be a setback…

  17. Evidence-Based Practice: Foundation for CONNECT 5-Step Learning Cycle[TM] in Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buysse, Virginia; Winton, Pamela J.; Rous, Beth; Epstein, Dale J.; Lim, Chih-Ing

    2012-01-01

    The movement toward evidence-based practice has had a tremendous impact on the early childhood field over the past decade. The authors describe the origins of the evidence-based movement for the early childhood profession and various definitions associated with it. They provide resources for identifying programs and practices that have been…

  18. Using an Evidence-Based Program Planning Model in a Macro Practice Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts-DeGennaro, Maria

    2010-01-01

    A graduate macro practice foundation course was modified to incorporate curriculum content on the paradigm of evidence-based (informed) practice. The author developed an Evidence-Based Program Planning Model that was used as the framework for teaching this paradigm. Students learned to search and appraise the evidence to answer a practice…

  19. Statistical Reform: Evidence-Based Practice, Meta-Analyses, and Single Subject Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, William R.; Clark, Elaine; Kircher, John C.; Kristjansson, Sean D.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence-based practice approaches to interventions has come of age and promises to provide a new standard of excellence for school psychologists. This article describes several definitions of evidence-based practice and the problems associated with traditional statistical analyses that rely on rejection of the null hypothesis for the…

  20. Is Evidence-Based Practice Diverse Enough? Philosophy of Science Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Dennis C., Jr.; Slife, Brent D.

    2007-01-01

    In its policy rationale for evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP), the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) claims to have constituted itself with "scientists and practitioners from a wide range of perspectives and traditions, reflecting the diverse perspectives within the field" (p. 273). We…

  1. Evidence-Based Practice and Research: A Challenge to the Development of Adapted Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutzler, Yeshayahu Shayke

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a growing movement in the health and educational disciplines that recommends emphasis on research outcomes during decision making in practice. EBP is made possible through evidence based research (EBR), which attempts to synthesize the volume and scientific rigor of intervention effectiveness. With the purpose of…

  2. Evidence-Based Practice Empowers Early Childhood Professionals and Families. FPG Snapshot #33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FPG Child Development Institute, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Evidence-based practice emerged as a result of the gap often seen between research and practice and gained momentum with the standards and accountability movement. Yet it originates in medicine. Healthcare professionals using evidence-based medicine determine a patient's treatment based on an assessment of evidence from the literature and current…

  3. Facilitating the Use of Evidence-Based Practice in Community Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Cynthia; Hopson, Laura M.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers are grappling with the challenges of implementing evidence-based practice in community organizations. This article reviews factors that facilitate the use of evidence-based practice in community settings along with future steps necessary for successful translation of knowledge into community agencies. Social workers are uniquely…

  4. Creating Synergy in Practice: Promoting Complementarity between Evidence-Based and Postmodern Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephanie; Kissil, Karni; Scott, Dalesa; Davey, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Postmodern and evidence-based practice (EBP) are compared and contrasted with the primary aim of adapting evidence-based practice with a more flexible epistemological lens. We begin by reviewing the epistemological underpinnings of postmodern and EBP within the field of marriage and family therapy (MFT). We next discuss how these contrasting…

  5. Evidence-based health practice: knowing and using what works for older adults.

    PubMed

    Altpeter, Mary; Bryant, Lucinda; Schneider, Ellen; Whitelaw, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Community-based health care agencies are facing demands for improved outcomes, cost-effective programming, and higher customer satisfaction. Implementing evidence-based health interventions and programs can help to address these challenges. This article provides an overview of evidence-based health practice, including the definition and advantages of this approach, other key terms and concepts inherent to evidence-based practice, and the tasks and steps necessary to its implementation. The article concludes with a list of resources to help health care providers learn about, plan, and implement evidence-based health interventions and programs.

  6. Reality of evidence-based practice in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Claire; Hadley, Gina; Wee, Bee

    2015-01-01

    There has been a paradigm shift in medicine away from tradition, anecdote and theoretical reasoning from the basic sciences towards evidence-based medicine (EBM). In palliative care however, statistically significant benefits may be marginal and may not be related to clinical meaningfulness. The typical treatment vs. placebo comparison necessitated by ‘gold standard’ randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not necessarily applicable. The complex multimorbidity of end of life care involves considerations of the patient’s physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. In addition, the field of palliative care covers a heterogeneous group of chronic and incurable diseases no longer limited to cancer. Adequate sample sizes can be difficult to achieve, reducing the power of studies and high attrition rates can result in inadequate follow up periods. This review uses examples of the management of cancer-related fatigue and death rattle (noisy breathing) to demonstrate the current state of EBM in palliative care. The future of EBM in palliative care needs to be as diverse as the patients who ultimately derive benefit. Non-RCT methodologies of equivalent quality, validity and size conducted by collaborative research networks using a ‘mixed methods approach’ are likely to pose the correct clinical questions and derive evidence-based yet clinically relevant outcomes. PMID:26487964

  7. Seeking Best Practices: A Conceptual Framework for Planning and Improving Evidence-Based Practices

    PubMed Central

    Schooley, Michael W.; Anderson, Lynda A.; Kochtitzky, Chris S.; DeGroff, Amy S.; Devlin, Heather M.; Mercer, Shawna L.

    2013-01-01

    How can we encourage ongoing development, refinement, and evaluation of practices to identify and build an evidence base for best practices? On the basis of a review of the literature and expert input, we worked iteratively to create a framework with 2 interrelated components. The first — public health impact — consists of 5 elements: effectiveness, reach, feasibility, sustainability, and transferability. The second — quality of evidence — consists of 4 levels, ranging from weak to rigorous. At the intersection of public health impact and quality of evidence, a continuum of evidence-based practice emerges, representing the ongoing development of knowledge across 4 stages: emerging, promising, leading, and best. This conceptual framework brings together important aspects of impact and quality to provide a common lexicon and criteria for assessing and strengthening public health practice. We hope this work will invite and advance dialogue among public health practitioners and decision makers to build and strengthen a diverse evidence base for public health programs and strategies. PMID:24331280

  8. Perspectives--A Problem in Our Field: Making Distinctions between Evidence-Based Treatment and Evidence-Based Practice as a Decision-Making Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Kristie; Diel, James; Feder, Joshua; Lillas, Connie

    2012-01-01

    The authors contend that the term "evidence-based treatment" (EBT) is often used synonymously with the term "evidence-based practice" (EBP) without making an important distinction. If a practitioner is applying an EBT, it should not be assumed that one is "practicing" the evidence. Within the infant-family and early childhood field, this confusion…

  9. The Application of Evidence-Based Practice to Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lass, Norman J.; Pannbacker, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to help speech-language pathologists (SLPs) apply the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) to nonspeech oral motor treatments (NSOMTs) in order to make valid, evidence-based decisions about NSOMTs and thus determine if they are viable treatment approaches for the management of communication disorders.…

  10. Evidence-Based Practices in the Field of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: An International Consensus Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L.; Verdugo, Miguel Angel; Gomez, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    As evidence-based practices become increasingly advocated for and used in the human services field it is important to integrate issues raised by three perspectives on evidence: empirical-analytical, phenomenological-existential, and post-structural. This article presents and discusses an evidence-based conceptual model and measurement framework…

  11. The use of collaboration to implement evidence-based safe practices.

    PubMed

    Clarke, John R

    2013-12-01

    The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority receives over 235,000 reports of medical error per year. Near miss and serious event reports of common and interesting problems are analysed to identify best practices for preventing harmful errors. Dissemination of this evidence-based information in the peer-reviewed Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory and presentations to medical staffs are not sufficient for adoption of best practices. Adoption of best practices has required working with institutions to identify local barriers to and incentives for adopting best practices and redesigning the delivery system to make desired behaviour easy and undesirable behaviour more difficult. Collaborations, where institutions can learn from the experiences of others, have show decreases in harmful events. The Pennsylvania Program to Prevent Wrong-Site Surgery is used as an example. Two collaborations to prevent wrong-site surgery have been completed, one with 30 institutions in eastern Pennsylvania and one with 19 in western Pennsylvania. The first collaboration achieved a 73% decrease in the rolling average of wrong-site events over 18 months. The second collaboration experienced no wrong-site operating room procedures over more than one year. Significance for public healthSince the Institute of Medicine's To Err is Human identified medical errors as a major cause of death, the public has been interested in the recommendations for reporting of medical errors and implementing safe systems for the delivery of healthcare. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has followed those recommendations and found that an essential intermediate step between analysing reports and implementing safe systems is collaborative learning among healthcare institutions. The experience in Pennsylvania should be useful to other public organizations wishing to improve safety. PMID:25170497

  12. Evidence-based practice recommendations for memory rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Piras, F; Borella, E; Incoccia, C; Carlesimo, G A

    2011-03-01

    Memory impairment is a common consequence of neurological injury or disease, causing significant disability in everyday life, and is therefore a critical target for rehabilitation intervention. Here we report a review of the available evidence on the efficacy of restitution-oriented therapies and compensatory approaches for memory rehabilitation. A total of 110 studies was systematically classified and analyzed in order to generate evidence-based clinical recommendations for treatment providers. Different key aspects, such as types of brain damage, treatments characteristics and outcome measurements guided the evaluation of the literature as to appraise the potential interaction between patients characteristics, interventions and outcomes. The general conclusion is that memory re-training programs and compensatory approaches are probably effective in ameliorating memory disorders in patients with focal brain lesions, with some evidences of changes in memory functioning extending beyond the trained skills. Externally directed assistive devices and specific learning strategies are effective (with a level D and B of evidence, respectively) in retaining information relevant for daily needs also in patients with degenerative diseases. Some methodological concerns, such as the heterogeneity of subjects, interventions and outcomes studied, may limit the generalization of the present recommendations.

  13. The experts rate: supervisory behaviors that impact the implementation of evidence-based practices.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Linda; Rapp, Charles A; Eichler, Monika S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the critical behaviors of supervisors for the successful implementation of evidence-based practice in adult mental health. Experts who work with supervisors to support implementation in three evidence-based practices were surveyed. The three evidence-based practices included Assertive Community Treatment, Integrated Dual Diagnosis Treatment, and Supported Employment. There was substantial agreement among experts as to the importance of supervisory behaviors in the areas of facilitating team meetings, building and enhancing staff skills, monitoring and using outcomes, and continuous quality improvement activities. PMID:21127975

  14. Ecological risk and resilience perspective: a theoretical framework supporting evidence-based practice in schools.

    PubMed

    Powers, Joelle D

    2010-10-01

    Multidisciplinary school practitioners are clearly being called to use evidence-based practices from reputable sources such as their own professional organizations and federal agencies. In spite of this encouragement, most schools are not regularly employing empirically supported interventions. This paper further promotes the use of this approach by describing the theoretical support for evidence-based practice in schools. The ecological risk and resilience theoretical framework presented fills a gap in the literature and advocates for evidence-based practice in schools by illustrating how it can assist practitioners such as school social workers to better address problems associated with school failure.

  15. Ecological risk and resilience perspective: a theoretical framework supporting evidence-based practice in schools.

    PubMed

    Powers, Joelle D

    2010-10-01

    Multidisciplinary school practitioners are clearly being called to use evidence-based practices from reputable sources such as their own professional organizations and federal agencies. In spite of this encouragement, most schools are not regularly employing empirically supported interventions. This paper further promotes the use of this approach by describing the theoretical support for evidence-based practice in schools. The ecological risk and resilience theoretical framework presented fills a gap in the literature and advocates for evidence-based practice in schools by illustrating how it can assist practitioners such as school social workers to better address problems associated with school failure. PMID:21082473

  16. Why isn't evidence based practice improving health care for minorities in the United States?

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeok; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Baik, Sung-Yi

    2013-11-01

    Achieving health equity by improving the health care of all racial/ethnic groups is one of the key goals of Healthy People 2020. The implementation of evidence based practice (EBP) has been a major recommendation to achieve health equity in hopes of eliminating the subjectivity of clinical decision making. However, health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities are persistent in spite of the adoption of standardized care based on evidence. The EBP with racial and ethnic minorities is often seen as a possible cause of health and health care disparities. Three potential issues of using EBP to reduce health disparities have been identified: (1) a lack of data for EBP with ethnic/racial minority populations; (2) limited research on the generalizability of the evidence based on a European-American middle-class; and (3) sociocultural considerations in the context of EBP. Using EBP to reduce disparities in health care and health outcomes requires that nurse professionals should know how to use relevant evidence in a particular situation as well as to generate knowledge and theory which is relevant to racial/ethnic minorities. In addition, EBP implementation should be contextualized within the sociocultural environments in which patients are treated rather than solely focusing on the health problems. PMID:23928122

  17. Embedding evidence-based practice among nursing undergraduates: Results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    André, Beate; Aune, Anne G; Brænd, Jorunn A

    2016-05-01

    Evidence-based practice is currently one of the most important developments in health care. Research in nursing science is rapidly growing; however, translating the knowledge based on this research into clinical practice is often hampered, and may be dependent on reflective skills. The aim of this study was to see how undergraduate nursing students in nursing should increase their skills and knowledge related to evidence-based practice through participation in clinical research projects. A qualitative approach was used in collecting and analyzing the data. Students participated in a pilot clinical research project and a received guidance related to their bachelor thesis. After the project was completed, all students filled in a questionnaire. The students' motivation to participate in this study was reported to be high, but they reported low knowledge related to evidence-based practice. All students reported that their attitude towards evidence-based practice changed in a positive direction during their participation in the project. Evidence-based practice influenced nursing practices by putting more focus on critical thinking, increasing pride and giving a sense of ownership in the clinical field. The curricula and the pedagogical perspectives in nursing education can influence the attitude towards evidence-based practice and skills among nursing bachelor students. PMID:27235563

  18. An Investigation of Counselor Educators' Attitudes towards Evidence-Based Practices and Perceived Barriers to the Incorporation of Evidence-Based Practices in Counselor Education Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Samir H.

    2010-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to investigate counselor educators' attitudes towards evidence-based practices (EBPs) and perceived barriers to the inclusion of EBPs in counselor education curricula. Additionally, this study aimed to assess whether counselor educators' level of agreement towards the presence of motivational interviewing (MI)…

  19. Making Evidence-Based Practice an Essential Aspect of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Phyllis

    2011-01-01

    Persuasive leaders in higher education have advocated using evidence to support teaching under the guise of scholarship of teaching and learning without much success. This article explains why scholarship of teaching and learning has not been accepted as the standard practice in higher education. Instead, faculty may accept the concept of…

  20. Evidence-Based Practices for Learners with Severe Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtade, Ginevra R.; Test, David W.; Cook, Bryan G.

    2014-01-01

    Because of their highly intensive and variable learning needs, learners with severe intellectual disability present significant challenges to special educators and other stakeholders in terms of selecting and implementing effective instructional practices. Although scholars have made considerable progress in conducting and synthesizing research…

  1. Teaching Primary School Mathematics and Statistics: Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Averill, Robin; Harvey, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Here is the only reference book you will ever need for teaching primary school mathematics and statistics. It is full of exciting and engaging snapshots of excellent classroom practice relevant to "The New Zealand Curriculum" and national mathematics standards. There are many fascinating examples of investigative learning experiences, and key…

  2. Instruction and Assessment for Struggling Writers Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troia, Gary A., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This book focuses on how to provide effective instruction to K-12 students who find writing challenging, including English language learners and those with learning disabilities or language impairments. Prominent experts illuminate the nature of writing difficulties and offer practical suggestions for building students' skills at the word,…

  3. Identifying Educational Practices Supported by Rigorous Evidence: A Guide to the Selection of Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Resource Center Program, 2014

    2014-01-01

    One component of the recently required State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP) for State Departments of Education calls for the selection and implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs). This report provides six steps to guide the process of selecting evidence based practices (EBP): (1) Begin with the End in Mind--Determine Targeted Outcomes;…

  4. Decision-to-Implement Worksheet for Evidence-based Interventions: From the WWAMI Region Practice and Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Karin; Tuzzio, Leah; Renz, Anne; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Parchman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Health-related scientific discoveries are often not applied in clinical settings after publication, even when recommended by a trusted journal or professional association. This article describes an assessment tool we developed for use by primary care clinicians and practice administrators to evaluate whether to implement recommended evidence-based interventions in their practices. Methods We used dissemination and implementation theory to develop a worksheet to guide decision making about whether interventions are suitable for implementation in primary care practice settings. We tested the tool by analyzing how members of a primary care practice-based research network rated 4 evidence-based interventions. Results The median likelihood of implementation ranged from 2 to 3.5 on a scale of 1 (low) to 5 (high). Raters’ level of agreement with statements about 3 intervention characteristics was associated (P < .05) with a higher likelihood of implementation using Spearman rank-order correlation: simple to implement, testable before fully implementing, and modifiable to meet the needs of the practice. Raters found the worksheet helpful in thinking through potential implementation, especially the prompts about modifiability and relevance to the practice's patients and priorities. Conclusions The Decision-to-Implement Worksheet provides a new resource for primary care practices that want to assess whether evidence-based interventions are suitable to adopt or adapt to meet their needs. PMID:27613788

  5. Adoption of Improved Agricultural Practices in Uruguay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucks, Carlos Alberto

    Conducted in Uruguay during 1965-68, this study compared adoption rates for selected agricultural practices between one area which received an extension program and one which did not; and sought relationships between selected characteristics of individual farmers and the adoption of new practices. Data came from interviews with 69 experimental and…

  6. Evidence-based practice for pain identification in cognitively impaired nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Sacoco, Christina; Ishikawa, Sally

    2014-09-01

    Pain identification of cognitively impaired elderly is very challenging. This project aimed to identify best practices for pain assessment in nursing home residents with cognitive impairment and to establish a standardized pain assessment guide to optimize nursing practice and resident outcomes. The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality of Care guided the project's process. Phase I of the project analyzed data gained from chart reviews on current practices of pain assessment, and Phase II used the results of Phase I to develop, implement, and evaluate an evidence-based practice standard for nursing assessment of pain for cognitively impaired residents.

  7. Evidence-based practice in times of drug shortage.

    PubMed

    de Lemos, Mário L; Waignein, Sally; de Haan, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Shortage of oncology drugs is a particularly complicated issue because there are usually limited therapeutic options. Moreover, oncology practice may employ medications for supportive indications which differ from their main usage. This means shortage of oncology drugs is not usually addressed by the major drug shortage guidelines. We have previously shown that, during a shortage crisis, it is possible to make a recommendation on the use of an expired drug supply based on a reasonable estimate of its safety and efficacy. Here, we would like to share further examples on how to deduce potential therapeutic alternatives based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles in the absence of direct clinical evidence in the literature.

  8. Medication Safety During Pregnancy: Improving Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Susan M; Miller, Richard K; Chambers, Christina; Cooper, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 90% of women in the United States have taken medications during pregnancy. Medication exposures during pregnancy can result in adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes including birth defects, fetal loss, intrauterine growth restriction, prematurity, and longer-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. Advising pregnant women about the safety of medication use during pregnancy is complicated by a lack of data necessary to engage the woman in an informed discussion. Routinely, health care providers turn to the package insert, yet this information can be incomplete and can be based entirely on animal studies. Often, adequate safety data are not available. In a busy clinical setting, health care providers need to be able to quickly locate the most up-to-date information in order to counsel pregnant women concerned about medication exposure. Deciding where to locate the best available information is difficult, particularly when the needed information does not exist. Pregnancy registries are initiated to obtain more data about the safety of specific medication exposures during pregnancy; however, these studies are slow to produce meaningful information, and when they do, the information may not be readily available in a published form. Health care providers have valuable data in their everyday practice that can expand the knowledge base about medication safety during pregnancy. This review aims to discuss the limitations of the package insert regarding medication safety during pregnancy, highlight additional resources available to health care providers to inform practice, and communicate the importance of pregnancy registries for expanding knowledge about medication safety during pregnancy. PMID:26771055

  9. Premenstrual syndrome. Evidence-based treatment in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Sue

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the strength of evidence for treatments for premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and to derive a set of practical guidelines for managing PMS in family practice. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: An advanced MEDLINE search was conducted from January 1990 to December 2001. The Cochrane Library and personal contacts were also used. Quality of evidence in studies ranged from level I to level III, depending on the intervention. MAIN MESSAGE: Good scientific evidence shows that calcium carbonate (1200 mg/d) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are effective treatments for PMS. The most commonly used therapies (including vitamin B6, evening primrose oil, and oral contraceptives) are based on inconclusive evidence. Other treatments for which there is inconclusive evidence include aerobic exercise, stress reduction, cognitive therapy, spironolactone, magnesium, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, various hormonal regimens, and a complex carbohydrate-rich diet. Although evidence for them is inconclusive, it is reasonable to recommend healthy lifestyle changes given their overall health benefits. Progesterone and bromocriptine, which are still widely used, are ineffective. CONCLUSION: Calcium carbonate should be recommended as first-line therapy for women with mild-to-moderate PMS. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can be considered as first-line therapy for women with severe affective symptoms and for women with milder symptoms who have failed to respond to other therapies. Other therapies may be tried if these measures fail to provide adequate relief. PMID:12489244

  10. Training Teachers to use Evidence-Based Practices for Autism: Examining Procedural Implementation fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Reed, Sarah; Lee, Ember; Reisinger, Erica M.; Connell, James E.; Mandell, David S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which public school teachers implemented evidence-based interventions for students with autism in the way these practices were designed. Evidence-based practices for students with autism are rarely incorporated into community settings, and little is known about the quality of implementation. An indicator of intervention quality is procedural implementation fidelity (the degree to which a treatment is implemented as prescribed). Procedural fidelity likely affects student outcomes. This project examined procedural implementation fidelity of three evidence-based practices used in a randomized trial of a comprehensive program for students with autism in partnership with a large, urban school district. Results indicate that teachers in public school special education classrooms can learn to implement evidence-based strategies; however they require extensive training, coaching, and time to reach and maintain moderate procedural implementation fidelity. Procedural fidelity over time, and across intervention strategies is examined. PMID:25593374

  11. Evidence-based practice: a deconstruction and postmodern critique: book review article.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Peter

    2005-03-01

    This paper discusses the significance of postmodernism for healthcare practice, specifically the discourse known as 'evidence-based practice'. It considers two texts, both of which present postmodern analyses of contemporary issues. One text presents a deconstruction of evidence-based practice in an attempt to reveal its 'true' nature, which is portrayed as one that does not respect research paradigms other than the randomised controlled trial, merely pays lip service to expertise and fails to connect with the real nature of clinical practice. The second text considers the accusation that absolute relativism implied by postmodern approaches may permit an 'anything goes' mentality and provide succour to those advocating unacceptable practices. A 'defence' of postmodernism in relation to the accusation that it encourages holocaust denial is used to consider further the nature and limitations of postmodern critiques of evidence-based practice. This review concludes that postmodernism fundamentally challenges the apparent 'objectivity' of evidence-based practice but it does not challenge the fundamental rules for acquiring and testing evidence. Rather it is the selection of questions to be asked and answered by evidence-based practice/practitioners that is the true limitation. This is the ground upon which fruitful argument can be had about the significance of evidence without undermining the requirement that there be evidence and standards to judge such evidence.

  12. Evidence-Based Practices for Young Children with Autism: Contributions for Single-Subject Design Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L.; Brown, William H.; Frey, Timothy; Karasu, Necdet; Smith-Canter, Lora Lee; Strain, Phillip S.

    2003-01-01

    A review of 37 single subject design studies examined evidence-based practices for young children with autism. Practices with well established evidence of effectiveness were adult-directed teaching and differential reinforcement. Emerging and effective practices included peer-mediated interventions, visual supports, self-monitoring, and family…

  13. Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology among College Counseling Center Clinicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stewart E.; Benton, Sherry A.; Benton, Stephen L.; Phillips, Julia C.

    2008-01-01

    This empirically based study sought to discover factors underlying diverse sources of information used to inform therapy practice, perceived salience of sources of evidence for clinical practice, importance of common factors to therapy efficiency, and beliefs about evidence-based practice, particularly in the form of evidence-supported treatments…

  14. Using Principles of Evidence-Based Practice to Improve Prescriptive Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraw, Gregory; Patall, Erika A.

    2013-01-01

    We draw on the evidence-based practice (EBP) literature to consider the relationship between empirical results reported in primary research journals and prescriptive recommendations for practice based on those results. We argue that the relationship between individual empirical findings and practice should be mediated by two additional steps in…

  15. Behavior problems, foster home integration, and evidence-based behavioral interventions: What predicts adoption of foster children?

    PubMed Central

    Leathers, Sonya J.; Spielfogel, Jill E.; Gleeson, James P.; Rolock, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Adoption is particularly important for foster children with special mental health needs who are unable to return home, as adoption increases parental support often critically needed by youth with mental health issues. Unfortunately, significant behavior problems frequently inhibit foster parents from adopting, and little is known about factors that predict adoption when a child has behavior problems. Previous research suggests that foster parent behavioral training could potentially increase rates of successful adoptions for pre-school-aged foster children with behavior problems (Fisher, Kim, & Pears, 2009), but this has not been previously tested in older samples. In older children, effective treatment of behavior problems might also increase adoption by reducing the interference of behavior problems and strengthening the child’s foster home integration. This pilot study focused on this question by testing associations between behavior problems, foster home integration, an evidence-based foster parent intervention, and adoption likelihood. Methods This study used an intent-to-treat design to compare foster home integration and adoption likelihood for 31 foster children with histories of abuse and neglect whose foster parents received a foster behavioral parenting intervention (see Chamberlain, 2003) or usual services. Random effect regression analyses were used to estimate outcomes across four time points. Results As expected, externalizing behavior problems had a negative effect on both integration and adoption, and foster home integration had an independent positive effect on adoption. Internalizing behavior problems (e.g., depression/anxiety) were not related to adoption or integration. However, the intervention did not have a direct effect on either foster home integration or adoption despite its positive effect on behavior problems. Conclusions Results from this preliminary study provide further evidence of the negative effect of externalizing

  16. Evidence-based practice: beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, and skills among Colombian physical therapists

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Muñoz-Rodríguez, Diana Isabel; Ramírez, Lorena; González-Ruíz, Katherine; Domínguez-Sánchez, María Andrea; Durán-Palomino, Diana; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Flórez-López, María Eugenia; Bagur-Calafat, M Caridad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The main purpose of this study was to describe a group of Colombian physical therapists' beliefs and attitudes towards Evidence-Based Practice (EBP), their education, knowledge and skills for implementing EBP, the use of relevant literature in clinical practice, access to and availability of scientific information and perceived barriers to including EBP in practice. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study which involved 1,064 Colombian physical therapists. The study used a 50-item screening questionnaire EBP developed to estimate attitudes, beliefs, knowledge and skills regarding. This instrument has been adapted and was validated previously in Colombia by Flórez-López et al. Results: The population mostly consisted of young females (77.2%) aged 22 to 29 years old (79.4%). Most respondents had an undergraduate degree (87.7%). The physical therapists stated that they had positive attitudes and beliefs regarding EBP, most of them answering that they agreed or strongly agreed that EBP is necessary (71.6%), the relevant literature is useful for practice (61.3%), EBP improves the quality of patient care (64.1%) and evidence helps in decision-making (44.5%). Forty-one percent of the respondents indicated that a lack of research skills was the most important barrier to the use of evidence in practice. Conclusion: The physical therapists reported that they had a positive attitude to EBP and were interested in learning about or improving the skills necessary to adopt EBP in their clinical practice. PMID:26019383

  17. Particularizing the general: Sustaining theoretical integrity in the context of an evidence-based practice agenda.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Sally; Sawatzky, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of demands for accountability and health care quality places nurses under constant pressure to ensure professional practice is evidence-based. The corresponding emphasis on knowledge that pertains to general populations challenges nursing's traditional focus on the uniqueness of each individual patient. Considering how nurses engage with professional systematic thinking processes, we reflect on ways competing agendas in the evidence-based practice environment compromise the professional vision aspired to by an earlier era of nursing model and framework builders. Exploring the scientific thinking underpinning practice evidence, we contemplate implications for applying general knowledge to particular practice, reconsidering options for conceptualizing nursing praxis.

  18. Evidence-Based Therapies, Evidence-Based Practice, and the Intersection of Nomothetic and Idiographic Foundations of Psychotherapy Research and Application: A Reply to Shean.

    PubMed

    Pilecki, Brian; McKay, Dean

    2016-03-01

    This article is a commentary on "Psychotherapy Outcome Research: Issues and Questions" by Glenn Shean (this issue). While we agree with a couple of Shean's points, such as over-reliance on diagnoses and lack of attention to global measures of quality of life and functioning, there are several very substantive points of disagreement. We argue that evidence-based therapies and evidence-based practice occupy a central role in developing effective and non-harmful therapies. Shean conflates evidence-based therapies and evidence-based practice in a way that is not representative of how science is intended to advance everyday treatment delivery. We further contest Shean's notion that reliance on empirically based research is limiting to clinicians and instead argue that it offers a helpful and pragmatic starting point for clinical decision making with each unique patient. Further, evidence-based practice, in contrast to evidence-based therapies, represents the model ideal for service delivery, rather than a slavish adherence to protocols employed in randomized clinical trials. Finally, we argue that both nomothetic and idiographic approaches are valid and important in the ongoing advancement of modern psychotherapy, a position wholly consistent with the evidence-based practice movement.

  19. Building bridges to evidence-based practice: the MacArthur Foundation Child System and Treatment Enhancement Projects (Child STEPs).

    PubMed

    Schoenwald, Sonja K; Kelleher, Kelly; Weisz, John R

    2008-03-01

    The papers in this special issue describe research undertaken by the MacArthur Foundation-funded Research Network on Youth Mental Health. The project is designed to understand the challenges of implementing evidence-based treatments in community-based mental health practices. This Introduction and the following articles describe the impetus and conceptual framework underlying one cluster of the Network's activity-i.e., the Clinic Systems Project (CSP). The CSP studies examined the organizational and service system environments in a large national sample of community mental health and affiliated organizations that provide services to children. The main goal is to identify leverage points for, and barriers to, the adoption and implementation of evidence-based practices for children. PMID:18085433

  20. Attitudes, Perceptions, and Utilization of Evidence-Based Practices in Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    James, Sigrid; Thompson, Ronald; Sternberg, Neal; Schnur, Elizabeth; Ross, Jordan; Butler, Linda; Triplett, Dawn; Puett, Lesley; Muirhead, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on results of a national survey conducted in the United States about the attitudes, perceptions and utilization of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in residential care settings. Seventy-five of 118 member agencies (63.6% response rate) of a voluntary national residential care association responded to a web-administered structured survey, which included the Evidence-Based Practices Attitude Scale (Aarons, 2004). Results show overwhelmingly positive attitudes toward EBPs. Concerns were reported mainly with regard to cost and impeding a client-driven practice approach. The study also showed a high degree of utilization of EBPs with over 88 percent of programs reporting the use of at least one practice they considered to be evidence-based. Altogether 53 different practices were reported although it is unknown at this point whether practices were delivered with fidelity. Behaviorally-based and trauma-focused interventions constituted the most common interventions used by residential care agencies. Practices were subsequently validated against four national clearinghouse sites, indicating that only slightly over half of all reported practices had been evaluated by at least one clearinghouse and rated as having some research evidence for effectiveness. Divergent views about what practices are evidence-based point to the need for continued discussion between the practice and research fields about conceptualizations of evidence.

  1. Evidence-based chaplaincy care: attitudes and practices in diverse healthcare chaplain samples.

    PubMed

    Fitchett, George; Nieuwsma, Jason A; Bates, Mark J; Rhodes, Jeffrey E; Meador, Keith G

    2014-01-01

    Leaders in health care chaplaincy and practice guidelines, such as the Association of Professional Chaplains' Standards of Practice, call for chaplains to develop an evidence-based approach to their work. The extent to which practicing chaplains accept this new paradigm is unclear. The aim of this study was to gather information regarding chaplains' attitudes and practices with respect to evidence-based chaplaincy care. Data for the study came from surveys of healthcare chaplains working in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA, n = 440), the Department of Defense (DoD, n = 164), and civilian settings (n = 169). Chaplains from all three contexts strongly endorsed an evidence-based approach to chaplaincy. Approximately three-fourths of the healthcare chaplains from VA and DoD and 42% of those from civilian settings considered their current chaplaincy practices to be evidenced based, with over half in VA and DoD samples and 94% in the civilian sample indicating that they would like their chaplaincy care to be more evidence-based. Approximately half of the VA and DoD chaplains and 35% of the civilian chaplains reported currently using measurement tools in their chaplaincy care. These results suggest that there is generally strong support among practicing chaplains for an evidence-based approach to chaplaincy care. PMID:25255147

  2. Adapting evidence-based interventions using a common theory, practices, and principles.

    PubMed

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Becker, Kimberly D

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of validated evidence-based intervention programs (EBIP) aim to improve families' well-being; however, most are not broadly adopted. As an alternative diffusion strategy, we created wellness centers to reach families' everyday lives with a prevention framework. At two wellness centers, one in a middle-class neighborhood and one in a low-income neighborhood, popular local activity leaders (instructors of martial arts, yoga, sports, music, dancing, Zumba), and motivated parents were trained to be Family Mentors. Trainings focused on a framework that taught synthesized, foundational prevention science theory, practice elements, and principles, applied to specific content areas (parenting, social skills, and obesity). Family Mentors were then allowed to adapt scripts and activities based on their cultural experiences but were closely monitored and supervised over time. The framework was implemented in a range of activities (summer camps, coaching) aimed at improving social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. Successes and challenges are discussed for (a) engaging parents and communities; (b) identifying and training Family Mentors to promote children and families' well-being; and (c) gathering data for supervision, outcome evaluation, and continuous quality improvement. To broadly diffuse prevention to families, far more experimentation is needed with alternative and engaging implementation strategies that are enhanced with knowledge harvested from researchers' past 30 years of experience creating EBIP. One strategy is to train local parents and popular activity leaders in applying robust prevention science theory, common practice elements, and principles of EBIP. More systematic evaluation of such innovations is needed. PMID:24079747

  3. The STROBE statement and neuropsychology: lighting the way toward evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Loring, David W; Bowden, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Reporting appropriate research detail across clinical disciplines is often inconsistent or incomplete. Insufficient report detail reduces confidence in findings, makes study replication more difficult, and decreases the precision of data available for critical review including meta-analysis. In response to these concerns, cooperative attempts across multiple specialties have developed explicit research reporting standards to guide publication detail. These recommendations have been widely adopted by high impact medical journals, but have not yet been widely embraced by neuropsychology. The STROBE Statement (STrengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology) is particularly relevant to neuropsychology since clinical research is often based on non-funded studies of patient samples. In this paper we describe the STROBE Statement and demonstrate how STROBE criteria, applied to reporting of neuropsychological findings, will maintain neuropsychology's position as a leader in quantifying brain-behavior relationships. We also provide specific recommendations for data reporting and disclosure of perceived conflicts of interest that will further enhance reporting transparency for possible perceived sources of bias. In an era in which evidence-based practice assumes an increasingly prominent role, improved reporting standards will promote better patient care, assist in developing quality practice guidelines, and ensure that neuropsychology remains a vigorous discipline in the clinical neurosciences that consciously aspires to high methodological rigor.

  4. Understanding administrative evidence-based practices: Findings from a survey of local health department leaders

    PubMed Central

    Brownson, Ross C.; Reis, Rodrigo S.; Allen, Peg; Duggan, Kathleen; Fields, Robert; Stamatakis, Katherine A.; Erwin, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Background There are sparse data showing the extent to which evidence-based public health is occurring among local health departments. Purpose The purpose of the study was to describe the patterns and predictors of administrative evidence-based practices (structures and activities that are associated with performance measures) in a representative sample of local health departments in the United States. Methods A cross-sectional study of 517 local health department directors was conducted from October through December 2012 (analysis in January through March 2013). The questions on administrative evidence-based practices included 19 items based on a recent literature review (five broad domains: workforce development, leadership, organizational climate and culture, relationships and partnerships, financial processes). Results There was a wide range in performance among the 19 individual administrative evidence-based practices, ranging from 35% for access to current information on evidence-based practices to 96% for funding via a variety of sources Among the five domains, values were generally lowest for organizational climate and culture (mean for the domain = 49.9%) and highest for relationships and partnerships (mean for the domain = 77.1%). Variables associated with attaining the highest tertile of administrative evidence-based practices included having a population jurisdiction of 25,000 or larger (adjusted odds ratios (aORs) ranging from 4.4 to 7.5) and state governance structure (aOR=3.1). Conclusions This report on the patterns and predictors of administrative evidence-based practices in health departments begins to provide information on gaps and areas for improvement that can be linked with ongoing quality improvement processes. PMID:24355671

  5. Educational strategies for teaching evidence-based practice to undergraduate health students: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this systematic review was to find best teaching strategies for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to undergraduate health students that have been adopted over the last years in healthcare institutions worldwide. Methods The authors carried out a systematic, comprehensive bibliographic search using Medline database for the years 2005 to March 2015 (updated in March 2016). Search terms used were chosen from the USNLM Institutes of Health list of MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and free text key terms were used as well. Selected articles were measured based on the inclusion criteria of this study and initially compared in terms of titles or abstracts. Finally, articles relevant to the subject of this review were retrieved in full text. Critical appraisal was done to determine the effects of strategy of teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM). Results Twenty articles were included in the review. The majority of the studies sampled medical students (n=13) and only few conducted among nursing (n=2), pharmacy (n=2), physiotherapy/therapy (n=1), dentistry (n=1), or mixed disciplines (n=1) students. Studies evaluated a variety of educational interventions of varying duration, frequency and format (lectures, tutorials, workshops, conferences, journal clubs, and online sessions), or combination of these to teach EBP. We categorized interventions into single interventions covering a workshop, conference, lecture, journal club, or e-learning and multifaceted interventions where a combination of strategies had been assessed. Seven studies reported an overall increase to all EBP domains indicating a higher EBP competence and two studies focused on the searching databases skill. Conclusion Followings were deduced from above analysis: multifaceted approach may be best suited when teaching EBM to health students; the use of technology to promote EBP through mobile devices, simulation, and the web is on the rise; and the duration of the interventions varying

  6. Dissemination of Evidence-Based Practices for Anxiety Disorders in Wyoming: A Survey of Practicing Psychotherapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipol, Leilani J.; Deacon, Brett J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-established effectiveness of exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of anxiety disorders, therapists have been slow to adopt CBT into their clinical practice. The present study was conducted to examine the utilization of psychotherapy techniques for anxiety disorders among community practitioners in a…

  7. Teaching evidence-based practice in the hospital and the library: two different groups, one course.

    PubMed

    Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra

    2013-01-01

    Key roles in teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) are of interest to many hospital and academic librarians. This article describes how three academic librarians, in collaboration with the academic medical center's EBP Nursing Council, developed a seminar consisting of three credit hours of instruction in the basics of evidence-based practice. The seminar consists of three core elements: basic principles of EBP and finding literature, clinical experience and integration of knowledge into the hospital setting, and patient education and participation. Emphasis is placed upon analysis of the literature, institutional models of practice change, and the importance of patient roles in guideline development. PMID:23394424

  8. Teaching evidence-based practice in the hospital and the library: two different groups, one course.

    PubMed

    Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra

    2013-01-01

    Key roles in teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) are of interest to many hospital and academic librarians. This article describes how three academic librarians, in collaboration with the academic medical center's EBP Nursing Council, developed a seminar consisting of three credit hours of instruction in the basics of evidence-based practice. The seminar consists of three core elements: basic principles of EBP and finding literature, clinical experience and integration of knowledge into the hospital setting, and patient education and participation. Emphasis is placed upon analysis of the literature, institutional models of practice change, and the importance of patient roles in guideline development.

  9. Awareness of Evidence-Based Practices by Organizations in a Publicly Funded Smoking Cessation Network.

    PubMed

    Provan, Keith G; Beagles, Jonathan E; Mercken, Liesbeth; Leischow, Scott J

    2013-01-01

    This research examines the awareness of evidence based practices by the public organizations that fund services in the North American Quitline Consortium (NAQC). NAQC is a large, publicly funded, goal-directed "whole network," spanning both Canada and the U.S., working to get people to quit smoking. Building on prior research on the dissemination and diffusion of innovation and evidence based practices, and considering differences between network ties that are homophilous versus instrumental, we found that awareness of evidence based practices was highest for quitline funders that were strongly connected directly to researchers and indirectly to the network administrative organization, controlling for quitline spending per capita and decision making locus of control. The findings support the importance of maintaining instrumental (a technical-rational argument) rather than homophilous ties for acquisition of evidence based practice knowledge. The findings also offer ideas for how public networks might be designed and governed to enhance the likelihood that the organizations in the network are better aware of what evidence based practices exist.

  10. Evidence-Based Practice and School Libraries: Interconnections of Evidence, Advocacy, and Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Ross J.

    2015-01-01

    This author states that a professional focus on evidence based practice (EBP) for school libraries emerged from the International Association of School Librarianship conference when he presented the concept. He challenged the school library profession to actively engage in professional and reflective practices that chart, measure, document, and…

  11. Facilitating the Effective Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices through Teacher-Parent Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Shepherd, Katharine G.; Cook, Sara Cothren; Cook, Lysandra

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practices represent an important advance in how effective instructional practices are conceptualized and identified, which has the potential to improve the educational outcomes of children with disabilities. Because parents have unique insights and knowledge regarding their children, special educators should collaborate with parents…

  12. Implementation of Evidence-Based Adolescent Literacy Practices by Select Secondary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergele, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods research study was to investigate how evidence-based adolescent literacy practices are implemented by secondary teachers in the classroom or what the reasons might be for these practices not being implemented. Three secondary English teachers of three different types of classes, comprising Intensive, Project-based…

  13. Using Qualitative Research to Develop Culturally Competent Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Louise Bordeaux; Auerbach, Carl F.

    2009-01-01

    Kazdin pointed out that the requirement for evidence-based practice (EBP) has made the long-standing gap between research and practice in clinical psychology even more salient. He offered several strategies for bridging this gap: investigating mechanisms and moderators of therapeutic change, and qualitative research. We agree that qualitative…

  14. Concepts, Challenges, Barriers, and Opportunities Related to Evidence-Based Practice in Rehabilitation Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Fong; Bezyak, Jill; Ramirez, Maria Romero; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Sung, Connie; Fujikawa, Mayu

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice espouses that all healthcare professionals should provide their clients with the most effective clinical services based on sound research evidence. This philosophy of practice has since permeated to an array of health care and human service disciplines, and the rehabilitation counseling profession is no exception. Although…

  15. Implementing Evidence-Based Practice Education in Social Work: A Transdisciplinary Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Mullen, Edward J.; Satterfield, Jason M.; Newhouse, Robin P.; Ferguson, Molly; Brownson, Ross C.; Spring, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence based practice (EBP) is reflected in social work publications, accreditation standards, research, and funding opportunities. However, implementing EBP in social work practice and education has proven challenging, highlighting the need for additional resources. This paper describes the Transdisciplinary Model of EBP, a model based on…

  16. Code of Ethics for Rehabilitation Educators and Counselors: A Call for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burker, Eileen J.; Kazukauskas, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    Given the emphasis on evidence-based practice (EBP) in the 2010 Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors, it has become even more critical for rehabilitation educators and rehabilitation counselors to understand EBP, how to implement it in teaching and in practice, and how to access available EBP resources. This paper defines and…

  17. Beyond Evidence-Based Practice: Nine Ideal Features of a Mental Health Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Gary R.; Drake, Robert E.; Becker, Deborah R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Recognizing the limitations of conventional frameworks for identifying evidence-based interventions, we sought to develop a comprehensive set of criteria that would have practical and policy relevance. Methods: We identify nine ideal attributes of a mental health practice (well defined, reflecting client goals, consistent with societal…

  18. Reliability and Validity of the Evidence-Based Practice Confidence (EPIC) Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salbach, Nancy M.; Jaglal, Susan B.; Williams, Jack I.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The reliability, minimal detectable change (MDC), and construct validity of the evidence-based practice confidence (EPIC) scale were evaluated among physical therapists (PTs) in clinical practice. Methods: A longitudinal mail survey was conducted. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were estimated using Cronbach's alpha…

  19. Asking Well-Built Questions for Evidence-Based Practice in Augmentative and Alternative Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlosser, Ralf W.; Koul, Rajinder; Costello, John

    2007-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is increasingly being advocated as the preferred approach to practice in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The EBP process involves multiple steps. The asking of a well-built question is the first step in the quest for answers. At the same time it is also often the first stumbling block for…

  20. Evidence-Based and Best Practice Addiction Treatment Resources: A Primer for Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacroix, Sheila I.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces concepts, such as evidence-based medicine and best practices, explores these concepts in terms of addiction treatment, discusses practice guidelines, offers suggestions to find and select science-based resources, and explores the librarian's or information specialist's role in the dissemination of this information. (LRW)

  1. Are Online Sources for Identifying Evidence-Based Practices Trustworthy? An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Test, David W.; Kemp-Inman, Amy; Diegelmann, Karen; Hitt, Sara Beth; Bethune, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practices has become a focus in education since the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act reauthorization of 2004 required using practices based on scientific research to improve student outcomes. Although many teachers may not have the time or expertise to evaluate the…

  2. Risk and Strategic Decision-Making in Developing Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilczynski, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) represents an important approach to educating and treating individuals diagnosed with disabilities or disorders. Understanding research findings is the cornerstone of EBP. The methodology of systematic reviews, which involves carefully analyzing research findings, can result a practice guideline that recommends…

  3. Right at Your Fingertips: Important Web-Based Resources for Understanding Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purper, Cammy J.

    2016-01-01

    The era of educational accountability has drawn attention to a need for the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in today's classrooms. The existence of a research-to-practice gap is well established in the field of early childhood education (ECE), and significant barriers to the use of EBPs by practitioners have been documented through…

  4. Reported Prevalence by Australian Special Educators of Evidence-Based Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Mark; Stephenson, Jennifer; Strnadova, Iva

    2011-01-01

    This research examined the reported level of implementation of eight practices in a national sample of Australian special education teachers, replicating the North American study of Burns and Ysseldyke (2009). The 194 respondents reported extensive use of a number of evidence-based practices, such as direct instruction and applied behaviour…

  5. Action Research: A Personal Epiphany and Journey with Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    The author reveals in this article that her action research journey in the land of evidence-based practice was not her own idea. She writes that she was lured by the profession's finest scholars who advocated for reflective dispositions for practitioners to improve their practice and demonstrate the school librarian's critical role in teaching and…

  6. Reverse Engineering: Strategy to Teach Evidence-Based Practice to Online RN-to-BSN Students.

    PubMed

    Gary, Jodie C; Hudson, Cindy E

    2016-01-01

    This article describes an innovative approach to introducing RN-to-BSN students to nursing research and evidence-based practice (EBP). Reverse engineering updates an existing EBP project to better emphasize the role of research and evidence to practicing RNs enrolled in an RN-to-BSN program. Reverse engineering of a nursing practice guideline offers a method for teaching an appreciation of research and supporting nursing practice with best evidence.

  7. Use of Web 2.0 Technologies in K-12 and Higher Education: The Search for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hew, Khe Foon; Cheung, Wing Sum

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based practice in education entails making pedagogical decisions that are informed by relevant empirical research evidence. The main purpose of this paper is to discuss evidence-based pedagogical approaches related to the use of Web 2.0 technologies in both K-12 and higher education settings. The use of such evidence-based practice would…

  8. Teaching evidence-based social work in foundation practice courses: learning from pedagogical choices of allied fields.

    PubMed

    Traube, Dorian E; Pohle, Cara E; Barley, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The field of social work is attuned to the need to incorporate evidence-based practice education into masters-level curriculum. One question remaining is how to integrate evidence-based practice in the foundation practice courses. Integration of evidence-based practice across the foundation-level curriculum coincides with the Council on Social Work Education's mandate that student's engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research. Through a discussion of definitions, criticisms, and pedagogy across the allied fields of medicine, nursing, and social work the authors address the current status of evidence-based practice curriculum in foundation-level education. The authors incorporate the lessons learned from allied fields and a Masters of Social Work student's analyses of their experience of evidence-based practice learning to propose an adult-learner model to improve evidence-based practice pedagogy in Social Work. PMID:22694131

  9. Health promotion overview: evidence-based strategies for occupational health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Jill J; Snelling, Anastasia M; Kalicki, Michelle

    2014-08-01

    Health promotion practice has evolved over the past four decades in response to the rising rates of chronic disease. The focus of health promotion is attaining wellness by managing modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, diet, or physical activity. Occupational health nurses are often asked to conduct worksite health promotion programs for individuals or groups, yet may be unfamiliar with evidence-based strategies. Occupational health nurses should lead interprofessional groups in designing and implementing worksite health promotion programs. This article introduces occupational health nurses to health promotion concepts and discusses evidence-based theories and planning models that can be easily introduced into practice.

  10. [Evidence-based medicine. 1. The transfer of research results to clinical practice. The Italian Group for Evidence-Based Medicine-GIMBE].

    PubMed

    Cartabellotta, A

    1998-03-01

    Evidence-based Medicine, born officially in November 1992, during last five years is grown everywhere, showing its power to influence virtually all aspects of health care: clinical practice, medical education, patient information and health policy. Because of the raising interest also in Italy for the new paradigm of clinical practice, "Recently Progress in Medicina" launches a series of articles with the aim of giving to physicians tools and skills for searching, critically appraising and implementing in their own decisions the best results of clinical research. For a better explanation of practical aspects of Evidence-based Medicine, the first article discusses about several obstacles existing in transferring correctly and timely the results of research into clinical practice, and about the potential role of Evidence-based Medicine in the evolution of the medical art and the health systems of the third millennium.

  11. Using evidence-based practice to address gaps in nursing knowledge.

    PubMed

    Tagney, Jenny; Haines, Caroline

    Implementing evidence based-practice and research findings into nursing care has been identified as a challenge to nursing staff. This article identifies key barriers to the use of research in the international literature, however, there are limited suggestions as to how to improve this in the clinical arena. This article aims to identify how nurses could optimize the implementation of evidence and research into their clinical care and reviews barriers to implementing and undertaking nursing research, suggesting a framework for improvement. It considers the widely varied levels of knowledge of research and equally varied critical appraisal skills present both at a pre and post-registration nursing level. The authors discuss an innovative, collaborative approach that considers the role of the nurse consultant, clinical academic and research facilitator posts. To ensure quality evidence-based practice is implemented into clinical nursing care a realistic and practical structure must be applied. With the appropriate framework, clinical structure and organizational support, promotion of evidence-based practice and research for patient benefit can be optimized. The implications for practice are also discussed. The implementation of a realistic research framework into clinical nursing practice has the potential to influence and develop a more active nursing research culture and promote evidence-based care within the workplace.

  12. A university and health care organization partnership to prepare nurses for evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Missal, Bernita; Schafer, Beth Kaiser; Halm, Margo A; Schaffer, Marjorie A

    2010-08-01

    This article describes a partnership model between a university and health care organizations for teaching graduate nursing research from a framework of evidence-based practice. Nurses from health care organizations identified topics for graduate students to search the literature and synthesize evidence for guiding nursing practice. Nurse educators mentored graduate students in conducting critical appraisals of the literature. Students learned how to search for the evidence, summarize the existing research findings, and translate the findings into practice recommendations. Through presenting and discussing their findings with key stakeholders, students learned how nurses planned to integrate the evidence into practice. Nurses used the evidence-based results to improve their practice in the two partner hospitals. The partnership stimulated action for further inquiry into best practices.

  13. An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in Application of Evidence-Based Policy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jill T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the impact of an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) to develop skills needed to apply an evidence-based approach to population-level practice decisions. Design. A 4-week evidence-based medicine APPE was implemented that included active-learning techniques and online learning modules, participation in state drug-policy committee meetings, and completion of an evidence-based medicine review for a specific drug agent or class. Assessment. Students’ mean score on application of principles related to biostatistics and information mastery on posttests increased 15.8% from pretest to posttest. Students’ mean score on a 22-question information mastery quiz was 90.8%. Mean scores for course evaluation components ranged from 4.8 to 5.0 on a 5-point Likert scale. All respondents indicated they would recommend the APPE to other students. Conclusions. An APPE that incorporated content from active drug-policy committees increased students’ evidence-based medicine skills and enhanced their understanding of, appreciation for, and confidence in evidence-based practice. PMID:23049105

  14. Evaluation of best practices in the design of online evidence-based practice instructional modules*

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Margaret J.; Shurtz, Suzanne; Pepper, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The research determined to what extent best practices are being followed by freely available online modules aimed at teaching critical thinking and evidence-based practices (EBPs) in health sciences fields. Methods: In phase I, an evaluation rubric was created after reviewing the literature. Individual rubric questions were assigned point values and grouped into sections, and the sections weighted. Phase II involved searching Internet platforms to locate online EBP modules, which were screened to determine if they met predetermined criteria for inclusion. Phase III comprised a first evaluation, in which two authors assessed each module, followed by a second evaluation of the top-scoring modules by five representatives from different health sciences units. Results: The rubric's 28 questions were categorized into 4 sections: content, design, interactivity, and usability. After retrieving 170 online modules and closely screening 91, 42 were in the first evaluation and 8 modules were in the second evaluation. Modules in the first evaluation earned, on average, 59% of available points; modules in the second earned an average of 68%. Both evaluations had a moderate level of inter-rater reliability. Conclusions: The rubric was effective and reliable in evaluating the modules. Most modules followed best practices for content and usability but not for design and interactivity. Implications: By systematically collecting and evaluating instructional modules, the authors found many potentially useful elements for module creation. Also, by reviewing the limitations of the evaluated modules, the authors were able to anticipate and plan ways to overcome potential issues in module design. PMID:24415917

  15. Combining Evidence-Based Practice, Learner-Guided Education, and Continuing Education.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Tahnee J; Theiss, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    Personal interest and investment in a topic can bring learning to life and affect real change in nursing practice. This article explains an innovative approach to combining learner-guided education and continuing education credit through a three-part approach to implementing evidence-based practice. This method can be used for nurses in any practice setting to generate learner interest and participation, while improving patient care.

  16. From Theory to Practice: One Agency’s Experience with Implementing an Evidence-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Maureen; Culver, Tom; Farmer, Betsy; Jackson, Leslie Ann; Rixon, Brian

    2013-01-01

    As evidence-based practice is becoming integrated into children’s mental health services as a means of improving outcomes for children and youth with severe behavioral and emotional problems, therapeutic foster care (TFC) which is a specialized treatment program for such youth, is one of few community-based programs considered to be evidence-based. “Together Facing the Challenge” (TFTC) which was developed as a component of a randomized trial of TFC has been identified as an evidence-based model. We describe the experiences reported by one of the agencies that participated in our study and how they have incorporated TFTC into their on-going practice. They highlight key implementation strategies, challenges faced, and lessons learned as they moved forward towards full implementation of TFTC throughout their agency. PMID:25242876

  17. Development and implementation of an inductive model for evidence-based practice: A grassroots approach for building evidence-based practice capacity in staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Strout, Tania D; Lancaster, Kelly; Schultz, Alyce A

    2009-03-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an essential component of the development of nursing science and has importance for today's clinical nurses. It benefits patients, organizations, and the nursing discipline, as well as having personal and professional benefits for individual clinicians. As interest in EBP has grown, so has the need for educational programs designed to develop the scholarly skills of the nursing workforce. The Clinical Scholar Model is one grassroots approach to developing a cadre of clinical nurses who have the EBP and research skills necessary in today's demanding health care delivery environments.

  18. Reconciling evidence-based practice and cultural competence in mental health services: introduction to a special issue.

    PubMed

    Gone, Joseph P

    2015-04-01

    The calls for evidence-based practice (EBP) and cultural competence (CC) represent two increasingly influential mandates within the mental health professions. Advocates of EBP seek to standardize clinical practice by ensuring that only treatment techniques that have demonstrated therapeutic outcomes under scientifically controlled conditions would be adopted and promoted in mental health services. Advocates of CC seek to diversify clinical practice by ensuring that treatment approaches are designed and refined for a multicultural clientele that reflects a wide variety of psychological orientations and life experiences. As these two powerful mandates collide, the fundamental challenge becomes how to accommodate substantive cultural divergences in psychosocial experience using narrowly prescriptive clinical practices and approaches, without trivializing either professional knowledge or cultural difference. In this Introduction to a special issue of Transcultural Psychiatry, the virtue of an interdisciplinary conversation between and among anthropologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and social work researchers in addressing these tensions is extolled.

  19. [Evidence-based radiology for diagnostic imaging: what it is and how to practice it].

    PubMed

    García Villar, C

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based radiology is defined as the decision that results from integrating clinical information to select the most appropriate imaging test on the basis of the best available evidence, the physician's experience, and the patient's expectations. The practice of evidence-based radiology consists of five steps: formulating the question, performing an efficient search of the literature, critically evaluating the literature, applying the results of the search and evaluation while taking into account our experience and the patient's values, and evaluating the results obtained within our own practice. In diagnostic imaging, the number of resources available for evidence-based radiology is increasing: apart from books, articles, and web pages on this subject, evidence-based radiology is receiving more attention at diagnostic imaging conferences. The principles of evidence-based radiology will help promote the appropriate use of resources, greatly benefiting patients (decreasing the use of examinations that use ionizing radiation), professionals (less overload), and managers (more efficient use of resources). PMID:21696793

  20. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Sarah L.; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to…

  1. Practice to research: integrating evidence-based practices with culture and context.

    PubMed

    Weisner, Thomas S; Hay, M Cameron

    2015-04-01

    There are ways to integrate culturally competent services (CCS) and evidence-based practices (EBP) which can improve the experiences of patients and their families and communities when faced with health problems, as well as the effectiveness and positive experiences of practitioners. CCS and EBP evidence should be jointly deployed for helping patients and clinicians. Partnership research models are useful for achieving the integration of CCS and EBP, since they involve close observation of and participation by clinicians and practitioners in the research process, and often use integrated qualitative and quantitative mixed methods. We illustrate this with 3 examples of work that can help integrate CCS and EBP: ongoing collection of information from patients, clinicians and staff, or "evidence farming"; close study and continuous improvement of activities and accommodations; and use of evidence of tacit, implicit cultural scripts and norms, such as being "productive," as well as explicit scripts. From a research practice point of view, collaborative partnerships will likely produce research with culture and context bracketed in, and will contribute stronger research models, methods, and units of analysis.

  2. Practice to research: integrating evidence-based practices with culture and context.

    PubMed

    Weisner, Thomas S; Hay, M Cameron

    2015-04-01

    There are ways to integrate culturally competent services (CCS) and evidence-based practices (EBP) which can improve the experiences of patients and their families and communities when faced with health problems, as well as the effectiveness and positive experiences of practitioners. CCS and EBP evidence should be jointly deployed for helping patients and clinicians. Partnership research models are useful for achieving the integration of CCS and EBP, since they involve close observation of and participation by clinicians and practitioners in the research process, and often use integrated qualitative and quantitative mixed methods. We illustrate this with 3 examples of work that can help integrate CCS and EBP: ongoing collection of information from patients, clinicians and staff, or "evidence farming"; close study and continuous improvement of activities and accommodations; and use of evidence of tacit, implicit cultural scripts and norms, such as being "productive," as well as explicit scripts. From a research practice point of view, collaborative partnerships will likely produce research with culture and context bracketed in, and will contribute stronger research models, methods, and units of analysis. PMID:25416746

  3. The organizational social context of mental health services and clinician attitudes toward evidence-based practice: a United States national study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence-based practices have not been routinely adopted in community mental health organizations despite the support of scientific evidence and in some cases even legislative or regulatory action. We examined the association of clinician attitudes toward evidence-based practice with organizational culture, climate, and other characteristics in a nationally representative sample of mental health organizations in the United States. Methods In-person, group-administered surveys were conducted with a sample of 1,112 mental health service providers in a nationwide sample of 100 mental health service institutions in 26 states in the United States. The study examines these associations with a two-level Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) analysis of responses to the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS) at the individual clinician level as a function of the Organizational Social Context (OSC) measure at the organizational level, controlling for other organization and clinician characteristics. Results We found that more proficient organizational cultures and more engaged and less stressful organizational climates were associated with positive clinician attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice. Conclusions The findings suggest that organizational intervention strategies for improving the organizational social context of mental health services may contribute to the success of evidence-based practice dissemination and implementation efforts by influencing clinician attitudes. PMID:22726759

  4. Adapting Evidence-based Interventions using a Common Theory, Practices, and Principles

    PubMed Central

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Becker, Kimberly D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hundreds of validated evidence-based intervention programs (EBIP) aim to improve families’ well-being, however, most are not broadly adopted. As an alternative diffusion strategy, we created wellness centers to reach families’ everyday lives with a prevention framework. Method At two wellness centers, one in a middle-class neighborhood and one in a low-income neighborhood, popular local activity leaders (instructors of martial arts, yoga, sports, music, dancing, zumba), and motivated parents were trained to be Family Mentors. Trainings focused on a framework which taught synthesized, foundational prevention science theory, practice elements, and principles, applied to specific content areas (parenting, social skills, and obesity). Family Mentors were then allowed to adapt scripts and activities based on their cultural experiences, but were closely monitored and supervised over time. The framework was implemented in a range of activities (summer camps, coaching) aimed at improving social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. Results Successes and challenges are discussed for: 1) engaging parents and communities; 2) identifying and training Family Mentors to promote children and families’ well-being; and 3) gathering data for supervision, outcome evaluation, and continuous quality improvement (CQI). Conclusion To broadly diffuse prevention to families, far more experimentation is needed with alternative and engaging implementation strategies that are enhanced with knowledge harvested from researchers’ past 30 years of experience creating EBIP. One strategy is to train local parents and popular activity leaders in applying robust prevention science theory, common practice elements, and principles of EBIP. More systematic evaluation of such innovations is needed. PMID:24079747

  5. Barriers Facing Physicians Practicing Evidence-Based Medicine in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Almaie, Sameeh M.; Al-Baghli, Nadira

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Tremendous advances in health care have been made through the development of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Studies show that physicians face barriers in practice, preventing the effective use of the best evidence available. Insight into these barriers should pave the way for an action plan to remove them. The aim of this study was…

  6. Untangling the Evidence: Introducing an Empirical Model for Evidence-Based Library and Information Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This research is the first to investigate the experiences of teacher-librarians as evidence-based practice. An empirically derived model is presented in this paper. Method: This qualitative study utilised the expanded critical incident approach, and investigated the real-life experiences of fifteen Australian teacher-librarians,…

  7. Understanding Evidence-Based Information for the Early Childhood Field: Tips from RAND's Promising Practices Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, Teryn; Kilburn, M. Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    With the growing and diverse use of the term "evidence-based practice" it can be difficult for policymakers, funders, program officers, and other professionals to separate the good evidence from the flawed. Furthermore, once good evidence has been identified, it can be difficult to know how to use it. This article discusses key issues to consider…

  8. Evidence-Based Practices for Teachers: A Synthesis of Trustworthy Online Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecker, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify evidence-based practices (EBPs) for teachers of students with disabilities. A review of 13 trustworthy websites yielded 61 EBPs relevant, as determined by this author, to teachers of students with disabilities. The EBPs were organized into six categories: schoolwide framework, literacy instruction, math…

  9. Portable Data Assistants: Potential in Evidence-Based Practice Autism Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkel-Jackson, Sarah M.; Dixon, Mark R.; Szekely, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The emerging era of "evidence-based practice" emphasizes that human service agencies need to find effective and efficient means of training staff and implementing systems change based on scientific evidence. Additional advancements in technology use across populations and settings within the field have also served as a catalyst for the development…

  10. Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Language: Evidence-Based Practice and Language Activity Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Katya

    2004-01-01

    The goal of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is the most effective communication possible. Speech-language pathologists are obligated to collect data, measure communication, and apply the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP). This article presents a model for EBP that represents how collecting and evaluating performance data…

  11. Promoting Evidence-Based Practices: New Teaching Module for Early Childhood Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young Children, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Linda Halgunseth, head of NAEYC's Office of Applied Research (OAR), tells readers about Child Care and Early Education Research Connections, a Web site (www.researchconnections.org/teaching_modules) to help teacher educators integrate knowledge about evidence-based practices into teacher education programs. In addition, the article touts the…

  12. Training Social Work Graduate Students in the Evidence-Based Practice Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Kimberly; Altschul, Inna; Yoder, Jamie; Parrish, Danielle; Nickels, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the effects of integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) process material into a research curriculum for master of social work (MSW) students. Methods: A quasi-experimental design (N = 152) was used across 12 sections of a required program evaluation course, with half integrating EBP process material and half using the…

  13. Coupling Changing Student Demographics with Evidence-Based Leadership Practices: Leading Hispanic Friendly Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Tod Allen

    2012-01-01

    The study assessed the need for learning organizations to implement evidence-based policies and practices designed to enhance the academic and social success of Hispanic learners. Descriptive statistics and longitudinal data from the National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) and the National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition…

  14. An Effective Model for Continuing Education Training in Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Rubin, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This study utilized a replicated one-group pretest-posttest design with 3 month follow-up to evaluate the impact of a one-day continuing education training on the evidence-based practice (EBP) process with community practitioners (N = 69). Outcome measures assessed the level of workshop participants' familiarity with the EBP process, their…

  15. Evaluating Evidence-Based Practice in Teaching Science Content to Students with Severe Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spooner, Fred; Knight, Vicki; Browder, Diane; Jimenez, Bree; DiBiase, Warren

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted for articles published between 1985 and May 2009 to (a) examine the degree to which science content was taught to students with severe developmental disabilities and (b) and evaluate instructional procedures in science as evidence-based practices. The review was organized by a conceptual model…

  16. Development of the Evaluative Method for Evaluating and Determining Evidence-Based Practices in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichow, Brian; Volkmar, Fred R.; Cicchetti, Domenic V.

    2008-01-01

    Although research in autism has grown more sophisticated, the gap between research knowledge and applicability of research in real world settings has grown. There have been a number of different reviews of evidence-based practices of treatments for young children with autism. Reviews which have critically evaluated the empirical evidence have not…

  17. Social Workers' Orientation toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process: A Dutch Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zwet, Renske J. M.; Kolmer, Deirdre M. Beneken genaamd; Schalk, René

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study assesses social workers' orientation toward the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and explores which specific variables (e.g. age) are associated. Methods: Data were collected from 341 Dutch social workers through an online survey which included a Dutch translation of the EBP Process Assessment Scale (EBPPAS), along with…

  18. Evidence-Based Practice at a Crossroads: The Timely Emergence of Common Elements and Common Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Richard P.; Lee, Bethany R.; Lindsey, Michael A.; Collins, Kathryn S.; Strieder, Frederick; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Becker, Kimberly D.; Sparks, Jacqueline A.

    2012-01-01

    Social work is increasingly embracing evidence-based practice (EBP) as a decision-making process that incorporates the best available evidence about effective treatments given client values and preferences, in addition to social worker expertise. Yet, social work practitioners have typically encountered challenges with the application of…

  19. The Common Core State Standards and Evidence-Based Educational Practices: The Case of Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troia, Gary A.; Olinghouse, Natalie G.

    2013-01-01

    Although writing plays an important role in the academic, psychosocial, and economic success of individuals, typical writing instruction and assessment in the United States generally does not reflect evidence-based practices. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) place a great deal of emphasis on written expression and may encourage an increased…

  20. Improving the Teaching of Evidence-Based Practice: Challenges and Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soydan, Haluk

    2007-01-01

    This article explores some of the main challenges of improving the teaching of evidence-based practice in schools of social work. The priority challenges are the needs for a general professional cultural shift, for adequate curricula, to overcome the controversy of scientific methodology, to better understand the state of the art of the…

  1. Evidence-Based Practice and Early Childhood Intervention in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Paul; BigFoot, Dolores Subia; Funderburk, Beverly W.; Novins, Douglas K.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the problems that tribal communities confront when forced to select from menus of evidence-based practice that were not developed with their unique challenges and opportunities in mind. The authors discuss the possibility for adapting or enhancing existing approaches but also point out the need for much more research and…

  2. School Librarians' Experiences with Evidence-Based Library and Information Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richey, Jennifer; Cahill, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based library and information practice (EBLIP) provides school librarians a systematic means of building, assessing, and revising a library program, thus demonstrating a school library program's worth to the larger school community. Through survey research collecting both qualitative and quantitative data, 111 public school…

  3. Preceptor Understanding, Comfort, and Use Related to Evidence-Based Practice Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, W. David; Volberding, Jennifer L.; Timson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Context: The Fifth Edition of the National Athletic Trainers' Association Athletic Training Education Competencies includes the significant addition of competencies covering evidence-based practice (EBP). While the concept of EBP is not new, the terminology in the Competencies may be new to clinical practitioners who did not receive the same…

  4. Single-Case Research Design: An Alternative Strategy for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapleton, Drue; Hawkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The trend of utilizing evidence-based practice (EBP) in athletic training is now requiring clinicians, researchers, educators, and students to be equipped to both engage in and make judgments about research evidence. Single-case design (SCD) research may provide an alternative approach to develop such skills and inform clinical and…

  5. Reviewing Evidence-Based Practice for Pupils with Dyslexia and Literacy Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Yvonne; Stuart, Morag

    2013-01-01

    There is now a strong evidence base from theory and research providing a "template" to inform practice at Wave 2, guiding the design and implementation of time-limited effective early intervention programmes for pupils identified as "at risk" of reading difficulties following initial literacy instruction (Rose, 2009). In contrast, there is…

  6. Cultural Competence and Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health Services: A Complementary Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whaley, Arthur L.; Davis, King E.

    2007-01-01

    The need for cultural competence and the need for evidence-based practice in mental health services are major issues in contemporary discourse, especially in the psychological treatment of people of color. Although these 2 paradigms are complementary in nature, there is little cross-fertilization in the psychological literature. The present…

  7. Implementing Secondary Transition Evidence-Based Practices: A Multi-State Survey of Transition Service Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Plotner, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate transition outcomes for youth with disabilities have produced a call for enhanced transition service delivery that includes implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs). However, research indicates transition service providers still lack the knowledge and skills to effectively implement EBPs to ensure youth with disabilities…

  8. Information Literacy for Speech-Language Pathologists: A Key to Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara J.; Ratner, Nan Bernstein

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this tutorial, we review the tenets of information literacy (IL) that parallel and intersect with new American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) certification standards requiring clinicians to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP). Method: A review of the literature on EBP in medical and allied health areas was conducted…

  9. Motivation and Engagement of Boys: Evidence-Based Teaching Practices. Appendices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munns, Geoff; Arthur, Leonie; Downes, Toni; Gregson, Robyn; Power, Anne; Sawyer, Wayne; Singh, Michael; Thistleton-Martin, Judith; Steele, Frances

    2012-01-01

    The first appendix in this report is the complete version of the literature review from the research project "Motivation and Engagement of Boys: Evidence-based Teaching Practices." This project was carried out by the University of Western Sydney on behalf of the Australian Government Department of Education, Science and Training (DEST) between…

  10. Current Status of Evidence-Based Practice for Students with Intellectual Disability and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Elizabeth A.; McCollow, Meaghan; Umbarger, Gardner; Kidwell, James; Cote, Debra L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a current look at the status of evidence-based practice (EBP) for students with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. Specifically, this paper will (1) provide an introduction to the history and evolution of the use of levels of evidence, (2) discuss the importance of EBPs, (3) identify…

  11. A Critical Quest: Confirming Physical Therapists' Attitudes and Knowledge toward Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Beverly Cumberland

    2013-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to investigate physical therapists attitudes and knowledge toward research and evidence-based practice (EBP). The research design was based on a realist theoretical framework. Twenty-five interviews were conducted asking standardized open-end questions which allowed the participants to relate their real world…

  12. Examining Inclusion of Evidence-Based Practice on Social Work Training Program Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wike, Traci L.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Grady, Melissa D.

    2013-01-01

    Websites represent a visible medium for social work programs to communicate information about social work research, academics, and professional training priorities, including evidence-based practice (EBP). However, few studies have examined the content of social work program websites. This exploratory study aimed to answer the question: Are EBP…

  13. Integrating Information Technology into the Evidence-Based Practice of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cucciare, Michael A.; Weingardt, Kenneth R.

    2007-01-01

    Information technology (IT) is increasingly being used to facilitate, complement, and support the implementation of evidence-based practices (EBP) in psychology. This article reviews recent randomised trials that evaluate the integration of IT applications into the process of delivering EBP. More specifically, we review 11 studies that illustrate…

  14. Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Service-Learning: A Model for Education and Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, John D.; Smith, Bradley H.; McQuillin, Samuel D.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is strongly emphasized in many professions and should be taught as part of pre-professional training or to promote the development of enlightened citizens who utilize professional services. Service-learning (SL) classes provide an excellent opportunity to provide meaningful training in how EBP relates to education,…

  15. Reported Prevalence of Evidence-Based Instructional Practices by Special Educators in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Mark; Strnadova, Iva; Stephenson, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The reported level of use of eight instructional strategies in a sample of 531 special educators in the Czech Republic was examined in this study. Consistent with recent parallel studies in North America and Australia, the respondents reported that they used a combination of evidence-based instructional practices (such as direct instruction and…

  16. Increasing Access to Evidence-Based Practices and Knowledge and Attitudes: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathers, Sonya J.; Strand, Tonya C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the effect of increasing field instructors access to information about evidence-based practices (EBPs) on their level of knowledge and attitudes about EBPs. Method: Eighteen field instructors received training and access to a library with extensive online journals. Half were randomly selected to also receive a…

  17. Evidence-Based Practices in Interventions for Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L.; Collet-Klingenberg, Lana; Rogers, Sally J.; Hatton, Deborah D.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practices (EBPs) are the basis on which teachers and other service providers are required to design educational programs for learners with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). As part of their work with the National Professional Development Center (NPDC) on ASD, researchers developed a process for reviewing the research literature and…

  18. The Technology of Evidence-Based Practice: Tools for Navigating the Health Sciences Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Whitney

    2011-01-01

    Medical and health sciences libraries have incorporated the elements of evidence-based practice (EBP) into their reference services, instruction, and online resource development for years. While EBP focuses on the use of medical and health sciences literature in the clinical environment (i.e., making decisions about how to treat a particular…

  19. What Does It Take to Scale Up and Sustain Evidence-Based Practices?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Janette K.; Boardman, Alison G.; Mcmaster, Kristen L.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the strategic scaling up of evidence-based practices. The authors draw from the scholarly work of fellow special education researchers and from the field of learning sciences. The article defines scaling up as the process by which researchers or educators initially implement interventions on a small scale, validate them, and…

  20. Social Work Field Instructors' Views and Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Oxhandler, Holly K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a cross-sectional study of social work field instructors' views of and implementation of the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and compares their responses with non-field instructors. A total of 688 National Association of Social Workers/Texas members (107 of which were field instructors) anonymously…

  1. An Investigation of Counselor Educators' Attitudes toward Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Samir; Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Bai, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based practices (EBPs) receive little attention in counselor education curricula despite the ethical obligation for counselor educators to teach EBPs to counseling students. This study investigates counselor educators' attitudes toward EBPs along with perceived barriers to the inclusion of EBPs in counselor education curricula. (Contains…

  2. Unifying and Elevating Rehabilitation Counseling through Model-Driven, Diversity-Sensitive Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Fong; Tarvydas, Vilia; Blalock, Kacie; Strauser, David; Atkins, Bobbie J.

    2009-01-01

    Rehabilitation counseling must embrace an evidence-based practice paradigm to remain a vital and respected member of the future community of professions in rehabilitation and mental health care and to fully discharge its responsibility to assist consumers in accessing effective rehabilitation interventions and exercising truly informed choice. The…

  3. Fostering Self-Determination in Higher Education: Identifying Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzel, Elizabeth Evans

    2014-01-01

    Research on the transition of students with disabilities and their post-school outcomes continues to move the field of special education in the direction of evidence-based practices. As special education professionals work to better recognize the impact of instructional and environmental characteristics to prepare youth for their transition, so…

  4. Evidence-Based Practice for Teaching Academics to Students with Severe Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spooner, Fred; Knight, Victoria F.; Browder, Diane M.; Smith, Bethany R.

    2012-01-01

    A review of the literature was conducted for articles published between 2003 and 2010 to build a case for the degree to which evidence-based practices were documented for teaching academic skills to students with severe developmental disabilities. This review extended earlier comprehensive work in literacy, mathematics, and science for the…

  5. Evidence-Based Practice and Information Literacy in Social Work: An Assessment of Students' Reference Lists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silfen, Kate; Zgoda, Karen

    2008-01-01

    To date, only a small number of articles have been written about the information literacy needs of social work students. This is a topic that needs to be addressed more among librarians because of the emergence of the evidence-based practice paradigm within the social work profession. Now more than ever, social work students need to know…

  6. Education Resources Needed to Support the Teaching of Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmundson, Eldon; Gallon, Steve; Porter, John

    2007-01-01

    The Northwest Frontier Addiction Technology Transfer Center surveyed addiction educators, providers and policy makers in Northwest states and Hawaii to define teaching resources and barriers in the teaching of evidence-based practices for the preparation of addiction professionals. The top three teaching resource needs were example student…

  7. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Literacy and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitten, H. Rae

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) and Literacy and Learning are derived from an inductive analysis of qualitative data collected in field research. FASD is the umbrella term for a spectrum of neurocognitive and physical disabilities caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Data from a sample of N=150 was…

  8. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Literacy and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitten, H. Rae

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) and Literacy and Learning are derived from an inductive analysis of qualitative data collected in field research. FASD is the umbrella term for a spectrum of neurocognitive and physical disabilities caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Data from a sample of N =150 was…

  9. Evidence-Based Practice for Children with Speech Sound Disorders: Part 1 Narrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Elise; McLeod, Sharynne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides a comprehensive narrative review of intervention studies for children with speech sound disorders (SSD). Its companion paper (Baker & McLeod, 2011) provides a tutorial and clinical example of how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can engage in evidence-based practice (EBP) for this clinical population. Method:…

  10. Implementing Evidence-Based Practice: A Review of the Empirical Research Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Mel; Joy, Elyssa; Plath, Debbie; Webb, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    The article reports on the findings of a review of empirical studies examining the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the human services. Eleven studies were located that defined EBP as a research-informed, clinical decision-making process and identified barriers and facilitators to EBP implementation. A thematic analysis of the…

  11. Representing Voices from the Life-World in Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovarsky, Dana

    2008-01-01

    Background: Current models of evidence-based practice marginalize and even silence the voices of those who are the potential beneficiaries of assessment and intervention. These missing voices can be found in the reflections of clients on their own life-world experiences. Aims: This paper examines how voices from the life-world are silenced in…

  12. The Rashomon Dilemma: Perspectives on and Dilemmas in Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Professionals working with adolescents who have been sexually abused are under ever increasing pressure to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP), or treatments that have demonstrated proof of their efficacy. While the quest for EBP is certainly praiseworthy, it has been an elusive concept for many professionals. Further, development of…

  13. An Analysis of Social Stories[TM] Research Using an Evidence-Based Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Michael R.; Menendez, Anthony L.; Wheeler, John J.; Carter, Stacy L.; Chitiyo, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    The number of Social Stories[TM] studies and reviews has increased in recent years, yet concerns regarding quality and effect sizes continue to be expressed. With the emphasis on evidence-based practices (EBPs) for the education and treatment of people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), this issue becomes of paramount importance as…

  14. The TEACCH Program in the Era of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesibov, Gary B.; Shea, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    "Evidence-based practice" as initially defined in medicine and adult psychotherapy had limited applicability to autism interventions, but recent elaborations of the concept by the American Psychological Association ("Am Psychol" 61: 271-285, 2006) and Kazdin ("Am Psychol" 63(1):146-159, 2008) have increased its relevance to our field. This article…

  15. The Delphi Method: An Approach for Facilitating Evidence Based Practice in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandrey, Michelle A.; Bulger, Sean M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The growing importance of evidence based practice in athletic training is necessitating academics and clinicians to be able to make judgments about the quality or lack of the body of research evidence and peer-reviewed standards pertaining to clinical questions. To assist in the judgment process, consensus methods, namely brainstorming,…

  16. Embedding Evidence-Based Practice in Pre-Service Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Alan; Lancaster, Julie; Zundans, Lucie; Parkes, Robert John

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the authors sought to establish the differential effects on achievement of embedding evidence-based practice in the design of an inclusive education teacher preparation course. Embedded design involves creating self-repeating patterns in the instructional design of a course by expressing essential design features at multiple levels…

  17. Social Validation of Evidence-Based Practices in Autism by Parents, Teachers, and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Kevin; Henson, Robin K.; Cowan, Angela K.

    2008-01-01

    Relatively little attention has been devoted to the social validation of potentially effective autism interventions. Thus, it is often difficult to identify and implement evidence-based practices, and programming is often inadequate. The authors identified autism intervention components with reported effectiveness for school settings. The results…

  18. Fidelity: An Essential Component of Evidence-Based Practice in Speech-Language Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaderavek, Joan N.; Justice, Laura M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a primer regarding treatment fidelity as it affects evidence-based practice (EBP) for speech-language pathologists. Method: This tutorial defines treatment fidelity, examines the role of treatment fidelity for speech-language pathologists, provides examples of fidelity measurement, and describes approaches for assessing…

  19. Identifying Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education through High Quality Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if meta-analysis can be used to enhance efforts to identify evidence-based practices (EBPs). In this study, the quality of included studies acted as the moderating variable. I used the quality indicators for experimental and quasi-experimental research developed by Gersten, Fuchs, Coyne, Greenwood, and…

  20. How Evidence-Based Teaching Practices Are Challenged by a Deweyan Approach to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2009-01-01

    The claim is made in this paper that the discourse of education offers a challenge to evidence-based practices because this latter approach is embedded in the discourse of management. Although claiming the status of being "scientific", this latter development is drawn upon problematically by policy makers to provide the warrant for stipulating…

  1. An Evidence-Based Practice Model across the Academic and Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Julie A.; Corbin-Lewis, Kim; Self, Trisha; Elsweiler, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This tutorial is designed to provide academic communication sciences and disorders (CSD) programs, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, with a comprehensive instructional model on evidence-based practice (EBP). The model was designed to help students view EBP as an ongoing process needed in all clinical decision making. The three facets…

  2. Evaluating Video Models of Evidence-Based Instructional Practices to Enhance Teacher Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieker, Lisa A.; Lane, Holly B.; Allsopp, David H.; O'Brien, Chris; Butler, Tyran Wright; Kyger, Maggie; Lovin, LouAnn; Fenty, Nicole S.

    2009-01-01

    A process was developed to create Web-based video models of effective instructional practices for use in teacher education settings. Three video models, created at three university sites, demonstrated exemplary implementation of specific, evidence-based strategies in reading, math, and science. Video models of strategies were field tested with…

  3. Evidence-Based Speech-Language Pathology Practices in Schools: Findings from a National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, LaVae M.; Ireland, Marie; Hall-Mills, Shannon; Flynn, Perry

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study documented evidence-based practice (EBP) patterns as reported by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) employed in public schools during 2010-2011. Method: Using an online survey, practioners reported their EBP training experiences, resources available in their workplaces, and the frequency with which they engage in specific EBP…

  4. Field Instructors' Perceptions of Evidence-Based Practice in BSW Field Placement Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiechelt, Shelly A.; Ting, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study surveyed 17 BSW-level field instructors on their experience, beliefs, and perceived self-efficacy regarding evidence-based practice (EBP). The authors conducted focus groups concerning EBP in participants' agencies and with BSW students under their supervision. Results indicate that although they felt positive toward EBP and…

  5. Perspectives--Talking with Practitioners: How to Integrate Best Practices with Evidence-Based Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based treatments are increasingly important and necessary parts of many disciplines when working with very young children and their families. In using them, it is advantageous to be grounded in the principles and practices that research has shown are critical to children's healthy development, particularly the importance of supporting the…

  6. Evidence-Based Practices: An Exploratory Study Concerning School District Professional Development Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juniel, Pamela Marie

    2015-01-01

    The identification and implementation of evidence-based practices by special education and general education teachers continues to be an issue in the field of education (Cook & Cook, 2011; Cook, Tankersley, Cook, & Landrum, 2008). Since the mandates of providing students with disabilities access to the general education curricula (IDEA,…

  7. Realist Evaluation in Wraparound: A New Approach in Social Work Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazi, Mansoor A. F.; Pagkos, Brian; Milch, Heidi A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to develop a realist evaluation paradigm in social work evidence-based practice. Method: Wraparound (at Gateway-Longview Inc., New York) used a reliable outcome measure and an electronic database to systematically collect and analyze data on the interventions, the client demographics and circumstances, and…

  8. Athletic Training Educators' Knowledge, Comfort, and Perceived Importance of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Cailee E.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.; Walker, Stacy E.; Manspeaker, Sarah A.; Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Brown, Sara D.; Laursen, R. Mark; Onate, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Before new strategies and effective techniques for implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) into athletic training curricula can occur, it is crucial to recognize the current knowledge and understanding of EBP concepts among athletic training educators. Objective: To assess athletic training educators' current knowledge, comfort,…

  9. Using Coaching to Improve the Fidelity of Evidence-Based Practices: A Review of Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretlow, Allison Graves; Bartholomew, Christina C.

    2010-01-01

    The authors conducted a comprehensive review of research to identify the impact of coaching on changes in preservice and in-service teachers' implementation of evidence-based practices. They identified a total of 13 studies from the 20 years of literature they searched. In general, coaching improved the extent to which teachers accurately…

  10. Perceptions of "'Evidence-Based Practice" among the Consumers of Adolescent Substance Use Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Sara J.; Spirito, Anthony; Vanmali, Roshani

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Several national organisations in the USA have recently developed educational materials that encourage substance use disorder treatment consumers to seek out approaches supported by scientific evidence in order to promote the use of "evidence-based practice" (EBP). This study aimed to explore how adolescents (young people aged…

  11. Teaching research and evidence-based practice using a service-learning approach.

    PubMed

    Balakas, Karen; Sparks, Laurie

    2010-12-01

    Because nurses are expected to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP), nursing students must learn to critically evaluate and apply research findings to prepare for professional practice. To connect research and EBP, the focus of a baccalaureate research course was changed from a traditional format to one of evidence appraisal and synthesis. Using an approach that incorporated service-learning and collaborative learning resulted in a new hybrid course that provided students with an opportunity to apply concepts in the real world. Working with a community partner, students were able to develop PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome) questions and critically appraise the literature to establish the evidence base for three pediatric programs. Students reported that working with a community partner was a meaningful experience because course assignments had a direct impact on current practice. Research courses taught from an EBP perspective can provide motivation for students to incorporate research into their practice as professional nurses.

  12. Latent practice profiles of substance abuse treatment counselors: do evidence-based techniques displace traditional techniques?

    PubMed

    Smith, Brenda D; Liu, Junqing

    2014-04-01

    As more substance abuse treatment counselors begin to use evidence-based treatment techniques, questions arise regarding the continued use of traditional techniques. This study aims to (1) assess whether there are meaningful practice profiles among practitioners reflecting distinct combinations of cognitive-behavioral and traditional treatment techniques; and (2) if so, identify practitioner characteristics associated with the distinct practice profiles. Survey data from 278 frontline counselors working in community substance abuse treatment organizations were used to conduct latent profile analysis. The emergent practice profiles illustrate that practitioners vary most in the use of traditional techniques. Multinomial regression models suggest that practitioners with less experience, more education, and less traditional beliefs about treatment and substance abuse are least likely to mix traditional techniques with cognitive-behavioral techniques. Findings add to the understanding of how evidence-based practices are implemented in routine settings and have implications for training and support of substance abuse treatment counselors.

  13. Translating evidence-based practices into policy: a case study in Texas.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Gerald; Montgomery, Katherine L; Bell, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Screening and brief intervention (SBI) in health care settings is an evidence-based practice for substance misuse. The Uniform Accident and Sickness Policy Provision Law (UPPL) discourages providers from carrying out SBI by allowing insurers in 26 states to refuse coverage for injuries resulting from intoxication. This project used a qualitative case study methodology to understand how policy-advocacy communication may have impacted the success of UPPL repeal efforts in Texas. Results showed bill progress could have been impeded due to less-effective communication from advocates. These findings suggest the quality of communication may influence the success of evidence-based policy-advocacy for UPPL repeal. PMID:22583026

  14. Evidence Based Surgery: How Difficult is the Implication in Routine Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Gaurav; Maheshwari, Namrata

    2012-01-01

    Surgery as a discipline has perhaps been slower than other specialties to embrace evidence based principles. Today, surgeons all over Asia are prepared to challenge the dogma of yesterday. Surgical science which rests on a strong foundation of laboratory and clinical research can now be broadened to include the armamentarium of evidence based practice to advance surgical knowledge. The sheer volume of easily accessed information creates a new challenge. This article discusses keeping up with new information and finding the best available answers to specific questions amidst all the other information. PMID:22359733

  15. Evidence based library and information practice in Australia: defining skills and knowledge.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Suzanne

    2011-06-01

    This guest feature from Suzanne Lewis, a long-time advocate of evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP) in Australia, discusses a current trend within the movement that focuses on the skills, knowledge and competencies of health librarians. In particular, the feature describes three specific Australia-based research projects, on expert searching, indigenous health and future skills requirements for the health library workforce respectively, that exemplify this trend. These projects illustrate how the evidence base can be strengthened around the skills and knowledge required to deliver services that continue to meet the changing needs of health library and information users.

  16. A Critical Assessment of Evidence-Based Policy and Practice in Social Work.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Clive; Drewery, Sian

    2016-01-01

    In this article the authors consider how effective social work has been in terms of evidence-based policies and practice. They consider the role that "evidence" plays in policy making both in the wider context and, in particular, in relation to social work. The authors argue that there are numerous voices in the policy-making process and evidence only plays a minor role in terms of policy development and practice in social work.

  17. Comparison of four teaching methods on Evidence-based Practice skills of postgraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ritin S; Tran, Duong Thuy; Ramjan, Lucie; Ho, Carey; Gill, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare four teaching methods on the evidence-based practice knowledge and skills of postgraduate nursing students. Students enrolled in the Evidence-based Nursing (EBN) unit in Australia and Hong Kong in 2010 and 2011 received education via either the standard distance teaching method, computer laboratory teaching method, Evidence-based Practice-Digital Video Disc (EBP-DVD) teaching method or the didactic classroom teaching method. Evidence-based Practice (EBP) knowledge and skills were evaluated using student assignments that comprised validated instruments. One-way analysis of covariance was implemented to assess group differences on outcomes after controlling for the effects of age and grade point average (GPA). Data were obtained from 187 students. The crude mean score among students receiving the standard+DVD method of instruction was higher for developing a precise clinical question (8.1±0.8) and identifying the level of evidence (4.6±0.7) compared to those receiving other teaching methods. These differences were statistically significant after controlling for age and grade point average. Significant improvement in cognitive and technical EBP skills can be achieved for postgraduate nursing students by integrating a DVD as part of the EBP teaching resources. The EBP-DVD is an easy teaching method to improve student learning outcomes and ensure that external students receive equivalent and quality learning experiences.

  18. Comparison of four teaching methods on Evidence-based Practice skills of postgraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ritin S; Tran, Duong Thuy; Ramjan, Lucie; Ho, Carey; Gill, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare four teaching methods on the evidence-based practice knowledge and skills of postgraduate nursing students. Students enrolled in the Evidence-based Nursing (EBN) unit in Australia and Hong Kong in 2010 and 2011 received education via either the standard distance teaching method, computer laboratory teaching method, Evidence-based Practice-Digital Video Disc (EBP-DVD) teaching method or the didactic classroom teaching method. Evidence-based Practice (EBP) knowledge and skills were evaluated using student assignments that comprised validated instruments. One-way analysis of covariance was implemented to assess group differences on outcomes after controlling for the effects of age and grade point average (GPA). Data were obtained from 187 students. The crude mean score among students receiving the standard+DVD method of instruction was higher for developing a precise clinical question (8.1±0.8) and identifying the level of evidence (4.6±0.7) compared to those receiving other teaching methods. These differences were statistically significant after controlling for age and grade point average. Significant improvement in cognitive and technical EBP skills can be achieved for postgraduate nursing students by integrating a DVD as part of the EBP teaching resources. The EBP-DVD is an easy teaching method to improve student learning outcomes and ensure that external students receive equivalent and quality learning experiences. PMID:23107585

  19. Knowledge development and evidence-based practice: insights and opportunities from a postcolonial feminist perspective for transformative nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Reimer Kirkham, Sheryl; Baumbusch, Jennifer L; Schultz, Annette S H; Anderson, Joan M

    2007-01-01

    Although not without its critics, evidence-based practice is widely espoused as supporting professional nursing practice. Engaging with the evidence-based practice discourse from a vantage point offered by the critical perspectives of postcolonial feminism, the incomplete epistemologies and limitations of the standardization characteristic of the evidences-based movement are analyzed. Critical analysis of evidence is suggested, such that it recognizes the evidence generated from multiple paradigms of inquiry, along with contextual interpretation and application of this evidence. We examine how broader interpretations of evidence might contribute to nursing knowledge development and translation for transformative professional nursing practice, and ultimately to address persistent health disparities within the complex context of healthcare delivery.

  20. Preparing students to practice evidence-based dentistry: a mixed methods conceptual framework for curriculum enhancement.

    PubMed

    Palcanis, Kent G; Geiger, Brian F; O'Neal, Marcia R; Ivankova, Nataliya V; Evans, Retta R; Kennedy, Lasonja B; Carera, Karen W

    2012-12-01

    This article describes a mixed methods conceptual framework for evidence-based dentistry to enhance the curriculum at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry. A focus of recent curriculum reform has been to prepare students to integrate evidence-based dentistry into clinical practice. The authors developed a framework consisting of four conceptual phases to introduce curriculum innovation: 1) exploration of the phenomenon; 2) development of two new instruments; 3) data collection, analysis, outcomes, and evaluation; and 4) application to curricular reform. Eight sequential procedural steps (literature review; focus group discussions; development of themes; survey design; internal review; data collection, analysis, and evaluation; development of recommendations with external review; and implementation of recommendations for curricular enhancement) guided the curricular enhancement. Faculty members supported the concept of teaching evidence-based dentistry to facilitate major curriculum reform, and course directors incorporated evidence-based teaching to prepare scientist-practitioners who meet dental performance standards. The new curriculum implemented following completion of the study is in its third year. Much of its structure is based on evidence-based teaching methodologies, and approximately one-third of the content consists of small groups researching clinical problems with applied science and discussing the findings. The framework described in this article proved useful to guide revision of predoctoral clinical education at one dental school and may be useful in other settings.

  1. Infusing evidence-based instructional strategies to prepare today's military practical nurses for tomorrow's practice.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Richard A; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L

    2014-01-01

    Is there one best method to provide instruction to today's nursing students? The evidence found in the current literature clearly states the answer is no. The student of today is technology oriented. But for them, it's not about technology, it's about the learning that technology provides. With this understanding, this article provides a review of the efforts by the staff of the US Army Practical Nurse Course (68WM6) to infuse evidence-based instructional strategies into curriculum. Five strategies that were integrated into the curriculum are presented: computer assisted learning, gaming software, classroom response system, human patient simulators, and video recordings. All of the initiatives discussed in this article were implemented into the program of instruction over a 6-year period in an attempt to incorporate the use of appropriate technology in the learning process. The results are a testimony to the necessity of using a combination of strategies for teaching today's nursing students. In doing so, the organization not only improved the learning process, but found significant financial savings. PMID:24488873

  2. Recognizing the need for evidence-based macro practices in organizational and community settings.

    PubMed

    Netting, F; O'Connor, Mary

    2008-01-01

    The need for using evidence-based macro practices is examined. EBP is viewed as practitioners recognizing client values and then using the most promising research to guide programmatic, organizational, community, and policy activities to facilitate change. There are multiple ways to search for evidence. The nature of evidence in macro practice will look different depending on the practice situation. Being able to assess the situation and recognize the context in which one is practicing will set the stage for how EBP should be defined. A set of questions are suggested to guide decision-making regarding the use and the management of evidence.

  3. What High School Administrators Need to Know about Secondary Transition Evidence-Based Practices and Predictors for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Test, David W.; Bartholomew, Audrey; Bethune, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    In response to legislative mandates that schools use evidence-based instructional practices, the National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center has identified evidence-based practices and predictors in the area of secondary transition for high school students with disabilities. This article provides an overview of practices and…

  4. Making Room for Dynamics in Evidence-Based Practice: The Role of Psychodynamic Theory in Client-Centered Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozas, Lisa Werkmeister; Grady, Melissa D.

    2011-01-01

    The move toward evidence-based practice has fortified, and continues to strengthen, the social work profession through accountability, greater support for social interventions, and linking research and practice. This article considers potential limitations in exclusively promoting evidence-based practice in social work programs and advocates for…

  5. Transforming health care from the inside out: advancing evidence-based practice in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Fineout-Overholt, Ellen; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Schultz, Alyce

    2005-01-01

    Health care is in need of change. Major professional and health care organizations as well as federal agencies and policy-making bodies are emphasizing the importance of evidence-based practice (EBP). Using this problem solving approach to clinical care that incorporates the conscientious use of current best evidence from well designed studies, a clinician's expertise, and patient values and preferences, nurses and other health care providers can provide care that goes beyond the status quo. Health care that is evidence-based and conducted in a caring context leads to better clinical decisions and patient outcomes. Gaining knowledge and skills in the EBP process provides nurses and other clinicians the tools needed to take ownership of their practices and transform health care. Key elements of a best practice culture are EBP mentors, partnerships between academic and clinical settings, EBP champions, clearly written research, time and resources, and administrative support. This article provides an overview of EBP and offers recommendations for accelerating the adoption of EBP as a culture in education, practice and research. PMID:16311228

  6. Use of Evidence-Based Practices and Resources Among Comprehensive Cancer Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Steele, C. Brooke; Rose, John M.; Chovnick, Gary; Townsend, Julie S.; Stockmyer, Chrisandra K.; Fonseka, Jamila; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Context While efforts to promote use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for cancer control have increased, questions remain whether this will result in widespread adoption of EBPs (eg, Guide to Community Preventive Services interventions) by comprehensive cancer control (CCC) programs. Objective To examine use of EBPs among CCC programs to develop cancer control plans and select interventions. Design Conducted Web-based surveys of and telephone interviews with CCC program staff between March and July 2012. Setting CCC programs funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP). Participants Sixty-one CCC program directors. Main Outcome Measures 1) Use of and knowledge/attitudes about EBPs and related resources and 2) EBP-related technical assistance needs. Results Seventy-five percent of eligible program directors reported use of EBPs to a moderate or great extent to address program objectives. Benefits of using EBPS included their effectiveness has been proven, they are an efficient use of resources, and they lend credibility to an intervention. Challenges to using EBPs included resource limitations, lack of culturally appropriate interventions, and limited skills adapting EBPs for local use. Most respondents had heard of and used Web sites for The Guide to Community Preventive Services (95% and 91%, respectively) and Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T. (98% and 75%, respectively). Training needs included how to adapt an EBP and its materials for cultural appropriateness (state 78%, tribe 86%, territory 80%) and how to maintain the fidelity of an EBP (state 75%, tribe 86%, territory 60%). Conclusions While awareness, knowledge, and use of EBPs and related resources are high, respondents identified numerous challenges and training needs. The findings from this study may be used to enhance technical assistance provided to NCCCP grantees related to selecting and implementing EBPs. PMID:24402431

  7. Ethical practice of evidence-based medicine: A review for plastic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Rajeev B.

    2013-01-01

    Last decade has witnessed a spurt in articles focused on the topic of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and medical ethics. These articles are not only educative, but draw attention to the changing scenario of medical practice. Surgeons seem a bit less attentive to practice of EBM, more so in the developing world. The theme is now percolating in our realm for demonstrable incorporation of EBM in our practice, which is allegorical of a good physician and is also likely to become demanding legally. In practicing EBM, several conflicts may arise with the ethical vows of medicine. However, majority of these conflicting issues have germinated from a capitalistic approach to medical practice, where the fear of extraneous compulsions dictating prescriptions and procedures in the garb of ‘evidence-based practice’ conflicts ethical behaviour. This review shall appraise the reader with important definitions of medical ethics, EBM and how to incorporate best evidence into ones practice. While, EBM brings objectivity to treatment to derive measurable outcomes it should not become regimented or metamorphose as a pseudonym for defensive medicine to escalate treatment costs. EBM also has several limitations one of which is to place the onus on the practicing physician to search for the best evidence and the other is the resource constraint of practice in the developing world. How a plastic surgery practice could be made to conform to evidence based (EB) procedures is proposed as insufficient surgical skills can pose a serious threat to not only the practice of EB procedures, but to ethical responsibilities as well. In conclusion, it is necessary to incorporate ethical temperance into EB procedures to withstand societal, peer and legal pressures of current times. PMID:23960301

  8. Healthcare workers and prevention of hepatitis C virus transmission: exploring knowledge, attitudes and evidence-based practices in hemodialysis units in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence exists regarding the full prevention of HCV transmission to hemodialysis patients by implementing universal precaution. However, little information is available regarding the frequency with which hospitals have adopted evidence-based practices for preventing HCV infection among hemodialysis patients. A cross-sectional survey has been conducted among nurses in Calabria region (Italy) in order to acquire information about the level of knowledge, the attitudes and the frequencies of evidence-based practices that prevent hospital transmission of HCV. Methods All 37 hemodialysis units (HDU) of Calabria were included in the study and all nurses were invited to participate in the study and to fill in a self-administered questionnaire. Results 90% of the nurses working in HDU participated in the study. Correct answers about HCV pattern of transmission ranged from 73.7% to 99.3% and were significantly higher in respondents who knew that isolation of HCV-infected patients is not recommended and among those who knew that previous bloodstream infections should be included in medical record and among nurses with fewer years of practice. Most correctly thought that evidence-based infection control measures provide adequate protection against transmission of bloodborne pathogens among healthcare workers. Positive attitude was significantly higher among more knowledgeable nurses. Self-reporting of appropriate handwashing procedures were significantly more likely in nurses who were aware that transmission of bloodborne pathogens among healthcare workers may be prevented through adoption of evidence-based practices and with a correct knowledge about HCV transmission patterns. Conclusions Behavior changes should be aimed at abandoning outdated practices and adopting and maintaining evidence-based practices. Initiatives focused at enabling and reinforcing adherence to effective prevention practices among nurses in HDU are strongly needed. PMID:23391009

  9. An organizational cybernetics framework for achieving balance in evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Dale

    2014-01-01

    This article applies the systems science of organizational cybernetics to the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the provision of social work services in a residential treatment center setting. It does so by systemically balancing EBP with practice-based evidence (PBE) with a focus on the organizational and information system infrastructures necessary to ensure successful implementation. This application is illustrated by discussing a residential treatment program that implemented evidence-based programming and evaluated the results; however, the systemic principles articulated can be applied to any human services organizational setting.

  10. Evidence-based veterinary medicine: evolution, revolution, or repackaging of veterinary practice?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Peggy L

    2007-05-01

    Over time, evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) should integrate with normal clinical practice. Also, clinical knowledge increases with EBVM, reducing the need for information in one area and allowing veterinarians to explore new areas of specialty or cutting-edge advances in the profession. Textbooks, journals, veterinary conferences, and web sites provide nearly unlimited information about EBVM for the practicing veterinarian to help with the transition to EBVM use in daily practice life. EBVM should continue to change and improve how we, as veterinarians, provide the best available care to our clients and patients.

  11. Evidence-Based Integrated Environmental Solutions For Secondary Lead Smelters: Pollution Prevention And Waste Minimization Technologies And Practices

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evidence-based methodology was adopted in this research to establish strategies to increase lead recovery and recycling via a systematic review and critical appraisal of the published literature. In particular, the research examines pollution prevention and waste minimization...

  12. Implementing evidence-based practice using an interprofessional team approach: part two.

    PubMed

    Bohnenkamp, Susan; Pelton, Nicole; Rishel, Cindy J; Kurtin, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    The complexity inherent in the inpatient oncology population requires effective interprofessional collaboration and integrated evidence-based practice (EBP), drawing from each of the disciplines to achieve desired outcomes. Each member of the team lends a strength and expertise that, when combined, often results in outcomes greater than the sum of its parts (Hall & Weaver, 2001; Petri, 2010; Pullon & Fry, 2005). EBP promotes the use of research to solve issues raised in day-to-day nursing practice. This article provides an overview and summary of an evidence-based project to increase compliance of sequential compression devices (SCDs) in gynecologic oncology and urology patients on a post-surgical inpatient unit using the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) model for continuous quality improvement (CQI) (Institute for Innovation and Improvement, 2013). PMID:25158660

  13. Implementing evidence-based practice in human service organizations: preliminary lessons from the frontlines.

    PubMed

    Austin, Michael J; Claassen, Jennette

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) involves the integration of the expertise of individual practitioners with the best available evidence within the context of values and expectations of clients. Little is known about the implementation of evidence-based practice in the human services. This article is based on a comprehensive search of the literature related to the organizational factors needed to introduce EBP into a human service agency, tools for assessing organizational readiness for EBP, and lessons learned from the current implementation efforts. Three approaches to implementing EBP are investigated: the micro (increasing worker skills), macro (strengthening systems and structures), and the combination (focusing on both aspects). Conclusions and recommendations are drawn from the literature review and framed in the form of a tool for assessing organizational readiness for EBP implementation.

  14. Falls prevention for elders in acute care: an evidence-based nursing practice initiative.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Tamara H; Labonte, Paula; Klock, Monica; Houser, Larry

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and measure the impact of a multifaceted program developed to reduce the falls rate on an acute medical unit at an academic tertiary care center. According to national benchmarks, this unit was one of the hospital's top 3 units for numbers of falls for several years. That distinction drove the hospital and unit leadership and a staff-led unit practice council to develop an evidence-based intervention plan. Interventions included a campaign to raise geriatric awareness, creation of "falls tool boxes," education of staff and family, and implementation of a structured hourly patient rounds schedule. The success of these interventions is discussed, including the effect on the falls rate benchmark. The discussion addresses implications and outcomes associated with the empowerment of nursing staff to respond to benchmarking measures, implement evidence-based practices, and use the same benchmarking procedure to measure outcomes.

  15. Awareness of evidence-based practices alone does not translate to implementation: insights from implementation research.

    PubMed

    Rangachari, Pavani; Rissing, Peter; Rethemeyer, Karl

    2013-01-01

    This article offers a scholarly review and perspective on the potential of "implementation research" to generate incremental, context-sensitive, evidence-based management strategies for the successful implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) (such as the "central line bundle"). Many hospitals have difficulty consistently implementing EBPs at the unit level. This problem has been broadly characterized as "change implementation failure" in health care organizations. The popular hospital response to this challenge has been to raise clinician awareness of EBPs through mandated educational programs. However, this approach has not always succeeded in changing practice. The health services research literature has emphasized the role of several organizational variables (eg, leadership, safety culture, organizational learning, teamwork and communication, and physician/staff engagement) in successful change implementation. Correspondingly, this literature has developed broad frameworks and programs for change in health care organizations. While these broad change frameworks have been successfully applied by some facilities to change practice, they are not incrementally actionable. As such, several facilities have not leveraged broad change frameworks because of resource and/or contextual limitations; a majority of hospitals continue to resort to mandated clinician education (awareness-building) for change implementation. The recent impetus toward "implementation research" in health care has the potential to generate incremental, context-sensitive, evidence-based management strategies for practice change. Authors discuss specific insights from a recently completed study on central line bundle implementation in 2 intensive care units in an academic health center. The study demonstrates that awareness of EBPs alone does not translate to implementation. More importantly, the study also identifies incremental, context-sensitive, evidence-based management strategies for

  16. Evidence-Based Plastic Surgery: Its Rise, Importance, and a Practical Guide.

    PubMed

    Agha, Riaz A; Orgill, Dennis P

    2016-03-01

    There is a perfect storm developing in 21st century healthcare; rising complexity and patient expectations in the context of fiscal restraint. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) may be the best-kept secret in dealing with the "storm." Such an approach prefers management pathways that deliver better outcomes at less relative cost. In this article, the rise of EBM, its significance, a guide to practicing it, and its future in the field of plastic, reconstructive, and aesthetic surgery are presented. PMID:26746230

  17. Evidence-based practice for intrapartum care: the Pearls of Midwifery.

    PubMed

    King, Tekoa L; Pinger, Whitney

    2014-01-01

    Care for women in labor in the United States is in a period of significant transition. Many intrapartum care practices that are standard policies in hospitals today were instituted in the 20th century without strong evidence for their effect on the laboring woman, labor progress, or newborn outcomes. Contemporary research has shown that many common practices, such as routine intravenous fluids, electronic fetal monitoring, and routine episiotomies, do more harm than good. In 2010, the American College of Nurse-Midwives released a PowerPoint presentation titled Evidence-Based Practice: Pearls of Midwifery. This presentation reviews 13 intrapartum-care strategies that promote normal physiologic vaginal birth and are associated with a lower cesarean rate. They are also practices long associated with midwifery care. This article reviews the history of intrapartum practices that are now changing, the evidence that supports these changes, and the practical applications for the 13 Pearls of Midwifery.

  18. Teacher Self-Assessment of Evidence-Based Classroom Practices: Preliminary Findings across Primary, Intermediate and Secondary Level Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgmeier, Chris; Loman, Sheldon L.; Hara, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    The limited implementation of evidence-based classroom practices and ways to provide effective professional development to address this challenge remain enduring concerns in education. Despite these concerns, there exists a well-established research literature on evidence-based practices for effective classroom management and instructional…

  19. Associations between evidence-based practice and mental health outcomes in child and adolescent mental health services.

    PubMed

    Deighton, Jessica; Argent, Rachel; De Francesco, Davide; Edbrooke-Childs, Julian; Jacob, Jenna; Fleming, Isobel; Ford, Tamsin; Wolpert, Miranda

    2016-04-01

    The effectiveness of evidence-based practice in the treatment of children with conduct disorder (n = 186) or emotional disorders (n = 490) in routine care was examined using naturalistic, previously collected data from 30 child and adolescent mental health services. Repeated measures analysis of covariance was used to compare the outcomes of children who received parent training for conduct disorder and cognitive behavioural therapy for emotional disorders (evidence-based practice) with children who did not receive these treatments (non-evidence-based practice). There was a relatively low occurrence of evidence-based practice, particularly for children with conduct disorder. Both the evidence-based practice and non-evidence-based practice groups improve over time, with moderate effect sizes, and there were greater improvements associated with evidence-based practice for children with emotional disorders, based on child self-reported symptoms but not on parent report. In the present sample, significant differences were not found for conduct disorder. Findings provide tentative support for evidence-based practice for the treatment of emotional disorders in routine care settings.

  20. Electronic Clinic Journaling: The Use of Weblogs to Support Evidence-Based Practice in Doctor of Audiology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neldon, Gayle B.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a strategy for the provision of high quality health care. The use of journals to document clinical experiences and reflection has been used in speech-language pathology as well as nursing and psychology. This study uses qualitative analysis to study what AuD students learn about evidence-based practice from writing…

  1. Teachers' Facility with Evidence-Based Classroom Management Practices: An Investigation of Teachers' Preparation Programmes and In-Service Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficarra, Laura; Quinn, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, teachers' self-reported knowledge and competency ratings for the evidence-based classroom management practices were analysed. Teachers also reflected on how they learned evidence-based classroom management practices. Results suggest that teachers working in schools that implement Positive Behavioural Interventions and…

  2. Future Paradigm or False Idol: A Cautionary Tale of Evidence-Based Practice for Adventure Education and Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Nevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is an approach that narrowly classifies research results by utilising a hierarchy of evidence. This process renders much available knowledge and experience redundant within its value structure. Currently a dominating ideology across medical and health fields, evidence-based practice is now being promoted in adventure…

  3. A Comparison of Evidence-Based Practice and the ACRL Information Literacy Standards: Implications for Information Literacy Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP), like information literacy, is concerned with an individual's knowledge, skills, and attitudes relating to using information. EBP is now a professional competency in fields as diverse as social work, nursing and allied health fields, and public policy. A comparison of the Association of College and Research Libraries'…

  4. Applying Critical Consciousness and Evidence-Based Practice Decision-Making: A Framework for Clinical Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Social work education is increasingly driven by the established movement of evidence-based practice (EBP) that drives the delivery of mental health care with the promise of providing treatments that work and greater efficiency. This emphasis on EBP coexists with the profession's expressed commitment to social justice. Social work literature rarely…

  5. Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health Care to Ethnic Minority Communities: Has Its Practice Fallen Short of Its Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aisenberg, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) has contributed substantially to the advancement of knowledge in the treatment and prevention of adult mental health disorders. A fundamental assumption, based on documented evidence of effectiveness with certain populations, is that EBP is equally effective and applicable to all populations. However, small sample…

  6. Randomised trials in context: practical problems and social aspects of evidence-based medicine and policy.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Warren; Raman, Sujatha; Turner, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Randomised trials can provide excellent evidence of treatment benefit in medicine. Over the last 50 years, they have been cemented in the regulatory requirements for the approval of new treatments. Randomised trials make up a large and seemingly high-quality proportion of the medical evidence-base. However, it has also been acknowledged that a distorted evidence-base places a severe limitation on the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). We describe four important ways in which the evidence from randomised trials is limited or partial: the problem of applying results, the problem of bias in the conduct of randomised trials, the problem of conducting the wrong trials and the problem of conducting the right trials the wrong way. These problems are not intrinsic to the method of randomised trials or the EBM philosophy of evidence; nevertheless, they are genuine problems that undermine the evidence that randomised trials provide for decision-making and therefore undermine EBM in practice. Finally, we discuss the social dimensions of these problems and how they highlight the indispensable role of judgement when generating and using evidence for medicine. This is the paradox of randomised trial evidence: the trials open up expert judgment to scrutiny, but this scrutiny in turn requires further expertise. PMID:26341114

  7. Randomised trials in context: practical problems and social aspects of evidence-based medicine and policy.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Warren; Raman, Sujatha; Turner, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Randomised trials can provide excellent evidence of treatment benefit in medicine. Over the last 50 years, they have been cemented in the regulatory requirements for the approval of new treatments. Randomised trials make up a large and seemingly high-quality proportion of the medical evidence-base. However, it has also been acknowledged that a distorted evidence-base places a severe limitation on the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). We describe four important ways in which the evidence from randomised trials is limited or partial: the problem of applying results, the problem of bias in the conduct of randomised trials, the problem of conducting the wrong trials and the problem of conducting the right trials the wrong way. These problems are not intrinsic to the method of randomised trials or the EBM philosophy of evidence; nevertheless, they are genuine problems that undermine the evidence that randomised trials provide for decision-making and therefore undermine EBM in practice. Finally, we discuss the social dimensions of these problems and how they highlight the indispensable role of judgement when generating and using evidence for medicine. This is the paradox of randomised trial evidence: the trials open up expert judgment to scrutiny, but this scrutiny in turn requires further expertise.

  8. Evidence-Based Practices in Addiction Treatment: Review and Recommendations for Public Policy

    PubMed Central

    Glasner-Edwards, Suzette; Rawson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The movement in recent years towards evidence-based practice (EBP) in health care systems and policy has permeated the substance abuse treatment system, leading to a growing number of federal and statewide initiatives to mandate EBP implementation. Nevertheless, due to a lack of consensus in the addiction field regarding procedures or criteria to identify EBPs, the optimal processes for disseminating empirically based interventions into real-world clinical settings have not been identified. Although working lists of interventions considered to be evidence-based have been developed by a number of constituencies advocating for EBP dissemination in addiction treatment settings, the use of EBP lists to form policy-driven mandates has been controversial. This article examines the concept of EBP, critically reviews criteria used to evaluate the evidence basis of interventions, and highlights the manner in which such criteria have been applied in the addictions field. Controversies regarding EBP implementation policies and practices in addiction treatment are described, and suggestions are made to shift the focus of dissemination efforts from manualized psychosocial interventions to specific skill sets that are broadly applicable and easily learned by clinicians. Organizational and workforce barriers to EBP implementation are delineated, with corresponding recommendations to facilitate successful dissemination of evidence-based skills. PMID:20557970

  9. Causal knowledge in evidence-based medicine. In reply to Kerry et al.'s causation and evidence-based practice: an ontological review.

    PubMed

    Strand, Anders; Parkkinen, Veli-Pekka

    2014-12-01

    In Causation and evidence-based practice: an ontological review, Kerry et al. argue that evidence-based practice (EBP) should revise its understanding of causation, and take on board a dispositionalist ontology. We point out that the challenges from complexity discussed by Kerry et al., are not properly addressed by their proposed ontology. Rather, the difference making views of causation Kerry et al. criticize, spell out the relevant aspects of causation, and have a range of advantages compared to dispositionalist accounts. We explore some of these here, with a special focus on the role of causal assumptions in inferences from scientific evidence to clinical decisions. A philosophical account should help us explicate the assumptions that go into causal inference in EBM. In doing so, it enables an understanding of the various ways in which these assumptions might fail, and of how they can be justified.

  10. Teaching evidence-based clinical practice to neurology and neurosurgery residents.

    PubMed

    Burneo, J G; Jenkins, M E

    2007-06-01

    The primary objective of education in evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) is to provide a resident or student with the requisite skills to satisfactorily solve real everyday clinical problems throughout their careers and to translate those solutions into better care for patients. At the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada, there is a well-developed and highly successful evidence-based neurology curriculum primarily aimed at residents. This article summarizes the current context of EBCP postgraduate training in the neurological sciences and a detailed description of its purpose, learning outcomes, required resources, content, teaching strategies, and assessment tools. In this program, we teach the principles of EBCP through the review of pertinent neurological clinical questions. The summary of each topic is recorded on our website in the form of critically appraised topics (CATs) in electronically accessible CAT banks. PMID:17418941

  11. Assessing the Effectiveness of an Evidence-based Practice Pharmacology Course Using the Fresno Test

    PubMed Central

    Lahoz, Monina R.; Bond, Irena; Levin, Len

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the effectiveness of an evidence-based practice (EBP) pharmacology elective course to teach EBP skills using the Fresno Test (FT). Methods. Pharmacy faculty members and medical librarians developed the elective course and offered it to two cohorts of doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students. A pre/post intervention study design was used. Seven of 12 FT items were chosen to measure specific EBP skills: Ask, Access, Appraise and Apply. Pre/postcomposite and FT item mean scores were compared using Student’s t test with p<0.05 set as significant a priori. Results. Composite FT mean scores increased significantly for both cohorts. Mean scores for both cohorts increased significantly in four of the seven FT items but on different FT items. Conclusion. As a profession that commonly uses evidence-based guidelines, developing and integrating an EBP course in the PharmD curriculum is worth considering. PMID:27756931

  12. The use and limitation of realistic evaluation as a tool for evidence-based practice: a critical realist perspective.

    PubMed

    Porter, Sam; O'Halloran, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The use and limitation of realistic evaluation as a tool for evidence-based practice: a critical realist perspective In this paper, we assess realistic evaluation's articulation with evidence-based practice (EBP) from the perspective of critical realism. We argue that the adoption by realistic evaluation of a realist causal ontology means that it is better placed to explain complex healthcare interventions than the traditional method used by EBP, the randomized controlled trial (RCT). However, we do not conclude from this that the use of RCTs is without merit, arguing that it is possible to use both methods in combination under the rubric of realist theory. More negatively, we contend that the rejection of critical theory and utopianism by realistic evaluation in favour of the pragmatism of piecemeal social engineering means that it is vulnerable to accusations that it promotes technocratic interpretations of human problems. We conclude that, insofar as realistic evaluation adheres to the ontology of critical realism, it provides a sound contribution to EBP, but insofar as it rejects the critical turn of Bhaskar's realism, it replicates the technocratic tendencies inherent in EBP. PMID:22212367

  13. The use and limitation of realistic evaluation as a tool for evidence-based practice: a critical realist perspective.

    PubMed

    Porter, Sam; O'Halloran, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The use and limitation of realistic evaluation as a tool for evidence-based practice: a critical realist perspective In this paper, we assess realistic evaluation's articulation with evidence-based practice (EBP) from the perspective of critical realism. We argue that the adoption by realistic evaluation of a realist causal ontology means that it is better placed to explain complex healthcare interventions than the traditional method used by EBP, the randomized controlled trial (RCT). However, we do not conclude from this that the use of RCTs is without merit, arguing that it is possible to use both methods in combination under the rubric of realist theory. More negatively, we contend that the rejection of critical theory and utopianism by realistic evaluation in favour of the pragmatism of piecemeal social engineering means that it is vulnerable to accusations that it promotes technocratic interpretations of human problems. We conclude that, insofar as realistic evaluation adheres to the ontology of critical realism, it provides a sound contribution to EBP, but insofar as it rejects the critical turn of Bhaskar's realism, it replicates the technocratic tendencies inherent in EBP.

  14. Radiologists’ perspectives about evidence-based medicine and their clinical practice: a semistructured interview study

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Allison; Mahady, Suzanne E; Craig, Jonathan C; Lau, Gabes; Peduto, Anthony J; Loy, Clement

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe radiologist's attitudes and perspectives on evidence-based medicine (EBM) and their practice. Design Face-to-face semistructured interviews, thematic analysis. Setting 24 institutions across six Australian states and New Zealand. Transcripts were imported into HyperRESEARCH software and thematically analysed. Participants 25 radiologists. Results Six themes were identified: legitimising decisions (validated justification, prioritising patient preferences, reinforcing protocols), optimising outcomes (ensuring patient safety, maximising efficiency), availability of access (requiring immediacy, inadequacy of evidence, time constraints, proximity of peer networks, grasping information dispersion), over-riding pragmatism (perceptibly applicability, preserving the art of medicine, technical demands), limited confidence (conceptual obscurity, reputation-based trust, demands constant practice, suspicion and cynicism), and competing powers (hierarchical conflict, prevailing commercial interests). Conclusions Radiologists believe EBM can support clinical decision-making for optimal patient outcomes and service efficiency but feel limited in their capacities to assimilate and apply EBM in practice. Improving access to evidence, providing ongoing education and training supplemented with practical tools for appraising evidence; and developing evidence-based guidelines and protocols may enhance feasibility and promote the confidence and skills among radiologists in applying EBM in radiology practice for better patient care. PMID:25500161

  15. The stages of implementation completion for evidence-based practice: protocol for a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This protocol describes the ‘development of outcome measures and suitable methodologies for dissemination and implementation approaches,’ a priority for implementation research. Although many evidence-based practices (EBPs) have been developed, large knowledge gaps remain regarding how to routinely move EBPs into usual care. The lack of understanding of ‘what it takes’ to install EBPs has costly public health consequences, including a lack of availability of the most beneficial services, wasted efforts and resources on failed implementation attempts, and the potential for engendering reluctance to try implementing new EBPs after failed attempts. The Stages of Implementation Completion (SIC) is an eight-stage tool of implementation process and milestones, with stages spanning three implementation phases (pre-implementation, implementation, sustainability). Items delineate the date that a site completes implementation activities, yielding an assessment of duration (time to complete a stage), proportion (of stage activities completed), and a general measure of how far a site moved in the implementation process. Methods/Design We propose to extend the SIC to EBPs operating in child service sectors (juvenile justice, schools, substance use, child welfare). Both successful and failed implementation attempts will be scrutinized using a mixed methods design. Stage costs will be measured and examined. Both retrospective data (from previous site implementation efforts) and prospective data (from newly adopting sites) will be analyzed. The influence of pre-implementation on implementation and sustainability outcomes will be examined (Aim 1). Mixed methods procedures will focus on increasing understanding of the process of implementation failure in an effort to determine if the SIC can provide early detection of sites that are unlikely to succeed (Aim 2). Study activities will include cost mapping of SIC stages and an examination of the relationship between

  16. Improving the implementation of evidence-based practice: a knowledge management perspective.

    PubMed

    Sandars, John; Heller, Richard

    2006-06-01

    Experience of knowledge management initiatives in non-health care organizations can offer useful insights, and strategies, to implement evidence-based practice in health care. Knowledge management offers a structured process for the generation, storage, distribution and application of knowledge in organizations. This includes both tacit knowledge (personal experience) and explicit knowledge (evidence). Communities of practice are a key component of knowledge management and have been recognized to be essential for the implementation of change in organizations. It is within communities of practice that tacit knowledge is actively integrated with explicit knowledge. Organizational factors that limit the development of knowledge management, including communities of practice, in non-health care organizations need to be overcome if the potential is to be achieved within health care.

  17. An information technology infrastructure to enable evidence-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Pochciol, Joan M; Warren, Joan I

    2009-01-01

    The movement toward evidence-based practice (EBP) poses new organizational challenges to provide the necessary infrastructure to promote effective nursing interventions based on the best available evidence. The purpose of this article is to describe a collaborative effort between nursing and library services to provide readily accessible information at the bedside to support nurses using the best available evidence. In collaboration with nursing, the Health Services Librarian created an information resource titled "Research-based Nursing Practice: Finding the Evidence," which enables nursing staff to access the resources at the bedside without having to perform lengthy searches. Every known resource that will educate nurses in defining EBP to providing them with the links to Web sites, published articles, and all the information resources is included in the tool. Much has been written about building the organizational infrastructure to promote EBP and finding the filtered, synthesized research evidence, but to our knowledge, little has been published on building the information technology infrastructure, which will give nurses real-time access at the point-of-care to the research evidence. The research-based nursing practice system is helping bridge the gap between evidence-based resources and practice by compiling the literature in one place and making it easily and readily accessible.

  18. Group Supervision Attitudes: Supervisory Practices Fostering Resistance to Adoption of Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Charles T.; Patterson, David A.; McKiernan, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was to qualitatively evaluate worker's attitudes about clinical supervision. It is believed that poor attitudes toward clinical supervision can create barriers during supervision sessions. Fifty-one participants within a social services organization completed an open-ended questionnaire regarding their clinical supervision…

  19. Training Therapists in Evidence-Based Practice: A Critical Review of Studies From a Systems-Contextual Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP), a preferred psychological treatment approach, requires training of community providers. The systems-contextual (SC) perspective, a model for dissemination and implementation efforts, underscores the importance of the therapist, client, and organizational variables that influence training and consequent therapist uptake and adoption of EBP. This review critiques the extant research on training in EBP from an SC perspective. Findings suggest that therapist knowledge improves and attitudinal change occurs following training. However, change in therapist behaviors (e.g., adherence, competence, and skill) and client outcomes only occurs when training interventions address each level of the SC model and include active learning. Limitations as well as areas for future research are discussed. PMID:20877441

  20. [Acute pancreatitis. Evidence-based practice guidelines, prepared by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    PubMed

    Hritz, István; Czakó, László; Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Kelemen, Dezső; Lásztity, Natália; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Párniczky, Andrea; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Szücs, Ákos; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Hegyi, Péter

    2015-02-15

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract associated with significant morbidity and mortality that requires up-to-date and evidence based treatment guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare evidence based guideline for the medical and surgical management of acute pancreatitis based on the available international guidelines and evidence. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and, if it was necessary, complemented and/or modified the international guidelines. All together 42 relevant clinical questions were defined in 11 topics (Diagnosis and etiology, Prognosis, Imaging, Fluid therapy, Intensive care management, Prevention of infectious complications, Nutrition, Biliary interventions, Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography pancreatitis, Indication, timing and strategy for intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, Timing of cholecystectomy [or endoscopic sphincterotomy]). Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate® grading system. The draft of the guideline was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. 25 clinical questions with almost total (more than 95%) and 17 clinical questions with strong (more than 70%) agreement were accepted. The present guideline is the first evidence based acute pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The guideline may provide important help for tuition, everyday practice and for establishment of proper finance of acute pancreatitis. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become as basic reference in Hungary.

  1. The Practice of Adoption: History, Trends, and Social Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamostny, Kathy P.; O'Brien, Karen M.; Baden, Amanda L.; Wiley, Mary O'Leary

    2003-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the practice of adoption to counseling psychologists to promote clinical understanding of the adoption experience and to stimulate research on adoption. The article includes definitions of adoption terminology, important historical and legal developments for adoption, a summary of adoption statistics,…

  2. Part II. Empowering grassroots evidence-based practice: a curricular model to foster undergraduate student-enabled practice change.

    PubMed

    Moch, Susan D; Cronje, Ruth J

    2010-01-01

    This article presents evidence collected over the past 15 years that attests to the success of curricular innovations conducted to foster socially meaningful contact between nursing students and practicing nurses as a means to promote evidence-based practice (EBP). Action research data collected as these pedagogical strategies have evolved suggest that such student-staff partnerships offer promise not only to encourage commitment to EBP among nursing students but also to surmount most of the barriers that prevent the widespread diffusion of EBP among practicing nurses in clinical settings. Based upon our successful experiences with student-staff interactions, we propose a curricular model-the Student-Enabled Practice Change model-that suffuses the undergraduate nursing school curriculum with opportunities for nursing students to form meaningful partnerships with practicing nurses. The Student-Enabled Practice Change Curricular Model relocates the power to drive practice change to the grassroots level of students and practicing nurses. PMID:20129588

  3. Part II. Empowering grassroots evidence-based practice: a curricular model to foster undergraduate student-enabled practice change.

    PubMed

    Moch, Susan D; Cronje, Ruth J

    2010-01-01

    This article presents evidence collected over the past 15 years that attests to the success of curricular innovations conducted to foster socially meaningful contact between nursing students and practicing nurses as a means to promote evidence-based practice (EBP). Action research data collected as these pedagogical strategies have evolved suggest that such student-staff partnerships offer promise not only to encourage commitment to EBP among nursing students but also to surmount most of the barriers that prevent the widespread diffusion of EBP among practicing nurses in clinical settings. Based upon our successful experiences with student-staff interactions, we propose a curricular model-the Student-Enabled Practice Change model-that suffuses the undergraduate nursing school curriculum with opportunities for nursing students to form meaningful partnerships with practicing nurses. The Student-Enabled Practice Change Curricular Model relocates the power to drive practice change to the grassroots level of students and practicing nurses.

  4. Partnering to Promote Evidence-Based Practice in a Community Hospital: Implications for Nursing Professional Development Specialists.

    PubMed

    Highfield, Martha E F; Collier, Andrea; Collins, Mara; Crowley, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Nursing professional development specialists working in community hospitals face significant barriers to evidence-based practice that academic medical centers do not. This article describes 7 years of a multifaceted, service academic partnership in a large, urban, community hospital. The partnership has strengthened the nursing professional development role in promoting evidence-based practice across the scope of practice and serves as a model for others. PMID:27187827

  5. [Development and Quality Evaluation of Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines of Chinese Medicine].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yue-rong; Chen, Ke-ji

    2016-01-01

    More attentions have been paid to the development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (ECPGs) of Chinese medicine (CM). International guideline evaluation instruments such as Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE I) has been gradually applied in ECPGs quality evaluation of CM. Nowadays, there are some certain methodological defects in partial ECPGs of Chinese medicine, with relatively low applicability and slowly update. It is suggested to establish technical specifications of CM-ECPGs in accordance with the characteristics of CM and international general specification, strengthen the quality evaluation of CM-ECPGs, attach great importance to the regularly update as well as popularization and application of CM-ECPGs.

  6. Analgesic Techniques in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: From the Daily Practice to Evidence-Based Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anastase, Denisa Madalina; Cionac Florescu, Simona; Munteanu, Ana Maria; Ursu, Traian; Stoica, Cristian Ioan

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are major orthopedic surgery models, addressing mainly ageing populations with multiple comorbidities and treatments, ASA II–IV, which may complicate the perioperative period. Therefore effective management of postoperative pain should allow rapid mobilization of the patient with shortening of hospitalization and social reintegration. In our review we propose an evaluation of the main analgesics models used today in the postoperative period. Their comparative analysis shows the benefits and side effects of each of these methods and guides us to how to use evidence-based medicine in our daily practice. PMID:25484894

  7. [Online information service: the library support for evidence-based practice].

    PubMed

    Markulin, Helena; Petrak, Jelka

    2014-01-01

    It frequently happens that physicians do not have adequate skills or enough time for searching and evaluating evidence needed in their everyday practice. Medical librarian can serve as a mediator in enabling physicians to utilize the potential offered by contemporary evidence-based medicine. The Central Medical Library (CML) at University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, designed a web-based information service aimed at the promotion of evidence-based practice in the Croatian medical community. The users can ask for a help in finding information on their clinical problems. A responsible librarian will analyse the problem, search information resources and evaluate the evidence. The answer is returned to the user by an e-mail. In the 2008-2012 period 166 questions from 12 clinical fields were received and most of them (36.1%) came from internal medicine doctors. The share of treatment-related questions was 70.5%. In the setting of underdeveloped ICT infrastructure and inadequate EBM resources availability, such information service can help in transfer of scientific evidence into the everyday clinical practice. PMID:24720156

  8. [Online information service: the library support for evidence-based practice].

    PubMed

    Markulin, Helena; Petrak, Jelka

    2014-01-01

    It frequently happens that physicians do not have adequate skills or enough time for searching and evaluating evidence needed in their everyday practice. Medical librarian can serve as a mediator in enabling physicians to utilize the potential offered by contemporary evidence-based medicine. The Central Medical Library (CML) at University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, designed a web-based information service aimed at the promotion of evidence-based practice in the Croatian medical community. The users can ask for a help in finding information on their clinical problems. A responsible librarian will analyse the problem, search information resources and evaluate the evidence. The answer is returned to the user by an e-mail. In the 2008-2012 period 166 questions from 12 clinical fields were received and most of them (36.1%) came from internal medicine doctors. The share of treatment-related questions was 70.5%. In the setting of underdeveloped ICT infrastructure and inadequate EBM resources availability, such information service can help in transfer of scientific evidence into the everyday clinical practice.

  9. Professional nursing societies and evidence-based practice: strategies to cross the quality chasm.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Gail A

    2010-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) published Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health Care System for the 21st Century nearly 10 years ago. Nursing societies are in a unique position to promote evidence-based practice (EBP). The purpose of this article is to describe EBP strategies that nursing societies can use to improve the quality of health care, thus decreasing the gap between research knowledge and practice. Nursing societies can take the lead in two key EBP activities: (1) development of evidence-based syntheses, systematic reviews, and guidelines for EBP; and (2) development, implementation, and testing strategies for these EBP resources to become available and used in clinical decision-making. The Oncology Nursing Society will be discussed as an exemplar of developing EBP programs and increasing knowledge of EBP and practice change resources for its members. The discussion stresses the importance of nursing society members and leaders in guiding their societies to contribute to the closing of the US health care quality chasm.

  10. Concluding the Series on Evidence-Based Practice: The Spread of Excellence in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The child and adolescent psychiatry community has been using large systems of information and new technologies to improve its performance.Evidence-based approach is used by practitioners to find and implement feasible therapies and medication. The different procedures involved of evidence-based practice, as used in child and adolescent psychology,…

  11. A Squandered Opportunity?: A Review of SAMHSA's National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices for Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Benjamin J.; Zhang, Sheldon X.; Farabee, David

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, the push for evidence-based programs has taken on unprecedented prominence in the fields of substance abuse and correctional treatment as a key determinant for intervention funding. The National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP), managed and funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services…

  12. Evidence-based strategies for teaching dysrhythmia monitoring practices to staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Susan Jane

    2011-07-01

    Standards for dysrhythmia monitoring were established by the American Heart Association in 2004, but they have not been fully implemented in everyday nursing practice. Nurses working on units with cardiac monitoring must be able to prepare the skin and place electrodes correctly, monitor in the appropriate lead, and identify potentially lethal dysrhythmias. This article presents a literature review of evidence-based strategies for educating staff nurses on dysrhythmia monitoring practices. Based on the findings of this literature review, there is evidence to support the use of an interactive web-based learning format combined with unit-based collaborative activities and competency validation. The program should incorporate Chickering and Gamson's seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. More research is needed with randomized controlled studies to determine the most effective strategies.

  13. Interdisciplinary evidence-based practice and the electronic health record: from theory to reality.

    PubMed

    Troseth, Michelle

    2008-11-06

    This session will share the vision of a growing international healthcare consortium that has created collaborative approaches in creating a common clinical practice framework that supports practice interoperability that is critical to healthcare technology and patient and clinician safety. The framework is grounded in integrated scopes of practice and a wealth of evidence-based clinical tools and resources to support learning and work environments that are intentionally designed to keep both clinicians and patients safe. Through partnerships with healthcare technology companies, the framework is now live in over 30 acute care Electronic Health Record's (EHR) and being used by thousands of interdisciplinary clinicians everyday to enhance the delivery of safe, quality care and maintain a healthy culture.

  14. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES) is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. TIDES social marketing approach The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Results Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Discussion and conclusion Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems. PMID:19785754

  15. Development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs): comparing approaches

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Tari; Misso, Marie; Harris, Claire; Green, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Background While the potential of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to support implementation of evidence has been demonstrated, it is not currently being achieved. CPGs are both poorly developed and ineffectively implemented. To improve clinical practice and health outcomes, both well-developed CPGs and effective methods of CPG implementation are needed. We sought to establish whether there is agreement on the fundamental characteristics of an evidence-based CPG development process and to explore whether the level of guidance provided in CPG development handbooks is sufficient for people using these handbooks to be able to apply it. Methods CPG development handbooks were identified through a broad search of published and grey literature. Documents published in English produced by national or international organisations purporting to support development of evidence-based CPGs were included. A list of 14 key elements of a CPG development process was developed. Two authors read each handbook. For each handbook a judgement was made as to how it addressed each element; assigned as: 'mentioned and clear guidance provided', 'mentioned but limited practical detail provided ', or 'not mentioned'. Results Six CPG development handbooks were included. These were produced by the Council of Europe, the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK, the New Zealand Guidelines Group, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network, and the World Health Organization (WHO). There was strong concordance between the handbooks on the key elements of an evidence-based CPG development process. All six of the handbooks require and provide guidance on establishment of a multidisciplinary guideline development group, involvement of consumers, identification of clinical questions or problems, systematic searches for and appraisal of research evidence, a process for drafting recommendations, consultation with

  16. Linking research to practice: the rise of evidence-based health sciences librarianship*

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Joanne Gard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The lecture explores the origins of evidence-based practice (EBP) in health sciences librarianship beginning with examples from the work of Janet Doe and past Doe lecturers. Additional sources of evidence are used to document the rise of research and EBP as integral components of our professional work. Methods: Four sources of evidence are used to examine the rise of EBP: (1) a publication by Doe and research-related content in past Doe lectures, (2) research-related word usage in articles in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association between 1961 and 2010, (3) Medical Library Association activities, and (4) EBP as an international movement. Results: These sources of evidence confirm the rise of EBP in health sciences librarianship. International initiatives sparked the rise of evidence-based librarianship and continue to characterize the movement. This review shows the emergence of a unique form of EBP that, although inspired by evidence-based medicine (EBM), has developed its own view of evidence and its application in library and information practice. Implications: Health sciences librarians have played a key role in initiating, nurturing, and spreading EBP in other branches of our profession. Our close association with EBM set the stage for developing our own EBP. While we relied on EBM as a model for our early efforts, we can observe the continuing evolution of our own unique approach to using, creating, and applying evidence from a variety of sources to improve the quality of health information services. PMID:24415915

  17. Using the internet to translate an evidence-based lifestyle intervention into practice.

    PubMed

    McTigue, Kathleen M; Conroy, Molly B; Hess, Rachel; Bryce, Cindy L; Fiorillo, Anthony B; Fischer, Gary S; Milas, N Carole; Simkin-Silverman, Laurey R

    2009-11-01

    Despite evidence-based recommendations for addressing obesity in the clinical setting, lifestyle interventions are lacking in practice. The objective of this study was to translate an evidence-based lifestyle program into the clinical setting by adapting it for delivery via the Internet. We adapted the Diabetes Prevention Program's lifestyle curriculum to an online format, comprising 16 weekly and 8 monthly lessons, and conducted a before-and-after pilot study of program implementation and feasibility. The program incorporates behavioral tools such as e-mail prompts for online self-monitoring of diet, physical activity, and weight, and automated weekly progress reports. Electronic counseling provides further support. Physician referral, automated progress reports, and as-needed communication with lifestyle coaches integrate the intervention with clinical care. We enrolled 50 patients from a large academic general internal practice into a pilot program between November 16, 2006 and February 11, 2007. Patients with a body mass index (BMI) =25 kg/m2, at least one weight-related cardiovascular risk factor, and Internet access were eligible if referring physicians felt the lifestyle goals were safe and medically appropriate. Participants were primarily female (76%), with an average age of 51.94 (standard deviation [SD] 10.82), and BMI of 36.43 (SD 6.78). At 12 months of enrollment, 50% of participants had logged in within 30 days. On average, completers (n = 45) lost 4.79 (SD 8.55) kg. Systolic blood pressure dropped 7.33 (SD 11.36) mm Hg, and diastolic blood pressure changed minimally (+0.44 mm Hg; SD 9.27). An Internet-based lifestyle intervention may overcome significant barriers to preventive counseling and facilitate the incorporation of evidence-based lifestyle interventions into primary care.

  18. Making psychological theory useful for implementing evidence based practice: a consensus approach

    PubMed Central

    Michie, S; Johnston, M; Abraham, C; Lawton, R; Parker, D; Walker, A; on, b

    2005-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based guidelines are often not implemented effectively with the result that best health outcomes are not achieved. This may be due to a lack of theoretical understanding of the processes involved in changing the behaviour of healthcare professionals. This paper reports the development of a consensus on a theoretical framework that could be used in implementation research. The objectives were to identify an agreed set of key theoretical constructs for use in (1) studying the implementation of evidence based practice and (2) developing strategies for effective implementation, and to communicate these constructs to an interdisciplinary audience. Methods: Six phases of work were conducted to develop a consensus: (1) identifying theoretical constructs; (2) simplifying into construct domains; (3) evaluating the importance of the construct domains; (4) interdisciplinary evaluation; (5) validating the domain list; and (6) piloting interview questions. The contributors were a "psychological theory" group (n = 18), a "health services research" group (n = 13), and a "health psychology" group (n = 30). Results: Twelve domains were identified to explain behaviour change: (1) knowledge, (2) skills, (3) social/professional role and identity, (4) beliefs about capabilities, (5) beliefs about consequences, (6) motivation and goals, (7) memory, attention and decision processes, (8) environmental context and resources, (9) social influences, (10) emotion regulation, (11) behavioural regulation, and (12) nature of the behaviour. Conclusions: A set of behaviour change domains agreed by a consensus of experts is available for use in implementation research. Applications of this domain list will enhance understanding of the behaviour change processes inherent in implementation of evidence-based practice and will also test the validity of these proposed domains. PMID:15692000

  19. The role of intact family childhood on women's earnings capacity: implications for evidence-based practices.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Richard K; Mason, Susan E

    2009-07-01

    This article examines the complexities of working with an evidence-based model to design intervention strategies benefiting individuals and families. It addresses the question, to what extent should the evidence of economic advantage for female children raised in two-parent families influence social work support for practices and policies that encourage marriage? The article reviews current research findings indicating benefits of two-parent families on children's well-being and contemporary policy prescriptions promoting marriage. It presents findings of the authors' study which considers the effects of being raised in an intact family on the economic future of young women. The evidence presented in the literature and found in our own study suggests that promotion of marriage may be a sound intervention strategy for parents interested in the economic advantages for their children later in life. For others, it may be the wrong choice based on women's personal circumstances. The association between early family structure and future well-being is further complicated by large gaps in the data on cultural and family diversity. Suggestions for social work practice are based on the synthesis of the evidence-based model and the values of the profession. PMID:20183676

  20. National Cancer Institute Biospecimen Evidence-Based Practices: a novel approach to pre-analytical standardization.

    PubMed

    Engel, Kelly B; Vaught, Jim; Moore, Helen M

    2014-04-01

    Variable biospecimen collection, processing, and storage practices may introduce variability in biospecimen quality and analytical results. This risk can be minimized within a facility through the use of standardized procedures; however, analysis of biospecimens from different facilities may be confounded by differences in procedures and inferred biospecimen quality. Thus, a global approach to standardization of biospecimen handling procedures and their validation is needed. Here we present the first in a series of procedural guidelines that were developed and annotated with published findings in the field of human biospecimen science. The series of documents will be known as NCI Biospecimen Evidence-Based Practices, or BEBPs. Pertinent literature was identified via the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Biospecimen Research Database ( brd.nci.nih.gov ) and findings were organized by specific biospecimen pre-analytical factors and analytes of interest (DNA, RNA, protein, morphology). Meta-analysis results were presented as annotated summaries, which highlight concordant and discordant findings and the threshold and magnitude of effects when applicable. The detailed and adaptable format of the document is intended to support the development and execution of evidence-based standard operating procedures (SOPs) for human biospecimen collection, processing, and storage operations.

  1. Towards a geology of evidence-based practice--a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Gary; Gardner, Lyn

    2006-09-01

    We begin this paper with a consideration of the significance of a historical perspective in presentations of evidence-based practice in the nursing and medical literature. We suggest that whereas writers often produce coherent historical narratives as justification for particular views of the nature of EBP, an examination of its origins reveals no such signs of historical development or progress in our conception or understanding of it. We then explore alternative modes of thought for attempting to understand and critique the variety of definitions and descriptions of EBP to be found in the literature. We eventually reject the linear mode of historical thinking in favour of Deleuze's notion of rhizomatic thought and the metaphor of geology. Finally, we employ the rhizomatic mode of thinking and writing to construct a geology of evidence-based practice which attempts to expose and embrace contradictions in definitions and uses of the term rather than discount them in an authorised historical narrative written from the perspective of the dominant discourse.

  2. Learn, see, practice, prove, do, maintain: an evidence-based pedagogical framework for procedural skill training in medicine.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Taylor; White, Marjorie; Zaveri, Pavan; Chang, Todd; Ades, Anne; French, Heather; Anderson, JoDee; Auerbach, Marc; Johnston, Lindsay; Kessler, David

    2015-08-01

    Acquisition of competency in procedural skills is a fundamental goal of medical training. In this Perspective, the authors propose an evidence-based pedagogical framework for procedural skill training. The framework was developed based on a review of the literature using a critical synthesis approach and builds on earlier models of procedural skill training in medicine. The authors begin by describing the fundamentals of procedural skill development. Then, a six-step pedagogical framework for procedural skills training is presented: Learn, See, Practice, Prove, Do, and Maintain. In this framework, procedural skill training begins with the learner acquiring requisite cognitive knowledge through didactic education (Learn) and observation of the procedure (See). The learner then progresses to the stage of psychomotor skill acquisition and is allowed to deliberately practice the procedure on a simulator (Practice). Simulation-based mastery learning is employed to allow the trainee to prove competency prior to performing the procedure on a patient (Prove). Once competency is demonstrated on a simulator, the trainee is allowed to perform the procedure on patients with direct supervision, until he or she can be entrusted to perform the procedure independently (Do). Maintenance of the skill is ensured through continued clinical practice, supplemented by simulation-based training as needed (Maintain). Evidence in support of each component of the framework is presented. Implementation of the proposed framework presents a paradigm shift in procedural skill training. However, the authors believe that adoption of the framework will improve procedural skill training and patient safety.

  3. Study on the methodology of developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines of Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng-guang; Luo, Hui; Xu, Shan; Yang, Yan; Wang, Shou-chuan

    2015-11-01

    At present, evidence-based clinical practice guideline (EBCPG) is the main mode of developing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in the world, but in China, most of CPGs of Chinese medicine (CM) are still guidelines based on expert consensus. The objective of this study is to construct initially the methodology of developing EBCPGs of CM and to promote the development of standardization of CM. Based on the development of "Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Common Pediatric Diseases in CM", the methodology of developing EBCPG of CM was explored by analyzing the pertinent literature and considering the characteristics of CM. In this study, the key problem was to put forward the suggestion and strategies. However, due to the methodology study of developing EBCPG of CM is still in the initial stage, there are still some problems which need further study.

  4. The role of relationships in connecting social work research and evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Jones, Johnny M; Sherr, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Critics of evidence-based practice (EBP) often challenge the efficacy of applying social work research in practice. Such skepticism underscores the historic chasm that still exists between social work researchers and practitioners. If taught and implemented consistently, the EBP model can mend the connection between researchers and practitioners by merging their roles. Merging their roles, however, requires a renewed emphasis on relationships in the research process. This article explores the role of relationships in social work research. Using a researcher/practitioner continuum, we assess the types of interactions faculty have with stakeholders. We then offer strategies for cultivating relationships with stakeholders that lead to community-derived and implemented research that is critical to advancing the widespread use of EBP in social work.

  5. Use of evidence-based assessment for childhood anxiety disorders in community practice.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Stephen P H; Sattler, Adam F; Hathaway, Julie; Douglas, Kristin Vickers

    2016-04-01

    High-quality assessment is essential to the delivery of effective treatment for childhood anxiety disorders. However, relatively little is known about how frequently child clinicians utilize evidence-based assessment (EBA) techniques in practice, and even less is known about the factors that influence EBA use in such settings. Thus, the current study presents data from a survey of 339 clinicians from a variety of professional backgrounds concerning their use of EBA for childhood anxiety disorders and explores issues preventing EBA implementation. Results indicated infrequent EBA use with clinicians citing practical barriers (i.e., time, access, knowledge, cost) and negative beliefs about EBA techniques (i.e., unhelpful) as issues preventing implementation. Implications for future EBA dissemination and implementation efforts are discussed. PMID:26962996

  6. Evidence-based preventive practice guidelines. Qualitative study of useful resources on the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Feightner, J. W.; Marshall, J. N.; Sangster, L. M.; Wathen, C. N.; Quintana, Y.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore family physicians' perspectives on how best to provide evidence-based preventive clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to physicians on the Internet. DESIGN: Focus groups. SETTING: A large, urban centre and a rural community hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-four of more than 150 family physicians who subscribed to an e-mail discussion group. METHOD: Qualitative survey of four focus groups, analysis of transcripts and researchers' notes. MAIN FINDINGS: Four themes characterized participants' preferences for disseminating preventive CPGs on the Internet: content expectations; quick, easy access to information; trustworthiness of information; and implications for clinical practice. CONCLUSION: Physicians want quick, easy access to trustworthy information. A website for preventive CPGs with these characteristics would be a useful resource. PMID:11561334

  7. Effects of Education Programs on Evidence-Based Practice Implementation for Clinical Nurses.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jae Youn; Jang, Keum Seong; Kim, Nam Young

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of an education program for evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation of clinical nursing. EBP knowledge/skill, attitude, and belief; information search ability; and EBP implementation were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Furthermore, the effect on implementation was maintained at week 4 and week 8, indicating that the education program practically promotes the EBP implementation of nurses. Results confirm that the education program for EBP implementation is critical and the continuous education program is an essential part of EBP implementation. Also, to promote EBP implementation and disseminate it to nursing organizations, an immediate concern should be the cultivation of mentors for EBP and fortification of the belief and ability regarding EBP implementation. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(8):363-371. PMID:27467312

  8. Tailored Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice for Patients with Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wensing, Michel; Huntink, Elke; van Lieshout, Jan; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Kowalczyk, Anna; Jäger, Cornelia; Steinhäuser, Jost; Aakhus, Eivind; Flottorp, Signe; Eccles, Martin; Baker, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background When designing interventions and policies to implement evidence based healthcare, tailoring strategies to the targeted individuals and organizations has been recommended. We aimed to gather insights into the ideas of a variety of people for implementing evidence-based practice for patients with chronic diseases, which were generated in five European countries. Methods A qualitative study in five countries (Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, United Kingdom) was done, involving overall 115 individuals. A purposeful sample of four categories of stakeholders (healthcare professionals, quality improvement officers, healthcare purchasers and authorities, and health researchers) was involved in group interviews in each of the countries to generate items for improving healthcare in different chronic conditions per country: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, depression in elderly people, multi-morbidity, obesity. A disease-specific standardized list of determinants of practice in these conditions provided the starting point for these groups. The content of the suggested items was categorized in a pre-defined framework of 7 domains and specific themes in the items were identified within each domain. Results The 115 individuals involved in the study generated 812 items, of which 586 addressed determinants of practice. These largely mapped onto three domains: individual health professional factors, patient factors, and professional interactions. Few items addressed guideline factors, incentives and resources, capacity of organizational change, or social, political and legal factors. The relative numbers of items in the different domains were largely similar across stakeholder categories within each of the countries. The analysis identified 29 specific themes in the suggested items across countries. Conclusion The type of suggestions for improving healthcare practice was largely similar across different stakeholder groups, mainly

  9. Scaling up Evidence-based Practices for Children and Families in New York State: Towards Evidence-based Policies on Implementation for State Mental Health Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Olin, S. Serene; Horwitz, Sarah; McKay, Mary; Cleek, Andrew; Gleacher, Alissa; Lewandowski, Eric; Nadeem, Erum; Acri, Mary; Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Kuppinger, Anne; Burton, Geraldine; Weiss, Dara; Frank, Samantha; Finnerty, Molly; Bradbury, Donna M.; Woodlock, Kristin M.; Hogan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination of innovations is widely considered the sine qua non for system improvement. At least two dozen states are rolling-out evidence-based mental health practices targeted at children and families using trainings, consultations, webinars, and learning collaboratives to improve quality and outcomes. In New York State (NYS) a group of researchers, policy-makers, providers and family support specialists have worked in partnership since 2002 to redesign and evaluate the children’s mental health system. Five system strategies driven by empirically-based practices and organized within a state-supported infrastructure have been used in the child and family service system with over 2,000 providers: (a) business practices; (b) use of health information technologies in quality improvement; (c) specific clinical interventions targeted at common childhood disorders; (d) parent activation; and (e) quality indicator development. The NYS system has provided a laboratory for naturalistic experiments. We describe these initiatives, key findings and challenges, lessons learned for scaling, and implications for creating evidence-based implementation policies in state systems. PMID:24460518

  10. Adoption of an Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Curriculum: A Case Study in a South Carolina School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Lauren M.; Flynn, Shannon; Kenison, Kelli; Prince, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Continued efforts are needed to reduce teenage pregnancy in the United States. Implementation of evidence-based curricula in schools is one strategy toward meeting this goal. In 2010, the South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (SC Campaign) received funding to implement a teen pregnancy prevention (TPP) curriculum. Congruent with South…

  11. Adoption of the Good Behaviour Game: An Evidence-Based Intervention for the Prevention of Behaviour Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkman, Marieke A. M.; Harting, Janneke; van der Wal, Marcel F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective: The Good Behaviour Game (GBG) has been shown to be effective in preventing childhood disruptive behaviours and their long-term unfavourable health-related outcomes. Like many other evidence-based preventive health programmes, however, its current use in Dutch primary schools is limited, and knowledge of the factors…

  12. Perceptions and Attitudes towards Evidence Based Practice among Nurses and Nursing Students in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Karki, S; Acharya, R; Budhwani, H; Shrestha, P; Chalise, P; Shrestha, U; Gautam, K; Wilson, L

    2015-01-01

    Background As the evidence based practice (EBP) movement expands, there is a need for health leaders and educators in each country to assess the extent to which health professional students and practitioners are prepared to locate, evaluate, and apply evidence to guide their practice. Objective The study objective was to explore nurses' and nursing students' perceptions and attitudes towards EBP. Method This was a descriptive cross-sectional survey administered to all 273 nurses and nursing students from Nepal who attended an EBP conference. The survey instrument that was used by Majid in Singapore was adapted for use in this study with permission from the author. Result In total, 121 nurses participated in the study. The majority (93%) of respondents reported that they had no previous training in EBP. The respondents' perceptions of their EBP knowledge and skills were variable, but most of them demonstrated positive attitudes toward EBP. Respondents identified a number of barriers that limit the implementation of EBP in Nepal. The greatest barriers were lack of time and resources, difficulty understanding research articles and translating the findings to practice, and limited autonomy to change practice based on evidence. Conclusion Although respondents had positive attitudes towards EBP, their knowledge and skills were limited and barriers to implementation existed. Nursing faculty can use the findings to guide implementation of EBP into curricula, and nursing administrators and clinicians can use the findings to guide practice to promote EBP. PMID:27423280

  13. Effectiveness of organisational infrastructures to promote evidence-based nursing practice

    PubMed Central

    Flodgren, Gerd; Rojas-Reyes, Maria Ximena; Cole, Nick; Foxcroft, David R

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses and midwives form the bulk of the clinical health workforce and play a central role in all health service delivery. There is potential to improve health care quality if nurses routinely use the best available evidence in their clinical practice. Since many of the factors perceived by nurses as barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) lie at the organisational level, it is of interest to devise and assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures designed to promote EBP among nurses. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures in promoting evidence-based nursing. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, BIREME, IBECS, NHS Economic Evaluations Database, Social Science Citation Index, Science Citation Index and Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes up to 9 March 2011. We developed a new search strategy for this update as the strategy published in 2003 omitted key terms. Additional search methods included: screening reference lists of relevant studies, contacting authors of relevant papers regarding any further published or unpublished work, and searching websites of selected research groups and organisations. Selection criteria We considered randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, interrupted times series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies of an entire or identified component of an organisational infrastructure intervention aimed at promoting EBP in nursing. The participants were all healthcare organisations comprising nurses, midwives and health visitors. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. For the ITS analysis, we reported the change in the slopes of the regression lines, and the change in the level effect of the outcome at 3

  14. A Drug Information Center Module to Train Pharmacy Students in Evidence-based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pereira de Lima David, Juceni; Noblat, Lúcia de Araujo Costa Beisl

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To use a drug information center training module to teach evidence-based medicine to pharmacy students and to assess their satisfaction with the experience. Design. During the 5-week module, students were taught how to develop information search strategies and to conduct critical analysis of scientific papers. The instructors developed activities based on past requests received by the university’s Drug Information Center. The complexity of the assignments increased throughout the module. Assessment. One hundred twenty-one students were trained between August 2009 and July 2010. Sixty-seven (55.4%) completed a voluntary assessment form at the completion of the 5-week module. Students’ feedback was positive, with 11 students suggesting that the module be integrated into the undergraduate curriculum. The most frequently (52.2%) mentioned area of dissatisfaction was with the performance of computers in the computer laboratory. Conclusions. The drug information center training module was an effective tool for teaching evidence-based medicine to pharmacy students. Additional research is needed to determine whether graduates are able to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the module to the pharmacy practice setting. PMID:23716748

  15. Shouldering the Burden of Evidence-Based Practice: The Experiences of Physiotherapists Partaking in a Community of Practice.

    PubMed

    McCreesh, Karen; Larkin, Louise; Lewis, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The study aim was to elicit the motivators, barriers, and benefits of participation in a Community of Practice (CoP) for primary care physiotherapists. We used a qualitative approach using semistructured interviews. The participants were twelve physiotherapists partaking in a newly formed Shoulder CoP. A desire for peer support was the strongest motivator for joining, with improving clinical practice being less apparent. Barriers to participation included time and work pressures and poor research skills. The structure of the CoP, in terms of access to meetings and the provision of preparation work and deadlines for the journal clubs, was reported to be a facilitator. Multiple benefits ensued from participation. The role of teamwork was emphasised in relation to reducing isolation and achieving goals. The majority of participants reported positive clinical practice changes in terms of improved patient education, increased confidence, and availability of new resources. All participants reported some element of personal growth and development, in particular in their evidence-based practice skills. The results provide support for the use of CoPs as a means of continuing professional development for physiotherapists in the workplace, as significant benefits are gained in terms of evidence-based practice (EBP), patient care, and therapist personal development. PMID:26904293

  16. Shouldering the Burden of Evidence-Based Practice: The Experiences of Physiotherapists Partaking in a Community of Practice

    PubMed Central

    McCreesh, Karen; Larkin, Louise; Lewis, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The study aim was to elicit the motivators, barriers, and benefits of participation in a Community of Practice (CoP) for primary care physiotherapists. We used a qualitative approach using semistructured interviews. The participants were twelve physiotherapists partaking in a newly formed Shoulder CoP. A desire for peer support was the strongest motivator for joining, with improving clinical practice being less apparent. Barriers to participation included time and work pressures and poor research skills. The structure of the CoP, in terms of access to meetings and the provision of preparation work and deadlines for the journal clubs, was reported to be a facilitator. Multiple benefits ensued from participation. The role of teamwork was emphasised in relation to reducing isolation and achieving goals. The majority of participants reported positive clinical practice changes in terms of improved patient education, increased confidence, and availability of new resources. All participants reported some element of personal growth and development, in particular in their evidence-based practice skills. The results provide support for the use of CoPs as a means of continuing professional development for physiotherapists in the workplace, as significant benefits are gained in terms of evidence-based practice (EBP), patient care, and therapist personal development. PMID:26904293

  17. Adopting Evidence-Based Medically Assisted Treatments in Substance Abuse Treatment Organizations: Roles of Leadership Socialization and Funding Streams

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Terry C.; Davis, Carolyn D.; Roman, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the organizational adoption of medically assisted treatments (MAT) for substance use disorders (SUDs) in a representative sample of 555 US for-profit and not-for-profit treatment centers. The study examines organizational adoption of these treatments in an institutionally contested environment that traditionally has valued behavioral treatment, using sociological and resource dependence frameworks The findings indicate that socialization of leadership, measured by formal clinical education, is related to the adoption of MAT. Funding patterns also affect innovation adoption, with greater adoption associated with higher proportions of earned income from third party fees for services, and less adoption associated with funding from criminal justice sources. These findings may generalize to other social mission-oriented organizations where innovation adoption may be linked to private and public benefit values inherent in the type of socialization of leadership and different patterns of funding support. PMID:25004707

  18. Adopting evidence-based medically assisted treatments in substance abuse treatment organizations: roles of leadership socialization and funding streams.

    PubMed

    Blum, Terry C; Davis, Carolyn D; Roman, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the organizational adoption of medically assisted treatments (MAT) for substance use disorders (SUDs) in a representative sample of 555 US for-profit and not-for-profit treatment centers. The study examines organizational adoption of these treatments in an institutionally contested environment that traditionally has valued behavioral treatment, using sociological and resource dependence frameworks. The findings indicate that socialization of leadership, measured by formal clinical education, is related to the adoption of MAT. Funding patterns also affect innovation adoption, with greater adoption associated with higher proportions of earned income from third party fees for services, and less adoption associated with funding from criminal justice sources. These findings may generalize to other social mission-oriented organizations where innovation adoption may be linked to private and public benefit values inherent in the type of socialization of leadership and different patterns of funding support.

  19. Tactics for teaching evidence-based practice: improving self-efficacy in finding and appraising evidence in a master's evidence-based practice unit.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anne; Levin, Rona F

    2014-08-01

    This column shares the best evidence-based strategies and innovative ideas on how to facilitate the learning of EBP principles and processes by clinicians as well as nursing and interprofessional students. Guidelines for submission are available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1741-6787. PMID:25131896

  20. Improving the evidence base in palliative care to inform practice and policy: thinking outside the box.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Samar M; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl

    2014-12-01

    The adoption of evidence-based hierarchies and research methods from other disciplines may not completely translate to complex palliative care settings. The heterogeneity of the palliative care population, complexity of clinical presentations, and fluctuating health states present significant research challenges. The aim of this narrative review was to explore the debate about the use of current evidence-based approaches for conducting research, such as randomized controlled trials and other study designs, in palliative care, and more specifically to (1) describe key myths about palliative care research; (2) highlight substantive challenges of conducting palliative care research, using case illustrations; and (3) propose specific strategies to address some of these challenges. Myths about research in palliative care revolve around evidence hierarchies, sample heterogeneity, random assignment, participant burden, and measurement issues. Challenges arise because of the complex physical, psychological, existential, and spiritual problems faced by patients, families, and service providers. These challenges can be organized according to six general domains: patient, system/organization, context/setting, study design, research team, and ethics. A number of approaches for dealing with challenges in conducting research fall into five separate domains: study design, sampling, conceptual, statistical, and measures and outcomes. Although randomized controlled trials have their place whenever possible, alternative designs may offer more feasible research protocols that can be successfully implemented in palliative care. Therefore, this article highlights "outside the box" approaches that would benefit both clinicians and researchers in the palliative care field. Ultimately, the selection of research designs is dependent on a clearly articulated research question, which drives the research process. PMID:24727305

  1. Still Subversive after All These Years: The Relevance of Feminist Therapy in the Age of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Laura S.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, based on my Carolyn Wood Sherif Memorial Award Address, I address questions of the viability of feminist practice in the current zeitgeist. Using the framework of responding to questions raised by doctoral students about feminist therapy, I address how feminist practice aligns with the evidence-based practice movement,…

  2. From Caterpillars to Butterflies: Engaging Nurse Leaders in Evidence-Based Practice Reform.

    PubMed

    Sanares-Carreon, Dolora

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) occurs when the integration of best evidence is brought to the bedside to ground patient care decisions. Barriers to EBP have lingered for years and held unabated. The experiences of an academic medical center offer fresh perspectives in devolving the accountability for EBP where care is provided and received by patients. More specifically, the initiative is a focused engagement of nurse leaders in administrative positions for energizing bedside nurses to reform the enculturation of EBP. The goal is not to control but to explore approaches of handling the barriers with a complexity mindset amidst uncertainties. Nurses' collective engagement is envisioned to spark or refine creative ideas that will steer and account for EBP outcomes. The flight of the butterfly is used as a metaphor; hence, the title for the Monarch Moments Initiative.

  3. The Effect of a Change Agent on Use of Evidence-Based Mental Health Practices.

    PubMed

    Leathers, Sonya J; Spielfogel, Jill E; Blakey, Joan; Christian, Errick; Atkins, Marc S

    2016-09-01

    Children's service systems are faced with a critical need to disseminate evidence-based mental health interventions. Despite the proliferation of comprehensive implementation models, little is known about the key active processes in effective implementation strategies. This proof of concept study focused on the effect of change agent interactions as conceptualized by Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory on providers' (N = 57) use of a behavioral intervention in a child welfare agency. An experimental design compared use for providers randomized to training as usual or training as usual supplemented by change agent interactions after the training. Results indicate that the enhanced condition increased use of the intervention, supporting the positive effect of change agent interactions on use of new practices. Change agent types of interaction may be a key active process in implementation strategies following training.

  4. From Caterpillars to Butterflies: Engaging Nurse Leaders in Evidence-Based Practice Reform.

    PubMed

    Sanares-Carreon, Dolora

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) occurs when the integration of best evidence is brought to the bedside to ground patient care decisions. Barriers to EBP have lingered for years and held unabated. The experiences of an academic medical center offer fresh perspectives in devolving the accountability for EBP where care is provided and received by patients. More specifically, the initiative is a focused engagement of nurse leaders in administrative positions for energizing bedside nurses to reform the enculturation of EBP. The goal is not to control but to explore approaches of handling the barriers with a complexity mindset amidst uncertainties. Nurses' collective engagement is envisioned to spark or refine creative ideas that will steer and account for EBP outcomes. The flight of the butterfly is used as a metaphor; hence, the title for the Monarch Moments Initiative. PMID:26938190

  5. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for managing depression in persons living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Relf, Michael V; Eisbach, Shelly; Okine, Kayj Nash; Ward, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms and depression are prevalent among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Depression among PLWH is associated with a lower quality of life, reduced adherence to antiretroviral treatment, poorer self-care, worsened treatment outcomes, greater impairment in social and vocational functioning, and increased social isolation. Assessment of depression in PLWH is critical to facilitate referral and management. Fortunately, two simple screening questions can be used to assess for depression, and evidence supports the effective management of depression for PLWH. First-line treatment regimens for depression include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), or a combination of SSRI and CBT. This paper examines the contemporary evidence related to depression in the context of HIV infection. A case study has been included to illustrate an application of evidence-based treatment interventions recommended for clinical practice.

  6. Impact of organizational change on organizational culture: implications for introducing evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Austin, Michael J; Claassen, Jennette

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) seeks to integrate the expertise of individual practitioners with the best available evidence within the context of the values and expectations of clients. Prior to implementing EBP, it is important to understand the significance that organizational change and organizational culture play. This article seeks to explore the literature associated with both organizational change and organizational culture. The analysis of organizational culture and change draw upon findings from both the private, for-profit sector, and the public, non-profit field. It is divided into four sections: organizational change and innovation, organizational culture, managing organizational culture and change, and finally, applying the findings to the implementation of EBP. While the audience for this analysis is managers in public and nonprofit human service organizations who are considering implementing EBP into their work environment, it is not intended to provide a "how to" guide, but rather a framework for critical thinking.

  7. Impact of organizational change on organizational culture: implications for introducing evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Austin, Michael J; Claassen, Jennette

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) seeks to integrate the expertise of individual practitioners with the best available evidence within the context of the values and expectations of clients. Prior to implementing EBP, it is important to understand the significance that organizational change and organizational culture play. This article seeks to explore the literature associated with both organizational change and organizational culture. The analysis of organizational culture and change draw upon findings from both the private, for-profit sector, and the public, non-profit field. It is divided into four sections: organizational change and innovation, organizational culture, managing organizational culture and change, and finally, applying the findings to the implementation of EBP. While the audience for this analysis is managers in public and nonprofit human service organizations who are considering implementing EBP into their work environment, it is not intended to provide a "how to" guide, but rather a framework for critical thinking. PMID:19064453

  8. Maintaining Perioperative Normothermia: Sustaining an Evidence-Based Practice Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Levin, Rona F; Wright, Fay; Pecoraro, Kathleen; Kopec, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Unintentional perioperative hypothermia has been shown to cause serious patient complications and, thus, to increase health care costs. In 2009, an evidence-based practice improvement project produced a significant decrease in unintentional perioperative hypothermia in colorectal surgical patients through monitoring of OR ambient room temperature. Project leaders engaged all interdisciplinary stakeholders in the original project, which facilitated the sustainability of the intervention method. An important aspect of sustainability is ongoing monitoring and evaluation of a new intervention method. Therefore, continued evaluation of outcomes of the protocol developed in 2009 was scheduled at specific time points after the initial small test of change with colorectal patients. This article focuses on how attention to sustainability factors during implementation of an improvement project led to the sustainability of a protocol for monitoring OR ambient room temperature with all types of surgical patients five years after the initial project.

  9. Evidence based practice: laboratory feedback informs forensic specimen collection in NSW.

    PubMed

    Nittis, Maria; Stark, Margaret

    2014-07-01

    The importance of having clear, evidence-based guidelines for the taking of forensic samples from suspects detained in police custody (persons of interest) and complainants of crime is essential for forensic practitioners. The need for such guidelines was seen as desirable in New South Wales (NSW) and a working group was set up comprising scientists, practitioners and police. Feedback from the laboratory regarding the results of the specimens taken by forensic practitioners throughout the State was received and analysed. This has resulted in changes to current practice and highlighted the need for further research in this area. It has also highlighted areas that have not changed in response to evidence A quality service demands transparency, process review, relevant research and feedback in order to progress. Examiners need to obtain the results for their cases in order to reinforce the value of the service they provide as well as to monitor and, where necessary, improve their forensic collection skills. PMID:24931859

  10. Evidence based practice: laboratory feedback informs forensic specimen collection in NSW.

    PubMed

    Nittis, Maria; Stark, Margaret

    2014-07-01

    The importance of having clear, evidence-based guidelines for the taking of forensic samples from suspects detained in police custody (persons of interest) and complainants of crime is essential for forensic practitioners. The need for such guidelines was seen as desirable in New South Wales (NSW) and a working group was set up comprising scientists, practitioners and police. Feedback from the laboratory regarding the results of the specimens taken by forensic practitioners throughout the State was received and analysed. This has resulted in changes to current practice and highlighted the need for further research in this area. It has also highlighted areas that have not changed in response to evidence A quality service demands transparency, process review, relevant research and feedback in order to progress. Examiners need to obtain the results for their cases in order to reinforce the value of the service they provide as well as to monitor and, where necessary, improve their forensic collection skills.

  11. Interagency Collaborative Team Model for Capacity Building to Scale-Up Evidence-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hurlburt, Michael; Aarons, Gregory A; Fettes, Danielle; Willging, Cathleen; Gunderson, Lara; Chaffin, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Background System-wide scale up of evidence-based practice (EBP) is a complex process. Yet, few strategic approaches exist to support EBP implementation and sustainment across a service system. Building on the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) implementation framework, we developed and are testing the Interagency Collaborative Team (ICT) process model to implement an evidence-based child neglect intervention (i.e., SafeCare®) within a large children’s service system. The ICT model emphasizes the role of local agency collaborations in creating structural supports for successful implementation. Methods We describe the ICT model and present preliminary qualitative results from use of the implementation model in one large scale EBP implementation. Qualitative interviews were conducted to assess challenges in building system, organization, and home visitor collaboration and capacity to implement the EBP. Data collection and analysis centered on EBP implementation issues, as well as the experiences of home visitors under the ICT model. Results Six notable issues relating to implementation process emerged from participant interviews, including: (a) initial commitment and collaboration among stakeholders, (b) leadership, (c) communication, (d) practice fit with local context, (e) ongoing negotiation and problem solving, and (f) early successes. These issues highlight strengths and areas for development in the ICT model. Conclusions Use of the ICT model led to sustained and widespread use of SafeCare in one large county. Although some aspects of the implementation model may benefit from enhancement, qualitative findings suggest that the ICT process generates strong structural supports for implementation and creates conditions in which tensions between EBP structure and local contextual variations can be resolved in ways that support the expansion and maintenance of an EBP while preserving potential for public health benefit. PMID:27512239

  12. Evidence-based practice profiles of physiotherapists transitioning into the workforce: a study of two cohorts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Training in the five steps of evidence-based practice (EBP) has been recommended for inclusion in entry-level health professional training. The effectiveness of EBP education has been explored predominantly in the medical and nursing professions and more commonly in post-graduate than entry-level students. Few studies have investigated longitudinal changes in EBP attitudes and behaviours. This study aimed to assess the changes in EBP knowledge, attitudes and behaviours in entry-level physiotherapy students transitioning into the workforce. Methods A prospective, observational, longitudinal design was used, with two cohorts. From 2008, 29 participants were tested in their final year in a physiotherapy program, and after the first and second workforce years. From 2009, 76 participants were tested in their final entry-level and first workforce years. Participants completed an Evidence-Based Practice Profile questionnaire (EBP2), which includes self-report EBP domains [Relevance, Terminology (knowledge of EBP concepts), Confidence, Practice (EBP implementation), Sympathy (disposition towards EBP)]. Mixed model analysis with sequential Bonferroni adjustment was used to analyse the matched data. Effect sizes (ES) (95% CI) were calculated for all changes. Results Effect sizes of the changes in EBP domains were small (ES range 0.02 to 0.42). While most changes were not significant there was a consistent pattern of decline in scores for Relevance in the first workforce year (ES -0.42 to -0.29) followed by an improvement in the second year (ES +0.27). Scores in Terminology improved (ES +0.19 to +0.26) in each of the first two workforce years, while Practice scores declined (ES -0.23 to -0.19) in the first year and improved minimally in the second year (ES +0.04). Confidence scores improved during the second workforce year (ES +0.27). Scores for Sympathy showed little change. Conclusions During the first two years in the workforce, there was a transitory decline in

  13. Reverse quality management: developing evidence-based best practices in health emergency management.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Tim; Cox, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The British Columbia Ministry of Health's Framework for Core Functions in Public Health was the catalyst that inspired this review of best practices in health emergency management. The fieldwork was conducted in the fall of 2005 between hurricane Katrina and the South Asia earthquake. These tragedies, shown on 24/7 television news channels, provided an eyewitness account of disaster management, or lack of it, in our global village world. It is not enough to just have best practices in place. There has to be a governance structure that can be held accountable. This review of best practices lists actions in support of an emergency preparedness culture at the management, executive, and corporate/governance levels of the organization. The methodology adopted a future quality management approach of the emergency management process to identify the corresponding performance indictors that correlated with practices or sets of practices. Identifying best practice performance indictors needed to conduct a future quality management audit is described as reverse quality management. Best practices cannot be assessed as stand-alone criteria; they are influenced by organizational culture. The defining of best practices was influenced by doubt about defining a practice it is hoped will never be performed, medical staff involvement, leadership, and an appreciation of the resources required and how they need to be managed. Best practice benchmarks are seen as being related more to "measures" of performance defined locally and agreed on by 2 or more parties rather than to achieving industrial standards. Relating practices to performance indicators and then to benchmarks resulted in the development of a Health Emergency Management Best Practices Matrix that lists specific practice in the different phases of emergency management.

  14. Reverse quality management: developing evidence-based best practices in health emergency management.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Tim; Cox, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The British Columbia Ministry of Health's Framework for Core Functions in Public Health was the catalyst that inspired this review of best practices in health emergency management. The fieldwork was conducted in the fall of 2005 between hurricane Katrina and the South Asia earthquake. These tragedies, shown on 24/7 television news channels, provided an eyewitness account of disaster management, or lack of it, in our global village world. It is not enough to just have best practices in place. There has to be a governance structure that can be held accountable. This review of best practices lists actions in support of an emergency preparedness culture at the management, executive, and corporate/governance levels of the organization. The methodology adopted a future quality management approach of the emergency management process to identify the corresponding performance indictors that correlated with practices or sets of practices. Identifying best practice performance indictors needed to conduct a future quality management audit is described as reverse quality management. Best practices cannot be assessed as stand-alone criteria; they are influenced by organizational culture. The defining of best practices was influenced by doubt about defining a practice it is hoped will never be performed, medical staff involvement, leadership, and an appreciation of the resources required and how they need to be managed. Best practice benchmarks are seen as being related more to "measures" of performance defined locally and agreed on by 2 or more parties rather than to achieving industrial standards. Relating practices to performance indicators and then to benchmarks resulted in the development of a Health Emergency Management Best Practices Matrix that lists specific practice in the different phases of emergency management. PMID:16622359

  15. Knowledge and Competency of Nursing Faculty Regarding Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Orta, Roxana; Messmer, Patricia R; Valdes, Guillermo R; Turkel, Marian; Fields, Sheldon D; Wei, Christina Cardenas

    2016-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine recommended that 90% of clinical decisions should be evidenced based by 2020. Both the IOM and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses identified evidenced-based practice (EBP) as a core competency for practice. EBP can reduce costs, improve patient outcomes, and ensure optimal nursing interventions. Because nursing faculty may have deficits in knowledge, attitudes, and competencies to teach EBP, few nursing students conduct EBP reviews. The purpose of this project was to develop EBP educational resources to increase nursing faculty knowledge and competency of EBP in a southeastern college with both a multicultural faculty and student body. A pre- and postsurvey design using Stevens' ACE Star Model of Knowledge Transformation and Evidence Based Practice Readiness Inventory (ACE-ERI) determined the effectiveness of the educational intervention. Results indicated that faculty's self-confidence about their competency in EBP increased significantly from presurvey to postsurvey, t(17) = -2.04, p = .028, but there was no significant change from pretest to posttest, t(17) = -0.576, p =.572, for the EBP knowledge component of ACE-ERI. The results of the study suggest that educational programs for RN-to-BSN faculty are vital in increasing participant's readiness for EBP. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(9):409-419. PMID:27580508

  16. Evidence-based practice for pain management for cancer patients in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mona; Kim, Hee Sun; Chung, Su Kyoung; Ahn, Mee Jung; Yoo, Jae Yong; Park, Ok Sun; Woo, So Rah; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Sun Ah; Oh, Eui Geum

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to implement an evidence utilization project using an audit and feedback approach to improve cancer pain management. A three-phased audit and feedback approach was used. A 46-bed oncology nursing unit in the university's cancer centre was selected as a research site. Nursing records extracted from 137 patients (65 for the baseline assessment and 72 for the follow-up audit) were used to examine nurse compliance with four audit criteria derived from best practice guidelines related to the assessment and management of pain. We observed a significant improvement in compliance from baseline to follow-up for the following criteria: documenting the side effects of opioids (2-83%), use of a formalized pain assessment tool (22-75%), and providing education for pain assessment and management to patients and caregivers (0-47%). The audit and feedback method was applicable to the implementation of clinical practice guidelines for cancer pain management. Leadership from both administrative personnel and staff nurses working together contributes to the spread of an evidence-based practice culture in clinical settings. As it was conducted in a single oncology nursing unit and was implemented over a short period of time, the results should be carefully interpreted. PMID:24118273

  17. Putting evidence into practice: evidence-based interventions to prevent and manage anorexia.

    PubMed

    Adams, Lynn A; Shepard, Nancy; Caruso, Rose Ann; Norling, Martha J; Belansky, Heather; Cunningham, Regina S

    2009-02-01

    Anorexia is defined as an involuntary loss of appetite.Approximately 50% of newly diagnosed patients with cancer experience the symptom, which often is accompanied by weight loss and most typically associated with advanced disease.Anorexia significantly affects the clinical course of cancer; it can lead to the development or exacerbation of disease- or treatment-related symptoms, decreased functional status, and diminished quality of life.As part of the Oncology Nursing Society's Putting Evidence Into Practice initiative, a team of oncology nurses examined and evaluated published research literature for the purpose of developing an evidence-based practice resource focused on the management of cancer-related anorexia.Even though anorexia is common among newly diagnosed patients and those with advanced disease, interventions to prevent, treat, and manage the symptom are limited.The evidence revealed that only two pharmacologic interventions, corticosteroids and progestins, can be recommended for use in clinical practice, and dietary counseling was identified as likely to be effective.This article summarizes selected empirical literature on interventions used to prevent and manage anorexia in patients with cancer.Familiarity with the literature will assist oncology nurses in proactively identifying and effectively managing patients experiencing this distressing symptom.

  18. Achieving healthy body weight in teenagers: evidence-based practice guidelines for community nutrition interventions.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, Brenna; Glanville, N Theresa

    2010-01-01

    An evidence-based review of research on obesity prevention and treatment in youth was conducted to identify successful elements of community nutrition interventions. Guidelines for dietetic practice appropriate to this age group were synthesized. Following a systematic review of English-language research papers published from 1996 to 2009, 63 interventions met inclusion criteria and were graded according to methodological quality, quantity, consistency, and reproducibility. They also were analyzed for common themes and used to develop guideline statements and a practice algorithm. A national panel of experts in community nutrition, public health, adolescent health, academia, and endocrinology assessed the guidelines and the practice algorithm for validity, acceptability, and applicability. Successful prevention strategies are comprehensive, address social and environmental influences, include nutrition education and physical activity, and use schools as a health promotion delivery venue. Computer- or technology-based and peer-modelling strategies are promising, developmentally appropriate approaches. Effective obesity treatment strategies utilize diet plans and behaviour modification techniques, and involve families in intensive, multidisciplinary interventions. Given the distinct needs of this age group, healthy body weight must be promoted through a comprehensive school-based approach. In summary, obesity prevention and treatment interventions should be comprehensive, multidisciplinary, and developmentally appropriate.

  19. International Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Evidence-Based Practice?

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Alysa; Barnes, Elizabeth; Ghosh, Sunita; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Roos, Daniel; Hartsell, William; Holt, Tanya; Wu, Jackson; Janjan, Nora; Chow, Edward

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the equivalence of multifraction and single-fraction (SF) radiotherapy for the palliation of painful bone metastases (BM). However, according to previous surveys, SF schedules remain underused. The objectives of this study were to determine the current patterns of practice internationally and to investigate the factors influencing this practice. Methods and Materials: The members of three global radiation oncology professional organizations (American Society for Radiology Oncology [ASTRO], Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology [CARO], Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists) completed an Internet-based survey. The respondents described what radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for 5 hypothetical cases describing patients with single or multiple painful BMs from breast, lung, or prostate cancer. Radiation oncologists rated the importance of patient, tumor, institution, and treatment factors, and descriptive statistics were compiled. The chi-square test was used for categorical variables and the Student t test for continuous variables. Logistic regression analysis identified predictors of the use of SF radiotherapy. Results: A total of 962 respondents, three-quarters ASTRO members, described 101 different dose schedules in common use (range, 3 Gy/1 fraction to 60 Gy/20 fractions). The median dose overall was 30 Gy/10 fractions. SF schedules were used the least often by ASTRO members practicing in the United States and most often by CARO members. Case, membership affiliation, country of training, location of practice, and practice type were independently predictive of the use of SF. The principal factors considered when prescribing were prognosis, risk of spinal cord compression, and performance status. Conclusion: Despite abundant evidence, most radiation oncologists continue to prescribe multifraction schedules for patients who fit the eligibility criteria of

  20. High nonpublication rate from publication professionals hinders evidence-based publication practices

    PubMed Central

    Stretton, Serina; Kenreigh, Charlotte A.; Wagner, Linda T.; Woolley, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The need for timely, ethical, and high-quality reporting of clinical trial results has seen a rise in demand for publication professionals. These publication experts, who are not ghostwriters, work with leading medical researchers and funders around the world to plan and prepare thousands of publications each year. Despite the involvement of publication professionals in an increasing number of peer-reviewed publications, especially those that affect patient care, there is limited evidence-based guidance in the peer-reviewed literature on their publication practices. Similar to the push for editors and the peer-review community to conduct and publish research on publication ethics and the peer-review process, the International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) has encouraged members to conduct and publish research on publication planning and practices. Our primary objective was to investigate the publication rate of research presented at ISMPP Annual Meetings. Methods. ISMPP Annual Meeting abstract lists (April 2009–April 2014) were searched in November 2014 and data were extracted into a pilot-tested spreadsheet. MEDLINE was searched in December 2014 to determine the publication rate (calculated as the % of presented abstracts published as full papers in peer-reviewed journals). Data were analyzed using the Cochran-Armitage trend test (significance: P < .05) by an independent academic statistician. Results. From 2009 to 2014, there were 220 abstracts submitted, 185 accepted, and 164 presented. There were four corresponding publications (publication rate 2.4%). Over time, ISMPP’s abstract acceptance rate (overall: 84.1%) did not change, but the number of abstracts presented increased significantly (P = .02). Most abstracts were presented as posters (81.1%) and most research was observational (72.6%). Most researchers came from the US (78.0%), followed by Europe (17.7%), and the Asia-Pacific region (11.2%). Discussion. Research

  1. Providers' Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practices: Is it Just About Providers, or do Practices Matter, Too?

    PubMed Central

    Reding, Michael E. J.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Lau, Anna S.; Innes-Gomberg, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) attitudes were measured in a sample of Los Angeles County mental health service providers. Three types of data were collected: provider demographic characteristics, attitudes toward EBP in general, and attitudes toward specific EBPs being implemented in the county. Providers could reliably rate characteristics of specific EBPs, and these ratings differed across interventions. Preliminary implementation data indicate that appealing features of an EBP relate to the degree to which providers use it. These findings suggest that assessing EBP-specific attitudes is feasible and may offer implementation-relevant information beyond that gained solely from providers' general attitudes toward EBP. PMID:24166077

  2. Factors associated with medical student clinical reasoning and evidence based medicine practice

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Robert; Chan, Kenneth; Goh, Sok-Hong; Ngee, Lek

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the factors associated with medical students’ clinical reasoning (CR) use and evidence-based medicine (EBM) use in the clinical setting. Methods Our cross-sectional study surveyed 44 final-year medical students at an emerging academic medical center in Singapore. We queried the students’ EBM and CR value and experiences in the classroom and clinical settings. We compared this to their perceptions of supervisors’ value and experiences using t-tests. We developed measures of teaching culture and practice culture by combining relevant questions into summary scores. Multivariate linear regression models were applied to identify factors associated with the students’ CR and EBM clinical use. Results Eighty-nine percent of students responded (n=39). Students reported valuing CR (p=0.03) and EBM (p=0.001) more than their supervisors, but practiced these skills similarly (p=0.83; p=0.82). Clinical practice culture and classroom CR experience were independently associated with students’ CR clinical use (p=0.05; p=0.04), and classroom EBM experience was independently associated with students’ EBM clinical use (p=0.03). Clinical teaching culture was not associated with students’ CR and EBM clinical use. Conclusions Our study found that medical students’ classroom experience and the clinical practice culture influenced their CR and EBM use. The clinical teaching culture did not. These findings suggest that in order to increase student CR and EBM use, in addition to providing classroom experience, medical educators may need to change the hospital culture by encouraging supervisors to use these skills in their clinical practice. PMID:26547924

  3. Is evidence-based medicine so evident in veterinary research and practice? History, obstacles and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Clegg, Peter; Vandenput, Sandrine; Gustin, Pascal; Saegerman, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) refers to the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence from research for the care of an individual patient. The concept of EBM was first described in human medicine in the early 1990s and was introduced to veterinary medicine 10 years later. However, it is not clear that the EBM approach promulgated in human medicine can be applied to the same extent to veterinary medicine. EBM has the potential to help veterinarians to make more informed decisions, but obstacles to the implementation of EBM include a lack of high quality patient-centred research, the need for basic understanding of clinical epidemiology by veterinarians, the absence of adequate searching techniques and accessibility to scientific data bases and the inadequacy of EBM tools that can be applied to the busy daily practise of veterinarians. This review describes the development of EBM in the veterinary profession, identifies its advantages and disadvantages and discusses whether and how veterinary surgeons should further adopt the EBM approach of human medicine.

  4. Launching a Baby's Adoption: Practical Strategies for Parents and Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Patricia Irwin

    Intended for adoptive parents and adoption practitioners and intermediaries, this book uses the metaphor of space exploration to provide practical strategies for meeting the adopted infant's needs and smoothing the transition. Chapter 1, "Mission: To Explore New Worlds," discusses adoptive and birth parent preparation, loss issues, and society's…

  5. Achieving a high-reliability organization through implementation of the ARCC model for systemwide sustainability of evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek

    2012-01-01

    High-reliability health care organizations are those that provide care that is safe and one that minimizes errors while achieving exceptional performance in quality and safety. This article presents major concepts and characteristics of a patient safety culture and a high-reliability health care organization and explains how building a culture of evidence-based practice can assist organizations in achieving high reliability. The ARCC (Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration) model for systemwide implementation and sustainability of evidence-based practice is highlighted as a key strategy in achieving high reliability in health care organizations.

  6. Evidence based general practice: a retrospective study of interventions in one training practice.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, P.; Dowell, A. C.; Neal, R. D.; Smith, N.; Heywood, P.; Wilson, A. E.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To estimate the proportion of interventions in general practice that are based on evidence from clinical trials and to assess the appropriateness of such an evaluation. DESIGN--Retrospective review of case notes. SETTING--One suburban training general practice. SUBJECTS--122 consecutive doctor-patient consultations over two days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Proportions of interventions based on randomised controlled trials (from literature search with Medline, pharmaceutical databases, and standard textbooks), on convincing non-experimental evidence, and without substantial evidence. RESULTS--21 of the 122 consultations recorded were excluded due to insufficient data; 31 of the interventions were based on randomised controlled trial evidence and 51 based on convincing non-experimental evidence. Hence 82/101 (81%) of interventions were based on evidence meeting our criteria. CONCLUSIONS--Most interventions within general practice are based on evidence from clinical trials, but the methods used in such trials may not be the most appropriate to apply to this setting. PMID:8608291

  7. Role of communication content and frequency in enabling evidence-based practices.

    PubMed

    Rangachari, Pavani; Madaio, Michael; Rethemeyer, R Karl; Wagner, Peggy; Hall, Lauren; Roy, Siddharth; Rissing, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Many hospitals are unable to successfully implement evidence-based practices. For example, implementation of the central line bundle (CLB), proven to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), is often challenging. This problem is broadly characterized as a "change implementation failure." A prospective study was conducted in 2 intensive care units (ICUs), a medical ICU (MICU) and a pediatric ICU (PICU), within an academic health center. Both units had low baseline adherence to CLB and higher-than-expected CRBSIs. The study sought to promote CLB implementation in both units through periodic quality improvement (QI) interventions over a 52-week period. Simultaneously, it examined (1) the content and frequency of communication related to CLB through weekly "communication logs" completed by physicians, nurses, and managers, and (2) outcomes, that is, CLB adherence rates through weekly medical record reviews. The aim of the study was 2-fold: (1) to examine associations between QI interventions and communication content and frequency at the unit level, and (2) to examine associations between communication content and frequency and outcomes at the unit level. The periodic QI interventions were expected to increase CLB adherence and reduce CRBSIs through their influence on communication content and frequency. A total of 2638 instances of communication were analyzed. Both units demonstrated a statistically significant increase in "proactive" communications-that is, communication intended to reduce infection risk between physicians and nurses over time. Proactive communications increased by 68% in the MICU (P < .05) and 61% in the PICU (P < .05). During the same timeframe, both units increased CLB adherence to 100%. Both units also demonstrated statistically significant declines in (1) catheter days: 34% decline in the MICU (P < .05) and 30% in the PICU (P < .05); and (2) CRBSI rates: 63% decline in the MICU (P < .05) and 100% in the PICU (P < .10). Direct

  8. Wrongful Adoption: Law, Policy and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freundlich, Madelyn; Peterson, Lisa

    The past decade has seen an increase in cases where adoptive parents fail to receive accurate or complete information about a child's physical, emotional, or developmental problems or about the child's birth family and history. In these cases adoptive parents are confronted with extremely expensive medical care or mental health care. This…

  9. Validation of the Portuguese version of the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rui Pedro Gomes; Guerra, Ana Cristina Pinheiro; Cardoso, Maria José da Silva Peixoto de Oliveira; dos Santos, Alzira Teresa Vieira Martins Ferreira; de Figueiredo, Maria do Céu Aguiar Barbieri; Carneiro, António Cândido Vaz

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to describe the process of translation and linguistic and cultural validation of the Evidence Based Practice Questionnaire for the Portuguese context: Questionário de Eficácia Clínica e Prática Baseada em Evidências (QECPBE). METHOD: a methodological and cross-sectional study was developed. The translation and back translation was performed according to traditional standards. Principal Components Analysis with orthogonal rotation according to the Varimax method was used to verify the QECPBE's psychometric characteristics, followed by confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was determined by Cronbach's alpha. Data were collected between December 2013 and February 2014. RESULTS: 358 nurses delivering care in a hospital facility in North of Portugal participated in the study. QECPBE contains 20 items and three subscales: Practice (α=0.74); Attitudes (α=0.75); Knowledge/Skills and Competencies (α=0.95), presenting an overall internal consistency of α=0.74. The tested model explained 55.86% of the variance and presented good fit: χ2(167)=520.009; p = 0.0001; χ2df=3.114; CFI=0.908; GFI=0.865; PCFI=0.798; PGFI=0.678; RMSEA=0.077 (CI90%=0.07-0.08). CONCLUSION: confirmatory factor analysis revealed the questionnaire is valid and appropriate to be used in the studied context. PMID:26039307

  10. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-01

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine.

  11. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Sumio; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Ikejima, Kenichi; Uto, Hirofumi; Ono, Masafumi; Sumida, Yoshio; Seike, Masataka; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Takehara, Tetsuo; Tokushige, Katsutoshi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Yoneda, Masashi; Saibara, Toshiji; Shiota, Goshi; Sakaida, Isao; Nakamuta, Makoto; Mizuta, Toshihiko; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-04-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common cause of chronic liver disease in industrialized countries worldwide, and has become a serious public health issue not only in Western countries but also in many Asian countries including Japan. Within the wide spectrum of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a progressive form of disease, which often develops into liver cirrhosis and increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. In turn, a large proportion of NAFLD/NASH is the liver manifestation of metabolic syndrome, suggesting that NAFLD/NASH plays a key role in the pathogenesis of systemic atherosclerotic diseases. Currently, a definite diagnosis of NASH requires liver biopsy, though various noninvasive measures are under development. The mainstays of prevention and treatment of NAFLD/NASH include dietary restriction and exercise; however, pharmacological approaches are often necessary. Currently, vitamin E and thiazolidinedione derivatives are the most evidence-based therapeutic options, although the clinical evidence for long-term efficacy and safety is limited. This practice guideline for NAFLD/NASH, established by the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology in cooperation with The Japan Society of Hepatology, covers lines of clinical evidence reported internationally in the period starting from 1983 to January 2012, and each clinical question was evaluated using the GRADE system. Based on the primary release of the full version in Japanese, this English summary provides the core essentials of this clinical practice guideline comprising the definition, diagnosis, and current therapeutic recommendations for NAFLD/NASH in Japan.

  12. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-01

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine. PMID:27181682

  13. Comparison of Manual Versus Automated Data Collection Method for an Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Study

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, M.D.; Jordan, T.R.; Welle, T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate and improve the use of automated data collection procedures for nursing research and quality assurance. Methods A descriptive, correlational study analyzed 44 orthopedic surgical patients who were part of an evidence-based practice (EBP) project examining post-operative oxygen therapy at a Midwestern hospital. The automation work attempted to replicate a manually-collected data set from the EBP project. Results Automation was successful in replicating data collection for study data elements that were available in the clinical data repository. The automation procedures identified 32 “false negative” patients who met the inclusion criteria described in the EBP project but were not selected during the manual data collection. Automating data collection for certain data elements, such as oxygen saturation, proved challenging because of workflow and practice variations and the reliance on disparate sources for data abstraction. Automation also revealed instances of human error including computational and transcription errors as well as incomplete selection of eligible patients. Conclusion Automated data collection for analysis of nursing-specific phenomenon is potentially superior to manual data collection methods. Creation of automated reports and analysis may require initial up-front investment with collaboration between clinicians, researchers and information technology specialists who can manage the ambiguities and challenges of research and quality assurance work in healthcare. PMID:23650488

  14. Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Interventional Pain Management in Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Sushma; Gupta, Maynak

    2015-01-01

    Intractable cancer pain not amenable to standard oral or parenteral analgesics is a horrifying truth in 10–15% of patients. Interventional pain management techniques are an indispensable arsenal in pain physician's armamentarium for severe, intractable pain and can be broadly classified into neuroablative and neuromodulation techniques. An array of neurolytic techniques (chemical, thermal, or surgical) can be employed for ablation of individual nerve fibers, plexuses, or intrathecalneurolysis in patients with resistant pain and short life-expectancy. Neuraxial administration of drugs and spinal cord stimulation to modulate or alter the pain perception constitutes the most frequently employed neuromodulation techniques. Lately, there is a rising call for early introduction of interventional techniques in carefully selected patients simultaneously or even before starting strong opioids. After decades of empirical use, it is the need of the hour to head towards professionalism and standardization in order to secure credibility of specialization and those practicing it. Even though the interventional management has found a definite place in cancer pain, there is a dearth of evidence-based practice guidelines for interventional therapies in cancer pain. This may be because of paucity of good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating their safety and efficacy in cancer pain. Laying standardized guidelines based on existing and emerging evidence will act as a foundation step towards strengthening, credentialing, and dissemination of the specialty of interventional cancer pain management. This will also ensure an improved decision-making and quality of life (QoL) of the suffering patients. PMID:26009665

  15. Nursing culture: An enemy of evidence-based practice? A focus group exploration.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Ellen M; Fletcher, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is challenging for most nurses due to the time constraints of caring for patients and the emerging pressures of a changing health service. To explore these challenges, and thus to establish possible means of overcoming them, three focus groups (n = 17) with children's nurses were conducted. Participants were asked how they would define EBP, what the barriers to EBP were, what skills they needed to help access evidence and how they could integrate evidence into everyday practice. Data were analysed thematically and the anticipated themes of definitions of EBP, barriers, education and nursing culture were determined. Important subthemes were personal and employer disengagement, passivity and lack of resource utilisation. Passive use of evidence readily available in patient folders and on the wards was common. It seemed that little consideration was given to how often this evidence was updated. Nurses define their access to evidence as primarily passive in nature. This is reinforced by a lack of ready access to ongoing education and a perceived lack of investment at institutional level in their continued engagement with evidence. Promoting EBP needs to engage more with those ritual and traditional aspects of nursing culture to challenge these perceptions. PMID:24812063

  16. "Shattering culture": perspectives on cultural competence and evidence-based practice in mental health services.

    PubMed

    Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio; Hannah, Seth Donal

    2015-04-01

    The concept of culture as an analytic concept has increasingly been questioned by social scientists, just as health care institutions and clinicians have increasingly routinized concepts and uses of culture as means for improving the quality of care for racial and ethnic minorities. This paper examines this tension, asking whether it is possible to use cultural categories to develop evidenced-based practice guidelines in mental health services when these categories are challenged by the increasing hyperdiversity of patient populations and newer theories of culture that question direct connection between group-based social identities and cultural characteristics. Anthropologists have grown concerned about essentializing societies, yet unequal treatment on the basis of cultural, racial, or ethnic group membership is present in medicine and mental health care today. We argue that discussions of culture-patients' culture and the "culture of medicine"-should be sensitive to the risk of improper stereotypes, but should also be sensitive to the continuing significance of group-based discrimination and the myriad ways culture shapes clinical presentation, doctor-patient interactions, the illness experience, and the communication of symptoms. We recommend that mental health professionals consider the local contexts, with greater appreciation for the diversity of lived experience found among individual patients. This suggests a nuanced reliance on broad cultural categories of racial, ethnic, and national identities in evidence-based practice guidelines.

  17. Approved Clinical Instructors' Perspectives on Implementation Strategies in Evidence-Based Practice for Athletic Training Students

    PubMed Central

    Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Understanding implementation strategies of Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) who use evidence-based practice (EBP) in clinical instruction will help promote the use of EBP in clinical practice. Objective: To examine the perspectives and experiences of ACIs using EBP concepts in undergraduate athletic training education programs to determine the importance of using these concepts in clinical practice, clinical EBP implementation strategies for students, and challenges of implementing EBP into clinical practice while mentoring and teaching their students. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Telephone interviews. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen ACIs (11 men, 5 women; experience as a certified athletic trainer = 10 ± 4.7 years, experience as an ACI = 6.8 ± 3.9 years) were interviewed. Data Collection and Analysis: We interviewed each participant by telephone. Interview transcripts were analyzed and coded for common themes and subthemes regarding implementation strategies. Established themes were triangulated through peer review and member checking to verify the data. Results: The ACIs identified EBP implementation as important for validation of the profession, changing paradigm shift, improving patient care, and improving student educational experiences. They promoted 3 methods of implementing EBP concepts with their students: self-discovery, promoting critical thinking, and sharing information. They assisted students with the steps of EBP and often faced challenges in implementation of the first 3 steps of EBP: defining a clinical question, literature searching, and literature appraisal. Finally, ACIs indicated that modeling the behavior of making clinical decisions based on evidence was the best way to encourage students to continue using EBP. Conclusions: Athletic training education program directors should encourage and recommend specific techniques for EBP implementation in the clinical setting. The ACIs believed that role modeling is a

  18. State Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice for Youths, Part I: Responses to the State of the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Eric J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

    2008-01-01

    A need for the development of a policy research base regarding state implementation pf evidence-based practice (EBP) is emphasized. Efforts are made on how to make use of EBP in everyday clinical practice as a means of improving outcomes in six states.

  19. Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders: What Do We Know, and When Do We Know It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollaghan, Christine A.

    2004-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP), a framework that originated in clinical medicine, offers a principled means of addressing longstanding questions about clinical practice in communication disorders. However, in several respects EBP represents a radical departure from traditional thinking in speech-language pathology and audiology. In this paper, I…

  20. Evidence-Based Practices for Children, Youth, and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Comprehensive Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Connie; Odom, Samuel L.; Hume, Kara A.; Cox, Ann W.; Fettig, Angel; Kucharczyk, Suzanne; Brock, Matthew E.; Plavnick, Joshua B.; Fleury, Veronica P.; Schultz, Tia R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify evidenced-based, focused intervention practices for children and youth with autism spectrum disorder. This study was an extension and elaboration of a previous evidence-based practice review reported by Odom et al. ("Prev Sch Fail" 54:275-282, 2010b, doi:10.?1080/?1045988100378550?6). In the…

  1. 75 FR 51075 - National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP): Open Submission Period for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Practices (NREPP): Open Submission Period for Fiscal Year 2011 Background The Substance Abuse and Mental... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP): Open Submission Period for Fiscal Year 2011 AGENCY:...

  2. Implementation of Evidence-Based Models in Social Work Practice: Practitioners' Perspectives on an MST Trial in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustle, Lars-Henry; Hansson, Kjell; Sundell, Knut; Andree-Lofholm, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    The implementation of new treatment methods in social work practice is warranted. Moreover, little is known about professionals' attitudes toward the introduction of evidence-based practices into their communities. Therefore, this article reports on the implementation of a Swedish research project that evaluated Multisystemic Therapy (MST). All…

  3. Searching for Evidence-Based Practice: A Survey of Empirical Studies on Curricular Interventions Measuring and Reporting Fidelity of Implementation Published during 2004-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missett, Tracy C.; Foster, Lisa H.

    2015-01-01

    In an environment of accountability, the development of evidence-based practices is expected. To demonstrate that a practice is evidence based, quality indicators of rigorous methodology should be present including indications that teachers implementing an intervention have done so with fidelity to its design. Because evidence-based practices…

  4. Perceptions of Approved Clinical Instructors: Barriers in the Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: As evidence-based practice (EBP) becomes prevalent in athletic training education, the barriers that Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) experience in implementing it with students need to be understood. Objective: To investigate barriers ACIs face when implementing EBP concepts in clinical practice and in teaching EBP to professional athletic training students and to investigate the educational emphases to improve the barriers. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Telephone interviews. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen ACIs (11 men, 5 women; experience as an athletic trainer = 10 ± 4.7 years, experience as an ACI = 6.81 ± 3.9 years) were interviewed. Data Collection and Analysis: We interviewed each participant by telephone. Interview data were analyzed and coded for common themes and subthemes regarding barriers and educational emphases. Themes were triangulated through multiple-analyst triangulation and interpretive verification. Results: Barriers to EBP incorporation and educational emphasis placed on EBP were the main themes reported. Resources, personnel, and student characteristics were subthemes identified as barriers. Resource barriers included time, equipment, access to current literature, and knowledge. Coworkers, clinicians, and coaches who were unwilling to accept evidence regarding advancements in treatment were identified as personnel barriers. Programmatic improvement and communication improvement were subthemes of the educational emphasis placed on EBP theme. The ACIs reported the need for better integration between the clinical setting and the classroom and expressed the need for EBP to be integrated throughout the athletic training education program. Conclusions: Integration of the classroom and clinical experience is important in advancing ACIs' use of EBP with their students. Collaborative efforts within the clinical and academic program could help address the barriers ACIs face when implementing EBP. This collaboration could

  5. Chiropractic clinical practice guideline: evidence-based treatment of adult neck pain not due to whiplash

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Peacock, Elizabeth; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Bryans, Roland; Danis, Normand; Furlan, Andrea; Marcoux, Henri; Potter, Brock; Ruegg, Rick; Gross Stein, Janice; White, Eleanor

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the chiropractic cervical treatment of adults with acute or chronic neck pain not due to whiplash. This is a considerable health concern considered to be a priority by stakeholders, and about which the scientific information was poorly organized. OPTIONS Cervical treatments: manipulation, mobilization, ischemic pressure, clinic- and home-based exercise, traction, education, low-power laser, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pillows, pulsed electromagnetic therapy, and ultrasound. OUTCOMES The primary outcomes considered were improved (reduced and less intrusive) pain and improved (increased and easier) ranges of motion (ROM) of the adult cervical spine. EVIDENCE An “extraction” team recorded evidence from articles found by literature search teams using 4 separate literature searches, and rated it using a Table adapted from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. The searches were 1) Treatment; August, 2003, using MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, MANTIS, ICL, The Cochrane Library (includes CENTRAL), and EBSCO, identified 182 articles. 2) Risk management (adverse events); October, 2004, identified 230 articles and 2 texts. 3) Risk management (dissection); September, 2003, identified 79 articles. 4) Treatment update; a repeat of the treatment search for articles published between September, 2003 and November, 2004 inclusive identified 121 articles. VALUES To enable the search of the literature, the authors (Guidelines Development Committee [GDC]) regarded chiropractic treatment as including elements of “conservative” care in the search strategies, but not in the consideration of the range of chiropractic practice. Also, knowledge based only on clinical experience was considered less valid and reliable than good-caliber evidence, but where the caliber of the relevant evidence was low or it was non-existent, unpublished clinical experience was considered to be equivalent to

  6. Chiropractic clinical practice guideline: evidence-based treatment of adult neck pain not due to whiplash

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Peacock, Elizabeth; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Bryans, Roland; Danis, Normand; Furlan, Andrea; Marcoux, Henri; Potter, Brock; Ruegg, Rick; Gross Stein, Janice; White, Eleanor

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the chiropractic cervical treatment of adults with acute or chronic neck pain not due to whiplash. This is a considerable health concern considered to be a priority by stakeholders, and about which the scientific information was poorly organized. OPTIONS Cervical treatments: manipulation, mobilization, ischemic pressure, clinic- and home-based exercise, traction, education, low-power laser, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pillows, pulsed electromagnetic therapy, and ultrasound. OUTCOMES The primary outcomes considered were improved (reduced and less intrusive) pain and improved (increased and easier) ranges of motion (ROM) of the adult cervical spine. EVIDENCE An “extraction” team recorded evidence from articles found by literature search teams using 4 separate literature searches, and rated it using a Table adapted from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. The searches were 1) Treatment; August, 2003, using MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, MANTIS, ICL, The Cochrane Library (includes CENTRAL), and EBSCO, identified 182 articles. 2) Risk management (adverse events); October, 2004, identified 230 articles and 2 texts. 3) Risk management (dissection); September, 2003, identified 79 articles. 4) Treatment update; a repeat of the treatment search for articles published between September, 2003 and November, 2004 inclusive identified 121 articles. VALUES To enable the search of the literature, the authors (Guidelines Development Committee [GDC]) regarded chiropractic treatment as including elements of “conservative” care in the search strategies, but not in the consideration of the range of chiropractic practice. Also, knowledge based only on clinical experience was considered less valid and reliable than good-caliber evidence, but where the caliber of the relevant evidence was low or it was non-existent, unpublished clinical experience was considered to be equivalent to

  7. Librarians and occupational therapy faculty: a collaboration for teaching evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Kimberly A

    2012-01-01

    Students in allied health educational programs learn evidence-based practice (EBP) skills, yet often do not consistently utilize these skills as practitioners. Barriers to implementing EBP include time pressures and lack of skill. This descriptive study explains how librarians can teach information literacy skills and strengthen knowledge of EBP in graduate occupational therapy (OT) students. The goal of the study was to evaluate students' perception of the effectiveness of learning activities about EBP, and librarians' perception of the value of teaching in an OT curriculum. Sixty-three students at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio read articles and learned didactic information from OT faculty and librarians about EBP. Students researched intervention questions and electronically sent searches to librarians for feedback. Students applied skills by researching an intervention of their choice. Evaluative data were collected from students in 2009 and 2010 and from librarians in 2009. Both groups rated the learning experiences highly. Students felt the learning experiences improved their effectiveness in carrying out EBP. Librarians valued the experience of teaching information literacy to OT students. These results support other studies showing librarians' effectiveness in developing EBP skills in students. Recommendations are given about using journal clubs and secondary literature to ensure the use of EBP at the workplace. PMID:22544409

  8. EVIDENCE-BASED TREATMENT PRACTICES FOR DRUG-INVOLVED ADULTS IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Peter D.; Taxman, Faye S.; Henderson, Craig E.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the extent and organizational correlates of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in correctional facilities and community-based substance abuse treatment programs that manage drug-involved adult offenders. METHODS Correctional administrators and treatment program directors affiliated with a national sample of 384 criminal justice and community-based programs providing substance abuse treatment to adult offenders in the United States were surveyed in 2004. Correctional administrators reported the availability of up to 13 specified EBPs and treatment directors up to 15. The sum total of EBPs indicates their extent. Linear models regress the extent of EBPs on variables measuring structure and leadership, culture and climate, administrator attitudes and network connectedness of the organization. RESULTS Most programs offer fewer than 60% of the specified EBPs to drug-involved offenders. In multiple regression models, offender treatment programs that provided more EBPs were community-based, accredited, and network-connected; with a performance-oriented, non-punitive culture, more training resources; and leadership with a background in human services, a high regard for the value of substance abuse treatment and an understanding of EBPs. CONCLUSIONS The use of EBPs among facility- and community-based programs that serve drug-involved adult offenders has room for improvement. Initiatives to disseminate EBPs might target these institutional and environmental domains, but further research is needed to determine whether such organization interventions can promote the uptake of EBPs. PMID:17383551

  9. Effect of an informatics for evidence-based practice curriculum on nursing informatics competencies.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Karen S; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Jenkins, Melinda; Bakken, Suzanne

    2005-12-01

    Effective and appropriate use of information and communication technologies is an essential competency for all health care professionals. The purpose of this paper is to describe the effect of an evolving informatics for evidence-based practice (IEBP) curriculum on nursing informatics competencies in three student cohorts in the combined BS/MS program for non-nurses at the Columbia University School of Nursing. A repeated-measures, non-equivalent comparison group design was used to determine differences in self-rated informatics competencies pre- and post-IEBP and between cohorts at the end of the BS year of the combined BS/MS program. The types of Computer Skill competencies on which the students rated themselves as competent (> or =3) on admission were generic in nature and reflective of basic computer literacy. Informatics competencies increased significantly from admission to BS graduation in all areas for the class of 2002 and in all, but three areas, for the class of 2003. None of the three cohorts achieved competence in Computer Skills: Education despite curricular revisions. There were no significant differences between classes at the end of the BS year. Innovative educational approaches, such as the one described in this paper demonstrate promise as a method to achieve informatics competence. It is essential to integrate routine measurement of informatics competency into the curriculum so that approaches can be refined as needed to ensure informatics competent graduates.

  10. Implementation of an evidence-based education practice change for patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Portz, Denise; Johnston, Mary Pat

    2014-01-01

    As oncology care continues to move toward delivery in the outpatient setting, oncology nurses must find ways to effectively educate patients about diagnosis, treatment, and symptom management. A cancer diagnosis induces high levels of anxiety, often affecting a patient's ability to retain information about his or her disease, treatment, and symptom management. Based on results from the ONS Foundation-supported Breast Cancer Care Quality Measures Set and Breast Cancer Survivorship Quality Measures Set, a community-based, multisite cancer center located in the midwestern United States embarked on a quality project in patient education. The purpose of this article is to describe a quality project that evolved from a review of the patient education process for patients with cancer in three medical oncology clinics to a pilot of a new model for patient education. The pilot identified gaps, developed and implemented evidence-based improvement strategies, and planned for evaluation of process and patient outcomes of this practice change. A pilot study to assess processes and workflows associated with a one-hour separate patient education visit was designed and initiated. Patients and oncology nurses have expressed satisfaction with standardized patient education. Although processes and workflows continue to be evaluated, a proposal was developed, submitted, and accepted by the institutional review board to evaluate patient-centered outcomes.

  11. Measuring participation in an evidence-based practice: illness management and recovery group attendance.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Alan B; Bonfils, Kelsey A; Kukla, Marina; Myers, Laura; Salyers, Michelle P

    2013-12-30

    Given the important role of treatment attendance as an indicator of program implementation and as a potential moderator of program effectiveness, this study sought to develop useful indicators of attendance for evidence-based practices. The current study examined consumer attendance patterns in a randomized controlled trial comparing illness management and recovery (n=60) to a problem solving control condition (n=58). Associations were examined between consumer clinical indicators, demographics, and level of recovery and indices of attendance. Attendance was poor, but comparable to rates found in many other studies. Four indicators of attendance (percent sessions attended, time enrolled, periods of attendance, and longest period of attendance) were highly inter-related and were more sensitive to baseline differences than a traditional approach of dichotomizing participants into "attenders" and "non-attenders." Older age, lower hostility, fewer psychotic symptoms, and more education were associated with higher group attendance in both treatment conditions; the client-reported illness management and recovery scale was associated with attendance in the control group. Indicators of attendance were an advancement over dichotomous classification. Strategies to increase attendance are still needed, particularly for younger consumers with greater positive symptoms.

  12. Evidence-based practice in speech-language pathology curricula: a scoping study.

    PubMed

    Togher, Leanne; Yiannoukas, Corina; Lincoln, Michelle; Power, Emma; Munro, Natalie; Mccabe, Patricia; Ghosh, Pratiti; Worrall, Linda; Ward, Elizabeth; Ferguson, Alison; Harrison, Elisabeth; Douglas, Jacinta

    2011-12-01

    This scoping study investigated how evidence-based practice (EBP) principles are taught in Australian speech-language pathology (SLP) teaching and learning contexts. It explored how Australian SLP university programs: (1) facilitate student learning about the principles of EBP in academic and clinical settings, and (2) self-evaluate their curricula in relation to EBP. The research involved two surveys. Survey 1 respondents were 131 academic staff, program coordinators, and on-campus and off-campus clinical educators. This survey gathered information about EBP teaching and learning in SLP programs as well as future EBP curriculum plans. Survey 2 investigated how clinical educators incorporated EBP into the way they taught clinical decision-making to students. Surveys responses from 85 clinical educators were analysed using descriptive and non-parametric statistics and thematic grouping of open-ended qualitative responses. Both surveys revealed strengths and gaps in integrating EBP into Australian SLP curricula. Perceived strengths were that respondents were positive about EBP, most had EBP training and access to EBP resources. The perceived gaps included the academic staff's perceptions of students' understanding and application of EBP, respondents' understanding of research methodologies, communication and collaboration between academic staff and clinical educators, and a lack of explicit discussion by clinical educators and students of EBP in relation to clients.

  13. Evidence-based healthcare in practice: a study of clinician resistance, professional de-skilling, and inter-specialty differentiation in oncology.

    PubMed

    Broom, Alex; Adams, Jon; Tovey, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is strongly shaping the nature and direction of biomedical practice and organisational culture. Clinicians are now expected to adopt the principles of EBM and evidence-based practice (EBP) whilst also maintaining such things as professional autonomy, clinical judgement and therapeutic integrity. Little sociological work has been done on the implications of EBM in oncology contexts. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 13 oncology consultants and 12 oncology nurses in Australia, in this paper we explore how oncology clinicians utilise and/or critique types of evidence and statistical probabilities; the organisational systematisation of care; and, wider policies of EBM. The results illustrate significant variation in perception of EBM between the oncology sub-specialties examined, and the central role of organisational structures and intra-professional hierarchies in how evidence is viewed and utilised in practice. The interviews also capture the ways in which oncology specialists are negotiating the systematisation of care under the rubric of EBM, and the contradictory effects of professional de-skilling vis-à-vis the reinforcement of biomedical objectivity/power. Finally, we examine the experiences and perceptions of oncology nurses in relation to evidence and EBM, exploring the interplay of processes of professionalisation and distinction in shaping the evidence-based trajectories of nursing. We contrast these results with previous sociological writings on EBM, reflecting on the applicability and limitations of these theoretical positions when applied to the experiences of oncology clinicians.

  14. Viral Immune Evasion in Dengue: Toward Evidence-Based Revisions of Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Chiappelli, Francesco; Santos, Silvana Maria Eloi; Caldeira Brant, Xenia Maria; Bakhordarian, Andre; Thames, April D; Maida, Carl A; Du, Angela M; Jan, Allison L; Nahcivan, Melissa; Nguyen, Mia T; Sama, Nateli

    2014-01-01

    Dengue, a leading cause of illness and death in the tropics and subtropics since the 1950׳s, is fast spreading in the Western hemisphere. Over 30% of the world׳s population is at risk for the mosquitoes that transmit any one of four related Dengue viruses (DENV). Infection induces lifetime protection to a particular serotype, but successive exposure to a different DENV increases the likelihood of severe form of dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Prompt supportive treatment lowers the risk of developing the severe spectrum of Dengue-associated physiopathology. Vaccines are not available, and the most effective protective measure is to prevent mosquito bites. Here, we discuss selected aspects of the syndemic nature of Dengue, including its potential for pathologies of the central nervous system (CNS). We examine the fundamental mechanisms of cell-mediated and humoral immunity to viral infection in general, and the specific implications of these processes in the regulatory control of DENV infection, including DENV evasion from immune surveillance. In line with the emerging model of translational science in health care, which integrates translational research (viz., going from the patient to the bench and back to the patient) and translational effectiveness (viz., integrating and utilizing the best available evidence in clinical settings), we examine novel and timely evidence-based revisions of clinical practice guidelines critical in optimizing the management of DENV infection and Dengue pathologies. We examine the role of tele-medicine and stakeholder engagement in the contemporary model of patient centered, effectiveness-focused and evidence-based health care. Abbreviations BBB - blood-brain barrier, CNS - central nervous system, DAMP - damage-associated molecular patterns, DENV - dengue virus, DF - dengue fever, DHF - dengue hemorrhagic fever, DSS - dengue shock syndrome, DALYs - isability adjusted life years, IFN

  15. Comprehensive Cancer Control Partners’ Use of and Attitudes About Evidence-Based Practices

    PubMed Central

    Rose, John M.; Townsend, Julie S.; Fonseka, Jamila; Richardson, Lisa C.; Chovnick, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Introduction National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) awardees are encouraged to work with partners (eg, nonprofit organizations) to develop and implement plans to reduce the cancer burden in their jurisdictions using evidence-based practices (EBPs). However, the extent of EBP use among awardees and their partners is not well understood. Methods From March through July 2012, we conducted a web-based survey of program partners referred by NCCCP program directors who were involved in implementation of cancer control plans. Results Approximately 53% of referred partners (n = 83) completed surveys, 91.6% of whom represented organizations. Most partners reported involvement in helping to identify (80.5%), adapt (81.7%), implement (90.4%), and evaluate (81.9%) EBPs. The factors rated most frequently as very important when selecting EBPs were “consistent with our organization’s mission” (89.2%) and “cost-effective” (81.9%). Although most respondents said that their organizations understood the importance of using EBPs (84.3%) and had adequate access to cancer registry data (74.7%), few reported having sufficient financial resources to develop new EBPs (7.9%). The most frequently mentioned benefit of using EBPs was that they are proven to work. Resource limitations and difficulty adapting EBPs for specific populations and settings were challenges. Conclusions Our findings help indicate how NCCCP partners are involved in using EBPs and can guide ongoing efforts to encourage the use of EBPs for cancer control. The challenges of using EBPs that partners identified highlight the need to improve strategies to translate cancer prevention and control research into practice in real-world settings and for diverse populations. PMID:26182148

  16. Dental education and evidence-based educational best practices: bridging the great divide.

    PubMed

    Masella, Richard S; Thompson, Thomas J

    2004-12-01

    Research about educational best practices is negatively perceived by many dental faculty. Separation between teaching and learning strategies commonly employed in dental education and evidence-based educational techniques is real and caused by a variety of factors: the often incomprehensible jargon of educational specialists; traditional academic dominance of research, publication, and grantsmanship in faculty promotions; institutional undervaluing of teaching and the educational process; and departmentalization of dental school governance with resultant narrowness of academic vision. Clinician-dentists hired as dental school faculty may model teaching activities on decades-old personal experiences, ignoring recent educational evidence and the academic culture. Dentistry's twin internal weaknesses--factionalism and parochialism--contribute to academic resistance to change and unwillingness to share power. Dental accreditation is a powerful impetus toward inclusion of best teaching and learning evidence in dental education. This article will describe how the gap between traditional educational strategies and research-based practices can be reduced by several approaches including dental schools' promotion of learning cultures that encourage and reward faculty who earn advanced degrees in education, regular evaluation of teaching by peers and educational consultants with inclusion of the results of these evaluations in promotion and tenure committee deliberations, creating tangible reward systems to recognize and encourage teaching excellence, and basing faculty development programs on adult learning principles. Leadership development should be part of faculty enrichment, as effective administration is essential to dental school mission fulfillment. Finally, faculty who investigate the effectiveness of educational techniques need to make their research more available by publishing it, more understandable by reducing educational jargon, and more relevant to the day

  17. Adopting Learning Technologies: From Belief to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bothma, Cornelius H.; Cant, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge faced by most heads of academic departments around the world is to manage the adoption and use of appropriate learning technologies in order to support the department's learning offerings to students. Earlier research undertaken by the authors revealed that lecturers within the Department of Marketing and Retail Management at the…

  18. Teaching evidence-based nursing practice in geriatric care settings: the geriatric nursing innovations through education institute.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Eleanor S; Lekan, Deborah; Bunn, Melanie; Egerton, Emily; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Hendrix, Cristina D; Bailey, Donald E

    2009-04-01

    Evidence-based practice holds tremendous potential to optimize care outcomes for older adults, yet many nurses are ill prepared to identify, interpret, and apply the best evidence to their practice. The Geriatric Nursing Innovations through Education (GNIE) Institute is a 39-contact-hour, hybrid distance learning continuing education model designed to strengthen RNs'clinical knowledge, leadership skills, and capacity for implementing evidence-based geriatric care. The GNIE Institute combines reflective, learner-centered instructional approaches with a practicum during which evidence-based guidelines are implemented.The experiences of 128 RNs suggest that the GNIE Institute supports the implementation of a variety of best practices, including management of acute pain, dehydration, delirium, oral hygiene, urinary incontinence, and falls prevention. Participant feedback has shown low initial awareness of practice guidelines but high satisfaction with their use. The GNIE Institute thus represents a viable model for building the capacity of practicing RNs to implement evidence-based approaches to the care of geriatric syndromes across the care continuum.

  19. Mind the Gap: Looking for Evidence-Based Practice of Science Literacy for All in Science Teaching Journals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagger, Susan L.; Yore, Larry D.

    2012-10-01

    Science literacy for all is the central goal of science education reforms, and there is a growing importance of the language arts in science. Furthermore, there are strong calls for teacher professionalism and self-directed professional learning that involve evidence-based best practices. This raises questions about whether science teaching journals' recommendations are anchored to high-quality evidence. We found that (a) most National Science Teacher Association journals' science literacy recommendations have weak or no evidence base and (b) those with evidence reference teaching journals, teacher resource books, and literacy education more often than science education research. We concluded that all participants in the knowledge production cycle and transfer process—authors, editors, and reviewers—need to encourage evidence-based practices anchored to ongoing reforms and to literacy and science education research.

  20. Advancing the Africentric paradigm shift discourse: building toward evidence-based Africentric interventions in social work practice with African Americans.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Dorie J; Harvey, Aminifu R; Belgrave, Faye Z

    2009-07-01

    For over a decade, a number of social work scholars have advocated for an Africentric paradigm shift in social work practice with African Americans; yet the paradigm shift has been slow in coming with respect to infusing Africentric theory and interventions into social work practice, education, and research. Interventions that infuse Africentric values (such as interdependence, collectivism, transformation, and spirituality) have been shown to create significant change across a number of areas important to social work practice with African Americans. However, a barrier to the full integration of Africentric models into social work practice is that Africentric programs lack cohesive documentation and replication and, thus, have limited potential to be established as evidence-based practices. The authors present an overview of various Africentric interventions, including their program components and methods of evaluation, with the aim of establishing guideposts or next steps in developing a discourse on Africentric interventions that are promising best practices or are emerging as evidence-based practices. The authors conclude with implications for social work practice, education, and research and a call for Africentric scholars to engage in increased discussion, dissemination of manualized treatments, and collaborative research to build the evidence-based Africentric knowledge base and foster replication of studies.

  1. The Ruling Relation of Evidence-Based Practice: The Case of Documentary Governance in a Social Welfare Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilerot, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Evidence-based practice has broadened and spread into new areas including librarianship. This reorientation has resulted in increased uncertainty regarding what counts as evidence and has caused a tension between formalised procedures and professional judgment. This theoretical paper aims to extend the knowledge about how…

  2. Research-Based Knowledge: Researchers' Contribution to Evidence-Based Practice and Policy Making in Career Guidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Erik Hagaseth; Plant, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To present evidence for the outcomes of career guidance is increasingly seen as pivotal for a further professionalization of policy making and service provision. This paper puts an emphasis on researchers' contribution to evidence-based practice and policy making in career guidance. We argue for a broader and more pluralistic research strategy to…

  3. Is Social Work Evidence-Based? Does Saying So Make It So? Ongoing Challenges in Integrating Research, Practice and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    The integration of research and practice is of concern in all helping professions. Has social work become an evidence-based profession as some claim? Characteristics of current-day social work are presented that dispute this view, related continuing concerns are suggested, and promising developments (mostly outside social work) are described that…

  4. Views of Evidence-Based Practice among Faculty in Master of Social Work Programs: A National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Allen; Parrish, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    Objective: A national online survey assessed the views of 973 faculty members in master of social work programs regarding their receptivity toward, definition of, and views of disparate sources of evidence pertinent to evidence-based practice (EBP) and the teaching of EBP. Method: Due to Internet-related technical difficulties, the response rate…

  5. Mind the Gap: Looking for Evidence-Based Practice of "Science Literacy for All" in Science Teaching Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jagger, Susan L.; Yore, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    "Science literacy for all" is the central goal of science education reforms, and there is a growing importance of the language arts in science. Furthermore, there are strong calls for teacher professionalism and self-directed professional learning that involve evidence-based best practices. This raises questions about whether science teaching…

  6. Structuring a life support program using evidence-based practice and the Magnet model for successful patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Krugman, Mary; Paston, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Integrating life support activities into an acute care academic hospital structure using evidence-based practice and the Magnet Model framework provides program operations and outcomes that are cost effective, link quality to life support professional development, and demonstrate excellence patient safety outcomes.

  7. Comparison of Evidence-Based Practice between Physicians and Nurses: A National Survey of Regional Hospitals in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Ya-Wen; Weng, Yi-Hao; Lo, Heng-Lien; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Shih, Ya-Hui; Kuo, Ken N.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Although evidence-based practice (EBP) has been widely investigated, few studies compare physicians and nurses on performance. Methods: A structured questionnaire survey was used to investigate EBP among physicians and nurses in 61 regional hospitals of Taiwan. Valid postal questionnaires were collected from 605 physicians and 551…

  8. Supporting the Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices for Adults with Co-Occurring Mental and Substance Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biegel, David E.; Kola, Lenore A.; Ronis, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    Significant barriers exist to the implementation of evidence-based practices into routine mental health and substance abuse settings. This paper discusses the role and function of technical assistance centers to help support the implementation process using, as a guide, the experience of the Ohio Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Coordinating…

  9. Promoting Evidence-Based Health Policy, Programming, and Practice for Seniors: Lessons from a National Knowledge Transfer Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, Carol L.; Stewart, Moira; Brown, Judith Belle; Feightner, John; Rosenberg, Mark; Gutman, Gloria; Penning, Margaret; Stewart, Miriam; Tamblyn, Robyn; Morfitt, Grace

    2003-01-01

    In response to Canada's pressing need for effective evidence-based policy, services, and practices specific to seniors, national leaders representing all concerned stakeholders designed and implemented a National Consensus Process to promote spread, exchange, choice, and uptake of research evidence on social and health issues associated with an…

  10. Social Workers' Orientations toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process: A Comparison with Psychologists and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Rubin, Allen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results from a large, cross-sectional survey of social workers, psychologists, and licensed marriage and family therapists (LMFTs) in Texas (N = 865) regarding their orientation toward and implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP). All social workers were recruited by e-mail using the state NASW Listserv (analysis…

  11. Adaptation Guidance for Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy and STI/HIV Prevention Curricula: From Development to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolleri, Lori A.; Fuller, Taleria R.; Firpo-Triplett, Regina; Lesesne, Catherine A.; Moore, Claire; Leeks, Kimberly D.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based interventions (EBIs) are effective in preventing adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections; however, prevention practitioners are challenged when selecting and adapting the most appropriate programs. While there are existing adaptation frameworks, there is little practical guidance in applying research in the field.…

  12. 78 FR 33853 - Announcement for the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP): Open...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Announcement for the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP): Open Submission Period for Fiscal Year... to reduce the impact of substance abuse ] and mental illness on America's communities. Established...

  13. Clearing Hurdles: The Challenges of Implementation of Mental Health Evidence-Based Practices in Under-Resourced Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiraldi, Ricardo; Wolk, Courtney Benjamin; Locke, Jill; Beidas, Rinad

    2015-01-01

    Schools have become the main provider of services to children with mental health needs. Although there is substantial literature on barriers to implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in under-resourced school districts, less has been written on how to overcome those barriers. Providing mental health services in the school setting…

  14. Systems Thinking Tools for Improving Evidence-Based Practice: A Cross-Case Analysis of Two High School Leadership Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kensler, Lisa A. W.; Reames, Ellen; Murray, John; Patrick, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Teachers and administrators have access to large volumes of data but research suggests that they lack the skills to use data effectively for continuous school improvement. This study involved a cross-case analysis of two high school leadership teams' early stages of evidence-based practice development; differing forms of external support were…

  15. A State Survey of Child Advocacy Center Therapists' Attitudes toward Treatment Manuals and Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staudt, Marlys; Williams-Hayes, Mona

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this descriptive study was to examine Child Advocacy Center therapists' attitudes toward treatment manuals and evidence-based practices and to gather information about the treatments they use most frequently. An online survey was sent to 30 therapists employed by 15 Child Advocacy Centers in a southeastern state. The response rate…

  16. LGB-Affirmative Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Social Anxiety: A Case Study Applying Evidence-Based Practice Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kate; Hope, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    Guided by the American Psychological Association's principles of evidence-based practice, this article reviews a single-case treatment outcome study whereby a client characteristic, sexual identity, was integrated into the assessment and treatment of social anxiety symptoms. The case involved a young adult European-American male who presented to a…

  17. Evidence-Based Practice: A Review of Theoretical Assumptions and Effectiveness of Teaching and Assessment Interventions in Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Aliki; Saroyan, Alenoush; Dauphinee, W. Dale

    2011-01-01

    Health care professionals are expected to use a systematic approach based on evidence, professional reasoning and client preferences in order to improve client outcomes. In other words, they are expected to work within an evidence-based practice (EBP) context. This expectation has had an impact on occupational therapy academic programs' mandates…

  18. A Socio-Cultural Analysis of Practitioner Perspectives on Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Roxanne F.; Davis, Carol A.; Blum, Grace; Greenway, Rosanne; Hackett, Jacob; Kidwell, James; Liberty, Lisa; McCollow, Megan; Patish, Yelena; Pierce, Jennifer; Schulze, Maggie; Smith, Maya M.; Peck, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the central role "evidence-based practice" (EBP) plays in special education agendas for both research and policy, it is widely recognized that achieving "implementation" of EBPs remains an elusive goal. In an effort to better understand this problem, we interviewed special education practitioners in four school…

  19. An Analysis of Evidence-Based Practices in the Education and Treatment of Learners with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Michael R.; Wheeler, John J.; Menendez, Anthony L.; Zhang, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Horner et al. (2005) present a review substantiating how single-subject research methodology can be utilized to determine whether interventions are evidence-based practices (EBPs). The current study utilized the Horner et al. research piece to: (a) systematically identify a set of quality standards for the evaluation of single-case research…

  20. Social Work Students' Use of the Peer-Reviewed Literature and Engagement in Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Bachelor of social work and master's of social work students were queried regarding their use of and attitudes toward the peer-reviewed literature and understanding of and engagement in evidence-based practice (EBP). Participants were asked to assess their field instructor's use of the literature and engagement in EBP. Students felt prepared by…